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Prince Rupert Journal Jul 4, 1911

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New Wellington
Coal
is the best
ROGERS & BLACK
Sole Agents
print* Jtaert
cnmal
High Class
Job Printing?
in all Lines
VOLUME II
Published Twice a Week.
PRINCE  RUPERT, B. C,  TCESDAY, JULY  i,  1911
Price,  Five  Cents.
No.
AGAIN IN TROUBLE
Aid. Newton is Opposed to Any Enabling
Measure in Connection With
License Bylaws.
He  Retails  Reports Which   He  Has
Heard Concerning Members of
Council and Commission
Aid. Newton was again at the
council board last night taking his
place without comment. Throughout
the first part of the meeting he
showed no special disposition to consume time with speeches for which
he has become somewhat famous,
and there was a prospect of a fairly
early adjournment.
The liquor amendment bylaw,
however, gave the scope for his oratory and resulted in the council sitting until after midnight. Aid. Newton was in his usual form and proceeded along sensational lines.
The bylaw was committed with
Aid. Morrissey in the chair. The bylaw is a simple one, introduced by
Aid. Kerr. It provides for the suspension for two months of the clause
in the liquor bylaw which insists
upon an application being filed for a
renewal of a license.
Aid. Newton wanted to know what
was the object of suspending the
rule for two months.
Aid. Kerr said that if the bylaw
was read it would be seen that only
one hotel could secure its license.
Aid. Newton said he did not find
an answer in this.
Aid. Morrissey explained that
■ , there   had   been   certain   formalities
that had not been complied with relative to securing a renewal of license. The amendment, as he understood it, would permit of the
granting of the license.
This did not satisfy Aid. Newton
and some other members of the
board.
Aid. Newton said that the business
had been decidedly botched from
first to last. He had no more respect forJb e actions of the present
license boara' than he had contempt
for the old board of last year. The
actions of the new board, as of the
old board, had been carried along in
a high-handed fashion, so that the
public got heartily sick of it. This
amendment was made he had no his-
itatlon in saying, for the purpose of
covering up dirty work by the commissioners. The council had no
business to alter the bylaws to shield
the commissioners. He had no intention of taking such a stand. He
opposed this amendment because be
felt that the liquor business was not
conducted in a way to bring credit.
There were little plans being
concocted. There had been some
"frame-ups" of late so that ugly rumors were floating about and names
of members of the council were being connected with contracts, etc. It
was a disgrace that members of the
board were so connected.
Speaking for the mayor, he did
not believe  he had  any concern  or
the Savoy Hotel. The board had
been criticised a good deal because it
did not grant a renewal before. The
board took the stand that it could
not violate the regulations which
forbade a license to a house within
a distance of a church within which
the Savoy came. The court had ordered a license to the Savoy and It
had been granted.
There was a technicality In connection with the application for a renewal which made It Impossible to
legally grant It.
He stated that as far as he was
concerned if there was any way of
dealing with the Savoy license without that, he was prepared to abide-
by it. He was not concerned about
granting licenses, j.e would not as
long as he sat as a commissioner
issue licenses except in conformity
with the law.
Aid. Clayton was surprised that
bottle licenses were issued. He was
surprised that liquor men with the
business ability they were supposed
to have and so well represented as
they were, should come here with
the statement that a mistake had
been made and this bylaw should be
asked to be amended so soon. He
felt that the hotel licenses could be
renewed without this move, and
therefore did not favor the amendment.
Aid. Hilditch rose to speak, stating thaj ne did not care personally
whether any of the licenses were renewed. He proposed, however, to
deal with some personal remarks.
Aid. Morrissey, the chairman, said
he would not permit personal references any longer. They must confine themselves to the question.
Aid. Hilditc hsaid he only wished
to refer to the insinuations by Aid.
Newton, which were absolutely cowardly.
Aid. Newton "always cowardly, of
course." He then proceeded to say
that It was cowardly to issue a challenge and then back down.
Aid. Hilditch said he never backed
down.
Aid. Douglas attempted to get into
the fray in defence of Aid. Newton,
when Aid. Hilditch turned on him
and said he saw him (Aid. Douglas)
and Aid. Newton framing this up
long before this. Aid. Newton, he
said, made a charge that certain
aldermen wef l mixed up with contracts and with licenses. Aid. Newton should not be allowed to make
such charges.
Aid. Newton said that he stated
that people were saying it.
Aid. Hilditch contended that this
was a cowardly way of putting it.
After some further cross-fire. Aid.
Morrissey   ruled   that   Aid.     Newton
KEEN   COMPETITORS
Prince Rupert Shows That it Has Athletes equal to Those to be
Fonnd Anywhere.
Under    Trying    Circumstances    the
Events of Dominion Day Were
Carried Out by Committee
SERIOUS RIOTS
* (Special to The Journal) *
* GLASGOW, July   4.—Serious *
* rioting marked    the    Seamen's *
* strike last night.    The strikers *
* cut the moorings of two vessels *
* and allowed  them to drift Into *
* the river.    Several strikers were *
* arrested    by the police.    Many •
* rioters have been arrested. •
any part in anything that had taken
place of late. He would have preferred to have seen affairs going
along In the smooth way in which
it was done up to a few weeks ago.
While the mayor was not tarnished
in the least, in any of these moves,
he felt that none of the other members of the council should be in a
position to lend themselves to suspicion.
Aid. Kerr said that Aid. Newton
misunderstood the intent of this. He
had brought the motion in because
there was only one licensed house in
town that had complied with the
regulations, It was up to the council.
Aid. Douglas said that he corroborated what Aid. Newton said. There
were hard feelings against the license commissioners. They turned
down Mr. Brown.
His Worship said that his idea
of litis was that .the amendment was
introduced to allow the licensing of
(Continued on Page Four)
PROMOTION LISTS
Results of the Public School Examina
tions Held in the
City.
Pupils  Who  Won  Honor Rolls  Due
ing tbe Term Which Has
,1 list Closed
The results of the promotion examinations in the public school have
been compiled by the teachers and
now made public. As some rearrangement of the classes may follow
the opening of a room in the business part of the city after the holidays, it cannot be finally decided in
every case in what room the pupils
will be placed,
The results of the examinations
show the following:
DIVISION   I
111 Division I ten candidates have
just written on the papers for high
school entrance. Results will be
published from the education office
in about one month.
The following pupils will constitute the graduating class for 1912:
Chesleigh Moore,
Arthur Manson,
Elsie Dunn,
Sarah   MacLeod,
John Dowling,
John Christiansen,
William Stephen,
William Rowell,
Arnold  Dunn,
Walter  Smith.
To this list will be added new
pupils who come into the city and
others who may fall to make the
required percentage at the current
examination.
(Continued on Page Eight)
The competitions In the land and
aquatic sports in the city on Dominion Day were keenly contested and
local athletes showed themselves
worthy of any company. The time
made in the various events was a
credit to those taking part.
In the forenoon the water contests
were held in the waters of the harbor when interesting races were
given. There is always keen interest in the motor boat race. The
Kayex, long the holder of the cup,
this year was forced to take a back
place. The race was a handicap one.
The Rover, Captain Partington, although the last to get away under
the handicap rules, was the first in
taking first place, with the launch
from the hydrographic steamer Lil-
looett second.
The canoe and rowing races were
keenly contested. In the crab race,
Melville, one of the competitors,
tipped his canoe and had to be
picked up from the water.
The six-oar race between crews
from the Lillooet and the Longshoremen, was won by the latter in
easy style, the winners pulling a
very steady course.
Land  Sports
In the afternoon the scene was
transferred to the corner of McBride
street and Sith avenue, where the
land sports were held. This year
brought together a number of new
athletes. Everywnere the familiar
colors of the Baptist Brotherhood
were to be seen showing that Rev.
W. H. McLeod is giving marked attention to the development of the
physical side of the young men. Mr.
McLeod, as a starter, gave eminent
satisfaction during the day.^ Mav..^
Manson and Frank Mobley . looked
after the tape at the judges' stand.
The ten-mile race proved a very
interesting one. Nicholson, a phenomenal runner, winning in easy
style, making the distance over anything but an easy course in one
hour's time. With a steady gait he
acquired the lead in the first half
mile and never again lost it. His
last mile was made in practically the
same time as the first one.    Watson.
GARBAGE DISPOSED
Weston Will Be Asked to Start Upon
His Work at Once as the Old
Company Has Ceased.
The   Scow   Will   Be  Moored  at   the
Davis Wharf to Tuke on
Material
(Continued on  Page Eight)
GOOSE BAY MINES
Manager McDonald of the Granby Company Has Good Force Steadily
Employed.
He Paid a Short Visit to Prince Rupert—Mr.  Sylvester   Is   Expected Shortly
The development at Goose Bay is
expected to be very rapid this summer. The Granby Company, which
has a reputation for saying little before work is actually under way, is
showing activity which promises well
for the camp.
.Mr. McDonald, the superintendent
in charge at Hidden Creek, paid a
short visit to Prince Rupert last
week on business connected with the
company. He had little to say as to
the work or as to the plans of the
company. He has a good force of
men engaged in development work
on the properties acquired from M.
K. Rodgers, and there is also an investigation into adjoining properties
being prosecuted with the object of
purchase if all is found satisfactory.
 o	
DROWNING ACCIDENT
Wife Loses  Life  While Husband  Is
Saving Their Son from
Death
(Special to The Journal)
HAMILTON, Ont., July 4.—Their
skiff colliding with the steamer Turbine, Edward Shepherd and his son
had a narrow escape from drowning
here, while Mrs. Shepherd met her
(leatli. Her husband was unable to
save her, having swam with the son
to safety and the wife sinking before
he could return.
The garbage question was before
the council last evening again. It
came up on the request of the sanitary inspector that Mr. Weston be
requested to start work today and
also on a report from the city engineer relative to the scow and its
place for taking the garbage. The
engineer recommended the Davis
wharf as the place for having the
scow moored. It was suggested that
the waterfront now being granted by
the Grand Trunk Pacific and the
government might be utilized. It
was pointed out, however, that before that was done a roadway would
have to be built to it. The Davis
wharf will be used in the meantime.
The sanitary inspector wrote that
the Prince Rupert Scavenging Company had ceased to gather garbage
and in consequence attention was required to overcome the conditions
resulting. He suggested that Mr.
Weston be authorized to begin the
work at once.
His Worship said that the city
solicitor had in compliance with the
request of member.-, of the committee
been that day taking steps to have
the contract entered into.
Aid. Douglas thought the agreement should be forthcoming before
he started upon his work. Why was
this contract so long in being prepared?
Aid. Kirkpatrick felt that the
work done by Mr. Weston would be
without prejudice until the agreement  was entered  into.
Aid. Hilditch said that neither the
city solicitor nor the council were to
blame for the agreement not being
slsHb€: ' i'lie old-'scavenger had until
July 15 to run.
Aid. Morrissey thought that the
old scavengers might be compelled
to live up to the terms of their license. In any event the agreement
with Mr. Weston should date from
the time he started work.
It was finally agreed, upon motion
of Aid. Hilditch that Mr. Weston
should be allowed to enter upon his
duties upon condition that he agree
to do the work at the rate set forth
in the agreement.
 o	
WAPPENSTEINGUILTY
SOCIAL   EVENING
Typographical     Hall     Players    and
Their Friends Celebrate  Victory in Fitting Manner
After their well-earned victory
over the team drawn from the Royal
Hotel a week '.go, the printers' Indoor baseball team enjoyed the
fruits of their success last evening.
Ben Self, of the Empress Dining
Room, provided a splendid table for
the team and the "rooters," after
which the parlor of the hotel was
placed at their disposal by Mr. Cas-
ley, and a soda! evening spent.
Frank Cullin acted as chairman
while a programme of speeches,
songs and recitations was carried
through. Harry Potts was the star
speaker, while W. G. Dennis gave
one of his recitations in good style.
Songs were given by Waterman,
"Coffee" and Pearl Harris, with a
piano solo by W. D. Black. Alex
Gray presided at the piano as accompanist throughout the evening.
Those who sat down to the dinner, which was served in the best of
style by Ben Self, were: P. R. Harris, Geo. Eckerman, L. T. Baarlaer,
B. F. Self, Frank E. Cullin, W. H.
Peck, H. R. Potts, W. G. Dennis,
Patrick J. Burns, 'Sandy," Albert
L. Forsyth, "Coffee," A. Gray, Phil
Hanefin, S. D. Macdonald, Geo.
Lichtenauer, L. J. Curtin, W. H.
Sherman, T. Thompson.
*   NEW   ZEALAND'S  WARSHIPS   *
* (Special to The Journal)        *
* LONDON, July  4.—New Zea- *
* land's  first  contribution  to  the *
* Imperial    Navy    was    launched *
* Saturday.    Lady Ward, wife of *
* the premier of the colony, nam- *
* ing   the   vessel   as   it   left   the *
ways. *
NO SETTLEMENT YET
Final Attempt is Being Made by Conciliation Board to Adjust
Trouble.
Miners    and    Operators   in    Crow's
Nest   Mines  Refuse  Proposals
Made  Recently
(Special to The Journal)
BANFF, July 4.—At a meeting of
the conciliation board held on Monday the operators and the miners
positively refused to accept the proposals of Chairman Gordon made on
Saturday. The board went into secret session instructing the two parties to return in a short time.
Later the board announced that
the final report won d be taken up
at once. Chairman Gordon intimated that this was his final attempt
to bring about an agreement.
WANT SIDEWALKS
Petition  Received by Council Asking
That One He Built on Third
Avenue
*   *   *
*   *   *   *
Former Chief of Police of Seattle is Held
to Have Accepted a Bribe
While in Office.
Is Nol  Intimated  When Sentence
Will lie Passed Upon Former
Head  of  Force
(Special to The Journal)
SEATTLE, July 4.—Former Police Chief Wappenstein was found
guilty last night of accepting a
bribe of $1,000 last August for permitting Tupper and Gerald to operate crib houses. This is the second
trial for Wappenstein, the first jury
having disagreed. No intimation Is
given as to when sentence will be
tassed on him.
IN CAUSE OF PEACE
(Special to The Journal) *
WASHINGTON,     July     4. — *
• That Germany  will  not  be- far *
'  behind     Britain   in   her  accept- *
• ance 'of  the  principle  of  unre- *
• stricted arbitration of .',4; issues *
• including those    involving    na- *
• tional  honor,  is  regarded   here *
• as practially certain in view of *
• recent developments.
Awarded Contract
On the recommendation of the
city engineer, endorsed by thee
streets committee of the council, it
was decided to award the contract
■or sewer pipe to Handasyde et Hurt,
lie lowest tenderer, at a cost eel'
52,660.
Dangerous to Horses
The transfer men of the city wrote
the council last night calling atten
tion to the condition of certain parts
of the plank roadways and also com
plaining that the contractors in relaying the planks frequently were
careless and left dangerous spikes
protruding.
 o	
H. L. Johnson, formerly assistant
engineer of the Grand Trunk Pacific
here, left yesterday with Mrs. Johnson and family. They will take up
their residence in Chilliwack,
where Mr. Johnson has purchased a
home. Mrs. Johnson will be very
much missed in various circles in the
city.
 o	
SPOKANE WRECKED
There is considerable rivalry being manifested in the different parts
of the city with respect to securing
sidewalks and macadamized roads
when the rough grading is completed. Each section wants the work
done in front of the property.
Last evening a communication was
received by the city council from
McCaffery & Gibbons, who wrote
relative to the question of a sidewalk
on Third avenue between Fifth and
Sixth streets. It was asked if the
council would lay this as soon as the
road was graded, the firm agreeing
to become responsible for its payment pen ling the passing of the bylaw.
This was referred to the streets
committee  with power to act.
MANY FATALITIES
Passenger Steamer Hits in Seymour Narrows and Has to be
Beached.
It  Is  Believed That the Vessel Can
lie Salved and  Put  in
Shape Again
The excursion steamer Spokane,
of the Alaska Steamship Company,
lies off Seymour .Narrows, with her
bottom torn, awaiting a survey to
determine whether she Is callable of
being raised and  put  in order again.
When the Prince George left her
on her last trip north the condition
nf the Spokane was that she was
resting easily but with only the
housework above water. It is believed   she  can   be  salved   all   right.
The Spokane cleared from Seattle
late Wednesday night with 14!) passengers on board and a crew of 61.
At the entrance to the Seymour Narrows, which she reached at 11
o'clock Thursday night, she struck
a rock which punctured a large hole
through both bottoms in the starboard side near the bow of the vessel. Although the pumps were at
once manned, water gained on them
so fast that it was considered advisable to land ant] the vessel was run
on the beach at Plumper's Bay,
where the operation of landing the
passengers was begun, This was accomplished with some difficulty, owing to the frighl of Bome of the la-
tlies and .Mrs. Stress and Mrs. Williams jumped overboard In their endeavor to reach land. Fears wore
entertained thai they had been
drowned,    fine- e>i    the-  women  was
(Continued on  Page Foil,-)
Series  of  Accidents  Near  Cincinnati
Results in  Heavy Loss
of  Life
(Special to The Journal)
CINCINNATI, July 4.—A climax
of a day marked by four fatalities
on rivers near here came Sunday
evening when the steamer Island
Queen ran down a skiff containing
three women and two men. Alvin
Seffrim, of this city, was struck by
the the wheel and sank. The other
four   were   rescued   by   bathers   who
wain to their assistance.
John Fischer and Clyde Taylor, of
Cincinnati, and Cora Stegman, of
Chicago, were drowned here. The
drowning of Miss Stegman and
Fischer was a double one. They were
canoeing in a river near here and
Ihe canoe upset.
IKATII OF P. W. SCOTT
Well-Known   Invest! I   in  Prince  Rupert Passed Away on Friday
M«bt
In the death of P. W. Scott, who
passed away in this city last Friday
night, the city loses one of Its most
ardettl and optimistic admirers. Mr,
Snotl was a native of Scotland, but
lived a goenl pari of his life in the-
United States, lie filled many important offices, being a member of
the legislature of Minnesota. At one
time In- filled the office of American
consul in Tangier and during the
whole nt hi:- life took an active part
in public affairs.
Becoming interested In Prince
Rupert, he came here and bought
considerable property. His faith in
this city's future was uiiboiinding.
Ills last visit to the city was taken
in the hope of residence here restoring his health in some part, as had
been the result during a previous
sojourn here. Bright's disease, how-
ever, bail made such ravages upon
his constitution that il was impossible for him to overcome the disease
and lie passed away on Friday at the
age  of  58.
The- funeral was held on Sunday,
under the- charge of Haynor Bros.
The members nf Tsimpsean Lodge,
A, P. *• A, M., atlenile-il In large
numbers, the deceased belonging to
the order. Members of St. Andrew's
Society, of which he was honorary
resident,   also  attended.
The services were conducted by
lev. Mr. DuBarres and Rev, F. W.
Kerr. PRINCE RI'PERT JOURNAL
Tuesday, July 4, 1011
<{• •:•**•:
*
*
*
AMONG THE MINES
I- * •> V * * * * * * * •** •> •> * * * * * * *i
CANCELLED CLAIMS
Cancellation of all the Cunningham coal claims in Alaska, the fight
over which cost former Secretary of
the Interior Balllnger iiis place in
public life, has been ordered by
Commissioner Fred Dennett, of the
general land office, with the approval
of Secretary Waiter L. Fisher, of the
interior department. This action of
the government, it is alleged, will
forever frustrate the Morgan-Guggenheim scheme to grab Alaska, as
the lands are restored to the public
domain anil will be at once thrown
open to re-entry.
Adherents of Gifford Pinchot,
former chief forester, were jubilant
when the government's decision was
announced and consider that the
fight against Bellinger has thus been
entirely justified. Attorneys for the
Cunningham claimants, however,
have decided to carry the case to the
United state's Supreme Conn and
will I'ight to the last ditch to retain
the Morgan-Guggenheim hold on the
coal  fields of the far north.
The decision of the government's
finds: "Several locations, filings
and entries made pursuant to an understanding and agreement of the
claimants prior to their location to
combine the claims for their joint
use and benefit; each location, filing
and entry was made with the unlawful purpose and intent that the
titles acquired thereunder should
inure to the benefit and use of an
association or corporation of claimants."
The department then rules: "That
no mine of coal opened or improved
on these tracts shall be located or
entered."
NEW  COASTERS
COAL AT AieBERM
Discovery  Has Occasioned Much Excitement at Port—Development
Will   He  Hushed
A seam of coal, of excellent quality, located almost in the middle of
Port Alberni, has occasioned great
excitement in that locality. A gang
of men has already been started at
work upon the outcrop by the Alberni Land Company, on the property of which the find was made.
Archibald Dick is in charge of operations, and will, in a few days, put
to work a larger gang. Work on
the development of the measure will
be rushed.
The news of the find was brought
to Victoria by Mr. Leonard Frank,
who, in company with his brother,
Mr. Rcrnard Frank, of the staff of
the Britannia mine, Howe Sound,
came to Victoria from the west
coast. Mr. Frank stated that the
seam was located some time ago
when the E. & X. grading operations
were tinder way. The value of the
find was not Immediately recognized, hut the analysis of the coal
has demonstrated it to be of a very
superior quality.
Work is now progressing in the
immediate vicinity of the old Water-
house wharf. What adds to the value
of the coal is its close proximity to
deep  water.
To provide for the rapidly increasing traffic between Victoria
and Puget Sound ports and San
Francisco and other California cities, the Pacific Coast Steamship
Company, which operates the steam
ships Governor and President, sail
ing direct from 'Frisco for Seattle,
and the City of Puebla and Queen
calling at Victoria en route, is planning to make an important addition
to its fleet of vessels.
Arrangements have been completed for the construction of two
palatial passenger liners to cost approximately $1,500,000 each, for
service between Seattle, San Francisco, Los Angeles and Southern California ports.
Bids will be requested in the near
future for the construction of two
S,000-ton turbine passenger steamships, which will be capable of making a speed of twenty knots an hour.
The vessels will be double-bottom,
twin-screw steamships with the
latest type of engine. They will
contain elaborate passenger accommodations and will be equipped
with everything known to convenience and safety in ocean travel.
NOTICE.
In the matter of an application for
the issue of a duplicate of the Certificate of Title for Part (N. 25
Acres) of the S. E. part of Section
1G, Township 1, Range 5, Coast District:
Notice is hereby given that it is
my intdntion to issue at the expiration of one month after the first
publication hereof a duplicate of the
Certificate of Title to the above
mentioned lands in the name of
John Flewin, which Certificate was
issued on the 21st day of November,
1906, and is numbered 284.
WILLIAM E. BURRITT,
Dist. Regr.
Land  Registry Office,
Prince Rupert, B. C.,
May  6th,  1911. 5-9-6-2
AT  SALMON   RIVER
PUBLIC SERVICE ACT.
The qualifying examinations for
Third-class Clerks, Junior Clerks,
and Stenographers will be held at
the following places, commencing on
Monday the 3rd July next:—Armstrong, Chilllwack, Cumberland,
Golden, Grand Forks, Kamloops,
Kaslo, Kelowna, Ladysmith, Nanalmo, Nelson, New Westminster, North
Vancouver, Peachland, Revelstoke,
Rossland, Salmon Arm, Summer-
land, Vancouver, Vernon and Victoria.
Candidates must be British subjects between the ages of 21 and
30, if for Third-class Clerks; and
between 16 and 21, If for Junior
Clerks or Stenographers.
Applications will not be accepted
if received later than the 15th June
next.
Further information, together
with application forms, may be obtained from the undersigned.
P. WALKER,
Registrar, Public Service.
Victoria, B. C, 27th April, 1911.
4-27—6-15.
NOTICE
PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given
that, under the authority contained
in section 131 of the "Land Act,' a
regulation was approved by the Lieutenant-Governor in Council fixieig
the minimum sale prices of first aid
second-class lands at $10 and $5
per acre respectively.
This regulation further provided
that the prices fixed therein should
apply to all lands with respect to
which the applications to purchase
were given favourable consideration
after the date of said regulation,
namely, April 3, 1911.
Further notice is now given that
by virtue of a regulation approved by
the Lieutenant-Governor in Council
on the 10th of May, 1911, that the
regulation dated 3rd April, 1911, he
held not to apply to applications to
purchase vacant Crown Iands which
were received by the Assistant Commissioners of Lands on or before the
said April 3rd, 1911, and with respect, to which the required deposit
of wfty cents per acre had been received by said Commossioners on or
before the said April 3rd, 1911.
ROBT.. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Department of Lands,
Victoria, B. C, 16th of May, 1911
5-23—Imo
WATER   NOTICE
I, C. N. Pring, of Prince Rupert,
B. C, occupation broker, give notice
that on the'12th day of July I intend tho apply to the Water Commissioner at his office in Prince Rupert, for a license to take and use
2.8 cubic feet of water per second
from Hot Springs on border of Lake
Lakelse in the Skeena Land Division of Coast District. The water is
to be taken directly from the Springs
and is to be used on Lot No. 3983,
for sanitary purposes.
Dated June 12th, 1911.
C. N. PRING,
6-13-lm Prince Rupert, B. C.
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that John Klrkaldy, of Lakelse Valley, occupation
farmer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 120 chains south
from the south end of Herman
Lake; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; tbence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains.
JOHN  KIRKALDY.
Dated April 11, 1911. 5-5
TRUST  COMPANIES.
EVERY COMPANY receiving de
posits of money or carrying on busi
ness in the Province of British Co
Iumbia as a Trust Company, as defined in the "Trust Companies Regulation Act, 1911," is requested to
furnish particulars as to the corporate name of the company, and the
name and address of its managing
director to the Inspector of Trust
Companies, Victoria, in order to receive a supply of forms to be used
in making the return as provided In
section 4 of said Act.
W. U. RUNNALS,
Inspector of Trust Companies.
4-18—lm
RESERVE
<iuoel   Prospects  Ale  Shown   at   This
Pari of the Portland Canal
Camp
The biggest strike of the
at the Portland Canal mining camp
was made lasl week on the Cascades
Falls claim, twelve utiles up the
Salmon River. Messrs. Dilworth and
Bunting, locators nf the property
have, e-rosscut through fifteen feet of
.solid galena Which assays $85 on an
average sample-. As Ihe hanging wall
has nut yet been reached it is impossible at the presenl time to even estimate the width uf the ore body,
which has been traced through three
claims.
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE.
Notice is hereby given the the
reserve existing by reason of the
notice published in the Britisii Columbia Gazette of the 2 7th December, 1907, over Iands on Graham Island, formerly covered by 'limber
Licences Nos. Nos. 37055, 37056 and
37057, which expired on the 6th day
of November, 1909, and the lands
embraced within Timber Licence No.
j 37059, which expired on the 25th
'day of January, 1909, Is cancelled,
season I and that the said lands will be open
for pre-emption only under the provisions of Section 7 of the "Land
Act" after midnight on June 16th,
1911.
ROBERT  A.   RENWICK,
Deputy  Minister of  Lands.
Lands  Department,
Victoria,  B.  C.,
Oth  March, 1911.
NOTICE is hereby given that all
vacant Crown lands not already under reserve, situated within the
boundaries of the Land Recording
Districts of Cariboo and Lillooet,
and the Kamloops Division of Yale
Land Recording District, are reserved from any alienation under
the "Land Act" except by pre-emption.
ROBT. A. RENWKSK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Department of Lands,
Victoria, B. C, April 3rd, 1911.
4-14—lm
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that I, V. W.
Smith, of Prince Rupert, occupation
contractor, intend to apply for permission to lease the following described foreshore:—Commencing at
a post planted about 2 miles in a
southerly direction from Port Simpson; thence northerly along high
water mark 25 chains and containing all foreshore between high and
low water mark.
V. W.  SMITH,
Locator.
Staked  31st May,  1911. 6-6
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Flora Orr, of
Masset, B. C, occupation spinster, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:
—Commencing at a post planted
about 40 chains south and 80 chains
east of the N. E. corner of Lot 35;
thence north 80 chains; thence west
80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains, containing 640
acres.
FLORA  ORR.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated November 25, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Arthur Ives,
Sr., of Masset, B. C, occupation hotel
keeper, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:— Commencing at a
post planted about 40 chains south
and 120 chains east of the S. E.
corner of Lot 35; thence south 80
chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence west
SO chains, containing 640 acres.
ARTHUR IVES, Sr.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 25, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE, that I, Minnie
Meredith, of Victoria, B. C., occupation a married woman, intend to
apply for permission to purchase the
following desoribed lands:—Commencing at a post planted about 40
chains distant and in a South direction from the Southeast corner of
Lot 1733; thence east 40 chains;
thence south 40 chains; thence west
40 chains; thence north 40 chains
to point of commencement, containing 160 acres more or less.
MINNIE  MEREDITH.
John Kirkaldy,
Agent.
Dated  February  20th,  1911.
INDIAN  MIXES
Tlie Indian .Mines, owned largely
in Prince Rupert are being developed in a conservative way by Geo.
Clothier and are showing up in fine
style. The group is expected to
make  one  of  the  best,  in  the camp.
NOTICE.
PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given
that, under the authority contained
in section 131 of the "Land Act," a
regulation has been approved by the
Lieutenant-Governor In Council fixing the minimum sale prices of first
and second-class lands at $10 and $5
per acre, respectively.
This regulation further provides
that the prices fixed therein shall
apply to all lands with respect to
which the application to purchase Is
given favourable consideration after
this date, notwithstanding the date
of such application or any delay that
may have occurred In the consideration of the same.
Further notice Is hereby given
that all persons who have pending
applications to purchase lands under
the provisions of sections 34 or 36
of the "Land Act" and who are not
willing  to  complete  such   purchases
Hard  to Satisfy
Broker  (to weablby, bul    stingy
client)-   Glad  you  did  se. well  with i under the prices fixed by the afore
those shares I mlel you to buy.
Client    Why, I lost a pot of ition
ey  over them.
Broker- -What
I wee  and   sold' at
Client     Aye!
to ten after!
You bought at
seven, didn't you?
Ilui   they   went   it|e
said regulation shall be at liberty to
withdraw such applications and receive a refund of the moneys deposited on account of such applications.
WILLIAM R. ROSS,
Minister of Lands
Department of Lands,
Victoria, B. C, April 3rd, 1911.
4-11—6-11.
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE.
NOTICE is hereby given that the
reserve of a parcel of land situated
on Graham Island, notice of which
appeared in the British Columbia
Gazette on the 25t'h of February,
1909, being dated 23rd February,
1909, is cancelled to permit of the
lands being acquired by pre-emption
only and for no other purpose
ROBT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Department of Lands,
Victoria, B. C, April 5th, 1911.
4-14—7-5
Skeena    Land    District—District    of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that Prince Rupert Sand & Gravel Company, Ltd.,
of Prince Rupert, occupation Industrial Company, intends to apply for
permission to lease the following described land:— Commencing at a
post planted at the Witness post on
the southerly boundary of Lot 4124;
thence southerly following the sinuosities of the shore line 60 chains
more or less to southerly end of the
Island; thence easterly 10 chains
more or less to low water mark;
thence northerly 60 chains more or
less along low water mark; thence
westerly 10 chains more or .esc to
the point of commencement.
PRINCE   .tUPLKT  SAND  &
GRAVEL Co., LTD.
Per J. Y. Rochester, Agt.
Dated May 30, 1911. .6-2
,.   Skeena  Land  District—D.s.rict
' of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that Joseph Edward Merryfield, of Prince Rupert,
occupation merchant, intends to apply for permission to lease the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about 10 chains
nortn from the northeast corner of
Lot 33; thence west 1500 feet to
shore of Smith's Island; thence following shore in u southerly direction
1200 feet; thence east to shore of
De Horpey Island; thence following
shore in a northerly direction to
point of commencement.
JOSEPH EDWARD MERRYFIELD.
E. Spro, Agent,
Dated April 4, 1911. 4-7
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Lynn Sutherland, of El Paso, Texas, U. S. A., occupation auditor, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 40 chains south
and 120 chains east of the S. E. corner of Lot 35; thence north 80
chains; thence east SO chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence west ' 80
chains, containing 640 acres.
LYNN SUTHERLAND.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 25, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Arthur W.
Nelson, of Chicago, 111., U. S. A., occupation clerk, Intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing
at a post planted about 4 % mlleB
north of the S. E. corner of T. L.
40859; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence south
80 chains; thence west 80 chains,
containing 640 acres.
ARTHUR W. NELSON.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 27, 1910.
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Oliver
Typewriter
—FOR—
Seventeen Cents a Day
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again. Then its tremendous significance will dawn upon you!
An Oliver Typewriter—the standard visible writer—the most highly
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The typewriter whose conquest of
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Keyboard"—all
Yours For 17 Cents a Day
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Wesley Singer, of Masset, B. C, occupation farmer, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing ai a post planted about 4 miles north of the N. W
corner of T. L. 40859; thence south
80 chains; thence west    80    chains
thence north 80 chains; thence east
SO chains, containing 640 acres.
WESLEY SINGER.
M. A. Merrill, Agent
Dated Nov. 27, 19i|0.
Skeena    Land    District—District    of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that I, Joseph
Pastl, of Watson, Sask., occupation
fanner, Intend to apply for permission tu purchase the following described lands:— Commencing at a
post planted about 30 calns in a
northerly direction from the N. E.
corner of Lot No. 2602 or T. L. No.
:125ns at Lakelse Lake; tlience north
20 cliains; thence east 40 chains;
thence south 20 chains along shore
of Lakelse Lake; thence west 40
cliains to point of commencement,
containing 120 acres, more or less.
JOSEPH PASTL.
George Hlr, Agent.
Dated  May  5,  1911. 6-2
of
Skeena   Land    District—District
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that I, John i.
Rochester, of Prince Rupert, occupation broker, intend to apply fir permission to lease the following described land:— Commencing at a
post planted on the northerly end of
an island in the Skeena River about
Mile 45 on the Grand Trunk Pacific
Railway; thence north 1000 feet
more or less to low water mark;
I hence westerly along the low water
mark 1000 feet more or less;
tlience southerly 1000 feet more or
less; tnence easterly 1000 feet to
I'c place of coniii.enceinent.
J. Y. ROCHESTER.
Dated May 30, 1911. 6-2
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast Range 5.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles
James Gillingham, of Prince Rupert,
■occupation contractor, Intends to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner of Lot 992 and
marked C. J. Gillingham's N. E.
Corner Application for Purchase; I,
C. J. Gilllngham, intend to apply
for permission to purchase 320 acres
of land bounded as follows:—Commencing at this post; thence 80
chains south; thence 40 chains west;
thence 80 chains north; thence 40
chains east to place of commencement.
CHARLES JAMES GILMNQHA.Y
Robtirt Osborn Jennings, Agent.
Dated  January 5,  1911.
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that Annie Klrkaldy, of Melville, Sask., occupation
married woman, intends to apply for
p ernilssion to purchase the following
described lands-:—Commencing at a
post planted 120 chains southwesterly from Herman Lake; thence west
80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
tlience east 80 chains; thence north
80 chains, containing 640 acres more
or less.
ANNIE KIRKALDY.
John Klrkaldy, Agent.
Dated May 13, 1911. 5-19
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
TAKE NOTICE' that George
Rudge, of Port Simpson, occupation
marble worker, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 2 miles in a
southerly direction from mouth of
Union Bay and on south side of Bay;
thence south 20 chains; thence west
20 cliains; thence north 20 chains to
shore; thence following shore In an
easterly direction to point of commencement, containing 40 acres
more or less.
GEORGE RUDGE.
Lionel Crippen, Agent.
Staked 11th May, 1911. 5-23
For Job Printing of all kinds see
The Journal man.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that A. Walter De
Lisle, of Masset, B. C, occupation
farmer, Intends to apply for permis-
sionu to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 40 chains south
and 120 chains east of the S. E. corner of Lot 35; thence south 80
chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence east
80 chains, containing 640 acres.
A. WALTER DE LISLE.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 25. 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Fred. A. De
Lisle, of Masset, B. C, occupation
farmer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described Iands:—Commencing at
post planted about 40 chains south
and 120 chains east of the S. E. corner of Lot 35; thence north 80
chains; thence west 80 chains;
tlience south 80 chains; thence
east 80 ehains, containing 640 acres
FRED.  A.   DE  LISLE.
M. A. Merrill, Agent
Dated Nov. 25, 1910.
Skeena Land District-—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Frank Nelson,
of Chicago, 111., U. S. A., occupation
clerk, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following de
scribed lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about one mile north of
N. W. corner of Application to Purchase 6953; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence north
80 chains; thence east 80 chains, containing 640 acres.
FRANK NELSON.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 25, 1910.
Skeena  |Land   District—District   of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that William H.
Hargrave, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation banker, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lanas:—Commencing at a post planted on the west
shore of Lakelse Lake, and about
1% miles distant and in a southwesterly direction from the S. W.
corner of Lot 3982, Skeena Land
District, District of Coast, Range V;
thence west 40 chains; thence south
80 chains, more or less, to the shore
of Lakelse Lake; thence following
the shore of said lake to point of
commencement, containing 160
acres more or less.
WILLIAM H. HARGRAVE.
Mancell Clark, Agent.
Dated 20th March,  1911.
GRAHAM ISLAND — "The surest
sign of the progress of a town cr
district Is Its newspaper—live, active, hustling." "The Masset Re-
vlev," Masset, Q.i;..
We announced this new sales plan
recently, just to feel the pulse of the
people. Simply a small cash payment—then 17 cents a day. That
is the plan in a nutshell.
The result has been such a deluge of applications for machines
that we are simply astounded.
The demand comes from people of
all classes, all ages, all occupations.
The majority of Inquiries has
come from people of known financial
standing who were attracted by the
novelty of the proposition. An Impressive demonstration*** the Immense popularity of tho Oliver Typewriter.
A startling confirmation of our belief that the Era of Universal Typewriting Is at hand.
A Quarter of a Million People are
Making Money With
T!)6.
OLIVET}
The Standard  Visible  Writer
The Oliver Typewriter Is a moneymaker, right from the word "go!" So
easy to run that beginners soon get
in the "expert" class. Earn as you
learn. Let the machine pay the 17
cents a day—and all above that is
yours.
Wherever you are, there's work to
be done and money to be made by
using the Oliver. The business world
is calling for Oliver operators. There
are not enough to supply the demand.
Their salaries are considerably above
those of many classes of workers.
"An Oliver Typewriter in
Every Home!"
That Is our battle cry today. We
have made the Oliver supreme In
usefulness and absolutely indispensable in business. Now comes the
conquest of the home.
The simplicity and strength of the
Oliver fit it for family use. It is becoming an important factor in the
home training of young people. An
educator as well as a money maker.
Our new selling plan puts the
Oliver on the threshold of every
home in America. Will you close
the door of your home or office on
this remarkable Oliver opportunity?
Write for further details of our
easy otter and a free copy of the new
Oliver catalogue.    Address:
R. C. BEAN
Prince Rupert Agent
General   Offices:   Oliver   Typewriter
Ruilding, Chicago, 111.
MISS HENNV WENNERS1^\
SWEDISH SPECIALIST
Electric, * acial and Scalp treatment;
Scientific Massage treatment for
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Tuesday, July 4, 1911
PRINCE  RUPERT JOURNAL
TRIBUTE TO BRAVE
Dawson News Recalls the fl.rjic Acts
of Mounted Police Party That
Perished From Hunger.
The  Fight   Against  Fate  That  Was
Put up by Little Band in
tlie Arctic
Yukon bends today In sorrow.
The loss of the Macpherson-Dawson
patrol will be written indelibly on
the history of the Northland, says
the Dawson News, referring to the
loss of the Royal Northwest Mounted
Police Patrol. The heroism In the
last struggles of the members of the
little band.will make their names
imperishable In the chronicles of
Arctic expeditions. Vast is is Britain's domain, no such desperate
struggle before has been recorded by
her frontiersmen or explorers within
the Arctic zone. Yukon has known
many a tragedy. Yukoners in large
numbers perished in such disasters
as the Islander wreck, the Chilkoot
disaster and the burning of the Columbian. But none of these tragedies carried with them that singular element of adventure and heroism in face of awful privation suffered by those brave Britons, Fitzgerald,  Carter,  Taylor  and   Kinney.
They failed in their undertaking
to cross the Rockies, and were not
successful on a trail which lu.d been
negotiated successfully several times
by other parties. But that does not
diminish the magnificence of their
fortitude and their devotion to duty
and their country. The men perished by virtue of having lost their
course. They were lost by reason
of having no familiarity with the
route. A mistake was made that a
party frith so meagre knowledge of
the country should ever have been
launched on such a hazardous expedition without- a native guide for the
entire distance. Natives have been
known to lose their way in that region, but very seldom.
The Fitzgerald party deserves the
encomiums of an empire for the reason it fought for success and strove
to push forward until there was not
the slightest hope to succeed on the
forward track. The men turned
back only because they knew the
track back. They were as far or
farther from Macpherson than Dawson. Only ten to fourteen days
would have brought them through
to Dawson, yet they traveled fully
a month or more on the back track,
and then with scarcely a handful of
supplies. They had hazarded their
lives for days seeking blindly in bitter January temperature of perhaps
70 below zero the course that would
lead over the Rockies to the Dawson
side. They wandered long about the
head of the Wind River. At last
they could see that here was no
longer reason In attempting to go
forward . In fact, they came to the
conclusion too late. Had they
started back earlier they would have
been safe. Their strength held out
to within two or three days of their
homes. Had they but started back
three or four days earlier; in fact,
started back at the end of the time
they had calculated on getting Into
Dawson their supplies and their dogs
would have seen them safely in Macpherson. But fate had decreed It
otherwise. No doubt their devotion
to duty was their chief zeal. But a
time comes when It is the greater
duty to save oneself than to be uselessly sacrificed fighting an inexorable foe, such as a blinding mountain barrier and pitiless cold and
storm.
No one living will ever know the
real fortitude of that intrepid little
band, struggling day after day, subsisting on the flesh of dogs, devouring at last the deer thongs of the toboggans and perhaps the harness.
No human heart ever will know how
the comr-.Jes bent to their work
and encouraged each other while
sickened, heartsore and footsore,
over the unbroken course. The
Great Trail Guide alone knows, and
for such brave souls there can be
naught but high reward. Determined
as were all, Fitzgerald was a true
leader. No man at the head of a
charging column on a battlefield apparently ever displayed more mental fortitude. His kindest attention
to his last fallen companion attests
the man's keen mentality to the end.
In all probability the sense of the
responsibility for the entire party
and an unflinching control of mind
over weakening flesh alone kept him
doggedly struggling until after the
others had yielded.
Canada, In all her years, has no
heroes more deserving a memorial.
Canada, In all her time, may not be
able to point with more Just pride
to an example of greater fortitude
under as trying circumstances ' In
Arctic  travel.    True,  it  was     In  re
treat, but it has been said that to
conduct a successful retreat arten-
umes requires greater skill than to
advance. So far is sun.! es and
strength bore up the men, their
fight was victory.
Dempster and his men of the rescue party deserve praise for a magnificent achievement. They also encountered a bitter storm returning.
Splendid reward should await the
leader, but his party had an advam
tage of knowing the course, the
point wherein the others utterly
failed.
It will be long before the horror
of the shock of the Dawson-Macpher-
son patrol will be forgotten in the
Yukon. In far lands hearts of loving mothers, wives and sweethearts
are broken. Their sacrifice to the
Empire cannot be replaced to them,
and the Empire can ill afford to lose
such splendid men—matchless men
of the type that makes Canadians
proud of their Canadianship and
British proud to be Britishers.
The brave little band lies buried
beneath the snows in the village at
far Macpherson. There the simple
rites were said, and there Yukon
and Canada will hold ever in grateful remembrance the deeds of Fitzgerald, Taylor, Kinney and Carter.
As a testimonial* a memorial service
in Dawson, where some of the party
were known, and where Carter long
made his home, would be a fitting
final  tribute.
But this not alone should be the
last respects.    Time should see a fitting memorial erected to these men,
and doubtless will.
How  sleep  the  brave,  who  sink  to
rest
By all their country's wishes blest!
When spring with dewy fingers cold
Returns    to    deck    their    hallowed
mould,
There honor comes, a pilgrim grey,
To bless the earth that wraps their
clay.
 o	
VALUABLE BARK
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that James Mul-
lin, of Murdo, So. Dakota, U. S. .A.,
occupation farmer, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands: — Commencing at a post planted on the
shore of Masset Inlet, about one
mile northeast of the mouth of tbe
Ain River; thence west 40 chains,
more or less, to the eastern boundary of T. L. 35414; thence south
60 chains, more or less to the shore
of Masset Inlet? thence northeasterly along the shore to point of
commencement, containing 60 acres
more or less.
JAMES   MULLIN.
G. S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated Feb.  24th, 1911.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE t at J. K Anderson, of Masset, B. C, occupation farmer, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted on the shore of Masset Inlet,
about two miles west of the S. W.
corner of T. L. 40787, thence north
80 chains; thence west 40 chains;
thence south 80 chains more or less
to the shore of Masset Inlet; thence
easterly along tbe shore back to the
place of commencement, containing
320 acres, more or less.
J. K. ANDERSON.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 25, 1910.
COAL MINES ACT
Skeena    Land    District—District    ot
Cassiar.    ,
TAKE NOTICE that Charles j.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, ii.tends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Commencing at post planted 6%
miles N. E. of the mouth of the
White River and the junction of the
Naas, marked Chas. J. Gillingham's
S. E. Corner; thence 80 chains
North; thence 80 chains West;
thence 80 chains South; thence 80
chains East to point of commencement and containing 640 acres more
or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles M. Huff, Agent.
Dated March 4, 1911. 4-18
Raw   Cuscaru   Is   Likely   to  Be  Obtained  in ijurge Quantities
on Vancouver Island
According to Mr. F. E. Corneille,
a merchandise broker now resident
in Victoria, who represents large
manufacturing interests using cas-
cara bark in the products they turn
out, the supply of raw cascara In
Washington and Oregon, the two
states upon which the manufacturers
have depended largely heretofore, is
almost exhausted and fresh supplies
must be found.
Vancouver Island, Mr. Corneille
declares, is known to these interests
as perhaps the most prolific district
in the raising of the tree from which
the bark is obtained, in the entire
west. Mr. Corneille is seeking to
establish the trade and says that his
principals can take four carloads of
the bark at once, at good prices laid
down at tide water. It is probable
that residents of the several districts
where the cascara bark is most
plentiful will engage at once in the
work of peeling and gathering it
and, if what the broker says turns
out to be correct, a new industry on
that island is in fair way of being
established.
The gathering and marketing of
the cascara bark is not wholly new
to the island. The earliest settlers
learned the efficacy of the bark from
the Indians who used its properties
quite skilfully in their rude medicines. The tree which produces this
bark is known familiarly as the barberry tree. It resembles the alder-
wood tree to some extent but its
bark is rougher and it is found
mostly in swampy, low places. This
tree is common in almost all parts
of the island but there are certain
districts only where It Is lo be found
In what might be considered really
profitable quantities. Within the
past few months more than 100 tons
of the bark were shipped from the
Little River district and smaller
quantities have been exported from
time to time from other districts.
 o	
PRISONERS'   PROTECTION
VICTORIA—In accordance with
suggestions made by Fire Chief Davis and emphasized by the grand
jury serving at the recent session of
the asisze court in this city, Instructions have been issued for the further improvement of the fire protection and alarm system at the Victoria provincial jail, while correspondence is taking place with a
view to the possible substitution of
electricity for gas as an lllumlnant
and a universal release system will
be installed, all cell doors being in
cases of emergency opened by means
of a single lever operated from the
warden's offices. The suggestion
that a new provincial jail be provided will not be taken up until Attorney General Bowser returns from
the old country, when it is expected
that the proposal will obtain ministerial  consideration.
Skeena Land DlBtrlct-—District of
Queen Charlote Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Wirt A. Stevens, of Chicago, 111., U. S. A., occupation civil engineer, intends to
apply for permission to purchase
the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on
the shore of Masset Inlet about one
mile northeast of the mouth of the
Ain River; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 40 chains more or less
to the eastern boundary of T. L.
35413; . thence south along the
boundary of T. L. 35413 and
T. L. 35414, a distance of 80 chains;
thence east 40 chains, more or less,
to point of commencement, containing  320  acres more  or less.
WIRT   A.   STEVENS.
G. S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated Feb.  24th,  1911.
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Oiissiiir
TAKJ NOTICE that Charles J.
Gilllngham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Comencing at a post planted 7 miles
N. E. of tbe mouth of the White
River and the junction of the Naas,
marked Chas. J. Gillingham's S. E.
Corner; thence 80 chains North;
thence 80 chains West; thence 80
chains South; thence 80 chains East
to point of commencement and containing 640 acres more or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles M. Huff, Agent.
Dated March 5th, 1911. 4-18
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that I, Roy,
Chrisman, of Port Esslngton, B. C.
occupation, prospector, intend to apply for permission to lease the following described land:—Commencing at a post planted about five
miles distant and in a southwesterly
direction from the point at the entrance to Captain Cove, Petrel
Channel, and on the northeast side
of McCauley Island; thence west 20
chains; thence south 40 chains;
thence east about 20 chains to shore
of Petrel Channel; thence northerly
along shore line of Petrel Channel
to point of commencement and con
taining eighty acres more or less.
ROY CHRISMAN.
Dated April 11, 1911. 4-25
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that W. H. Fergu
son, of Prince Rupert, B. C, occupation tivil engineer, intends to apply for ,iermission to purchase the
following described lands:—Com
mencing at a post planted about one
mile southerly, following the sinuosities of the shore line from the
southwest corner of Lot 104, Range
V; thence 20 chains west; thence 20
chains south; thence 20 chains west,
thence 20 chains south; thence 20
chains west; thence about 40 chains
south; thence along shore northerly
to point of commencement.
W. H. FERGUSON.
G. Hansen, Agent.
Dated April 22nd, 1911. 4-25
Skeena Land District-—District of
Coast
TAKE NOTICE that F. T. Saunders, of Vancouver, occupation master
mariner, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands:— Commencing at a
post planted about 6 miles northwest of Love Inlet on the north
east shore of Pitt Island; thence
south 20 chains; thence west 40
chains; thence north to shore;
thence following shore In a southeasterly direction to point of commencement , containing 80 acres
more or less.
FRANK TAUNTON SAUNDERS,
Locator.
W. Hamilton, Agent.
Staked 17th, Feb., 1911.
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Commencing at a post planted 7%
miles N. E. of the mouth of the
White River and the junction of the
Naas and marked Chas. J. Gillingham's S. E. Corner; thence 80
chains North; thence 80 chains
West; thence 80 chains South;
thence 80 chains East to point of
commencement and containing 640
acres more or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Oharles M. Huff, Agent.
Dated March 5th, 1911. 4-18
ihence  80   chains  North;   thence  80
'l.ains   West;      thence     80     chains
oath;   then.ee   SO   chains     East    to
• nt   of   commencement   and     con-
...ning 640 acres more or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles  M.  Huff,  Agent.
Dated March 4th, 1911. 4-18
Skeena    Land    District—District    of
Pn CGI 51 T"
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J. I
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C.
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for |
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Commencing at u post planted about
8 miles N. E. of the mouth of White
River and the junction of the Naas
River, marked Chas. J. Gillingham's
S. E. Corner; thence 80 chains
North; thence 80 chains West;
thence 80 chains South; thence 80
chains East to point of commencement and containing 640 acres more
or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles M. Huff, Agent.
Dated March 6th, 1911. 4-18
Skeena   Land    District—District   of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Commencing at a post planted about
S miles N. E. of th> mouth of White
River and the junction of the Naas
River, marked Chas. J. Gillingham's
S. E. Corner; thence 80 chains
North; thence 80 chains West;
thence 80 chains South; thence 80
chains East lo point of commencement and containing 640 acres mo: 3
or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles M. Huff, Agent.
Dated March 6th, 1911. 4-18
Skeena
of
Land   District—District
Oil ssi li v
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Commencing at a post planted 7 Vfe
miles N. E. of the mouth of the
White River and the junction of the
Naas, marked Chas. J. Gillingham's
S. E. Corner; thence 80 »hains
North; thence 80 chains West
thence 80 chains South; thence 80
chains East to point of commencement and containing 640 acres more
or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM
Charles M. Huff, Agent.
Dated March  5th,  1911. 4-18
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for a
license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Commencing at a post planted about
8 miles N. E. of the mouth of the
White River and the junction of the
Naas, marked Chas. J. Gillingham's
S. E. Corner; thence 80 chains
North; thence 80 chains West;
thence 80 chains South; thence 80
chains East to point of commencement and containing 640 acres more
or less.
CHARLES   J.   GILLINGHAM.
Charles M. Huff, Agent.
Dated March 6th,  1911. 4-18
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gilllngham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Commencing at a post planted 6 %
miles N. E. of the mouth of the
White River and the junction of the
Naas, and marked Chas. J. Gillingham's S. E. Corner; thence 80
chains Nortn; thence 80 cuains
West; thence 80 chains South;
thence 80 chains East to point of
commencement and containing 640
acres more or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles M. Huff, Agent.
Dated March 4th, 1911. 4-18
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that George Stanley Mayer, of Masset, B. C., occupation farmer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted on the east shore of
Tsu Skundale Lake; thence east 80
chains; thence south 40 chains, more
or less, to the north boundary of
T. L. 35413; tlience west and south
along the boundaries of T. L. 35413,
to the shore of the Ain River; thence
northerly a'ong the shore, back to
the place of commencement, containing 500 acres, more or less.
GEORGE STANLEY MAYER.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 28, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Robert Cross,
of Masset, B. C, occupation farmer.
Intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted on the east shore of Tsu Skundale
Lake; thence east SO chains; thence
north 80 chains, to or near to the
S. E. corner of Lot 35; thence west
40 chains, more or less; thence
south 40 chains, more or less; thence
west 40 chains more or less, following the southern boundaries of Lot
35; thence south to the shore; thence
southerly along the shore back to the
place of commencement, containing
500 acres, more or less.
ROBERT  CROSS.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov.  28,  1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Christina Orr,
ol Masset, B. C, occupation married,
Intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described
lands: —Commencing at a post planted about 40 chains south and 3 miles
east of the N. E. corner of Lot 35;
thence touth 40 chains; thence west
80 chains; thence north 40 chains;
thence east 80 chains, containing 320
acres.
CHRISTINA ORR.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 25, 1910.
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE thi.t Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for a
license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Commencing at a post planted about
8 miles N. E. of the mouth of the
White River and the junction of the
Naas, marked Chas. J. Gillingham's
S. E. Corner; thence 80 chains
North; thence 80 chains West;
thence 80 chains South; thence 80
chains East to point of commencement and containing 640 acres more
or less.
CHARLES   J.   GILLINGHAM.
Charles M. Huff, Agent.
Dated  March  6th,  1911. 4-18
Skeent Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Clara Orr, of
.Masset, B C., occupation spinster,
intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted about 40 chains south and 80
chains east of the N. E. corner of
Lot 35; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence north
80 chains; thence east 80 chains, containing 640 acres.
CLARA ORR.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 25, 1910.
WATER NOTICE.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Merton A.
Merrill, of Masset, B. C, occupation
prospector, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted at the S. W. corner of
T. L. 40787; thence north 80 chains;
thence w.est 80 chains; tlience south
80 chains, more or less, to the shore
of Masset Inlet; thence easterly along
the shore back to the place of commencement, containing 640 acres,
more or less.
MERTON A. MERRILL.
Dated Nov. 25, 1910.
Skeena Land District—Dlstrlet of
Queen  Charlotte  Island.
TAKE NOTICE  that Robert Fra- j
ser    Ogilvle, of Vancouver, occupation   banker,   intends   to   apply   for
permission to purchase the folowlng
described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 2 miles west of
the  southwest  corner  of A.  P.   12-1
037;  thence east 80 chains;  thence
north   80   chains;   thence   west   80 '
chains;   thence  south   80  chains  to
point of commencement, containing
640 acres.
ROBERT FRASER OGILVIE.
Arthur  Robertson,  Agent.
Dated Dec.  9,  1910.
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Commencing at a post planted about
S miles N. E. of the mouth of White
River and the junction of the Naas
River, marked Charles J. Gillingham's S. E. Corner; thence 80
chains North; thence 80 chains
West; thence 80 chains Soutli;
thence 80 chains East to point of
commencement and containing 640
acres more or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles M. Huff, Agent.
Dated March 5th, 1911. 4-18
of
J.
Skeena Land District—District of
of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that James G.
Crombie, of Prince Rupert, occupation auditor, Intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:— Commencing at a
post planted at the northwest corner, 55 chains east and 20 chains
south from northeast corner of Lot
1116 (Horry Survey), Coast Dist.,
range 5; thence 20 chains east;
thence 25 chains, more or less,
south to Angus McLeod Pre-emption; thence 20 chains west; thence
25 chains, more or less, north, to
post of commencement, containing
50 acres, more or less.
JAMES   G.   CROMBIE.
Fred Bohlen, Agent.
Dated June  14,  1911. 6-23
Skeena    Land    District—District
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles
Gilllngham, of Prince Rupert, B. C.,j
occupation contractor, intends to j
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land:—-
Commencing at a post planted 6%
miles N. E. of the mouth of White
River and thi junction of the Naas,
marked Chas. J. Gillingham's S. E.
Corner; thence SO chains North;
thence 80 chains West; thence SO
chains South; thence 80 chains East
to point of commencement and containing 640 acres more or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles M. Huff, Agent.
Dated March  ith,  1911. 4-18
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gilllngham, of Prince'Rupert, B, C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 6-10 acres of land: —
Commencing at a post planted six
miles N. E. of the mouth of White
River and the junction of the Naas
River on Canyon Creek, marked
Chas. J. Gillingham's S. E. Corner;
NOTICE is hereby given that an
application will be made under Part
V. of the "Water Act, li)09," to obtain a licence in the Queen Charlotte Islands Division of Skeena District.
(a) The name, address and occupation of the applicant—Merton A.
Merrill, Masset, Q. C. I., B. C,
Prospector.
(If for mining purposes) Free
Miner's  Certificate  No	
(b) The name of the lake,
stream, or source (if unnamed, the
description is)—I-in-tsua Lake, Tsu-
Skundale Lake and Ain River.
(c) The point of diversion-^At r
near the outlet of Tsu-Skundale
Lake into Ain River.
(d) The quantity of water applied for (in cubic feet per second)
—1,000.
(e) The character of the proposed works—Power Plant, Dam,
Flumes, etc.
(f) The premises on which the
water Is to be used (describe same)
—At or near the mouth of the Ain
River.
(g) The purposes for which the
water Is to be used—Generating
power.
(h) If for irrigation, describe
ihe land intended to be Irrigated,
giving acreage	
(I) If the water Is to be used for
power or mining purposes, describe
H19 place where the water Is to be
returned to some natural channel,
and the difference in altitude between point of diversion and point
of return—At or near the mouth of
the Ain River, about 100 feet below
point of diversion.
(j) Area of Crown land Intended to be occupied by the proposed
works—10  acres more or less.
(k) This notice was posted on
the 28th day of November, 1910,
and application will be made to the
Commissioner on the 1st day of
June,  1911.
(1) Give the names and addresses of any riparian proprietors or
licensees who or whose lands are
likely to be affected by the proposed works, either above or below
the outlet—Don't know of any.
(Signature)
MERTON   A.   MERRILL,
(P.   O.   Address)   Massee,   B.  C.
NOTE.—One cubic tool per second Is equivalent to .'15.71 miner's
inches.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Carl Nelson,
of Chicago, 111., U. S. A., occupation
draughtsman, Intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about SO chains east
and 120 cliains north of N. E. corner of Lot 35; tlience south 80
chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence west
80 chains, containing 640 acres.
CARL NELSON.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated, Nov. 26, 1910.
Skeena    Land    District—District   of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that Freadrick
Madden, of Seattle, Wash., occupation laborer, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described land:—Commencing at a
post planted about two hundred feet
east of mile 77 on the south side of
G. T. P. Right-of-way; thence west
40 chains following the said Right-
of-way; thence south to bank of
Skeena River; thence east following
the sinuosities of said river until
due south of said post; thence north
10 point of commencement, contaln-
ihg 130 acres more or less.
FREADRICK MADDEN.
Thos. L. Fay, Agent.
Dated April 27, 1911.
5-16
Job Printing of all kinds neatly
executed at the Journal Office.
NOTICE.
A book Is kept In the City Clerk's
Office In which to enter the names
and addresses, etc, of citizens of
Prince Rupert desiring employment
on City work. All desiring employment should register at once.
ERNEST A.  WOODS,
City Clerk.
Prince  Rupert   Private   Detective
  Agency 	
N. McDonald, Manager
All kinds of legitimate detective work
handled  for companies and  Individuals.     Business strictly  confidential.
P. O. Box 803 — Phone 210
I
If you  want tbe honey
That  conies  from  the
Take up the phone and
Cull one, double five.
hive PRINCE RlPERT JOURNAL
Tuesday, July 4, 1911
prince mmjommx COMMISSION COMING
Telephone   1:18
Published  twice a  week  on Tues- .
days and  Fridays from the office of  Railway Ulirt  Will Hold  a  Sitting  in
Prince Rupert on August
19.
publication,     Third     Avenue,     near
McBride Street.
Subscription  rate  to any  point in
Canada, $2.00 a year;  to points out- 	
side of Canada, J3.0U a year.
Advertising    rates    furnished    on  TouI.(1 „,- Various Western  Points Is
application. „    ., ,,    ,     ,.     .,   .
lei  lie  Muile ley  the  Body
During \c\i Month
0. H. NELSON,
Editor.
" rii*"'
Tuesday, July 4, mil
PERNICIOUS   PRACTICE
There is a pernicious practice
which Is all too prevalent In this city
of taking liberty with the reputations of men who may occupy public
positions en- who live even in private
walks. This is all the more to be
frowned upon because the community is as yet comparatively small and
the circulation en' such reports is
calculated to work greater injury to
those against whom they are directed than if the city were larger.
Last evening the council listened
to most damaging charges being
itimed at members of the board, although the person hurling them out
so freely took the ground that he did
not pretend to substantiate them,
but stated that he only said people
were saying that this was true.
Surely. Aid. Newton will concede
that the floating out of charges on
such a foundation is not fair to those
against whom the accusations are
made. We have nn desire to screen
any one, but in a spirit of what is
fair, surely, accusations should not
be made against any one without
stronger grounds for these charges
than is to be found in the gossip of
the street. A man's reputation in
the community is surely not to be
trifled with quite so easily as that.
If there are charges to be made
against any one let them be made
on   facts and  not on  gossip.
According to Information sent out
from Ottawa the Railway Commission will sit here on August 1 :i to
dispose of any applications that are
to be argued here.
The commission is to make a tour,
sitting at Port Arthur on August ID
and al Fort William on the day fol-
lowlng. Then the commissioners
will jump half way across the conti-
le-in to hold Ihe third session at
Prince Ruperl on August 19 and
subsequently at Vancouver on August 31.
'J'hey will be at Calgary September
8; Edmonton, September 11; Regi-
na, September 14 and Winnipeg on
September  15,
 o	
ATTENDED GRAND  LODGE
REC
EATION GROUNDS
Each succeeding celebration in the
city brings more forcibly than its
predecessors the need that exists
here for a recreation park of some
kind. With the increase in population the necessity becomes greater
both from the standpoint of the
young men and boys who train and
take part in the sports and also from
the standpoint of the citizens who
wish to attend and watch the sports.
Through no fault or the committee in charge, the sports of Saturday were sadly marred by Hie impossibility of seeing the events in
anything like a satisfactory way.
Crowded together on a narrow
street the citzens failed to witness
with any degree of comfort and the
participants were handicapped in no
small measure by the narrow space
given them. This is not written in
a spirit of fault-finding with any
one. Succeeding committees have
tried their best to arrange matters
so that they would be satisfactory,
bul without solving the trouble. The
The only solution seems to be the
providing of a recreation ground of |
some kind.
With the acquisition of the park
sites from the Grand Trunk Pacific
by the e-iiy, which now seems settled.
something should be done to fit up
a small area where sports can beheld. Even a small beginning might
be made at an early date without
involving much expense. A good lo-
catlon is said to be found on Acropolis Hill, where an early start should
be muile In draining so that the
preparation of tlte- seeii may follow at.
an early time.
It possible, something should be
(lone before any Dominion Day, lo
provide for a suitable place to hold
the sports. The long evenings that
are so characteristic of this latitude
Is an Incentive to sports of various
kinds If suitable grounds could he-
provided.
M.   Stephens   Returns   from   An.
una! Communication Held
in Victoria
M. M. Stephens has returned from
the annual communication of the
Most Worthy Grand Lodge, A. F. &
A. M., of British Columbia, which
was held in Victoria, a few days ago.
Mr. Stephens has been made a grand
lodge officer, being Grand Superintendent of Works. The officers of
the Grand Lodge for the year are as
follows:
M. W. Bro. Francis J. Burd, Grand
Masterd; R. W. Bro. Arthur H.
Skey, Deputy Grand Master; R. W.
Bro. John M. Rudd, Senior Grand
Warden; R. W. Bro. William Henderson, Junior Grand Warden; M.
W. Bro. Harry II. Watson, Grand
Treasurer; V. W. Bro. W. A.
DeWolf-Smith, Grand Secretary; V.
W. Bro. T. Mitchell, Sr., Grand
Tyler. V. W. Bro. Rev. II. G. Fien-
nes- Clinton, Grand Chaplain; R. W.
Bro. P. J. Riddell, D. D. G. M. District No. 1; R. VV. Bro. Angus Munn,
11. I). G. M District No. 2; R. W.
Bro. Chas. II. Gatewood, D. D. G. M.
District No. 2a; R W. Bro. L. II.
Fraser, D. D. G. M. District No. 3;
R. W. Bro. P. F. McGregor, D. D.
G. M. District No. 4; R. W. Bro.
C. II. Barker, D. D. G. M. District
No. 5; R. W. Bro. Surtees J. Tow-
good, D. D. G. M. District No. 6;
It. W. Bro. George D. Clark, D. D.
G, M. District No. 7; R. W. Bro.
George G. Jewell, D. D. G. M. Districl No. 8; R. W. Bro. Gerald L.
Parker, D. D. G. M. District No. 9;
It. W. Bro. Eliel A Wert, D. D.
G. M. District No. 10; V. VV. Bro.
VV. A. DeWolf-Smith, Grand Historian; VV. Bro. Samuel A. Cawley,
Grand Senior Deacon; VV. Bro. Mat-
theni J. Barr, Grand Junior Deacon;
VV. Bro. William Astley, Grand Director of Ceremonies; VV. Bro. M.
McK. Stephens, Grand Superintendent of Works; VV. Bro. Stewart M.
.Manuel, Grand Marshal; VV. Bro.
John Warwick, Grand Sword Bearer; VV. Bro. Frederick VV. McLalne,
Grand Standard Hearer; VV. Bro.
Ernest II. Russell, Grand Organist;
w. Bro. Thos. Long. Grand Pursuivant; Grand Stewards—VV. Bros.
John II. Kilmer, ,1. C. Pitts,
Bridges, ('has. L. Wain, VV. II
er and  Robert Gordon.
AGAIN IN TROUBLE
Chas.
Fish-
Installation of Officers
The local lodge, I. 0. O. P., will
Install officers Ihis evening in the
lodge rooms. After the ceremony
the lodge will be at home to its
friends.
Stewart  Celebration
Stewarl celebrated Dominion Day
in royal'fashion. There was a large
attendance from outside places.
 o	
Entertained  Friends
Tlie Kaien Island Club gave a
most enjoyable dance last Friday.
Like all other functions arranged by
this popular club all the arrangements were perfect.
 o ■
Prince Rupert Coming
The Grand Trunk Pacific steamer
Prince Rupert will reach here tomorrow again on her regular schedule.
sin- will continue on the- run the
rest of the season. On Thursday
morning she will leave for Stewart,
thus giving the northern city a twice
B week service by means of I he-
Grand Trunk Pacific steamers. The
vessel  has  been  fully overhauled.
The   Hospital   Hoard  wll
Friday at the hospital.
meet on
SPOKANE WRECKED
(Continued From Page One.)
later found, but It Is feared that the
other has been lost.
The Admiral Sampson, which was
on her way south to Seattle from
Skagway, and the Grand Trunk Pacific steamer Prince George, which
had left Vancouver for Prince Rupert and Stewart, were both signalled by wireless and at once stood
by to render all necessary aid. The
American vessel look on all the passengers of the disabled steamer and
a portion of the crew and proceeded
on her way southward. After standing by for several hours, the Prince
George also continued on her way,
and the captain, mate, chief engineer
and cook, with some of the sailors,
were left alone on the vessel. All
efforts to keep her clear of water
were  discontinued.
Soon the water entered the engine
room and Ihe dynamo which operated the wireless apparatus, which
was considered the most up to date
on the coast, was flooded.
(Continued From Page One.)
should not make any more alluslcus
to  those  personal  matters.
Aid. Newton said he was leadi ig
up lo a motion to strike out t is
motion.
Aid. Douglas said that there was
no frame-up between himself and
Aid.  Newton.     He denied this.
Aid. Newton tried to explain, but
the chairman insisted that th-ay
should  keep to the question.
Aid. Claylon asked why this
amendment should be adopted.
Aid. Newton said that he thought
he could answer this. It was that
two bottle licensees wanted their licenses put through and this was intended  to allow It.
Aid. Morrissey said that men hud
put their money into a busiriess. He
did not favor doing something that
would cut them out.
Aid. Clayton wanted to have a
legal man consulted outside of the
city solicitor. He felt that any technicalities could be overcome without
this amendment.
Aid. Newton wanted to know
wliere these licenses were going to
end. He had no fear with respect
to the hotel keeprs. They would
have corner saloons soon. He would
not endorse the methods pursued.
Aid. Morrissey stated that the
commissioners were not to blame In
this matter at all.
After some further discussion Aid.
Kirkpatrick called attention to the
fact that it was after 11 o'clock (it
was almost twelve), which was the
hour  for  adjourning   automatically.
The question of a settlement did
not seem in sight and Aid. Kerr
moved that the committee rise in
order to consider the amendment at
a later meeting.
Aid, Hilditch, in amendment,
moved that the amendment pass
committee.
The latter amendment was voted
1836 1911
The Bank of
British North America
75 Vein In luilneis.
Capital and Reserve Over $7,300,000
Letters of Credit
For our customers' convenience
we issue Letters of Credit payable
in Pounds Sterling for use in
Great Britain and all parts of the
world, and payable in Dollars for
use in Canada, United States,
Mexico, Bermuda, Bahamas, Cuba
aud the West Indies.
We buy and sell Draft9 on
France, Germany, South Africa,
Australia, New Zealand, India,
China and the West Indies.
Prince Rupert Branch —
F. S. LONG, Manager.
Jaegers
Pure Wool
Clothing and
Bedding
Wool is Ihe most equable
clothing. Heing a bail heal
conductor, wool does not feel
hot iii u high temperature,
nor cold in a low. The general
belief Hint woollen clothing is
peculiarly wann and enervating is entirely wrong. Wool
protects against beat as much
ns against cold and by its bud
beat-conductivity lessens the
effect of sudden changes of
temperature, thus hardening
instead of cuci-vating; I. e.,
rendering the body indifferent
to such changes.
The Jaeger name nnd Trade
.Mark guarantees Pure Wool in
place of mixtures containing
cotton or other adulterants.
We have secured the exclusive agency for this celebrated
line and a small consignment
has arrived. More are on the
way anil you can order nny
special line desired from the
catalogue and price list, which
may be bud for the asking.
This catalogue contains much
valuable Information,  Oct one.
SLOAN & CO.
Otll  Street P.  O.   Box  (122
■»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦
down and the motion to rise carried.
Aid. Newton, upon the council re-j
suming proposed the six months'
hoist in order to kill the amendment,
but this was lost, so that the amendment will come up at the next meeting  again.
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that T. M. Turner,
of Lakelse Valley, occupation farmer, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands: — Commencing at a post
planted on the Omineca & Hazelton
right of way and adjoining the N. E.
corner of Lot 518; thence west 17
chains to corner of Lot 3996; thence
norlh 20 chains; thence following
right of way to point of commencement.
T. M. TURNER,
John Kirkaldy, Agent.
Dated  14th June,  1911. 7-4
it»;. •;. *;..;. * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
iRetnemberi
•J* *%*
i That we
I Import    ]
I Our Wines I
* direct from Europe; and that
*:* no house In Prince Rupert can
* equal   them   for  quality.     No
* better can be bought anywhere
.;. in the Province. We make a
.;. specialty  of
Family Trade
and guarantee satisfaction
* *
* •:•
^ We  also   carry  a  complete *
* stock of other *
Liquors
*
Try a glass of
Cascade
Beer
The best local  beer on  the  y
market.
CLARKE BROS.
Christiansen & Brandt Bid.
*   Telephone 30        Third Avenue  *
**************************
The British Columbia Company
LIMITED.
AUTHORIZED CAPITAL $100,000.::  PAID UP CAPITAL $41,500
DIRECTORS:—Reginald C. Brown, President; J. C. Maclure, Vice-
President; H. E. Marks, Managin g Director; Capt. E. Nash, William
McNair, R. A.  Bevan, and P.  C.   Williams, Secretary.      :-:      :-:
INTEREST 4 PER CENT. DEPOSITS
This Company acts as Executors,  Administrators, Transferees and
Secretaries to Public Companies.    Commercial, Industrial and other
business propositions underwritten.    Issues  made  on  the
London and New York Stock Exchanges.
TIMBER, COAL, LANDS, and
COMPANY ORGANIZATION
Head Office for Canada, 203, 208, 210, 215 Cartcr-Cotton Building,
VANCOUVER, B.C.
The Staneland Co. Ltd
■is Tin-:
Paint Supply House
of British Columbia
ALL GOODS ARE GUARANTEED
WRITE FOR PRICES AND SAMPLES
The Staneland Co. Ltd
836-840 Fort Street, VICTORIA, B.C.
W
r
■
■
■
■
Replenish
the
Pantry
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
High-Class....
Grocery
Stock
to choose from
EVERYTHING CLEAN AND FRESH
Goods for the Table to Suit the Mo3l
Fastidious Housewife
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
1
I
I
I
I
I
1 MERRYFIELD'S I
i
i
i
k
CASH GROCERY
I
I
.J
TIDES AT PRINCE iRUPERT, JULY, 1911
HIGH WATER
LOW WATER
DATE   AND   DAY       | Timo| Ht | Time| Ht|| Time) fit |Timef Ht
1 j  Saturday  .
2 1  Sunday.    .
Monday   .
Tuesday  .
Wednesday
Thursday   .
Friday.   .   .
Saturday   .
Sunday  .   .
Monday .   .
Tuesday.   .
Wednesday
Thursday  .
Friday.    .
Saturday  ,
Sunday .   .
Monday.   .
Tuesday .   .
Wednesday
Thursday  .
Friday.    .
Saturday  .
Sunday .   .
Monday.   .
Tuesday.   .
Wednesday
Thursday   .
Friday.    .
Saturday  .
Sunday.    .
Monday.   .
44119.7 17:
42ll8.1l18:
50 16.6 19:
06115.6 20:
21 15.3 21;
28!l5.4|22:
15.9 22:
16.4,23:
....12:
19.8J13:
20.2 14:
20.4 14:
20.4J15:
47:18.
39118.
38 18.
29 17
24 17.
14118.
(lil
20.2
19.8
19.2
18.3
17.3
16.3
15.8
16.0
16.8
17.9
26 22.6
17 22.9
06)22.81
53122.2115
■40|21.1|16
28'19.8il7
18 18.1117
18
19
17
17.
17
18.
18.
18.
18.
18,
18,
18.
18
19
19.
20.
21
Hi
111
20.
00120.
44 20
27 20
09ll9.
52jl8.
91111:151
4'! ]
0:49i
1:58
3:10
4:14!
5:05
5:49
6:28
7:03
7:36
8:08
8:41
9:15
9:50
10:27
14:07
11:52
0:49
2:03
3:19
4:28
5:26
6:18
7:06
7:52
8:37
9:21
2-]10:04
5j. 10:46
7   11:28
3.7123:47
...12:05
7.9
12:58
6.9
7.7
13:66
8.8
7.2
15:011
9.1
6.4
16:110
9.6
.", r>
16:50
9.6
4.7
17:3-1
9.5
4.0
18:14
9.2
3.5
18:53
8.8
3.1
19:31
8.4
2.9
20:08
S.1
2.9
20:45
7,7
3.0
21:23
7.5
3.5
22:03
7.2
4.2
22:48
7.2
5.0
23:43
7,0
6.0
6.9
12:48
7,0
6.4
13:57
7,9
5.3
15:13
8,3
3.9
16:21
8,0
2.3
17:22
7,4
1.1
18:18
6,8
0.2
19:11
6.0
-.1
20:02
5.5
0.2
20:51
5 2
1.0
21:39
5.2
2.3
22:28
5 5
3.9
23:18
6,0
5.7
The Time used Is Pacific Standard, for the 120th Meridian west. It
Is counted from 0 to 24 hours, from midnight to midnight.
The Height Is in feet and tenths of a foot, above the Low Water datum
adopted for the Chart. The Harbor datum, as established by the Grand
Trunk   Pacific  Railway,  is   one  foot lower.
:• * *.;. * * * * * * * * * * * * ***** * * * *
STORAGEJ
Household Goods and Baggage S
given careful attention
Forwarding,   Distributing   and *
Shipping Agents *
TRANSFERERS
Prince   Rupert    Warehousing *
and   Forwarding   Co. J
First Ave.,   near  McBride  St. *
%
DOUGLAS SUTHERLAND,     *
Manager. %
P. O. IJo.v 007 Phone 202 J
*
*************************
NOTICE.
In the matter of an application for
the Issue of a duplicate of the Certificate of Title for an undivided
one-half of Lot 883, Group I,
Cassiar District:
Notice Is hereby given that it is
my intention to issue at the expiration of one month after the first
publication hereof a duplicate of the
Certificate of Title to the above
mentioned land in the name of William Jordan Larkworthy, which Certiorate is dated the 30th day of September,  1910, and  numbered 326R
williaM e. burritt,
, _ Dl-'.rtct  Registrar.
Und Registry Office,
Prince Rupert, B. C,
May  26,  1911. J23 mmsssmm
ttm - eVUMiiMMMli
,.-   ,
1
r>
Tuesday, July 4, 1911
PRINCE  RUPERT JOURNAL
THE WESTHOLME LUMBER CO., LTD
Specials
FEET BY (I FEET AM) 2 FEET
BY (f FEET (i INCHES (EACH)
****** ******** * ************** * *\*
* *
* *
I All Prices Include I
I Delivery to any j
j Part of the City
No. 1 Dry Spruce Rustic, 10 in. per m. -
No. 1 Dry Fir Drop Siding, 6 in. per m. ■
First Class Cedar Doors,
Crystal Rock Plaster, per ton
Tacoma Hardwall Plaster, per ton
No. 1 Hard Selected Bricks, per m.
No. 1 Fir Lath, per m.
No. I Shingles, per m. -
$20.00
22.00
1.00
13.00
18.25
24.00
3.00
3.00
.>£• »J« ♦*♦ »Jt »*• »*« »** »** .j. ►;♦ »j* .j. »♦* ►;« *.*. <%, ►j, ►;. »;« »*.
2,500
Barrels of
Cement
Just Received
m
*•* *** *»' *I* '*■ *** *** *** **' v ***''.' *'.' *** *
GERMAN ALSEN CEMENT
Is conceded to be the very best Cement manufactured. It has stood the severest
tests for all cement work. It is known and used all over the world. The most
prominent Architects, Engineers and Contractors use and recommend it. We guarantee this Cement to contain 25 pounds more net Cement to the barrel than any
other Cement on the market.
PRICE DELIVERED IN ANY QUANTITY, $4.00 PER BARREL
t
*
Everything
for
Your
Building
*»' •*• ■■»* *»* •£* "J" *»•
First Avenue     Prince Rupert, B.C.     Phone 186
3<
FROM THE PRAIRIES
Lieut-Governor Bulyea of Alberta Paid
Short Visit to Prince Rupert
Last Week.
WATERFRONT QUESTION
He  Says  Heavy   Crop   Is   Promised
This Vein-—This Port Will
lie Ultimate Outlet
lkm. G. II. V. Bulyea, lieutenant
governor of Alberta, was a visitor to
Prince Ruperl for ti Sew days last
week. He left Sunday morning by
tlie Seattle steamer for tlie United
States port after making a very thor-
oitgb inspection of the local town-
site. Tlie visit of tlie governor of
the sister province was one of inspection in order to satisfy bis curiosity as to tbe new city which is
to play such an Important part in the
trade of tbe territory witli which he
is Identified,. Ills Honor is deeply
interested in business ventures In
the west and undoubtedly bis mission to this port was for the added
object of looking Into the opportunities for investment here.
Speaking of the city be said that
the people of the province of Alberta
looked forward to this poet having a
great deal tu d" in the grain shipping trade of the prairie sections.
He made a tour about the city
and inspected the work that was being done. The immense expenditure
involved struck him but he was Impressed with tbe splendid streets
that the city was to have when the
work was done.
Referring to the crops of the prairie provinces the governor said that
there never had been as promising
an outlook as there was this year.
The area under cultivation was far
in excess of what it had ever been in
any previous year and the outlook
for a bumper crop was the best in
years. The season is a good one and
the crops are well advanced so that
there is at present signs of a record
being established in the matter of a
wheat yield this year.
 o	
C. N. P. Road
The length of the Canadian Northern Pacific line from New Westminster to Yellowhead Pass, according  to tbe route map.  Is  r.02  miles.
Fear Expressed    That    Hay at Seal
Cove Might  He Closed hy the
Grand Trunk Pacific
The fear was expressed at the city
council last evening that the Grand
Trunk Pacific might want to close
up the entrance to Seal Cove. This
arose in connection with some communications from Ottawa.
Letters were received from Pringle & Guthrie and from the department of railways, acknowledging the
receipt of notification by the council that it intended to withdraw its
objection to the approval of the company's plans for the section of the
railway  from mile  0   westward.
Some discussion followed this, it
being contended by some of the
aldermen that, there was danger that
the bay at Seal Cove, near which the
old mill stood might be closed. It
was pointed out that the plan
showed tlie railway passing along so
as to cut off Seal Cove.
Aid. Newton said that when Mr.
Hays was here it was a clear understanding that nothing of the waterfront was lo be blocked except so far
as was necessary for the drydock at
Mays Creek. He disliked the closing of the mouth of the creek. It
was only to facilitate a large dry-
dock that be consented to It. He did
not like this new turn In affairs.
Aid. Smith said that he did not
regard the situation as nearly as serious as some of the aldermen
thought. After the Shawatlans
Passage was entered there was good
anchorage almost anywhere without
coming within the railway line. The
company had left the opening there
and he did not expect the company
would close it. Warning was to be
given -if the company intended to
do so.
Aid. Douglas felt that the interests of the public must be protected.
Aid. Newton again expressed his
opposition at length lo allowing this.
Aid. Smith pointed out that the
small craft at the present time used
the waters outside the right of way
although there was an opening to
where the old mill stood.
His Worship explained that he bad
at the time Mr. Hays was here, suggested that a fresh protest be entered Immediately against closing
any of the bays west of Hays Creek.
The officials of the company were
not opposed  to that.    It might    be
well  to  make such  a  move as was
suggested.
Aid Hilditch, while agreeing that
Aid. Smith was right as to the outside portion In Shawatlans passage
being quite as safe anchorage as the
part inside, yet favored keeping the
bay open because it gave an opportunity for pleasure craft to have a
lunging without passing over the
railway.
company really intended to close the
bay. He believed this because the
bay was almost dry at half tide.
How could such a bay be used for
pleasure craft?
It was decided to communicate
with D'Arcy Tate and ascertain If
the company were agreeable to leaving the passageway open.
 o	
The  Board   of
\ld. Morrissey contended that tbe'this evening.
Trade   is  meeting
Double Weekly Service
S.S. PRINCE RUPERT & S.S. PRINCE GEORGE
Sail for Vancouver,  Victoria and Seattle
Mondays and Fridays at 8 a.m.
For STEWART Thursdays und Sundays 8 a.m.
Special reduced fare Sunday's boat $9.50
return,   including   meals   and   berths.
S.S.PRINCE ALEERT for Port Simpson, Naas River, Masset and
Naden Harbor, Wednesdays, 1 P.M., and for Queen Charlotte
Island points, Saturdays, 1 P.M.
RAILWAY SERVICE TO COPPER RIVER, mixed trains from
Prince Rupert Wednesdays and Saturdays, 1 P.M.; returning Thursdays  and  Sundays, 5:20 P.M.
THE GRAND TRUNK RAILWAY SYSTEM, connecting with
trains from the Pacific Coast, operates a frequent and convenient
service of luxurious trains over its DOUBLE TRACK route between
Chicago, Toronto, Montreal, Quebec, Halifax, Portland, Huston,
New York and Philadelphia.
Atlantic Steamship bookings arranged via all lines
Full information and tickels obtained from the office of
A. E. McMASTER
Freight and Pasenger Agent, G. T.
P.  Wharl.
Excursions!
Let us tell you all about the cheap
ROUND TRIP EXCURSIONS
to all Towns and Cities In Eastern
Canada and United States
Via
The Great Northern
Choice of Return Route
Tickets to the Old Country hy all
Lines. Take any Steamer from
Prince Rupert.
ROGERS STEAMSHIP AGENCY
Phone 11C Second Ave
Prince Rupert, B.C.
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY GO.
II. C. Const S. S. Service
Famous
Princess
Line
The Journal (twice a week), only
$2.00 a year.
Princess Royal
Friday, July 7,  at 9 a.m.
SOUTHBOUND FOR
Vancouver, Victoria,
AND
Seattle
Friday June 16,   at 9 a.m.
3. G. McNAB,
General  Agen'..
The Thompson!
Hardware Co.
—Secoxd Avenue—
NIOKERSON-ROERIG COMPANY
—o—
CUSTOMS AND MERCHANDISE
—o—
Brokers, Forwarding Agents,
Storage,  etc.
Paints. General Hardware,
Oils, Stoves and Ranges
•I
ROGERS & BLACK
Wholesale Dealers In
HIITLDINQ material,   cement,
LIME,  HAIR-FIBRE PLASTER
COKE, BLACKSMITH COAL,
COMMON BRICK, PRESSED BRICK
SHINGLES AND LATH
NEW   WELLINGTON   COAL
All   orders   promptly  filled—see   us
for prices.
PHONE 11(1 PHONE 110
J.  W.  POTTER
ARCHITECT     AND     STRUCTURAL
ENGINEER
Re-inforced Concrete a Specialty
—o—
Law-Butler Building - Prince Rupert
HAYNOR   BROS.
FUNERAL   DIRECTORS
and
PROFESSIONAL   EMBALMERS
DR.   W.   11.   CLAYTON-
DENTIST
Office  in    tbe    Westenbaver   Block.
Over  Orme's   Drug   Store.
Prince Rupert
Free Employment
Office
For all kinds of help. Cooks, waiters, dishwashers, hotel porters, all
kinds of laborers or mechanics, call
up 178 or call at tbe
FREE  EMPLOYMENT OFFICE
GRAND HOTEL
Headquarters for Cooks and Waiters
Hamblin's Bakery
Just Re-opened
Sale    counter    in    MERRYFIELD'S
STORE, Third Ave. and Fifth St.
Family trade catered to.  Will supply restaurants and steamers.
Cokes and Confectionery of nil
kinds
THE WESTHOLME LUMBER CO.
LIMITED
We handle all kinds of
Building Supplies
First Avenue Telephone 18(1
Corner Eighth and Fraser Streets
Clinton Rooms
Newly    remodelled    and    furnished.
Board   and   lodging.   Home cooking
a  specialty.     Mrs.   AnderBon,   Prop.
Rooms, $3 Per Week
New Knox Hotel
ARTAUD & BESNER
Proprietors
For Neat Job Printing
nee the Journal Man
Tel. 138
The New Kuox Hotel Is run on the
European plan. Flrst-clas service.
All the latest modern Improvements.
THE BAR keeps only the best
brands of liquors and cigars.
TIIE CAFE Is open from 6.30 a.m.
to   8   p.m.     Excellent  cuisine;   first-
class  service.
Board, $1 n Day — Beds, BOc and an
First Avenue    Prince Rupert PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Tuesday, July 4, 1911
PRINCE RUPERT'S ZONE OF INFLUENCE IN A COMMERCIAL WAY
The work on the Grand Trunk
Pacific line is now progressing at a
most satisfactory rate. It is reported from all points wliere construction is being prosecuted there is
abundance of labor to meet the de
mauds. In consequence there is
every reason to expect that record
time will be made in closing up the
gap between the two ends of- the
Steel. E. J. Chamberlin, the general
manager of the line, who is an expe
rlenced builder as well as an operator of railroads, puts the completion
Of the line at 11)13. Mr. Chamberlin
Is a conservative man, so that there
is little doubt that he is not overes
timating the rate of progress to be
made in the next few months.
Some are inclined to estimate the
time to be taken in completing the
gap from Aldermere to Tete Jaune
Cache on the basis of the time taken
to build the Skeena River section of
the road to Hazelton. There is no
comparison between the two classes
of work however. The extreme
western section of the road from
Hazelton to Prince Rupert was one
of the most trying portions that the
company had to do. There were difficulties that will not be met with on
the remaining portion.
Easier Work
With the completion of the river
section, tlie road passes through the
Bulkley valley, which is comparatively easy work. For a considerable part of the way the road runs
along navigable waters, lakes and
rivers where the familiar river
steamer can  be utilized.
With the close of the season here
this year the company's steamers
will probably be taken to pieces and
conveyed to the interior waters to
be reconstructed and used to carry
material for the contractors. In
this way the road grading will be
attacked at many different points
and the time shortened for completion. |
Those who have had conversations
with the railway officials connected
with the construction department
and with the contractors, have all
been assured of completion of the
road In 1913, so that there seems to
be   an   understanding  between     the
company  and  the  builders that the
road is to be through in that year.
A New Trade
This means that there is to be
but one more clear year for the before it is on a transcontinental line.
In the meantime the steel is to be
quickly extended so that this port
will be 'the shipping point and the
entre pot for a very wide stretch of
territory in the interior of the province.
By next spring probably about 22fe
miles of road will be operating out
of here with some of the richest
lands of the province tapped by It.
There are rich mineral deposits to
be opened up along that route and
next summer should see a tremendous volume of trade passing
through this port.
Vast Territory
The completion of the line brings
within the "zone of influence" of
this port an area which is the greatest in the world today as a freight
producer. The Grand Trunk Pacific
taps the rich grain fields of northern Alberta, central Saskatchewan
and .Manitoba. With the feeders under construction, practically the
whole of the prairies are brought
within the range of the territory
served by the line. In its eastern
connection no line has the same advantages. Ontario is completely
served by the railway while all the
commercial and manufacturing centres in the remainder of eastern
Canada and the eastern states of the
Union are in touch with the line
through the Grand Trunk system or
allied lines. Prince Rupert will be
brought as close to Chicago, New
York and other great centres as is
Seattle, or any of the other Pacific
coast cities.
Local Trade
Long before the through line is
completed there will be an immense
local trade developed. The opening
up of 100 miles has resulted already
in the building up of a very considerable passenger and freight business. This is increasirg and with
every mile added to the line the increase in traffic will be proportionate at least.    It is more than prob
able even that the increase In business as the road reaches the Bulk-
ley valley will be increased by many
fold over what it is on the lower
stretches of the Skeena, for the land
is already settled to no small degree and is open to cultivation at
once.
Prince Rupert's Time
With the laying of every mile of
track into the interior, the value of
Prince Rupert real estate advances
because it brings the property into
a position to become a money producer. Trade will follow the tapping of the mineral and agricultural
belts which will be felt In Prince
Rupert to a marked degree.
There is now no denying the fact
that in the development of new
British Columbia tbe central point
must be Prince Rupert. It is be the
port where the trans-Pacific trade
will centre and the point from
which distribution will be made. In
a commercial sense it is able to
compete with markets like Winnipeg
or even Toronto in the matter of
goods brought from Britisii or other
European marts. This is possible,
owing to the fact that ocean carriage
is so much cheaper than transportation by rail. Through steamers
will be making runs from the British ports to Prince Rupert by way of
the Mediterranean or the Horn, just
as the Holt and Harirson lines are
now operating. These will lay down
their freight in Prince Rupert at a
comparatively small advance over
the rate to Montreal and Halifax at
present.
The haul by rail to interior points,
like Winnipeg and Edmonton increase the rates very materially so
that the cost of goods from the old
land will be cheaper at Prince Rupert than at the prairie cities.
As a result this city should have
great distributing houses and manufacturing concerns and be in a position to control the trade of the interior of the province and even its
share of the prairie sections.
Manufacturing Centre
With the opening up of the timber resources of the north, the utilization of the full advantages to be
derived  from  the  fishing    industry
and tbe many other accessory raw
materials this city must become a
manufacturing centre of no mean
onler.
Enough is known of the deposits
other than what are regarded as
strictly mineral within the immediate reach of the place to warrant the
assurance of brick of various kinds,
cement and other classes of building material being manufactured.
There are rich marble deposits that
are now on the eve of development.
Out of Prince Rupert along the line
of the Grand Trunk Pacific there are
immense bodies of granite of various
colors, which must have their place
in the building up of the city, and
which may prove of commercial value as well.
The country in new British Columbia, in fact, is proving itself to
be a treasure house contaning all
kinds of riches that only await the
enterprise and capital to bring them
into money makers.
 o	
FLOATING CANNERY
The Glory of the Seas, which was
bought at the admiralty sale at Victoria by a syndicate of Ketchikan
people is being converted into a
unique craft, a floating cannery, and
considerable canning machinery has
been placed in position on board.
The plan of handling fish on the
Glory of the Seas is simple; The
salmon are first thrown on the deck
and in the process of cleaning, canning, cooking and boxing work
downward until by the time they
are ready to deliver to the jobber
they are in the lower bold of the
vessel. On the main deck of the
floating cannery the salmon are
placed in the "iron chink" whihe removes the head, tail, scales and entrails and delivers the fish to the
washing tank. From the washing
tank the fish is conveyed by belts
to the cutter, which slices it and
makes it ready for the cans. At this
stage the fish passes to the deck below, where it is placed in cans by
automatic machinery, and after the
sanitary seamless cans are sealed it
is passed to the retorts for the cooking.    After the cans    have    cooled
they are delivered to the deck below for lacquering and casing and
are then stored in the lower hold.
When the hold is filled with the
season's pack of 30,000 cases, the
floating cannery will be taken in
tow by a tug and brought back to
Seattle, where the pack will be disposed of.
All the vessel's machinery is driven by gasoline and steam engines, a
large boiler having been installed on
board, which also furnishes steam
for the cooking and for an electric
light  plant which  lights the vessel.
The vessel will carry the regular
cannery officers, a superintendent
and his assistant, as well as a sailing master, first and second mates
and chief engineer.
 —o	
TO  SAYE TIMBER
To prevent unnecessary destruction of timber on lands in the railway belt in British Columbia the
terms of the annual license to cut
timber on these lands, issued by the
Dominion Government, have been
amended by the addition of the following clause: "(f) That the
licensee shall prevent all unnecessary destruction of growing timber
on the part of his men and exercise
strict and constant supervision to
prevent the origin and spread of fire
and shall also comply, during the
term of the license and of any renewal thereof, with all regulations
made in that respect by the governor
in council and with all laws and
regulations in that respect in force
in the province or territory in which
the berth is situate."
 o	
SELL   DEBENTURES
Royal Securities Company, Montreal,
Offers $09.(18 for Block, Total-
ing $1,730,101 in Edmonton
The board of commissioners of
Edmonton recommend acceptance of
the tender of the Royal Securities
Corporation, Limited, Montreal, for
the issue of city debentures amounting to $1,730,101.76.
Following are the tenders received
by the commissioners and the tabu
lation, showing the amount each bidder offered for the city's debentures:
Opaz  (lo,m?h..0 tion   cmfw   cmf   c
Royal Securities Corporation, Ltd.,
the successful tenderer, $99.S3.
C. H.  Burgess & Co.,  $99.68.
Imperial Bank of Canada, $98.50.
Dominion Securities Corporation,
Toronto,   $99.25.
Merchants Bank of Canada,
$97.65.
G. A. Stimson & Co., Toronto,
$96.23.
Ontario Securities Co., $98.01.
Wood, Gundy Co., $99.16.
Dominion Bond Co., Ltd., Toronto,
$98.71.
Coates, Son & Co., $98.0625.
Canadian Agencies, Limited,
$99,275.
The issue will net the city about
$3,000 less than par, and is one-
fourth of one per cent lower than
last year.
The debentures cover expenditures
incurred by the pity in making a
variety of municipal improvements.
The issue runs eight, ten, twenty
and forty years. The ten-year debentures are known as straight term
debentures. On the latter the principal will not be paid until the expiration of the term called for. Interest on both installment and
straight debentures will be paid
semi-annually.
 o	
Timid Lover—Jimniie, I'll give
you this quarter if you'll steal me a
lock of your sister's hair.
James—A'right—make It 50 cents
and I'll steal ye a whole switch!
Willi a Good Delivery
"These are the days when the
young divinity student has a terrific
mental struggle."
"About what?"
"Whether to preach or pitch."
When Women Meet
"That woman pretended to be glad
to see me.    What an actress she Is."
"But you were a match for her?"
"Yes;   I  pretended  to  be just as
glad to see her." ■^-r—
l>!
Tuesday, July 4, 1911
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
ANNOUNCEMENT
The Management of the Continental Trust Company Limited wish to announce that their office is now fully equipped in all departments for the transaction of
business.   The public is invited to inspect its premises on Second Avenue, CONTINENTAL TRUST BUILDING.
SAVINGS DEPARTMENT
Deposits received payable on demand. Interest allowed at the rate
of 4% per annum, compounded
quarterly. We allow the use of
cheques, thus combining the advantages of a Current and Savings
Account.
"1
$1.00
will open an account
with us.
Safe Deposit Department
The company has the largest and
best equipped vault in the City.
Safe Deposit Boxes for rent at moderate rates.
The vault is absolutely fireproof
and the door, which weighs three
tons, is both fire and burglar-proof.
The only safe place in the city for
valuable papers, jewelry, etc.
To persons who contemplate a
more or less extended absence from
the city and are at a loss what to
do with their securities and property, we tender our services at a
very   moderate   charge.
Real Estate and Insurance
Department
This company will take entire
charge of real estate in the absence
of the owner, or for those who wish
to be relieved of the responsibility,
collecting rents, paying taxes, making repairs, looking after insurance
and taking all the trouble off the
owners' hands.
Members of the Prince Rupert
Real Estate Exchange.
A general Insurance business
transacted.
TRUST DEPARTMENT
Executing all deeds, discharges,
etc., also for bond Issues of financial, industrial and all other corporations under mortgage deed of trust,
and In the management of sinking
funds  in  connection  therewith.
Providing for safe investments In
first mortgages and other good securities, for collection of interest, dividends, rents and other income, and
for managing and winding up estates.
Countersigning and certifying the
Issues of stocks and bonds of mining,
industrial and other corporations,
thus protecting shareholders against
the danger of over-issue through
error or otherwise and from irregular scrip.
Of companies or firms in financial difficulties.
For the benefit of creditors, in
cases of bankruptcy or friendly settlement.
WILLIAM T. KERGIN, M. D., Pics. DAVID   H.   HAYS,  First Vice-Pres. M. ,T. HOBIN, 2nd Vice-Pres. & Mgr. JAY   KUGLER,   Secretary-Treasurer
C.  B. PETERSON, Ass't Manager
THE CONTINENTAL TRUST COMPANY, LTD.
Prince Rupert
British Columbia
ARE BRITISH   BUILT
Navies of all Nations are Constructed
in the United Kingdom.
Some   of  the   Dreadnoughts     Being
Prepared in  Dockyards for
Foreign Nations
There are many ways of classifying the 102 ships of the Dreadnought type now built or building,
or to be laid down during the present year, but perhaps the following
is  most striking.
Thirty-two have been or are being
built in Britain for the Britisii
navy.
Eight have been or are to be
built in Britain for foreign fleets.
Seventeen under construction in
foreign dockyards are being built
under the direction of British shipbuilding firms or with the assistance
of British workmen or manufacturers.
Forty-Jive have been or are being
built in foreign yards with British
help.
These facts are a remarkable testimony to the efficiency and reputation of the Britisii shipbuilding industry. There are now thirteen pow-
rs which have entered the Dreadnought race, and of the twelve foreign nations four (Germany, the
i'nited States, France and Austria)
are going ahead on their own resources. Of the remaining eight, six
have sought British assistance, and
only the Argentine, unable to build
her own Dreadnoughts, has gone
elsewhere for them, and even she
has ordered other craft here.
The first foreign power to come to
England for Dreadnoughts was
Brazil. Two ships of 19,250 tons—
the Minas Geraes and Sao Paolo—
have already been completed for this
nation, and a third, tbe record-
breaking Rio Janeiro, of 32,000 tons,
is now under construction at Els-
wick. This ship will carry, it is
stated, twelve 14.3-inch guns and
fourteen of six inches calibre, making her far and away the most powerful warship—at any rate, on paper—ever built. Brazil also ordered
two scout cruisers and ten destroyers in England, and till these have
been completed and delivered.
Eastern Ally
Japan was the next power to order
a British built Dreadnought, and the
case is of particitlad Interest because
since the beginning or the war with
Russia all Japan's warships, with the
exception of submarines, have been
built in native yards. In the case of
the first two ships so built (the armoured cruisers Tsukuba and Iko-
ma, the first ships of their class to
carry twelve-inch guns), the result
was fairly satisfactory; but with the
rather larger and much more powerful vessels IbukI and Kurama, things
iid not go so well, for the first was
three and the other five years under
construction.
Two battleships were also tried.
The first, the 19,250 ton Satsuma-
was laid down In May, 1905, and
completed in the spring of last year,
while the Aki, 600 tons larger, was
begun in March, 1905, and not completed until Auril 1 of this year, thus
taking six years to build.
Still, the Japanese authorities
were not entirely disheartened by
these experiences, and they are now
engaged in building two 20,800-ton
Dreadnought battleships, tbe Knwa-
chl nnd Settsu.    These were to have
been completed by the end of this
year, but only one so far is
launched. Both of the vessels are
being equipped with British-made
guns and with armour manufactured
by an Anglo-Japanese syndicate.
Their offensive and defensive powers will, therefore, be almost wholly
British.
Last year, however, Vice Admiral
Saito, the Japanese minister of marine, admitted that it was, as yet,
hopeless to expect Japanese yards to
turn out ships so expeditiously and
efficiently as British builders could;
the result being that a contract was
placed with Messrs. Vickers for a
battle-cruiser of the Lion type which
was laid down in January.
Britisii Officers Help Turkey
Turkey next appeared on the scene
and the history of the placing of
contracts for two 19,750-ton Dreadnoughts with Sir W. G. Armstrong,
Whitworth & Co. is too recent to
need detailing here. Germany made
very strenuous efforts to secure
these contracts, and even offered to
sell Turkey her first two Dreadnought battleships and the armoured
cruiser Blucber. But the naval affairs of Turkey are being directed b>
a staff of Britisii officers, who were
no doubt far from anxious to purchase for Turkey ships with which
Germany was obviously dissatisfied.
Other ships are to be built under
the new Turkish naval scheme, and
no doubt they, too, will come to England.
Having failed with Turkey, Germany next concentrmated her energies on securing an order from the
Chilean government, which is about
lo enter ou the construction of two
powerful Dreadnoughts. These vessels are to he of 26,000 tons, and
will curry the new 13.5-inch gun.
The orders have not been actually
placed, but compared with the tenders from Germany and the United
States, the prices quoted by Messrs.
Vickers and Messrs. J. Brown, were
about $1,000,000 lower per ship, so
that there can be little doubt where
the vessels will be built.
In an attempt to influence the
Chilian government, Germany sent,
the Dreadnought cruiser Von der
Tann on a so-called experimental—
actually an advertising—cruise to
South American waters, but the
proved excellence of Britisii construction and a saving of $1,000,000
per ship are not to be ignored. Two
destroyers for the Chilian navy
have just been ordered In England.
Britain's Triumph
The following is a striking summary of the manner in which Great
Britain is associated with the building of foreign fleets:
Argentina—Four destroyers are
under construction at Birkenhead.
Brazil—Two Dreadnoughts and 12
other ships recently built In England, and a third Dreadnought now
under construction. Ten petty officers have been borrowed from tne
British Navy to assist in training the
personnel.
Chill—Two destroyers have just
been ordered, and orders for two
Dreadnoughts are expected to foelow
shortly. A Britisii lieutenant has
been lent.
China—A 2,500-ton cruiser is being built at Barrow.
Greece—Reorganization of navy
being carried out hy a British staff
under Rear Admiral Tufnell.
Holland—Destroyers building at
Flushing under direction and from
the designs of Messrs. Yarrow.
Italy—Armour and ordnance of
four  new  Dreadnoughts  being  sup-
Subscription
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Publicity |$2.00
Channel °
a Year
THE JOURNAL
Is the best Advertising
Medium in the City
of Prince Rupert
a »Ji *$« »J» jj« *;* »;«»;«»;
FOLLOW THE TREND OF THE CITY'S
PROGRESS BY SUBSCRIBING
FOR THE PAPER
The Journal aims at keeping Prince Rupert
and new B.C. ever before the public eye. Send
it to your friends and any whom you wish to
interest in the coming Metropolis of the North.
WATER  NOTICE
plied by Britisii firms having works
In Italy.
Japan—Fleet already contains 11
Britisii built armoured ships. A
battle cruiser Is being built at Barrow, and two Dreadnoughts building in Japan will be equipped with
armour and ordnance manufactured
by a British firm.
Portugal—Several new ships to be
built in England.
Russia—Four Dreadnoughts . In
the Baltic building under British supervision. Two Dreadnoughts to be
built in the Black Sea by a British
firm and two others with the help
of British artizans.
Spain—Three Dreadnoughts and a
number of swmaller vessels being
built by a group of Britisii firms.
Dockyards being modernized by a
British firm.
Turkey—Reorganization of navy
being curried out by a Britisii staff
under Rear Admiral H. P. Williams.
Two Dreadnoughts recently ordered
in England.
 o	
For Job Printing -f all kinds see
the Journal Man.
KAISER'S  DAUGHTER
Her  Father  Said   lo   Have  Declared
That She Is Free to Marry for
Love and   Nol   Politics
"I have no intention whatever of
sacrificing my little girl to politics;
she shall marry whom she loves and
be happy."
This statement, referring to his
only daughter Princess Victoria
Louise, is attributed to the Emperor
by the Militar-Politisehe Corerspond-
enz, and it is reproduced by many
of the leading newspapers here. In
accordance with the sentiments so
emphatically expressed ill these
words the Bmperorand Empress are
said to have rejected several alliances recently mooted, each of
which would have offered definite
political advantages to Germany, and
to have given their consenl to a love
match between their daughter an (I
the hereditary Prince Adolph Fri <1-
I't'ic of Mecklenburg-Strelltz, who
will one day ascend tin- throne of
that miniature grand duchy with n
population  of just  iivcr  I iKi.eiiiil.    .
Prince Adolph Frederic was    sta-
Skeena   Land    District—District   ol'
Coast-   Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that I, Charles
Percy Hickman, of Naas Harbour,
occupation constable, intend to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:— Commencing at a post planted on the
oust shore of Naas Bay, about two
miles in an easterly direction from
Lot 3, marked C. P. H„ S. W. corner; thence east 20 chains; thence
north 40 chains to the shore; thence
along the shore line to the place of
commencement, containing 40 acres,
more or less.
CHARLES  PHECV  HICKMAN.
Dated June  7,  1911. 6-30
NOTICE is hereby given that an
application will be made under Part
V of the "Water Act, 1909," to obtain a licence in the Queen Charlotte
Islands  Division   of  Skeena  District.
(a) The name, address and occupation of the applicant—Orland P.
Merrill; Massett, Graham Island,
B. C;   prospector.
(If for mining purposes) Free Miner's Certificate No	
lb) The name of the lake,
stream or source (if unnamed, the
description is)—Ain Lake and Ain
River.
(c) The point of diversion—At
or near Ain Lake.
(d) The quantity of water applied for (in cubic feet per second)
—700.
(e) The character of the proposed
works—Dam, flume, pipe line and
power  plant.
(f) The premises on which the
water Is to be used (describe same)
—Near mouth of Ain River.
(g) The purposes for which the
water is to be used—Generating
power.
(h) If for irrigation, describe the
hind to be irrigated, giving acreage
tioned for several years at Potsdam,
as an officer in one of tlie crack
regiments of gards, and during his
period of residence there has was tt
very frequent guest iii the Imperial
palace and enjoyed the Intimate
friendship of the Emperor, who is
known lo think very highly of him.
Recently the hereditary prince resigned his commission to study the
details of the governmenl service in
Ills future capital of Neu-Strelitz, a
quaint little town of 12,000 Inhabitants, it is reported that thee formal announcement  nf    the engage-
(i) If the water is to be used for
power or for mining purposes, describe the place where the water is
to be returned to some natural channel, and the difference in altitude
between point of diversion and point
of return—Near mouth of Ain River
about 150 feet below point of diversion.
(j) Area of Crown land intended
to be occupied by the proposed
works— About 10 acres.
ik) This notice was posted on
the tenth day of June, 1911, and application will he made to the Commissioner on the fourth day of September, 1911.
Il) Give the names and addresses
of any riparian proprietors or licensees who or whose lands are
likely to be affected by the proposed
works, either above or below the
outlet—None.
(Signature)  ORLAND P. .MERRILL,
(P.  O.  Address)   Masset,  B.  C.
George S. Mayer, Agent,
(P.  O.  Address)   Masset,  B.   C.
Note—One  cubic   foot   per  second
is equivalent to 35.71 miner's inches.
Skeena    Land    District-
Coast—Range
TAKE NOTICE that
Port, of Prince Rupert,
pation farmer, intends
permission to purchase
ing described lands: —
at a post planted In the
Corner, on the shore 1
Lakelse; thence 20 cha
South West Corner of
thence 30 chains North
along the West line of
post; thence South, toll
the shore line of said L
of commencement, conti
■lit acres.
EDWARD II
By ('.  N.  I
Dated  June  26,   1911,
6-26
-District of
V.
Edward II.
B. C, occu-
o apply for
the I'ollow-
Commenclng
South West
ine of Lake
ins  East,   to
Lot 6S4;
following
Lot 684 to
owing jibing
kp to point
lining  about
PORT,
'ring.  Agent.
Skeena   Land   Districl     District   ot
ejiteena.
TAKE NOTICE thai the Canadian
Canning Company, Limited,,ot 224
Winch Building, Vancouver," B, C,
occupation salmon callers, Intends to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted adjoining
a post marked W. N. ahout 300 feet
South of Wallace's wharf, Naas Harbour, B. C; thence '"list 20 chains;
thence south 20 chains; thence west
2ii chains; tlietu-e following the
coast line in a northerly direction
back to the point of commencement
and containing forty acres more Or
less.
CANADIAN CANNING CO., LTD.
Per <-■.   II.   Leslie.  Agent.
Dated  6th June,  1911, 6-26
tiii.nl will e-nsite- shortly. Prince
Adolph Frederic is twenty-nine and
Princess Victoria Louise will be
nineteen In September.
 —o	
Her Dad—No, sir; 1 won't have
my daughter tied for life to a stupid
tool.
Ile-r Suitor—Then don't you think
you'd better let me take her off your
hands? !   '    i
PRINCE  RUPERT JOURNAL
Tuesday, July 4, 1911
PROMOTION LISTS
(Continued from Page One)
In this division the honor rolls
will be awarded when the entrance
results five a final basis of ranking,
the rolls for deportment and regularity going to pupils in possible competition for the proficiency roll.
DIVISION II
Senior  Third  to Junior Fourth
Katharine  Pillsbury,
Madeline Nelson,
Marjory   Sing,
Johnnie Currie,
Reta   Dean,
Eva  Scherk,
Esther Naden,
Joan Grant,
Margaret Morgan,
Sam Weston,
Grace Meloche,
Fred Leggett.
Junior Third to Senior Third
Matthew Nehring,
Cecil  Mairs,
Seymour  Shirley,
Fred Stephens,
Kathleen Lake,
Lottie Daitghtry,
Doris Dowling,  Lawrence  McMullen   (equal),
Faye Hanson,
Henrietta  Richmond.
Honor Rolls
Proficiency—Katharine   Plllsbury.
Deportment—Reta Dean.
Punctuality and  regularity—Madeline Nelson.
DIVISION III
Senior  Second  to Junior Third
Mary Blyth,
Norma  Shirley,
Mary Astori,
Eleanor Cowper,
Julia Kask,
Iva Hicks,
Mary  Kirk
Frank Cameron,
Murray Stephens,
Carman Sing,
Violet  Frizzell,
George Shaw, ,
Frank Brown,
Irene Gampp,
Thos.   Moorehouse,
Carl Halverson,
Beatrice Killin,
George Tite,
Henrietta  Eckermann,
Mabel  Bowen,
Guy Bramen,
John  Ambrose,
Louis Astori.
Junior Second Render to Senior
Second
Kathleen  Holland,
Olivia Solem,
Jack Naden,
Winnie Nehring,
Clarice Griffiths,
Thelma Rudnick,
Chester Scherk,
Fred Ritchie,
Joseph  Olsson,
Gladys Vierrlck,
Gilbert Donaldson,
Leonard   Donaldson,
Russell Scherk,
May Gardiner,
Roderick   McRae,
Douglas Starrings,
Teddy Leggatt,
Mabel Vierrlck,
Betty  Knott.
Honor Rolls
Regularity      and      punctuality—
Irene  Gampp,  Carman   Sing.
Proficiency—Mary Blyth.
Deportment—Julia    Kask,    Mary
Kask.
DIVISION IV
First Reader to Second Reader
Bernlce Roosa,
Thelma Nehring,
Halma  Byman,
Marjorle Cowper,
Gertrude Knott,
i.anner Anderson,
Agda  Johnson,
Shorrle    McKay,    Thos.    McKay,
Helen  Shirley   (equal),
Hans  Knott,
John  Davidson,
Eva  Esson,
Louise Rowell,
Lily Shrtibsall,
Richard   Pillsbury,
Jack   Humble,
Harry Kingston,
Rhoda Morrison,
John Solem, George Alder (equal)
Kenneth  Scherk,
Joseph Maxwell,
Eddie Clapp,
Melvln Stevens.
Second  Primer to First Reader
Sigfrid Iledstrom,
lleiinie Halverson,
Mayme Day,
Georglna Hunter,
Joseph Cavelier,
Marie Larsen,
Gordon  Kirkpatrick,
Albert   Dewbnrst,
Anson Jones,
Glenora Donaldson,
Bernlce  Palmer,
Charley Currie,
Clarence  Knight,
Frank Mazzel,
Willie Alexander,
Re.se Denda,
Willie- Duncan,
Chris.  Weston,
David  Cavelier,
Jimmy Mairs,
Luigi  Mazzei.
Honor Rolls
Punctuality      and      regularity—■
Ueorgina  Hunter.
Deportment—Agda Johnson.
Proficiency—Bernlce Roosa.
DIVISION V
Second Primer li to Second Primer A
Grace Carroll,
George Johnstone,
Vienna Calderone,
Dorothy  Tremayne,
Dorothy Stephen,
Isa  Kellie,
Muriel Owen,
Theresa  Maggi,
Glen Braman,
Jennie Collier,
Milja Gurvich ,
Earlemond Latrace,
Larnie Larsen,
Jean Bailey,
Moya Bailey,
Henry McKenzie,
Sydney Hunter,
Harry Lake,
Robert Reddie,
Herminia Corrall,
Fred Corrall,
Lawrence Thomson,      a
Thomas Cobb,
Helene Olsen.
First   Primer   to   Second   Primer   B
Albert  Palmer,
Olga Hask,
Walter Owen,
Dorothy  Jones,
Helga  Halverson,
Isabel Kirkpatrick,
James Kelly,
John Kelly,
Leonard Anderson,
Garnet McPherson,
Levina Solem,
Teddy Lincoln,
Rose  Davidson,
Kay Braman,
Pearl Latulippe.
Honor Rolls
Deportment—Dorothy    Tremayne.
Proficiency—Grace Carroll.
Regularity  and  punctuality—Sydney Hunter.
DIVISION VI
From  Division VI to Division V
Norman McLeod,
Hugh  Kirkpatrick,
' Mary   Hancq,
Constance Cowper,
Tony  Budinich,
Raymond  Scherk,
Howard Frizzell,
Grace Leek,
Helen  Morrison,
Robert Gardner,
Violet Mortimer,
Eric Holland,
Clary Knott,
Willie Montgomery,
Julius Maggi,
Sadao Sugo.
From Class B to Class A
Anna  Lttndgvist,
Philip Morrison,
Pazzi Mazzei,
Isabella  McKenzie,
Annie Crossley,
Lily Cohen,
Elsa Johnson,
Alida Johnson,
Helen MeRae,
Chrissie  McKenzie,
Annie Nehring.
From Class C to Class E
Aleck Johnston,
Eva  Cavalier,
Arthur  Collier,
Alphonse French,
Violet  Mclnnis,
Robert  Douglas,
Theodore  Halverson,
Frank Morrison,
Bertie Duncan,
Lenore  Benson,
Morgan O'Brien.
Hulls of Honor
Proficiency—Norman   McLeod.
Regularity and punctuality—Tony
Budinich.
Deportment—Eric Holland.
 o—:	
KEEN COMPETITORS
(Continued from Page One)
the second man, finished in good
style, while Anderson and Richards
in third and fourth places, made
time that would quality them for any
company, llolmquist, the Swedish
runner, who was expected to be a
formidable competitor, lost his lead
very early in the race and after making about two miles and a half
dropped  out.
Pickett and Atkins, representing
Claxton, distinguished themselves in
the events to the delight of the
Claxton visitors.
Evening Programme
In the evening at a concert held
In the Empress Theatre, the tug of
war contests were held. The Grand
Trunk Pacific Bridgebuilders won In
the final from the Digby Island team
drawn from the staff of the con-
struction company there.
Prizes were presented at the concert to the winners in the events of
the day. A good programme of
music was given also.
Tin- Skidegate Indian Band hon-
ereil the occasion of Dominion Day
by       providing       excellent     music
throughout to day and at the concert
in tlie eveuing.
The    winners    of    the    different
events were as follows:
Water Sports
Power Boats—First, Rover, Captain Partington, cup and binoculars:
second,  Lillooet  launch,  gold  chain.
Six-oared Gig—First, Longshoremen;   second,   Lillooet.
Crab Race—First, Clyde Rogers,
gold chain;  second, H. Rogers, fob.
Skiffs, Mixed Doubles—First, N.
Norman and Miss Olson, pipe and
card case; second, H. Green and
Miss Green, cigar holder and brooch.
Four-crew Canoe—First, Clyde
and Harrison Rogers, Green and
Godson, four cups; second, Reitchel,
Mobley, Bainter and Ives, four
fountain   pens.
Canoe Double—First, Gamble and
Sinclair, two flasks; second, Ives
and Mobley, two pipes.
Skiffs—First, N. Oman, watch;
second, N. Norman, wallet.
Canoes, Single—First, Ives, silver
cup; second, Melville, cuff links.
Skiffs, Doubles—First, Oman and
Norman, meerschaum pipes; second,
Cribb and Ross, cigar cases.
Mied   Double  Canoes—First,   Mrs.
Roberson   and   Mr.   Parker,   bracelet
and fob;  second, Miss McDonald and
Mr. Fournier, brooch and cigar case.
Land Sports
One Hundred Yards—First, Atkins, cup;  second, Bell, wallet.
Fat Man's Race—First, Wall, ton
of coal; second, Beattie, military
brushes.
One-Mile Race—FSrst, Sherman;
second, Nicholson, cake tray.
Running High Jump—First, W.
Pickett, field glasses; second E. O.
Ritchel, clock.
Running Broad Jump—First, W.
Pickett, umbrella; second, Davis,
carving set.
Hop, Step and Jump—First, Provost, shaving mug; second, Pickett,
pickle jar.
Eight Hundred and Eighty Yards
—First, Sherman, cup; second, H.
Mobley,  cup.
Four Hundred and Forty Yards—-
First, Sherman, cup; second, Rellly,
shaving jar.
Business Men's Race—First, Rev.
W. H. McLeod, vases; second, Oiler
Besner, cake tray.
Two Hundred and Twenty Yards
—First, Atkins, cup; second, Sherman, tobacco jar.
Five-Mile Walking Race—First,
Azzali, cup;  second, Reichtel, vases.
One-Mile Relay Race—First,
Brotherhood team (Ives, Rellly,
Mobley, Daggett), medals; second,
Sherman, Cameron, Anderson, Astoria, pocket knives.
Three-Mile Race—First, Nicholson, cup;  second, Green, picture.
Ten-Mile Race—First, Nicholson,
cup; second, Watson, clock.
Tug-of-War—First, G. T. P.
Bridge, a cup; second, Digby Island
Construction.
 o-	
The assistant teachers on the staff
of the public school all left yesterday for the southern part of the
province  to  spend  their  holidays.
KILLED AT THE MINES
GRAND HOTEL
WORKINGMAN'S HOME
Spring Beds, Clean ORa
White Sheets "Ol
Rooms 50 Cents
Best in Town for the Money
FIRST AVE. AND SEVENTH ST.
J. Goodman, Proprietor
Fatal Accident at Stewart Camp-Good
Progress is Made on Roads and
Trails.
Good   Wagon   Way   Is   Being   Constructed to Salmon Itiver District by the Government
(Special  Correspondence)
STEWART, July 2.—One of the
most terrible accidents in the history
of the camp occurred at Bitter Creek
last Wednesday at 3:15 p. m. It is
believed that the explosion was occasioned by the emptying of a missed
hole. Thomas Fall, foreman of the
cut, and Fred Johnson, the men
who were killed, were known to be
working there at the time of the accident. Both men were blown right
out of the cut, and the body of Fred
Johnson was picked up half in and
half out of the river on the farther
side, a distance of between 200 and
300 feet. The body of Thomas Fall
was found 40 feet from the scene of
the accident. Fred Switzer, who was
working near, was also slightly injured in the head by falling rock.
Dr. G. E. Richards, who was at once
called, pronounced life extinct and
said in his opinion death must have
been instantaneous in both cases.
Coronor Conway decided after investigation that there was no necessity for holding an  inquest.
Work on Roads
The work by the Provincial Government road parties is progressing
rapidly under C. L. Cullin, who has
charge locally of operations. C. J.
Gillingham, the superintendent, has
now arrived on the scene and is
spending a few days with the local
superintendent, and  the foremen.
There is now a good wagon road
beyond bitter Creek. Mr. Cullin has
about twenty teams at work and the
construction is moving without loss
of time.
In the city there is a lot of work
also under way under Foreman 'J.
Patterson. Fifth avenue has received attention and the way to the
Dominion Government wharf has
been put in good shape.
Mrs. William Manson and her
daughter, Gracie, have gone south
for a few weeks.
ATTENTION, ODD FELLOWS
All members of the I. O. O. F.
(visiting Brothers included) are
earnestly requested to meet at the
Hall, on Tuesday, July 4, at 7:30
p. m., for the purpose of having a
photo taken. Immediately after
this, the installation of the newly-
e'ected officers will take place.
G. S. JOHNSTONE, N. G.
HARRY, H.  MORTON,
6-30—7-3 Recording  Secy.
FREDERICK PETERS, K. C.
Barrister, Solicitor and Notary Public
Office in
EXCHANGE  BLOCK
WM. S. HAi^L, L. D. S. D. D. S.
:-:   DENTIST   :-:
Crown and Bridge Work a specialty.
All dental operations skillfully
treated. Gas and local anaesthetics
administered for the painless extraction of teeth. Consultation free.
Offices, Helgerson 3k., Prince Rupert
VOL1 ARE SURE OF
Engine  Reliability
IP  YOU  RUN  A
Fairbanks - Morse Marine Engine
OVER 125,000 IN USE THROUGHOUT THE WORLD
TWO
CYCLE
FOUR
CYCLE
ft    yt
ifTL\
JCHww
s&n
WW
HEAVY
DUTY
MEDIUM
DUTY
Runabout
Type
MOST  COMPLETE  LINE OF GASOLINE ENGINES IN
THE WORLD
Write  for Catalog P19
The Canadian Fairbanks Co., Ltd.
1M.M7 WATER STREET
Local Agent—F. M. DAVIS
VANCOUVER, D. C.
■ PRINCE RUPERT
-PAINTS-=
COVER THE EARTH.
WE   ARE   SOLE   AGENTS
CARLOAD JUST ARRIVED
Ready Nixed Paints,
Paints Ground is Oil,
Paints Ground in Japan,
Varnishes, Shellac, etc.
Water Stains
and
Decotint
IN ALL OOLOHS
Prince Rupert Hardware & Supply
Company, Ltd. thos. dunn, m*.
^0[5][§00[§000|§00[§[i[D][5](§000@0lE]
You Can Avoid This
by sending your Clothes to the
PIONEER  STEAM  LAUNDRY
There are Many
Reasons Why
IT   IS   TO   YOUR   INTEREST
We do first-class work and
are careful with your Garments. We can do your work
and return it within 48 hours
if necessary. We call for your
uaundry and return it to you.
Should anything be lost or misplaced we will make it satisfactory.
When your Laundry goes to the Chinks there are many drawbacks. When you Bend it to us your money helps pay WHITE
LABOR.
PIONEER STEAM LAUNDRY
We Require Listings of Inside Business Property
Also Residence Property at Right Prices
M.M. Stephens & Co. Ld.
Real Estate, Insurance and Investments,
Notaries, Nines, Timber
Box 275
PHONE 222
PRINCE RUPERT, B.C.
OFFICE  THIRD  AVE.
The'Slay Satisfactory Range
Good, Sound Reasons for
MONARCH Economy
Monarch Ranges are built so that they can
never have "air leaks"—
For around every opening into the body there
is a   Malleable   Iron frame  to which the
steel is riveted.
No putty is needed in such joints.    They are
air tight when new and stay air tight.
If these other ranges were built in this way
they might be economical too.
Investigate this matter of rivet construction
versus  stove  bolts and  stove  putty.    It's
Important to  every  one  using  or  buying
a range.
SOLD AND GUARANTEED BY THE
Kaien Hardware Co.
Telephone 3
Third Avenue
FOR   SALE
SECTION ONE
LOTS BLOCK
19 ..
BLOCK
11    1-2-3-4-5-6
11 9-10
12    22
13 21-22
18    1-2
SECTION FIVE
9    22-23
18 22-23
W. S. BENSON
i.OTS
 3-4
19 16-16
20 19-20
34    36-37-38
3*    42
27    9-10
27 42-43
SECTION SIX
'I 7-8-9-10
The Atlantic Realty anil Improvement
LINDSAY'S CARTAGE STORAGE
G. T. P. CARTAGE AGENTS
Office at H. B. Rochester, Centre St
LADYSMITH  COAL
is handled by us.   All orders receive
prompt attention.  Phone No  68.
 LADYSMITH	
COAL
ROCHESTER 8c MONROE, Phono MS

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