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Prince Rupert Journal Feb 22, 1914

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Array ufc-iaM
'
I
to
The Journal
$5.00
a year
Ptinct Unpttt
unrnal
High Class
Job Printing
in all Line*
as
4-
VOL.  III.
PRINCE.RUPERT, B.C., SUNDAY,  FEBRUARY 22,  1914.
Pi'ice 5 Cents.
NO.  80.
FURTHER GUARANTEE
OF RAILWAY BONDS
The Government At Victoria Has Increased the Amount For Which It
Assumes Liability Under Canadian Northern Pacific Charter-
Increase Is  About Five Millions
Victoria, Feb. 21.—Bonds of the
Canadian Northern Pacific to a further amount of $5,110,000 are to
be guaranteed by the province of
British Columbia. A biH for that
purpose was Introduced into tiie legislature yesterday.
This makes the total amount of
the Canadian Northern Pacific bonds
guaranteed by the province of British Columbia $4 7,975,000. The new
bonds, like the others, will be
guaranteed both as to principal and
interest.
They are for $10,000 per mile for
the company's main line from the
south end of Westminster Bridge
easterly and northerly to Yellow-
head Pass, a distance of 500 miles,
and $10,000 per mile in respect to
the company's line from the north
end of the Westminster Bridge to its
terminals iu the city of Vancouver,
a distance of eleven miles, with interest at 4 1-2 per cent, payable
hair yearly. The principal is payable
April  2,   1950.
OLD HAT IS ON
A LONG TOUR
IT
WILL ARRIVE HERE IN THE
COURSE OF TIME BV
EXPRESS.
It la Now Travelling From Point to
Point on the Continent to End
inj L'P at Exposition.
On an extensive tour planned to
last until the Panama-Pacific Exposition opens at San Francisco in
1915, an old hat is travelling among
the agencies of the Dominion Express Company. First sent from
Waco,'Texas, at the beginning of
the year, it has already crossed and
recrossed the continent on the American side, commencing a further
transcontinental journey from St.
John. N.B., by an All-Canadian
route. At least as far as Prince Rupert it will travel through Canadian
Express companies and where it will
go then, is for the companies to
decide.
Obviously old when the journey
commenced, the hat is now in a very
dilapidated condition. So many
tags have been stuck on it that the
original shape is hardly visible.
Tags hang inside and out, from
crown, rim and brim. Oue hundred
and four in all. All sorts of warning
notices have been added, such as
"Fragile," "Do Not Open Before
Christmas." "Do Not Shake Contents," and others of the same sort.
Practical jokers have philosophized in many met red verse on the
tags, some of which to us certainly
will not pass the censors when the
vagabond head-piece reaches Snn
Francisco.
Altogether, it is a unique sort ot
hat now, and is likely to be more so
t«fore its journey is ended next
year.
—;—, o —■—
itapiiM Services.
"Hidden Sustenance." will oe the
subject of tne pastor at 11 a.m. In
the evening the subject to be discussed will be, "The Architect and
His Plans for a Life.' Bible School
at  2:30.  Von are welcome.
MADE RAID LAST   NIGHT.
Early this mfcrning the city
police made a raid of the Two
Star Boarding House on Fraser
Street. As a result a force of
thirty-seven charged with
gambling or being in a gambling
place were marched to the Police Station under Officers Shiel,
Adams, Carroll and Grady.
Charges will be laid Monday
morning against Thlo Anamte
and John Borezeos, the proprietors of the place, with keeping
a gambling house. The others
are charged with playing or being in a gambling place. A large
collection of cards was brought
in. Five tables were found with
players at them. The raid was
made about 1 o'clock in the
morning. A number were bailed
out before morning.
Will Be Given His Passport
Whether President Huerta plans to give a passport to Nelson
O'Shaughnessy, American charge d'affaires at Mexico City, does not
greatly worry the American diplomat. The photograph shows Nelson
O'Shaughnessy engaged in a little game of golf on the links in the
Mexican capital. It is said Huerta has concluded to "allow" O'Shaughnessy to leave Mexico if the United States lifts the embargo on the
shipment of arms and ammunition to the rebels.
BRITISH FEELING IS
RUNNING HIGH
While Goodwill Expressed Towards
President Wilson It Is Thought In
London That His Policy Towards
Mexican Situation Is a Mistake-
American Colony Think the Same
REAL ESTATE IS
FIRM IN THE CITY
Increased Demand Indicates That
There Is Utmost Faith In Outlook
Here-Good Sale Made on McBride
Street Which Is Held By Investors
As Gilt  Edge  Business  Property
There is a decided feeling of optimism with regard to this city.
Visitors who have been south return
wiih the assurance that tTTere are
many inquiries about Prince Rupert
and a demand for information relative to the city and ils opportunities.
Real estate in the place, which has
throughout the entire stringency
kept its value well sustained, Is
again coming into demand in a more
marked way than for some months
past.
An evidence of this was afforded
yesterday when Mr. Lee Baker of
Weatenhaver     Bros,   put   through   a
H. F. McRae and Williams & Man-
son two years ago. The price realized
is a decided advance on the sum then
paid.
The purchaser is an eastern client
who has been over the ground and
has studied the situation in Prince
Rupert. He was convinced that McBride Street was one of the best
buys in the city, describing that
street as "the neck of the bottle."
lie has purchased these lots as au
Investment and is well pleased with
his purchase.
In   other  parts   of   the  city   there
have been purchases made    recently
deal whereby two    lots on McBride'and there have also    been many in-
Street, Lots 63 and 64, Block 34,
Section 1, were sold for $36,500.
These lots, which were formerly
held by P. I. Palmer, are situated
just- west of the lots that were
graded there. They were bought by
quiries of tbe local dealers. Everything points to a busy year in Prince
Rupert in every line of trade and
industry which will haie a most
marked effect upon the real estate
'values here.
Anniversary Services.
The Methodists are preparing to
do full honor to the anniversary of
their church this year. A grand concert is to be given on Monday evening, March 2, which will be of the
highest order. It is a'so expected
that the Rev. S. D. Chown, D.D.,
will be here to preach on the anniversary Sunday, March 1.
. o	
Buy a lot in Port Edward before
the railway is completed.
 o	
London,    Feb. 21.—Only the feel-, test for the damage done British In-
Will Continue Pictures.
The success which attended the
putting on the Johnson-Flynn pictures at the Majestic Theatre yesterday resulted in the decision to continue these for Monday and Tuesday evenings also. These films show
the fighters In their best style.
 o	
Methodist Services.
Services at the Methodist Church
on Sunday will be as follows: 11
a.m., subject of sermon, 'The More
Excellent Way." Sunday School 2:30
p.m. Evening Sendee at 7:30, subject, "Stirring Up the Gift." Stay
for the song service following tbe
evening sermon. A hearty welcome
to all.
Keep your eye o,i Port Edward.
Best Bargains In Rupert Realty
A good lol on plnnk roadway, Section    Two 9030
Lot 10, Block 7, Section Two, easy terms 91000/' J
Second Avenue lot, level and fine,  1914     Improvement    tax    paid,
$7'i0 cash, balance G.T.P, ' $1800
Double  cornel,   Fifth  Avenue and  Eberts, good terms $8000
Lane corner, Block ,10, Section Six  $1000
Four-room  house and  good  lot in Section Seven;  good terms.   Lot
alone is well worth the price   asked $1000
Lot 7, Block 6, Section Seven, a fine level lot with excellent water
view, $800; SHOO cash, balince 6, 12 and IS months,    7    per
cent. This  lot should bring $1500 within a few months.
Lot   7,  Block  32, Section Seven, $700; $300 cash, 6 and 12 months
Sixth Avenue lot, Block 13, fcection  Seven    $t:»0O
Lots 7 and 8, Block S», Section Bight, Eleventh Avenue, at corner
of city park property, $1130;  $375 cash.
r?^t 31, Block 3, Section Eight, $030; half cash, 6, 12 months 7%
WESTENHAVER BROS.
PHONE 100 SECOND A\ E. and THIRD ST.
"A GOOD INVESTMENT IS WORTH A  LIFETIME   OF   LABOR."
ing of British good-will toward
President Wilson and a desire not to
hamper him in his policy with regard
to Mexico in any way, prevents an
outburst of a serious nature over
tne murder of W. S. Benton. All the
best informed British authorities
agree that President Wilson's Mexican policy is a mistake and prevents
a peaceful settlement of the troubles
there.  It is ruinous commercially.
The British Foreign Office has
strained its diplomatic courtesy to
the utmost in refraining from a pro-
I
terests there. Benton's English
friends are powerful. The murder
tends to a criticism of the president's policy, and the opinion is
held that President Wilson should reconsider his policy towards Mexico.
The American community in London are of the same opinion as the
Englishmen on this matter. "We believe President Wilson made a mistake as regards Mexico, but. right or
wrong, we must support our president in foreign affairs," is the typical expression of their attitude towards that policy.
MARRIED VKSTKRDAV
AT OETINJE HOTEL
Eliihoratc   Festivities in   Conneetion
With This Most Enjoyable
Event.
SUSPECTED OF
KNOWING PLAN
TWO    MEN' ARRESTED IX    CONNECTION  WITH ATTEMPTED
TRAIN ROBBERY.
i'bi-.
Men   Shot   Ity   the     Would-be
Robbers Before They
Escape.
Belllngham, Feb. 21.- Two men
were arrested here this afternoon and
will be detained until Monday at
least in connection with a daring at-
The marriage took place yesterday at the Cetinje Hotel of Mr. Pete
Titioyn and Mis? Olympia Korinee,
of this city. The event was made
the occasion of a general rejoicing
ou the part of the numerous friends
of the bride and groom and a most
elaborate wedding feast was spread
by  the  proprietor of  the  house,     I.
Slchlkowski,
l	
After  the   wedding supper,   which   tempt in train robbery near here last
was  partaken  of  by a  vast  number: night.   It, Is  nol  suggested  thai  they
of friends, a time of rejoicing    was (ire the bandits who    held    up the
held at the house on Second Avenue Great Northern train, killing    three
with dancing and  music. passengers,     but   Hie.-,   me  held     on
The groom is well known  in  this suspicion  thai  they    belong    to the
city. For years he has been employed Bang which engineered the bold at-
ou  the Grand  Trunk     Pacific    eon-  tempt al   robbery.
struction, and for four years he has,     A daring  and  brutal   hold-up  or-
been a foreman under D.  Dempsey, curred last night near  here on  the
the layer of the track. The bride is j Ureal Northern train, in which three
also well known here. She has been passengers lost their lives. Tlic dead
a resident of the city ror five years jure: H. R. Atkinson, travelling saies-
and  in  that  time has  made a  host   man,    of  Vancouver;   i.  S.     IVads-
of friend3. i worth, C. P. R. conductor,    of Van
couver, and R. L. Lee, of Bremerton, j
Wash.
The robbers were three in number and when first uoticed were seated in the smoking car. Later they
covered their faces with handkerchiefs for masks and entered the
day coach. Oue of the men walked
to the rear of the car, another stopped at the vestibule, while the other
stepped iuSide the coach.
When the robber at the rear attempted   to   lock   the   door     several
men  jumped   from  their  seats  and
attacked him. The holdup man at the
forward end then, began to shoot at
.the lights.     .Meanwhile  the     robber
who was grappling with the three assailants drew an automatic and shot
tiie three  men  dead.  The conductor j
in the adjoining car when  he  .u-jrd
the shooting    immediately    stopped
the train.  The bandits  left  the car
together as  soon  as  it  came  to  a
stop.
The robbers did not succeed in
getting any valuables, although
several terribly frightened laijies
were holding out their purses in the
aisle as they passed out.
Novel Sign.
Among the latest, things in the
line of an electric sign is one that
N. Scheinman brought back with
him from New York on his last
trip and which was put Into use at
the Acme Clothing Store last night.
A small light throws an illuminated
sign on the sidewalk in front of the
store. It can be used to throw the
slem on the opposite side of tbe
street,
The G.T.P. steamer Prince Albert
will arrive today from Ihe south
with mail.
A GOOD   PROPERTY.
Engineer Group  at   Atlin  Has Made
Good Showing This
Season. I
The Engineer Mine, which is situated about 30 miles from Atlin on
the shore of 'laku Arm of Tagi.sh
Lake, has during the past season
produced gold to the value of $25,-
000 at a cost of $12,000.
The property is being worked by
Capt. Alexander, of Atlin, for an
English company, and is producing
ore of exceptional richness. Tho
values are entirely in free gold aud
tellurlde. Adjoining is ihe Gleaner
Group, for which $125,000 cash was
refused some weeks ago.
 o	
Malaspina In.
The fisherj protection steamier
Malaspina, Captain Newcotnbe, is in
port. I;, arrived from a patrol of
the waters off the Queen Charlotte.!
yesterday. She will likely leave Monday  again   for  the   fishing  backs.
0<Is>CHKKKKKKia<10
Major Hart McHarg to Command
Ottawa, Feb. 21.—Hon. Sam Hughes, minister of militia, announces that Major Hart McHarg of the Sixth Regiment D.C.O.R.
of Vancouver, will be commandant of the Canadian Bisley team this
year. Col. Hughes has cabled the War Office that the Canadian
team would compete at Bisley under the rules of 1913, the War
Office having backed down  in Its recent demand.
O^KKKKKi<KKI O-oXHSO 0*OO<KKHKI<i OHjs3<H>0HKKKr0Wi 00<3<KX>0
Majestic Theatre
SPECIAL!
Moving Pictures of Fight Betweea
Jack Johnson and Flynn
Excellent Bel of films showing the two champions
Quarters, followed by the Prize Fight, Only official
presented to the public,
in    tratniui;
film.-    ever
Monday and Tuesday Evening
X   Special high-class Programme in addition
S    Change each evening ...
Best yet  given
I     Special Prices 25c and 10c. PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Sunday,   February   22, 1914.
j&rtnce liupetf journal
Telephone  1.18
| supplies  of  the  four  hundred   million  of  Chinese  and  the    sixty-five
million of Japanese.    These    people
"today  lived  as a  rule on scant sup-
East I l'"e8  from  day  to  day,  and  strange
O. H. NELSON, Editor.
Office:     128 Third Avenue
near McBride Street. Telephone 138. i as it might sound, rice was in some
Montoffice Box  607
DAILY  EDITION.
Published    every morning    except
Monday.  Delivered by carrier in the
city at the following ra e, if paid in
tdvanc >: —
One  "ear $5.00
Six   Months $2.50
'"firee   Months $1.25
One   Month $0.50
WEEKLY EDITION.
Pul'ished e\ ry Frld v for circulation   outside  the    City    of    Prince
Rupert at 52.00 a year, addressed to
points In Canada; or $3.00 .. year to!
all   points  in  the  Un'ted   Kingdom,
the  United Slates or   other   "oreign
countries.
Advertising Rates Upon Application.
Sunday,   February
EASIER  MOXK1
Easier money is looming lip. The
passing of the war clouds and the
return of confidence
vestments are given by Hie financial
journals ns some of the signs of
the passing of the financial stringency, if this is so tlion municipalities will be encouraged to plan for
the carrying on of necessary civic
improvements. Already the Toronto
Globe points out there is a lively
demand for municipal bond issues,
and good prices are In siglil' for
cities with their credit well established. In this connection the Toronto
paper says:
"There is no longer any danger
that bonds will remain unsold. One
of the most careful financial experts
of Toronto assures the Globe that
the problem i., no longer one of how
to place good civic bonds, bul of
where to get them. This sudden
change in conditions docs not justify
plunging. The bond buyers expect
that the activities ol Canadian municipalities will be limited to necessary works for immediate use, and
there are plenty of such works
awaiting the advent of favorable
conditions. They may be proceede'd
with confidently. The orders for
steel and cement and lumber and
other raw materials and supplies
will do much toward starting the
wheels of industry and preventing
a further drift toward curtailment
aud unemplo: mem in factory and
workshop."
plaees getting too dear for the native.
This was because all tlie better
quality of rice was exported. All that
was left vvns inferior goods. They
were now getting the idea of eating
flour products, and even though the
increase might be but fractional it
amounted to n tremendous volume
when ii was among a population of
more than four hundred millions.
The aggregate would sum up very
large. There was certainly n great
field for Canadian flour and wheal
products.
"We have a great front door on
the Pacific," snid Mr, Foster, "und
we must keep our eyes open and
every string attached thai will hold
tills trade. Xo country has a better
chance to take advantage of that
trade iliiin Canada. Necessity und
changing conditions are making the
opportunity  for us in the Orient."
,.,,  „,.„   ,,_ OFFICIALS ARE   FOUND   GUILTY.
mil.
Three Officers of Western  Fuel Co,
Are Convicted of Conspiring to
Defraud U.S. Customs,
After deliberating for over eight
hours, the jury In the case of the
Western Fuel Company officials
and employees in San Francisco
found three of the four defendants
gtiilly as charged of defrauding the
government out of customs duties
on imported coal.
Those found guilty were F. C.
Mills, superintendent; .lames B.
Smith, vice-president and general
manager, and E. II. Mayer, weigher.
Edward J. Smith, checker, was acquitted.
It was three minutes before midnight when word was sent out that
a verdict had been reached and the
court-room was rapidly filled by
those who had been waiting since
4 o'clock in the afternoon when the
jury retired.
The first indictments in the case
were brought by the United States
grand jury, February 10, 1913, and
were directed against John L. Howard, president of the Western Fuel
Company; J. L, Schmitt, Sidney V.
Smith and Robert Bruce, directors;
James B. Smith, vice-president and
general manager; Edward J. Smith,
his brother, und a checker employed in the company Frederick C.
Mills, superintf mt, and E. It.
Mayer, a weigher, They charged thai
the defendants entered into unlawful' agreement ti id the federal
government In I ire*   .vays.
The trial opened before United
State? Districl Judge Maurice T.
in reply to a question in the Dooling, December 10, The govern-
House of Commons al Ottawa from ment completed Its evidence January
Hon,   I '•<'■'■ to  Canada's  22.  Within an  hour after court ad-
trade in  the Orient, the minister of journed that day, John    L.  Howara
MARKED GlfOWTII
IN FLOUR TRADE
Hon. George li. Foster Informs Hon.
Flunk  Oliver Thai    Canada's
Trade in Flour Increases.
mm\
S. S. PRINCE GEORGE
FRIDAY 9 a.m.,
S. S. PRINCE ALBERT
SUNDAY 6 p.m.
For points easl of Chicago and the Atlantic Seaboard, connecting with principal ATLANTIC STEAMSHIP LINES use the GRAND
TRUNK   RAILWAY  SYSTEM, the double-track  route.
-   For full particulars and through  tickets  to all  points   apply   to
ALBERT  DAVIDSON, General Agent, G.T.P. Tlckel  Office, Third
Avenue,
Extremely  low third-class rales now in effect
TO AND FROM EUROPE
ALBERT DAVIDSON, General Agent, Hurt Block, Prince Rupert,
Agency    nil    Atlantic       Steamship       Lilies.
C. P. R. COAST STEAM
SHIP SERVICE
PRINCESS
BEATRICE
Southbound Sunday
8 p. m.
Cor. Third Ave. and Sixth »< J- O. McNAB. I.ei.eniJ Agent
certificates are returned to them.
The master of the Prince George
and his officers, from the time the
fog came on until the stranding, did
all t.bar could be reasonably expected
of the;:; as seamen. They used every
precaution and attended to and carried out all regulations in so far
that the "need of the vessel was reduced, proper fog signals sounded
and ai ent look-out kept.
Tho court is of the opinion that
the ma: ler was justified, under the
circuit; unices, in attempting to make
the enti   uce into the First Narrows.
Subf    Ibe  for   tne  Prince  Rupert
I lurnal, $2.00 a year.
i !      HUSH OOIF
■etieral Teaming
; ,'iiiil Ave. Phon" 03
ii. Furniture anil Baggage
i-el'iilly and Promptly Done
'    VXD FORWARDING
'.!. AND  WOOD
"WATER ACT"    AND    AMENDING
ACTS.
Before the Board of Investigation.
In the matter of Alder Creek, Atlin
Lake, Alsek River, Boulder Creek,
Birch Creek, Big Spruce Creek, Big
Horn Creek, Beaver Lake, Bennet
Lake, Carrion Creek, Consolation
Creek, Chllkat River, Clear Creek.
Dominion Creek, Dixie River, Elk
Lake, Eureka Creek, Eagle Creek,
Eldorado Creek, Bdgar Lake, Fourth
of July Creek, Gold Hun Creek, Graham Creek, Homan River, Johnston
Creek, Jarvis Creek, Klehinl >.uver,
Ledgewood River, Little Spruce
Creek, Lindemann Lake. Moose
Lake, McKirley Creek, hfoKee Cree!<.
Nelson Lake, Pine Creek, Otter
Creek, Otter Lake,' Quartz Creel;,
Pike River, Rubv Creek, Rose Creel
Spruce Creek, Surprise Lake, Snakf
Creek, Slo\o Lake, Taglsh Lake, ir'-
shi Lake, Tatshenshini River, Willov
Creek, Wright Crook, Wilson Creek
and all other steams in the Atlin
Water District, as defined on Pag<
6470 of the British Columbia Gazette
of the-.31st July,  1918.
-♦"♦-
HOTEL DIRECTORY
MEMBERS OF PRINCE RUPERT LICENSED VINTNERS ASSOCIATION
WINDSOR HOTEL
Cor, of First Ave. and Eighth St.
W. H. Wright, Prop.
HOTEL CENTRAL
First Ave. and Seventh Street
European and American Plan
$1.00 to $2.50 per day
Peter Black, Prop.
K*~
KNOX HOTEL
First Ave. Between Eighth and Ninth
European Plan
Rates 50c. to $1.00 per day
-~
Besner & Besner, Props.
EMPRESS HOTEL
J. Y. ROCHESTER V. D. CASLEY
Third Ave. Between 6th and 7th Sts.    t
European Plan
5oc. to $l.oo per day
PREMIER HOTEL
American and European Plan
wa    sti Icken v. i:    a >0] lexy und died
the next  day.
Minions  for the dismissal    of  Indictments agains   Rchmltt, Brm i  ■•■
■ ■ .■     thai
mm - ■'   i   with     thi
to !;■ cy to di fraud had nol  h    >
11   ied    wi •'   I
I 14. The in
II	
r govern men
. ■   '  -      ■' '
i rade n; d  comm< ree said    thai  the
feature  of  this   year I ie  very
marki ' the ( anadii n
trade -  Ised
he bel
lion in I ■
cals,
CI In
NOTICE.
t
1' NOTICE.
	
To  Mr.   Blankenberg,
Graham Island, B.C.
formerly     of
Take notice
A                     foi   n  Licence  to take
|
•
i""'             ,nd  to store or  pen    b;u-i;
watoi   will be made under the "Wa-
i   ■ -   nuless  iiiiiount
incurred   foj
ti      '. - i"   of   British    Columbia,  as
: ir-   and  storage
on eii'-' n
:
i
i          -  name  oi   the ai i ii -nut  is
nol   - ;'■'   within    ' i:
>■  days rro
I ■::                rl Townsl      C
.-
■ : i           :            .       ;
i
ie   honwor
:■
l-ri
1]   Co., 1 td..
II.  D   Robin
1 he sn i
,„a    ,•   -   , .
i
F.  W.  Hennino.  Mpr.
o1 o
ROYAL HOTEL
Corley & Burgess, Proprietors
Third Ave. and Sixth St.
c.
>ean Plan
Steam Pleated
j
f Prince Rupert
1  Importing Co.
\
r
i-   nil-:—
i
£ VALL
It you send a wire K'
Alyunsi. we v. ill have u bom
to meet you nt Port Nelson
any day In ihe week. Regular
tr.ps made with mail, pas-
sei ■ , :d freight every
u. from Port Nelson to
t i i it!i lion reserve Full
inforii:     on g'ven  free
and Captain I
The laas River
Trading & Trans-
porta tion Cm$»
Myers & Dunlap, Alyansh, U.C.
JelO
Coliml
Captain .1   T, SI
J, Oosse.
Tiie marine court Is   of the opinion that the master    of the  l r •  ,
ilcorgo  was  somewhat  hnsty  In
judgment In arriving nt the conclusion il   i  thi   ligl    or lights seen on
bis starboard  ho     were the    lights
of i rospect Bluff, though    the mo
i. ■ cciu i desiies to place on record
is opinion that he hsd noi    m i-1
lime in  which  to decide  or  reflect,
the weather being so thick In land
locked and narrow    waters.     L'ndi
these circumstances the   court til
thai  no blame can be    attach*
the master  or  the officers    oi the
: i ne c Geot ie and   ihe     ire     I
■    ■
-.
i
-
:' i hli    uol h e wl an
■   suanl  i!>' ii-tii and  to;
■nis   of  the    "Water |
-   filed   in  the  office  of
Recorder al   Prince  Hu-
Objectlons  may be  filed j
Id   Water    Recorder, or
Comptroller    of    Water
rllatncnt    Buildings, Vic-1
VAHD    TOWN  1 iE   CO.,
A   pliennl  i
Stanley Nivcn.  (Agent.)
Port Edward tins Insured lis own
wnte, system.
I
Phone
it Tug 'Nora'
ire or Charter
■ rni       <v Also
.L/j Capt.Ron
Blue 320. Standard Fisheries Doc*
for local
ii -:.. ,. The r. Is will be I ml
in Pi Hue i.i'i-r •■ early next
month, ..ui will, them Mill
come an Increase in values.
Don't waii until Spring and
Bay, "That lot i« Worth 92600
ami I Could have bought it six
months ago for .111000." Oct
in now before the boom.
I urn offering the unsold
portion of the Grnnd Trunk
Pacific Development Company's lots at AUCTION SALE
PRICES. The usual terms of n
quarter cash, and the balance
in one, two and three years at
0 per cent.
ED #ARD F. DOYLE
Second Avenue and
Sixth Street
Phone 102
Eraser and Sixth
Streets
Phone 7
■   '•!■       1
I   ipiic Ml
« p.in;
"WWSWTT*
THE DAILY JOURNAU
SO Cents per Month
THE ONLY   FORMING PAPER IN NORTHERN B.C.
<•    flMjMMM ■■■■>  ■  "■■•- ■ ■■ ■»
Sunday,  February. 22, 1914.
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
i        J.   W.   POOTEK.   I1.R.I.B.A.
ARCHITECT  AND STRUCTURAL
ENGINEER
Re-inforced Concrete a Specialty
P.  O.  Box  271
L.O.L.
Meets second and fourth Friday In
each month in K. of P. Hall.
Heigerson Block, rd Ave. and 6th St
Recording Secretary, Box 324
HAYNER BROS
Pionee.- Funeral Director., and
timbulmors.     Open   Day   and
Night.     Iiftdles'    Assistant    if
Attendance
PHONE 86.    710 THIRD AVE.
Telephone 44 8
P. O. Box 1714
RITCHIE,   AGNEW  &  CO.
Civil Engineers ana Surveyors
Prince   Rupert, 11.0.
Waterworks, Water Power, Wharf
Construction, Reports, Plans, Dominion and Provincial Land Surveying,
Electric Blue Printing, Negatives and
White Prints.
Phone 300
F. O.  Box 1635
Harrison W. Rogers
ARCHITEC1
,,Suite 1
Federal flldg Prince Rupert, B.C.
A. FAULDS, M.I. HE.
Consulting Mining Engineer
Examinations and  development    of
Coal, Metal, Oil, etc.
709 Dunsmulr St.       Vancouver, B C,
nr Ilditch
Contractor and Builder
Estimates given  on all classes ol
wct^whethcr sn.ull or large.   Pei-
Fonal attention given to every Wens,
PHONH GREEN 321
J. L. PARKER
MINING ENGINEER
Prln' ■ Rupert, B. C.
Open for Consultation and Mine
Examination
Temporal y Address   -
Prince '■'    cri inn
FREDERICK   PETKUS   K.C.
. hi-i'iater, Eoliclioi rotary Public
>.    ice lu
EXCHANGE BLOCK
w~jl jephson
BARRIST-"*! LICITOR
Of British    ? erta and
MOTA1
Phone *90       B ost Office
Prince  Rupert-    j   Uazelton   B.C
Snap
Park Avenue
Lot 36, Block 27,
Section 1
At $3,800, one
third Cash Balance
6,12 & 18 months
P. McLACHLAN j
tkKKKKHKHJIWtHKKKHKBKKKKHKI.
Customs Broker
STORAGE
Forwarding,  Distributing   and
Shipping Agent
Special attention given to storage  of  Household  Goods  and
Baggage
Bul'tHAS    SUTHERLAND
606  Third   Avenue
P.O. Ho.v 907 Phone 262
tTnder New Management.
Pioneer
Laundry
LIMITED
Successors to
Pioneer Steam Laundry
A FIRST-CLASS PLANT
Thoroughly experienced    and   com
pe.tent superintendence, prompt
service
HYGIENE    —QUALITY    —KIN181
Solicits your  patioaag.
Wagons  call  and  deliver anywben
in city.
WRITE  OR   PHONE   11*.
HTliD AVENUE,  NfjAH MiBKlllf
St. Patrick's Concert.
Arrangements have been made for
the holding of a St. Patrick's Day
concert on March 17. A meeting has
been held for the purpose of organizing a committee to take charge of
it, when the following were elected:
President, Aid. Morrlssey; vice-president, E. V. Gibbons; secretary, Richard Moore; treasurer, itev. Father
Iiunoz; programme committee, J.
nlcNulty, J, C. Brady aud R. Roach.
The intention is to provide an excellent concert as usual.
The CI'.It. steamier Princess Maqulnna arrived from the north lasi
night and  left again  for Vancouver.
FOUND.
On  Sunday   on  Second  Avenue,  .1
dinner ring. Inquire at this office.
GOVERNMKXT WEATHER
REPORT.
furnished by  F, \V. Howling,
For 24 hours ending 5 p.m.
February  21.
Bar.  reduced to sea level. . . .L'll.llllX
i.ighest   temperature 53.0
Lowest temperature 34.0
 o	
Subscribe   for  the   Prince   Ruperl
Weekly Jburnal, $2.nn a year.
TIMBER  SALE  A 100.
Sealed tenders will be received by
the Minister of Lands nol later than
noon on the .'ith day of March, 11*14
for the purchase of Licence Xiou,
being l,146,d00 feel of timber adjoining T.I.. 33914, on the Scotia
River, Range 6, I'nasi District. 'I'll roe
years will be allowed for the removal
of the  limber.
Particulars of the chief Forester,
Victoria,   B.C. fS
Corporation of tho City
Rupert,
of   Prince
Port Edward taxation will be very
low.
Department  of Naval Service of
Canada,
Tenders will be received at noon
ou Saturday, March 21st, 1914, for
the supply of Steaming Coal to vessels lying at Prince. Rupert, B.C.
Forms of tender may be obtained
on application to the undersigned.
The lowest or any tender not
necessarily accepted.
(Sgd.)   GEO.  PHILLIPS,
Naval More Officer.
H.M.C. Dockyard, Esquimau, B.C.
William T. House
B. C. LAM) SURVEYOR
215  Second  Ave Phone  43
P   O. Box 518
Prince Rupert, B. C.
—o-
 0-
TRV A    WANT AD.
•b-.-.j   150
THE MSDKkiiE PEOPLE
fire
i |fC
e
■   'df.iit
Glasf
Employ ra' I lability
Contractors' i rsonal Bonds
Polic'cs      itten    Irect
TEXDUIt I'lll! STEKIj pipe.
Sealed tenders endorsed 'Tender
for Steel Pipe" will be received by
Hie undersigned not later than 12
noon of Saturday, 7th of March,
1914, for the supply of approximately 10,00(1 feel of 45-inch and 12,l)ii0
feet of lS-inch lapwelded steel pipe.
Specified form of tender, etc., may
he obtained at the office of City Engineer, Prince Rupert, B.C.
The council iloes nol hind itself to
accept  ihe lowest  or any tender.
ERNEST A.  WOODS,
City Clerk.
City Hall, Prince Rupert, B.C.   2tfll
SI«H>ai«HW!»«<H»l>*<H>*lJlWHW
LINDSAY'S WAGE & STORAGE
G. T.  P. CARTAGE AGENTS
331    SECOND    AVENUE
JINGLE POT COAL
is hanaled by us. All orders receive
prompt attention   Phone No. 18.
For all kinds of
- good -
Insurance
GEO. LEEK
018 Third Ave. Phone 208
Pf in c   Rupert
——■ ———
Subscribe
for the
JOURNAL
The only morning paper
in Northern B.C.
The Journal is noted for
giving the NEWS—Its
columns are exact.
Fair reports of all
gatherings and all news
subjects is its unalterable
rule.
0<»iKRKK>-»*<HWl>rrtHWl»Or^ ■ i iMhmhxkw&opooo
^7 ,-i«p«*i^a-i?'Woa»w»fli>i;)KKi:*»<i-ii
ft-       ;''■■
I  The Mack Rcai    8   is 'anceCo
P.S.i-Houii s pi     Ri ntals
fanaHttMNranua his
!.-:■   ... •■ r. ■
mm
., SASH,,DC ..
■    ■■        jr*— —•■■»
-
A  Real  Lever  Simulation
GOLD WATOH FREE.
A at™ IrIi [forward frcrtcroiis
offer (rum nn tttabllihed
firm Wo are diving away
Watches to thousand* o(
im i|i!o Ml over tho
world ui A htljru
RdvoillBcmeiit. Now
la yiur cJiarPM to
obtain onu. Write
now, t'tu'loBim; as
cent* (or on i ol oui
fashionable Iiitdlcs'
TionR Gnni.U, cr
Gcn*9' All^rt-i. Hcnt
rnrrlfiRO ptlil to wear
with Mm watch, which
will ho u ron rrni
(thou watt ■ i .-.!"
RiiarAiiteod 0 e al .
nhoiild you toko nil-
vantnu'j ol i ut n vol
lonn offer. Wo oipoct yon to toll >■■ ;;r fi nds
abtral IM and allow thorn tho beautiful ustah,
Don't Mink this oiler ton cood to l«j trn.-. hi
■"■   i   ritfl   '   lay und. i c-iti   r   Proa   Wa ri
-     I     IVIMjI ■-.-. •   A   l.i OVD,   '■ '    ■   ilo
i : . ■ -. '.'■  ' ' - I'.iiiiwftUia ltoad, Van     , S„
.     uJ
circulator  Ah^
istrict oi
0 ":   ■  '
1
v,*ge.sL
ei t
' Forn Mrcnri     ■
i
2
it
■ .
1
)T
W-o
••'
TltK.i
nn
.ii, m.iBHii "i -
 'i-ll ."d" 000
I   pund #18,000,000
meta      $175,000,000
lepartioe&t -*i Will Open nn accoud,
im   .aniidft and   Hanking  (Annuellens  Wit!   #U   j
" ,ita of tho United States £
Agents nirnoglionl (he World 2
IK '.-. WILSON, Manager  Prince Rupert Bran .1     jr,
3
09C*CWt«WKi^UlKKI««5-i;' *K««WKKHKKK>0-WH^(J 'WHKKKHKtlWHKIC0
^t^'v +* .•»»»»■»»» * .^♦..♦«>»******»****+ *t********^***^
|l  I    .,'     .   !
TAKE N01 ICK
in nn, ol iji i: ce i!ni ■     1      pa. I ui
Master Mariner, Intsli I        n
[lermisslon lo lease .no roll ivi .
scribed  land:     A    sand-bai im.
month of the Skeena River kiiui. i    9    in   troller of water rights,   Parlls
Base Flats, slaked on February  18,   n        Buildings, Victoria, B. C.
i and   containing  about   200  acres. iramn     Development    Company
H. B. BABINGTON.     j Ltd.   (Applicant).
Dated  February  IS    1914, f31 By George W, Kerr (Agent)
-
ii     1 '
e,   am
;
Ion   '■N|    ■'■   fil<
In,,   offl  '■   "I     ; '    '•' ; ;' ;    ■'
->, 1, ■ ■   1: •; Itl h   Columbia,
)■ j,  1   n    ma;   bi   tiled  with the
s   1   water    recorder or    wHh    the
UMBER
^cal Cement, Plaster and Brick
AND A COMPLETE LINE OF BUILDERS' SUPPLIES ,
WESTHOLME LUMBER CO., LTD. \
First Avenue '   Prince Rupert      Telephone t38 ;
or
tt*«lWH»aiWllKHK«H31.. 0' I iWKBHmiWKHWHWH 0 CHW«S 0 MI-iWHHHW««hKi«
STORES BUILT TO SUIT YOU
New  biisini -s block is lo be erected on
BANK OF MONTREAL PROPLRTY
Corner of Third .''.   ■
S|illi
Al'l'l.V TO Si.
. ; Fourth Street   Those wanting to rent
r)y and  lie provldrd  tur.
"\ WESTHOLME   IitMBEK   00.
1 1
ice Ruperl i.e., ■■ ipatlon
Telegraph OjierBtoi. Inti la 10 apply
for permission to urcl " Ihe following described lands: Commencing at a post planted about 40 chains
westerly following shore line and 28
chains south from 11 tree'* Which
flows into Dcndmiiii fl Inlet, at tlic
sotttli-eaeterly end tlieiei'f, said po-t
being about 20 chains south of the
iiorili-wost corner of application to
mrchase No. 32280, being lingatei-
(,l survey lot 214S; thence South
I i-liains, thence eust 40 chains,
'hence north 40 chains, thence west
in chains to this po»l, contalnlg
'00 acres.
LEO WAIT, 11
oitod 1st S01 tomhor, 1918.
V
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********* A ♦■*■*■*-*■*■+»•< *'«
jKHWHKHKBWKHKKWW )   *t*W wOMXW&WaQWWQ^^
TitV  A    \\A\i  All.
' HI.
I.N
it OF an   11
1   .1   ill.;  1
tlflui ti
■1   Lol  29A   Range
1, Coai
NO'J
m:hv GIVEN that
It Is .1
in issue, al the e\-
plrauo
iilh after the flrn
1 ,:>,-    ■
•   .if, a duplicate   of
the ■.
title  to the aboic-
mem
.11  the    oatne   oi
John v   .
Company, Limited,
. :.i      • in
to of   title    Ik  dated
7 th   la
.il numbered 28029-
c.
•11. F. MacLeod,"
District Reglstrai
:,ai. 1 ;
tfice, Prime Ruiiert,
Ojc,     ■ . ,.
82,  1913,           Ja28t28
WAN
lion as stenographer,
!"'
experience.   Box 48*.
Fertile, n
C   lessio L, Pobson  Jalt PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Sunday,   February   22, 1914.
\
\  25   Per   Cent, to 50   Per   Cent.   Off      25   Per   Cent, to 50   Per   Cent.   Off       -^   Per   Cent, to 50   Per   Cent.   Off      25   Per   CeJit. to 50   Per   Cent.   Off     2.% Per   Oent, to 50   Per   Cent.   Off
GREAT DISCOUNT SALE!
High Class Jewelry
Beginning Wednesday, February 11th
We shall hold our first Discount Sale, and it is going to be a real one. We require the money as well
as the space for incoming stocks in preparation for the larger business that will be here with the linking
of the Transcontinental.   We are going to offer the most phenominal bargains ever known in the city.
hd
a
0
&
3
o
15
I
Our entire stock consisting of Diamonds, Jewelry, Sterling Silver, Silver Plate, Cut
Glass, Clocks, Souvenir Goods, Etc., is at your disposal for the next twenty days
Do not overlook this opportunity to secure high grade goods while selling at such
an extremely low figure.   Everything goes regardless of cost.
Corner of 2nd Ave
and Sixth Street
R. W. CAMERON
Corner of 2nd Ave
and Sixth Street
il
I
9
8
J
o
3
25   Per   Ceo*, to 50   Per   Cent.   Off      25   Per   Cent, to 50  Per  Cent.   Off      25   Per   Cent, to 50   Per  Cent.   Off       25   Per   Oent. to 50  Per   Cent.   Off       25   Per   Cent, to 50  Per   Cent.   Off
REPRESENTATION
IN PARLIAMENT
HOW THK NEW IIFDI.STI.H.l TIOV
1111,1.  Ull.l, AFFECT Till:
COUNTRY.
Tiie Altering  of the  Poller  to West
Is to He More
Evident.
Tim Redistribution Bill which
Premier Borden introduced In Parliament last week, the fifth since
Confederation, 1867, is an important
And far-reaching measure. A consideration of the changes made in Canada's representation by this bill
gives one an interesting sidelight
upon the nature of Canada's
growl h.
When the first. Parliament of Canada met in 1867, Ontario had 82
members, Nova Scotia 19, and New
Brunswick 15. Other provinces
came in later. Manitoba's original
representation was 4 members, British Columbia s 6, Prince Edward Island 8, v.hile Alberta and Saskatchewan were included with what Is now
the Northwest Territories, under
that name, with 1 members.
Ontario secured her greatest representation by the Redistribution    bill
of 1802-3, which gave her 92 members iii Ottawa, Nova acotla hud
then 20, Now Brunswick it. und
Pi nee Edward Island .".. At this
liuic Eastern Canada had attained
the zenith iii ns power Iu Parliament. Prom then on, the policy of
securing s vai i liumlgrai Ion ivai to
populate the Wei tern porl Ion ol the
Dominion al a pace faster than the
k.-i could stand. In succeeding redistribution bills one finds Ontario,
Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and
Prince Edward Island lulling behind. Today by the bill just introduced by Mr. Borden, Ontario returns to 82 members, which was her
representation in Parliament In
1867.
The contrast between East and
West in the matter Of growth of
population is shown by comparing
the figures for Nova Scotia, on the
Atlantic, an original member of
Confederation, and Manitoba, which
was one of the first Western provinces to Join. Manitoba came Into
the union during the fourth session
of tiie first Parliament of   Canada,
and was given four members. Af
that time, Nova Scotia reached her
greatest representation to date,
with 21 members, while -Manitoba
had her original 1. By the Representation Act of 1S02-3, Nova Scotia
dropped one member and Manitoba
gained three. Ten years later, Nova
Scotia had dropped two more members, making her total IS., while
Manitoba had gained three more,
making her total 10. By the Redistribution Bill now before Parliament. N'ova Scotia loses two more,
making her total 16, while Manitoba
gains 6, leaving her just one behind
her Easlern  rival.
Saskatchewan entered Confederation in 1905 with ten members,
when Nova Scotia had 18. By the
present Redistribution Bill, Saskatchewan catches Nova Scotia in the
race, gaining six where the Atlantic
Toast province loses two.
Taking four Eastern and  Western
provinces  we find according to comparison   of    the    Redistribution    of
1003 and of 1014 that in ten years
Ontario,     Nova  Scotia, New    Brunswick  and   Prince  Edward     Island —
counting the latter with  four mem-
I bers, although  a reduction of    this
Iciiiit    members,    while    Manitoba,
Saskatchewan, Alberta and    British
'Columbia hare gained twenty-two.
The change in  the character, or
mature of Parliament as a resull of
th" new Redistribution    Kill should
'be marked.   The mosl obvious   and
natural i hange is a more radical at-
tltude as a resuli  of the    Infusion
of -I'litinietii     iu contrast with    the
traditional conservative outlook    of
the East. Thai there shall be In fti-
I ture,   however,  a   larger  outlet     for
I Western opinion in  Parliament  is a
good  thing for the country ou the
: whole,   ii  means that  the Canadian
people  will   be  In  a   better  position
to settle down    solidly  Into an  intelligent appreciation of their national heritage and  East and  West may
teni|ier    their    ideas    of     sectional
! rights   by  a   better  reminder  of  the
I proportion  of  sectional  claims.
PANAMA CANAL
AND COAST
HOW TRADE Wli.l, BE AFFECTED
BV OPENING OF THAT
AVENUE.
New V'oi'k Writer on the Situation ns
It Appeals to the
Pacific.
Christian Science Meetings.
Tbeso meetings are held in the
Hays Block, Second Avenue. Sunday
service at 7:30 p.m. Sunday School
meets in the afternoon at 2:30.
Testimony meetings Wednesday at
8 p.m Reading room is open every
day from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m., except
Sundays and legal holidays.
Some of those who are of executive authority iu the Canadian transcontinental railroads have recently-
been in New York and have spoken
with apparent sincerity aud with
something of courage of conditions
which prevail, as they say, in Western Canada and in the vicinity of
Puget Sound, says a correspondent
of the Montreal Mail in New York.
They have been iiersuaded to make
these statements because they are
confident that the opening of the
Panama Canal to navigation is to be
of great commercial benefit to Western Canada. The stimulus which the
canal will give to a certain trade
furnished by Western Canada will
produce results that will go far toward offsetting the somewhat tic-
pressing conditions tliar, now exist
in that portion of the Doiuinlou.
it was a very high authority of
the Canadian Pacific Railroad who
stated  a  day   or  two ago  thai   there
is no i|iiesiiiin about the depressing
conditions Unit prevail in pans of
the Dominion and especially ihe
vicinity nt Pugel sound. Vancouver
has felt this perhaps more than
an) of tho oilier communities in that
region.
Bul, according to this authority,
the condition is no more than a
reaction from excessive speculation
in land. The people who live in
those parts and who were inspired
by enthusiasm as they forecast their
future began land speculations wholly in good faith, believing that the
great emigration from the United
States to Canada would continue in
volume and that the completion of
tne Grand Trunk Pacific Railway to
the Pacific Coast would greatly
stimulate emigration from this country, and thereby Canadian development. But these people made the
mistake of discounting the future
too rapidly. Their presenl condition
will find abundant precedent in the
land speculations which occur m
many parts of the remote west. A
few years of rest, of awaiting normal development, will bring about
a new and healthy reaction and it
is for this reason that the experienced railway managers of Canada
do not regard with any great apprehension the depression which they
now   frankly   admit   does   prevail.
They are inclined to think, however, with the opening of the Panama Canal to navigation, preceded
as this event is by the enactment of
the new tariff law, there will speedily be created an enormous commerce from the Puget Sound region,
from Vancouver and from western
parts of the Dominion which will
be carried through the canai to the
markets of the eastern and central
parts of the United btates. There
are some American citizens who are
the owners of great tracts of timber
lands in Western Canada. The new-
tariff law which permits lumber
to be exported without duty and the
uew opening of the Panama Canal to
navigation will, in the opinion, of
these owners of timber lands and of
the Canadian railroad officers, lead
to a very great development of the
limber industry in Western Canada
and  Iu  Vancouver.
Tills may mean a revolution In
building operations In the eastern
half of the United States. Competent
authorities in New York say thai
one of the reasons why iron, brick
and concrete now supplant, timber to
so great an extent In building construction is due to the fact that they
are cheaper materials. Those who
are interested in the timber lands
of the Pugel Sound region even as
far north as the Alaska boundaries
are persuaded that the low cost for
transportation of timber from these
parts to the eastern coast of the
United States by way of the Panama
Canal and the fact that the timber
or lumber will be marketed here free
of duty will make it. possible to
furnish effective competition with
iron and brick and concrete for
building construction in the eastern
half of the United  States.
The timber supplies in that region
are enormous and climatic conditions are such as to make it possible to cut cheaply and put into
marketable condition the timber
which grows there.
COUNTRY THAT
BORDERS GXP
WELL-KNOWN   IWK'i)   GIVES IMPRESSIONS    OF    TERRITORY
ALONG   MM-:.
A Great Milling Area    Exist.*—Will
Be Opened l'p Almost    ,
At Once.
VV. P. Hinton. general passenger
agent of the Grand Trunk Pacific;
A. E. Rosevear, general freight
agent; S. T. St. John, manager of
the Transcontinental Townsite Company, and George Hartford, of the
Inter-Ocean, Chicago, recently returned from Prince George and Willow River, B.C.
Mr. St. .fohu and Mr. Hartford
were looking over the country traversed by the new line, particularly
Willow River, which townsite was
sold by Mr. St. John's company last
year. Willow River is a railway
townsite at. the junction of three
rivers, the Eraser, Willow and Sal-
tnou, about twenty miles northwest
of Prince George, and the centre of
a district rich In natural resources.
On the Willow River it is estimated
there Is enough potential electric
energy to supply several cities, while
twelve miles away from the town
are vast beds of coal of good qual-
ity, also other minerals, tile district
having been for years the centre of
placer mining. On the Willow River
alone there is 9,000,000,000 feet of
timber, according to Government estimates, of size and quality equaled
only by the giant trees of the coast.
The whole district has splendid soil
and climate.
Willow River has already begun
to feel the effects of such varied resources. All the lots in the centre
of the townsite were sold to buyers
all over Canada and the United
States a few weeks after they were
offered, and Mr. St. John had to buy-
back from one purchaser and pay
$100 profit recently in order to secure a suitable lot for his own office.
Mr. Hartford, who has been with
the Chicago Inter-Ocean for the past
17 years, is going to the Windy
City to settle his affairs, and will
come back early in the spring with
two newspaper plants, one for Willow River and the other for Stuart
River, another townsite which the
company will soon put on the market. He says that Willow River has
more resources and a location far
better than any city of 100,000
population  in  the States.
"There have been thousands of
people," ne said, "in and around
Chicago who have been waiting to-'
come to Canada until the G.T.P. was
finished to Central British Columbia.
The crops you had in Canada last
season and the weather this winter
have obliterated what doubt existed
in their minds, and you will see an
unprecedented influx into the country this spring. The Transcontinental
Townsite Company, the G.T.P. and
others have done some effective advertising among the well-to-do people in the .Middle West. I beard so
much about it that tbe paper sent
me up here, but 1 am going to
come up on my own hook iu a couple
of weeks and settle in Willow River."
Bruce O'Dell, of Cadillac, Michigan, a well-known lumberman, is
also with the party, and is about
to establish and operate at Willow
Ri-.er for a Michigan concern, oue
of the largest and most modern
sawmills in the world, ft will cut
100,000 feet per ln-hour day, or
200,000 feet daily in two shifts. A.
C. Frost, the man who built the
Chicago & Milwaukee Interurban
Electric rtallway, Is also putting In
a large mill for some Vancouver
capitalists, while T. E. Haley, o'
Crosby, Minn., Is about to build a
tine modern hotel, which it Is claimed will be the finest between Edmonton and the Coast.
'There will be a city a Willow
River about next June," said Mr.
St. John. "Tiie sawmill will itself
employ about 3U0 men. It should be
the largest lumbering centre in
British Columbia, outside of Vancouver. They have the timber and
three rivers to float it down. Mr.
Haley is now arranging for the construction of his hotel." Asked as to
what towns he thought would grow
into large centres in Central British
Columbia, Mr. St. John stated that
there would be about half a dozen.
Willow River, Prince George, Stuart
River, Smithers and Prince Rupert,
and possibly Fort Fraser, Fraser
Lake and ilazelton.
'I
Port Edward  offers Ideal    Industrial sites.

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