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Prince Rupert Journal Aug 30, 1914

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▼OL. IV.
PRINCE  RUPERT.  B.C., SUNDAY,  AUGUST  30,   1914.
Price a Cents.
NO. 239.
GRAHAM ISLAND COAL
OF HIGH QUALITY
M\ Roberts, Professor In Washington
State University Speaks Of the Excellence Of Fuel Found At Camp
Wilson—Examined For Trust Co.
How The Germans Fought At Liege
The quality of coal on Graham Island is of the best, says Mr. Roberts,
who Is professor of mineralogy in
the University of Washington at Seattle. Mr. Roberts has been at Camp
Wilson, making an expert examination of the coal fields there held by
the Metropolitan Trust Company of
New York. There are thirty men at
work exploiting the field with drills
and proving the extent of the holdings.
The Metropolitan Trust Company
came into possession of the coal
fields through relations with J. A.
Moore, of Seattle, who was at the
head of the Western Steel Corporation. With the falling into their
hands of these coal holdings steps
have been taken to exploit them and
see just what there Is. That work Is
going on.
Prof. Roberts, who was in the city
yesterday when interviewed with regard to the situation said the coal
was of excellent quality. It Is bituminous in quality and cokes perfectly,
which makes it of special value for
smelters. The extent has not been
fully proved up and the company Is
not endeavoring to open the property
up in a commercial way. The Trust
Company, says Mr. Roberts, is not a
mining company. It is a financial
institution and will probably take
steps to turn over the coal fields to
some other company later on.
For the running of the diamond
drills now used there several hundred tons of the coal has been taken
out. This proves in actual use to be
of excellent quality. While drilling
the gangs have met with gas and
also oil tn small quantities. This is
of usual occurrence, but it has not
been found in quantity anywhere.
RICH ORE FOUND
NEAR SKEENA
GEO.   T.   FRYER,    AN   OLD-TIME
PROSPECTOR,   HAS    MADE
DISCOVERY.
It  Is  Supposed   That   the   Prospeel
~"" -     jggjjrTiSvelSjrtnto* Rich'
.     Mine. .
Geo. T. Fryer, an old-time prospector and mining man, recently of
Los Angeles, California, but now of
Skeena Crossing, has certainly made
good during the month he has spent
ln this district, says the Skeena
Crossing Chalcopyrlte. Two weeks
ago he went into the near-by hill.'
with a couple of Indian packers, and
after being out four or five days returned to the Crossing with twenty-
five or thirty pounds of as fine-look-
copper ore as we have seen in this
district.
This ore came from a vein which
Mr. Fryer discovered about ten
miles distant from the Crossing, in
a hitherto unprospected section
which had been previously Ignored
because it was considered to be outside the established limits of the
mineral zone.
The vein, which, like the Rocher
de Boule, is a fissure in granite, is
from four to six feet wide, and outcrops for a distance of two thousand
feet. The ore is identical in character with that of the Rocher de noulo.
vein, and Mr, Fryer declares Hint
from n surface standpoint it is the
best looking thing lie linn seen In
l!n district, lie found other showings, somewhat different In charac
tor, In the same locality, and ii.'iH
made several  local ions.
That he has much confidence i'<
this district Is demonstrated by the
fact that he has entered Into un
agreement with the owners of the
well-known Panama group, whereby
DAN DEMPSEY HAS
GONE TO P.G.E. WORK
Veteran   Railway   Construotor   Left
Yesterday  for the   South   to
Join New Service.
Dan Denipsey, well known all
along the line of the G, T. P. and
far herond, K with tho final Unking
up of that line, off to new fields. He
has joined the P. G. E. service, and
left yesterday for the south in company with J. W. Stewart to enter on
his new work.
A completed line Is not congenial
to Dan Dempsey, the fastest tracklayer on the continent. New roads
and construction work are where he
excels. After the track was laid on
the G. T. P. he for a time filled the
post of superintendent from Smithers to Fort George. The call of the
wild, however, soon got him and he
has now  left to  lay track again.
It was in the vicinity of Saskatoon
that Dan Dempsey made the record
of being the fastest track-layer in
America. There on the G-. T. P. he
laid 167 miles of line In 21 days and
S hours. In that work he did It all
from one end. The mileage included
some side-tracking, which assisted
somewhat in making such a high
score possible.
GERMAN PLANS FOR
THE PRESENT WAR
An Interesting Document Picked Up
By French Officer As Far Back
As Dec, 1913—Details As Then
Outlined Are Being Carried Out
A   remarkable  document,  showing | ful   gold  letters  there  was  Inscribed
After many futile assaults on the Liege fortifications the German
army now digs trenches for the protection of their infantry. This method of fighting has somewhat retarded their advance.
WAS SURPRISED
AT THE PROSPECT
MR. BLOW, OF WINNIPEG, NEVER
EXPECTED TO FIND SUCH
A COUNTRY.
He  Was  Astonished   at   the   Open
Character of Country Along' the
G. T. P.
he Is to do a certain amount of development work for un interest there/
in.
The Panama group is adjoined on
the north by the Red Robo group
which is now being negotiated for
by English capitalists.
Mr, Fryer has already begun operations and lias several men mi tho
Iground, building a cabin and doing
other preliminary work.
Mr. Blow, who represents the
Western Associated Press as well as
several papers, including the Winnipeg Free Press, and who is now in
the city, expressed his surprise yesterday at wha* he had seen along the
line of the G. T. P. He had expected
when lie came through the gateway
to British Columbia at Yellowhead
Pass to come into a rocky territory
that would be forbidding to everyone but the miner and the sightseer. Instead of that, Mr. Blow
found a great plain of farming land
stretching miles and miles in extent
and capable of supporting a vast
population, The future of the coun-
Contlnned on Page Four.
—i o	
LOCAL REGIMENT
START DRILLING
BRITISH FLEET
SCORED SUCCESS
CLEVER   WORK   DONE  IN SEOUR.
ING GERMAN SHIPS UNDER
FORTRESS  GUNS.
Three Cruisers und Two   Destroyers
Wiped Out in the
Attack.
THOSE   WHO   HAVE   HANDED    IN
NAMES WILL  PARADE ON
MONDAY   NIGHT.
An Ex-Sergt.-Mnjor of the   Famous
Innlsklllen  Fusiliers Will  Act
ns   Instructor.
The loiai amount of coal exported
from the United .Kingdom in 1912
and 1913 were (14,444,395 tons and
73,400,118  tons,  respectively.
LOW PRICED JEWELLERY
To clear out the entire stock of jewellery in our store we offer
unprecedented bargains for th* next ten days. Everything must go
Including High-class Cutlery, Silverware and Diamonds. Sold at
your own price.
Auction sales commence Monday at 2:30 In the afternoon and
7^30   ln  the  evening.
HERMAN'S JEWELLERY Hurt Block, 3rd Ave. and 5th St.
On Monday evening the local regl-
lenl which !s in course of formation here «ill Btarl drilling, .'. paradi
Una been called for thai evening al
the linviTiinii'iit .lock, tvhen thosi
who have banded In their names «ill
i . iblc ninl a Btarl in drilling will
in- made.
Thi re have been a good numboi
of enlistments of men who are
anxious to serve and who are rery
desirous of getting started at once
in drill. A late member who bus
joined Is Henry Lee, who served for
21 years In the Twenty-seventh In-
niskillen Fusiliers, one of the
famous regiments of the line. He
was sergeant-major In his regiment
and will undertake the work of drill
instructor,
There are many others who have
had long records with regiments of
the line and well-known militia battalions who have also joined and
will lend every assistance to make
the local body a worthy one.
London, Aug. 29.—A British cruiser arrived today in the Nore with
two hundred German prisoners taken
from the cruiser Mainz, one of those
sunk ha the sea fight at Cuxhaven.
The Chronicle says this battle was
a glorious victory for the British
fleet, with all the courage and fearless enterprise which distinguished
our old officers. Vice-Admiral Beatty
and Rear-Admirals Christian and
Moore conducted the combined operations right under Heligoland,
where the enemy has all its strength
at its command.
The triumph was complete. The
German light cruisers Mainz, anothei
of the Koln class, and a third of unknown name, were destroyed as well
as two destroyers. It was complete as
o victory. The British suffered little
All our ships are afloat and in good
order.
We must officially note Hie high
efficiency uf our gunnery. Not a German cruiser escaped. Their destroyers scattered wildly to shelter.
The importance of this daring rnii!
is the fact that the British Heel
passed behind the German heavll)
armed outpost nf Heligoland Island
and engaged tin- German Heel guard
Ing tin- mouth of the Elbe -ii tin en
Itrancc uf ihe Kaiser Wllholm Canal
Oil'    III   llll'    I'll.III.
Ni ;; McKen :1 i, .i brotliei n I
nf Dan sn wart, formerly ol i
cltj. lefl lai i i renins on his was li
Scotland, where he will join lilt
former regiment, and, as he hopes
get iii the fronl In tho war. Mr. Mr-
Kenzie is a stalwart specimen of
manhood, In ihe prime of youth. Me
bus been engaged in the contracts
held by the Stewart Brothers on the
lino of the O. T. P.
 —0	
The Prince Rupert Weekly Journal
52 a year.
all the German military plans and
purporting to outline all the future
operations of Germany, fell by accident into the hands of the French
government as long ago as December
1913, according to an article in the
French military paper, The Journal
des Sciences Militaires, published
last February. There is a possibility
that the document was "planted"
by Germans, but practically all the
plans materialized in the last feu
weeks coincided with the statements
of the documents. The documents
contained a prophecy of practically
every movement made by Germany
so far, as well as an accurate fore-
■ast of every step taken so far by
each of the nations against her. The
author of this article in The Journal
des Sciences Militaires, who transcribed verbatim the contents of th |
document he found, entitled it: "The
German Concentration, According to
a Document Found in a Railroad
Compartment,    faithfully   translated
by  ."
He tells that on November IB
1913, he was returning from Central
Germany, and without having the
necessary passports from a German
military authority or any permit
from  the French   Minister   of  War,
on tiie inside of the portfolio: 'inspector of the Seventh Army Head-*
quarters at Strassburg-on-Main,' Besides, it was impossible not to bd
struck by tlie military form of the
document by chance put into my
hand. Its resemblance with the celebrated memoirs compiled before the
war of 1870 by Marshal von Moltke
is so complete that it attains in certain parts like identity. For ail who
know the traditional spirit of the
great neighbor state of Berlin, this
circumstance offered a new guarantee
for the official origin of the document herewith translated."
The document, itself takes up
twenty-two closely printed pages of
the Journal. Here is the translation
in part:
"War plan of the German Empire—International complications Te
to be foreseen In the near future
They lead up to and recur to oui
sole decisive argument; otirj resources of diplomacy are exhausted
—war.
"The crigin of the differenies between nations will be in the Orient,
where Russia has prlmoral interest,
Possibly she will proceed to first
armaments. As soon as these appear
disquieting that will be the moment
ll
,   , ....       ,! to  declare-war on  France.   It  is not
boarded a night  train at Strassburg
,     , ,,, ,.    „     „     _    ,,     necessary to recoil before thenppear-
for Lunevllle, on the Moselle. Real!/- i   .
ing thai it was forbidden for anyone
connected with the French army to
remain even a minute in that part
of the German empire,, and  troubled
anco of aggression, for we ran be
sure the preparations of Russia
would not be effected if the twe
powers allied were not decided on a
by the thought of arrest if lie should ,common offensive. France, lo whose
be discovered, he remained quiet in iInterests tl,is w("ll(i "*, *»' simply
the darkest corner of the compart-10lloW Rufisla ""le (0 ,"'°":lre ,ier-
ment. j3elf'
Just after the train left Strass-' "'" "'nkinS ,var °" RllSS,a We
burg, he said, he suddenly saw In must expect f0 "rovokp ***'a«<l.
the far corner of the compartment/a Tl" now we always C0llnted on Au's"
biack Morocco case. There was no trla agaInst *u9sia' lM" «"'s support
other passenger In the compartment t0(lay is weak8n«d' Roumania, Ser-
Evidently the case had been iefl by via' Gre(,''e 8dd M°ntenegro will be
a passenger alighting at. Strassburg, leasued aga,nst °"r ally' and ,ho"sh
The Frenchman picked up the case ""'"' may "° ,,''lli"1"''1 «y Bulgaria
an imposing receptacle, circled with and Turkey' whnse governments are
a band of copper and locked with a a"ie(1 t0 tne Tri,,1<' Alli;ln,'('' we ">"st
copper buckle. He intended at flrsl count °" pos8,ble l'"li'«llinl ln,er-
to hand it over to the employ.,., of runtlon """ m» al Ip,'s, Paralyse
military aspect on guard on the ,"P Austria» for,'ps- P™d«»W '"-der*
train, but a thought of his own "s ,n roly in "" w:iy °" Aurtrta'i
Plight if he were questioned and ,>f""',ivc sunport ;" "IP b*&™1™-
fniind "obliged to decline to toll his "Ak f<"' Italy, one musl nol expect,
surname, Christian name, or other "' In every coalition, that which is
qualities," made him resolve to kef>i nol ln the advantage of the con-
the case if ti r it he gol safelj to trading party.
France, when he trusted he could "Reftecl on 'he attachments to
discover from the contents whi wan England, the danger of liei Heel In
the owner anil send II back I i  Mediterranean with the combined
"I    was   Btupefled,"    he    writes   naval forces of England and France
"when on passing the frontier I dls   all of which will make H profitable
i    . red i"'- doi uments w lib ill     I for the Hon     of Savoy to draw I
. revvltli Iran ilati <'   i(    u Inl - a  beni volenl  noutralltj  oi
coiKicKHJo^Ki-riciiKiOOOooois-ocaooooiwonoooooaooooocor
g
NOTICE!
LACK OF NEWS.
-    *i&    ^
Owing
war    nc
scanty
ALL THOSE APPLYING
NEW REGIMENT FnliVIV
DRILL AT TH'
I'll It
k Sunday, August 30, 1914.
PRINCE   RUPERT   JOURNAL
d
prince Bupcr* journal
Telephone  138
O. ii. NELSON, Editor.
Office: 128 Third Avenue East,
ar McBride Street. Telej.hone 13S.
ostoffice Box  607.
DAILY  EDITION.
Publishel    every mornlug    except
4onday.  Delivered by carrier In the
tlty at the following ra j, If paid in
tdvanc:: —
One  '-ear $5.00
Six  Months $2.50
Three   Months $1.25
One   Month $0.50
WEEKLY EDITION.
Pul-'ished e\ ry 'Frld v for circulation outside the City of Prince
Rupert at $2.00 a year, addressed to
points m Canada; or $3.00 ., year to
all points In the United Kingdom,
tbe United States or other foreign
countries.
Advertising Rates Upon Application.
.Sunday, August 3n, 1914.
| Correspondence I
ovoooo<haooaotOiioo#ootooooH!f&o
A   FLAT    DENIAL.
To the Editor:
The statement published by \V. S.
Fisher this afternoon that Mr. McMullln had made efforts to get me
in stand aside as commanding offlcei
|of the regiment here is an unqualified falsehood.
I certainly offered to stand aside
in favor ui llr, McMullln when first
appointed, but he absolctely refused
id accede to that. He has never suggested 11 since, but has, on the olhei
hand, been most loyal m me in every
way.
Vuiirs  truly,
('. W. PECK.
 o	
WHAT IS Till-: MEANING
OF  "MORATORIUM"?
WANTED—A   NAME.
The Sew York Herald asks: By
what name will this war be identi
fled  in history?
We are now using the rather loose
appellation "The European War"
for want of something better, and because to us on this side of the Atlantic all Europe seems in conflict
But all Europe is not involved, and
each nation of Europe sees it from
a different viewpoint.
If the Kaiser has struck the keynote of German thought it will appear in German eyes the War for
National Preservation. To Belgium
It is clearly the War of German Invasion. To Austria it is the War
against Servia and Russia. To Russia it is the War against Germany
and Austria. To England it is the
War with Germany, Austria being
left out of it. To France it is so fai
only the War with Germany. To
Servla it is only the War against
Austria.
Had Italy met the demands of
Germany and Austria it might have
been the War between the Triple
Alliance and the Triple Entente, but
without Italy there is no Triple Alliance.
THE LOCAL REGIMENT.
A local citizen, W. S. Fisher
speaking, we presume from the tone
of his letter, for afjout three othei
ex-militia officers in the city, has at
considerable length undertaken to
explain that he feels aggrieved because the militia authorities did not
call upon him to form a regiment
here. The evident intention of these
men, from the tone of the letter, is
to insist upon the resignation of C
W. Peck to whom has been committed the task of forming a regiment
by the Adjutant-General. The penalty which the Empire will have to pay-
should Mr. Peck not accede is lo be
that these men will not serve In the
battalion.
We fee! that the course that this
little band may take in the matter
will not affect the Department. The
regiment will be organized just the
same, these men being at perfect
liberty under the volunteer system
of service In ihis country to sit on
the fence and make feces as the regl-
The word "moratorium," appearing repeatedly now In discussing tlie
International credit, has a simpler
meaning iban its length and verbal
structure might imply. If it carried
no meaning to the average layman
he need not feel chagrined. There
are bankers and brokers, we venture
to affirm, who have had their first
lesson in its meaning of late. And
this for a very simple reason. Only
on extraordinary occasions do states
resort to a "moratorium" that is, to
an emergency legislative act on
executive decree suspending ordinary
provisions of law relative to payment of indebtedness. When a government, acting for the welfare of its
subjects and in obedience to the
soundest advice it can get, decides
o delay or rather to postpone the
date when commercial obligations
must be met according to customary
rules of honor and of law, it does it
in conformity with a higher law of
conservation arising from the need of
the hour, if the structure of the
credit is to be upheld.
Once the exigency passes"and the
courts, national and international,
come to review proceedings taken
i under monetary laws, they usually
are deemed valid. Arbitrary they
may be, but having a constructive
purpose and a general application to
all debtors and creditors caring to
take advantage of them, they serve
their end in the realm of "high
finance," using that expression in
the best sense of that term.—Ex.
Skeena Land  District — District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Wilfred C.
Macdonald, of Prince Rupert, B.C.,
occupation Prospector, intends to apply for permission to prospect for
'oal and petroleum over the following described lands: Commencing at
a post planted about six miles east
and two miles north of the northeast
corner of C.L. 0484, thence south
80 chains, theuce east SO chains,
ti.ence north 80 chains, thence wesl
So chains to point of commencement
containing 640 acres more or less,
ami    WILFRED C. MACDONALD.
Date   located   June  12,   1914.
Phone 300 F. O. Box 1635
Harrison W. Rogers
ARCHITEC1
Suite 1
Federal Bldg        Prince Rupert, B.C.
II
Engines   lnsla.red   and General
Repairs
Oxy-Acetylene  Plant   in   Connection
Phone lied  ISO Third Avenue
Skeena   Land   District — District  of   .
Queen Charlotte islands.
TAKE NOTICE that 00 days after
date I Intend to apply to the Chief
-I
Commissioner of Lands for a licence:
to prospect for coal, petroleum aud
natural gas as follows: Commencing
al  a post  planted at   the   northeast!
corner of Lot 4 Moresby Island aud j
marked    A.J.G.'s    southeast    corner i
thence north SO chains, thence west
SO  chains,  thence south   80  chains, j
theuce   easl   8(1   chains   to   point   of
commencement.  Located June 22nd,j
1914.
A.   J.   GORDON,   Locator.
au-2 A. Cromp, Agent.
J. H. HILDITCH
Contractor and Buildei
Estimates given  on  nil  classes ol
work, whether small or large.   Pet<
tonal attention given to every Item
PHONE GREEN 321
FREDERICK PETERS, K.C.
■tn'Ster, Solicitor and Notary Pubic-
Skeena Land District — District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that 60 days after
date I intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a licence
to prospect for coal, petroleum and
natural gas as follows: Commencing
at a post planted at the southeast
corner ef Lot 4 Moresby Island and
marked A.J.G.'s northwest corner;
thence south 80 chains, thence east
80 chains, thence north 80 chains,
thenee west 80 chains to point of
commencement. Located June 22,
1914.
A.   J.   GORDON,   Locator.
au2 A. Cromp, Agent.
Skeena Land District — District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Thomas P.
O'Farrell, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation Miner, intends to apply for
permission to prospect for coal aud
petroleum over the following described lands: Commencing at a post
planted 40 chains north of the S.W.
cor. Lot 2451, thence west 160
chains, thence south 40 chains,
thence east 160 chains, thence north
40 chains to point of commencement,
containing 640 acres more or less.
THOMAS   P.   O'FARRELL.
Agent, William Porteous Sloan.
Date located  3rd June,  1914.    jy31
Office m
EXCHANGE  BLOCK
DR. GILROY, DENTIST
Crown and Bridge Work a
Specialty
Office: Smith Blk., Third Avenne
J.   W,   POWER.   L.R.I.B.A.
ARCHITECT     AND   STRUCTURAL
ENGINEER
Re-inforced Concrete a Specialty
P. O.  Boi 271
A. FAULDS, Ml MJE.
Consulting Mining Engineer
Examinations  and   development    of
Oral, Metal, Oil, etc.
709 Dnnsmuir St.       Vancouver, EC.
Skeena  Land  District  —  District  of
Coast — Range 6,
TAKE   NOTICE  that   II.    Bell-Irving A Co., Ltd., of Vancouver, R.C.,
occupation   Salmon   Canners,    intend
,,,,., to apply for permission  to   purchase
'"  ""     -■ and "v"n "•"' Holes j,,,,, 'fniiowlng described   lands:   Com-
menclng at a post planted nt high
water on easterly side of He Horsey
Island nnd about two miles In a
north-easterly  direction   from    Parry
Skeena Land District — District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Wilfred C.
MacDonald, of Prince Rupert, B.C.,
occupation Prospector, Intends to apply for permission to prospect for
coal and petroleum over the following described lands: Naden Harbor,
Graham Island, commencing at a
post planted at the south-west corner of S.T.L. 2551, thence south 80
chains, thence east SO chains, thence
north 80 chains, thence west 80
chains to point of commencement,
containing 640 acres more or less.
WILFRED C. MACDONALD.
mm*!, ..iuw——
HAYNER BROS
I'lonee." Funeral Director.* and
Kliilmliucr* Ojmmi Day and
Night.     Ladles'    Assistant    ii>
A Uendmice
PHONE 86.    713 THIRD AVE.
Skeena Land  District •— District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Wilfred C.
Macdonald, of Prince Rupert, B.C.,
occupation Prospector, intends to apply for permission to prospect for
coal and petroleum over the following described lands: Commencing at
a post planted about six miles east
of the northeast corner of C.L. 9484,
thence south 80 chains, thence east
80 chains, thence north 80 chains,
thence west 80 chains to point of
commencement, containing 640 acres
more or less.
au6    WILFRED C. MACDONALD.
Date located June 12,  1914.
—THE—
Union Transfer Co.
GENERAL TRANSFER AND   0»AL
We  carry the   ROYAL   MAIL   and
meet all boats and trains.   We
are the only outut in town
that    give    day    and
night  service.
Office Phone 86 Rea. Phone 110
William T. House
B. C. LAND SURVEYOR
215 Second Ave. Phone 43
P. O. Box 518
Prince Rupert, B. C.
G.T.P. S.S. SAILINGS
TO VANCOIA ER AND VICTORIA, mpltlng oon-
uections for Seattle, Tuesday    9    p.m.,    September 1, 15, etc.
TO MASSET,   ETC., August 26,   September   9
etc.,  10- p.m.
T<)  SKIDEGATE,   QUEEN  CHARLOTTE  CITY,   ETC.,  August  27
September 10, etc., 10 p.m.
TO GRANBY AND   STEWART—Monday, August   21,    und    ever,-
week    thereafter.
Passenger  trains    leave   Prince   Rupert,   easlhoiiiul,   on    Mondays,
Wednesdays and  Saturdays at   10 a.m.;   returning, arrive   Prince
Rupert on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Sundays at 5:15 p.m.
L'se the Grand  Trunk  Railway System  for points east of   Chicago
the   Double-track   Route.
ALBERT DAVIDSON'     General   Agent
The G.T.P. Ticket Office, Phone 260
AGENCY   ALL   ATLANTIC   STEAMSHIP   LINES.
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Canadian Pacific Railway
SUMMER EXCURSIONS! SUMMER EXCURSIONS!
Prince Rupert io Montreal and   return $141.00
Toronto "     128.00
St. Paul "       96.00
Chicago "     198.50
New York        "     144.50
Other points correspondingly low. Effective June 1,    final    return
limit October 31. i
"PRINCESS   ROYAL" Southbound, 8 p.m., Sunday,
J. G. MoNAB, General Agent, cor. Third Ave. and   Fourth Street
MHMMHtHMHMHKHeHMHOHHH^^
THE UNION STEAMSHIP CO. OF B.C. LTD' "
S.S. VENTURE .
Sails for Port Simpson, Mil   Bay, Naas River,   Thursdays;    for   ) I
Vancouver,  'Victoria, fieaittle, every  Friday at 4 p.m.
11
il
S.S. CHELOHSIN
Sails  for Granby Bay, Naas River, Sunday midnight;   for Vancouver, Victoria.i Seattle every Tuesday 9 p.m.
Phone 588 JOHN BARNSLEY, Aasnt.
Agency   American E press, Atlantic   Steamers
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Skeena Land District — District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Wilfred C.
Macdonald, of Prince Rupert, B.C.,
occupation Prospector, intends to apply for permission to prospect for
coal and petroleum ove- the following described lands: Commencing at
a post planted about five miles east
of the southeast corner of Lot 2438,
thence north SO chains, thence east
SO chains, thenee south 80 chains,
thence west 80 chains to point of
commencement, containing 640 acres
more or less.
IU8     WILFRED C. MACDONALD.
Date located  Juno 9,  1914.
P. O. Box 17-14 Telephone 448
RITCHIE,   AGNEW   &   CO.
Olvil Engineers and Surveyors
Prince   Rupert, B.O.
,'»terwoi*8, Water   Power,    Wharf
Oenetrnctien, Reports, Plans, Dominion and Provincial Land Surveying,
Electric Bine Printing, Negatives and
Wnlte Prims
JANES GILMORE
ARCHITECT
Second Ave. Near McBride St.
The Queen Charlotte
Oil Fields Limited
olllce  will open today  in Law-Butler
Building   for sale of a   limited
iiiniin.i of treasury stock
OEO.   F.   MACDONALD,    Sec.-Treas.
OCEAN FISH CO.
Fresh Fish Arriving Kvery Day
Outside Ordeie Promptly Attended To
Phone: BLUE 250
60  YEARS'
,  ,—i JnuraL   Term lot
TV, po«we miMd.   Hold br
MUhsuMkaa    I
' rBuw—tteaT
LUMBER
SHINGLES, MOULDINGS, SASH, DOORS
Prince Rupert Lumber Co.
FHJHT AVE. AND McBRHJB ST. PRINCE RUPERT
Phone 25 Branch Yard at Smithers, B.C.
MMIMIlHIiEHHHiMilE^iVba
OWKHHHWOHKHKHKHWWHKHWKHW
Royal Bank of Canada
HEAD  OFFICE:   MONTREAL ESTABLISHED 1800
Capital    $ 11,500,000
Reserved  Fund $ 12,500,000
Total    Assets $185,000,000
Savings   Bank   Depart ncnt—$1 will open an acaonnt
Brunches Throughout  Canada and Banking Connections With   All
Parts of tho United States Agents Throughout the World.
H. P. WILSON, Manager       - • Prince  Rupert  Brunch
«!H«HCWHHKHIHHHW«WSH»WWK^
CLEAN UP AND PAINT UP NOW
O-CEDAR   MOPS,   O-CEDAR MOP  POLISH
ALABASTINE SANITARY WALL COATING
WATER HOSE, GARDEN TOOLS, WATERING CANS
MARTIN-SENOUR    100  PER CENT.   PURE  PAINT
PAINT BRUSHES, LAWN MOWERS AND GRASS SHEARS
0ARPBT BEATERS, GARBAGE PAILS
WINEOW SCREENS, SCREEN DOORS
—AT   THE—
KAIEN HARDWARE CO., eos Third a*.
tt-tttt—"■ ■■«■■■ | rtan<n«<nnnnniinaiwMM»wm
Prince Rupert Transfer Co
Coal, Furniture Moving, Baggage
and Heavy Teaming
OEoe  tad lUaldamce:
i«0"    THIRD    AVE.
I W. J. CRAWFORD, Manager
I PHONE 566 Sunday, August 30, 1914.
<3RERIDAN ON
GERMAN ARMY
HOW   CONFEDERATE   AMERICAN
GENERAL    VIEWED   THE
FORCES YF.AHS Alio.
He Did Not Hold the Kaiser's Army
In Such   iti:-.11   Esteem
Then.
Among Hie critical spectators oi
the last Franco-Prussian war was
General Phil Sheridan, who wan with
the German headquarters staff, ami
whose memoirs contain some vary In
teresting passages relating In his cs
perlences. Sheridan, of course, was
primarily a cavalry leader, hut be
was also one of the most scientific
soldiers of his lime, and the comments he made upon the German
army on the last occasion it, took the
field against an enemy are of par
ticular interest at the present time.
German organization and superiority
of numbers, and French unprepared-
ness and the blunders of her officers
were, in his opinion, the reasons for
the defeat of the French armies. The
Prussians did not show that they
were supermen. Sheridan says that
his own American troops would have
done just as well as the Germans in
the same conditions, but he expressed doubt if the Germans wiould have
done as well as the Americans did
had they to contend against the conditions that prevailed throughout the
Civil War.
"Of course," he says, "I found a
good deal to interest and instruct
me, yet nowadays war is pretty much
the same everywhere, and this one
offered no marked exception to my
previous experience. . . . Following the operations of the German
armies from the battle of Gravelotte
to the siege of Paris, I may, in conclusion, say that I saw no new military principle developed, whether of
strategy or grand tactics, the movements of the different armies and
corps being dictated and governed
by the same general laws that have
so long obtained, simplicity of combination and manoeuvre, and the concentration of a numerically superior
force at the vital point." In other
words, the German generals, able as
they were, and fresh from their experience against Austria, failed to develop anything new In the handling
of troops that was not known to t
general whose whole experience had
been  gained  in  the  United    States.
They invented nothing, improved
nothing, and their victories were due
wholly to the previous organizing
genius of Moltke, the incredible
blunders of their adversaries, and
their overwhelming superiority in
numbers.
Of the Prussian Infantry, Sheridan
says:
"The Infantry was as line as I
ever saw, the men young and hardy
in appearance, and marching always
uiih an elastic stride. The Infantry'
regiment, liowever, I thought too
large too many men for a colonel
In command, unless he has the staff
of a general— but this objection may
be counterbalanced by the advantages resulting from associating together thus Intimately the men from
the same district or counly, as we
would call it; the celerity of mobilization and, in truth, the very foundation of the German system being
based on this local or territorial
scheme of recruiting. There was no
delay when the call sounded for Ihe
march; all turned out promptly, and
while on the road there was very
little straggling, only the sick fallinr
out. But on such fine, smooth roads
and with success animating the men
from the day they struck the first
blow, It could hardly be expected
that the columns would not keep
veil closed up. Then, too, it must be
borne in mind that, as already^tated
campaigning in France—that is the
marching, camping and subsisting of
an army, is an easy matter, very
unlike anything we had during the
rebellion. To repeat, the country Is
rich, beautiful and densely populated, subsistence abundant, and thrt
r otitis all macadamized highways;
thuB the conditions are altogether
different from those existing with
us. I think that under the same
circumstances our troops would have
done as well as the Germans, marched as admirably, made combinations
as quickly and accurately, and
fought with as much success. I can
but conjecture how the Germans
would have got along on bottomless
roads—or none at all—through the
swamps and quicksands of northern
Virginia, from tbe wilderness of
Petersburg, and from Chattanooga
to Atlanta and the sea."
 o '	
Australia has now a sea-bor.ne
trade of no less than £160,000,000
and New Zealand of £50,000,000
Australia has a population of 5,000,.
000; New Zealand of 1,000,000.
RUSSIA AND AUSTRIA
:H THE BALKANS
History of  the Aspirations   of   Two
Peoples Which Plunged  Europe
^H Into
In face of the appalling calamity
of war and the danger of a still mo.^
appalling European conflagration,
the question of right and wrong recedes to the background, wrote i:
correspondent <u' the London News
and Leader just, before the outbreak
in' war. Whal mailers il who was
right and who was wrong In this
fatal quarrel when the impartial Injustice of the sword Is about'to level
down holh those who were right and
those who were wrong equally to
dust? What the average man, with
A feeling of consternation, is apt to
ask himself is: How has It all come
about? How was il that within forty-
eight hours Europe has been hurled
into a precipice where all her acquisitions of culture and material
wealth may be wiped out?
Of course, everyone remembers
that the other day the Austro-Hun-
garian heir to the throne and his
consort perished at the capital of
Bosnia from the pan-Servian conspirators. He has also been told that
the threads of that conspiracy have
been traced to Belgrade, the capital
of Servia, in consequence of which
the Austrian government demanded
from the Servian government reparation. What remains, however, obscure to him is: Why should the
Servian government have been made
responsible for the doing of some
miscreants to an extent involving
either abject surrender or war, and
why has the whole grim affair come
to a head within such a brief space
of time, as though it. had been foreseen, and only expected to happen
in order to let loose the dogs of
war? For a reply to those questions
we must go to the past—to that past
which, though it does not excuse,
nevertheless explains everything.
New Empire of the East.
Austria was the bulwark of
Europe against the Turks. It was
against the walls of Vienna that the
successive waves of Turkish inva
sion broke down, and it was under
the blows of Prince Eugene of
voy that the Turkish conquereors
began for the first time to recede.
This was Austria's great historical
role, but it was also her great   his
War Courage
MANY a man in Canada, willing to
*• ■* go a-warring across the seas,
is unwilling to fight at home-against
the shadowy foes of bad times or
of business depression.
THIS IS A TIME IX CANADA WHEN CANADIAN BUSINESS MEN SHOULD FIGHT—FIGHT
TO CAPTURE NEW TRADE AND TO HOLD OLD
TRADE. TO STOP ONE'* ADVERTISING IS To
WITHDRAW A POWERFUL OFFENSIVE AND
DEFENSIVE FORCE, AND TO EXPOSE ONE'S
BUSINESS    WITHOUT A (HARD.
IF THE COURAGE OF MANUFACTURERS,
WHOLESALERS, RETAILERS—THK GENER.
ALS AND CAPTAINS OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY— FAILS, THE COURAGE OF THE NATION-
WILL   EBB.
*
KEEP UP YOUR    KEEP UP YOUR
COURAGE ADVERTISING
torical luck. For in that process oi
repelling the Turk, Austria was
obliged to gather up and bring within the folds of her state the fragments of various—mostly Slav—nationalities which were ever driven to
her walls by the Turkish onslaughts,
and there dropped from sheer exhaustion. It. was thus that the Austrian-Hungarian monarchy was reared.
Tn any contemporary of those long
and exciting centuries it must have
seemed Inevitable that Austria
should In the long run spread hei
might over the whole of the Bal
kans and establish a new empire of
the East. Hut there came, with the
eighteenth' century, a powerful rival
to Austria in the shape of Russia
and Austria's natural—as it then
seemed—mission was lefi unfulfilled
Whether this Is to be regretted or
not may be left -for the historical
philosopher to decide. Certainly
however, one race and one natlona'i
ity dearly paid for that failure. Tha''
was the Serbs. Two-thirds of them
have found a home and a refuge under the Hapsburg sceptre, but one-
third remained under the Turkish
yoke, and that third was made the
'small change"—as Milan Obreno-
vitch once bitterly observed—with
which the two rivals, Russia and
Austria, were wont to settle their
mutual accounts.
Unfulfilled  Expectations.
Both in turns now helped and
then impeded the struggle of the
Servians for their emancipation, but
neither regarded them as having a
human value in themselves. Czar
Nicholas I. frankly said: "The Servians must always have something
to aspire to, which could only be
given them by Russia, so that they
may remain under her protection,"
and Prince Metternich, on his part,
declared that "Servia must either
become Austrian or remain Turkish."
As a matter of fact, however, from
the days of the first Karageorgee-
vitch, who had offered to Austria
in 1810 a protectorate over Servla,
down to our own, when that protectorate was virtually realized under
the famous treaty of 1881, concluded by King Milan, the relations between the two powers were exceedingly amicable, and certain political
prophets predicted that the entry of
Servia Into the Austro-Hungarian
state union, there to form, together
with the other Serbs, a third state,
was merely a question of time. But
hese expectations were not fulfilled. By the middle of the nineties
Servia became a prosperous agricultural country, with a growing export in corn and cattel, and this it
was which—strange to say—actually
made the two countries implacable
enemies. For Austria, but especially
Hungary, too, were agricultural
countries, and a jealousy of the
meanest kind began to prevail on
this side of the Sava. The Austro-
Hungarian "Junkers" could not tolerate that the Servian "pig," the emblem of Servian agricultural and
pastoral produce, should Invade their
home and foreign markets, and Servla having to use for export purposes
the railways of the dual monarchy,
that Jealousy soon assumed the shape
Of a tariff and railway rale war. The
political prestige, hitherto enjoyed
by the dual monarchy In Servla, was
gone at one blow, and the "pig"
now became the pivot round which
the economic and political relations
of the two countries turned.
Servia, led by the radicals who
represented the small peasant, now
became anti-Austrian, and sought
and obtained the support of Austria's secular enemy, Russia. It was
under the latter's instigation that
she now began to seek an extension
of her moral and political Influence
among the Serbs of the dual monarchy—above all, in Bosnia and
Herzegovina, where Austria blocked
her way to the sea. It was because
of this "Greater Servian" propaganda that Austria saw herself ultimately constrained to annex the two
"occupied"  provinces.
Russia ardently supported Servla's
Latest Photograph Of Dead Pontiff
This is the last photograph taken of Pope Pius, just before bis last
illness. The conclave of cardinals to elect a successor to Pope Pius has
been set for September 3, but will ] osslbly be delayed on account of the
European war. Cardinals Gibbons i,nd O'Connell sailed from New York
on August 21. Cardinal Farley, the other American cardinal, was is
Switzerland when the news of the i ope's death reached him. He immediately set out for Rome.
protest against that measure, and
has ever since encouraged her aspirations for the unification of the
entire Serb race at the expense not
only of Turkey, but also of Austria-
Hungary. In Dalmatia, in Slovenia,
In Croatia, and in Bosnia-Herzegov
ina—everywhere the pan-Servian
propaganda found its way through
emissaries and clandestine literature,
and It cannot be denied that its success—especially among the educated
youth—was considerable. The successful wars against Turkey and
Bulgaria and the eviction of Servia
from the Adriatic, mainly at the
insistence of Austria, added new-
zest to the propaganda of a Greater
Servia (carried on largely with Russia's help), and at last the catastrophe at Serajevo, the direct fruit of
that propaganda, brought the   mat-
Skeena Land District — District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that W. J. Sanders, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation
Miner, intends to apply for permission to prospect, for coal and petroleum over the following described lands: Commencing at a post
planted one mile west of the S.E.
cor. of I.R. No. 11, thence north 80
chains, thence west 80 chains, thence
south 80 chains, thence east 80
chains to point of commencement,
containing 640 acres more or less.
WILLIAM JOHN SANDERS.
Agent, William P. Sloan.
Date located 6th June, 1914.    jy31
ters lo a head. Austria or Servia
(with or without Russia)—that was
how the question was put by the terrorist act of the pan-Serb conspirators, and Austria has decided that
it should be Austria, cost what it
may.
Skeena Land District — District ot
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that 60 days after
date 1 intend to apply to the Cbiet
Commissioner uf Lands for a licence
to prospect for coal, petroleum and
natural gas as follows: Commencing
at a post planted 1-4 of a mile north
and one mile east of the nortlisast
corner of Lot 4 Moresby Island and
marksd A.J.G.'s southeast corner;
thence north 80 chains, th«nce wesl
80 chains, thence south 80 •haias,
thence east 80 chains to point ol
commencement. Located June 22,
1114.
A.   J.   GORDON,  Locator.
au2 A. Cromp, Asent
Skeena  Land  District — District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Wilfred a
Macdonald, of Prince Rupert, B.C.,
occupation Prospector, intends to apply for permission to prospeet for
coal and petroleum over the following described lands: Commencing at
a post planted about two miles east
and two miles south of the southeast
corner of C.L. 0484, thence soutk
80 chains, theace east S» chains,
thence north 80 chains, thence west
80 chains to point of commencement,
containing 640 acres more or less.
au6    WILFRED C. MACDONALD.
Date located June 8, 1914. ,
Skeena Land District — District of
Queen Charlotte Islnnds.
TAKE NOTICE that Mark I amidol Vancouver, B.C., occupation M' i-
er, intends to apply for permlBsh ti
to prospect for coal and petrol* urn
o>-er the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted 3 1-2
miles north and ono mile west of
the S.W. corner of L. -4.M. thence
im'ih 80 chains, thence oast SO
chains, ihence sout.'i So chili 4,
Ihence   west   80   chains   lo   point   of
commencement containing uto acres
iu re or less.
MARK   LAUDER
Agent.  William  Porteous Sionn.
Date  located  3rd  June,  1911.    jy",l
Skeena Land  District — District   of
Queen  Charlotte islands.
TAKE NOTICE that John A. Kirk-
palrick,  of  Prince  Rupert,  B.C., oc-
lupatlon Merchant, intends to apply
for permission to prospect for coal
nil petroleum over Ihe following described lands: Commencing at a post
lanted on Naden Harbor, about two
and one-half miles north of the
south-west corner of S.T.L. 2551,
thence east 80 chains, thence north
(0 chains, thence   weBt   80   chains,
nence south  80  chains to point  of
ommencement, containing 640 acres
more or less.
JOHN   A.   KIRKPATRICK.
Agent, John  Munro.
Skeena Land District — District ot
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE mat W. J. Sanders, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation
Miner, intends lo apply for permission to prospect for coal and petroleum over the following described lands: Commencing at a post
planted two miles north of the S.E
cor. of S.T.L. 2632, thence south 8t
chains, Ihence wesl 80 chains, thence
north 80 chains, thence east so
chains in po „ nf commencement!
containing 840 acrcj mine or ism
WILLIAM JOHN BANDERS
Agent, William  P, Sloan.
Hate located  8th June, 1914. Jy31
Subscribe  for  The   Dally  Journal,
50  cents a  month,
7
SUTHERLAND
SISTERS
7
Free  Demonstration   In   Oar    Drug-
store, Aug a hi  10 to 31
Oonc  aad  learn  hair   to   save   aad
grew yoar hair.
CONSULTATION  MWU
O. H. ORME
FriBM   Ituport,  B.C.
IkliK.,^   ivr   ise   Prince   Ruperl
Weekly Journal. (2.00 a year Sunday, August 30, 1914.
PRINCE   RUPERT   JOURNAL
->
PIONEER BAKERY
The Pioneer Baker, MR. JAS. CURREE, late of Knott & Clifton
Bakeries, will resume business .for himself on Wednesday, August
"lb, and will he in a posit ion to give the Public of Prince Rupert
BETTER satisfaction than iiny bakery iu the city with Bread and
Cakes of all descriptions and also the famous CIRIMF.'S MUTTON
PIES will be made three times weekly, ami if the public notice they
will see that they are not made by a machine but by the hand uf a
tradesman. ALL ORDERS TO THE PIONEER BAKERY HILL BE
STRICTLY ATTENDED TO.    P. 0. BOX 2K.j THIRD AVENUE   S
PHONE Uii:{ Below Postoffice S
1KHW0<>0WOO<yO0<>OOiHMOtrtOi}O4OO<i&0O<> WXre*<HK«H» (KhWHKKW
■■I -
a is
Special For One Week
1 — Only =====
GOV RRNMENT WEATHER
REPORT,
burnished by   F. IV. DowUng,
For 24 hours ending 5 p.m.
August 29, 1914.
Bar.  reduced to sea  level. .. .30.149
Highest  temperature    58.0
Lowest temperature   51.0
his opinion, realize what this will
mean. The railway will bend every
effort to make Prince Rupert a great
c*ity and with the natural advantages
it possesses it will astonish even its
most sanguine advocates.
 o	
GERMAN   PLANS.
'.Continued   "rom   Page   One.)
A limited number of my $120 Guaranteed HOT-WATER-
IN-'FIFTEEN-MINUTES COIL reduced to Sl.">. Forty now
in use in Prince Rupert. Price includes installation. Patent applied for.
Harry Hanson   -  Phone 489
I The Reliable Plumber s
l***** *******.**+*++* ***************4Jf*******x.*if.*^
LUMBER   |
3 Coal, Cement, Plaster and Brick
AND A COMPLETE LINE OF BUILDERS' SUPPLIES
WESTHOLME LUMBER CO., LTD.
First Avenue       Prince Rupert       Telephone 186   JI
__•_■ +>
HHHHHHhHHH **r*++******rtr*r****+*++++r*+*+*+++***-**+ir*.*-t*
G&ao&tHi&so<&aioo#oo^
A. E. Rand, President. J. S. Pearoe, Manager.
THE; PRINCE RUPERT SASH
AND DOOR COMPANY, LTD.
MANUFACTURERS
DOORS,   SASH,   MANTLES,   MOULDINGS,     SCROLL    AND   BAND
SAWING, AND ALL KINDS OF FINISHINGS,    STORE   AND   OFFICE FIXT   RES. HOUSE FINISH A SPECIALTY
Factory and Office: Seventh  Avcnui.-,   Hays   Cove   Circle
Telephone 218 P.O. Box 207.      Prince Rupert, B.C.
Thompson Hardware Co., Limited I
Rifles and Shot Guns
Ammunition
Camping Supplies
PHONE 101, P.O. DRAWER 1640 380 SECOND AVE
0-OOi«HWWUlKHWKKHKW«HHKHXi^^
New Wellington
Coal
The Favorite Household Coal
♦.leanest, Brightest and Best
Rogers & Albert
A  CHANCE  TO  MAKW $8.00.
For or.o week I will take orders.
My $20.00 guaranteed Hot Water
ilciiting Coils reduced for oae week
to $15.00 if ordered at eieo.      jy81
| PERSONALS I
!HHKHJlKi«-lKl{H>iKHW>&^^
George W, Morrow of the   Hotel
i
Prince Rupert went to Woodcock «•
the G.T.P, yesterday,  lie will return j
today.
.1. W, Stewart of Foley, Welch &
Stewart, accompanied by his daughter Margaret, left lasi evening for
the south.
Lt.-Col. G. W. Peck and Mrs.
Peck left last evening by the Princess May for the south. They will be
absent a few days.
Mr. Justice Morrison of the Redistribution Commission left by the
Princess May for the south last
evening. He was accompanied by W.
P. Ogilvie, secretary of the Commission.
G. B. Hull, resident engineer of
the Public Works Department at Ottawa, has returned from the north
where he inspected work that is to
be done. He is accompanied by Mr.
Gingras.
J. G. Scott of the Kaien Hardware
Company returned to the city yesterday. He made a trip to the north,
going as far as Lake Lebarge. Mr.
Scott, who is an old Klondiker, Is
not unfamiliar with the territory
visited.
CHIEF ENGINEER
IS RETIRING
B. B. KELLTHER, IT IS SAID, HAS
RESIGNED FROM THE G. T. P.
SERVICE.
He Will,  According  to   Report,   lie
Succeeded  by   His   Assistant,
Sir. Woods.
Seeimil  Avenue
Phone Blue
Phone 11C
lies.   Phone ^93
UP-TO-DATE
HAIRDRE5SING
PARLORS
NOTICE TO THE   PUBLIC.
Effective Monday, August 10th,
Household Coal will be $V1.00 per
ten delivered in fections 1, 6, and 6;
jJ12.nn per ton delivered in Sections
2, 7, 8, dial will be sold fur sti-jeily
oash. N'n sacks will be left.
NEW WELLINGTON GOAL GO.
LINDSAY'S   CARTAGE   &  !»TOrt-
A(iE. u.SJw
PAR WEST FUEL CQ.
PACIFIC  CARTAGE   LIMITBD.
A report which seems to be
founded In fact Is that B. B. Kelli-
her, chief engineer of the G. T. P.
is retiring from the service of that
company. He lias just completed a
tour over the line with his assistant
Mr. Woods, and yesterday left for
the south by the Princess May. Mr
Woods went back over the line of
the railway and it is said that the
severance of Mr. Kelliher's services
has really taken  place.
Mr. Kelliher is not a man who
has much to say with respect to
matters affecting himself or his
work, but il seems to be generally
understood that lie has retired and
will take a rest afier a strenuous
term during construction,
WAS   SURPRISED.
fContinued from  Page One.
Massage,    Manicuring,   Scalp   Treat-' "   	
ment.  Electric Treatments,  Etc.       PaClflC Cartage   Limited
Successors to   Pacific   Transfer   Co.
Mrs.   N. L. Hundnsyde, Plop.
211   Third St.        PRINCE RUPERT
PHONE 554
P.O. BOX560
P
FOR
APERHANGINC
AINTING
OLISHING AND
WALL TINTING
HIGHrORADH    INTERIOR
DECORATING    A    SPECIALTY
Martin Swanson
General   Teaming
Olllce:  Corner 3rd Ave. and 2nd St
Ladysmith Coal
CARTAGE AND STORAGE
PHONE 03.
SECOND AVE.
*»AR McBRIDl
UNDSArS CARTAGE ft ST0RA6E
G. T.  P.  CARTAGE AGENTS
331    SECOND   AVENUE
JINGLE POT COAL
Is handled by us. All orders recelvs
prompt attention   Phoue No. US
try, he says, Is of the very brightest
with that comes immense things for
Prince Rupert, which will from now
mi he ;i fast developing centre,
in  the Intorlor of Ihe province
and   Mr,   Blow  had excellent   oppor-i
tunltles    For    Investigating    li    al
leisure   there  Is   a   territory   thai
will  In  a  few   years   be   producing
greal  herds of cattle and   contributing In  other ways  to  the supply of
farm  produce to  maintain  Ihe cities
and   towns  along  the  line   of   the ■
road.
Nearer Prince Rupert, in the Lakelse and the Kitsumkalum, Mr,
filow says the province will soon
have a territory that will rival the
Okanagan as a fruit producer. He
contends that there is a veritable
surprise for all in that country. [
Prince Rupert must in consequence
of her position develop very Quickly
The coming through of the G.T.P.
train service, lie contends, will have
a  phenomenal  effect  here.   Pew,  in
promises which the Triple Entente
will surely make when we cannot offer anything comparable. So we must
consider Italy only a doubtful ally
;it best. Everything iioints to the
fact that she will wait till she sees
which way the balance inclines to before she takes decisive action.
"If fate favors us and Victor Emmanuel goes lo our side, then an. invasion of France by the Italian army
will be of great help to us at a moment when we shall have to light
Russia, and she will certainly help
to vanquish France's aversion to
sign terms of peace."
The document added that Spain
might possibly be drawn into the
conflict on the side of the Triple Entente, but that her small mobilization and the uncertain effectiveness
of the troops she could put in the
field, owing to her occupation of
Morocco, made this a matter of lit
tie importance. Moreover, it adds:
"Very likely a great success achieved
by us will free the military ardor of
King Alfonso."
Taking up England, the document
says:
"Her chief force is her fleet, under whose cover she can put through
an expeditionary force of about two
army corps on the Continent, provided with fairly numerous cavalry-
Haunted by the dread of a German
invasion, England will not very likely resolve to risk her active army
on the Continent except after long
hesitation, and especially after attempting the destruction of our
fleet. If so, she will be too late. The
decision on the Continent will already have been won, provided that
we have not lost time in crushing
one or other of the two powers of
the entente.
"Where would England disembark
her forces? Perhaps on our shores
perhaps in Belgium, perhaps in
France. The attempt on our shores
need not be greatly feared, as she
would first have to put our navy out
of commission, and that would require much time. If by that time we
were victorious on land, England
would abandon her attempt.
"A disembarkation of English in
Belgium interests us more, since it
will influence directly our operations
against the French, If we are led,
as everything gives us reason to believe, to make use of the road
through Luxemburg and of Belgian
Luxenburg. In that case we first shall
be obliged to violate the neutrality
of those two countries, which will
draw on us the hostilities of Belgium. We shall then have to guard
our right flank and our rear against
the Belgian army reinforced by the
linglisli."
That sacrifice the writer held was
made necessary since the two neutral
lands were Indispensable to the tier-
man  march.
"Finally," the document continues
"the forces of England can Join
France directly as an Integral pan
of bar army to be counted with.
in the last analysis the only situation we can consider is that of a
battle of Germany, Intimated,
against France—perhaps directly
supported by England- -united with
Russia. Who Is the most formidable
Of  these  foes?
"The frontier from Basle to
Strassburg via Melz and Ghlondile
assures us of a defence against
France such as we have not against
Russia, since on the east our forti-
fed frontier passes through Broslau
Posen, Phors and Danzig and leaves
without defences Silesia and all of
East Prussia. It is certain that from
200 000 to 300,000 active troops and
reserves could in three weeks defend
the territory between Switzerland
and grand duchy of Luxemburg
against an adversary, no matter how
superior. On the other hand, if we
take the defensive on our west frontier, we may be sure that Italy will
not declare war for us, as we shall
leave England and Spain all necessary time to prepare and mobilize,
"On the other hand the safety of
our resistance between Alsace and
Thioneille rests on the hypothesis
that France will respect the neutrality of Luxemburg and Belgium.
But how carry the manoeuvres if
France comes against us through
those countries? Clearly Luxemburg
cannot offer resistance to an entry
to her territory. As for Belgium, if
she is tempted to defend access to
her country, a thing which our own
attitude would scarcely encourage
her ;o try, she would be prevented
therefrom by the English."
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIC.
HOTEL DIRECTORY
Members of the Prince Rupert    4L
Licensed Vintners' Association
WINDSOR    HOTEL
Coi'. of First Ave. and Eighth St,
W. H. Wright, Prop.
HOTEL  CENTRAL
First Ave. and Seventh St.
European   and   American   Plans
$1.00 to $3.50 Per Day
Peter Black, Prop.
KNOX HOTEL
Ural     Ave.    Between    Eighth    and
Ninth
European PIuu;   Rates 50c to $1.00
Per Day
Besner  X   llesner,   Props.
Patent is now pending for a certain coil I am installing In kitchen
ranges and stoves. Imitations of this
are now being installed by others
This is to warn the public in general that anyone possessing a coll or
infringement of this coil when I re- r
ceive my patent papers will be vigorously prosecuted and sued for damages. While the times are hard, or at
least until September IB, 1914, the
price will be $15.00. HARRY HANSON, the Reliable Plumber.   Iwau29
Use "Canada First Creasi"; it has
the fresh cream flavor. jy2!)
The Daily Journal
SOc. oer month
«<B«HWH«H«HMH>0««HWKHWHKKW
FOR RENT
Ctoupletely furnished eilice   on
Third  Avenue,   including typewriter, $05 a month
FOR SALE
Lot 38,   Block   6,   Section   7.
$1,050
O.  E.   BAINTER
Phone 387
foWlMl»OWW>aO<KHMHK^
<H«H«H»0«HWKHKHIWWiKHKIIK«W
SAFETY      8
It is during such times as
these that people realize the
advantages of having a safe-
deposit box. We still luive a few
boxes to rent at reasonable
rates   in   our   large   ftre-pi'Oof
vault.   Call und see them.
THE   CONTINENTAL    TRUST
OOMPANV, Iir».
EMPRESS HOTEL
J. Y. Rochester V. D. Casley
Third Ave. Between Sixth and
Seventh Sts.
European Plan;  50c to   $1 Per Day
ROYAL HOTEL
Corley & Burgess, Props.
Third  Ave.  and  Sixth  St.
European Plan Steam Heated
BEAVER     WHOLESALE     LIQUOR
CO.,  LIMITED
Second  Ave.  and  Sixth  St.
Phone 102
PRINCE RUPERT IMPORTING CO.,
LIMITED
Fraser and Sixth Sts.
Phone   7
 o	
Baby carriages and go-earts 25
per cent, reduction at Tite's midsummer sale. JylB
MERCHANTS
LUNCHES
THE ROYAL CAFE
hoe    initiated    a    system   of
Merchants'   Lunches   at   noon
each   day
PRICE 35 CENTS
Service in keeping with   standard    established    by    popular
Honse
NOTICE OF DISSOLUTION OF
PARTNERSHIP.
Take notice that the partnership
existing between Messrs. Gollart &
Reynolds has this day been dissolved
ky mutual consent. All accounts
due the firm to be paid to T. H. Col-
lart, who will assume all tie •bliga-
tions of tbe partnership. Dated
August 1, 1914. au2
ASK FOR
FIVE ROSES
The World's Best
Send for Five Roses
COUPON
Wiilt   N.mt   >nd   Ma„„   (lowly.
Dm'! k*f«t lo endow Tan Canto
Cook Book—
BEING A MANUAL OF GOOD RECIPES carefully
choaen from the contribution!, of over two thousand
Mccessful uteri of Five Rose* Flour throughout Canada.
Alto Utcfu! Note* en the variout classes of good things
to eat, all of which have h**n carefully checked and
re-chccked by competent authority.
Mtrtu m Ejj*g It UKt Of THC WOODS WHIM. CO. UWTIO, jggg
Distributors Prince Rupert, B.C.
STEWART & MOBLEV KELLY, DOUGLAS * CO.
NAM* •* OCALn .

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