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Prince Rupert Journal May 30, 1912

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3161 v- Nflf
The Jonrnal
$5.00
a year
tmu
Job Printing
in all Lir.es
'.
VOL.   I.
PRINCE   RUPERT,   B.   C. THURSDAY, MAY 30, 1912.
Price, Five Cents.
NO. 153,
TRIBUTE TO  DEAD
Public Men in London Refer to the Value
of the Services Rendered by
Charles N. Hays.
A   Kitting  Memorial   to  His   Worth
Is Signed by Canadians in
Imperial House
Possibly the most striking of all
the numerous tributes to the memory
of the late Charles M. Hays, president of the Grand Trunk and Grand
Trunk Pacific railways, has just been
made public by the officials of the
company In a letter received from
twelve members of the Imperial
House of Commons in London, all
of whom, it will be noted from the
appended signatures, with the possible exception of the Rt. Hon. John
Burns, are Canadians themselves.
The letter is as follows:
"House of Commons Library,
"London.
"My Dear Sir—Up to the last possible moment the personal friends
of Mr. Hays here In the House of
Commons (and they are not a few)
had been hoping and praying that
not only for the sake of his family
and your company, but especially for
the sake of Canada, he might have
been in the list of rescued from the
Titanic. For days his name was first
in and then out of the printed list
of saved. May we express to you
the profound regret which we feel
for the irreparable loss of which you
have sustained through the death of
your president.
"When it Is realized that his abilities as 'a railway man were perhaps
not excelled, if equalled, by those of
any other man on your continent,
and that his character and qualities
endeared him to everyone *who got
to know him and became Ins friend,
then we can estimate to" some extent
the loss which his death means to
you personally, to your company, and
to the entire Dominion. Such men
are true Empire builders.
"We are thankful that Mrs. Hays
and daughter are among the saved.
"Again, expressing our sincerest
condolence with them and with you
all.
"Yours faithfully,
"A.   BONAR   LAW,
"HAMAR   GREENWOOD,
"JOHN BURNS,
"GILBERT  PARKER,
"JOSEPH. MARTIN,
"IAN MALCOLM,
"J. ALLEN BAKER,
"C.   D.   ROSE,
"DONALD   MACMASTER,
"A. SHIRLEY BENN,
"N. MACNAMARA,
"W.  H.  AITKEN."
FUNERAL TOMORROW
Mrs. Zarelli Will Be Interred at Garden  Island—Services Will Be
From Haynei's Chapel
The funeral of the late Mrs. Zarelli will take place tomorrow from
Hayner Bros.' chapel to Garden Island. The funeral will be held at
L30 in the afternoon. 'Services will
be conducted by Rev. W. H. McLeod.
METEOROLOGICAL REPORT
(May   29-5   p.   m.)
Barometer   30.010
Maximum temperature 58.0
Minimum temperature    45.0
Aeroplane Social
The ladies of Uio Presbyterian
Church will give an aeroplane social
In Mclntyre Hall one week from today. There will be a good programme and a most enjoyable time
is promised to all who attend.
WESTERN  STUDENTS
This "is  Reason   Railways   Give   for
Proposed Withdrawal of Special
Rates to Students
Before the Railway commission at
Ottawa a few days ago various universities protested against the proposal of the railways to abolish after July 1 the one-half one-way fare
now granted to students attending
eastern universities. Mr. Phlppen,
K. C, for the Canada Northern, explained that the rates were originally made to allow westerners to
attend eastern universities before
western universities started. Now
that these universities had been established in the west, there was no
need for this, the railways claimed.
A. E, Goodeve observed that many
British Columbia students had entered in courses in eastern universities, and If the change was made
they would find their expenses unexpectedly increased. Mr. Phlppen
agreed that this required consideration, and the matter was left over
for discussion between the railways
and the universities.
 o	
FISHERIES  QUESTION
Decision of the Privy Council with Respect to Appeals has Important Bearing.
There Will Be a Reference of Several
Pressing Points to tlie Courts
for Decision
Trial Here
Chief Vickers of the oity police
force arrived home unexpectedly yesterday from Victoria. He had .gone
south to attend court there as a witness in a case from here. Upon
arrival he found that there might
be sqme objection to the hearing in
the city of Victoria owing to the
fact that ltt was not within the
bounds of tiie judicial county where
the crime was supposed to have
taken place and that it would have
to be heard In this city. The case
was therefore allowed to stand over
until tlie sitting here.
The decision given the other day
by the judicial committee of the privy
council, to the effect that the Dominion government refer to the Supreme Court of Canada questions affecting the jurisdiction of the federal government and the privinces,
without securing- t,he consent til .lit-
provinces before making such reference, will have the result of bringing forward a number of matters
which • have been lying In abeyance
pending this decision. Among these
matters is the difference of opinion
which exists between the Dominion
and the province of. British Columbia regarding their respective jurisdictions over the coast fisheries. Application will be made to the supreme court within the next few days
to fix a date for hearing the case
and there is no doubt that the date
will be set for some time during
the fall term. The questions at issue are three, as follows:
Is it competent to the Legislature
of British Columbia to authorize the
government of the province to grant
by way of lease, license or otherwise,
the exclusive right to fish in any or
what waters within the railway belt
(a) as to such waters as are tidal
and (b) as to such waters bb, although not tidal, are in fact navigable?
Is it competent to the Legislature
of British Columbia to authorize the
government of the province to grant
by way of lease, licenses or otherwise, the exclusive right or any right
to fish below water mark in or in
any or what part of the open sea
within a marine league of the coast
of the province?
Is there any and what difference
between the open sea within a marine  league  of  the  coast  of  British
Columbia, find the gulfs, bays, chan-1
nels, arms of the sea and estuaries j
of   the  rivers   within   tho   province,
or lying  between  tho province and
the   United   Stntes   of   America,   no
far as concerns tho authority of the
Legislature  of   British   Columbia   to
authorize   the   government    of   the1
province to grant by way of lease,
license  or  otherwise   the   exclusive
right  or   any   right   to   fish   below j
low water mark In the said  waters
or any of them?
It will be argued on behalf of the ;
attorney general of Canada that each
of these questions should be answered  in  favor  of the  jurisdiction  of
the province.
AN ENGLISH TEAM
New Soccer Club Organized Here to Be
Known as the Rose Football
Team.
The. Membership   Will    Consist   of
Englishmen and English-Canadians Resident in the City
Not to be outdone by the Scottish
residents of the city, the Englishmen
have taken steps to organize a football club. The initial steps were
taken last evening In connection with
this and the final organization of
the club will soon be completed,
when the team representing it will
get into training and be ready to
meet the other teams of the city.
The new club Is to be known as
the Rose Football Club. Membership In it is open to English-born
and English-Canadians. Practice
will begin at once feo that the team
may get in good shape.
As a result of this, organization
there is likely to be a good deal of
friendly rivalry aroused between the
Roses and the Caledonians with the
result that the city should have at
least two excellent soccer teams.
COD CURING SHEDS
Cold Storage Company will Begin
Construction of this Addition to
the Works at Seal Cove.
the
George  II.  Collins,   Managing   Dircc
tor of the Company Again in City
—Vessels to Re Ready This Fall
INSPECTION TOUR
Major Mills of Work Point Barracks
Is on a Visit to This Point to
Inspect Local Militia Here
There arrived in the city by the
Prince George Major J. E. Mills of
Work Point' Barracks, who has come
here on a tour of inspection of the
loca] militia corps. He is accompanied by Mrs. Mills. • The official
Inspection of the rifles here will be
tonight, when there is a parade of
the company ordered for the purpose.
 -o —
Rev. Charles R. Sing arrived home
yesterday after attending the meeting of the Methodist Conference in
Victoria.
There has returned to the city,
G. H. Collins, the general manager
of the Canadian Fish and Cold Storage Company. He has been on a
trip to the south on business in connection with the concern with which
he is so prominently identified. He
will begin within a very short time
the construction of another addition
to the plant at Seal Cove. This will
be the cod-curing sheds, which will
be heavily framed but will be of
timber and adapted for the purpose
of taking care of the catch of cod
that the company will be obtaining
at an' early stage of the proceedings
of the company. The sheds will be
of two storeys in height and will
be built to carry the immense weight
that is put upon them.
With the strike in the old land
some months ago there has been a
delay in the construction of the
steamers. The order has been placed
for the wooden vessels that are to
be built on this coast. All of the
vessels will be ready for use in these
waters early this coming winter.
Odd  Fellows'  Officers
The Odd Fellows have elected
senior office bearers as follows:
A. H. Allison, N. C; Neil McNeil,
V. G.; W. G. Barrie, recording secretary; A. R Philips, financial secretary, and C. G. Thome, treasurer.
Installation night will be on July
1, when other officers will be appointed. W. G. Barrie was appointed delegate for the district to attend
and meet with the Grand Lodge at
Victoria on June 12.
GRANBY SMELTER'S
MAGIC EFFECTS HERE
It will Arouse Interest in Mining in this District to a Marvellous Extent--What the
Company Plans in Connection with
its Undertaking at the Hidden
Creek Proposition-Profits
will be Large it is
Estimated.
VESSELS  FOR  THE  PANAMA
British Shipowners  Taking Time  by
the Forelock  in   Readiness for
New   Channel-,  of Trade
FIRE   AT   PREMIER
British shipowners have taken
time by the forelock in preparing for
the trade development which will
follow the opening of the Panama
Canal. Not a few of the steamers
now building on the northeast coast
of England are designed to navigate
the canal, and will be ready even
before the waterway itself is opened.
The orders for these vessels have
been placed very quietly, and, in
many cases, it is not yet known for
which particular branch of the Pacific trade they are intended, but
the fact that they are building to
particular dimensions to secure as
much tonnage as possible on a restricted draught of water leaves no
doubt as to the intention of the owners. The present year will see a
good many more vessels ordered for
the same traffic.
Mrs. Sawle of Hazelton was among
the arrivals in the city yesterday.
THE PREMIER'S VISIT
Natters which Attracted the Attention
of Hon. Nr. McBride while
in London.
British Columbia Stands High in tlie
Estimation  of   the  British
Investor at  Present
Timely Action on the Part of the House
Brigade Resulted in Putting
Out Flames.
Conflagration   Is  Believed  to  Have
Started   From  Gas Stove in the
Kitchen—Dining Room Injured
Again laBt night there was a
threatened conflagration in the city.
This time it was in the Premier
Hotel. The fire Is supposed to have
started from the gas stove in the
kitchen. It spread quickly and
scorched the wall of the room badly.
The dining room also suffered but
more from water than from fire.
Before the fire department reached the spot the house brigade had
done good work by using the hose
provided there for that purpose. The
fire was practically out before the
firemen arrived.
From fire and water there was
considerable damage done to the
kitchen and the dining room.
GOING TO LONDON
Premier Borden Will Leave in June
to Discuss Naval Question
Ottawa, May 29.—Premier Borden, with two ministers, will leave
on June 2 8 for London to confer
with the imperial authorities on the
question of the Canadian navy.
WHEAT PORTS
Rev. G. H. Raley of Port Simpson
and Mrs. Raley arrived on the Prince
George. Mr. Raley lias been elected
president of the B. C. Conference of
the Methodist Church, as previously
announced in these columns.
WANTED
Wanted—Competent stenographer
for temporary work. Remington
machine supplied. Apply after 11
a. m./Room 28   G. T. P. Inn.
That the opening up of the copper smelter at Granby on Observatory Inlet Is going to do marvels for
northern British Columbia in a mineral sense Is the opinion of all that
H
have   studied   the   situation   to   any
extent. Already the influence is he-
ginlng to be felt. By the time the
sm'elter is built the whole country
will have awakened as never before.
The following from I lie pen of
George Walker in The Boston Commercial regarding the British Columbia copper stocks deals with this
aspect  of the situation:
Granby directors have authorized
the management to begin work itn-
medlately on the const ruction of a
2,000-ton daily capacity smelter at
Hidden Creek. The.ore hmil will
he about a mile and the distance
from the smelter Bite to tlie docks
Is it little less. Hydro-electric power, sufficient for nil users at mine
and smelter, will he developed on a
stream near by. ,
No arrangement for new financing
has been made. The company has
money enough to proceed with the
development of the mine, conduct its
railroad and docks and pul in the
foundations for the new plant. Meanwhile it Is earning approximate^
$1 Oil 000 a month. It is probable
that the 'entire new plant will b
paid for out of operating profit!
Diamond drilling and developmen
work have proved  Iho  Hidden Creole
ore   bodies   to   be   both   larger   and
higher In grade than they were believed to be 'when the property was
I purchased.    Over 12,000,000 tons of
| self-fluxing smelting ore, which will
average over 2 per cent copper and
| carry   30   cents   a   ton   in   gold,   has
I been demonstrated.
It is figured that the company will
make copper at Hidden Creek cheaper than it does at Phoenix and Grand
Forks. Mining costs will be about
the same; but there will be a saving
of 28 cents a ton on ore transportation, and only half as much coke
will be required to smelt a given
tonnage of ore. The cost of trans-
pouting a ton of bullion to the eastern refineries will lie ."ill centl II I
tliltn   It is  from Grand   Porks.
The new plant, which will cosl
?I,Too,iioo, will be completed  wlth-
i In  eighteen  months lo two yours,   tl
lis expected to turn out 80,000,000
pounds of copper annually, giving
Granby a total yearly production of
46,000,000 to 50 000,000 pounds.
General Manager Graves says
Granby is now Heating a larger tonnage of ore al Grand Forks, over
3,F>0Q tons dally, at a lower cost per
ton. This ore yields about IS 1-2
pounds of coppeer and 7", cents In
gold; and   silver   per   ton.     Ho  says
I the future outlook for Granby is
brighter, and that its assets are
worth more than al any previous
time in the company's history.
i calculate thai when Granby gets
itself into n   position  where  it   can
produce 46,000,000  pounds of 11
per annually at a cost of 10 nuts, ii
will  earn  $18  a  share yearly  on
1(l-cont .metal   market,  or   $9   on
13-cent copper.
Premier McBride of British Columbia has arrived in Montreal after
a short trip to England, where several important provincial matters engaged his attention. One of these
was the necessity for the erection of
a building in a prominent place in
London for British Columbia offices.
This necessity is due to the extraordinary growth of interest in the province and the Immense Increase in the
business of the agent general's of
flee.'
British Columbia never stood so
high in financial circles as today,
and undoubtedly suitable quarters
for offices are greatly needed. The
site has been practically decided on
in the most central location. Plans
for the buildings are now in course
of  preparation.
Among other questions that of the
B. C. Electric Railway franchises
was taken up with President Home-
Payne and a satisfactory solution of
the difficulties may be anticipated,
although Premier McBride was not
in a position to make any announcement.
A most important tiling was bis
invitation by the first lord of the
Admiralty to visit the fleet at Portland, when he was given a private
audience with the King, whicli is
much interested in the Pacific province.
The Canadian Club dinner was the
occasion for the premier to make
an address, and his reference to
British Columbia was highly applauded. Very great hospitality was
shown Mr, McBride in England. Everywhere British Columbia is In the
J people's mouths.
Mr.   McBride   goes   to   Ottawa   to i
■ see  Premier  Borden  on   various  important matters.
Prince  Rupert and  Vancouver  Will
Be shipping Grain Before Panama Caiiiil Opens
Vancouver, May 29.—H. Patton,
brother of the Chicago wheat king,
has declared here that western
wheat will come to British Columbia
ports even before the opening of the
Panama Canal, and it will be shipped from Vancouver and Prince Rupert.
SIR   llir,m,KT  MENTIONED
Another Nniiic Added to the List of
Those Spoken of for Railway Commission
Ottawa, May 29.—The name of
Sir Charles Hlbbert, Tupper is now
being mentioned in connection with
the chairmanship of the railway commission. While it is believed that
the vacant office has not been offered to Sir Hibbert, his name is
under consideration by the government.
*        CHELHOSIN ON AGAIN
DETECTS  ICE
Prof, Haines' Invention Detected the
Presence  of   Ice  at   a   Di-tniice
Of   Ten   Miles
The steamer lto> al Gem ge i an i
on its last voyage from Halifax to
Bristol, Prof, Howard T. Barnes of
VIcQill Unlveislty, who crossed for
the purpose of testing his invention,
j known as the micro-tormometer,
j which, he claimed, will detei I the '■
presence of Ice under any wi ather
conditions al great'distances.
Captain Harrison refused to make
8 Btatemeill of the value of tiie instrument to navigators, because lie
bad "nol si en it tested under ail
kinds of weather conditions," He
admitted II detecti d Ice at a dii tan e
of ten utiles, bul said further tests
\< ere noi tied to den mi irate the In-
strutnenl     • unplete success
G. Kerr, fire Warden pn the Skei
na,  Is in  the lily,     lie  reports  thai
it Is in' iming more dlffloull all tin
i ime to prevent the oul break ol I
in  tliis pari  of tin; province.
After  Expensive  and   Rapid   Repairs
the Vessel of Union s. S. Company Returns
Costing between 125,000 and $30,-
000, and accomplished in very quick
time, the repairs of the damage
caused to the 1'nlon Company's
steamship C'helohsin when she struck
a rock In the bed of the Skeena have
been completed al the Wallace Shipyards, North Vancouver.
The rhelohsin arrived In port last
night. She has had her hull thoroughly overhauled In addition to the
insert ion of new plates and other
repair work, sin- is an admirably
equipped steamer throughout,
PERSONALS
Martin n'lteiih and Mrs. O'Reilly
i-etiiined to the city yesterday.
J. Hammond ol Vh torla baa arrived in iii eclty t" become a resilient here.
The bacheloi b of thi i Ity are giving a dance In the Bkatlng rink tonight,
Mrs. Cade gave a bridge party yesterday afternoon In honor of her sister, who is visiting her.
.1. e. i'in-let t of the Queen Charlotte City Mills' arrived In the city
last night from an inspection of Ills
mills there. The work I.-.. progressing well and there Is quite a demand
for the output He Is now on Ills way
to Seattle, where he resides.
There   arrived    from   the   Queen
Charlotte Islands last evening. \v. .1.
a  well   known  mineralogist
lei  ria,  v, ho has i a  over to
tin mds looking Into Investments
thai lie has there. He reports that
there are ,-i greal many settlers moving Into the different parts this summer, Tliur.' are also good promises
In   the line of  mining. TRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Thursday, May 30, 1912.
prince iRupevt journal
Telephone   138
Office: 128 Third Avenue East,
near McBride Street. Telephone 138.
P. 0. Box do".
0, H. KELSON, Editor,
DAILY   EDITION^
Published   every   morning   except
Monday.    Delivered by carrier in the
c'.ty at the following rate if paid in
advance:—
One Year $fl.00
Six  Months $2.50
Three   Months $1.25
One Month $  .50
WEEKLY  EDITION.
Published every Friday for circulation outside the city of Prince
Rupert at $2.00 a year addressed to
points in Canada or $3.00 a year to
all points In the United Kingdom,
the United States or other foreign
countries.
Advertising Hates Upon Application,
|   RAILWAYS'    TROUBLES t
*****************************************************
F. A. Delano, president and receiver of the Wabash Railroad, recently dealt with the question of
railways and the disabilities under
which they operate. In the paper
which lie presented before railway
men there are many interesting fea-
First, that the railways have been
starved by reductions in rates, and
by increases in taxes, wages and cost
of materials, to a point where the
margin between income and outgo
has diminished to an alarming extent.    Even the strongest and  most
tures brought out which will stand '. fortunately located railways of the
careful investigation. While Mr. De- country have suffered a serious
lead's conclusions may  lie somewhaj I shrinkage In net. earnings, and their
}&&*■
Thursday, .May 30, 1912.
A  DANGEROUS SPOT
There Is probably no spot in the
city where there is greater danger
of the corporation being obliged to
face an action for loss of life or Injuries than a section In front of
the Journal office on Third Avenue.
For some unexplained reason the
general design of work for the improving of the street east of McBride seems to be.to leave the section immediately in front of the
Journal as long as it is possible to
to leave it without improving. The
Pioneer Laundry, with expensive
wagons to maintain, has suffered
very materially by the leaving of
the street in the shape In which It
1b in. Had it been allowed to remain as originally planked there
would have been no ground for objection. As It is it is simply scandalous and there is no excuse for
the lack of action since the street
was prepared for the wall and the
filling. No light Is provided at this
point and with rocks and excavations
that cannot be located in the dark
the wonder is that there has not been
some serious accident at the p'ace.
Only last night a man under the
influence of liquor was gathered in
there, having fallen and rolled over
the embankment at the risk of his
life.
The condition of the street at the
point referred to is a disgrace to
whoever is responsible for the situation as it exists. We are willing to
concede that there should be an exercise of patience for a reasonable
length of time. The limit has certainly been reached in this matter.
There is apparently some good influence at work to delay this piece
of work. There can always be, found
work in some other part when any
move is made to complete this work,
which is destined, it would appear,
to be tlie last piece of filling to be
done in  Section  One.
LOOKING TO THE NORTH
Anyone who watches the arrival of
the steamers at this port cannot fall
to be struck by the large number of
survey parties that are constantly
arriving here for work in different
lines In all parts of this new British
Columbia. It is an evidence that
the day for this part of the province
Is now here. Attention is being diverted to this Skeena district as
never before and there Is a wonderful
awakening In store for the different
sections of the district. It Is safe
to prophesy In view of the immense
agricultural resources that this
northern portion of the province possesses that in a very few years there
will be a much larger population
living on the lands of the districl
than Is to he found in any other part
of iills Pacific province.
It Is well that it should be so for
there Is no Industry that gives a
country any inure stable reputation
than does thai of agriculture. It inspires confidence In the country on
the purl of Investors and adds materially to the general prosperity.
Such a condition the north is going
to have when all its valleys become
known to the world in general.
Arthur Gowlng has returned from
the Queen Charlotte Islands.
W. Law returned to the city yesterday after a visit to the southern
coast cities.
William Lorimer, who Is interested In mining property on Banks Island, was among the arrivals In the
city by the Prince George yesterday.
He has gone to his property on the
island.
one-sided, yet there can he no ques-i credit   has   thereby   been   impaired,
whereas, weaker and less fortunate
roads have been pushed to the wall.
Tho effect of this has been that the
railways have done just what any
individual or corporation would do:
They have had to skimp' wherever
they could. Like the man who can't
afford to buy a new pair of shoes,
lie manages to make the old pair do
the work. If the old pair happens
to be pretty thin in the soles, and
the winter proves to be very cold,
he suffers in consequence.
The 16-Hour Law
The second and very obvious cause
of the trouble has been restrictive
laws to which railways have been
forced to accede. These are: First,
the so-called "16-hour law," under
which no engine or trainman can
be kept in service longer than sixteen hours without rest. Granting,
at least for the sake of argument,
that the 16-hour law was desirable
or ev.en necessary, the effect of it
is as follows: The railway divisions
usually are adjusted for runs of
125 to 175 miles, the average being
not far from 150 miles. Coarse and
heavy—that is to say, drag freight
trains (in contradistinction to merchandise and perishable trains)
make runs of this length over single-
track roads, allowing for delays in
passing tracks, at a speed of from
ten to twelve miles per hour, including detentions. It will thus be seen
that under normal conditions the division will be covered in from fifteen
to sixteen hours; but longer than
this when the conditions are abnormal or congested.
Without question, this was a long
day's work; but under normal, conditions, the men who made the run
had a long rest at the end of it.
When the 16-hour law came into
effect the railways were forced to
one of two alternatives: Either to
change the length of their engine
runs, which involved a very large
expense, or to run the trains lighter
(that is to say, with less tonnage)
so that they would make higher
speed between division points; and,
in a few cases, to cut the divisions
in two—a very expensive expedient
on account of the rule imposed by
engine and trainmen upon the roads
that a minimum pay of 100 miles a
day shall be paid, even if less than
100 miles is made; in other words,
the so-called "monus mileage" rule.
In a severe winter, such as we
have gone Airougb, the experience of
every railway has been that all expedients have broken down. "Engineers and conductors, firemen and
brakemen, have, on reaching a sidetrack or passing track' at the end
of 16 hours, notified the despatcher
—as the law permits them to do—
that their 16 hours were up and
have deliberately abandoned their
trains. I suppose ft Is safe to say
that there isn't a road north of the
Ohio River that hasn't had many of
its trains thus abandoned and the
engines frozen up. The splendid
esprit de corps which used to exist,
when the engine and train crew
would keep going, and, like the captain on the bridge of the ocean
steamer, bring the train Into her
"port," Is a myth of the past; and,
worse than this, one of the effects
of trades unionism and meddling legislation between the employer and
the employee has been that In such
severe weather as we have recently
had the old and well-tried men have
laid off; that is. demanded furloughs, and the railway has had to
call on its younger and less experienced men to man Its trains. Small
wonder that it cost a number of
well-conditioned trunk lines in January last more to operate than they
received in gross earnings.
The Boiler Inspection Law
Another law which was urged by
the trades union element in Congress,
and which—while undoubtedly well
meant by many of the men wjio voted for It—has had a very disastrous
effect, is the so-called "boiler Inspection law." Under the terms of
this law, the chief Inspector at Washington, employs an army of Inspectors who go over the country and
without hesitation condemn locomotives, which, while not in firBt-class
condition, are unquestionably safe to
run. As is well known, all boilers
are built with a very large factor
of aafety, and perfection in a locomotive boiler is not to be expected.
A   modern   locomotive   boiler,   has
tion thai there is a great deal of
force in what he says. Mr. Delano
says:
Business men and prominent manufacturers of Michigan have met together in convention, to ask the
question, "What is the matter with
| the railways?" I am here today, by
invitation, to give an answer to this
question  as  1  see  it.
Most railway men would like to
reply that the railways are all right;
thai tliey neither need your, help
nor your sympathy; but the fact of
tlie matter is that they are not all
right, and that the national policy
of the country seems to be to reduce
them to starvation. In any starvation process, of course, it is obvious
that those with ample resources will
survive a good deal longer than those
that are poor. This is no less true
of railways than of individuals. In
this connection it would be amusing,
if it were not so sad, to see the frequent references in the public prints,
magazines, etc., to the carelessness of railway managers in letting
their property run down. It is said,
with a great show of wisdom, that
the railways should put their property in splendid condition during the
summer, repair all their locomotives
and cars, so as to be in good condition to go through the winter. Unfortunately, the railway manager
with Interest charges and a payroll
to meet must "cut his garment according to the cloth." Many of them
have shown uncommon resourcefulness in getting along under uncommonly difficult condition, but when
all facilities have been strained to
the utmost, and on top of that we
have a winter like the one just past,
a complete collapse ensues, and the
demoralization Is sometimes so
great that the public marvels at the
utter lack of foresight on the part
of the railway officials.
I do not claim that railway officials are more far-seeing or wiser
than the rank and file of men who
manage the commercial, mercantile
and manufacturing business of the
country. I do contend that they average lip with the rest. They come
from the same general stock, and
their education—whether in book-
learning or in the school of hard
knocks—is equal to that of other
men. So far as I know, they work
just as hard. It is only fair to
assume that they are fully up to tlie
average of intelligence.
No one has to tell a railway man
that If he doesn't put his motive
power in good condition, he is bound
to suffer when bad weather comes,
or when he has a rush of business.
He knows that perfectly well. The
inevitable question with him always
,is, "iTnere is the money coming
from?" If he doesn't make a good
showing in low operating expenses
and a safe margin between expenses
and earnings, his credit suffers and
he can't borrow any more money to
buy new cars and engines. The constant question with every railway
manager Is how close he can cut
his expenses and still not go beyond
the danger line of a safe reserve.
If lasl winter had been a normal winter, or, like some of the winters we
have had recently, abnormally mild,
most of the railways in the country
would have come through quite comfortably, it so happened that it was
an abnormally had winter, and,
therefore, even roads that were well
equipped suffered seriously. Indeed,
it is a remarkable tiling which mosl
ruilway men fully appreciate, that
tlie margin is very narrow between
between close and successful operation on the one band, and overload-
i ed facilities, with demoralized oper-
I ation, on the other.
Railway Regulations
Most thinking men today, whether
in railway service or not, are convinced that the regulation of public
service corporations, including the
railways, is necessary and desirable.
The only difference of opinion Is as
to how far this regulation should
go. In the last few months the shippers of the country have suffered
severely from the failure of the railways to furnish prompt and adequate
facilities; and I understand the object of this convention is to consider,
in a frank and free discussion, what
the causes of that failure have been.
In my bumble opinion, the causes,
stated  in  a  few  words—are  these:
Eastern Excursions—Low Rates
PRINCE  RUPERT  TO ALL
Points East
Montreal   and   Return   . . .9141.00
Toronto    and     Return   . . ,11127.60
New York nnd Return   . . .$14-l..-i(>
Chicago    and    Return   . . . $108.50
St.   Paul   and   Return  . . . .S9fl.no
St.   Louis   and   Return '. . .$100.00
Frequent  Selling   Dates—Final   Return Limit October 31st.
EQUALLY LOW RATES TO OTHER POINTS
' TRAVEL SOUTH
via
THE FAMOUS "PRINCESS LINE"
Princess  Royal
Every Sunday 6  P. M. Every Sunday
Princess  May  or  Princess  Sophia
Every Saturday 9   A. M. Every Saturday
J. G. McNAB, General Agent. PRINCE RUPERT
Agency for all Atlantic Steamship Lines.
ii
ii
i>
' To Rent front offices in Exchange Block, lately oc-
ii
•
Exchange Block 3rd Ave and 6th St
PRINCE RUPERT, B. C.   "
C. D. NEWTON
REAL   'ESTATE
cupied by Carss & Bennett.    Also inside offices;
STEAM  HEATED   !	
P. O. BOX 226.
CONTRACTORS, and MINING MACHINERY, and SUPPLIES, BUILDING MATERIALS, Gasoline Engines, Marine Engines, CONCRETE
MACHINERY, Rails, Wheels, Axles, etc. CANADIAN RAND CO.'S
PRODUCTS, Motor Vehicles.* Trucks, Fire Rope, Steel, etc. Boilers, Agricultural Implements, Hoists, Teaming & Dump, Wagons.
Third ATepe a H- handle. JR
P.O. Box 436
Manufacturers  Agent
PRINCE RUPERT, B. C.
Phone* 131
Blue 326
!.i" I   I'll
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
SIR HDMUND WALKER, C.V.O., LL.D., D.C.L., President
ALEXANDER LAIRD. General Manager
CAPITAL - $10,000,000 REST. -   $8,000,000
DRAFTS ON FOREIGN COUNTRIES
Every branch of Tha Canadian Baak of Commerce is equipped to issue drafts on
the principal cities in tha foUawiaf countries' without delay s
Xfrica data Cm New Ze
Arabia Cola Holloas! Norway
Argentina Kaaasssc Denmark IceUssi Panama
Australia Egypt India Persia
Austria-Huasjswy Faroe lalasaas Irdassi Peru
Belgium Fiolaad •   Italy Philippine
Brazil Formosa lapaa Portugal
Bulgaria Praaos Jan Roumasua
Cevlan Fi'ds Cocksa China Malta Russia
Chili Germany Manchuria Serria
China Great Britain Mexico Siam
The amount of these drafts is stated irfthe ssroney of the country where they are payable ; that is they are drawn in sterling, franca, narks, lira, kronen, florins, yen,
taels, roubles, etc., as the.case may be. This ensures that the payee abroad will
receive the actual amount intended. A233
J. M. CHRISTIE, Manager Prince Rupert Hranch
Siberia
Soudan
South Africa
Spain
Straits Settlements
Sweden
Switzerland
Turkey ,
United States
Uruguay
West Indies, ate.
GASOLINE ENGINES
MoINTYRE BLOCK
ASK US ABOUT THEN
PHONE 245
CANADIAN GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY, LTD. c»hi?irney
I See our MAHOGANY BEDROOM FURNI-
S TURE with Sanitary Mahoganized Brass
|   -   -   -    Bedsteads to match   -   -
i NEW  SHOW  ROOMS ON  SECOND AVENUE
In every branch of house furnlihing we are well equipped.    Call
and  see  our  stock.
The Big Furniture Store
Jiid   Avenue
Corner of 2nd Ave. & 6th St.
Xru>r>rj<H>r>ofl0rj<H>r>r>r>r>r^^ CKKHSO
from 1,200 to 1,500 staybolts, between four and five inches apart,
on all sides of the firebox. Under
the law, five broken staybolts are
sufficient to condemn an engine.
This means that a locomotive boiler
must, be more than 99 per cent perfect to meet approval; and yet it
Is safe to say that no high-pressure
boiler can be cooled down and reheated again (as If for each washing
out) without breaking at leaqt this
number of staybolts. In my early
railway experience in locomotive
shops, we used to consider that if
there were not more than five stay-
bolts In one cluster broker, the engine was safe; and I do not recall
the bursting of a boiler due to broken staybolts In the side sheets of
an engine. The worst effect of such
broken staybolts would be the bulg
ing of the sheet and consequent serious leakage of the engine.
The bursting of a fire tube or flue
in an engine Is a common thing, and
in old days it used to be considered
good practice to plug such a flue
and to run the engine until the
damage could be repaired. Under
the rules today, no engine is permitted to run out of a terminal with
a burst flue. Thus, without going
into further details, it is safe to say
that the present law in regard to
boiler inspection will require the
railways of the country to maintain
from 15 to 5 per cent more power
to move the same volume of freight
than was formerly necessary, and yet
this law became effective at very
short notice.
A number of other laws have add-
(Continued on Page Three)
For all kinds of
-■good - -
Insurance
SEE
GEO. LEEK
618 Third Ave.        Phone 200
Prince   Rupert
JEREMIAH H. KUGLER, Limited
SECOND   AVENUE
Prince Rupert, R. C.
The Club
An up-to-date Barber Shop
which caters to the fastidious.
The most modern shop north
of Vancouver
Six Chairs ' Experienced
Hatha Barbers
THE WESTHOLME BLOCK
Seoml Avenue
"DOC"   DEMERS,  Mgr.
ar>»<KHMH^r«KrrKHicHW»Oi«mi»
¥¥+#4MMMMMMMMMp<
I  THE IDEAL
I Mn'i Funishiig But and Shoe
I Hwe
j   Uarr$ Smith*
i 3rd and 7th Street*
t Corliss Coon Collars,   Everythiij
| for the Working M.»
*******#*lHr*******#******»r
HAYNER BROS
Pioneer Funeral Directors and
Enibnlmci's.      Open   Day   and
Night.     Ladies'    Assistant   in
Attendance
PHONE 86.    710 THIRD AVE.
NOTICE TO LEASE
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Coast, Range Five
TAKE NOTICE that we, Geo. A.
Young and Fred E. Juggins, intend
to apply for permission to lease the
following described foreshore: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
northeast boundary of Lot 992, on
Ice Berg Bay, Naas River, and about
two thousand feet north of Chamber's Creek; thence south 60 chains,
following high water mark; thence
east 10 chains; thence north 60
chains, following low water mark;
thence west 10 chains to point of
commencement.
GEO. A. YOUNG and FRED E. JUGGINS.
Located. April 15, 1912. m3
TENDERS  WANTED  ' 0
Tenders will be received by the
undersigned up to 5 p. m., Tuesday,
June 4, for the delivery of about
1,000 Tons of Cast Iron Pipe, from
the Government Wharf to localities
as stated In specifications, copies of
which may he obtained from the City
Engineer.
The lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted.
Tenders to be marked "Pipe Do-
livery."
ERNEST A.  WOODS,
29>-30 City Clerk.
TENDERS WANTED
Tenders for the tearing down of
the present post office building will
be received by the undersigned.
The building is to be vacated Monday. The tearing down of it must
be* done Immediately following the
vacating of it without delay.. Information can be obtained at the
pott office.
ROBT.  L.   MCINTOSH.
f w Neat Job Printing
an the Journal Man
Tel. 138 -HP-
Thursday, May 30, 1912.
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
RAILWAYS' TROUBLES
(Continued from Page Two)
ed very much to the cost of railway
operation and maintenance, such,
for example, as the safety appliance
act, in regard to freight cars, the
mail compensation order, the automatic ash pan law, the steel mail
car law, the third brakeman law in
some states. ,
Economic Conditions
It is, perhaps, unnecessary to
dwell on the fact that the cost of
living has Increased in the last five
or ten years and that the railways
have fell this very seriously. The
principal "food" of tlie railway Is
coal, ties, lumber, steel rails, Iron,
etc. There bus been a general advance in the price of practically all
articles used by railways, from the
low level of '93 to the present day,
with the one exception of cement.
The advance in the cost of coal and
In the cost of ties has been very
great in this period. The railways
have had nothing to offset this advance in the cost of material and in
the cost of doing business, except
economy in railway service incident
to the increased volume of business
and increased efficiency of railway
operation—handling of larger train
units, etc. But, In spite of all efforts, it has been impossible in the
last few years to stem the tide in
many cases. Railway freight rates
have been substantially stationary
for a number of years. Up to eight
or ten years ago, they moved progressively downward. Perhaps
some rates are too high today, and
railway men would be inclined to
admit this in particular cases; but
with the public attitude opposed to
the advancing of any rate, no traffic
manager or executive officer would
dare to lower a rate, even if he
thought it would encourage the volume of business and consequent
earnings.
Passenger rates in all the states
of the Middle West, and north of
the Ohio River, have been reduced,
generally to a level of 2 cents per
mile; and yet the demand of communities for low rates on special
occasions is Just as great as ever
it was. It is almost unnecessary to
point out that In the days when
.3 cents was the regular fare for ordinary travel, the railways were
ready to give half rates, and even
lower, for special occasions', to stimulate travel, etc.; but with the maximum fare reduced to 2 cents, it Isn't
possible to do this.
To add to our other difficulties,
railway taxation has advanced steadily upward for a long period, of time,
and in this respect the state of Michigan has taken the lead and has
well nigh taxed the railways out of
existence. It would be a hold man
who would project the building of a
steam railway in the state of Michigan today, in the light of your very
drastic taxation methods. Undoubtedly, yon can bold on to what you
have got, because a railway isn't
like a factorf—it can't pull up stakes
■and go somewhere else. Even
though it may be unfortunately located and prove to its owners a liability, rather than an asset, it must
go on and on, assessing and reassing
its owners until enough money has
been put in the foundation to make
a superstructure which will sustain
itself.
It is a favorite theme with a certain class of politicians to tell of the
fabulous profits of railways. They
do not tell of the fortunes that have
been lost in ralways, of the frequent
reorganizations, nor of the wiping
■out of capital actually Invested. Because we are a hopeful nation, and
because there is always a fresh crop
of investors coming alon, there 's
always new money to be found to
refinance an old property or to float
a new one; but there has been a
marked checking of the enthusiasm
in this direction.
Few people, apart from those engaged in finance, comprehend the
content requirement of railways for
cash for development work. The
needs of this country in normal
years are not far from five hundred
millions per year. Now, this money
must be drawn from the investor—
the banker, the trustee, the insurance company and the savings bank
—by the issuance of .securities,
backed by a valid promise of repayment of the principal and a fair rate
'of interest on the investment. The
railway cannot sell securities—that
is to say, borrow money—without
credit, It has no credit unless Its
operations show a fair profit; it cannot show a fair profit if starved and
strangulated by legislation; and who
suffers most? The public, whose
servants the legislatures and the
commissions are. In this endless
chain of circumstance, what is the
answer?
My conclusion Is that the only
remedy in the situation Is co-opera
tion. The railways do not complain
of supervision so 'ong ts that supervision is intelligent and takes a fair
share of the responsibility for its
acts. When a man or a body of men
negotiate for an interest whicli they
represent, it is their duty to do the
best they can for their client; but
it is never advisable to press the
bargain so far that the service demanded cannot be performed undere
the conditions of the bargain. There
Is such a thing as "killing the goose
that lays the golden eggs." Railway
men sometimes complain (and certainly with some show of justice)
that the legislature and commissions
have only one Interest, viz., to drive
a sharp bargain for the benefit of
the public, and thereby acquire
merit In the public estimation; but,
after, all, if the legislatures or com-
misstons take this view, It Is a1 very
short-sighted view, because obviously
if railway business is unprofitable
and continues In that condition for
several years, the public interests
of the country will suffer, just as
the interests of you gentlemen have
suffered this winter. 'You are calling a convention here to find out
what the trouble is. You are calling
on me for an expression of opinion,
and admit that my opinion is an ex
parte statement of the case; but I
have tried to be frank and straightforward with you.
But in the consideration of this
question it would not be for the
manufacturing and commercial interests to think that the Idea of government regulation is spreading. No
corporation can exist except by reason of charter rights from the government. There is scarcely a corporation but what sustains some public relation, and to which the broad
and elastic phrase so often used by
the courts, "affected with a public
use," applies. From little beginnings we shall soon find a greater
and greater disposition to extend the
limits of corporate control and supervision. And, while I shudder to
think of the multiplication of government bureaus, I think it is the
duty of business men to study the
problem in its broadest sense and
try to work out some method of
partnership between public interests
and private control, which shall produce the best results for all. In the
case of the railways, I think It would
be well for the public to see that It
Is essential that the capital invested
in railways should yield a fair return and that unless this condtion
exists, railways will be starved to
death and service will become poorer, instead of better.
Perhaps we shall never instill Into
the mind of the public this Idea of
the absolute need of co-operation,
unless there Is an actual sharing of
the profits. If, In lieu of taxation,
the public could have a share in the
net profits as is done in Chicago in
the case of the street railways'), we
would come nearer to faid conditions for all and the public would
appreciate that they were not only
indirectly, but also directly Interested
in prosperous conditions for the
railways. In this way, and perhaps
in no other way, will this hostile
legislation against railways cease—
legislation whicli with each succeed-
increasing earnings or diminishing
ing year puts upon them new burdens and exactions, yet affords no
means to the railway manager for
expenses.
ML M. STEPHENS & CO., LTD.
Offer   the   following   subject   to
prior sale without notice:
Section One
Lots 7 and 8, block 5; $G,000;
$2,000 cash; 6, 12 and 18 months.
Lots 3 and 4, block 8; $10,000; one-
third cash;  9 and  15 months.
Lot 4, Block 9; $6,500; $1,500 cash;
1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 years at 6 per cent.
Lots 30 and 31, Block 29; $6,000;
one-third cash; 6, 12 and 18
months.
Lot 46, block 29; $6,250; half cash;
6 and 12 months.
Section Two
Lots 50 and 61, block 12; $1,100
each; $415 cash; balance G. T. P.
Lot 26, block 12; $1,800; $675 cash;
balance G. T. P.
Lot 1, block 15; $1,650; $650 cash;
balance G. T. P.
Section  Five
Lot 39, block 22; $1,600; $800 cash;
6 and 12 months. Has house rented for $12  per month.
Lots 41 and 44, block 27; $750 each;
half cash;  6 and 12  months.
Lot 8, block 29;' $600; $350 cash;
6 and 12 months.
Lot 6, Block 13; $2,000; $500 cash;
1, 2, and 3 years at 6 per cent.
Section Six
Lot 38, block 22;   $960;  half cash;
6 and 12 months.
Lot 27, block 29; $1,000; half cash;
6 and 12 months.
Lot 30, block 29; $1,100; half-cash;
6 and 12 months.
Section Seven
Lots  11  and  12,  block   5;   $1,000;
half cash;  6 and  12 months.
Lot  27, block  6;   $750;   half cash;
6 and 12 months.
Lots   6   and   6,   block   11;   $1,500;
half cash; 6 and 12 months.
Lots   3   and   4,   block   19;   $1,700;
half cash; 6 and 12 months.
Lot 18, block SO;   $600;  half cash;
6 and 12 months.
Lot 16, block  35;   $800;  half cash;
j     6 and 12 months.
Section Eight
Lot 10, block  4;   $600;   $200  cash;
6 and 12 months.
Lot 31 and 32, block 15;$600 pair;
half cash;  6 and 12 months.
Lots 29 and 30, block 15; $650 pair;
half cash;  6 and 12 months.
Lot 13, block 27;  $550;  $450 cash;
balance 6 months.
Lots 29 and 30; block 46; $750 pair;
half cash; 6 and 12 months.
FOR SALE
Steam laundry with buildings, machinery and two lots; complete and
in first class condition; $9,000; one-
third cash; balance 1 and 2 years.
A bargain for the right man.
FOR LEASE
50  feet,  Second  Avenue,  between
First and Second Street.
50 feet Third Avenue.
FOR   RENT
Steam heated offices in the Stephens  Block.
Offices In new Post Office Block,
now under construction.
FOR  RENT
The best steam heated apartments
in the city; 5 roomB, bath, private
hall, and all modern conveniences,
in Campbell Block. Walls are deafened. Excellent marine view. $50
and $45, with range and hot water
equipment.
FOR   SALE
160 acres finest land in Kitsumkalum Valley, $12.50 per acre.
See our lists.
Insurance written In all its
branches. See our new B. C. Life
policy.
Phone  222
M. M. STEPHENS & CO., LTD.
Office 623%  Third Ave.
P. O. Box 275
P.O. Box 436
Office Requisites of Every Description.
"UNDERWOOD" *"*S"5fi
Phone 131
"MACEY
»»
Typewriters for Hire
Inter-Inter Filing Systems
Office Furniture
NEW    TYPE    LOCOMOTIVE
No. 1114, Walshheart valve gear
consolidated, Pacific type, a big
triple drive wheel, trailer truck, high
speed locomotive, the first of its
kind to run out of Edmonton on
the Grand Trunk, rolled out of the
Union Station drawing passenger
train No. 2 at 9 o'clock this morning
with Engineer W. Ayer at the throttle and Robert Davidson feeding the
firebox, says Ihe Edmonton Capital.
Passengers going east on No. 2 this
morning had added Interest placed
to their journey by the fact that
No. 2 was being drawn by a new
type of locomotive, an engine built
last November and just arrived to
go into service, the first of its kind
in the west. Tonight a duplicate of
the big locomotive, making her
maiden trip from Edmonton this
morning, will come in on No. 1 and
will  haul No.  2 tomorrow morning.
Quite a crowd of interested people watched the new locomotive on
No. 2 roll up to the station this
morning and pull out on its race
down the line to the end of the division, a run of 126 miles.
WM. S. HAi.:.,, L. D. S. 0. D. 8.
'.-:    DENTIST   :-:
Crown and Bridge Work a specialty
All. dental operations skillfull)
treated. Gas and local anaesthetic!
administered for tbe painless ex
traction of teeth, Consultation free
Offices, Helgerson °k.. Prince Ruper'
Call or Send for Catalogue.
C.H.HANDASYDE,Jr.,   Third Avenue,  Prince Rupert, B.C
.".I!'I >
OUR
BEST   LEADER
Rexall Glycerine Soap
ISc the Cake.   You will cone back for more
REMEMBER THE GUARANTEE
C.H, ORME, The Pioneer Druggist
Telephone 82      The
■M^'jaW"**''.'  N-»jii
k Store
INSURANCE
Fire Insurance in Board Companies.—We Never Handled Any Other
Norwich Union Fire Ins. Society, Ltd., of Norwich, Eng. (Founded 1797.)
London Assurance Corporation, of London, Eng. (Founded 1720.)
Alliance Assurance Company, Ltd., of London, Eng. (Established 1806.)
Caledonian Insurance Company, of Edinburgh, Scotland. (The oldest Scottish Company. Founded 1824.
Canadian Fire Insurance Company—as Its name implies, purely Canadian.
Ask about our new policies In the British Columbia Life. They are
unequalled.
Our Accident policies pay triple benefits of accidents in travel.
EMPLOYERS   LIABILITIY
M. M. Stephens & Co., Limited
rCHIC
OAI LY
M EMOR AMDUM
• Of-tH EVENINGS UNT1U 9 CfcLOGt
LET US L0 4NI
You the Money at
5
PER
CENT
TO   BUI'
TO   BUILD
PAY OFF MORTGAGES
OP IMPROVE REAL ESTATE
SEE   OUR   PLAN
WRITE.   PHONE OR  CALL
The
Canadian Home
Investment
Co., Ltd.
Branch Office      Phone 365
Mclntyre Block
F. E. IHHOTSON, Supt.
HOTEL CENTRAL
ALL MODERN CONVENIENCES
The larg;st, best app inted Hotel
in Prince Rupert. First Class
i.'"' ae. European and American
plan. Best accommodation iu town.
Sun-: dinner a specialtj. Ask for
"tie)  .o the Cellar."
PETER BLACK.  Prop.
First Avenue niul Seventh Street
GRAND HOTEL
WORKINGMAN'S HOME
Free Labor Bureau in Connection
GEO. BRODERIUS, Prop.
Phone 178 1st Ave. and 7th St
PONY EXPRESS
Systematic Merchants' delivery Service. Baggage, Storage and Forwarding Agents.   For Rigs or Motor Car
DAY OR NIGHT
7th Ave. and Fulton Phone 801
Northern B. C.
Liquor Co.
The Leading Wholesalers of
Northern British Columbia
Exclusive Agents for
Budweiser  Beer
Phone 222
Office; 6 3 1-2 Third Ave.
LIGHT AND POWER
To supply all coming goon. Estimates given for supplying and fitting for
Light, Power, Bells, Phones, water Heaters, Etc. Stock of Lamps
Shades and General Electrical Supplies carried.
W. R. LOVE,   Electrical Contracting
P. O. Box 967
Fulton St. and. Third Ave.
Phone 41
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WESTHOLME LUMBER CO., LTD.
COMPLETE  LINE  OF
BUILDING SUPPLIES
i
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kirk**************************************************
COAL! Ladysmith COAL!
$8.80 PER TON DELIVERED
First Avenue
Telephone 186
1 '     PHONE 17
THIRD AVE & FIFTH    <'
WE MAKE A SPECIALTY OF BOTTLED GOODS FOR RETAIL TRADE
When replenishing your larder don't forget
The Family
Wine and Liquor Store
A complete lln"   of all tbe best   Wines   and   liquors
stock.   All orders delivered.
J. A. SMITH,
PROPRIETOR
In   ,,
New Wellington
COAL
FREE FROM DUST
DOES NOT CLINKER
ROGERS & BLACK
SECOND AVEXli:
PHONE 110 PHONE 110
Pioneer Steam Laundry
WHITE  LABOR  ONLY
DO AWAY  WITH THIS!
Prompt  Service       Reasonable   Rales
Goodo Culled   for  and   Delivered
I'tlolH     II"
11. C irdon Munro   W, Nlc'olson l.alley
MUNRO & LAILEY
ARCHITECTS
PRINCE RUPERT, B. C.
P. O. ROT  14 PRINCE RUPKRT
New Knox Hotel
BESNER & BESNER
Proprietors
THE NEW KNOX HOTEL is run
on the Eii-opean plan. First clau
service. All the latest modern Improvements.
THE BAR keeps only the belt
brands of  liquors  and  cigars.
THE CAFE is open from G:30 a.m.
to 8 p.m. Excellent cuisine. Firft
class service.
Rooms 50c and up.
FIRST AVE. PRINCE RUPERT
FOR   SALE
High Class Bell Piano Player
(Autonola); practically new; in first
class condition. Can be seen at 618
Fifth  Avenue East.
LINDSAYS CARTAGE&STORAGE
Q. T. P. CARTAGE AGENTS
Office at H. B. Rochester, Centre St
LADYSMITH COAL
is handled by us.  All orders receive
prompt attention.  Phone No. (8.
BOWLING, BILLIARDS AND POOL
4 Alleys, 7 Tables. A good exercise.
A clean sport. Ladles every afternoon. Newman Block, between 6tb
and 7 th Streets.
TBI) MORRISON
Proprietor and Manager
I Customs Broker j
|    STORAGE   I
;.   Forwarding,   Distributing   and  J
% 3hipping  Agent -:
f   Special attention given to stor- *
•:•   age  of   Household   Goods  and  *
■* *
+
t
* DOUGLAS        SUTHERLAND    *
.;. ..<.
%   First   Ave.   Near   McBride   St.   %
* P. O. Box 007 Phone 262  +
•:• +
•:• ♦
.'?'!•'> ft t •> T *'.' ♦ "J* * *!' 'I' * *> *> *> •!• •!• ♦ •)• * & "fr
J.  W. POTTER, L.R.I.B.A.
ARCHITECT     AND     STRUCTURAL
ENGINEER
Re-Inforced Concrete a Specialty
—o—
P. O. Box 271
E. L.  FISHER
Funeral Director & Embalmer
CHARGES   REASONABLE
817 THIRD AVE.  PHONE 88fl
OPEN DAY AND NIGHT
m
■   J.H.HILDITCH
Contractor and Builder
Estim itc given on a.I r asses of
work, whether mm 'I or huge. Personal hi lent ion given to ever* Rem.
PHONE GREEN 321.
FREDERICK PETERS, K. C.
A. FAULDS, M.I. M.E.
Consulting   Mining   Engineer
Examinations   and   development   on
Coal, Metal, Oil, etc.
709 Duusmulr St.      Vancouver, B. C.
RITCHIE & AGNEH
.nil  Engineers
Dominion nnd British Columbia Land
Surveyors.  Mine Surveyors. Reporti,
Estimates and Surveying
OFFICE:   Rand   Bldg,   Second   Ave.
TRY   A   WANT  AI)
Barrister, Solicitor and Notary I'ubllo
Office In
EXCHANGE  BLOCK
J. W. SHIRLEY
Locator, Timber Cruiser,  Valuator
P.  O.   Box  003
A   few  choice   Farming  Locations
left close In.
LAND   CLEARED   BY   CONTRACT.
Choice Nursery   Stock   for  sale.
Taylor St. Prince Rlipcrt
J. L. PARKER
MINING ENGINBrR
Prince Rupert, B. C.
Open for Conrul'atlon and Mln«
Examination
Temporary Addresi: —
Prince Rupert Inn PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL.
Thursday, May 30, 1912.
SCOTCH RED DEER
Animals will be Secured in   Scotland
to be Brought to British
Columbia.
Game  Animals   Will  Re  Introduced
Into   the  Const  District
This Fall
The famous red deer of the Scottish Highlands are to be bred in British Columbia to form an addition to
the native species as an attraction
for the hunter. Two herds of these
famous deer, one from the estate of
the Duke of Sutherland and another
from the Scottish estate of C. J. Lucas of Warnliam Court, Sussex, are
already arranged by Provincial
Game Warden Byran Williams and
will reach British Columbia early in
September. News that the herds are
now being prepared for the long
ocean and rail journey from Scotland to British Columbia was received the past week.
When the animals reach here special precautions will be taken to
safeguard them from the ravages of
the cougar, to which they would fall
an easy prey. Generations of warfare with the cougar have resulted
in our own mule deer exercising cau.
tion against their natural enemy. Instances are known where the mule
deer has even killed a cougar in
open combat. The red deer for many
generations will have to be more or
less protected until they acquire and
develop instinct to be wary of the
cougar and develop the ability to
meet his tactics of prey.
It Is proposed as soon as the animals reach Vancouver to have them
transferred to the grounds of the provincial asylum at Coquitlam. They
■will be kept there for a year or two
to become properly acclimatized and
accustomed to the native grasses. At
home they feed largely on heather
and deer grass but no difficulty is
anticipated over their feeding.
Herds that were taken to New Zealand some years ago quickly acclimatized, and have now multiplieds to
an enormous extent.
Later on it Is proposed to remove
the animals In smaller herds to some
of the coast islands where natural
protection will be afforded them.
Graham Island and some of the lesser islands of the Queen Charlottes
will probably be enriched by some
of these beautiful game animals, it
is hoped that within a few years to
be able to promise visiting sportsmen, in addition to bear, _moose,
mountain goat and native deer, a
chance to go stalking the red deer
in the manner familiar to hunters
in the Scottish Highlands.
 o	
QUADRA'S WIRELESS
Smelter Company that a big plant
would be erected there to mine the
ore found in that vicinity, all the
steamship companies are including
the Inlet in the list of ports of call.
The Quadra is lying at Esquimau
and the finishing touches are now
being added to her. The repairing
of the steamer has been carried out
by the navy department, and when
she enters service about the end of
the week she will be in the best of
condition. She has been cleaned and
painted inside and outside, and a new
set of wireless instruments and a
powerful searchlight have been Installed on her. Her new wireless
will have a much larger range than
the old one, and when running up
the coast she will never be out of
communication with the land stations.
— o ——
Double
Weekly
Service
mm
mm
Double
Weekly
Service
S. S. "Prince Rupert" and "Prince George"
for Vancouver, Victoria,  Seattle,   Mondays  and  Fridays,   0   a.   m,
S. S. "PRINCE JOHN"—Weekly  service  to   Port  Simpson,  Naas,
Stewart, Granby Bay and Queen  Charlotte Islands.
Trains   leave   for   Vanarsdol   Mondays, Wednesdays, Saturdays at
1 p. m.    Frequent connections with river steamers for Hazelton.
-    For fall  information  apply to
A. E.  M< MASTER, General Agent.'
Office on Centre Street. Agent Atlantic Steamship Lines.
Government   Steamer,    Which    Will
Come  North,  Will  Be  in
Land Coiiiiuuniratioii
Upon Ihe completion of the overhauling of the goverenment steamer Quadra at Esquimau, Capt. Mac-
nherson, she will be given an assignment in tlie north. She is to establish three spar buoys and a day mark
at Observatory Inlet. Since the announcement    made   by   the   Granby
OLYMPIC   TRIALS
The British Columbia trials for
the Olympic games, which will commence at Stockholm, Sweden, the last
week in June, and continue practically throughout July, were held at
Brockton Point, Vancouver. There
was not a very large attendance of
athletes, only two men competing in
each event, with the exception of
the mile run, the quarter-mile and
the weights. The athletes, as given
below, were chosen to participate in
the All-Canadian trials, which will
be held in Montreal on June 8.
Frank McConnell, Vancouver—
100 yards and 220 yards.
Dune Gillis, Vancouver—Hammer
and discus.
Tom  Gallon, Victoria—440  yards.
H. B. Beasley, Victoria—100
yards.
H. R. Chandler (reserve), Vancouver—10,000 metres.
The city of Victoria will be asked
to contribute $400 towards the expenses of sending these athletes to
I compete in the all-Canadian Olympic
| trials at Montreal on June 8. The
city of Vancouver has already pledged itself to contribute $500.
One of the surprises of the trials
on Saturday was the failure of Jack
| Hoult, the Columbian College athlete, to win the quarter mile dash.
Following is a summary of .the
trials:
100 yards dash—Frank McConnell, V. A. C; H. B. Beasley, J. B.
A. A.    Time, 10 seconds.
220 yards dash—Frank McConnell; H. B. Beasley. Time, 22 2-5
seconds..  A new B. C. record.)
440 yards—Tom Gallon, ,T. B. A.A.
Time, 51 1-5 seconds.
One mile—Alex. Macdonald, V. A.
C; Carl Raine, Y. M. C. A.; W. Day,
Victoria. Time, 4 minutes 43 seconds.
Half mile—A. Copping, Vancouver; Jack Hoult, New Westminster.
Time, 17 2-5 seconds.
Five miles—W. Chandler, V. A.
C; Cameron Smith, Y. M. C. A.
Time, 26 minutes, 8 3-5 seconds.
Discus—Dune Gillis, 123 feet 11
inches; J. Cameron, P. M. B. A.,
116 feet 11 inches; A. McDiarmid,
V. A. C, 112 feet.
 o	
Subscribe ■ for the Prince Rupert
Weekly Journal, $2.00 a year.
The British Columbia Company
LIMITED.
AUTHORIZED CAPITAL $100,000.:: PAID UP CAPITAL *41,500
DIRECTORS:—Reginald C. Brown, President; J. C. Maclure, Vice-
President; H. B. Marks, Managing Director; Capt. E. Na»h, William
McNalr, R. A. Bevan, and F. C.   Williams, Secretary.      :-:      :•:
INTEREST 4 PER CENT. DEPOSITS
Thin Company acts as Executors, Administrators, Transferees and
Secretaries to Public Companies.   Commercial, Industrial and other
business propositions underwritten.    Issues made  on  the
London and New York Stock Ezchangei.
TIMBER, COAL, LANDS, and
COMPANY ORGANIZATION
Head Office for Canada, 203, 'MS, 210, 215 Cartel --Cotton Building,
VANCOUVER, B.C.
ROYAL  NAVAL  COLLKGJ
CANADA, HALIFAX, N. S.
OF
The next examination for the entry of Naval Cadets will be held at
the examination centre of the Civil
Service Commission in November,
1912; parents or guardians of intending candidates should apply to
the Secretary, Civil Service Commission, Ottawa, for entry papers before
1st October next.
Candidates must be between the
ages of 14 and 1C on 1st October,
1913.
Cadets are trained for appointment as Officers in the Naval Service, the course at the College being
two years, followed by one year In
a Training Cruiser, after which
Cadets are rated Midshipmen.
Further details can be obtained
on application to undersigned.
G. J. DESBARATS,
Deputy Minister, Department of the
Naval   Service. n-12
Department   of   the   Naval   Service,
Ottawa, May 6th, 1912.    —22868
»«<BWKHWJittHKHKH«HWKHWK(^
EVERY PACKAGE OF
BurrelVs White Lead and
Linseed Oil
IS MARKED "WARRANTED GENUINE" and is
guaranteed absolutely pure.
Sole Agents in Western Canada
The Staneland Co. Ltd
q$ 836-840 Fort Street, VICTORIA, B.C. 6<1
Royal Bank of Canada j
HEAD OFFICE-MONTREAL                              ESTABLISHED  1869 8
Surplus         $7,200,000    • 3
Capital  .     90,200,000 o
Total Assets $100,000,000 |
. Savings   Bank   Department—$1 Will Open an Account J
Branches Throughout Canada and  Banking  Connectlsns  With  All 8
Parts of the United States «
Agents Throughout the World o
i                                   H. P. WILSON, Manager Prince Rupert Branch 2
a S
WHHW3H#KHramHKH>0*HKWrKHKBra<W^^
GEO   D. TITE
Complete Hwise Furnishings
We especially draw your  attention  to our  splendid  assortment of
Carpet Squares
In WILTONS, AXMIN8TBR BRI SSELS AND TAPESTRIES,
Lastest Colorings and  Designs
Special Sale of Wider Chairs and
Rockers for this Week
Regular  Value  $7.50  and  $7.no,  for .Si.-,.,-iO
WICKER  ROCKERS without   arms;   regular   value,   $r,'no.
Sale Price       $1.00
SEE WINDOWS FOR DISPLAY
BUFFETS,   CHINA   CABINETS,   DINING   TABLES,   LEATHER
SEATED OAK CHAIRS, In a dozen designs to select from.
Blankets, Sheets, Pillows and Comforts
A  LARGE  ASSORTMENT  ALWAYS   ON   HAND.
i'lione  20
P.  O.   Box  1502
U-
Real Estate
Offering
Lot  on   Second   Avenue,   Section   1,
$2,500.
Lot on Beach Place, $1,900.
Modern house and lot on Frasen St.,
Block 32,  $5,500.
Lot on   Second  Avenue,  Section   2,
$1,500.
Two lots on Sixth Avenuo, Section 5,
$2,250 each.    Easy terms.
Two lots  on   Sumnill   Avenue,   $530
each.
House nnd lot on Seventh Avenue for
$1,800.    Easy terms.
Double   corner   on   Seventh   Avenue.
Section   6,  $3,600.
Lot 9,  Block   19.  Section  (I,  $2,700.
Easy terms.
Lot  S,   Block   8,  Section   6,   $1,205.
$715   cash,
j Two lots on Eighth Avenue, Section
G, $950  each.    Easy terms.
Lot on Sixth Avenue, Block 15, Section 7, $1,275.    Easy terms.
Lot 14, Block 7, Section 7, $635.
Lots 2 and 3, Block 40, Section 7,
$1,800 pair.    Easy terms.
FOR RENT
Furnished   house   in  Section   1,   $50
per month.
furnished  house on  Borden  Street.
$60 per month.
Four-room  house with  bath, Section
6, $25 per month.
Terrace
We are solo agents In Prince Rupert
for Terrace townsite lots.
Ten-acre   tracts   adjoining   Terrace
on easy terms.
INSURANCE.
McCaffery & Gibbons
THIRD   AVENUE
I
FOR  SALE
Household goods, and house for
rent. 919 Ambrose Avenue. Phone
^reen   321.
NAVAL SERVICE OF CANADA
Sale by Tender of Steamer
"Kestrel"
SEALED TENDERS addressed to
the undersigned and accompanied by
a certified cheque for $500 will be
received up to noon on Wednesday
the third day of July, 1912, for the
purchase of the Canadian Government Ste.iiner "Kestrel," lately employed Fishery Protection duties on
the British Columbia Coast and now
lying at H.M.C. Dockyard, Esquimau,
B.  C.
Forms of tender, conditions of sale,
full particulars of the Steamer and
permission to inspect her may be obtained on application from the Officer in charge, H.M.C. Dockyard, Esquimau, B. C.
Unauthorized   publication   of  this
advertisement will not be paid for.
G.  J.  DESBARETS,
Deputy Minister.
Department   of   the   Naval   Service,
Ottawa, May 3, 1912. —22725
SYNOPSIS OF CANADIAN NORTH.
WEST   LAND   REGULATIONS.
Any person who is the sole head of
a family, or any male over 18 years
old, may homestead a quarter section (160 acres more or less! of
available Dominion Ianr! in Manitoba, Satskatchewan or Alberta. The
applicant must appear in person at
the Domiuion Lands Agency or Sub-
Agency for the district. Entry by
proxy may he made at any agency,
on certain conditions, by father,
mother, son, daughter, brother or
sisier of Intending homesteader.
DUTIES.—SU month's residence
upon and cultivation of the land in
each of three years. A homesteader
may live within nine miles of his
homestead on a farm of at least 80
acres solely owued and occupied by
him or by his father, mother, son,
daughter, brother or sister.
In certain districts a homesteader
in good standing may pre-empt a
quarter section alongside his homestead. Price $3.00 per acre. Duties.—
must reside six months In each of
six years from date oi homestead
entry (Including the time required to
earn homestead patent) and cultivate fifty acres ex^ra.
A homeslcadf'1 who nas exhausted bis homestead right and cannot obtain a pre-emption may take
a purchased homestead in certain districts. Price $3 per acre. Duties.—
Must reside six months In each of
three years, cultivate fifty acres, and
erect a house worth $300.
W. W. CORY,
Deputy of  the  Minister  of  the  Interior.
N. B.—Unauthorized publication
of this advertisement will not be
paid for
MAIL CONTRACT
SEALED TENDERS, addressed to
the Fostmaster General, will be received at Ottawa unt' noon, on Friday, the 9th August, 1912, for the
conveyance of His Majesty's Mails,
on a proposed Contract for two (2)
years, fortnightly each way, between
Alynansh and Kitsumkalum, from
the Postmaster General's pleasure.
Printed notices containing further
Information as to conditions of proposed   Contract   may   be   seen   and
bland forms of Tender may be obtained  at  the  Post  Offices  of  Kitsumkalum,  Terrace,  Prince  Rupert,
Naas   Harbour,   Kincolith,   at   Mrs.
Ross' Dominion Telegraph Office, at
Rev. J. B. McCullough, Aiyansh and
at the office of the undersigned.
E.  H.  FLETCHER,
Post Office Inspector.
Post  Office  Inspector's  office,  Victoria, B. C, May 10, 1912.     '
"CIVIL SERVICE ACT"
The qualifying examinations for
Third-class Clerks, Junior Clerks and
Stenographers will be held at the
following places, commencing on
Tuesday, tbe 2nd July next:—Armstrong, Chilliwack, Cumberland,
Duncan, Golden, Grand Forks, Kam-
loops, Kaslo, Kelowna, Ladysmith,
Nanaimo, Nelson, New Westminster,
Peachland, Prince Rupert, Penticton,
Revelstoke, Rossland, Salmon Arm,
Summerland, Vancouver, Vernon, and
Victoria.
Candidates must be British subjects between the ages of 21 and 30,
if for Third-class Clerks; and between 16 and 21, if for Junior Clerks
or Stenographers.
Applications will not be accepted
if received later than the 15th June
next.
Further information, together with
application forms, may be obtained
from the undersigned.
Section 7 of tlie "Civil Service Act"
provides that temporary clerks and
stenographers, who have not been
regularly appointed by Order in
Council, must puss this examination.
P. WALKER,
Regisi ir, Civil Service.
Victoria, B. C , Mi ' 1, 1912. 1yl7
FOR RENT
Desirable four-room suite in Rand
Block, corner Fifth Avenue and Fulton Street. Also large airy store and
offices on Second Avenue. Very reasonable rent.
C.  D. RAND
311 Second Avenue
L.O.L.
Meets second and fourth  Friday in
each month In K. of P. Hall.
Helgerson, Blk., 3rd Ave and 6th f<t
Recording Secretary, Box 32-t.
Photn   150
THE INSURANCE PEOPLE
Fire
Life
Marine
Accident
Plttlc GIssb
Employers'  Liability
Contractors &  Personal  Bonds
Policies    Written     Direct
The Mack Realty & Insurance
COMPANY
P.S.—Houses and Rentals
Coast    Land    District—District    of
Skeena, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that William
Nicholson Lniley, of Prince Rupert,
B. 0„ occupation Architect, intends
to apply for permission lo purchase
the following described lands:--
Commencing at a post, planted at the
southeast, corner of Lot. 76; thence
00 chains east; thence 20 chains
north; thence 60 chains west; thence
20- chains south to point of commencement; containing 120 acres,
more or less.
WILLIAM NICHOLSON LA1LEY.
D.  C.  Whlteford, Agent.
Daled  January   27,   1912. f2
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that I, Filippo
Panvlnl, Engineer, of Prince Rupert,
B. C, intend to apply for a licence
to prospect for coal and oil on the
west coast of Graham Island, on the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted om mile
east from the northeast corner of
coal licence 5582; thence 80 chains
west; thence 80 chains south; thence
80 chains east; thence 80 chains
north, to the place of beginning;
containing 640 acres.
m3 FILIPPO  PANVINI.
Located March  16, 1912.
Skeena    Lund    District—District   of
Queen  Charlotte  Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that I, Filippo
Panvinl, Engineer, of Prince Rupert,
B. C, intend to apply for a licence
to prospect for coal and oil on Ihe
wesl const of Graham Island, on the
following described hinds:—-Commencing at n post planted one mile
east from I lie northeast corner of
coal licence 5.182; tlience SO cliains
north; thence 80 chains west; thence
80 chains south; thence 80 chains
east, to tho place of beginning; containing 640 acres.
m3 FILIPPO   PANVINI.
Located March 16, 1912.
NOTICE
Lot Owners Attention
Acting under instructions from
the City Council, I call attention to
the necessity of lot holders, under
agreement from the Grand Trunk
Pacific Development company, to
completo their titles, and have the
same registered In the Land Registry
office before July 1st next. Owners
whose lots are not registered by that
time run the risk of being unable to
vote in Municipal matters, or being
eligible for the office of Mayor or
Alderman. The Council considered It proper that this question should
bu brought to the notice of the whole
public.
ERNEST A. WOODS,
8-14 City Crerk.
COMPANIES ACT
TRY A WANT AD
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Coast, Range Five
I, J. A. M. Faulds, Passenger
Agent, Vancouver, B. C, intend to
apply for permission to lease 320
acres of land, bounded as fol'ows:-—
Commencing at a post planted 40
chains south and 80 chains west of
southwest comer post of Lot 3997,
on the northern bank of the Skeena
River; thence west 40 chains; tlience
north 80 chains; thence east.
40 chains; thence south 80 chains to
point of commencement; containing
320 acres; staked by me on the
sixth  day  of April,  1912.
J. A.. M. FAULDS.
Alexander Faulds, Agent.
Dated April 6, 1912. a9
Re Grand Trunk Development Company,   Limited
NOTICE Is hereby given that after
one month after the flrsl appearance of this nollce, the above named
company, Grand Trunk Development
Company, Limited, will change its
name to "THE CHRISTIANSEN-
BRANDT COMPANY, LIMITED."
Dated at. Vancouver, B. C, this
23rd day of April, A.D. 1912.
CRAIG, BOURNE  &  McDONALD,
Solicitors for Grand Trunk Development Company, Limited. m2-lmo.
NOTICE
NOTICE Is hereby given that the
Northern   British   Columbia   Liquor
Company, Limited, Intends to apply
one month after the date hereof to
the  Registrar  of Joint  Stock  Companies at Victoria, B. C, to change
the name of this Company from the
"Northern  British  Columbia  Liquor
Company, Limited," to "The -Prince
Rupert   Importing   Company,   Limited."
Dated this 25th day of April, 1912.
J. COOPER,
Secretary   of   the   Northern   British
Columbia  Liquor  Company,   Limited. ii27-iii27

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