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Prince Rupert Journal Nov 7, 1911

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•"■^
The Journal
$2.00
a year
Ptinu ftajwrt Journal
r
High Class
Job Printing
in all Lines
VOLUME II.
Published  Twice  a  Week.
PRINCE  RUPERT,   B.   C.   TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 1911.
Price, Five Cents.
No.^rT 3 «f
HYDRO-ELECTRIC
BY-LAW IS VALID
City Solicitor Returns With Assurances From the Attorney-General's Department That City Ordinance
is Good-Bank is Satisfied with the
Situation as it now Exists--
Work Will Proceed.
On Monday, Fred Peters, K. C.
the city solicitor, returned from Victoria with confirmation of the news
that the Hydro-Electric Bylaw of the
city is held by the attorney general's
department to be perfectly valid. The
government has agreed to facilitate
the passage of a private act confirming the bylaw- thus satisfying the
solicitors of the Bank of Montreal,
and in turn satisfying the bank, so
that the money Is expected to be
immediately available, allowing the
work to proceed. In view of the
reports that gained currency, that an
appeal would have to be taken to
the people again on these bylaws,
the news brought by the city solicitor is welcome, as it saves trouble
and time.
Solicitor's  Report
At the meetiug of the council last
evening Mr. Peters presented his report, which read as follows:
November 6, 1911.
To His Worship the Mayor,
Prince  Rupert,   B.   C.
Dear Sir:I beg leave respectfully
to submit my report respecting my
late visit to Victoria and Vancouver.
I left Prince Rupert on the 27th
October, and arrived in Victoria on
the 29th.
The 30th being Thanksgiving Day,
nothing could be done. On the 31st
I waited on the Honorable Mr. McBride at the earliest possible moment, and explained to him the reason why I had come, namely, that
our bankers had been advised that
the Hydro-Electric Bylaw wds subject to objection upon the ground
that it contained two subject matters. I explained tp him verbally
that I did not agree with the objection taken, and pointed out to him
my reasons for the course that had
been pursued. Mr. McBride then
asked me to put my ease in writing,
and also suggested that I should see
the Honorable Mr. Taylor and discuss the matter with him, and that
1 should furnish Mr. Taylor with
a copy of the memorandum, that he
i,Mr. McBride) had asked for.
I immediately, on Tuesday the
31st, wrote a letter to Mr. McBride
explaining the whole matter (of this
letter I have already furnished you
with two copies).
I also left a copy of this letter
with Mr. McBride's secretary and
also with Mr. Taylor, and asked for
a further interview on Wednesday
morning.
On Wednesday morning, I again
interviewed the premier, when he
stated that the matter was one that
should come before the council, and
informed me that there would be a
council meeting some time during the
forenoon and asked me to wait.
A council meeting was held at
which I attended, and again briefly
explained my case. It was not necessary to go into the matter very
fully then as my memorandum had
already been considered by the members of the government.
I bad asked, as appeared In my
letter to Mr. McBride, that the supposed error in the bylaw (and I
used the word "supposed" advisedly)
might be corrected by Public Act.
The council thought, however, that
It was better that a Private Act
would be brought in, and I therefore
obtained the order, wliich I have already submitted to you.
I may say that before interviewing the government I had interviewed the deputy attorney general. As
you are aware, there is now pending
an application for the approval of
our scheme under the "Water Act."
Part of the matter which has to
be submitted on this application is
a certified copy of the bylaw, and
the practice is that the attorney general's department has to pass on the
validity of the bylaw itself.
I found that our bylaw had been
submitted to the attorney general's
department by the water commissioner, and that the attorney general's department had advised in
writing that the bylaw was good in
every particular.
At my interview with the deputy
attorney general, he informed me
that he had very carefully considered
the real point raised by the bank
solicitor, and that be had come to
the conclusion that there was nothing in the objection, and stated further that the recitals in the bylaw,
which clearly set out the reasons
why the whole thing was done in
one (1) bylaw were amply sufficient. He further gave me liberty
to inform the government that that
was his opinion, and this I did.
At all my interviews with the government, I made it very clear that
I was not making the application,
because I thought it was necessary,
but merely to remove from the minds
of our bankers, any objects, which
they might be advised existed.
Having obtained the order from
the council, I made an appointment
with Mr. Sweeny for Saturday morning at Vancouver, and on meeting
him I produced and gave him a copy,
or rather duplicate of the order obtained from the government, and explained our position fully.
Mr. Sweeny said he would like to
have the opinion of his solicitor, Mr.
Bloomfield, and a meeting was arranged for that morning.
Later on, Mr. Sweeny, Mr. Bloom-
field and myself met together, when
Mr. Bloomfield expressed himself
satisfied with the undertaking that
I had received, and further stated
that if the government wanted to
retract a petition of Right by the
Bank would lie. Mr. Sweeny then
expressed himself willing to make
the necessary advances, I telling him
that I could not say what amount
would be immediately required, but
that we would tell Mr. Clancy all
about that matter.
I have the honor to be, your obedient servant.
FRED PETERS,
City  Solicitor.
P.S.—Since arriving in Prince Rupert, I have seen the statement that
the arrangement made will make it
necessary to submit the bylaw again
to the people. 1 may say that this
is an entire misapprehension. The
great reason that induced the government to make the order that they
had made was the fact that the bylaw
bad already been carried by a very
large majority and no further reference to the people will be necessary.
F. P.
Victoria, B.C., Nov. 1, 1911.
l'\ Peters, Esq., K.C., Solicitor for
the City of Prince Rupert—at
Victoria, B. C.
Sir:—In reference to your consultation with the executive today, I
am instructed by the lieutenant governor in council to say, that in view
of the passage of the "Hydro-Electric Bylaw" for the City of Prince
Rupert, the council are prepared at
the coming session of Parliament,
to validate by way of Private Act,
the passage of the said bylaw.
NOT UNDER BONDS
Aid. Hilditch Finds Fault With
Newton's Methods of
Work.
Aid.
As  Usual,  tbe Two Members of the
Council   Cannot   Agree  Upon
Question   of   policy
(Continued on Page Eight)
At the council meeting last evening Alderman Hilditch raised the
point that the city clerk and city
treasurer were not working under
bonds. He raised the point as a
question, asking whether this Was
a fact, as he had heard It was. IHe
understood . that these officials lad
been without bonds for three
months.
Upon receiving the answer that
the new bonds had not yet been accepted, Alderman Hllditch thought
that was no way for the finance committee to carry on the business.
Alderman Newton did not know of
any such state of affairs. He had
never heard of any delay. It was
a great surprise to him to learn that
such a condition existed. It was no
fault of his that this was so.
Alderman Hilditch wanted to know
who was to blame if Alderman Newton was not. If he had been on the
finance committee, this would not
exist. If Alderman Newton would
pay attention to the finance committee and leave the public works committee alone it would be better. The
trouble arose over Alderman Newton
insisting upon transacting the business.
Alderman Newton complained of
Alderman Hilditch "rubbing him up
the wrong way." He did not deny
that he made the motion to transfer
the insurance from one company to
another. He had thought that the
change took effect at once. He felt
that the onus rested with the city
clerk. He wanted to know why he
(Alderman Newton) was not acquainted with the facts. He would
like to know from the chairman of
the committee why he was not informed. He supposed that Alderman,
Hllditch sought to make a point
against him.
Alderman Hilditch said his object
was to get the clerk under bonds.
Alderman Hllditch said that while
he understood that the clerk was not
under bonds, yet he thought there
there was an interim receipt of some
kind.
Alderman Newton wanted the
clerk to explain.
The city clerk explained the situation and told of the form through
which  this had to pass.
Alderman Hilditch said he objected to the proceeding. This was done
because one member of the finance
committee desired to spite a member of the old council. There was
no business about this.
Alderman Newton took the whole
onus for the transfer of the insurance. He had expected that this new
insurance went into effect at Once.
It was not fair to criticise him when
be did not know that the Insurance
was placed. He felt that the finance
committee had done a good deal ot
business without calling him to the
meetings, lie did not reflect upon
the members of the committee by
this.
Alderman Hllditch said it was
poor business to change the company.
.Alderman Clayton said It came
down   to   this   fact,   that   Alderman
SKIDEGATE  NEWS
Island
Centre   Has   Had  Visit
Indian Agent and
Inspector.
From
SEWER BY-LAW HAS
PASSED THE COUNCIL
Situation at That  Point Mas- Found
to Ile Satisfactry to the
Officials
(Special Correspondence)
Skidegate, Nov. 3.—Thomas Deasy,
Indian agent for Masset and Skidegate bands of Indians, and Mr. Tyson, Inspector of Indian agencies,
made official visits to Skidegate Indian villages last week. They were
well received, and their messages appreciated. They in turn were pleased
to find things going along quietly
and well.
Mr.  Russell has  taken  charge  of
Skidegate school.
Mrs.   John   Robson   of   Skidegate
died of cancer on the 22nd. inst.
STREET IMPROVEMENTS
Method of Dealing With the Debentures Necessary to Carry Out
tbe  WorK
The finance committee, at the
council meeting last evening reported against the proposition put forward by the public works committee relative to street work being
done by paying for the work with
debentures. The committee recommended rather that the petitioners
should either take the bonds or find
some one to take them.
Aldereman Hilditch thought the
committee should take this back and
reconsider it. He felt that the work
would not be possible under the plan
suggested.
Alderman Douglas objected to this
plan because he felt the outside sections were not going to get work
done.
His Worship said that the finance
committee lamented the fact that it
had to take the course it did. The
city must realize that the financial
position of the city was of the very
flrBt' importance. The city had now
undertakn obligations amounting to
$1,421,000 but had not yet floated
any of these bonds. He did not feel
that they should jeopardize the
financial position of the city. They
must get on the market with some
of their bonds. These short term
debentures, such as local improvement debentures, were not likely to
sell as readily as the Ion longer
ones. The city should put these best
selling debentures on the market
first.
The report was adopted.
Start will be Made on the Work of Putting in Necessary
Sewerage System-Main Trunk Line will be Laid
Along Hays Creek to Act as a Take off
for Large Section of
Townsite.
The city council last evening considered the sever bylaw, providing
for the expenditure of $75,000. This
will be laid along Hays Creek from
near Comox Avenue, emptying Into
the harbor near the mouth of Hays
Creek.
The bylaw will be voted upon on
Saturday, November 25, at the police station, with Peter McLachlan
as returning officer. As in all such
cases, only property owners will be
liberty to cast their ballots.
The introduction of a sewerage
system is essential if Prince Rupert
is to maintain her high standard of
health. As the population becomes
more dense tbe danger of epidemics
will increase. It Is necessary, therefore, to have the health of the city
fully ensured by making a start on
the trunk sewers. j
With this line laid connection can
be made with it from a very large
part of the city now building up.
This will be but the beginning of a
modern system of taking care of the
sewerage of the city and should find
a ready endorsement from the citizens.
READY TO ENLARGE
Pioneer   Laundry   Purchases    Addi-
ditional Ground for Further
Extension
A few days ago Otto Nelson, proprietor of the Pioneer Laundry on
Third Avenue, throt-gh the agency ot
O. M. Helgerson LtreSVv,iui*chased the
two lots adjoining '.sfc building and
extending as far asifhe Journal office. Mr. Nelson lias paid $7,000 for
these two lots, which he will hold
for the purposes of extending his
business as occasion warrants.
ihe business which the Pioneer
Laundry has established here is one
of the enterprises of the'place that
has had a remarkably quick development. Under tbe careful business
eye of Mr. Nelson, it has in the course
of two years' time become one of the
best investments in the city.
It is not the intention of the laun
dry to build on the lots at once.
MINISTER  RETURNED
Hon. Martin Burrell, minister of agriculture at Ottawa,
has been returned for Yale-Cariboo without opposition. He has
therefore been elected by acclamation.
Newton was to blame for taking the
insurance from one company to another without knowing that it would
take the time It did to transfer.
Alderman Newton said Alderman
Clayton also "wanted to get his
progs" into him.
"You are not worth It," returned
Alderman Clayton.
LIQUIDATED DAMAGES
City Solicitor Will Take Up the Subject of Writs Served in Connection With Contracts
At the council meeting last evening the announcement was made that
two writs had been served upon the
city clerk In the matter of the settlement, of the street contracts. The
writs were served on behalf of Frank
Kelly and S. H. Watson & Co.
The matter was referred to the
city solicitor  for consideration.
The question at issue is for the
withholding of the $25 a day from
the contractors for time they ran
over the limit of their contracts. The
council withheld the $25 a day for
each day not allowed as having been
lost from any hindrance by the city
the ground that the contract
called for this as "liquidated damages." The council held that the
matter was one in which they had
practically no choice, but that It was
a subject for settlement by the courts
or  by  arbitration.
 o	
On Saturday evening, at the home
of Rev. Dr. McLeod, pastor of the
Baptist Church, the marriage took
pHue of Mr. Fred Clarke and Miss
Gertrude Hardy. The wedding was
a quiet one. Mr, and Mrs. Clarke
win reside In tin- city.
LAND SALE TO BE PUT ON IN PRINCE RUPERT
G.T.P. Development Company Will Through its Representative David H. Hays Put up to Public
Auction in This City Lots Held by the Corporation in Section 2---
Arrangements are now Being Made Locally
for This Event.
* * * *
WINS  HIGH   HONOR
Word   has   reached   the   offi-  *
* cials of the agricultural depart- *
* ment at Victoria that the prov- *
* Ince's   display   of   potatoes   en-  *
* tered at New York in competi- *
»  tion   for   the   Stillwell   Trophy  *
* and  the  $1,000   prize  has  cap- *
* tured   the   award.     Practically *
* every state in  the Union  com- *
* peted  for the  honor. »
*   *   *   *
.   *   .   *
HARDY HAY TERMINUS
0.  P.  R.  Will  Hulled   Its  Vancouver
Island Line to That Point
Hardy Bay, near the north end of
Vancouver Island, has been selected
as the terminus for the C. P. R. lint
on the Island.
The plans of the company In this
respect are not made known. When
the line is completed, however, that
company, by using its rail line to
Hardy Bay from Victoria and connecting points, will be in a position
to shorten the steamer route between
the southern points and Prince Rupert.
The G. T. P. has in contemplation a similar plan, having a charter for a road the length of Vancouver Island.
MAY ham: good BOUT
Bayley,    Well    Known    Here,    Won
rom   Eddie  Marino — Seeking  a
Motch Witn Lander oi Calgary
loe Bayley, recently seen here in
a match with Oscar Nelson, defeated
Eddie Marino of Seattle, who one
time went 2d rounds to draw with
Abe At I ell, in eight rounds at Cal-
gary   on Thanksgiving Dny.
Bayley won easily, aird is trying
for a match with Lauder of Calgary
for the lightweight championship of
Canada. Lauder is matched to fight
I.nnihard, who was seen here.
Local enthusiasts are making an
effort to land the Bayley-Lauder
fight for Prince Rupert If they meet.
If this is accomplished ii will be a
great attraction.
The G. T. P. is going to put on sale
in the city the lots held by the company In Section 2. David H. Hays,
agent of the G. T. P. .Development
Company, under whose charge the
lots are administered, has just returned from a trip south, where he
was engaged getting ready for the
sale. He will he busy for the next
few days settling upon the final details which have yet to be made.
Section 2 lies beyond the junction
at Lynch's, overlooking the water.
It Is high ground, beautifully situated for residential purposes and
should bring very high prices at the
sale. Over 540 lots will he offered
for sale, Mr. Hays expects, and In
spite of the fact that lhe news of
the sale was not supposed to be out,
he found many inquiries when he was
in the south.
Mr. Hays says there will be no
lack of buyers. The sale will be
well advertised and buyers will be
able to reach here from all parts.
Early In December will be the date,
he expects, but final announcement
will be made later.
The governmenl lots arc not going
on sale at Ibis time, the auction being confined to the G, T. P, Pits
alone.
The commanding view from iho
high ground in Section 2 is such as
to make thai portion of tha city
very desirable as a residential quarter for a long time to come and prices
should rule high In consequence. Tire
sale of lots there will undoubtedly
be followed by improvements and
next year should see streets opened
and a general Bcheme of development carried out.
PRICE To ADVANCE
Northern   Anthracite   Collieries
Meeting Willi Success in
Their  Boring
li. it. Young of ihe- Northern Anthracite Collieries Ltd., nun- boring
for coal at Queen Charlotte City, Is
In Prince Rupert. Ile reports that
the drilling operations are going
along splendidly. The formation of
the rock encountered is that necessary to ensure the loeatlng of the
coal and in proof of it Mr, Veiling has
the core taken from the drill bole.
Sir well satisfied are the directors,
that, within a week tbe price of
shares is to be advanced to 2ii cents
a share.
Locally, II. F. McRae & Co. re-
port steady sales. The arrival of
Mr. Young with the news that all
is going well lias bad a stimulating
effect upon I lie market and some
good blocks of shares have been sold
In consequence.
\
- PRINCE RUPERT JOURN.iL
Tuesday, November 7, 1911.
Resources   of  the   Queen   Charlottes
The lit 11 cl excitement over the coal
and oil possibilities of the Queen
Charlotte group of Islands is founded
on the work on the few daring prospectors who have braved isolation
and hardships In a country that will
shortly be better known. That there
are coal and oil fields on Graham
Island is known beyond theh possibility of a doubt. Their extent cannot be known until the development
work now in progress is finished.
Many years ago, tire best geologists
in Canada reported favorably on the
deposits, and all experts who have
visited the camps recently add their
optimistic views to those of the men
who are working both on the nortlr
and south ends of the island. Men
who have been In the old fields of
Utah, California and Pennsylvania
have looked over the indications and
all are convinced that the formation
is perfect. Tbe drill, on Tiahn Point,
is down several hundred feet and has
struck oil in small quantities. The
limestone rock, in which the drilling
is now being done, may have a thickness of thousands of feet; it is beneath this capping that the oil beds
will be struck. It would be useless
to advise persons to visit the ground
in the hopes of securing any more
open land; all is taken up and is
staked and restaked. Should oil be
struck, in quantity, there will be a
great deal of litilgation and trouble
over the ground, which is said to
cover hundreds of square miles. As
a speculative proposition, the investment in oil stock is one that no reasonable person can ask friends or
foes to place their funds in—with a
surety of success. Like all mining
propositions, in the development
stage, the prices of stock will be low
until the ground is proven. Oil shares
are sold to assist in developing and
securing ground, and the chance of
reaping a rich reward is the reason
for investing. When the bore reaches
oil, stock will advance in value and
many companies will withdraw their
shares from the market; hence the
purchaser must use his own judgment on the possibilities and indications known. It is a virgin field
over which Professor Dawson and
many others expressed their opinions
many years ago. There is but one
oil boreing plant on the ground and
it is problematical whether they have
erected their derrick in a place that
will prove all that is desired. There
Is no doubt that other oil wells will
be drilled, and the men now at work
feel assured that they have planted
their valuable machinery in a p'ace
that will "tap" the oil. Your correspondent has been to Tiahn Point
and can assure your readers that the
drill owned by the B. C. Oilfields
Company is one of the best. Accompanying us was a man who has spent
many years in milling, both for gold
and oil. He went thoroughly over
the shore line and ground contiguous
and expressed the opinion that the
territory was more promising than
the Utah fields, where over thirty oil
drills have been erected. This man
had no other object, in visiting the
property than to secure an interest
in the adjoining ground. Latere, another man, who has been interested
in Pennsylvania old fields, went to
the property. He invested in shares
Immediately on returning to Prince
Rupert. The men mining on the
ground were consulted. They were
convinced that oil would be struck,
in quantity. Tbe government geological report and maps show that
the territory, between Otard Bay and
Frederick Island, is of a nature that
contains oil. Apparently, for the
present, all will depend on the work
accomplished by the drill now at
work. It may take them months to
make a showing that will prove the
value of the country as an old,field.
In the meantime, especially during
the winter months, little news will
be obtainable. There Is a blazed
trail from the west, roast of Graham
Island to Naden Harbor—about 20
miles—and this is the only means
of communication, The west coast
is treacherous for small craft, and
few desire to take lhat means to
reach Tiahn Point at this season.
Regarding tbe coal measures
known to exist on the Yakoun River and on the soutli end of the Island,
it would be advisable to state that
they are being exploited now as never
before. Men and machinerey are being taken in and roads are under
construction. That there is coal, of
good quality, in certain sections of
Graham Island there can be no doubt.
The extent of the seams and the
quantity Is a problem that cannot be
dilated on at present. It would be
well to understand tnat there are
three qualities of coal on the island,
ranging from lignite to semi-bituminous and anthracite. There are large
beds of lignite, which are not of very
great value, and they have been located along the seashore. The bituminous   coal   has   been   found   inland,
while the anthracite is located, principally, on the south end of the Island. When a man knows little of
coal mining, it is well to write as
little as possible about it. That there
is coal on Graham Island, there is
no doubt, and the proximity of a
market will cause the owners of coal
liences to develop.
Timber of many varieties can be
found on the islands. The spruce,
yellow cedar, red cedar, alder, and
smaller trees, are to be found In millions, awaiting pulp and sawmills.
There Is good water power on the
Ain River, and many of the other
streams can be harnessed.
We have been over a great deal of
the island, and examined a few of
the copper and gold mines. A number are being developed; on others,
no others than assessment work has
been done, while It is well known
that the Hudson's Bay Compjany
took over $;!(),000 in gold from a
small ledge on one of the islands in
the early days. Several copper
claims have been bonded, for many
thousands of dol'ars, and there is no
doubt that smlters will be erected on
the south end of the islands when
the properties have been proved.
There are few placer mines. The
gold taken from several streams is
known as "float," and is very light.
We have seen several ounces, taken
from a stream near Masset; but the
diggings were not of the paying kind
and were abandoned. Several parties
are now on the east coast of Graham
Island, sinking test holes and finding values in the block sands, which
cover over twenty miles of beach..
The problem of extracting the iron
that covers gold, and saving the valuable portions, has been one that
puzzled many prospectors. It has
been announced that the black sand
carried 17 ce« in gold to the square
yard; but all^neans used, up to the
present, in saving the gold do not
appear to bring paying results.
If some arrangement could he
made with those holding timber and
coal licences along the shores of the
inlets of the Queen Charlotte Islands
to allow, settlers the surface right.!
on one hundred acres, there would
be a large influx of people who
would open up market gardens and
dairy farms. The would-be settler
is not anxious to take up land in the
Interior of the islands, away from
neighbors and without roads. The
inlets are safe for navigation at all
seasons of the year, and the tides
so strong, during the ebb and flow,
that boats travel six miles an hour
each way on the rising and falling
tide. There are thousands of acres
of land which could be cleared along
these waterways; but all are held
under timber and coal leases. The
settler might "log" the land for the
benefit of the lessee and still retain
the surface rights, giving the lessee
a right-of-way over the land for the
taking of the timber to the water.
On forty or fifty acres of this land
a family could make a comfortable
living, and the islands would be set
tied up. The land is good and the
Prince Rupert market will be available. Small fruits and vegetables
grow in abundance, and cattle roam
during the whole year.
The wealth of fish caught in Hecate Staits is only the beginning of a
trade that will assume vast proportions in the near future. Herring,
halibut, salmon, cod and many other
varieties abound. There is not one
local concern on the islands, with
the exception of the Pacofi plans and
the conceren started at Queen Charlotte City, Off Langara Island, at
Virago Sound, and in the neighborhood of Masset Inlet, the halibut and
herring banks are extensive. Along
the west coast of Graham Island
there are but few harbors; but, during the summer season, the few fishermen have no cliff lout yin obtaining
more fish than they can use. The
31)0 Indians pend little time fishing,
and obtain all the food they require
for winter use in a few days. In the
luture fishermen will reside on the
Islands and will ship their catches
to Prince Rupert, to be transferred
ovei the G. T. P. to eastern markets.
There is no doubt that the Queen
Charlotte Islands will have many
thousands of inhabitants. It is worth
the while of any persons, seeking
land or investment, to visit Masset
Inlet and Virago Sound and to take
a trip along the shores of theh islands
on the south side. At present the
islands are almost isolated—without
telegraphic communication and with
but one steamer fortnightly. It was
so on Vancouver Island, thirty years
ago; but the advent of railway communication on the mainland brought
that island to the front, and there
is no reason why the Queen Charlotte Islands should not reap material benefits from their proximity
to Prince Rupert. It Is the last land
on this side of the ocean—a land
that has the climate and possibilities
possessed by no other section. The
summer days are long and the waterways are ideal for those seeking
recreation and rest. With its long,
sandy shores, its rivers and streams,
its wealth of flowers and fruits, Graham Island 'must become the resort
of the tourist and the home of the
weary workers in the cities. The
sportsman will find fish and game
birds in the rivers and on the inlets.
A camp can be "struck" anywhere,
and the freedom from dust, pests,
wild animals and venemous reptiles
would mean that homes will spring
ti]) along the shores, where the families of the merecliants will spend
their summer months. The Indians
are known as the most progressive
on the Coast and crime is so little
known among them that there is not
even one police officere on the largest island of theh group. They have
two towns, with their churches,
schools and town halls. In each
place there is a uniformed brass band
and almost all of the native speak
the English tongue They have cooperative stores, and residences that
are a credit to the builders and occupants.
It is to be hoped that the present
government will take into consideration the construction of wireless stations on the north end of Graham
island. Improvements of this description would mean a great deal to
the business men and would break
the isolation that people should not
suffer from, within eighty miles of
the coming metropolis of the west.
SKOOKUM.
 o	
BRITAIN'S EXTENSION
Wonderful Expansion in the Empire
Recalled to Mind by United
States Writer
The first Parliament of Great Britain met two hundred and four years
ago—on October 23, 1707. By a
vote of 110 for and 69 against, Scotland accepted the "Union," and the
Scottish and English acts ratifying
the union being signed by the King,
England and Scotland together became Great Britain, writes Rev. Thso.
Gregory in the San Francisco Examiner.
When the first Parliament met on
the October day of the year 1707,
Britain was "great" only in name.
Had Webster been on the stage then
he could not have gotten off his famous saying about the globe-encircling power of the British Empire.
It was an insignificant empire in comparison with what it is today.
With the exception of the narrow-
strip of territory along the Atlantic
coast of North America between the
Alleghenles and the sea, her colonial
possessions were nil. England was
just beginning to establish her industrial dealings with India. Clive
was still far in the future. It was
not until 1723 that Captain Stubbs
sailed up the Gambia, thus giving the
initial opening to England in Africa.
Australia and the vast island empire
of the South Seas were still practically unknown to the western peoples. England bad been at Gibraltar but two or three years; Malta
must wait nearly a century to become- British. The idea of the Mediterranean as an "Eng'ish lake" was
unborn. Canada and the Great American West, Southwest and Northwest
was a vast "No man's Land " to be
fought for and won later along in
the game.
When the first Parliament met
Great Britain was England, Scotland,
Wales, Ireland, a few acres at Gibraltar and the thirteen colonies along
the slope of the Alleghenies in Nortli
America, with an area of some six
hundred thousand square miles and
a population of not over twenty millions.
Today the British Empire takes In
a third of theh globe, and wields an
influence more or less commanding,
over five hundred millions of people.
Its coaling stations girdle the earth,
the flag of Ils merchant marine
floats above all waters, its navy is
equal to those of any two nations on
tlie planet, and Its language is heard
In every nook and corner of the
world.
Nor Is there much danger of the
dismemberment of this wonderful political fabric. Britons, In whatever
part of this mighty empire they may
be found, are freemen, making their
own laws and managing their own
local affairs, and, with their pride in
the Empire, they will not think of
disrupting It. "Hall Britannia*" is
destined to be sounded over the seas
and continents for thousands of years
to come.
 o	
"So you resigned?"
"Yes. I couldn't stand the way
the firm treated me."
"What did they do?"
"Took my name off the pay roll."
LAND NOTICES
Skeena   Laud    District—District    of
Queen  Charlotte  Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Howard K.
Dutcher, o: Vancouver, B. C, occupation suneyor, intends to apply for
p -mission to purchase the following
described lands'.—Commencing at a
post planted about 11 miles east und
100 chains north from the southeast
corner of Indian Reserve No. 11,
Graham Island; thence north 80
chains; tlience east 80 chains; tlience
south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains to place of commencement;
containing 640 acres.
HOWARD K. DUTCHER.
A. S.  Christie, Agent.
Dated September 8, 1911.        olO
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Queen  Charlotte  Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Lancelot A.
Wilson, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation surveyor, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing
at a post planted about 11 miles east
and 100 chains north from the southeast corner of Indian Reserve No.
11, Graham Island; thence north 80
chains; thence west 80 chains; tlience
south 80 cliains; thence east 80
cliains to place of commencement;
containing 640 acres.
LANCELOT A. WILSON.
A. S. Christie, Agent.
Dated   September   8,   1911.       olO
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen  Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Orniond Stitt,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation surveyor, Intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted about 10 miles east and 100 chains
north of the southeast corner of Indian Reserve No. 11, Graham Island;
thence north 80 chains; thence west
80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
tlience east 80 chains to place of
commencement; containing 640 acres.
ORMOND STITT.
A. S. Christie, Agent.
Dated September 8, 1911. olO
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Alvena Converse, of Peabody, Kansas, occupation
housewife, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about' 7 miles east of
the southeast corner of Indian Reserve No. 11, Graham Island; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains to place of
commencement; containing 640 acres.
ALVENA CONVERSE.
A. S. Christie, Agent.
Dated September 8, 1911. olO
Skeena   Land    District—District    of
Queen  Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Ralph Converse, of Peabody, ivansas. occupation farmer, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 7 miles east of
the southeast corner of Indian Reserve No. 11, Graham Island; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to the place of
commencement; containing 640 acres.
RALPH CONVERSE.
A. S. Christie, Agent.
Dated September 8, 1911. olO
Skeena    Land    District—District    of
Queen  Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Lloyd Converse, of Peabody Kansas, occupation farmer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 7 miles east of the
southeast corner of Indian Reserve
No. 11 Graham Island; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains to place of
commencement; containing 640
acres. LLOYD  CONVERSE.
A. S. Christie, Agent.
Dated September 8, 1911. olO
Skeena   Land    District—District   of
Queen  Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Edith Denner,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation clerk,
intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted about 8 miles east and 60 chains
south of the southeast corner of Indian Reserve No. 11, Graham Island;
thence north 80 chains; thence east
80 chains; tlience south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains to place of
commencement; and containing 640
acres. EDITH DENNER.
A. S. Christie, Agent.
Dated  September 8,  1911. olO
Skeena   Land    District—District   of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Fern K. Converse, of Galva, Iowa, occupation
farmer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 8 miles east and
60 chains soutli of the southeast corner of Indian Reserve No. 11, Graham Island; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence north
80 chains; thence west 80 chains to
place of commencement; containing
640 acres.     FERN K. CONVERSE.
A. S. Christie, Agent.
Dated September 8, 1911. olO
Skeena   Land    District—District   of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Nona Converse, of Galva, Iowa, occupation
housewife .intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 8 miles east and
1 miles south of the southeast corner of Indian Reserve No. 11, Graham Island; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence north
80 chains; thence east 80 chains to
place of commencement; containing
640 acres. NONA CONVERSE.
i A. S. Christie, Agent.
Dated September 8, 1911.        olO
LAND NOTICES
Skeena    Land    District—District   of
Queen  Charlotte  Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Josephine
Sommerville, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation clerk, Intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing
at a post planted about 8 miles east
and 140 cliains south of the southeast corner of Indian Reserve No.
11, Graham Island; thence south 40
chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 40 chains; tlience west 80
chains to place of commencement;
containing 320 acres.
JOSEPHINE SOMMERVILLE.
A. S. Christie, Agent.
Dated   September   9,   1911.       olO
Skeena   Land    District—District    ol
Queen  Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that James Nash,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation shoemaker, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 7 miles east and
3 miles soutli of the southeast corner of Indian Reserve No. 11, Graham Island; thence north 80 chains
thence west 80 chains; thence south
80 chains; thence east 80 cliains to
place of commencement; containing
640 acres. JAMES NASH.
A. S. Christie, Agent.
Dated September 9, 1911. olO
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Queen  Charlotte  Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Whittaker, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation salesman, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 7 miles east and
3 miles south of the southeast corner of Indian Reserve No. 11, Graham Island; tlience south SO chains;
thence east 80 cliains; thence north
SO chains; thence west 80 chains to
place of commencement; containing
640 acres.
CHARLES J. WHITTAKER.
A. S. Christie, Agent
Dated September 9, 1911.        olO
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that James Mitch
ell Dryden, of Vancouver, B. C, occu
pation casemaker, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described Iands:—Commencing at a post planted about 7 miles
east and 3 miles south of the southeast corner of Indian Reserve No
11, Graham Island; thence south 80
cliains; thence west 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80
cliains to place of commencement;
containing 640 acres.
JAMES MITCHELL DRYDEN.
A. S. Christie, Agent.
Dated September 9, 1911.        olO
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that William Edg
erly, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
salesman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 6 miles east and
3 miles south of the southeast corner of Indian Reserve No. 11, Graham Island; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence north
80 chains; thence east 80 chains to
place of commencement; containing
640 acres. WILLIAM EDGERLY.
A. S. Christie, Agent
Dated September 9, 1911.        olO
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Queen  Charlotte  Islands
TAKE NOTICE that William Wai
lace, of Ladysmith,' occupation
rancher, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 6 miles east and
'< miles south of the southeast corner of Indian Reserve No. 11, Graham Island; thence nortli 80 chains;
thence west 80 cliains; thence south
SO cliains; tlience east 80 chains to
place of commencement; containing
640 acres.   WILLIAM WALLACE.
A. S. Christie, Agent.
Dated September 9,  lull.        olO
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Queen  Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Margaret Wallace, of Ladysmith, B. C, occupation
widow, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 6 miles east and
5 miles south of the southeast corner of Indian Reserve No. 11, Graham Island; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; theuce south
80 chains; thence west 80 chains to
place of commencement; containing
640   acres,
MARGARET WALLACE.
A. ... Christie, Agent.
Dated  September  9,  1911.      olO
Skeena   Land    District—District   of
Quetwi  Charlotte  Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Horace Curtis, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
carpenter, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 6 miles east and 5
miles south of the southeast corner
of Indian Reserve No. 11, Graham
Island; thence south 80 chains-
thence east 80 chains; thence nortli
8 0 chains; thence west 80 chains to
place of commencement; containing
640 acres. HORACE CURTIS.
A. S. Christie, Agent.
Dated September 9, 1911. O10
Skeena   Land    District—District   of
Queen  Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Sydney Curtis
of Vancouver, B, C, occupation
clerk, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a po.it planted ahout 8 miles east and 6 miles
south of the southeast corner of Indian Reserve No. 11, Graham Island-
thence north 80 chains; thence west
80 chains; thence south 80 chains*
tlience east 80 chains to place of
commencement; containing 640 acres
SYDNEY CURTIS.
A. S. Christie, Agent
Dated September 9, 1911.        0l6
LAND NOTICES
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Mattle Curtis,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation spinster, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted about 8 miles east, and 5 miles
south of the southeast corner of Indian Reserve No. 11, Graham Island;
tlience south SO chains; tlience west
80 chains; thence nortli 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains to place of
commencement; containing 640
acres MATTIE CURTIS.
A. S. Christie, Agent.
Dated   September   9,   1911.       olO
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Elizabeth
Whitccros, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation widow, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 8 miles east and
7 miles south from the southeast
corner of Indian Reserve No. 11,
Graham Island; thence north 80
chains; thence east 40 chains; thence
south SO chains; thenee west 40
chains to place of commencement;
containing   320   acres.
ELIZABETH WHITECROS.
A. S. Christie, Agent.
Dated  September 9,  1911.        olO
Sketna   Land   District—District   of
Queen  Charlotte  Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Hugh C. Nelson, of St. Paul, Minnesota, occupation salesman, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:-—Commencing at a
post planted about 8 miles east and
7 miles south of the southeast corner
of Indian Reserve No. 11, Graham
Island; thence north 80 chains;
tlience west 80 cliains; thence south
80 chains; thence east 80 chains to
point of commencement; containing
640 acres.        HUGH C. NELSON.
A. S. Christie, Agent.
Dated September 9, 1911.    *   olO
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Nellie Nelson,
of St. Paul, Minnesota, occupation
housewife, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 8 miles east and
7 miles south from the southeast corner of Indian Reserve No. 11, *ira-
ham Island; thence soutli SO cliains;
thence west 80 chains; thence north
80 chains; thence east 80 chains to
point of commencement; containing
640  acres. NELLIE NELSON.
A. S.  Christie, Agent.
Dated  September  9,   1911.       olO
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Amelia Nelson, of Windsor Park, Illinois, occupation housewife, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about 8 miles
east and 7 miles south from the
southeast corner of Indian Reserve
No. 11, Graham Island; thence south
80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence west
80 chains to point of commencement;   containing   640  acres.
AMELIA   NELSON.
A. S. Christie, Agent.
Dated  September 9, 1911.        olO
TAKE NOTICE that Guy Nelson,
of Windsor Park, Illinois, occupation
bank clerk, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 6 miles east and
7 miles south from the southeast
corner of Indian Reserve No. 11,
Graham Island; thence north 80
chains; thence east SO chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains to point of commencement;
containing 640 acres.
GUY   NELSON.
A. S. Christie, Agent.
Dated September 10, 1911.      olO
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Retta Gray, of
Blair, Nebraska, occupation housewife, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted about 6 miles east and 7 miles
south from the southeast corner of
Indian Reserve No. 11, Graham Island; thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence north 80
chains; thence west 80 chains to the
point of commencement; containing
640 acres. RE'l 1'A GRAY.
A. S. Christie, Agent.
Dated September 10, 1911.      olO
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Queen  Charlotte  Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Herman Aye,
of Blair, Nebraska, occupation attorney, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted about 0 miles east and 7 miles
south from the southeast corner of
Indian Reserve No. 11, Graham Island; thence south 80 chains; thence
west SO chains; thence north 80
cliains; thence east 80 chains to the
point of commencement; containing
640 acres. HERMAN AYE.
A. S. Christie, Agent.
Dated September 10, 1911.      olO
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Eileen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that W. R. Glasscock of Missoula, Montana, occupation real estate, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 6 miles east and
7 miles south from the southeast
corner of Indian Reserve No. 11, Graham Island; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south
80 chains; tlience east, 80 chains to
point of commencement; containing
040  acres.      W.  R.  GLASSCOCK.
A. S. Christie, Agent.
Dated September 10, 1911.      olO wmrmmmmmmummmm
Tuesday, November 7, 1911.
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
French and German Armies Compared
"Cavalier," writing in the London
Standard, says: The two most powerful armies of the world, whether considered from numerical strength or
perfect equipment and organization,
are unquestionably the French and
German. The question is often asked
which is the more formidable as a
machine of war, or "whether one has
any chance against the other," by
persons who have not had the opportunity of acquiring special knowledge
in bucIi matters. It is a very difficult question to answer correctly.
Mistakes In answering this very question accounted for Rosbach, Jena, and
Sedan. Both armies have now, as
formerly, different characteristics,
different points of superority, and
different failings. The two are probably so nearly equnal in value as
machines for making a war that victory or defeat would depend upon
the chiefs who respectively handled
them. In the past wars between
France and Germany victory has invariably been snatched by tbe side
which possessed the great leader at
the time. King Frederick, Napoleon,
Moltke, were immeasurably superior
to the generals they defeated, but,
of course, other courses contribute
which are not strictly dependent on
the fighting power of the armies,
such as to the cause of the quarrel,
the enthusiasm, or the lack of it,
for the war on one side or the other
of the combatant peoples, whether
one side or the other was surprised
at the outset, and so far.
The recent manoeuvres in Eastern
France and Northern Germany have
given fresh opportunities for studying the special qualities of both
armies, and both have shown themselves to be keenly conscious of their
all-important mission," modestly
aware of how far all armies fall short
of perfection, and anxiously striving
to raise their own military value. To
institute a comparison the different
arms may be briefly surveyed. The
German infantry, thanks to the large
number of young men annually
available for conscription and the
consequent choice of recruits, have
improved very much in physique.
Both in height and breadth the
soldiers of the line made a most
favorable impression and on several
occasions one had to look twice to
be sure that a line regiment did not
belong to the Guards, whose recruits
are chosen for exceptional stature.
The marching performances of the
infantry have consequently improved,
for, although the distances demanded
were the same on an average as formerly, there was far less straggling
than German troops used to show. It
is true that the weather was perfect, and German infantry can endure cold better than heat of wet.
In the past the French infantry have
surpassed their rivals in marching
power, which is one of the most important points of all. In discipline
the soldiers of each nationality display different characteristics. The
German is more stolid, more mechanical, less impatient of reproof, generally speaking more docile and
phlegmatic; in these respects he excels as a foot soldier. The Frenchman Is more difficult to lead, is more
responsive, has more intelligence, initiative, and is far quicker. If be is
attached to bis officer and trusts
him, the greatest self-sacrifice can
be demanded of him. It is easier
to arouse enthusiasm in France than
In Germany. Both artilleries claim
the superority over the other, and
nothing short of trial by battle can
decide the point. The German cavalry Is more numerous than the
French, and the greater part of it,
Uhlans, Hussars and Dragoons, are
better mounted than any cavalry in
Europe. The Cuirassiers in Germany,
as elsewhere, are under-mounted. It
is very difficult to say which is the
superior in this arm. The Germans
are more powerful men and strong
riders, serve for three years as
against two years' service in the
French cavalry. The German light
cavalry moves rapidly in better order
than the French and is armed with
the lance.
On the other hand, the French are
quicker, more alert, and more resourceful. The French Dragoons are
a fine arm, and on both sides the
value of fighting on foot and of machine guns is understood. In a tournament between French and German
horse, with anything like even numbers, victory would ptrobably side
with the most skillful commander,
and who can say on which side he
rides until the trial takes place?
In technical equipment the French
possess at present a great superiority
in aeroplanes, which were used with
great effect at the manoeuvres in
each country. Their radius of action
is limited by the weather, of course,
but when they can fly, it is possible,
during daylight at any rate, to see
whether roads are being used and by
columns of what size. It seems doubtful whether the huge airships could
be handled if exposed to the attacks
of aeroplanes. The spectator has the
impression that on the whole the
French army is keener than the Germans. Tlie side which has to defend what it has taaen is always
somewhat at a disadvantage during
the years of peace-preparation. The
French, in fact, have a greater Incentive to prosecute the difficult and
wearisome task of preparing for war
in peace than the Germans.
Without doubt the greatest power of Germany lies in the peculiar
organization of her corps of officers.
It is not only that they are on the
whole better educated than any
other, for they have a longer, more
methodical, and more logical, preparation for their important duties, but
the strength of the common understanding wliich binds these men together, and which gives them so powerful a bold over their fellow countrymen, cannot be underrated. To
say that the German officer corps is
aristocratic does not explain the matter, as the word aristocratic is generally used in England, though the
officers of the German army do constitute a real aristocracy. Their influence rests on the confidence they
inspire. They are credited with
suond comprehension of their business, they are known to be punctual, energetic and self-confident.
They are believed to have a higher
standard of honor than their compeers in civil life, to be more self-
sacrificing and trustworthy. The best
half of the German youth are trained
by these officers and their influence
in all grades of society is tremendous.
Their poverty, which in England reduces their importance, is precisely
the secret of their strength. To the
Prussion officer is due the resurrection after Jena, the triumphs of 1886
and 1870, and upon his shoulders
rests the burden of maintaining the
German Empire of today.
Field for Investment
That the recent visit of Andre Lazard to British Columbia was conversant with the investment of $3,000,-
000 in Vancouver Island coal properties is the news that has just become public. Mr. Lazard, who is
managing partner of that great financial institution known as "Lazard
Freres," considered second only to
the Rothschilds in European mone
tary power, came, saw and—bought
—and British Columbia is the fortunate object of his shrewdness.
Lazard Freres are already heavily
interested in the Canadian Collieries
(Dunsmuir) Ltd. holdings, and as a
result of Mr. Lazzard's visit plans
are now being formulated for a more
elaborate Industry than had been previously decided upon earlier in the
year.
R. M. Kindersley, himself one of
the most prominent financiers in
Great Britain and the rere.sentative
of Lazard Freres, who accompanied
Andre Lazard on his visit to the coal
mines at Extension and other Vancouver Island fields, stated afterwards that $3,000,000 had been appropriated for the purpose of further
opening up the coal properties of
Vancouver Island. A large proportion of that sum will be used for
haulage power, made possible by the
installation of hydro-electric plants,
utilizing the natural water force
within the vicinity of Extension and
Cumberland coal fields. This undertaking will occupy the greater part
of 1911 and 1912.
It Is generally known that Lazard
Freres were formerly largely interested in timber properties in the
northwestern part of the United
States, but in recent years this great
French firm has practically disposed
of all its American holdings, investing its capital instead in Canadian
offerings, and while on this coast
Mr. Lazard consummated a deal disposing of 700,000 acres of land in
Oregon for $6,000,000. This land
was acquired by his firm in the late
sixties for a sum approximating
$300,000.
Mr. Lazard in an address which
he delivered recently at San Francisco before the board of trade In
that city, after leaving British Columbia, took occasion to remark that
In his opinion nothing could equal
the wonderful possibilities of this
province and Its great wealth of natural resources, and he also informed
his auditors that he contemplated
heavy invxestments in this part of
the northwest within the next five
years.
This eulogy, coming from such an
eminent and shrewd financier as the
bead of the house of Lazard Freres,
must be more than encouraging to
all investors in Britisii Columbia
propositions, and will undoubtedly
exercise great stimulating power on
future investors, particularly from
France, where the cautiousness and
sagacity of that great financial firm
are properly  appreciated.
 o	
LAYING   CONTEST
Hens of Various Breeds Are Matched
Against One Another in
Year's  Test
Two hundred and forty hens entered upon a one-year competition in
the city of Vancouver a week ago
for the purpose of ascertaining which
can lay the greatest number of eggs
within the period. The contest will
close October 19, 1912.
This novel competition, which, jy
the way, Is the first to be Inaugurated on the American continent, is heing held on the Vancouver Exhibition grounds, Hastings Park, under
the auspices of the B. C. Poultry Association, in conjunction with the
Vancouver  Exhibition  Board.
Tire importance of this egg-laying
contest, and the benefit lo be derived
by the poultry industry, more especially in this province, has already
been fully recognized by the provincial government, which has donated
$100 towards the prize fund; Che
Vancouver Exhibition Hoard anil the
B. C. Poultry Association have each
donated a similar amount.
The judging will be figured by the
number of eggs taken from each
hen, in which there will be six liens.
Thus the 240 hens will make in all
40 hens. During the competition
valuable experiments will be held
and a detailed report of the progress
of the contest, giving the number of
eggs taken from each group, with
the name of the breed of hens which
laid them, and the price received
from them, will be furnished by the
committee and published by the
newspapers throughout the province.
Such contests have created much
interest In Australia and In the United States. The first egg-laying contest was instituted by the Sydney
Telegraph, New Soulh Wales, and,
at the end of eight years, Is still
being run by that journal. The pbila-
being run by that journal. The Philadelphia North American contemplates running an international egg-
laying competition in Connecticut,
commencing on the first day of November.
Hens have been received from the
following sections of the province,
and betoken the widespread interest
awakened: Revelstoke, Arrow Park,
Vernon, Chilliwack, Central Park,
Duncan, Lulu Island, Port Mann,
Steveston, Crofton, Victoria, Salt
Spring Island, Thetis Island, Cowichan., Burquitlam, Cobble Hllll, Kamloops, Burnaby, Chemainus, Saanich-
ton, Hagan, Mt. Tolmie; and five
pens from Australia and one from
New  Zealand.
The following committee has
charge of the contest; Messrs. T. Edwards, poultry judge, Victoria (chulr-
ninii); W. Stonehouse, Vancouver,
representing the B. C. Poultry Association; H. Ralston, manager Vancouver Exhibition; ,\1. A. .lull, Vancouver; E. W. .Scott, deputy minister of agriculture (ex-oificio) and
.1. R. Terry, department of agriculture, Victoria.
Me-llirr I'luliling
Stew some praises with sugar nml
lemon till soft, then take out the
stones and put the prunes in a greased pudding basin. .Make a batter
with one cupful of flour, one table-
spoonful of sugar, half a teaspoonful
Of baking powder, anil one' cupful
Of milk. Mix well till smooth, pour
over the prunes, iwisi a piece of buttered paper over the top, and steam
one hour.
Skeena   Land   District — District   ofi
Coast
TAKE NOTICE that Hugh A. |
Gourlay, of Vancouver, occupation
bookkeeper, intends to apply for per-!
mission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 10 chains distant
and in a northly direction from the
northwest corner of Lot 370, and on
the southwesterly end of an island;
thence following the southeasterly
shore to the northeast end of Island;
tlience following the northwest shore
of said island to the point of commencement; containing fifty acres,
more or less.
HUGH A. GOURLAY.
Mancell  Clark, Agent.
Dated  Oct.   12,   1911. o-20
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that I, Anton Sal-
berg, laborer, of Prince Rupert, intend to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands: —
Commencing at a post planted on the
west side of Lakelse Lake; forty
(40) chains north and about two
(2) chains east of A.P 18787, and
two miles south of Lot 1733; thence
soutli 40 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence north 40 chains;
thence east 40 chains, to point of
commencement; containing 320
acres, more or less.
ANTON   SALBERG.
Fred E. Cowell, Agent.
Dated Sept. 18, 1911. o-20
Skeena    Land    District—District    of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that I, Hans Rus-
tad, laborer, of Prince Rupert, intend to apply for permission to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post
planted on the east side of Williams
Creek, which flows into Lakelse
Lake, about one (1) mile from Kitamaat Branch right-of-way in a
southerly direction, and five (5)
chains from the creek bank; thence
south 40 chains; thence east 40
chains; thence north 40 cliains;
thence west 40 chains, to point of
commencement; containing 160
acres, more or less.
HANS RUSTAD.
Fred E. Cowell, Agent.
Dated Sept.  15, 1911. 0-20
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that I, Lars Anderson, of Prince Rupert, occupation
laborer, Intend to apply for permission to purchase the following described liuids:—Commencing at a
post planted on the east side of Williams Creek, a tributary of Lakelse
Lake, one and one-half (11-2) miles
in a southerly direction from the Kitamaat Branch right-of-way and ten
(10) chains from the creek bank;
thence south 40 chains; thence east
40 chains; thence north 40 chains;
thence west 40 chains, to point of
commencement; containing 160
acres, more or less
LARS   ANDERSON.
Fred E. Cowell, Agent.
Dated Sept. 15, 1911.         ji-20
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Gwendolen E.
Burrowes of Prince Rupert, B. C
married woman, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described land:—Commencing at a
post planted about one mile west of
post marked L. 1443, northwest
corner; thence south SO chains;
tlience east 40 chains; thence nortli
80 chains; thence west 40 chains, to
point of commencement; containing
320 acres, more or less. Said land
is situated between T.L. 42913 and
A.P. 11679.
GWENDOLEN E. BURROWES.
Gilbert   Burrowes,  Agent.
Dated October 11, 1911. o-24
Skeena    Land    District—District   of
Qrreen  Charlotte  Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Jens Hansen,
of Masset, B. C, occupation farmer,
intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted at the southwest corner of Timber
Limit No. 30901; thence north, following the line of said timber limit,
SO chains; tbence west about 30
chains to Coal Claim No. 3582;
thence south to the shore line; tbence
following Ihe shore line in a northeasterly direction to the point of commencement; containing 300 acres,
more or less.
JENS HANSEN.
Dated Oct.  16,  1911. 0-24
LIQUOR ACT, 1010
(Section 42)
NOTICE is hereby given that, on
the first day of December next, application will be made to the Superintendent of Provincial Police for renewal of the hotel licence to sell
liquor by retail in the hotel known
as the Big Canyon Hotel, situate at
Kitselas, in the Province of Britisii
Columbia.
J.   W.   PATERSON,
Applicant.
Dated October 6, 1911. olO
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Queen  Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Eliza Sutherland, of Blair, Nebraska, U. S. A.,
occupation housewife, intends to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about 2V*
miles north and 5 % miles west from
the northwest corner of Lot 992;
thence east 60 chains; thence north
80 chains; thence west 60 chains;
thence south 80 chains, to point commencement; containing 4S0 acres.
ELIZA SUTHERLAND.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated August 25, 1911. s22
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Queen  Charlotte Islands
TAKE  NOTICE  that  Aimee  Merrill,    of    Masset,   B.   C,   occupation
orrsewife, intends to apply for permission   to   purchase   the   following
described  lands:—Commencing  at  a
post planted  about  2 Vs   miles north
and 5 %  miles west from the northwest corner of Lot 992; thence east
60 chains;  thence south 80  chains;
thence west 60 chains; thence north
SO   chains,   to   point   of   commencement;  containing 480 acres.
AIMEE MERRILL.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated August 25, 1911. s22
Skeena Land  District—District
of Coast, Range 6
TAKE NOTICE that Thomas Stewart, of Prince Rupert, occupation
accountant, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at c
post planted 40 chains south from
the southwest corner of Lot 1733;
thence west 40 chains; thence south
40 chains; thence east 40 chains;
thence north 40 chains to point of
commencement; containing 160 acres
more or less.
, ,   - THOMAS STEWART.
John  Klrkaldy, Agent.
Dated  September  22,  1911.       s26
Form of Notice  (Section 34)
Skeena    Land    District-—District   of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that Edward Chesley, of the City of Prince Rupert,
B. C, occupation trainman, intends
to apply for permission to purchase
tbe following described land:—Commencing at a post planted about half
way between Mile Post 77 and Mile
Post 78 on the Main Line of the
Grand Trunk Pacific Railway from
Prince Rupert and about fifty (50)
feet west of the right-of-way of the
said Railway; thence north eighty
(80) chains; tlience w-est forty (40)
chains; thence south eighty (80)
chains; thence east forty (40) chains,
to the point of commencement; and
containing three hundred and twenty
(320) acres more or less and which
land was located by me on the 26th
dav of August, A. D. 1911.
EDWARD  CHESLEY.
Dated August 28, 1911. s5
Form of Notice (Section 47)
Skeena    Land    District—District    of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that John A. Kirkpatrick, of the City of Prince Rupert, dry goods merchant by occupation, intends to apply for permission
to lease the following described land,
bounded as follows:—Commencing
at a pobt planted about three hundred (300) yards west of Mile Post
79 on the "line of the Grand Trunk
Pacific Railway track from Prince
Rupert; thence north eighty (SO
cliains; thence west forty (40)
chains; thence south eighty (80
chains; thence east forty (40)
chains to place of commencement,
and containing three hundred and
twenty (320) acres more or less, and
which land was located by me on tin
26th day of August A.D. 1911.
JOHN A.  KIRKPATRICK.
Philip T. Chesley  Agent.
Dated August 29, 1911. s5
Skeena   Land   District — District   of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that I, George M.
Wilson, of Mountair, New Mexico, occupation farmer, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing
at a post planted at the northwest
corner of Lot 698; thence south 70
chains, more or less, to Hell's Gate
Slough; thence westerly along slough
following edge of island around to
point of commencement; containing
220 acres, more or less.
GEORGE M. WILSON.
A. Wilson, Agent.
Dated August 25,  1911. 9-26
Form of Notice (Section 47)
Skeena    Land    District—District   of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that Alexander
Faulds, of the City of Vancouver,
B. C, occupation mining engineer,
intends to apply for permission to
lease the following land, bounded as
lease the following described
land, bounded as follows:—
Commencing at a post, planted
on the south bank of the
Shamos River (sometimes called
Shames River) about three-quarters
of a mile west from the Grand Trunk
Pacific Railroad and en the south
bank of said river; thence south
eighty (80) chains; tlience west forty
(40) chains; thence nortli eighty
(SO) chains; thence east forty (40)
e hains to the point ot commencement,
and containing three hundred and
twenty (320) acres more or less, and
wliich land was located by me on the
25th day of August, A. D. 1911.
ALEXANDER FAULDS.
Philip T. Chesley, Agent.
Dated August 25, 1911.
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE
Skeena    Land    District—District    of
Coast,  Range  5
TAKE NOTICE that I, Mitchell
Albert, of Prince Rupert, occupation
manager, intend to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted on the east shore; of the
Exi'bunislk River, and being nlieiiii
two miles northerly from lhe mouth
of the said Exchumsik River, and
■which post Is about forty chains
j north from a stake planted on the
Exchumsik River and known as
"Ed"; thence north 4(1 chains;
thence east 80 chains; theme south
80 cliains; thence west 40 chains;
ihence north 40 chains; thence west
4ti chalnB to the place of commencement; containing 480 acres, more
or le?ss. MITCHELL ALBERT.
John  R.  Beatty,  Agent.
Dated October  1,  1911. o!7
Form of Notice (Section 47)
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Coast, Range 5
T4.KE NOTICE that George A. Mc-
Nicholl, of the City of Prince Rupert, railway superintendent by occupation, intends to apply for permission to lease the following described
land:—Commencing at a post planted about three hundred (300) yards
west of Mile Post 80, on the line of
the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway
track from Prince Rupert; tlience
north eighty (80) chains; thence
west forty (40) chains; thence south
eighty (80) chains; thence east forty
(40) chains to place of commencement and containing three hundred
and twenty (320) acres, and which
land was located by nie on the 2Gtlr
day of August, A. D. 1911.
GEORGE A.  McNICHOLL.
Philip T, Chesley, Agent.
Dated August 29, 1911. s5
Form of Notice (Section 47)
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that Philip T.
Chesley of the City of Prince Rupert,
occupation prospector intends to apply for permission to lease the following described land, bounded as
follows:—Commencing at a post
planted on tho south bank of the
Shamos River (sometimes called the
Shames River) about three-quarters
of a m 1"e west from the Grand Trunk
Pacific Railway and on the soutn
bank of the said river; Ihence north
eighty (80) chains; thence west
forty    (40)    chains;     lliei.ce    south
Form of Notice (Section 47)
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that George W.
Kerr, of the City of Prince Rupert,
occupation butcher, Intends to apply
for permission to lease the following described land:-—Commencing at
a post planted about three hundred
(300) yards west of Mile Post 79
on the line of the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway track from Prince Rupert; thence south eighty (SO)
cliains; thence west forty (40)
chains; thence north eighty (SO)
cliains; thence east forty (40) chains
to the place of commencement, and
containing three hundred and twenty (320) acres more or less, and
which land was located by me on
the 26th day of August inst. A. D
1911.
GEO.   W.  KERR
Dated August 28,  1911. sc
WATER NOTICE
THE AIN RIVER DEVELOPMENT
CO., LTD. of Prince Rupert, a Corporation, gives notice that it intends,
on the 2 7th day of November next,
at eleven o'clock in the forenoon, to
apply to the Water Commissioner at
his office at Prince Rupert for a
licence to take and use 701) cubic feet
of water per second from Ain River,
a tributary of Masset Inlet, to be
diverted at a point. 2'A miles above
the outlet into Masset Inlet.        ■-•'
The water will be used at on near
the mouth of Ain River for generating power for sale purposes.
It intends to apply at the same
time for pennission to store 75,000
acre-feet of the said water in a reservoir at l-in-tsua Lake.
The copy of siri-li parts of the Memorandum of Association as authorize
the. proposed application and works
are: —
(ji The construction or operation
of works for the supply en- utilisation
of   water   under   the   "Water   Act,
1909."
NOTICE is hereby given that the
reserve existing over Crown lands on
the Morrlce River, Range 5, Coast
District, notice of which bearing date
of May 5th, 1910, was published in
the Br'tlsh Columbia Gazette of May
5th, 1910, is cancelled In so far as
it relates to the lands surveyed as
Lots 3881, 3882, 3883, 3884, 3885,
38S6, 3887, 388S, 3889, 3890, 3891,
3892, 3893, 3894, 3895, 3S96, 3S97,
3898, 3899, 31)00, 3901, 3902, 3903,
3904, 3905, 3906, 3907, 3908,, 3909,
and 3910.
ROBERT A. RENWICK,
Deputy  Minister of Lands.
Department of Lands, Victoria, B. c.
September 12, 1911. s22-d22
The Thompson]
Hardware Co.
-Second Avende-
eiglny (80) chains; thence cart forty j ik) To apply for and obtain, un-
(40) chnlns to point of commence- der the provisions of the "Water
ment, and containing three hundred Act, 1909,' or to pure-base err oihfi-
and twenty (32(1) acres more or loss, wise acquire, water records, or water
and   which   land  was  located  by  me licences,
on the 26th August, A. D. 1911, (o)  To construction   operate and
PHILIP T.  CHESLEY.|maintain     electric     works,     power-
Dated August 28, 1911.
Form of Notice I Section 34)
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that Philip T.
Chesley, of the City of Prince Rupert, B, C, occupation prospector,
intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described
land:—Commencing at a post planted
about half-way between Mile Post
77 and Mile Post 78 on the main line
of the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway
from Prince Rupert, and about, fifty
(50) feet west off the said rlght-of-
works, generating plant, and such
other conveniences as may be necessary  for generating electricity.
(P) Producing power In any manner and of any kind.       - •   - ••-■•*
(s) For rendering water and water-power available for use, application and distribution by erecting
dams, Increasing the head of water In
any existing body of water, or extending the area there.of, diverting the
waters of any stream, pond or lalM
into any other channel or channels,
laying or erecting any line of flume,
pipe or wire, constructing any raceway, reservoir, aqueduct, weir, evheel,
Paints. General Hardware,
Oils, Stoves and Ranges.
way of the said railway; thence j building or other erection or work
soutli eighty (80) chains; thence which may be required In connection
west forty (4U) cliains; thence north J with tlie Improvement and use of the
eighty (80) chains; thence cast forty said water and water-power, or by
(40) chains to point of commence- altering, renewing, extending, lm-
ment. and containing tie ee hundred'proving, repairing, or maintaining
and twenty (320) acres more or less any such works err any pari thereof
and which land was located by me OB THE AIN RIVER DEVEl OPMBNT
tho 26th day of August, A. D. 1911. CO., LTD
PHILIP  T.   CHESLEY. By  George  S.   Mayer,   Agent
Dated August 28, 1911. I     Dated October 1, 1911. olO
5 PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Tuesday, November 7   1911.
•prince -Kupett journal
Telephone  138
*
Published twice a week on Tuesdays and Fridays from the office of
publication, Third Avenue, near
McBride Street.
Subscription rate to any point in
Canada, $2.00 a year; to points outside of Canada, $3.00 a year.
Advertising rates furnished on
application.
0. H. NELSON,
Editor.
Tuesday, November  7    1911.
SEWERAGE  SYSTEM
The decision of the city council io
make a start upon a sewerage system is a wise one and it is to be
hoped the bylaw will carry without
opposition. Prince Rupert has a
reputation as a place where the
healthiest conditions are to be found.
With population comes crowding of
buildings and with this unsanitary
conditions unless the greatest care
is  taken.
The outbreak of an epidemic of
typhoid or some other disease at any
time would do more harm to the city
in deterring people from coming to
it than could possibly be overcome
by the expenditure of a sum such as
will be spent on sewers.
The putting in of sewers is an insurance against disease and a 'afe-
guard to the city's health that should
be zealously watched.
cility for people to obtain information
relative to land. The government is
anxious that the agricultural areas
shall be opened up as quickly as possible so as to satisfy the numerous
seekers after land. Surveyors have
been hard at work for some time in
marking out new hundreds.
The lands that will be offered
shortly are: Western district (Eyre's
Peninsula), 168,00 acres; Central
district (County Buccleuch), hundreds of Vincent and Wilson on surveyed line of railway from Tailem
Bend to Browns Well. 160,000 acres.
The 'land on Eyre's Peninsula will
be gatzetted in a few- weeks, and
the hundreds of Vincent and Wilson
In about two months. Survey will
be continued on the Darke's Peak
line and on the Tailem Bend and
Brown's Well line.
 o	
FOR SPINAL MENINGITIS
THE  HINTERLAND
Dr. Simon Flexner Announces Serum-
Applying Method That Is
Absolute
Some idea of the vast resources of
the country wliich will find through
Prince Rupert the Pacific outlet for
its produce is contained In Information given by F. B. Vrooman, traveller, lecturer and writer.
Mr. Vrooman is a walking geography of the Dominion, especially in an
economic sense. An American born,
he followed his academic course of
Harvard with special training at Oxford, a combination which enables
him to step naturally Into the life of
any section of the far-flung Anglo-
Saxon Empire. His knowledge of
Canada is the result of persona! exploration and a patient study of the
reports of geologists and geograjl'ers
to be found in the best equipped II-
brairies on the continent. Of late
he has been astonishing the undergraduates of stately Oxford with
some striking illustrative parallels in
his lectures on Canada. His interest
particularly has been centred in the
vast unexplored region of Canada, the
great belt of territory which extends
from Northern British Columbia to
Ungava. In that zone, he says, there
are one hundred and fifty mi'lion
acres of wheat land, more than the
acreage under crop in the rest of
the world last year, and this after
excluding ninety million acres as a
wide margin. In making this computation Mr. Vrooman uses as a
standard the character of land employed for wheat growing in Germany and Austria. This does not
include tlie area suitable for barley
and other crops. It is Illustration!,
such as these which Mr. Vrooman
uses to convey an Impression of the
immensity of Canada's unexploited
district. Ile is especially enamored
of the Peace River country and his
confidence In the future of that, region is based upon careful stilly ol
its soil and climate. Its winter is
modified very largely by Chinool,
winds and is not a bit more severe
than many uf the trlvlng agricultural
communities in the east. As a mr.t-
ter of fact, the Peace River opens
in the spring and closes in the fall
two weeks earlier than the Ottawa.
AUSTRALIAN   LAM)
Government Pursues Progressive Pol-1
icy to Populate Australia  More
Itapidly  Than   Before
A press despatch from Adelaide,!
Soulh Australia, states that the ever-
Increasing demand for land has ie 1
theh governmenl to pursue a 'ee
gresslve pulley In lire opening up of
hundreds of thousands of  acres i.
various parts Of the state. Crow;
lands in Knili Australia may be obtained on either agreement, to purchase or perpetual lease. The latter
form of lease is granted at intervals
fixed by the land board in perpetuity;
that is, without revaluation, and it
is subject to land tax. The purchase
money and rent are fixed according
to the actual value of the land after
careful Inspection by the land board.
After the land has been surveyed it
is gazetted to application and subsequently the board hears the evidence of applicants in support of
their application.
All other things being equal, the
board Is bound by the act to allot the
land to the applicant who agrees to
reside on It for at, least nine months
in each year. The board's decision
on allotment is absolutely fined. The
land's  department  affords  every  fa-
Dr. Simon Flexner, director of tbe
Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research announced to theh annual
conference of sanitary officers of the
state of New York in Carnegie Ly-
cyem that epidemic spinal meningitis
could now be absolutely controlled.
Dr. Flexner said the curt had been
perfected through the discovery of
a new method of using the serum.
It is now injected into the cerebral
spinal membrane instead of into the
blood.
"Influenza meningitis in the child,"
said the doctor, "will, with the application of this neW method of
treatment, be not one-tenth as dangerous as  it has been.
"It will take a large sum of money
and a long time to perfect this cure.
This is the first time I have announced It as only very recently
have 1 demonstrated to my own satisfaction that the serum will do what
I claim it will."
Dr. W. S. Magill of the New York
State Hygienic Laboratory expressed
his disappi*. ,-al of the way in which
many physicians were using diptheria
antix-toxin.
"Every t j we se'id a doctor any
anti-toxin for diptheria there is a
sheet of instructions enclosed," he
said, "hut out of 100 cases I found
only one who had tried to follow
direcieons. Of the 100 cases I looked
Into all of the r-.tients died, and in
t-eiy Instance ant'-toxin had beui
i ::ed, but had not heen used cor
reriiy.
"The mortality pel 100,000 In
Frai'ce from diptheria is 3 to 4. In
this country it is 16 to 17. Why?
The case I have just cited about the
misuse of anti-toxin is a good reason,
I think."
 o	
********************** ****"**** *''■********
* >
%     News of the Province      *
* •>
* •:• *■ ** ******************...* *
RAILWAY   BELT   LANDS
GOLDEN—At a meeting of the
Golden Board of Trade a resolution
was passed petitioning the Dominion
Government to open ror* settlement
the lands contained in the railway
bejlt. Tbe Federal government was
.\lso urged to erect as uitable building here for the accommodation of
'lie post, customs, telephone and
other offices, take the necessary
steps for the immediate construction
of a new wharf at this point, establish a semi-weekly mail service between Golden and Windermere, and
provide a more efficient telephone
service betwee n these points. The
rollowing is the text of the resol-
tton regarding the land: contained in
Hie railway belt: "Wherer's, there are
large tracts of agricultural laud In
; lie railway belt in the Gorrlejn district, and, whereas, It has been Impossible to obtain homestead entries
in said railway belt since these lands
were withdrawn from settlement on
.lime 1, 1909, and, whereas, a large
number of settlers have applied for
homestead entries in the said railway belt since that date; therefore,
be it resolved, that the minister of
the Interior be urged to take Immme-
dl ite steps for the opening up of said
lands tier settlement and for the establishment of a sub-land officii at
Golden forthwith for tire convenience
of intending settlers and that copies
of this resolution, be forwarded to
the minister of the interior, A. S
Goodeve, M.P. tor Kootenay, and H
G. Parson, M.P.P., tbe board's reprt
Bentatlve."
MILL  AND  ELEVATOR
NELSON—Next spring the Taylor
M'''ing and Elevator Company will
build in Nelson the largest wheat
elevator in British Columbia and also
a grist mill with a large capacity for
grinding grain in transit. The elevator will have a capacity of 30,000
bushels. With the grist mill it will
be. built on four lots between Vernon
Street and the railway track purchased by the company for the purpose about a year ago.      It was the
intention to erect these buildings last
summer, but theh company held up
the work pending the result of the
election, as they feared that if the
reciprocity pact were fatified it would
make it desirable, from a business
point of view, to transfer the company's local business to Spokane.
Later it was proposed to carry on
the work this fall, but the company
has had so much construction work
on the pariries that it was decided
to postpone the local work until next
spring.
 o e—
Tenders   for  Coal
Tenders for coal for tne electric
light plant were received last evening at the council. The figures quoted were: Lindsay Bros., $8.75; Rogers &. Black, $8.25; and Union Transfer Company, $8.15. These were referred to the electric light committee for report.
 o	
New Fireman
John F. McLeod of this city was
selected as fireman by the council
last evening. He had resided here
three years and was strongly recommended by the chief, who made
a selection from the applicants for
the committee. He is 23 years of
age and while he has had no experience in that line he is regarded
as a very likely recruit.
 o	
Well  Equipped Office
M. M. Stephens & Co. have become
settled in the new office on Third
Avenue, directly opposite the office
formerly occupied by the firm. The
new quarters are second to none in
tire city. They are on the ground
floor in the new block built by the
firm. The front offices upstairs in
the same building will be occupied
soon by the Dominion Government
Telegraph service.
 o	
Inspected  Schools
J. T. Pollock, inspector of schools,
has been here this week on his official duties. He has finished his inspection of the city rooms and is
now inspecting Port Simpson and
Port Essington school. He will leave
Friday for tne south. He reports
favorably upon the local conditions,
but realizes that Prince Rupert has
quite a problem to face In taking
care of the school population under
all the conditions prevailing here.
 o ■	
The Tree Again
The city council has again had the
question of the spruce tree that
stood on the G. T. P. reserve near
the electric light station up again.
Last year's council had trouble over
the tree, Alderman Barrow contending strongly for sparing the tree. It
was found to jeopardize the electric
light plant and was accordingly cut
down. Alderman Douglas last evening wanted to know who gave permission to have It cut down. His
Worshap said he did, and the council passed a resolution confirming
his action.
 o	
To Preserve tbe Records
The following letter from the honorable the provincial secretary explains itself. The report accompanying it is one of the most interesting
documents that we have received
from the office of the King's Printer.
It may be that some of our readers
have in their possession or know
where there is available historical
material which deserves a place in
the provincial archives. The report
eay be obtained from the provincial
secretary.
Victoria, August 24.
Editor Fernie Free Press:
Dear Sir—I have pleasure ' in
transmitting to you, herewith, a copy
of the Report of the Provincial Archivist for the six months ended December 31, 1910. You will gather
from this report that a determined
effort is being made to collect from
all sources manuscript letters,
dairies, journals and memoranda
throwing light upon the early history of British Columbia, in order
that si ch documents may be collated,
arranged and preserved. The work
wLi be systematically carried on
from year to year and it is hoped
that it will result In the bringing
together of much interesting and valuable material. But the undertaking is of such magnitude that It will
not tie an easy matter to cover the
whole province without the friendly
aid of those in a position to give It.
I would therefore bespeak for the
provincial archivist your kind offices
and help.
11 Is not necessary for me to assure you that any assistance which
you may be able to afford the archives department will be highly appreciated and gratefully acknowl
edged.
I am, very respectfully yours,
-H. E. YOUNG,
Provincial Secretary.
ticular crisis, when important papers
reach Downing Street, the premier,
after perusing them, places them in
the despatch box and hands the box
to a special messenger, who takes it
round to each member of the cabinet
in succession, says the National Magazine. Each member opens it with
his key and relocks it after he has
read the documents it contains. In
this way the papers are prevented
from falling into the hands of strangers or members of Parliament who
are not in the cabinet. Now and
again It Is found necessary to print
copies of a "secret" which comes up
for discussion at a meeting of the
cabinet. The document Is cut up into
many small pieces and distributed
among a goodly number of compositors In the government printing office, each of whom sets up his little
piece, and the little piece may represent only a dozen lines of type.
When all of the fragments are in
type a highly trusted official collects both the copy and the type
and puts the latter together. The
printing of the document is then done
in secret under the eyes of this official, and the men who work the
printing machine are forbidden to
handle any of the paper after it is
printed upon.
Skeena    Land    District—District   of
Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Thos. L. Fay, of Prince
Rupert B. C, occupation miner, Intend to apply to the Chief Commissioner of Lands for a licence to prospect for coal and petroleum on and
under six hundred and forty acres of
land described as follows: Commencing at a post planted about one
mile in a southerly direction from
mouth of Khutzeymateen Inlet;
tlience .east 80 chains; thence south
80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains, to place of
commencement.
THOS. L. FAY, Locator.
Dated October  30,  1911. n7
* $.
* *
*
*
I Fergusons
p
&
o
The Most Popular
SCOTCH
WHISKEY
in the World
* Sole Agents for British Columbia
CLARKE BROS.
v ablnet   Secrets
Each member of the cabinet Is supplied with a key which fits the lock
of  a  certain   despatch  box  retained
by the I rime minister.    At any par-
J Melntyre Block,       3rd Ave. *
* *
I     Phone 39     I
! P.O. BOX 319 t
* *
* *
■> *
*
fy **************************
GRAND HOTEL
WORKINGMAN'S HOME
25c
Rooms 50 Cents
Spring Beds, Clean
White Sheets
Best in Town for the Money
FIRST AVE. AND SEVENTH ST.
J. Goodman, Proprietor
Burrell's Sanitary Distemper
in Powder
35 Beautiful Colors
A full stock carried by the A. W. EDGE CO., Prince Rupert
SOLE AGENTS IN BRITISH COLUMBIA
The Staneland Co. Ltd
836-840 Fort Street, VICTORIA, B.C.
Wr-mHKH'H'H-H'H'H'H-l^^
r«HKHWO<HKBKH»<HKH3^^
The British Columbia Company
LIMITED.
AUTHORIZED CAPITAL $100,000.::  PAID UP CAPITAL $41,500
DIRECTORS:—Reginald C. Brown, President; J. C. Maclure, Vice-
President; H. E. Marks, Managln g Director; Capt. E. Nash, William
McNair, R. A. Bevan, and F.  C.   Williams, Secretary.      :-:       :-:
INTEREST 4 PER CENT. DEPOSITS
This Company acts as Executors, Administrators, Transferees and
Secretaries to Public Companies.   Commercial, Industrial and other
business propositions underwritten.    Issues made on  the
London and New York Stock Exchanges.
TIMBER, COAL, LANDS, and
COMPANY ORGANIZATION
Head Office for Canada, 203, 208, 210, 215 Carter-Cotton Building,
VANCOUVER, B.C.
Royal Bank of Canada
HEAD OFFICE: MONTREAL ESTABLISHED  1869
Surplus         $7,200,000
Capital         $0,200,000
Total Assets $100,000,000
Savings   Bank   Department—$1 Will Open an Account
Branches Throughout Canada and  Banking  Connections With  All
Parts of the United States
Agents Throughout the World
H. P. WILSON, Manager Prince Rupert Branch
S<HKHS^*^«BKBKH>r*«8Ke^
4 Per Cent 4
On a Checking Account
is what our depositors receive.   Start saving today by opening an account with us.
$1.00 is enough to begin with
The Continental Trust Company, Limited
Second Avenue, Prince Rupert, B.C.
Replenish
the
Pantry
High-Class....
Grocery
Stock
to choose from
EVERYTHING CLEAN AND FRESH
Goods for the Table to Suit the Most
Fastidious  Housewife
1 MERRYFIELD'S ■
i
i
i
L.
CASH GROCERY
l
I
1
.J
~*i ■MRH
Tuesday, November 7, 1911.
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
**************************
I   MARINE NEWS   f
% *
**************************
FOR FRASER RIVER
Alex. Watson of Victoria the well
known builder of stern wheel steamers has received instructions from
the British Colmbia Express Company for construction of a new
steamer to be operated next spring
on the Upper Fraser between Fort
George and Tete Jaune Cache. The
steamer will be built at Soda Creek
and will cost about $100,000. The
materials for the steamer will be assembled at Soda Creek without delay.
NEW  TRADE  ROUTES
That the preparations being made
by the British shipowners and steamship lines for the commerce resulting
from the opening of the Panama Canal is considered of Importance In English shipping circles, Is indicated by
a leading article appearing in the
London Daily Telegraph of recent
date. It mentions that minute inquiries into trade possibilities, and
careful consideration of the various
ports from Vancouver to Valparaiso.
The article has a bearing on Prir.cc
Rupert trade as well. The article
reads in part: It is no secret that
some of the leading British steamship companies stood in no need of
President Taft's warning. They are
already laying their plans in anticipation of the opening of the Panma
Canal. It may seem full early to
take such work in hand, but. as a matter of fact, it necessitates, if it is
to be done properly, a good deal of
examination on the spot. What is
in prospect is apparently, a complete
revolution in the shipping trade between Europe and the vast Pacific
seaboard of North and South America. In former days this long voyage trade was almost exclusively in
the hands of sailing ships. Then
the ubiqultious tramp steamer began
to compete for business even with distant San Francisco, and so to upset
all established notions. Now, with
the sundering of the Isthmus of Panama, the liners will evidently endeavor to sweep the field.
Necessarily this involves minute inquiry into trade possibilities, and
careful consideration of the claims
and the accommodations of the various ports from Vancouver to Valparaiso. The steamship companies
unacquainted with the trade of the
Pacific Coast, it is to all intents and
purposes like a venture into a new
world. But the enterprise is rendered the less formidable by the
knowledge that the Panama Canal
will of itself create commerce, just
as did the Suez waterway, and that
it is foreign rather than American
shipping which stands chiefly to gain
by it. While, too, the eye pictures
big fleets of steamers coming from
North and South Pacific ports to pass
through the Panama waterway, the
reflection is inevitable that this short
cut from ocean to ocean will bring
new life to Central America and to
the West Indies.
SEALING FLEET PASSES
The sealing industry passes from
Victoria with the return of the four
schooners which have just completed
this season's cruise. On December
15 next the treaty recently made under which Canada agreed to a suspension of pelagic sealing for fifteen years in return for a share In
the proceeds from the Pribyloff, Com-
manderofski, Robben Bank and other
rookeries of the North Pacific—a
share of which will bring upwards
of two millions of dollars into the
Canadian treasury—will come Into
effect. No more may the Victoria
sealer go to sea. His business is
taken away. The three decades or
more of effort, the capital expended
in the fleet of schooners, now left
idle, is to be wiped for the good of
the State.
Compensation is to be provided for
he sealers, and It is anticipated that
ti.e government will set aside not less
than $500,000 for the Victoria Sealing Company, and will provide for
the owners of tbe Independent
schooners, four of wliich went to
the hunting grounds during the past
season. Provision will also, in all
probability, be made for some compensation for the hunters who now
find their business gone. The payment to the Victoria Sealing Company would not be more than the
•amount of the capital Invested, and
when His Excellency Earl Grey visited Victoria about two years ago he
summoned some of those interested
in the sealing industry before him
and told them he considered their
claim for compensation to the amount
mentioned a just one. The United
States government advanced $200,-
000 of the amount to be paid in compensation when the treaty comes into
force, this amount is to be afterward
deducted from the share to be received by Canada from the sale of
skins  taken   from  the  Pribyloff  Is
lands. Canada will receive 15 per
cent of the catch taken yearly from
the Prybiloff rookeries, 10 per cent
of that taken on the Russion rookeries at Commanderofski Island, and
20 per cent from the Japanese rookery on Robben Bank in the Okhostch
Sea. With the Victoria sealers and
the Japanese hunters removed from
the sea as a result of this treaty the
herds will increase and theh proceeds
of the yearly killings will net at
yeast two millions of dollars—many
estimate much more—durin the fifteen years provided for in the treaty.
The Japanese government is providing for ample compensation for the
owners of fifty or more schooners
wliich piled from the ports of Yokohama, Hakodate, Niigata and Toklo,
and that no time should be lost in
providing compensation for those
who have Invested their capital at
Victoria in the industry to now find
their business taken from them with
one stroke of the pen is the general
opinion.
 o	
Nines and Mining
SECRET GOLD MINE
The Harwich steamer Reporter
has returned to Aberdeen after a
secret expedition to Spitzbergen in
search of gold. It is now stater by
members of the expedition of that
venture has been an unqualified success, for gold bearing quartz of payable value has been found in large
quantity.
Extensive deposits of marble and a
valuable coldfield were also discovered. Fifteen tons of marble and
fifty tons of coal have been brought
back as samples, and a company will
be formed to work the deposits.
The Reporter Is a steel screw
steamer of 246 tons, and the fact
that he port of entry Is Harwich
suggests that her voyage was connected with the romantic secret of
a Spitzbergen mine, which is being
worked by Essex villagers from Tol-
leshunt Darcy.
SPORTS
LAWN TENNIS
By the steamer Zealandia, which
left for Australia on Wednesday
last,, the America Davis Cup team,
W. H. Larned, Maurice MeLoughlin
and Beals Wright, set out on their
ocean journey, the goal of which is
Christ Church. New Zealand, where
will be played the series of tennis
manches which will decide for another year the world's championship.
FIGHTING RULES COMPARED
The New York State Athletic Commission has decided that in future
contestants must break clean in the
clinches, a change which promises to
make it difficult for Ad Wolgast and
a few more of the American boxers
to rough ther way through a ten-
round mill in Gotham. Commenting
on the change, W. W. Naughton, the
San Francisco ring authority, says:
"Can it be true? If so, farewell
the loop-de-loop and the breast grazing uppercut. For, with the loop you
must have something to cling to before you can make it effective, while
with the breast grazer the only man
you could hit under the clean break
system  would  be  yourself. e,
"Furthermore, exit the Ad Wol-
gasts and the Battling Nelsons and
enter the Matt Wells and the Freddie
Welshes. Welcome the straight left
and the sweeping right and bid goodbye to the hundred and one little
pokes and prods that can only be
delivered when a fighter has his face
flattened against, an opponent's
chest.
"It was the way they boxed years
ago, and the New York State Athletic Commission bus ordered a return to the first principles.
"But Is It fair to the generation
of American boxers that has built up
a new system of glove craft—a system thnt has overshadowed the old
straight-from-the-shoulder boxing as
completely as magazine rifles have
supersede tbe muzzle-loaders of fifty
years ago.
"It was the 'fight yourself loose'
style of milling that gave us Terry
McGovern, Battling Nelson, Ad Wolgast, Pilly Papke and others too numerous to mention. If the clean
break system, which has never been
rigidly observed since the days of
the old California Athletic Club, had
been insisted upon right along there
would have been no Battling Nelsons
and consequently no Ad Wolgasts.
'Joe Gans, under the rules in question would have kept in the the forefront of champions until outlawed
trom the game by increasing years
and declining health. Then some
clean-break specialist would have
usurped the premiership of the lightweight   division   and   held   the   Nel-
WEEKLY SERVICE
TO
Vancouver, Victoria and Seattle
S. S. PRINCE RUPERT
SAILS   FRIDAYS   8   A.M.
S.S. PRINCE JOHN for Port Simpson, Naas and Stewart, Wednesdays at 1 p.m. For Masset, Naden Harbor, every alternate
Thursday at 10 p.m., commencing November 9. For Skidegate, Jedway, etc., every alternate Thursday at 10 p.m., commencing November 2.
RAILWAY SERVICE to Vanarsdol—Mixed trains from Prince Rupert, Wednesdays and Saturdays at  1   p.m.,  returning  Thursdays  and  Sundays at  4   p.m.
On your Christmas VISIT EAST.    Travel via the Grand Trunk
Railway System from Chicago. The   finest   and   best   service   over
Double Track  Route.    Connections  with  all  roads east  and  west.
Atlantic steamship bookings arranged.
Full information and tickets obtained from the office of
A. E. NcNASTER
Freight and Pasenger Agent, G. T. P. Wharf.
——I III  ■ellHlllllllilelUllll JeWLW      HIMel     Ill. JKV
sons   and   Wolgasts   successfully   at
bay.
"The news of the clean-break renaissance will be heard with joy in
England. Here every boxer regards
a referee's as 'his master s voice,'
and disentangles himself from
clinches with lightning speed so as to
minimize the prospects of disqualification.
'The system does not require a
boxer to waste his strength in wrestling and wriggling and striving to
blanket free-arm punches, to say
nothing of the battering it saves him
if he happens to be holding and the
other man is engaged in fighting himself loose. The break-at-the-order-
of-the-refree style of fighthib is the
one that has always found favor with
English ring men, and there will be
widespread satisfaction over the water when the news of the action recently taken by the New York commission reaches there.
"Wonder what the dear public will
think of the restoration of refined
fisticuffs? If the order of the New
York commission is as definite as it
appears on paper, Tom Jones may
well be trembling for the fate of his
champion, Ad Wolgast, for in a ten-
round bout with clean breaks it seems
as though Mat Wells of London
should be a top-heavy favorite over
Wolgast of Cadillac."
 o	
POSTOFFICE BANK
Deposits Total 100 Millions Sterling,
With 8,000,000 Accounts—Profits
Steady   Since   1801
September 16 was the Jubilee of
the Post Office Savings Bank, which
began its career in 1861 In accordance with an Act of Parliament of
May of that year. It provided a safe
place for nest eggs, and in doing so
materially added to the safety of
those who owned them. Robberies
became less common, and henceforth
hidden panels and mysterious secret
drawers in grandparents' dining room
suites began to go out of fashion.
The foundation of the scheme was
laid by George Chetwynd, who was
appointed the first controller of the
Post Office Savings Bank. The bank
opened with 301 branches, and with
a headquarters staff of twenty to deal
with its bookkeeping in a small back
room  at St.  Martin's-le-Grand.
By the end of 1862 the branches
numbered    2,532,   and   there   were
Mr. Non - Resident
Write us regarding the value of your
Prince Rupert property.    We will be
pleased   to   keep   you   posted   as   to
conditions here.
0. M. HELGERSON, LTD.
REAL ESTATE AND RENTALS
Offices:  Helgerson Block
nearly 180,000 depositors, with sums
to their credit aggregating a million
and three-quarters.
Eight years ago the headquarters
staff entered the new red brick
building near Olympia where the inside work of the stupendous business
is done. Instead of the twenty
clerks of fifty years ago one finds a
staff of officials numbering 3,200.
The ledgers number 20,000, for the
accounts aggregate 8,000,000 in the
United Kingdom, representing a sum
of £169,000,000. The correspondence to be dealt with runs frequently
to 200,000  letters in  a day.
Until 1896 the savings bank had
always shown a profit on its workings but It had deficits between 1896
and 1899, and has again shown losses
since 1903. Last year the debit balance was only £18,649, and the jubilee year will, it is hoped, produce
a surplus.
Cases have been discovered in
which the permission to make withdrawals on presentation of the bank
book has been abused. A schoolboy
who opened up an account with a
shilling made six withdrawals of twopence—the transaction costing, altogether 3s 4V<jd in administrative expense. Other depositors have had
seventy and eighty transactions in
the course of a year, putting a a
small sum in the bank, drawing It
out in two or three days' time, and
repeating that operation week by
week.
There are evidently plenty of middle class people who place the "rent
money" in the savings bank to make
sure of it, for the accounts drop almost to nothing every quarter day.
Cy Peck lias returned from a hunting trip to the Lakelse.
#
The
World's Greatest
Highway
Let us plan your
Trip East
OR TO
Europe
We like to answer enquires.
Agent  for all Atlantic lines.
Call on or write:
J. G. McNAB,
General Agent.
Now™ Time
To arrange for that trip EAST or to
the OLD COUNTRY
THE GREAT NORTHERN RAILWAY
Offers the Best Service
First   and    Second    Class    Sleepers,
Observation   Cars   and   Dining   Cars
by their  celebrated
ORIENTAL  LIMITED
Atlantic   Ocean   tickets   by  all   lines
from New York  or  Montreal
ROGERS STEAMSHIP OFFICE
Crown and Bridge Work a specialty.
All dental operations skillfully
treated. Gas and local anaesthetics
administered for the painless extraction of teeth. Consultation free.
Offices, Helgerson 3k., Prince Rupert
Phone 110
Second Ave
New Wellington
COAL
FREE FROM DUST
DOES NOT CLINKER
ROGERS & BLACK
SECOND AVENUE
PHONE 110 PHONE 110
Free Employment
Office
For all kinds of help. Cooks, waiters, dishwashers, hotel porters, all
kinds of laborers or mechanics, call
up 178 or call at the
FREE EMPLOYMENT OFFICE
GRAND HOTEL
Headquarters for Cooks and Walters
Skeena    Land    District—District   of
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Thos. L. Fay, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, occupation
miner, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a licence
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under six hundred and forty
acres of land described as follows:
Commencing at. a post planted about
one mile in a southerly direction
from mouth of Khutzeymnteen Inlet; tlience east 80 e-hains; thence
nortli 80 e-hains; tlrene-e west 80
cliains; tlience soutli SO chains to
place of commencement.
THOS.   L.   FAY,  Locator.
Dated Oct. 30, 1911. n"
.HJ.OT:
MEMORANDUM
E. L. FISHER
Funeral Director & Embnlmer
CHARGES   REASONABLE
THIRD AVE. PHONE  350
OPEN DAY AND NIGHT
J. L. PARKER
MINING ENGINE!"!!
Prince Rupert, B. C.
Open for Consultation and Mine
Examination
Temporary Address:-—
Prince Rupert Inn
FREDERICK PETERS, K. C.
Barrister, Solicitor and Notary Public
Office in
EXCHANGE BLOCK
WM. S. HAiA,, L. D. S. D. D. S.
:-:    DENTIST   :-:
NICKERSON-ROERIG COMPANY
CUSTOMS AND MERCHANDISE
—o—
Brokers, Forwarding Agents,
Storage,  etc.
J.  W. POTTER
ARCHITECT     AND     STRUCTURAL
ENGINEER
Re-inforced Concrete a Specialty
Law-Butler Building - Prince Rupert
H. Gordon Munro   W. Nicholson Lailey
MUNRO & LAILEY
AReCHITECTS
PRINCE RUPERT, B. C.
P. O. BOX 14        PRINCE RUPERT
HAYNOR   BROS.
FUNERAL   DIRECTORS
and
PROFESSIONAL  EMBALMERS
DR.  W.  B. CLAYTON
DENTIST
—o—
Office  in    the    Westenhaver   Block,
Over Orme's Drug   Store.
         Prince Rupert
 LADYSMITH	
COAL
ROCHESTER & MONROE, Phone 116
*************************
I Customs Broker
STORAGE   I
• Forwarding,   Distributing   and
', Shipping  Agent
\ Special attention given to stor-
• age of  Household   Goods  and
! Baggage
• DOUGLAS        SUTHERLAND
; First  Ave.   Near  McBride   St.
; P. O. Box 007 Phone 202
• *
***** * * * * * *. * * * * * *. * *. * * * * * * * *
LINDSAY'S CARTAGE & STORAGE
G. T. P. CARTAGE AGENT8
Office at II. It. Rochester, Centre St
LADYSMITH  COAL
Is handled by us.   All orders receive
prompt attention.   Phone No   68.
c
For
Neat Job Printing
sec the Journal Man
Tel. 138
V
THE WESTHOLME LUMBER CO.
LIMITED
We handle all kinds of
Building Supplies
First Avenue Telephone 180
New Knox Hotel
ARTAUD & BESNEIt
Proprietors
The New Knox Hotel Is run on the
European plan.      Flrst-clas service.
All the latest modern Improvements
THE BAR keeps   only    tbe    best
brands of liquors and cigars.
THE CAFE Is open from 6.30 a.m.
to 8 p.m. Excellent cuisine; flrst-
elass service.
Hoard, Sl a Day — Beds, 50c and an
FlrBt  Aven"-    Prince   Rupert
I
errarita
H
«rt^ = PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Tuesday, November 7, 1911.
D. R. YOUNG HAS CONTRACT-
El) FOR THE PURCHASE OF
TWO BLOCKS OF SHAMES OF
100,000 SHA11ES EACH, AND
THEY Alil'l BEING SOLI) HY
A. E. KEALEY, FISCAL
AGENT, FOI! THE PUB-
CHASER.
Consulting Engineers, Vancouver, B.C.
NORTHERN ANTHRACITE COLLIERIES UNITED
'      HAS   BEEN   INCORPORATED   WITH   THE   FOLLOWING   OFFICERS: .'    '
T. S. Gore, resident, Victoria, B.C. A. S. Innes, Victoria, B.C.
J. C. Keith, Vice-President, Vancouver, B.C.
Arthur E. Hepburn j
Christian F. J. Galloway   J
F. H. Hepburn, Secretary, 317-317 Winch Building
Kenah & Nesbit, Auditors
$85.00 Profit
IN SIX MONTHS ON AN INVESTMENT OF $15.00 IS
GOOD ENOUGH FOR ANYONE
88,000   SHARKS   HAVE   BEEN
ALREADY  SUBSCRIBED FOR
The Diamond Drill on the
Limited Amount of Stock at 15
Ground Today
Cents—5 Cents Cash
Read this offer over carefully. Be
sure that it is right, then don't wait.
The owners take a chance with you.
They put up the coal lands and you
put up tbe money to prove the coal,
one-half of the stock for you, and
one-half for them. This is one of
the fairest and best offers ever made
to the public under ironclad conditions. A business proposition from
start to finish, there is nothing on
the market like it. Leases and Crown
grants to over 3,500 acres of the best
coal lands on Queen Charlotte Islands
are being conveyed free from all encumbrances to the Northern Anthracite Collieries, Ltd., capita] stock
1,500,000 shares, par value of $1.00
each; one-half of this stock for the
treasury and one-half for the owners
of the land. The first 100,000 of
these shares of par value of $1.00
each, non-assessable and fully paid
up, are to be sold at 15c, 5c with
application, 5c in 30 days and 5c in
CO days. The proceeds from this
block of stock will be used proving
these coal lands with a Diamond
Drill under special contract, and in
charge of competent management. It
is expected that the proceeds  from
this first block of stock will be sufficient to put down at least three or
more boreholes of 1,000 feet each.
This will undoubtedly cut one or two
seams of splendid coal—then see
your stock jump. Satisfactory tenders have been accepted and a contract let to the Diamond Drill Contracting Company of Spokane, Wash.,
for the boring and drilling operations. As an emergency, and to be
absolutely on the safe side, a further
block of 100,000 shares of treasury
stock will be offered at 25c per share,
5c on application and 5c per month
until paid, as soon as the first block
has all been subscribed.
Now, use your own judgment, but
consider carefully what your chances
are of making $85.00 on an Investment of $15.00 in six months, or
$1,000 on an investment of $150.00,
for as sure as the sun rises and sets
this stock will go to $1.00 at least as
soon as the drill cuts through the
seams of splendid coal that are surely
there, according to all experts' reports of the highest obtainable authority, who have reported on the Queen
Charlotte Islands coal measures as
follows: T. R. Marshall, F.C.S., 1902;
Dr.     George    M.     Dawson,    D. S.,
A.R.A.R.S.M., F.G.S., 1ST8; H. E.
Parrish, John J. Langdale, 1S67;
James Deans, 1872; James Parkinson, 18S8; R. W. Ellis, 1906; T. B.
Cory, of the State of Washington,
U. S. A., and our own expert, C. F. J.
Galloway, B.Sc, who is among the
best authorities In B. C.
These report's cover first the Wilson-Robinson coal fields, three miles
north of this coal land; second, the
Old Cowgate coal fields, almost adjoining on the west; third, the Alfred
Bay coal fields on the south; and
fourth, the company's own coal, all
of which are positive evidence that
this is one of the best coal fields on
the Queen Charlotte Islands. Situate on Graham Island, Bearskin Bay,
one of the best harbors in the north,
at the gateway of transportation to
all points of the world, and at the
very doors of Queen Charlotte City;
in fact, a portion of this coal underlies the townsite. No railroads to
build—just load the coal from the
mines to the boats. These are facts
that defy contradiction, and within
five days the Diamond Drill will be
on the ground and in operation. This
is the only way anyone can tell how
many millions of tons of coal  there
is in the property.
All applications will be filed in
order received, and only 100,000 will
be sold at 15c.
How many times in your life have
you had a cnance like this? A square
deal for once at least in a stock
proposition, with almost a certainty
of the stock being worth $1.00 before
you have made your third payment
at 15c. Do not hesitate. Send in
your application today.
For further information call or
write to the head office of the company, 506 Pacific Building, where the
report of C. F. J. Galloway, B.S.C.,
on this coal land can be seen. His
report is all that could be asked,
practically saying that the coal is
there beyond a doubt, with sufficient
evidence in sight to warrant drilling
and development work at once.
Paragraph From Mr. Galloways
Report
"The easiest seam to prove will be
the Cowgitz, as its horizon is known.
I should, therefore, recommend you
to put down a borehole near the eastern end of your easternmost section.
At the point marked C on the map
the position of this seam should be
passed through at a depth of about
500 feet, the Camp Anthracite seam
being probably passed through in the
same hole, if it occurs at all in this
locality."
All promoters' stock is to be pooled
until $200,000 has been raised for
the purpose of developing the mine.
In conclusion, you will have the
satisfaction of knowing that your
money is all goinng into proving the
coal is there, not into the promoters'
pockets nor to pay for a dead horse
of any kind, as the coal leases and
titles are all paid for and clear of
all encumbrances and will always be
a valuable asset. Fill out the application form for any number of
shares you want and address your
application to H. F. McRae & Co.,
Second Avenue, Prince Rupert, who
are the authorized agents to receive
applications and receipt for same.
All cheques or money orders should
be made out to them. You are requested to make any enquiries not
answered in this advertisement,
which will receive a prompt answer.
The solicitors for all concerned are
Burns & Walkem, 415 Winch Building, Vancouver, B. C.
Capital $1,500,000- -1,500,000 Shares of $1.00 Each
ARNOLD   E.   KEALEY
Fiscal Agent, Registered office, 506 Pacific
Bldg., 743 Hastings St. West, Vancouver,
B.C.       H. J. Heal, 125 Pemberton Block,
Victoria, B.C., or
RF.McRAE&C0.K£=
APPLICATION   FOR   SHARES.
To Arnold E. Kealey, Fiscal Agent.
Vancouver, B. C.
I hereby request you to obtain for me 	
shares in the NORTHERN ANTHRACITE COLLIERIES LIMITED, of the
par value of $1.00 each at the net price to be of 15c per share, and I
now hand to you the sum of $ , being the first payments of five cents on each share now applied for; balance I agree to
pay as follows: Five cents on each share in thirty days from date hereof;
five cents on each share in sixty days from date hereof; being payment
hereof; oeing payment in full, and I hereby agree to accept the said
shares or any less number of shares allotted to me, and also pay for
same; and I hereby authorize you to register me the holder of the shares
allotted to me.
This application is made by me subject to fifty thousand (50,000)
shares being subscribed for and  purchased.
COOKEIIV HINTS
A Tasty Supper IHsIi
Three-quarters of a pound of finely-chopped onions, season with pepper and salt, and add a little beef
dripping. Put them into a frying-
pan with half a pint of water; cover
the pan, and cook tlie onions till
soft. Then place six ounces of grated
cheese on the top, cover the pan
again and set It by the side of the
fire till the cheese Is melted. Serve
with toast or new rolls. This makes
a cheap and very appetixing supper
for three people.
Celery and Cabbage Pickle
To two quarts of chopped celery
add the same quantity of white cabbage, chopped. Put all In a pan with
three quarts of malt vinegar, half an
ounce of crushed ginger root, four
ounces of mustard seed, half an
ounce of turmeric powder, two tablespoonfuls of salt, and five ounces of
sugar SI in rae: .'or* four hours, or
until the celery Is quite tender. Put
into jars, ond tie down, so as to exclude all air. This pickle can ,:•
used at once.
Knuckle Broth
When your lm toiler cuts off the
knuckle from the leg of mutton, do
not throw it away. Wash it, put It
in a saucepan with ,a small carrot,
turnip, and onion, cut small, a des-
serspoonful of pearl barley or rice
well washed, and a pint and a half
of waier. Season with pepper and
salt, and stew genlly for two hours.
Just before serving add a little chopper parsley. This makes a good basin
of mutton broth.
WATER  NOTICE
I, Henry Newton Boss, of Victoria,
B. C, occupation broker, give notice
that on the fourteenth day of November, 1911, I intend to apply to
the Water Commissioner at his office
in Prince Rupert, B. C, for a licence
to take and use three cubic feet of
water per second from the Lakelse
Hot. Springs situated on tlie east side
of Lakelse Lake In the Coast District,
Range Five. The water is to be taken
directly from the said .springs and
is to be used on Lot 684 for industrial purposes,
0l3-nl4      HENRY NEWTON BOSS.
Skeena   Land    District—Uistrict   of
Queen   Charlotte
TAKE NOi'ICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
Sadd'er, Intend to npply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a licence
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:— Commencing at post planted
at the northwest corner of C. L.
4469, Graham Island; tlience south
80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence nortli 80 chains; thence east
80 chains, to place of commencement.
AUSTIN M. BROWN.
Dated August 20, 1911. s-27
Corner Eighth and Fraser Street!
Clinton Rooms
Newly remodelled and furnished.
Board and lodging. Home cooking
a  specialty.     Mrs.   Anderson,   Prop.
Rooms, 98 Per Week
Skeena   Land   District--District   of
Queen  Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
saddler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a licence
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
at the northwest corner of C. L.
4471, Graham Island; tlience south
80 cliains; thence west 80 chains;
tlience north 80 chains; thence east
80 chains, to place of commencement.
AUSTIN  M.   BROWN.
Dated August 20, 1911, s-27
Skeena    Land    District—District    of
Queen  Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
I'rince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadd'er, intend to npply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a licence
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
at the southwest corner of C. L.
4472, Graham Island; tbence north
80 chains, to place of commence-
thence south 80 chains; thence east
80 hcalns, to place of commencement.
AUSTIN M.  BROWN.
Dated August 20, 1911. s-27
NOTICE.
A book Is kept In the City Clerk's
Office in which to tnter the names
and addresses, etc. of citizens of
Prince Rupert desiring employment
on City work. All desiring employment should register at once.
ERNEST A. WOODS,
City Clerk.
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that I, Martin Peterson, of Towner, North Dakota, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted on the east bank of Williams
Creek, a tributary of Lakelse Lake,
forty (40) chains in a southerly direction from John N. Kuhl's initial
post; thence west 40 chains; tlience
north 80 cliains; tlience east 40
cliains; thence south 80 chains, to
point of commencement.
MARTIN   PETERSON.
Fred E. Cowell, Agent.
Dated Sept. 15, 1911. o-20
Skeena   Land    District—District   ot
Queen  Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Theone
Gauge, of Lindsay, California, occupation housewife, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about 8 miles
east and 14 miles soutli of the southeast corner of Indian Reserve No. 11,
Graham Island; thence north 80
chains; tlience east 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains to point of commencement;
containing 640 acres.
THEONE   GANGE.
A. S. Christie, Agent.
Dated September 13, 1911.      olO
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Queen   Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
saddler, Intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a licence
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
at the southwest corner of C. L.
4475, Graham Island; tlience north
80 chains; tlience west 80 chains;
tlience south 80 chains; thence east
80 chains to place of commencement.
AUSTIN M. BROWN.
Dated August 20, 1911. s-27
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen  Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C.,,by occupation
saddler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a licence
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
at the southwest corner of C. L. 4470,
Graham Island; thence north 80
chains; tlience west 80 chains; tlience
south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains, to place of commencement.
AUSTIN M.  BROWN.
Dated August 20, 1911. s-27
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen   Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
saddler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a licence
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
at the southwest .rner of C. L.
4473, Graham Is'and; thence north
80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east
80 chains, to place of commencement.
AUSTIN M.  BROWN.
Dated August 20, 1911. s-27
S;-*eena Land District—District of
Queen  Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
saddler, Intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a licence
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land or.
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
at the northwest corner of C. L.
4476, Graham Island; thence south
o0 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence east
80 chains, to place of commencement.
AUSTIN M.  BROWN.
Dated August 20, 1911. 8-21
Skeena    Land    District—District    of
Queen  Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Miner Converse, of Peabody, Kansas, occupation farmer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 8 miles east and
14 miles south of the southeast corner of Indian Reserve No. 11, Graham Island; thence south 80 chains;
tr.ence west 80 cliains; thence north
80 chains; thence east 80 chains to
point of. commencement; containing
640 acres.       MINER CONVERSE.
A. S. Christie, Agent.
Dated September 13, 1911.       olO
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NO'llCE that Oscar M.
Brown, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation salesman, intends to apply for
permission to pure-base trie following
described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 8 miles east and
14 miles soutli of the southeast corner of Indian Reserve No. 11, Graham Island; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence north
80 cliains; thence west 80 chains to
point of commencement; containing
640 acres.        OSCAR M. BROWN.
Dated September 13, 1911,      olO
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Queen  Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
saddler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a licence
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
at the northwest corner of C. L.
4474, Graham Island; thence south
80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence east
80 chains, to place of commencement.
AUSTIN M.  BROWN.
Dated August 20, 1911. s-27 Tuesday, November 7, 1911.
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
MOUNT ROBSON
Mount Robson, the monarch of the
Canadian Rockies, which will form
one of the grandest of the attractions to the sightseer along the line
of the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway
when the construction of the transcontinental has been carried through
the mountains next year, and which
will undoubtedly become in the near
future, as it is to day to a limited
degree, the rendezvous of the most
distinguished of Alpinists, was described in entertaining fashion by Arthur 0. Wheeler, F.R.G.S., president
of the Canadian Alpine Club, in a
recent Interview. Mr. Wheeler has
spent the summer in tlie vicinity of
Mount Robson und the Yellowhead
pass and In the very near future arrangements are to be made for the
holding of the Canadian Alpine Club
summer camp in Jasper Park, or at
some point along the line of the
Grand Trunk Pacific Railway in the
mountains.
"It has been the general Impression," said Mr. Wheeler, discussing
his tour through the Yellowhead
Pass country, "that the Rocky Mountains of Canada attain their greatest
average height not very far north of
years, much  has been heard of Mt.
(Robson, which dominates the region
of the Yellowhead Pass, but the pop-
uular notion was that there was nothing else in the neighborhood worth
seeing and that the two transcontinental railroads would pass through
a region of little Interest from the
point of view of the tourist or the
mountaineer.
Organizing the Trip
"Some years ago, the Alpine Club
of Canada was organized, the main
objects of which are enunciated in
Its constitution as 'The promotion of
Canadian Alpine and glacier regions,'
and 'The encouragement of the
mountain craft that the opening of
I? new   regions   as   a   nationa-1  play
ground.' In pursuance of this policy early this summer the club,
which has become an international
for the survey of a larger portion of
these regions by methods which had
been found so successful by the Dominion governnint in the case of the
Selklrks and part of the main range
of the Rookies. The club succeeded
In Interesting the Dominion govern-
ment, the government of British Co-
•V— lumbla, and that of Alberta, and also
the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway. At
fii*fet it was hoped that men of science from the Dominion would be
able to accompany the expedition, but
this proved impossible of arrangement. Falling them, negotiations
were opened through Dr. Walcot, an
old student of our mountain regions,
with the Smithsonian Institute of
Washington, D. C. Thence came a
party of four who attended to the
natural history section of the work.
Mr. Harmon, the official photographer of the club, superintended the
landscape photography, exposing
some 600 plates, and Messrs. Kinney and Phillips, the conquerors of
Mount Robson, also assisted. In the
mountaineering department, Konrad
Kain, the club's guide, was of great
service. The party started on July
4 and has pust returned fro its travels, heavy snowstorm bringing the
mountain season to its close.
A  Supreme  Peak
"There was no mistake about Mt.
Robson. It is without doubt, as was
stated by one of the most travelled
and skilled mountaineers of the day,
Dr. Norman Collie, one of the most
magnificent mountains in the world.
Whether seen from the soutli, the
view that Is most familiar, one from
beautiful Berg Lake, It still stands
supreme. In the hundred mile circuit of the great massif on all sides
were found mighty snow-clad peaks,
widespread snowflelds, huge Icefalls,
rushing torrents, waterfalls, flower-
clad meadows and vast strenches of
dark pine forests. A few of the
peaks arc named. Southeast lies Mt.
Resplendent, most happily named by
Dr. Coleman on his pioneer travels
in this country. It is a magnificent
snowplle of great beauty.
"Northwest rises to a sharp poinnt
jn the thin air a mountain of great
distinction, which the expedition
named Mr. McBride for obvious reasons. And so on; summit after summit. Many of the peaks were named
by the surveyors, but they are legion,
and it will be many years before they
are familiarly known as individual
mountnains. The whole mighty mass
seems to have centered about Mt.
Robson, with arms and tentacles
stretching out in every direction. On
the entire circuit it Is only necessary
to climb a peak to bring this pivotal
point into view. If the day be clear
the long, ridge-like crest is seen at
an immense height in midair, like a
pure white crystalline structure.
Down Its sides, especially on the east
and northwest where lie the Robson
and Tumbling Glaciers, pour great
sheets and torrents of snow-covered
ioe. We saw it first from a very
highg point on the Lynx range, which
bounds the Robson.
A Stupendous Scene
"The day was a perfect one, and,
ascending Reef Glacier (named by
Soleman), we had climbed a very
steep rock face, the east Blope of
Lynx range. As we topped the crest
the whole wonderful panorama came
into full view.
"It struck us dumb with amazement that anything so stupendous,
so superb, so undreamed of, should
exist. At our very feet flowed the
great river of Ice, every crevasse,
every moraine, every lcefall, clearly
portrayed. Directly opposite rose
massif, its outline clear from base to
summit, for fully 8,000 feet. Up the
sides were piled mass on mass of
snow, falling In great waves to the
glacier below—all of an Intense
whiteness. There was 'The Dome,'
'The Helmet,' 'The Rearguard,'
names familiar enough through Gole-
man and Kinney. Above the snow
masses rose the almost perpendlcun-
lar rock to the great southeastern
ridge, and beyond the ridge the nearly as steep arete that leads to the extreme crest. The air was so thin
and clear we could easily define the
tremendous cornices with which the
crest was lined .... But Mt. Robson was not all. To the south rose
Resplendent, clad In snow from top
to bottom, and to the southeast the
mighty precipices of the Lynx frowned down upon us. I may say with
truth that it waa the most stupendous
scene I had ever gazed upon.
"From the beautiful Meadows at
the head of Resplendent Valley,
twenty-fvie peaks were counted, all
unknown and unnamed. And lakes,
which perhaps lend the most characteristic charm to Canadian mountain
scenery were everywhere. Lakes of
all colors, many ice clad, all the
summer long, as Is Oesa, in the better known region to the south. The
forests are in many places still green
and it is hoped that the authorities
will take care that they are well protected from fires.
The Provincial lloundury
"When the circuit of Mt. Robson
was completed the party moved up
the Fraser River, surveying, of
course, all the way. At the summit
of the Yellowhead Pass a monument
was established defining the boundary between Alberta and British Columbia. This, of course, is at the intersection of the Great Divide with
the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway. On
the huge post, which is surrounded
with a big stone mound, are carved
tbe words Britisii Columbia on the
west face, Alberta on the east face
and on the south 3,728.98 feet, being the aldtitude of the summit at
the point where the post is set.
"From here the party journeyed
to Maligne Lake, following the excellent trail already built by the Dominion parks department. The group
of mountains at the headwaters of
the Athabasca and Whirlpool Rivers
was found to be magnificent.. It
rises approximately to 12,000 feet
above the sea level and presents a
glorious field for exploration and research. To the south where an endless array of peaks. Somewhere
among them were the giants of the
Columbia ice fields, but they could
not be identified.
Maligne lake, already familiar to
a few favored mortals is a gem of
mountain scenery. Unfortunately
the loweh end Is spoiled by burnt
timber but this is soon passed. The
upper clad peaks, and on their lower
slopes are numbers of mountain
goats. None of these peaks are too
high or too difficult for the average
climber and as times goes on there
is little doubt that here will be one
of the most delightful resorts of the
northern mountains.
"The scientific section was greatly
delighted with the resu'ts obtained
and the report will add much to the
knowledge of Canadian natural history.
"Tlie region has proved lo be su-
pert, but as yet there are no means
of access. Trails will have to be
built and stopping places provided
before the general public will be
able to take advantage of the grand
playground opened to It. Tourist
travel brings an immense Income to
a country when wisely handled; It Is,
however, ther people who stay for
some time and come back again,
bringing their friends, who do good
to the country at large. Therefore,
every arrangements that tends to
make the visitor comfortable—a different thing to providing expensive
luxuries—is wise, and Its cost Is soon
repaid. When the railways are completed It Is probable that many people will go by one and return by
the other and their resultant criticisms will be beneficial to the general  public,  who,  after all are  the
ones who pay the money and should
'call the tune.'
"The reports of the expedition will
be worked out during the winter and
will be sentn to the leading learned
societies of the world. They will be
of admitted value to the Dominion,
and the western provinces, both scientifically and as advertising matter."
 o	
NEW ARCTIC TRIBE
Confirmation Obtained of the Race
Found in the North
Right Reverend Dr. Holmes of
Athabasca, who has just returned to
Winnipeg from a voyage down the
Great Mackenzie River, announces
the existence of a hitherto unknown
tribe of 1,000 Eskimos, living west
of the Mackenzie River and between
Great Bear Lake and the Arctic
Ocean. The Eskimos still hunt with
bow and arrows and use stone implements.
The bishop sold the Eskimos had a
higher intelligence than ordinary Indians and were apt and eager to
learii, but at present there were only
two teachers among them, 1,200
miles from the Mackenzie. The bishop
was received cordially wherever he
went.
The Eskimos tell stories of won-
dereful discoveries, which, if Investigated, the bishop said, would startle
the world of science.
 o	
TO FAR NORTHLAND
Norwegian Explorer Will Travel by
Dog Team From Peace River
Landing
On his way to the great unkonwn
regions of the Canadian north, Christian Leden, Norwegian explorer, detailed by their majesties the king and
queen or Norway to make explorations for the University of Christl-
ania, passed through Winnipeg recently.
After a few day's stay in Edmonton, Mr. Leden will leave for Athabasca Landing, where his assistant,
Harold I'haulow, is now outfitting.
From Athabasca Landing Mr. Leden
and his assistant will go by wagon
to Lesser Slave Lake and then on
to Peace River Landing. They figure to reach Peace River Landing
about November 18, and from there
will take dog team north as far as
Fort St. John and Fort Laird. On
their way Indian camps will be visited and trophies and curios of the
different tribes obtained. Mr. Leden carries letters to all the factors
of the various Hudsons Bay posts,
who will lend every assistance in
the way of personal aid and with
supplies.
Mr. Leden, unlike many other explorers, believes there is a certain
kinship between the Indians and the
Eskimos, but he believes the study
of the music of the various tribes
of the Indians and Eskimos to be a
greater factor in solving their reputed kinship than the study of skulls
and languages.
The exploration trip which he and
his assistant are making this winter is merely a preliminary trip to
get the best route, and they expect
to reutrn at the end of February,
returning to Norway, and return
again to Canada in the laate spring
for a further trip that will cover a
period of three years.
On this trip Mr. Leden will be at
the head of a party of five skilled
travellers from Norway. Leaving
Fort Laird, the farthest north they
will go this winter, the party will
travel by canoe up the McKenzie River to the Arctic Ocean follow the
Northwest Passage from west to East
to Victoria Island. On Victoria Island there is believed to be a tribe
of Eskimos utterly unkonwn to
white men. From Victoria Island the
party will continue on down to theh
mouth of the Hayes River and then
across the Barren Lands lo Chesterfield Inlet on Hudson Bay and then
by steamer back to Norway.
Mr. Leden, thought only twenty-
six, has had wide experience as an
explorer. He spent three years in
the far north of Greenland studying the Eskimos of that vicinity,
who, he believes, are practically the
same people as inhabit the northern
regions of Canada. Mr. Leden found
the Eskimos of Greenland a fairly
intelligent   and   moral   people.
Mr. Leden is greatly aided In his
travelling by being able to speak En-
nuit, the language of the Eskimos.
In addition to making estrographi-
cal collections for the University of
Chrlstiania, - Mr. Leden Is also collecting for the Royal Museum, Berlin. Mr. Leden spent five years in
the German capital and stated that
the learned societies all over Germany are greatly interested in the
exploration of Ibese northern regions.
About the easiest thing in the
world Is to make splendid plans for
the investment of the money one has
not yet succeeded in getting.
LAND NOTIeCES
Skeena    Land    District—District    of
Queen  Charlotte  Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Clarissa Merrill, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
housewife, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 7 miles east and
9 miles soutli from the southeast corner of Indian Reserve No. 11, Graham Island; thence south 80 cliains;
thence east 80 chains; thence north
80 chains; thence west 80 chains to
point of commencement; containing
640 acres.   CLARISSA MERRILL.
A. S. Christie, Agent.
Dated September  10,  1911.      olO
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Queen  Charlotte  Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Eltham D.
Converse, of Estherville, Iowa, occu-
Peilion farmer, inlends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands.—Commencing at a
post planted about 7 miles east and
9 miles south from tire souUiei.st corner of Indian Reserve No. 11, Graham Island; thence north SO chains;
thence east 80 cliains; tlience south
80 chains; tbence west 80 chains to
point of commencement; containing.
640 acres.
ELTHAM   D.   CONVERSE.
A. S.  Christie, Agent.
Dated Sep mincer 10, 1911.      oio
Skeena   Land    District—District    of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Fielder W.
Converse, of Estherville, Iowa, occupation banker, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 7 miles east and
9 miles soutli from the southeast corner of Indian Reserve No. 11, Graham Island; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; tlience south
80 chains; thence east 80 chains to
point of commencement; containing
640 acres.
FIELDER W. CONVERSE.
A. S.  Christie, Agent.
Dated September 10. 1911.      olO
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Queen  Charlotte  Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Effio D. Converse, of Estherville, Iowa, occupation housewife, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described ,ands:—Commencing at a
past planted about 7 miles easl. and
9 miles south from the southeast corner of Indian Reserve Ni. 11, Graham Island; thence soutn 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence north
80 chains; thence east SO chains to
point of commencement; containing
640 acres.   EFFIE D. CONVERSE.
A. S. Christie, Agent.
Dated September  10,  1911.      olO
Skeena    Land    District—District    of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Emma Converse, of Estherville, Iowa, occupation housewife, intends to apply for
permisson to purchase 'he followiae
described lands:—Commencing at a
poet-planted about 8 miles east and
9 miles south from the southeast corner of Indian Reserve No. 11, Graham Island; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence south
80 chains; thence west 80 chains to
point of commencement; containing
640 acres.       EMMA CONVERSE.
A. S. Christie, Agent.
Dated September 10, 1911.      olO
Skeena    Land    District—District    of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Fay F. Converse, of Estherville, Iowa, occupation spinster, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 8 miles east and
9 miles south from the southeast corner of Indian Reserve No. 11, Graham Island; thence south 80 chains;
tbence east 80 chains; thence nortli
80 chains; thence west 80 chains to
point of commencement; and containing 640 acres.
FAY  F.   CONVERSE
A. S. Christie, Agent.
Hated Sep'ember 10   It'll,        'j!0
Skeena    Land    District—District    of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that John P. Curtis, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
niir-rger, luteuds ■<■ apply foi pvinrs-
sion io purcnas' the follov ian di-
scribed lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 8 miles east and
11 miles south of the southeast corner of Indian Reserve No. 11, Graham Island; thence north 80 chains;
tlience east 80 chains; thence soutli
80 cnains; thence west 80 cliains
to place of commencement; containing 040 acres.    JOHN P. CURTIS.
A. S. Christie, Agent.
Dated September 11, 1911.        olO
Skeena    Land    District—District    of
Queen  Charlotte  Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Walter W.
Cross, of Masset, Q. C. I., occupation
farmer, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 8 miles east and
11 miles south of the southeast corner of Indian Reserve No. 11, Graham Island; tlience nortli 80 chains;
theme west 80 chains; thence south
80 drains; thence east 80 chains to
place of commencement; containing
640 aires.      WALTER W. CROSS.
A. S. Christie, Agent.
Dated  September  11,  1911.      olO
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Queen  Charlotte  Islands
TAKE NOTICE that John R.
Boyes, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation laborer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 8 miles east and
11 miles south of the southeast corner of Indian Reserve No. 11, Graham Island; tlience south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; tlience north
80 chains; thence west 80 chains to
place of commencement; containing
640 ae'res. JOHN R.  BOYCE.
A. S. Christie, Agent.
Daied September 11, 1911.        olO
LAND NOTICES
Skeena    Land    District—District    of
Queen  Charlotte  Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Agnes War-
nock Cross,'of Masset, Q. C. I., occupation housewife, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about 8 miles
east and 11 miles south of the southeast corner of Indian Reserve No.
11, Graham Island; thence south 80
chains; tlience west 80 cliains; thence
north 80 chains; tlience east 80
ehains to place of commencement;
containing  640   acres.
AGNES WARNOCK CROSS.
A. S. Christie, Agent.
Dated September II, 1911.      OlO
Skeena    Land    District—District    of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Elizabeth
Brown Boyes, of Vancouver, B. C,
occupation housewife, intends to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about 8
miles east and 12 miles soutli of
the southeast corner of Indian Reserve No. 11, Graham Island; thence
south 80 chains; tlience east 80
chains; thence north SO chains;
tlience west 80 chains to place of
commencement; containing 640
acres.
ELIZABETH  BROWN  BOYES.
A. S. Christie, Agent.
Dated September  11, 1911.      olO
Skeena   Land    District—District   of
Queen  Charlotte  Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Bella Wilson
Cross, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation clerk, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 8 miles east and
12 miles soutli of the southeast corner of Indian Reserve No. 11, Graham Island; thence south SO chains;
tbence west 80 chains; thence north
SO chains; thence east 80 chains to
place of commencement; containing
640  acres.
BELLA   WILSON   CROSS.
A. S. Christie, Agent.
Dated September 11, 1911. olO
LAM) NOTICES
Skeena    Land    District—District    of
Queen  Charlotte  islands
TAKE NOTICE that Alexander
McEwan, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation manufacturer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about 4
miles east and 12 miles south of
the southeast corner of Indian Reserve No. 11, Graham Island; tlience
south SO chains; thence west SO
chains; thence north 80 chains;
tbence east 80 chains to point of
commencement; containing 640
acres.       ALEXANDER McEWAN.
A. S. Christie, Agent.
Dated September 12, 1911.      olO
Skeena   Land    District—District   of
Queen  Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Thomas McEwan, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation manufacturer, Intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about 4 miles
east and 12 miles soutli of the southeast corner of Indian Reserve No.
11, Grahtun Island; thence south 80
chains; fflfcnce east 80 chains; tlience
north 80 chains; thenci west 80
cliains to point of commencement;
containing  640  acres.
THOMAS McEWAN.
a. S. Christie, Agent.
Dated September 12, 1911.      olO
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Nora Keenan,
of Estherville, Iowa, occupation
widow, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 4 miles east and
14 miles south of the southeast corner of Indian Reserve No. 11, Graham Island; tbence nortli 80 chains;
tlience west 80 chains; thence south
*!0 chains; thence east 80 chains to
roint of commencement and contain-
ng 640 acres.      NORA KEENAN.
A. S. Christie, Agent.
Dated  September  12,  1911.      olO
Skeena   Land    District—District   of
Queen  Charlotte  Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Clyde Edwards, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation machinist, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 6 miles east and
12 miles south of the southeast corner of Indian Reserve No. 11, Graham Island; thence north SO chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence south
8 0 chains; thence west 80 chains to
place of commencement; containing
640 acres.        CLYDE EDWARDS.
A. S. Christie, Agent.
Dated September 11, 1911.      OlO
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Queen  Charlotte  Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Frank Taylor,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation shoe
maker, intends to apply for permis
sion to purchase the following described Iands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 6 miles east and
12 miles south of the southeast corner of Indian Reserve No. 11, Graham Island; tlience nortli 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence soutli
80 chains; thence east 80 chains to
point of commencement; containig
640   acres. FRANK  TAYLOR.
A. S. Christie, Agent.
Dated  September 11,  1911.      olO
Skeena    Land    District—District    of
Queen  Charlotte  Islands
TAKE NOTICE fiat T. C McKen-
elley, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation retired, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 6 miles east and
12 miles south of the southeast corner of Indian Reserve No. 11, Graham Island; tlience south 80 chains;
thence east 80 cliains; thence north
SO chains; thence west 80 chains to
point of commencement; containing
040 acres.      T. C. McKENELLEY.
A. S. Christie, Agent.
Dated September  11,  1911.      olO
Skeena    Land    District—District   of
Queen  Charlotte  Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Harry Fogg,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation shoemaker, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 6 miles east and
12 miles south of the southeast corner of Indian Reserve No. 11, Graham Island; tlience south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence nortli
SO chains; thence east 80 chains to
point of commencement; containing
640   acres. HARRY   FOGG.
A. S.  Christie, Agent.
Dated September 11,  1911.       olO
Skeena    Land    District- District    of
Queen   Charlotte  islands
TAKE NOTICE that Benjamin
Taylor, of Vancouver, B, C, occupation shoemaker. Intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 4 miles cast and
12 miles south of the southeast corner of Indian Reserve No. 11, Graham Island; thence north SO cliains;
thence east 80 chains; thence south
80 chains; tbence west SO chains to
point of commencement; containing
640 acres.    BENJAMIN TAYLOR.
A. S.  Christie, Agent.
Dated  September 12,  1911,       olO
Skeena   Land    District—District   of
Queen  Charlotte  Islands
TAKE NOTICE that William Wilson, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
shoemaker, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following die-
scribed lands. Commencing at a post
planted about 4 miles east and 12
miles south of the southeast corner
of Indian Reserve No. 11, Graham
Island; tlience nortli 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south
80 chains; thence east 80 chains to
point of commencement; containing
640 acres.        WILLIAM WILSON.
A. S. Christie, Agent.
Dated September 12, 1911.      olO
Skeena    Land    District—District,    of
Queen  Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that L. Bruce Converse, of Missoula, Montana, occupation real estate, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing
at a post planted about 4 miles east
and 14 miles south of the southeast
corner of Indian Reserve No. 11, Graham Island; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence south
80 chains; thence west 80 chains to
point of commencement; containing
640 acres.  L. BRUCE CONVERSE.
A. S. Christie, Agent.
Dated September 12,  1911.      olO
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Cora J. Converse, of Missoula, Montana occupation housewife, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about G miles east and
14 miles south of the southeast corner of Indian Reserve No. 11, Graham Island; tbence north 80 cliains;
thence west SO chains; tlience soutli
80 cliains; thence east 80 chains to
point of commencement; containing
640 acres.      CORA J. CONVERSE.
A. S.  Christie, Agent.
• Dated September  lie,  1911,      olO
Skeena   Land    District—District    of
Qrreen  Charlotte  islands
TAKE NOTICE that Myrne Converse, of Missoula, Montana occupation spinster, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a
Iiost planted about 6 miles east and
14 miles south of the southeast corner of Ind'an Reserve No. 11, Graham Island; tbence north 8(1 chains;
thence east SO chains; thence south
80 chains; thence west 80 chains to
point of commencement; containing
640 acres.      MYRNE CONVERSE.
A. S. Christie, Agent.
Dated September 13, 1911.      olO
Skeena    Land    District—District    of
Queen   Charlotte  Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Reed S. Lyons,
of Sterling, Kansas, occupation editor, intends to apply for permission
to purchase tbe following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted about 6 miles east and 14 miles
south of the southeast corner of Indian .,eserve No. 11, Graham Island;
tlience sou'.h 80 chains; tbence west
80 chains; thence north 80 cliains;
thence east 80 chains to point of
commencement; and containing 640
acres. REED  S.   LYONS.
A. S.  Christie, Agent.
Dated  September  18,  1911.      old
Skeena    Land    District District    of
Queen Charlotte islands
TAKE NOTICE that Ruth Lyons,
of Sterling tvansas, occupation editor'. Intends to apply for permission
to purchase the Following described
lands:—Commencing ai a post planted about 6 miles east and 1-1 miles
south of the Boutheasl corner of Indian itescrve No, 11, Graham island;
thence south 80 chains; thence east
80 chains; thence north SO chains;
thence west SO chains to point of
commencement; and containing 640
acres. RUTH LYONS.
A.  S.  Christie., Agent.
Dated  September  13,  1911.      olO
Skeena    Land    District—District    of
Queen   Charlotte  Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Charles
Gauge, of Lindsay, California, occupation farmer, intends to apply for
permission to purchase tha following
described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted aboul S miles easl and
14 miles south of the southeast corner of Indian Reserve No. 11, Graham Island; thence north 80 chains;
thence west SO drains; thence south
SO chains; tlience east SO cliains to
point of commencement; containing
640 acres. CHARLES GANG!.
A.  S.  Christie, Agent.
Dated   September   13,   1911.    olO PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Tuesday, November 7, 1911.
OPENING UP ISLAND
i '
Progress at Various Points on  Queen
Charlottes Follows Development
of Industries.
English   Company,   It   Is   Reported,
Has   Purchased   Oil   Plant
at   Skidegate
(Special Correspondence)
Masset, Nov. 4.—A trail has been
blazed from the oil fields on the
west coast of Graham Island to Naden Harbor.
Arthur Robertson, the pioneer
prospector, has discovered a bed of
plumbago, on which he is doing development work.
There is talk of a new townsite
at Queenstown, at the head of Mas-
set Inlet. The opening up of the
coal mines will mean a "rush" for
lots in that locality, which is the head
of navigation.
Three steamers visited Masset Inlet last week. The British Empire,
Prince John and a whaling steamer
were all in port, showing that the
central portion of the island is advancing.
A large lumber yard has been
opened at New Masset, with a stock
of shingles and timber that wl'l
supply local demands for some time
to come.
The old wharf at New Masset is
falling to pieces, and the danger from
accident precludes people from standing on the structure when steamers
arrive. It is time some action was
taken to build a proper wharf for
the hundreds of residents in that
neighborhood.
The survey party completed their
work for the year and left for the
south. It is reported that the head
of the survey party will visit Masset
shortly on a mission that will place
him in a field where the many friends
he made will wish him prosperity and
a long life.
James Martin, the popular proprietor of the general provision and
hardware store on Masset Inlet, intends to open his branch store at
Queenstown shortly.
A. M. Wilson has a townsite on
Delkatla Bay which promises to be
the future summer resort of Prince
Rupert. Over fifty lots have been
disposed of, and the work of constructing buildings is progressing.
The owner is living on the property
and has added the eighty-acre location formerly owned by Captain
Francis to the settlement.
The work of clearing the site of
the new lighthouse on Langara Island is progressing. It is intended
to construct the largest lighthouse on
the Pacific Coast on this, one of the
most barren and uninviting islands
on the Pacific Coast. The light will
be the last of the chain between
Prince Rupert and Yokohama.
B. J. Russell, a young Methodist
student, has been appointed teacher
of the Skidegate Indian day school
and is filling the position in a most
commendable manner.
Mrs. John Robson, the wife of a
member of the Skidegate band, died
recently from cancer, and was interred in the cemetery on the reserve.
The Indians, accompanied by the
brass band, attended the funeral.
It is reported that an English company purchased the oil plant at Skidegate and will expend $50,000 on a
cold storage plant. The soutli end
of Graham Island offers an extensive
field for the extraction of oil from
the shoals of dogfish in the waters.
The Skidegate Indians caught a large
number of the fish recently and extracted over 5,000 gallons of oil from
the carcasses.
MOURN HIS DEATH
Masset   Residents   Lament   the   Passing  Airway  eel   Daniel   Sliinliiy
All residents of Graham island teel
keenly the demise of the late Daniel
Stanley, who succumbed at Prince
Rupert on October 27, says a Masset
correspondent. He was known and
generally respected by tbe whites as
much as by the Indians, and the report of his death was a sad blow to
his young wife, a brother and other
relatives. The news or his death was
brought to Masset by Peter Hill, a
friend of the deceased, who journeyed from Skidegate on foot over a
trail and by boat from Queenstown,
at the head of Masset Inlet. Mr.
Wright, who owns a gasoline launch,
was kind enough to place the boat
at the disposal of the bearer of the
sad news, and the Indians are thankful' to him for the kind consideration
shown in bringing Mr. Hill to the reserve. Captain Henry Edenshaw and
Councillor Alfred Adams are now in
Prince Rupert and will convey the
remains to Masset for Interment,
The late Daniel Stanley was one
of the first navigators between Port
Simpson   and   Graham   Island.     He
built and handled several schooners,
among them the Princess Victoria,
which is now in the halibut fishing
business. He was a "carver" in silver and gold, and his work can never
be duplicated. The Masset reserve
loses one of the most progressives of
the Hydah band in the death of Daniel Stanley. He was always at the
head of every movement to uplift
his people and improve the settlement. Having met with an accident
during childhood, he bore suffering
with the hardihood of his race, and
was always the first to welcome the
white settler. On the lecture platform, and in the home, he was always ready with good advice and his
cheery voice and pleasant face will
be missed more than words can express. The crushing news has cast
a gloom over the inlet which shows
that the young man leaves behind a
host of sorrowing friends.
 o	
Selling Building
The Canadian Bank of Commerce
is offering for sale the building now
used as a city hall on Centre Street.
The building win have to be removed
on short notice.
 o	
GOOD PRICES PAID
Real Estate Values   in   the Business
Section of City Continue Firm
—Latest Sale.
Third Avenue Property Brought ljUOO
a Front Foot—Bought by
English  Investors
Within the past few days the firm
of O. M. Helgerson Ltd. has put
through a real estate deal which
ranks as one of the best in the present year of activity. It was the sale
of Lots 5 and 6, Block 32, on Third
Avenue next to the block of Dr. Melntyre. The price realized for the
50 feet was $23,000, or $460 a front
foot for inside propert. The purchaser was S. Hanson & Co., representing English clients. The vendor
was H. .1. Fairlie.
During the past month the firm
of O. M. Helgerson Ltd. has put a
number of other transactions
through totalling $412,220, including the following:
Lot 47, Block 34, Section 1, sold
for $5,100; from J. W. Bell to Jerry
Bonneau.
Lots 46, Block 17, Section 1,
$2,475; W. S. Hall to local parties.
Lot 25, Block 7, Section 1, $1,700;
W. S. Hall to Edward Patterson.
"Lot 9, Block 31, Section 6, $725;
H.  B. Crosset to H.  Daggett.
Lots 13 and 14, Block 23, Section
6, $1,500;    F.   J.    Kilner   to    Mat
Brown.
Lot 41, Block 7, Section 6, $950;
W. F. Lemon, Spokane, to J. T.
Moore.
Lot 57, Block 6, Section 7, $550;
Roy Walters, Portland, to R. L. New-
comb.
Lot 5, Block 12, Section 7, $750;
H.  McGregory  to J.  T. Moore.
Lot 6, Block 12, Section 7, $900;
W. Shaw to Peter Mikkelson.
Lots 78 and 79, Block 3, Section
7, $1,400;   Peter   Mikkelson   to   H.
McGregory.
Lot 11, Block 12, Section 8, $250;
F.  Cocoran  to M.  Carroll.
Lot 26, Block 34, Section 8, $225;
F. W. Dowling to Charles M. Young.
Lot 27, Block 34 Section 8, $225;
F.  W. Dowling to M. Sands.
Lots 18 and 19, Block 1, Section
8, $850;  E. Rich to W. B. Kerr and
John   McLain.
Lot 28, Block 34, Section 8, $225;
W. F. Dowling to Dan McLellan.
Lot 29, Block 34, Section 8, $225;
W.  F.  Dowling to local parties.
Lot 12, Block 12, Section 8, $170;
Kathryn  Heck, Seattle to S. Turner.
HYDRO-ELECTRIC BY-LAW
1836 1911
The Bank of
British North America
75 Years In ■nilntii.
Capital and Reterr. Over $7,300,000
Letters of Credit
For our customers' convenience
we issue letters of Credit payable
in Pounds Sterling for use In
Great Britain and all parts of the
world, and payable in Dollars for
use in Canada, United States,
Mexico, Bermuda, Bahamas,Cuba
and the West Indies.
We buy and sell Drafts on
France, Germany, South Africa,
Australia, New Zealand, India,
China and the West Indies.
Prince Rupert Branch —
F. S. LONG, Manger.
I have the honor to be, Sir, your
obedient servant.
H. E. YOUNG.
Provincial Secretary.
Victoria, B.C., Oct. 31, 1911.
Honorable  Richard  McBride,
Premier of British Columbia.
Dear Sir:—Referring to our conversation of this morning, and in
confirmation thereof, I wish to point
out that the City of Prince Rupert
passed a bylaw, No. 59, a certified
copy of which accompanies this letter, authorizing the construction of
a water supply and also a supply of
electric light and power, and the
raising of the necessary amount,
viz—$550,000.00 for the purpose of
constructing  the  same.
You wlli notice that in order to
construct this system, it is necessary
to construct a pipeline from Wood-
worth Lake to Shawatlans Lake, to
be 45-inch diameter, and the recitals
of the bylaw show that this pipe,
whilst it is absolutely necessary for
the joint system, would be unnecessary for a purely water works system, or a purely electric system.
By reference to the plan which
also accompanies this letter you will
easily see where the large pipe ends,
viz—at Point B. This bylaw was
placed before the people in the mode
prescribed in the Municipal Act, and
was passed as follows: For the bylaw, 310 votes; against the bylaw,
127 votes; thus giving for the bylaw
a clear majority over that required
by the statute of 42 votes.
I may further state that there is
now no opposition to the carrying
out of the bylaw.
Since the bylaw has been passed
the Bank of Montreal, who at the
present time finance the City of
Prince Rupert, have been advised by
their solicitor, Mr. Charles Wilson,
K. C, of Vancouver, that this bylaw-
relates to more than one matter;
with this contention I cannot agree,
for the reason that the joint pipe
from Woodworth Lake to Shawatlans Lake connects two schemes together in such a way that you cannot divide them, and if I had to draw
two bylaws instead of one, It would
certainly give me a good deal of difficulty to state which part related to
the water works, and which to the
power scheme; it would be madness
to have two pipes from Woodworth
Lake, the expense would almost be
double, and no corresponding ">dyan-
tage could arise.
I enclose you a report which contained the original report signed by
by Mr. Davis, the city engineer for
Prince Rupert, and the report of
Mr. Thompson of Seattle. The first
report referred not all to any electric system; but Mr. Thompson's report suggested a combination of the
two systems.
This report of Mr. Thompson's
was adopted by the city and the bylaw submitted in pursuance thereof.
My present object is to obtain an
assurance from the government that
they will assist in obtaining a ratification of the bylaw already passed,
and I understand from you today
that you are willing to give me this
assurance, the matter to be brought
in as a private bill. I would much
rather have had the matter brought
in by way of amendment to the
Prince Rupert Corporation Act, but
so long as 1 have your assurance
that the government will expedite
the passage of a private bill, I will
have to be satisfied.
In order to satisfy the bankers,
I must have some written assurance
that the government will assist iu the
passage of the private bill, and this
I understand you are willing to
give me.
Before closing, I wish shortly to
pul the reasons why the City of
Prince Rupert is so anxious that this
present bylaw should be passed and
confirmed:
1. We are advised by Mr. Thompson that a water works system alone
cannot be made to pay for several
years to come.
2. That the joint system will pay
from the grass roots; in fact, If you
refer to Mr. Thompson's report, you
will see that the proposed system will
pay enormously.
3. To divide the systems will add
very largely to the expense.
4. If we had a water works system alone it will be necessary to tax
the people in Prince Rupert each year
for interest and sinking fund, whereas the joint system assures us of being able to run the system without
any expense whatever to the ratepayer.
5. The Interest of the whole city
demands that we should proceed
with the construction of this work
at once. In order to do this we must
assure our bankers that the present
bylaw will be fully ratified. I do
not think myself that any such ratification is necessary, but when large
Conservatives
Attention!
The Annual Meeting of the
Conservative Association will
be  held  in  McINTYRE  HALL
Wednesday
Nov. 5
at 8 p.m.
for the election of officers for
the ensuing year. Admission
will be by membership card
for the year 1912. Applications for membership, and all
dues for the ensuing year,
must be in the hands of the
Secretary not later than 6 p.m.,
Saturday, November 11, 1911,
in order to take part in the
proceedings.
W. J. QUINLAN,
Secretary.
TENDERS   WANTED
Separate tenders will be received
by the undersigned up to 5 p. m.,
November 9, 1911, for the following
work in connection with the new
City Fire Hall:—Plastering and
brick work, doors and frames, window frames and sash, all trim,
base and stairs, all galvanized iron
roofing, flashings, gutters and down
pipes.
Plans and specifications at the offices   of   Messrs.   Potter   &   Lailey,
architects.       ERNEST  A.  WOOD,
n7 City Clerk.
NOTICE
The Canadian Bank of Commerce
are open to receive offers for the
purchase of the building now occupied as the City Hall. In. the event
of an offer being accepted the purchaser must hind himself to remove
the building on receipt of 30 days
notice from the G. T. P. Railway Co.
The highest or any offer will not
necessarily be accepted. n7-10
sums   of   money  are  concerned  we
must  satisfy  our   bankers.
I sincerely hope that you will see
your way at once to give me an
assurance sufficient to satisfy the
Bank of Montreal in the matter.
I have the honor to be, your
obedient servant.
F. PETERS.
Council   Satisfied
His Worship expressed satisfaction that the city solicitor had returned and had succeeded in satisfying the bank in the matter of the
bylaw.
Alderman Clayton moved the adoption of the report, which he was
sure was gratifying in view of the
attempts to besmirch the efforts of
the council by certain elements in
the city.
Alderman Hilditch said he always
felt sure that that bylaw was valid,
but he wished to call attention to
the press that, with its boosting propensities, had endeavored to show
that an appeal would have to be
taken to the people again and which
had taken a position of "I told you
so." He was pleased to see that the
critics would have "to take to the
woods."
Alderman Morrissey joined in the
congratulations.
Solicitor Explains
Mr. Peters said he had but done
bis duty. The bylaw was drawn in
such a way that some people thought
It was Invalid inasmuch as It referred to the two schemes. If he
bad the thing to do over again he
would do it the same. He bad contended that the bylaw was good. He
was pleased to know that the attorney general's department, which had
to go into this, decided after the most
mature consideration that It was perfectly valid. He had gone down
to Victoria, not because he had any
doubt as to the validity of the bylaw, but to remove any doubt on
the part of the Bank of Montreal.
The bank had been very generous in
dealing with the city, and it wbb only
right to satisfy it as to the legal end
of the matter.
Alderman Newton did not intend
to bother his head with any statements of a member of the council,
but would have treated them with
contempt; yet he would assure the
city solicitor that in any publicity he
gave to a report that a vote would
be necessary, he acted In perfect
good faith, and produced the message
received from Victoria.
Alderman Hllditch thought Alderman Newton should have taken pains
to   get   confirmation  of  the  report
He,'Stay S&Usf&ctory'KueSC
Good, Sound Reasons for
MONARCH Economy
Monarch Ranges are built so that they can
never have "air leaks"—
For around every opening Into the body there
is a   Malleable   Iron frame to which the
steel la riveted.
No putty Is needed In such joints.   They are
air tight when new and stay air tight,
if these other ranges were built in this way
they might be economical too.
Investigate this matter of rivet construction
versus stove bolts and stove putty.    It's
Important to every  one using or buying
a range.
SOLD AND GUARANTEED BY THE
Kaien Hardware Co.
Telephone 3 Third Avenue
M.M. Stephens & Co. Ld.
Real Estate, Insurance,
Investments
Insure in Companies with many years of successful and unquestioned reliability in writing insurance, and unstained reputation for
paying their claims, whose policies are taken as collateral by all
banks.
FIRE,  LIFE,  ACCIDENT, MARINE,  PLATE  GLASS,
EMPLOYERS' LIABILITY
Insure before it is eternally too late.
Office Third Ave. P. O. Box 275.
Phone 222. PRINCE  RUPERT, B. C.
^@[^I^[ei[^@[^[^E^[n][^[^@[^L^@E^[5]CH3[°][°Ke]l
HOTEL
ENAMELWARE
HAVE JUST RECEIVED A SMALL SHIPMENT OF HOTEL
ENAMELWARE ESPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR USE IN
HOTELS, RESTAURANTS AND CAMPS. WE GUARANTEE
THEM TO LAST TWICE AS LONG AS ORDINARY ENAMEL
WARE.
A CALL IS SOLICITED
Prince Rupert Hardware & Supply
Company, Ltd.
i   I
THIRD AVENUE
PHONE 120
SEEBlBEElBEBiBEBBEBBBiEEEEEBEE
w-
#*WBKHKHJ-3*tt-S*5*WW^
i*8MH'*-'KHKBWlWl-^
THE BIG
FURNITURE STORE
-WE SELL-
DRESSERS, CHIFFONIERS, DESKS, BABY
CARRIAGES, BUFFETS, DINING SETS,
IRON AND BRASS BEDS, BEDDING,
BLANKETS, COMFORTS, DRAPERY, POR-
TIERS, CURTAINS, (in variety), CARPETS,
MATTING, LINOLEUMS, PICTURES, MIRRORS, MIRROR PLATE, CROCKERY of all
kinds, GLASSWARE in great variety, CUT
GLASS, CUTLERY, STOVES, ENAMELWARE, and GENERAL HOUSE FURNISHINGS  COMPLETE.    Largest  Stock in the North.
F. W. HART,
HART BLOCK
Kntrrrnccs raid Avemrrr irntl 6th Street
■fy *KH>!><HKHW8»<«rt«K5 l"MI*'S'W**K>*-afrl^^ flr*KHKH«HKHj
when it had such an important bearing on the city. He, however, had
alluded more particularly to the
News in the reference made by himself.
The motion to adopt the solicitor's carried.
 o	
C. D. Newton, Mrs. Newton and
daughter have returned to the city.
* *     *
C. H. Orme and his bride arrived
on  Monday from  the  east and  are
taking up their residence here.
* *     *
S. A. Corley of the Royal Hotel
returned this morning from Pitt Island, where he was engaged in hunting and In looking over the prospects
there.
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE
NOTICE is hereby given that the
reserve existing over Crown lands on
the Morrice River, Range 5, Coast
District, notice of which bearing date
of May 5th, 1910, was published in
the Br'tish Columbia Gazette of May
5th, 1910, is cancelled in so far as
it relates to the lands surveyed as
Lots 3881, 3882, 3883, 3884, 3885,
3886, 3887, 3888, 3889, 3890, 3891,
3892, 3893, 3894, 3895, 3896, 3897,
3898, 3899, 3900, 3901, 3902, 3903,
3904, 3905, 3906, 3907, 3908,, 3909,
and 3910,
ROBERT A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Department of Lands, Victoria, B. C.
September 12, 1911. s22-tl22

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