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The Prospector Nov 14, 1903

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Array *"      fi ' / V
>4    3_S=V1.- »"_»( ~,| ,
- ■ ■ r'.i_3_i iCJ^X JjS^^
THE PROSr^f    ^ ^^
foi. 6 No. 17
ULLOOET, B.C., SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 1903.
$100 a year.
NDIANS ON THE YUKON,
y   submit   to   Mm v .linn With   Km g-
ihIIoi — . lmy Are   Al*o   Saiil   tu lie
«..Mi<l-Natuie«l antl HarinlenH.
(hi; Indians on thc Yukqn aro
d-nafured anil harmless, says «.
ter in Forest and Stream. In
ny ways they remind one ol' the
ithern negro. Ihey sing "My
l's a High-Horn Lady" and all
latest music hall airs. It is said
it  thu  British drum    beat sounds
(und    thu   world,   but    nowadays
lular  songs    do   thc  same   thing,
in    a very much more thorough
ly.       At tiuam,   in  thc Ladroncs,
newspapers  tell  us  tho  natives
IS "Ta-ra-ra Boom-de-aye," ami
is air is often heard along thc
kon. No doubt it has penetrated
| Timbuctoo and the sacred city of
kibet. Judging from the Yukon,
Itivo music seems to be dying out.
ie catchy airs of thc music hall are
pplying a world of music. The
mans have very  kwn cars, though
Iuir voices can hardly be called me-
dious.   Some of them will catch an
alter   hearing   it   once,   and    re-
|oducc it corrcelly by  humming or
the   moulh-organ.    I  never  heard
Ii Indian whistle or sing at the full
:tcnt    of his   lungs,     though  very
kely they do both.
J Give     an   Indian  a   mouth-organ,
juice harp," as Huckleberry Finn's
egro had it, or an accordion,    and
ou   will insure   his    happiness, no
patter if he is cold or starving.  The
ndian is as yet ignorant of tho ban-
>,  but  when  he  is  once  introduced
o it I think it will bo his favorite
nstrument,  as  it  is   with  his  sable
Irothor.   It must  be  borne  in  mind
hat   I  am speaking  of  the  interior
ndianR.     Tho   coast  In. inns are   u
'cry different breed.   They are light-
ts   and   quarrelsome,     robbing     tho
vhite     man  by   exorbitant  packing
[charges  now  that  they  have  learned
It isn't    wise    to do    thc thing    by
Jforce of arms.   It was these  Indians
who, by right of their possession of
the passes, made the interior an unknown country    for so long to     tho
white man. Up to a very recent date
they     effectually     monopolized     tho
trade of the Yukon.  Thoy even checkmated    the    Hudson  Day   Company
whei' it    attempted to gain an   entrance  into    the country     from  the
east, capturing und burning the post
established at l-'ort Selkirk in 1852.
These  Indians  aro   powerfully  built,
and a twelve-yeur-old girl will trudjo
[ along with us heavy a pack as   the
average white man can carry,  while
I their skookum packers carry as much
as a horse.
Indians arc not very particular
about tho condition of their food,
and will dispose of some pretty rank
messes, but one thing they will not
eat is wolf. More surprising still,
if true, is the reported fuct that
Indian dogs will not eat wolf. These
dogs rob white men's caches, tearing
open sacks and gorging on raw flour
nnd oatmeal, and nothing froth soup
to sulphur matches is safe from their
depredutions. Wanting to dispose of
the carcasses of the wolves we killed
below Selkirk, I asked the Indians I)
they could use them. They said no.
I suggested feeding to the dogs, and
they shook their heuds again. '.'Dog
no muck muck wolf," they said.
"Todder way, wolf muck muck dog."
When the time comes for starving,
the Indian takes it as a matter of
fact and contentedly. Only once in
it while is there tt wouk-livercd one
who cries and says: ' 'Muck muck
all gone. 'Fraid poor Indian die."
They peel the bark from pine and
even popple trees and oat the softer
Inner portion. The pine bark is full
of resin and nasty Bluff, nnd there is
certainly no nutriment in it- It serves, however, to till the stomach and
lessen the gnawing nt tho inwards.
Due cnn travel for miles along the
Vukon and never be out of sigiht of
peeled trees, marked with the char-
act eristic ai'i'ow-shaf  ' blaze.     *"««■»
ii      LOCAL NEWS      a
yiiiiiiiiAiiiiiaaiiaiiii
The fii-st; colli snap of the Hetts.
on is lieing experienced in town
toil ny.
The annual tax Hale for Lillooet
Asseststneiit'Distiict, is advertised on page 4.
A meeting of the local liriiitch
of the Lillooet*' CoiiKervative Association was held in Frasei's
Hall last Saturday.    '
King Edward's liirl Inlay was
duly celebrated last Monday.
The l.rett brothers have return
ed   from a,   hunting expedition
and brought several deer to (own.
Me.'-srs ].. I'hnirand Cioler had
good sport during Iheir recent
hunting totu
Government-Agent Soues, of
Clinton, held Revision Court in
town last  Monday.
Mrs. Mcintosh, of I'einbeiton,
was visiting friends in town last
Saturday.
The Seton Lake Salmon hatchery now has over two millions of
eggs in the iiiciibii'.ors.
A. Macdonald, M.I'.P. was in
town this week. He purposes to
call a mcetii'g of the voters in
this section before he loaves to
attend parliament whicli meets
ou Nov. 26.
Word reached town vesrerdny
that W. MclMia.il, it miner, has
been seriously injured while travelling on the North Fork frail.
Mel'hail had dismounted from his
horse to fix his saddle, when Ihe
animal moved suddenly and hilling Mcl'hail caused him to lose
his balance and roll down the
sleep mountain slope for over
100 feet. He Continues to live,
but is in a, mangled condition.
NOTICE
Re The Estate of John Miller, Dec-a-id
Take notice that all persons having
any claim Atruinst the Estate of the lute
Tohn Miller must send in their claims
duly verified to the under, inned on or
Itefoie the 14 th day of December, A.P.
1903, and sny person owing any debt to
the saitl Estate must pav ihe same lo
the undersigned on or before the above
date.
Piled this 14th day of November, A.P.
1903.
Miih. idATlLDA WILLIAMS,
A-'ntribtralor or I In K.tale,
Lillooet, B.C.
Claim jumping is causing sone
trouble at Poplar Creek,
—oo—
Mrs. Mary Schenley has dieil
in Loudon, leaving 50 million
dollars.
—00—
Great  It. it ain   and Italy tire
still lighting the Somnlis.
-oo—
TheC/ar savs he wijl nob declare war with Japan tinier any
condition.'.
—po—
A foot of snow hits fallen in Michigan.
—I o—
The Provincial government are
pi inning lo further restrict lie
employment uf Chinese iu  mines.
(H>	
A series of raids on Vancouver
gambling houses have Uen.successful.
—oo—
Sugar factories are being operated in Alberta with success.
—oi—
The Russian troops lire reported to have withdrawn  from (..open.
— o—
The Liberals will coldest Vancouver at Ihe approaching bye-
election.
"The Modern Times" is the
name of n, new paper to be published iu Vancouver by Rev. (joro
Ivnburagi, the .Methodist Japau-
e .e mission.ipy in that city.
-'JIER.
.;. ■morv of Sir
The Canadian I'acilic Kailway
Ieleurapliers have been able to
wire from Port William fo Montreal, a. thousand miles, without
batteries.
Dei-Dura (• A re   |>t Tt»».
Nichtjus Murphy, K.O., who is nn
old friend of Sir M. Ivlllo Parker,
who ha*, bton recently i'i ut his
home in Coo. avl'.le, noted tho fact
thut. Sir Melville, v.Im over 10 veins
ago wan rppn'ntod ;> 'ustlco of the
pence, is one of tl.o Sii'v few ho"dors
of such of ce who declines to uuv-pt
fees or emolument for his s rvlcis.
While living a qultt retired life ns a
country goi.leu.mi, Sir Molviilo hns
always taken un nctlvu Interest In
local affairs, nnd was Wa den of Feel
County, and was rciwe<6f Toronto
Township for several totins,
"A man cf education," raid Vv.
Murphy, ''of rei i;. nu nl and of tt
most genial disposition, with luvh
friends and opponent?!, and n .lusti.
of the Pence for inonv, mnn\ veor«,
in the County of Vet), Sir Molvil't.
has settled more cuss thnt have
come before hlin by milking friends
of those who wanted lo li> nr.o"iie>s,
than any oilier Justice of th." hit
in Canada And ho Was ulwnys un
adherent of Ihe fact t'.f .(rr.ds pat*
ent. that Justice, of the Peace should
not be paid fees, nnd he held his position  in  tbi '      •' ;" •    '     :■• -•
fees or rewa.d for bin valuable    und
lone service."
A CIVIL
Canada'* Interim 	
WHII..111       ... _ . n.
Canada and New Ycrk have a joint
inteiest in thc memory of Sir William Johnston, the most picturesque
persoballty of the generation immediately preceding the commencement
of the American revolutionary war.
He was an irishman by birth, but at
twenty-three he emigrated to the
wilds of the I'rovinee of New York
to manage an uncle's landed estate
which lay in the valley of the i\_o-
hawk Rivor not far from Schenectady. All about him were the survivors of the great tribe, which travo
the river its name, and with these
and others of the Iroquois confederation he became int'niately acquainted in the couise of the traffic which
he'earried on with them. By honorable dealing, an attractive manner.
and facility in accommodating himself to their modes of life he acquired an ascendancy over the Indians
that was as advantageous to the
Government as it was profitable to
himself.
When still young he was created
military commander of the Six Nations, and through this appointment
he was drawn into the frontier wars
against the Frcn"h. Ho took part in
1754 in the Albany Congress, which
was in some sense the prototype of
tho later gatherings out of which
was evolved the American federation.
With the rank of "Major-Gero'al" he
took pait in the campaigns of
1755-60, that ended in the capitulation of Montreal, at which event he
was present as commander of tbe
Indian allies of the liritish. His
great personal influence with the Indians of New York kept them from
joining in the conspiracy of Pontiac
three years later, and whi n the,
movement died down he it was who
hy a treaty of amity quon bed at
Nianra'a tbe sinou'd- ring rm' rs of
that curious uprisincr.
Sir William Johnston, in the enjoyment of a liberal pension nnd n
Baronetcy, lived till 177-1 on nn extensive estate granted to hint bv the
liritish Crown close to the i-lve
which had long been his home.
Johnstown, culled nfter himself, was
founded bv him, und tbere a monument to perpetuate h's n enory will
be unveiled (his month. As th- I n'-
tle of Lexington was not foi'Bit till
1775 he wns just spared the catastrophe that scattered his familv and
drove them to reside nciv Montreal.
His son. Sir John Johnston, fought
on the liritish side in both tbe revolutionary war and the war of 1812-
II., To those who admire patriotic
StatesmnnsMn there is on this continent no shrlre more worthy of a
visit than the old homo of this famous civilian poldlcr, whose reputation is tlu> heritage of two nations
and \vho«o memory is unstained by
any act of savagery,
To nny To-.-.il.. «t.».t   ■ »ilwn,T.
A Toronto alderman has n s'iiemn
to buy the Street Railway when the
franchise expires eighte. n >earg
hence. Tho gist of the proposal is
thut all tii" monev received from the
Street Railway Company, over nnd
above whnt is required to pay the interest, and sinking fund on the rtreet
railway pavement rldbt, should l ■ put
into a fund. Tbe resu't of it, if
adopted, will bo that whin Iho Toronto Railway Company's agreement
exp;res the city w'll have |S_.0011,000
with which to purchase the mils.
plant und e'lui;■ni- nt.
Story of I'i In. I|i»l Buchan.
Not a fortnight after Mr. Buchan's
induction in 188.1 he gave the whole
Upper Canada College, Toronto, in
prayer-hall assembled, a taste of his
quality as a disciplinarian. There
had arisen some slight friction regarding, if memory serves, Day by-
Day in Toronto News, a change in
the rule allowing members of the
Sixth Form, two, in place of three,
afternoons' leave down town each
week. Mr. Buchan* made the change
after deep consideration, and, after
ro.oivinjj a deputation from the
Sixth, promised to announce his final resolution the next afternoon at
prayers. The statement was duly
made, and it wus that the change
must take place. .Suddenly from
where the Sixth sat, came a sibilant,
long-drawn hiss. The boys wore
amazed. Nothing of thc kind had
been over heard in that hall before.
Mr. Buchan gazed towards thu Sixth,
and,  in cold,  even tones, said:
"The boy  who hissed,  stand up."
In a second a ta 1, broad shouldered youth was on his feet.
"A ," said  the Principal,  "you
will take  ten demerits."
The boy turned white and sat
down. HO and another were running
neck and neck for the headship of
thc school, and the Prince of Wales
scholarship. Ten demerits meant
thut a number of marks represent ing
a fat'- month's work would be de-
duc' at the end of the year. Ibe
judgi... it of the Principal meant
death to the offender's chencis: it
was about the sti.lest sentence thai
could be imposed, short of expulsion.
Iho culprit, who is one of the lenders of his profession to-day, took his
punishment gamely, but it was neither mitigated nor remitted, although
h:s ihal und conqueror--as ,sul>:e-
quent events showed—begged Mr.
buchan to ict him tu o li\o of his
demerits himself. 'Ihis mifht haw
allowed a third boy to gam lhe coveted distinction, hit this was doubtful, as the two lads mentioned woro
head md shoulders above their form-
mates. Mr. Buchan sternly reused
to make any change, so tho friend
and advocate of the boy who hiss.\d
went abeed and centered in with the
honors. ITo was as much provoked
nt being d -trod the contest as he
was pleased at 1 is success.
*■ ir >11-1viI-»   I'n.k.r. It Tt.
The lllno s of Sir Melville Parker,
Bart., is causing his ft n ids much
anxiety Sir Melville, who is nearly
80 years of age. tufTcted n slioie of
paralyi Is ui liis I oiuo in ur t ool s-
vlilo a few days i go. und his condition is rather grave, Should he ilie.
tho baronetcy is ended.
Sir Mohillo is tie second son of
tne hit' Admiral Sir Hi my Parke .
and is the si.'ilh baronet, the title
having been cieat ' in 1707. the Admiral settled near Coq! svllle. and
had three sons. Icirv. vim married
a sister of the late John le tor. I..'
('.: Albirt, who ah;o married in ('a-
nndu. and Sir Mehille, who mai'l'lid
Jessie, al'o sister to Mr, IN. tor, In
1817. iv succeed d to tht ba onotcv
in 1877. 'i lu r one cl'id. May, rallied f.lout. Gordon of the Imperial
service nfterwa-ds Commodore Cordon of lhe Cunu-'inn naval service
lady Parker died ul out three years
ago.
»"<rlli  IIoII.mh f, r n t ol • I.
A medical mun In Kovn Stofln is
in n fair whj lo male tt ~ o tl h n._{
out of n recent hniel ln\ sluunt, l.'c
bought u v .n'tini h el I,ui ding an I
shipped i; to f-ydni-y, v. hen* h h
now havii-.. .t erected. 1 Irs building i ii- I S ;.,<l0O. Tl e do '<_..• I ii .jilt
It for 8-10 .'nd is um1 iij, im ri/te-
in-nis nnd c.n'org'ng ii n> such in
exti ut i hat '.i \\ ill lie win I li. v.li u
complete in Sydney,  nl,-oi,l ,;;ii.iM). THE   PROSPECTOR, LILLOOET, B.C., NOVEMBER 14, 1903.
THE   PROSPECTOR.
PUBLISHED   EVERY    SATURDAY
AT LILLOOET,  B.C.
BY  Till. PKOIPKcrillt  IHIIII.HIllSH   COMI'ANY
THE PROSPECTOR Is the only paper published in the I.iiiooet District, and is all home
Printed.
Subs, li pilous: One Dolltir n vein' In ml Vance. ;
Ailvei lisinn in.rs Hindi! known on application.
Ciirri'Sputiilciii-.   is invilcii nil nil iiuilii'is  of
public or local Interest.    A II i-iiiiiiiuiiiii'iil inns
iiinst   bu  accompanied  by   Iho   nainu   of   thr:
writer, bul not necessarily for publication.
Fruit Raising,
(A synopsis of an ntltli't'sstlttliver-
e<l Ly Mr. Earl, of l.ylton, nl llie
litinieis Institute meeting' lielil
nt Lillooel, on Nov. 2nd, 1903.)
Mr. Etirl in addressing tlie iui-
tlience coiigrtilnlnled llie peopl-t
of Lillooel oli llie interest, t liey
nre laking in f.nil, raising'. His
aim was lo poinl; out to '.lieiii
mistakes whicli cost him money.
Mis nd vice wns lo raise only III*,
best; iniirl.el;ililefrttil,siicli ns (lie
Yellow, Trtuisparenl., Maclntosli,
King and (.nno apples'. When
I rees nre set out, o 111. off t he roots
nt the cones, for where it is cut,
growth will soon commence.
When a topist'ormed cut it down
to two buds, mid nexl vein- to
four buds, ttntl when roots nie
.Irmly established lei lhe lite
grow. Leave the centre in the
trees, ns it prevents the sun from
burning the apples, and'streiig
(hens the tree. Always leave
plenty of room for the root. Clover should not be grown in orchard. Young trees should be
kept growing until August, and
the wootl then allowed lo ripen.
Never put immure in hole when
phi n I ing, but scatter lhe in a u tlie
uniformly on the ground. Do
not, irrigate the ground too
much.
Mr. Earl thee referred to Ilic
markets. If Ihe mines in this
district nre fully developed, lhc
local fruitgrowers will make big
gains, lie would favor the working of moderately large farms as
a man cannot hope to make a
living in this count ry on 10 acre
fruit farms. The speaker pointed
out' how Lord Aberdeen manages
his orchard. Helms 100 acres.
In it not one w e e d cnn be seen.
He raises apples foi- profit and
each apple is wrapped up in paper, and packed in a box suitable
for I he fruit. The system of jam-
ill iugupples into a box and I hen
packing them for miles in thai
condilion, will nol pny.
Mr. Earl, in concluding Ids address, remarked that 45 years
ago he came into British Columbia w il h his pack on his buck,
nnd found, asothers have found,
sublime solil ude and hard work
nt his journey's end.
T.I'.. Ilraiidon.
I
Do Not Begrudge Praise.
We heard a   most   unusual   re-
mark   I he  other day.    II was a
remark of free unqualified praise,
I hnt is, praise wil hottt the  word
-"but" in   it,  lind   following  the
'imt'" some  remark  that takes
I he sweetness out of lhe com pi i-
liient.   We are tnugliti to be indifferent lo praise or blame, bul
unstinted praise comes to us nil
so seldom   that it' generally surprises us.    Why is it lhat   praise
is r.stially given with hesitation,
-while hlnme i.s nlwayH freely  bestowed.   If tin individual, in our
honest judgment, deserves praise
let us give it lo him full and free.
Jt will do good all nrouud. '
IS VOUR HEALTH
WORTH
A   $
TO
ry
ISYOUR  HEALTH
WORTH A$TOU?
$ THE GREAT  $
One Dollar Plan
II0W  ALL SICK PEOPLE CAN  BE
Cl'K.'l) ON THIS SIMPLE LOW-FEE
PLAN. THE IL SI TREAT .MEN C FOR ONLY ONE DOLLAR.
The purpoce of tlii-* advertisement is to explain to the readers
of this pap-r how this cm lie done, how we can treat patients
for only $1.00 per month.
In the fi ret place we t'ent, from five hundred to seven hundred liy in iii. Our mail order system of treating patients is the
largest in lhe United States. We liny all our (Lugs, etc., at
wholesale, and compound and put up all our medicines, hence,
some idea may he formed of.tlie enormous business carried on.
Prom the tl ty this pi in was adopted, it has stead ly giovtn and
developed, and its popiil iritv i.-wvnienccd hvthe hundreds who
have availed i iieuiseives of the opportunity to lie permanently
benefitted and cure t at the nominal rite of
$i.oo a Month.
Our method of ireatinent is -trictly up to date. Kverycase is
given a thorough di urn >si~, an I tiie same close study and attention t irou*>hout the course of treatm mt as if it were visiled daily.
We isk our parent, to write us their condition fully and often,
and in this way we are kept in clo-ie ioiie.lt wi'h each new symptom as it developi.   0 ir $1,00 a  mini u elan   nas  no -perjal
offer feature of a single ■ ilh, but is go > I for any month iu the
year. It is a refill ir plan. It has proved a successful plan to
onr pati Mils and to ih. S -ii I m a comp e'e ni -i • • v of yonr ea>e
with one dollar, and lienin lieatnumi ; t mice. R-meitiher we
W'll furnish complete dia.'iio-is of ii".r ens', ami •'■•rtM-h all
inedi ines, apph incej, etc., nee hSir* :o a I I li.onl 't'- ' r • ■••-
ment f.r the vry |,v.v fee of $1.00. ' CAN* YOU A K FORD TO
OVERLOOK THIS PLAN? Tie rich a. d ne po .r al ke have
endorsed i'. Tlie ureater the nutn'icr >f a ieii-, tiugicacr
the popular ly of the plan.
Kidney
I liseu.ses
Kliciniialisin
Live
llOlllill
Asllnun
111 no
1 P
lisill
l'liv;
te
Dig
rase..
n incline,
AU of ihese d sen "es treated until i u-. d nn ihe "one d liar
p'an." Iiynuni' (.jcliai.d HlffeiuiU. i lid Mid ■ Xperl Inal-
inent, do not delay, lull wiite In u- at unci . I> hit i. dangeious.
Di not i-t your disease g i t» ' far a Ivinecd, (J i- •■ y mrself it.
its early stages and vou will save ion self yn snf nffering,
The 1 tiger \r>u let it rim ilia longer i i-ike. and h-- harder it
is to cure. Do not experiment Aith patent n e.licihe . Don't
be ro'die I bv frauds who promise au> i mm au I ae n uml ish u >-
thiug Thev are here tmiav an-l au;i> Inluorrow, \\- aiei-s-
ta'iiished t'27 years) and re-<p imibl", fin iu i ill,, md proleSMo i-
al!y. Iiieonipeien' physi ians iua\ um onlv swindle yon. but
they may rnin yonr system. In in my f n,ir meirop ditaii papers you often -ee adv-'riis 'men s offurini! fr-e ciiivh, fiee prescriptions, seiviee f'ee 'ill cured, ai d longa'ti I- of tie inns
pftrtcted Ity some pa ent, medicine . Tli-'S'. ml 'Minn-ri u« n'her
s ■ eiues are lor tin- sole pur..use of gitllin. .he pubuc, unu en, ic.ti
foine per ons or fii ••> wbo have not iVitl ll pi-ysucian among
them. Ot iern advertise test lnonia'8 of person, t hey have cured
after evervtlimgele" has fsiled,    W'v. fsic no namks of pkiibons
WHO ll.W i: I1KHN TKKATEDOU CUKKD M . l'~ SKCiC. IS iiL It MuTTO,
AM) tt K DO SOT l'l.U'K ANY COSPtOKXl'K IN A.XY TKBTI MOMA1.S fSKI)
11V l'IIY-li i.tfs Wlln MAKI-: DIHKAhKH I'ECIM.IA : To MBS A SI'KiIAl.TY,
IIKCAUsK WE KNOW llto.M KXI'EKIKNCK THAT MEN Wl I.I. NOT Al.l.OW
Til Kill XAJIKV UBl.D FOit I'll ,S I'll i.l ONI-:.
We advertise, lint under no • on-ddpraiinn do »o nff.T false in-
diuenienls to tain liatrnnRge. We welcome in\e i ga inn, lilt,
dl'spi'e disnoneSI mil boil- and will Iml cater lo ll.o-e who do
not •ni'iic to pal run lz • us b cau*e we do not offer some enlcli-
penny si heme.
The do.'tois of tlih inst ii ui ion have heen healing the nll'iicled
for over a quirier of a lentuiy, T ev are uraduittes from the
lust med'.-al cnlicge. of I w - 'niriiir"'-. Thei- i-s p ■• In ce has
been wide and searo'tiug Tueir skill is hevond dispute, Their
inte.' ity i- uni|Ue.-tion ible. Tbeir reputations us pbysici ins i.
abiive lepruaub. Ihey are th- f n*s of disease, ihe enemies of
pail a-ters of all chronic and other ailments.
200.000 Weak men citied. keder'.are ymt avc'im? Havo
yon Inst nope 7 11 is vou* 'l iml been diseased? Our N -w Me hod
"ONE DOLLAR A MONTH" oeminent will i-u'e j on. What it
has done for o: hers it lias done for o h ts it *\i I do fm you.
Consult Us About Your Case Without Cost.
*#
We invite vou to consult n-i freely without charge, We deal
with otir patients in an hon irable mid Btraightforwatd manner
and conn the clo'CBt Investigation of otn methuih. Ifyuu cannot see us personally wrile us fully about y.'iir case.
Send r 2'. st nip to pav po«ti'ge on our bonk, "A WARNING
VOICE*' (or tin n only, tnat shows bow strength N lo<tand how
it mil) he renal lied,    It I* sent s-ciirely sealed in plain envelnpe.
All correspondence nnd piH'.knues sent in plain .wrappers
without marks to indicate contents,
Address:
W. II. SAUNDERS & C<>*
1) in. A. 1457,
Eilglewnoii Stn.
(Tiiengo, 111.
wimp
I
M®
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OUIGfci
CASH I
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^ ZOBsai2, fir^-^^Mi^^^WtNN€AF>0UIS. HINN.
<*&*&£M____$lVt^^^ ;••;■;'
LILLOOKT AND  l.l_li)(~~. KIVLIt STOKKS.
j, DUNLOP.
o-_E3_i~NrE_R/_A~.Xj   ~M:i_]_E^G____r_A.:iNrT
Miners Supplies."
LILIiOOBT,   B. a.
Bralicli Store at  lJ~i(li>(.  Kiver where ;i
full stoek of General Mereliaudise nud INlin
ers Outfits are o 11 1 rid.
J. Dunlop, General Merchant, Lillooel.l..(
repeat. They don't jam, catch, or fail to extract.
In a word, they are the onlv reliable repeaters. $
Winchester rifles are made in all desirable
calibers, weights and styles; and arc plain,
partially or elaborate'./ ornamented, suiting every
purpose,   every  pocketbook,   and   every  taste.
WINCHESTI.^.    AMMUNITION
made forall kinds of shooti.igin all kinds of gun;;.
popp Send name and address , u Postal
™ nut    forour 104-page Illustrated Catalog.
WINCHESTER REPEATING ARMS CO., NEW HAVEN, CONN.
Subscribe for " I he h u 11 iu r
$1 00 par anr-iim. L'tf_   PKOSPECTOI-, LILLOOKT, B.C., NOVEMBKR IL 1903.
0_1E~D  FOR CANADA
Jristened great battle.ship in
*   honor of the dominion.
/ill
F
Ing oue
It r.niiini. 1"«ii r.M in.'i l Um « ei.liKinv,
.njf l"elrr Inlmlil I'Iim miia-'n.* A Tfi'-
p i lilt. >|.'ij;lillii_ -IllWlllm—Olie «-. live
l><.'»- it urKliiji* M lii.li Arc tlin MiikI
[» iiniiiliil.l.- Afloat t.'miaila'n luf-r,.~i
1 in tho Kt-iiiI.
'Pfintirion" if the name which the
Ktisl. Government chose when wish-
ti   christen a great battloihlp in
\r litiHor.   Tho newest of Britain's
ira meii-o'-wat-    was launched    at
(irrow on  the last Monday in Au-
tst, ,n the presence ol a clistingulsh-
imptiny.    Tim  ceremony  of naai-
|g  the ship was performed by I'riii-
\i"t Louise,  and to add  "local coi-
r" to the event PelCo Island clutta-
iigne  wc.    used,   lhe    vessel  lie ng
Iew and unsophisticated was jest, us
ell pleased us though Veuve C.iquot
ad been pen iitcd to trickle (.own
er nose
Terrible Fighting Machln..
' The   Boi"inion,  when she is   com-
tleted,   will   tvpresent     thc   highest,
ype  of  battleship  ever  built.    Sho
o, the largest vessels in
er guns are of the most
constructed, and in one
will  be capable  of  lir-
       tile of 850 pounds, six-
en of    S~80 pounds,     and eight of
100 pounds.   In pursuit of nn enemy,
ihe Dominion can fire ahead lour projectiles of 850 pounds, eight of 380
tounds, and sixteen of 100 pounds,
vnything that she can approach
* ith'n twelve miles she can throw a
~iitdl aboard of. In other words, tho
Silver    Spray     would     ha\e   litlle
I chance in an encounter with her.
Her speed will bo 18 J knots an
hour, and hor officers and crew cost
will exceed $5,250,000, and she is
nmr-d after Canada.
rive Now   tVurrihip*.
The Pominion, as stated, belongs
to the most powerful typo of battleship in the British navy. She shares
with .our sister ships the honor of
buihg the most formidable man-o'-
war floating the Union Jatk. Thoy
tt.'o the King Edward VII., launched
at llevonport; the Commonwealth,
ouilding at Fairfield; the llindostnn,
| building nt Clydobaak; the New Zealand, building at Portsmouth.   These
| are all I'i,350-ton ships. The weight
of metal discharged by one of these
vessels in a single round is 5,920
11,3., and is greatei t'.ian that of any
other British ships. Two American
inen-o'-war, thc Georgia and the
Connecticut, exceed this figure, tremendous as it is, the hitter being callable r.f unloading 7,380 pounds of
sudden death at one discharge.
Thuorolical !iii|ir<.vri_l. mu.
Experts declare that thc Dominion
and the four other ships of her class
exemplify the new tendency of battleship designers to afford bettor protection to the secondary battery, and
to increase the calibre of the guns.
The improvement— for such we must
assume it to be—wns first noticeable
in the Mikasa, a battleship built for
the Japanese Government by Yickers
and Maxim, tho builders of the Dominion. In lieu of tbe scattered casement system, a central battery is
used, it must be admitted, however,
tbat, most of the "improvements"
which euch of these great ships shows
on its predecessor are of a theoretical nature. There i.s no finality ahout
them. 'ihey represent, experiments.
The reason i.s that there has born
little or no opportunity to test in
action tbe merits of the different systems of armaments. The bombardment of Alexandria in 1882 wns
the first and lust time that modern
British ships have been engaged, 'llie
Spanish-American War was not ns
suggestive of the power of these
leviuthiuns as it might have been
had the nnvies ef the two countries
heen more ovenly matched. The
same remark applies to the nnvnl
buttles between China and Japan.
\t hor** It uiilii Mnil-I~i
Canada's interest in discussions of
this sort will be more personal now
that she has a ship for which she
Will stand sponsor. True, tho Dominion is not ours, in tbe sense that
the (.ood Horo belongs to Cape
Colony, inasmuch as this magnificent
vessel, which boro Joseph t hnniber-
lain to South Africa, was a free gift
of Cape Colony to the Motherland.
Canada, however, through hor Government, expressed her unwillingness
to make any such contribution to th_»
Empire's navy at tho colonial co«->
ference. Australia is gi * ing a million dollars a year for this purpose.
New Zealand 1200,000, (ape Colony
5250.(11)11, Nuta" $175,000, and even
Newfoundland hwa promised to contribute $15,000 annually, bo. Ides $V>.-
000 foi fitting up a drill ship. The
ancient, colony also maintains a
naval reserve force of 600 men. But
whore is Canada? This country In
stondlng modestly by, and permit-
ring the rest of the Empire to i.aw»
^ i-Sflela in hor honor.
%  ..iu Ki-imh the  Dominion. I
On   this   .ireii-inii,  however, Canada j
Will not   tail in showing iipi'i'eeinlinn
of the hiiiini' done her.   Shi" will  desire   io   follow   the   precedent  established    bj     Godparents,    who    grace'
somewhat,  similar   occasions   by   lire-
Sent ing «  mug or  a spoon  to tbolrj
little pamesake.   This custom is very .
popular in the United Stales, when.1
tho practice is made of naming vessels  after the various States.     The
State so honored never fails to pre-
Sen!   to  the  vessel  some magnificent ;
present, loautiful dinner plates lying;
probably tho favorite gift..     Most of
Iho  large American  tmii-o'-war  have
exquisite  services,   nnd  much  Rivalry
is shown by the various States, oneb
being  anxious  to   outdo   ber   sisters.
The Dominion Government will probably   not   allow  the   opportunity   to
puss   without  presenting   to   the   Dominion   sjnto   present to show thnt
wo  are    not.    insensible  to    tbe compliment,     thut    bus     been     paid    us.
Whatever  gift  is  chosen,   it  must  be
worthy of a great country.    The best
is none too good  for the Dominion,
and only  the best would bo worthy
of (.nnnfl~~.
. umilu'1 lrailo With J»i>~.h.
The United States are being mode
aware that they will have to encounter competition from Canada in the
markets of Japan. E. C. Bellows,
United States Consul-General at Yokohama, in a report to his Govorn-
ni( nt on *"' 'oreign commerce of Canada, *' "The imports from
Canad:., _,,. her parts of British
America Japan now amount to
only a trifle over one per cent, of the
value of those from tho United
States, but the people of the Dominion are making a trong effort to increase their trade in the onst. At tho
Osal^a ii.xposition, now open, tlio La- '
nadians are spoken of as having the ■
largest and best of the foreign ex- I
hibits. They are striving especially
to advertise tho merits of Canadiun
flour. Bread is baked on the grounds \
and sold or distributed freely among
Iho natives, to whom the superior
quality of the Canadian product is
explained; aud it is reported that
largo orders have been recoi\ed for
florr as a result of this woik. The
United States have been furnishing
from 5)6 to 1)0 per cent, of nil Ihe
Hour imported into Japan, and lust
year this commodity rnn'-'ed third in
value of the imports from O-,. United
States, raw ginned cotton being li st
and ken Bono oil second. The most
important import from Canada in
1'.'02 was said d salmon and trout.
of whi h sho furnished nearly twice
as much as the Un:*ed States, followed bv timber nnd lumbor—hoards
and planks—of which her quota was
less than two-thirds of ours.
Lillooet District
is
Attracting Attention
on account of
i. Its Fraser River Placers.       ^E^
As fur back as the year 1858, successful placer mining was carried on at Horse Beef
bar, near tbe town oi Lillooet. The adjoining* ground is being worked with profit at
the present time,
A company is now working a gold dredger on the Fraser, with gratifying success, and
a new company has been formed with a capital of $350,000, to operate an improved
dredge nenr tho town of LILLOOET.
2. Its Promising Mineral Lands.-^
axi.ku.son lake and iiimdok im visit mining properties will prove themselves sufficient to
Fonn a prosperous camp. Yet  there are miles of territory  that remain unprospected
3. Its Fishing and Hunting Grounds-<^^
Increasing numbers of tourists from all parts of the globe testify that the sportsman's
I'aradise is litre. Mountain slice}), bear, deer, and all kinds of large and small game
abutiiiil.    Anglers liinl the lusty trout where least expected, and fresh salmon cease to
Cor-
who
Hnva You Criminal Eyes?
A Russian savant lays claim to a
discovery for detecting criminals.
According to M. KurlolT, you can
tell a criminal by the color of his
oyo Murderers and thieves have
maroon or reddirh brown eyes,
tramps light blue, and so forth. M.
Karl off bus classified eyes into families and has drawn up rules which he
d(clares to be infallible. Honest folk
have dark trey or blue eyes.
A Tjplcnl  IinwuoM City.
A Dawson City paper says:
poinl Hell of tie N.Vv.M.P.,
lately returned from the outside, tells
some amusing stories of the ideas
entertained by people in the east of
the Klondike and conditions as they
obtain here.
At the Lucas House in Toronto,
where Mr. 13ell registered from J law-
son, he was importuned with innutu-
0 ante l|Uihtions, .01 i-ui..)..*, uwl
follow said:
"V cally. my dear fellow, I am
pleased to meet you, doncherknow,
for J wish to ask you a i;u.sl,ion,
doncherknow. 1 havo been told tbat
the Yukon llivor is all tlie way t.om
twenty to fifty feet deep, ami that
tho water freezes solid every winter;
that the lish freeze up in the ice und
that carving lish out of tbe ice is a
favorite pastime with you people.
also, that when the ice thaws in tho
following spring the bloomin' lish not
mined in the winter begin to wriggle,
doncherknow.  Now,   dew  tell."
The Iluwson corporal was just, recovering his breath to inform tho now
arrival from across the pond thut ho
hull received onlv straight tips regarding the habits of t.he Yukon in
winter, when a freshly arrived Australian chipped in with:
"'But blime mo, thev snv thr.t 110
matter how thick the ice is in tho fall
the bloomy worms ent it all up before spring. Taik this bit of paper
end a pencil and draw me the outline of a bloomin' ire worm, for \
am wild to see what, the critter
looks like."
Hell explained that, ho had the picture ot a family .reunion 01" leg
worms in his Saratoga over at another hotel und told the crowd l.o rail
the following afternoon to F.o It,
Thev wore delighted wiih the Invitation, but the wily corpora] left th"
city on »n early train next morning.
Itixurv
4. Its Salubrious Climate.
In the dry licit, and at an altitude that renders the seasons temperate and equable,
the climate is most suitable for health-seekers. Semi-tropical fruit may be grown, and
al i!:*' 1 I'eseiii lime, November, rosebushes and geranium plants may be seen in bloom
in I lie gardens ol' the lown
N.arest Uailway towns are ASHCitoft andI lytton, on the Canadian pacific kailway,
__\
PROSPECTOR
CLUB OFFERS
"Chicago Weekly Inter-Ocean" $1.00
"The Prospector" 1.00
BOTH FOR ONE YEAR 1.25
CHISOFFER IS OPEN toll ONLY A SHOUT TIME.
"Family Herald & Weekly Star $1,00
'The Prospector"    1,00
BOTH FOR ONE YEAR 1,60
"Manitoba Free Press"  $-1.00
"The Prospector" 1,00
BOTH FOR ONE YEAR L,50
"Montreal Witness," "World Wide," and   "Northern
Messenger" $2,80
"The Prospector"  L.oo
THESE FOUR WEEKLY PAPERS ONE YEAR 2,bo
[f^TSPECIAL: We will send all of the above seven
papers valued at $6.30, postpaid, for only $3.75
£R*.
Subscribe for "The Prospector' $1.00 a year. THE  PI JOS PHOTO   , LILLOOEI, PO., NOV.EMM.I. 14, 1903.
A YACHT RACE.
Ezo~ll«nt l)es<ii|H mi ni Watching One by
si Writer Wlui m.w Strut liuona Win
liis! Knee ('rum Ironilequo'.t.
Tho pale blue was butterllicd with
timid gray wings. Flags fluttered.
A lazy sou'wester fanned out of tho
smoke-shot sky-line. And ht'ty-ono
lopsided big sails and little sivils.
fat with thc wind, were crawling
along to westward—just as they felt
inclined; all but two that since th"
pop of a gun from a steamer had
Ih.ii doing a windy wait/ anywhere
within a furlong of a bobbing buoy,
says a marine writer in the Toronto
News.
One was a crCam-colored big butterfly, the other a phantom of white
wings. They cut a pair of foam-
spitting curves, pointed their jib-
booms at the buoy and bore down
like a pair of swuns. .Iusl at the
second when to the man without a
telescope on the breakwater it loo -
ed as ihough one boom would put a
pencil of daylight through the other's
lore-sail, they wheeled side-long. A
gun popped—to signify that all the
previous manoeuvres had been merely skirmishes; but this was the race.
The butterflies glided after—just as
they felt inclined. Most of the crowd
sat leisurely along the rocks, some
with their books open again. Sonic
headed off for a stroll. '1 hat is one
advantage of yacht race over ahorse
rucc—you may go away and leave it
without missing much. For it is not
highly exciting to bore long-distance
holes in two dabs of sail out on the
smoke-line. The best frame of mind
to wait for tho finish is one of suspended animation. Of course, there
are a good many wise aquatic folk,
who can sec signs and symptoms in
a pair of hazy whit* wings on a
mile of mist. Cut you never hear
Ihcin shout or swear. It is almost
as sub-clued a pastime as betting on
tho clouds.
Watching a yacht race in a lazy
wind is a good deal like gazing at a
comet. There are always some folks
who can see a comet in any patch of
tho milky way that looks as though
it had a tail. And thc-'.e are a lot.
of people at a yacht race who can
tell tho Strathcona from the Iron-
dequoit, when they both look as
much alike at live miles as a pair
of Indian tepees on the prairie. It
takes considerably tenacity of purpose for an average man lo watch
just those two patches of sail, and
ignore all the others—especially if
h. knows not which is which. frantically, it is about as useful to enquire that from the average man
with the binoculars, as it is to try
to see a fish in a pond when somebody else tells you to. One man
tells you the Strathcona is fair in
front of another little boat—when
from the perpendicular to your pair
of shoes thc one in front is the Iron-
doquoit. Another tells you to sight
over his shoulder fair in the direction of his finger, forgetting that his
shouldcr on the beach repnsnts
about five miles on the yacht-course,
and that his linger wobbles like the
end of a pole on a man's back. The
next man sub,;ects you t» a series of
categorical questions. "Vou sec that
steamer?" "Yes." The bunch of
sails next to it'.1" "Sure." "Well.
then, you ■ce the little black sail?"
"Black sail?" you murmur incoherently, not quite sun. tl___t hi* Idea*
of a rainbow »ie quite the Mm.. «-
yours. "Well, yen ~*« that ..hit*
.•loud that look* like a sheep—'?**
"lou muinUle stupidly that they all
look like sheer. wV_»n he says,
"Well, the <__.• with the tail on—d'
you see that?" "Y—yes—" "Well,
that's not the Strati.! on ft—for she's
going to come »ut   k«_d."
And that mam's laugh pretty nearly makes » dead culm of the Wind.
Sou scarcely begin to feel cool again
before there comes « chung!— Own a
charivari of v.i.t.tli~ like ha!!' a
dozen circus calliopes, more Runs—
and b.v lhe way the 'cats nr. cutting
circh-s on lhe breakwater you know
that a lot of people are Hying '"
shout louder then the guns and
whistles. All which slffllltles tlmt in
Uie long, lazy crawl home Ilu
Strathcona has crossed t lis lihe first.
COUNTfY-BC RN
Blacksmith Supplies
We carry tlio largest and host stock in K.C.,
including; Bar Iron, Cast Steel, Spring Steel, Tire Steel,
S.S. STEEL, TOE CALK STEEL.
GAJTIER TOE CALK, HORSE SHOE   IN IRON AND STEEL,
PENDER     ■• .. HORSE N All S,
CARRIAGE AND TIRE BOI TS,      SQUARE NU I S IN BLACK AND TAPPED
HORSE RASL'S,   ETC.,   ETC..
Sole Agents For VALENTINE'S Nigh (•fade CARRIAGE VARNISH.
MAli.OUDKUK HHOKIVKOIIIt  PROMPT ATI ICNTION.
McLennan, McFeely & Co Ltd.
Wholesale and Retail Merchants
122 Cordova Street, Vancouver, B n.
Paul Santini,
In tlie dust of tlie ci'inviletl e'U,
O'er  the   K'.lt~ln"   mill   '*>' !-voiced   .vorils.
He lingers  I"  lntlnlle i>'ty,
KecillHuii un-  s*ol!_s ii.   ... - lu'ils.
And e'en  tlirniitfli tlie i o so of the trafllc
He Witches tile sweet in  H' <• ti'i 1
(K' tin* sllverc  speech   •!' tin'    ver
As it ripples nlonj? to.vii.r.1* tho n.._l.
In spite of the ratigU tones ttlxint lilm.
Above nil tho till) ot t e Ice n,
He lists to tlie  lo-wing of e. (tie
And  gathers   tlie  Violets   tilil*. m.
His dreams are of wealth of sweet  roses,
As  lie  trai's  on  the  ll il'i'MV rtreetS
Or of searching for mi's or of poses.
Or wandering  'mid  goMen  wlieat.
An alien  Who's linrtc r'.ng his liirthr'glit
For the City  stn-kc  and gloom.
But  his  spirit  dw.l'fj in  the  li me  Inn I,
Though his hands nny tn'l at the; I <>ni.
—Kat.iCllne A   Clarke.
Thumping, Jumping, Aching I
Heads
If we were in yonr place we
would mil go nu siillViing day
iiflei ilu)- with such terrible
headaches when there i** such a
good remedy In lie li.ul, Sumo
lieadaclie remedies miglit never
In lie laken. lull ne put up II
simple powder which relieves
ilie headache :i! once without
having any hail effects upon llie
system. We call this pieparal-
nm Mullery's Headache Waters,
They are put up, une dozen in
a Lux nl 25 ce-ijs. Nol liinl to
lul.e and iliey certainly bring 11
welcome relic! im matter whal j
lhe c.lllsa of llie In-nl.ic'-e may
he. Senl anywhere li)' mail on I
receipt nl pi ice. !
Made ni'nl sol I nn'y l-y '
THEMALLERY
DRJ3 C3 m.
KAMLOOPS, i.C.
If you knew positively tbat
you could purchase a Diamond of guaranteed quality
at 9. great saving in price,
would you invest.
That ii precisely whnt we
ofTer in our No. 947 S.ditaire
Diamond Ring', No. 916
shown here.
rrlif, #'•».
Orimr hy mail, tf #n receipt it 4an
not fully itatisfy >•!*, >.ur money
will  lie r«lur.~ri «itli«iuL question.
49 y«ars of lio«*rnh!e dealing
speak for the reliability of
our h«u«, "IMnmoBd Hall."
VVrit_ for our new catalogue.
Ready Nov. 15th.
DYRJE BROS.
JEWEUERS
113, 1-0. \:.i and 12+
V^n*f.e. JSi„ Toronto
0
0
J
_.kJk_s*«£'»V~rf       60   YEARS'
1  gW^^';fl"^
Trade Marks
Designs
Copyrights Ac.
Anvonn soiidlm? n f l*ol. ti nnd description mny
nulckly asoorl.iil'i our opinion free whether an
invention is probably piiientable. Communion-
I lent dtrtotty GauttUen-lnl. llundbookon Patents
-sent. fine, nlilost nuency for securing patents.
I'll, rits tiiken through Munn & Co. receive
ipcciiti iviHco, without charge, in tlio
$Hmm Hmericatn
A linwlsn-noly llh:°trntert weekly. I.nrirest clr-
riiliitliui nf any . <• icnllUn Journal. Terms, lit a
voir: four Ihont.uo, .... Sold by all ncwsilealers.
BUNN&Co.c05Groad^' New York
Branch Oifloe, ~25 V St. Washington. D. C.
Rend our special
offer 011 the
third page.
^eecls, "i liiii.I spritiKpiiiniii.
■^iilhs Plants,
Irees
AdKlCUl.TUKAl, IMI'I.KMI'.NTS,
Ul'-.l*. SUI'I'I.IKS,
l'U till' UAvfKKTS,
KICK I'll.l/.I-'.KS.
Ciitalogue free.
M. !. Dsnry,
2 X)Q    Wnsi'iii'i.i   r   'v'nitl    \ inri.Hy.'i,  UJ
W1IITK I.AHOi: OM v.
R.r.Anderson&Co
M-:\'   ni'.STMINSTKK, 15. (J.
Gcncrivl Hardware,
I'icks and Sliovels,
Axes, Hoes Si Hakes,
!.nr Iron, J)rill Steel,
Oils, I'n in is, etc.
GICNrcii/VI.   MKIHIIAXT, 1,1 IAA K.)KT. !!. (J.
carries a  full stock, of all kinds of (..•oru-i.'s,  hrvOotxl
Jloo.ts aiul Shoes, Hardware Sie
MINERS' OUTFITS A SPECIALTY.
CARIBOO & LILLOOET STAGE LINES
BRUSH COLUMBIA EXPRESS COMPANY.
Head Office - - Ashcroft, B.C.
Clinton it Way Points: Mondays, Wednesdays and Krid;i\]
All [joints in I'arihoo:      -   -    Mondays.
! ~>0 Mile Utilise : Mondays Si Fridays |semi-weekly seryice
Lillooet:  Monday and Friday.
-k   Special conveyances fnniislietl.    Send   for   folders
LYTTON STAG
'lite  new siiiL>e line leaves Lytton every Monday ani
nd ay   lor
'i-i
Li I loot
rettirning next
ay.
s
pecial  In j
made,    Write ns for information.
Peter UeliauJiali Si. Co., Lvtton
<:
PATRONIZE HOME
INDUSTRY.
McCOSH is your nearest TAILOR]
WHEN YOU WANT A NEW SUIT
Don't Forget the Address.
THOMAS McCOSH, MercliauiTailor, AHlnnofl, B.C
PELLEW-ilARVEy, BRYANT k GILMAN
MINING l_NGIN.l_IDliS AND ASSAYL1.S,
Vancouver, B.C.
Established, 1890.
j)QOdQii.®Q0d®
There    are    very  few    cleansing operations  in   which  Sunlight
Soap "cannot   be    used   tO   advant-j     Assay work of a" desc,il'li"»s undertaken.     Tests made up to 2000 ll,s.    As,,, dali;
age.    It  makes  the home   bright ,wule of d,eck,nB sraeller i,uli,s*   Sm,,l,,es' f,om l,1-« Inte,,or 'v  Mnil or   _**'**
__j  ,.j,.-n | promptly attended to.   Correspondence   solicited
IB
SALE   01''   LANDS   FOK    UNPAID   DELINQUENT   TAXES   IN   THE   LILLOOET     ASSESSMENT   DISTRICT,    PROVINCE   OF    BRITISH   COLUMBIA.
I hereby give notice that on'Monthly, the seventh day of Decomber^A.D. 1903, at llie hour of twelve o'clock
noun, at the Court House, Lillooet, 1 shall sell at public auction the lands hereinafter setout of tlie persons in
said list hereinafter set out, for the delinquent taxes unpaid by said rcrsons on the 31st dayof December,
1902, and lor interest, costs and expenses, inclm ing lhe cosl of advertising s;iid sale.
LIST   ABOVE   MENTIONED.
COLUMN   No. I.
COL. No.'a |< 01..No. 3.
NAME   OF   PERSON
ASSESSED
Bishop, Thomas	
Cassidy .* O'Halloran.
DeWolf & McCartney,
SHORT   DESCRIPTION OFi DELINQUENT TANKS IbTATUTOltV
PROPERTY
aii7kMmma:ai€miy^
Devine, Ann       Purl Lot   208,
Fewster   Philip       Part   ,,      176,
Gregson, T.&J. and Jos.
Vowart
Garden,   William	
Hunter, John & William
Huppard, Ceorge	
Haller, Joseph	
Hunt, S.  Lucas	
lninan, James  	
Johnston, |. II	
nnes, Oron Otis	
Keiih, A.J	
Lindlay, lidwip P	
Madson, Roliert	
Murphy, E.O	
McKwen, Donald	
McWhinney, James   ...
McKinlay, A. I	
Phillips, E, Lindsay ...
I'onsford, Harold & A..
Price, William Scott...
Power, Thomas	
Ramsay, William	
Scolt, Leonard	
Shields, Alexander	
Skinner,  Thomas  	
Taylor, John	
Unsworth, Mary   	
Underbill, Rev, H.J....
Wallbridge, D.G	
Wycott, William W....
Wycolt, Thomas	
Group 1.
Lots   138,    14*1, 340 acresJ
Part Lot     210, 80   ,,
Parts Lots 206,    212, 325   ,,    j
160
Part   „      210, 80   ,,
I'aris Lots 202,   203, 120  ,,
Part Lot   203, 140   ,,
Lot 2,   Block 2, Sub.
Lot 220, 160 acres.
X Lot 390, 40   ,,
Pts. L0IS203,    209, 206    ,,
Lot 3,   Block 3, Sub.
Lot 594, 320 acres
Part Lot 211, 310    ,,
Part Lot 203, 80    ,,
Lot 303, 160   ,,
Pis, Lots 208,     210, 130    ,,
Pait Lot 180, 103    ,,
Part Lot 180, 103    ,,
Lots    4,    lot, 468    ,,
TAXES
$ lo.
2o'oO
86U0
512 26
5490
I96.S'>
OSTH   AN liii   TOTAL
INTKIIKPI  All fcXl'ENSl-S
HAT
lAl.tt
13282
I75J1;0
7650
2050
5"PS
26
297
75
10
00
5»
5o
5"
1 on
Part Lot 205,
Part Lot 211,
Part Lot 206,
Lot 358,
Part Lot 208,
Part Lot 204,
Part Lot 204,
Part Lot 210,
Pari Lot 205,
Part Lot 208,
H Lot 399,
Part Lot 212,
Lot 367,
Lot 366,
160
73
173
220
20
170
90
80
160
20
120
148
320
80
76
447
13°
3'
9
138 26
12538
34925
25650
127I90
218
9
19
i5"
>23
52
251
16
73
25^
i.l'
28
39
60
5"
99
75
5°
29
5°
5"
69
34
5°
$,
*•'• ■     1
$
C.
|        $   c.
S'"4
2 00
24'04
882
2 00
1      97;32
5225
200
56651
5 60      i
2 00
6250
2-04
2 00
2*-*]54
'3 54
2'iin
;     '^\_6
17
90
2 00
'9540
7
80
2 00
8630
2 to
2 on
i      24 60
5 12
2 loO
57 37
265       |
2 00
3065
3'37
2 OO
|    33"'«2
M03
2 00
13 '3
7,75
2 00
«5 75
4564
2,00
495 '4
*3
32       j
2 00
145 82
3
32
2 no
36 72
9
18
2 00
lot 18
14
10
2 00
154 36
12
78
2 00
140 16
35
62
2 00
3S687
20
16
2
00
284 66
13
04
2
00
142 94
22
27
2
00
242 66
98
2 no
1       1258
1
99
2100
23 49
154"
2 00
16839
1262
2-oO
:   13837
5,36
2 OO
5986
25162
2
no
278I91
1 68
2
00
2018
750
2jOO
1    8300
2578
2 00
280 47
'3
4.1
2 110
1   14674
2|
90     !
2 OO
33'4<>
Dated 24th October,   1903,
CASl'AK    PHAIR,    Assessor,
Lillooet  Assessment District,
Lillooet, B.C.

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