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Prince Rupert Journal Aug 30, 1910

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Array New WellinjUn
Coal
Is the best
ROGERS « BUCK
Sole Agents
ptinu Unpett
SEP 6    1910
VOLUME  1
Published Twice a Week
PRINCE RUPERT, B. C,  TUESDAY, AUGUST 30, 1910.
High-Claw
Job Printing
In all Lines
Price, Five Cents
NO 22.
CREDIT OF THE CITY
IN GOOD CONDITION
Bank of Montreal is Willing to Advance a Million Dollars
to Prince Rupert for Street Grading—Council
WU1 Accept Offer for Works of
Local Improvement.
The credit of the city of Prince
Rupert is good. This was evidenced
at the meeting of the council on Saturday evening when the result of the
investigations of the finance committee into the question of securing
funds to carry on the work of local
improvement. It was announced that
the Bank of Montreal, one of the conservative financial institutions of the
Dominion, was prepared to advance
the city $1,000,000 to carry on the
work. This has been proferred as
a result of negotiations between the
finance committee and the local manager, Mr. Claucy, who had referred
the matter to headquarters before
deciding. The money will be guaranteed on the credit of the whole city.
The finance committee presented
reports stating that the Bank of
Montreal had proferred to advance
the money for the carrying out of the
local improvement work in section
one and on Eighth avenue..
Aid. Pattullo said the Rank of
Montreal was prepared to advance
the money to carry on the work.
This money would have to be guaranteed on the credit of the whole
city. He gave this as information
so that the council would know
where  it was  at.
Aid. Hildltch thought that if the
credit of the city was to be Involved
In guaranteeing the improvements
carried out on the local improvement
system in Section one, he could not
see where the advantage under the
system came in. He believed that
It would have been better for the city
to hav borrowed the money and done
the work out of general revenue.
Aid. Pattullo said that if the improvements in section one were guaranteed by the whole city so would
th Improvements in the other sections   be   guaranteed.     He   believed
that the bonds when guaranteed on
the credit of the whole city would
sell quite as high aB if they represented a general loan.
Aid. Hildltch wished these reports
laid over. It would take some time
to consider.
His Worship said there was nothing to consider in this. The Finance
committee was Instructed to look
into the financial arrangements so
that they might go ahead with the
work.
Aid. Hi'ditch thought there was a
decided change In connection with
the borrowing as understood by the
city.
Aid. Lynch said he saw no change,
"le had understood all along that the
credit of the whole city might be
sought in these works of local improvement.
Aid. Pattullo was agreeable to let
the reports stand over.
Aid. Lynch moved the adoption of
the report and that the necessary
arrangements be made to secure the
necessary funds.
Aid. Hilditch said it appeared to
him that the report ca'led for the
passage of bylaws that the Bank of
Montreal dictated. He thought they
should wait until they saw what the
bank wanted.
Aid. Pattullo said all the bank
wanted was that the bylaws should
be in conformity with the municipal
clauses act. The bank was willing
to advance $1,000,000. This was a
considerable sum and the solicitors
of the bank must be satisfied that all
was in proper shape.
Aid. Lynch said he would try to
give Aid. Hilditch to understand
what the banks wanted. All the bank
wanted was an assurance that the
city would pass the necessary bylaws
to ensure the credit.
The motion carried.
COAL FIELDS DRAW
Investors  Look  Into   Possibilities
Measures on Queen Charlotte
Islands.
of
LOOKING INTO NEEDS
MAY INVEST HERE
Hon. Thos. Taylor Again   Visits
Constituency on Public
Duties.
This
Hugo Ross of Winnipeg,  is Pleased
With the City of Prince Rupert
And its Prospects
Hugo Ross, of Winnipeg, one of
the best known real estate dealers
and investors in Western Canada, has
been attracted to New British Columbia, which is the surest indicatbn
that the country of which Prince Rupert is the centre is very much in the
public eye. In company with G. K.
Killam, also of Winnipeg, Mr. Ross
visited the Queen Charlotte Islands
last week. His mission was for the
purpose of looking Into the coal properties on the Island in the vicinity of
the old Cowgitz where coal was mined in the early sixties.
Mr. Ross has mnde no purchase of
properties yet, his object being to
Inspect it. He prefers, however, to
wait until there has been more prospecting work done in the way of
drilling.
The reports of the engineers, he
says, are excellent, and he expects
to see considerable Interest manifested In these coal beds.
The old Cowgitz workings with
the remains of the primitive bunkers
and the tramways where supplies
for the British navy were taken out
years ago, all were very interesting
to Mr. Ross. He marvels that more
work has not been done to fully exploit the properties.
Mr. Ross and Mr. Killam visited
Stewart where the former is interested In the Red Cliff properties.
Mr. Ross, who is a real estate man
and Investor second to none in the
country, is well pleased with Prince
Rupert. He thinks that with the
work that will be done to bring the
city to a proper grade, etc., there will
be built up one of the most prosperous and at the same time pretty
cities in the west. His faith is un-
boundlng with regard to it.
He Has Goiiu With the Member of
the District to Queen Charlotte
Islands to Make Inspection
Hon. Thomas Taylor, minister of
works in the provincial government,
reached the city Sunday by the
Prince George. The same evening he
left with W. Manson, M.P.P., representing this constituency, and Road
Superintendent Jennings, for Queen
Charlotte Islands to inspect the work
being done there and look into the
needs of that portion of the province.
Before leaving Mr. Taylor visited
the new school house here and also
the government wharf. He expressed
his satisfaction with the character of
the work in both instances.
Mr. Manson last week made a trip
with Mr. Jennings to Stewart and
other parts of the constituency in
the north looking into the requirements. Near Stewart the member
will recommend that a new bridge
be built over the Bear river at Nine
Mile point. The cost will not he
great and the work would serve the
miners going into the mineralized
section, avoiding a long detour that
has now to be made and simplifying
the transportation question there.
 o	
AVEDDED ON SUNDAY
On Sunday afternoon the marriage
of Mr. A. O. Franks, of Hazelton,
formerly of this city, and Miss Alice,
daughter of Mr. H. Cameron, of this
city, was solemnized In the Church
of England. The ceremony was performed by Bishop Du Vernet, only
the immediate friends of the bride
and groom being present.
The bride was given away by her
father, while Mr. S. D. Macdonald
suported the groom. Mr. and Mrs.
Franks will take up their resldepce
near Hazelton.
Prominent French  Financiers Visit
City
The sons of two of the wealthiest
families in France have been in
Prince Rupert this week in the persons of Camllle Rlboud, of Lyons,
and Maurice de Schlumberger, of
Paris. Mr. Rlboud's father Is one of
the principal bankers In France, and
the visitors stated that their mission
to this country was to Investigate the
opportunities presented for capital,
and that in all probability a great
deal of French capital would flow
into British Columbia in the near
future.
Canada, however, is not their only
field of investment, for they are making a tour of the world, and where
ever prospects look bright they will
advise their principals in the Old
Country. They came to Prince Rupert on the invitation of C. M, Hays.
After this trip they will sail for
Honolulu, Japan and China.
NEARLY READY
Concentrator    at    Portland     Canal
Mines Will Soon Be in Operation
C. H. Dickie, managing director of
the Portland Canal Mining Company,
was a passenger on Sunday on the
Prince George on his way to Stewart. He was accompanied by Mrs.
Dickie. At Stewart the head of the
company will join the two other ul-
rectors of the corporation, Messrs.
Mara and Martin, and make a general inspection of the workings and
all the accessories. Mr. Dickie expects that he may remain there for
about a month and urint; Ms stay
expects to see the concentrator of
the company put into operation.
Everything is going along steadily
at the mine, he says,' and the prospects are good for a large production.
Mr. Dickie is the most conservative
of men, and abhors any attempt at
exaggeration with respect to the
mines.
DISSATISFIED WITH
RATE OF PROGRESS
G.T.P. Officials are   Perplexed to Know How  to Cope
With the Shortage of Labor offering at This
End of the Railway Line—Work
Is Far Behind.
The G.T.P. party left last night for c      It was quite evident that the offi-
the south after a week's stay in and ' cials were quite discouraged at the
about the city. On Sunday the
original party was joined by D'Arcy
Tate, the solicitor of tb« company,
who came north for the purpose of
transacting some legal business
which required his attention.
At the end of the week the party
made an interesting trip up the
Skeena. They proceeded by the railway line as far as that is completed
and then transferred to the river
steamer and went as far as the canyon. The trip was one of never ending delight to the visiting members
of the company who had never had
an opportunity to take in the scenery
along the river before. They were
all agreed that the Skeena would become one of the great tourist attractions of the place. Mr. Hunter, of the
well known shipbuilding firm, looked
forward to the time when the
Skeena would be dredged In order
to accommodate shipping and assist
in the carrying trade to the interior
of the province.
There was no denying the fact,
however, that the men who were directly interested in the work of having the railway constructed, came
back from the trip disappointed. Mr.
Hays and Mr. Chamberlin, and also
Mr. Smithers, the chairman of the
board, were all agreed that the outlook from the standpoint of construction was most discouraging. The end
was nowhere in sight.
Mr. Chamberlin, in reply to a question "How is the work getting
along?" replied "Not getting along
at all." The whole trouble Is labor,
they say. The contractors find it impossible in spite of the fact that the
men are being treated In the very
best way possible in the matter of accommodation and board, to get
enough labor to prosecute the work
in any'hlng like a satisfactory way.
Mr. Chamberlin, whose statement
was corroborated by Mr. Hays, says
that the work is away behind. It
should at the present time be so far
advanced that they would be delivering the supplies where they could he
hauled to the camps as far as Aider-
mere. Failure to do as It should he
at this time means that the work Is
now a year behind.
situation and were perplexed to know
what move to make to cope with the
situation.
At the other end of the line, Mr.
"humberlin says the conditions are
different and while they are not getting more men than they' need they
are coming near to the requirements
in the matter of labor and the work
is accordingly going along at something like a satisfactory rate. The
labor offering on the prairie section
is also more reliable than a good part
of it at this end of the line. The contractors here, he says, had the greatest difficulty in keeping men steadily.
The cost of labor at this end is,
moreover, about $1.75, as compared
with $1 at the other end. In spite
of this disparity in the rate there is
the greatest difficulty to get enough
men to cary on the work and what
is obtained is very intermittent.
The officials offered no explanation
as to what the outcome would be.
They are to meet Premier McBride
upon his return to Victoria, and It
is probable that the whole question
will be gone into then, but what can
be done to overcome the difficult
position is very hard to see.
It is rather suggestive, however,
that contracts that should naturally
have been let before this time for
the next section beyond Aldermere
have not yet been placed. On the
other hand the work of pushing forward from the Edmonton end is well
in hand.
Mr. Hays says before the winter
sets in the track will be laid to Athabasca River, seventy-nine miles from
Tete Jaune Cache. During the winter the supplies will be hauled in
over til is 79 miles so that work may
begin promptly In the spring.
The only explanation which Mr.
Hays could offer for the intermittent
character of the labor at this end waa
tnat there were too many attractions
in other ways here to permit of men
settling down to the more steady
work of railway onstruction.
The officials were well satisfied
with the character of the work done
on the Mne out of here. Their only
complaint was that there was too little of it done
CITY WILL INSTAL
TEMPORARY PLANT
Council Decide That it Would Not be a Wise Policy to
Decide Quickly the Larger Question of a Permanent Method of Supply—Will More
Fully Consider It.
The city council will in all probability proceed with the installation
of Its own electric lighting plant In
the city which will be put in on the
basis of being a temporary means to
cover about two years' requirements.
This the council feels will give time
to consider the broader question of
a permanent supply and allow a decision to be reached along that line.
At last evening's meeting of the
council the question of light was proceeded to at an early stage. It was
not long before the council decided
that the installing of its own plant
in the meantime was the only practical way out of the difficulty for the
present. Some considerable discussion followed as to the course to follow even on that plan. An estimate
will be submitted by the light committee, and Mr. Durant, of Walter &
Durant, kindly proferred his assistance in deciding upon a plant and
this will be accepted.
An Offer Made
On  opening the subject last evening, Walter & Durant made a proposal to supply light, which was as
follows:—
To   the   Mayor   and   the   honorable
body,   the  Council  of  the  city  of
Prince Rupert.
Gentlemen:—I  am  authorized  to
tion, at a price per kilowatt hour ol
eight cents for lighting and six cents
for power.
2. The city agrees to purchase all
electrical energy from the company,
and vvi'l not grant the privilege to
any other company of supplying electricity within the time covered by the
contract. The city also guarantees
a minimum annual consumption
equivalent to 187,500 k.w. hours of
lighting, or  $15,000.
3. The term of contract to be for
twenty-live years, with the understanding that at the end of either
the loth, 15 or 20th year, the city
shall have the option of purchasing
the power plant at an arbitrated
price, in vvhlhc case the contract will,
of  course,  expire.
4. The company will install immediately a plant of 330 k.w. capacity which will be amply sufficient
for the first winter, and will extend
the capacity of the plant from time
to time as the demand requires.
5. The company will deposit with
the city a bond of $10,000, as evidence of good faith, said bond to be
returned to the company upon completion of the plant and first delivery
of current.
6. Company promises complete installation  and  delivery    of    current
"  ''""', "';-""'""-"  ""I within  four  months  from  the time
submit to you the following proposal j , , ,_ _, ,      .       ...
for supplying electrical energy to
the city. If this proposal is accepted,
a contract will be Immediately drawn
up for execution by the representatives of the city and the company
contracting for the supply. This contract will contain the following
clauses: —
1. The company agrees to supply
all electrical energy required by the
city delivered at a substation built
and operated by the city at a point
on the city limit the shortest practicable distance from the power sta-1
contract is signed. Any further delay, however, from causes beyond (he
company's control, shall not act as
a forfeiture of the bond or an annulment of the contract.
7.   Character of electrical energy
delivered   to  city   substation   to   be
2,300 volts, 3 phase, 60 cycle, alter-
I nating current.
The   following   comments   will   be
useful in examining these clauses:
The price of eight cents per k.w,
I hour is equivalent to 4-10 of a cent
(Continued on Page Eight)
QUESTION OF TAXES
CHANGE IN  BANK
City and G.T.P. Fail to Reach Settlement on Vexed
Question.
Terminal   Lands  Held   by   Company
is Assessed At Very High
Rate-
Yesterday President Charles M.
Hays, D'Arcy Tate and other officials
of the G.T.P. had a conference with
Mayor Stork, Aid, Pattullo, Aid.
Lynch and the city solicitor In which
the question of the assessment levied
upon the company for their terminal
reserve was the subject of discussion.
As a result of the discussion no settlement was reached between the two
sides to the dispute.    The conference
F. S. Long Will Succeed Mr. Stonham
in the Local
Branch.
New    Manager    is   Will   Known   in
Northern Country, Coming
Prom Dawson
A change Is to be made in the
management of the Bank of British
North America In this city. About
four months ago Mr. Stonham one
of the inspectors of the bank, came
to the city and opened the branch.
He is now to be removed to resume
his other duties of Inspector, and a
permanent manager will take his
place here In the person of F. S. Long
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^      of   Dawson.     The   new   manager   Is
ivas a private one and  little or noth-c well   known   to
ing of what took place has been made i
public.
A  report  was  received  from	
mayor  at  the  council   meeting  last ' business life of thi
GRADING OF LINE AT STEWART
Among the south bound passengers
on the Prince George last evening
was Thomas Cameron of this city,
brother of Soi Cameron, the contractor for the grading of the Portland
Canal Short Line of railway. Mr.
Thomas Cameron is in charge of the
work at Stewart and says they will
have It finished early this fall, probably within a month's time.
There are now nine miles of the
road ready for track laying. The
bulk Ivy, loaded with rails is lying
In the harbor awaiting the completion of the wharf for D. D. Mann.
The contract, of Mr. Cameron Is for
the grading of the road alone.
Mr. Cameron thinks Stewart mines
are very promising and next summer
should see a lot of work done nt
them.
evening on the Bubject. This report!
stated that there had been such a
conference and that the G, T. I', objected to tiie assessment, which was
neld to be exorbitant. The city representatives hail, however, informed
the company representatives that in
view of the fact thai the assessor
was appointed by the provincial government and an appeal had not been
entered by the company in time to
bo heard before the court of revision
the council could not interfere.
It is inferred from statements
made by Mr. Hays that the company
is exceedingly averse to paying on
tiie assessment which Is regarded by
" Im as most excessive.    It Is report-
many   residents   of
this city anil throughout the whole of
the north,    lie is a popular banker
the j and   will   be   nn   acquisition   to   Hie
•ity.
in tiie removal   of   .Mr.   Stonham,
Hie city of Prince Rupert loses' one
'if its mosl ardent admirers. lie has
been charmed with the place and
while lie realized that his stay would
nut lie ii long one here he has been
desirous Hint it should be continued
I as long as possible as the city appealed to him. He has been very popular among the business men of
Prince Rupert who will regret to
see him leave. The change will take
place in about two weeks time.
The city clerk has reported that
there has been no petitions received
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ against the carrying out of the pro-
ed that Mr. Hays makes no objection | p_osea Improvement on Second street
to paying taxes on the ordinary city
lots on  the very same basis as the
ordinary citizen, but the terminal
lands he held to have been assessed
out of all proportion to the practice
in other places.
 o	
•I. Fred Ritchie, of this city, and
A. 13. MrKenzIr, of Rossland, returned on Sunday from Stewart.
Tenders will be called for the work
o	
At last evening's meeting of the
city council a communication was
read from the Typographical Union
stating that the Optimist had been
granted the right to use the union
label, the differences between the
union and the owning company having been settled.
v- THE   PRINCE   RUPERT  JOURNAL.
Tuesday, August 29, lO'li?
NEXT CONFERENCE
British Blue Book Dealing With   Last
Imperial Gathering is
Issued.
Very   Little   Has   Yet   Been   Done
Little   Has   Yet   Been
Towards    the    Next
Meeting
.a' 	
The British government has issued
a Blue Book containing correspondence on a large variety of subjects
dealt with by resolution at the last
Imperial conference. The resolutions
then passed are taken one by one,
each being followed either by a
Colonial office memorandum on the
subject with which it deals or by
any correspondence to which it may
have biven rise. Some correspondence is also given on subjects which
were not dealt with by resolution,
but which have arisen out of the proceedings of the conference. Among
these are the profits on silver currency, stamp duties on colonial securities, the Radio-Telegraphic convention of 1906, Marriage Facilities,
and also copyright, which has since
been considered by a special subsidiary conference.
The re-arrangement of the colonial
office, carried out in discharge of the
pladge given by Lord Elgin to the
conference of 1907, was communicated to the dominions in a despatch
dated September 21 of the same year,
and made public in the following November. Lord Elgin then announced the formation of the dominions
department and the appointment of a
permanent secretary to the conference, who was to correspond either
with the colonial governments direct, or, if those governments preferred it, through the high commissioners and agents-general. The replies to this dispatch are now made
public. The first is from General
Botha, who states that the Transvaal
are strongly of the opinion that the
secretary should correspond through
the high commissioners and agents-
general, and urges the closer association of these officials with the
conference. Dr. Jameson, on behalf
of the Cape, expresses a similar view
and desires to be furnished with suggestions for making the association
as effective as possible. A similar
opinion is expressed by Natal.
Mr. Deakin, on behalf of the Australian government, is more critical.
He describes the re-arrangement of
the Colonial office as merely "an alteration of departmental practice,
which is too minute to call for attention." The proposals, he points out,
differ from the compromise finally
accepted by the Australian government at the conference, In three Important particulars:
(a) It contemplated an organization entirely separated from the colonial office.
(b) It proposed that the officers
should be controlled by or on behalf
of the conference.
(c) It provided that expenses of
the staff should be borne by the countries represented.
These proposals not having been,
in his opinion, met, he differs the
question of the association of the
high commissioners with the secretariat until the secretariat responds
more closely to the Australian idea.
These replies were all received be-
for the end of 1907. In spite of two
subsequent inquiries from the secretary of state, neither the Canadian
nor the New Zealand government
seems at any time in the last three
years to have expressed an opinion
on the establishment of either the
dominions department or the secre-
taiiat.
Defence nnd Emigration
• Resolutions II and III, of the 1807
conference dealt with colonial rep-
resentatlon on the committee of de-
fence and thef ormatlon of an Imperial general staff. These matters
have been Hie subject of continual
correspondence, and were also, of
course, dealt with at the imperial defense conference last year. The present blue book contains only a memorandum giving references to what
has already been made public in regard to the development of the imperial defence.
Resolution IV. urged the desirability of encouraging British emigrants to proceed to British colonies
rather than to foreign countries, and
pressed for co-operation with this
object between the various governments of the empire. There Is no
correspondence published in regard
to it, but It is made the subject of
the following colonial oice note:
"The view taken respectinr,
subject matter of thlsr esolutlon was
that, In the absence of any request
from one or other of the dominions
for co-operation In a particular mat
ter, tiie needs of the situation were,
as stated by Coolnial Seely in the
House of Commons on June 22, sufficiently met by the officers of the
self-governing dominions in the
United Kingdom and by the emigrants' information office, which affords full and trustworthy information to intending emigrants to the
Britisli dominions. The whole question is, however, again under consideration.
JndicinI  Appeals
In pursuance of resolution V.,
which dealt with Judicial appeals, the
secretary of state forwarded to the
various colonial governments on
August 29, 1908,, copies of a new
code of rules to govern appeals to
the King in council from colonial
courts. These rules are given at
length, and the secretary of state
points out that they may be adopted
either by a law of the colonial parliament or by a request to His Majesty to issue an order in council enacting them. Such orders in council
have since been Issued by the Transvaal, South Australia, New South
Wales and New Zealand. An objection to the new rules having been
expressed by the government of the
commonwealth, the privy council office intimated to the colonial office
that the rules were isuedl n pursuance of the resolution of the 1907
conference, and that there was no desire to press them on any government not desiring to enact them.
Trade and Shipping
Resolutions VI, VII, VIII, IX and
X all dealt with the question of preferential trade and the development
of commercial relations, and the support of British shipping Full correspondence is given here in regard
to the apoplntment of British trade
commissioners to the different dominions, the proposal being received
with especial favor in Canada.
The following memorandum Is
published on resolutions XI and XII
which dealt with the subject of preferential trade arrangements and
treaty questions: —
"The desire of the Dominion government for information as to treaty
benefits and obligations has been met
by the information as to national and
most-favored nation clauses in existing treaties published in Cd. 3395
and 3396, and also by the publication of a special volume containing
the existing commercial treaties. Correspondence respecting the treaty obligations of the empire In relation to
the resolutions, has proceeded cautiously since the conference, but it is
not judged expedient in the public interest to publish it."
A correspondence of much Interest
follows in regard to uniformity in
trade marks and patents, in trade
statistics, and in company law, all of
which were the subject of resolutions at the conference. Reciprocity
in the admission of surveyors to practice is also dealt with, and a discussion of great importance is recorded
on the subject of naturalization.
Statements are also given in regard to the resolutions on International penny postage, imperial cable
communication and the all-red route.
The last Is as follows:—
"This resolution was remitted by
His Majesty's government for consideration by a committee of His
Majesty's ministers. So far it has
not been found practicable to proceed
further In the direction indicated in
the resolution."
Conference of 1011
It should finally be noted that the
secretary of state has already twice
asked for the views of the various
governments of the dominions on the
business to be discussed at the conference next year. The first of these
dispatches was sent In February,
1909, the second in March of the
present year. Neither has as yet produced any definite suggestions. A
similar request to the government departments in Whitehall has met with
equally little success, except In the
case of the home office, which advocates the discussion of measures to
prevent the arrival In the United
Kingdom of undesirable aliens expelled from the Dominions.
iiDiiiaiini
HAYNOR BROS.
i House Furni sin
Located temporarily, since the Are,
 L in Dunedln Block, corner of Second
m   as — Avenue and  Eighth  Street.
i   Some snaps in slightly damaged  goods  which  we  want  to  clear
B  out  before moving into new quarters in Manson Blk., Third Ave.
a
H	
viinniinnnimiu
FUNERAL  FURNISHERS
(HiniiiniiiiiiHinaiaiznnHinniniiiiiHiinwiaiannniF
A MANN TOWNSITE
Railway Promoter Will Postpone Sale
of Lots Until Next
Year.
His Proposition To  Make   the   New
Site a Continuation of the
Present City
Under the name of "Portland
Canal," the 160 acres adjoining the
original townsite of Stewart on the
east, being part of the acreage owned by Donald D. Mann, Alvo von Al-
vensleben and E. P. Davis, K.C., and
divided Into lots 25 by 200 feet, were
placed on the market Monday by the
townsite department of the Canadian
Northern railway, says the Portland
Canal Miner. T. S. Darling, of Winnipeg, manager of the townsite department, under whose direction the
sale will be made, left for the south
Sunday and will arrange for the disposal of lots in Victoria, Vancouver
Winnipeg and Toronto. An office
will be opened by the land department at Vancouver to handle both
Stewart and Port Mann realty.
According to Mr. Darling it is the
intention to dispose of no lots south
of Princess street (Seventh) for the
present, except warehouse sites adjoining the railway tracks. So as to
obtain an idea of the location of the
streets, it may be stated that Portland Canal is not laid out in uniform-
iy with Stewart, as the line of the
railway divides the two townsltes,
consequently even numbered streets
running east and west are not carried
through. Starting from the south
the streets are Shore, corresponding
to Third street of the parent town-
site; Douglas to Fifth; Princess, to
Seventh; Centre, to Ninth; McBride,
to Eleventh; Royal, to Thirteenth;
Cassiar to Fifteenth; Yukon, to
Seventeenth. North and south the
street names are King on the west,
then Main, Queen and Davis to the
east. The streets are 66 feet wide
with the exception of Main, which is
80, with 10-foot alleys. There are
about 1,200 lots of which a quarter
revert to the provincial government
It is the intention of the management to instal a water and sewerage
system at an early date together with
sidewalks around the principal business blocks.
The prices and terms are as follows: Main street, which is to be
made the principal business thoroughfare, $100 per front foot. Warehouse sites, $2,000 per lot, and the
balance range down to $550 for resi-
dental lots. The land department is
offering special inducements for hose
desirous of erecting premises in the
business section by way of 50 per
cent reduction in the price of a lot.
For instance, those buying a 2 5-foot
lot on Main street, listed at $2,500,
and who will agree to erect a building of not less than 60 per cent of
its value, viz, $1,500, the net cost
of the lot will be only $1,250. There
are no building restrictions on residence lots. Terms are one-third cash,
balance in 9 and 18 months with 7
per cent interest on deferred payments. Mr. Darling states that corners have been reserved for the Portland   Canal  Lumber  Company,  who
TRADE FOR THE GXP
First Flock of Sheep to he Located West
of Edmoiton so Model
Farm.
Line Tributary to Prince Rupert Will
Have Diversified Lines of
Freight Offering
After Inspecting the lands of the
Western Canada Land Company in
he Edmonton district, and also visiting the 10,000 acres of coal lands
which the company will develop on
the banks of the Pembina river, at
Entwistle, on the Grand Trunk Pacific, Sir Ronald Lane, chairman of
the board of directors of the Western
Canada Land company of London,
England, left on his return to the
Old Country.
Sir Ronald spent several days in
the Edmonton district. He spent two
days at Entwistle, on the coal properties, and at i/abamun, on the model
farm which the company intend establishing at that point, and spent
three days more touring the districts
south and east of the city, during
which time he motored 120 miles in
company with H. M. E. Evans, and
inspected a large area of the company's lands.
The Western Canada Land company recently purchased from a St.
Paul and Winnipeg syndicate, 10,000
acres of rich coal land on the Pembina river, for which they pair
$1,100,000. The property is close
to the main line of the Grand Trunk
Pacific railway, which is now in operation past the property. The company have issued debentures to the
extent of 1,500,000 more, which they
will expend in development within
the next few years. A considerable
portion of this is being spent this
year In surveying the property and In
sinking test shafts. The company expect to be able to deliver coal from
the mines next year.
During the past few days a particularly rich seam of coal has been
struck on the property through a test
hole which has been sunk. Although
the drillers have not gone through
the seam, it gives indications of being at least twenty-five feet thick.
The coal is on a particularly high
grade.
Sir Ronald spent a day inspecting
the property, and is very enthusiastic
over the prospects of its deevlop-
ment. He will have a very satisfactory report to make to the board of
directors on his return to the Old
Country.
Sir Ronald also spent a day Inspecting the land of the company
at Wabamun, on which it Is the intention to establish a model farm.
He announced himself as greatly Impressed with the character of the
land. The farm has been placed In
charge of Mr. Dunn of Wabamun and
preparations for stocking the farm
are now being made.
This morning a flock.of 660 sheep,
purchased at Lethbrldge, were shipped west from the city over the
Grand Trunk Pacific. This is aboil
the    largest    flock    that   exists    In
were pigmented to exclude too much
light, physicians were sceptical, preferring to consider nature a fool to
create colored races in light countries. The light theory that was utterly rejected by Americans has sines
been accepted by the French and
British, however, who are now taking steps in the tropics to give themselves the same protection by colored
underclothing that nature gives to
the natives by colored skin*—another of the innumerable instances
where an American idea must go to
Europe for acceptance. The writer
continues:—
"Now that the subject Is considered settled abroad, we are tardily
taking It up. In an article In Tbe
Medical Press of June 2, 1909, DrB.
Phalen and Nichols describe the experiments now being made to find
out whether it will do any good to
protect our soldiers from tropical
light by opaque underclothing, and
they make the astounding assertion
that tbel are personally In 'the
strict agnostic mood.' So there are
still some who think that the pigment of the Filipinos is merely a useless freak of silly nature. This ts
depressing, yet it shows the proverbial difficulty with which a new Idea
attains recognition	
"Opaque clothing Is becoming popularized and it is interesting to note
that the instinctive demand for it,
not only in the tropics, but in America also, is so great that manufacturers are flooding the market with
enormous quantities of black undergarments. Lay experience already
shows it to be comfortable and beneficial. It is, of course, wholly unnecessary in such cloudy places as
Northern Europe, nor do the swarthy
Italians need it, but blond migrant
types must use it when residing In
light countries where the native Is
pigmented. It is considered well
worth a trial in this latitude, for It
is known to prevent those nervous
conditions so common in the light
season. That is, it begins to look as
though the lay public will lead and
the medical profession follow. It
might be well to direct attention to
the need of better head-covering if
one is exposed to the sun All tropical natives use elaborate headdresses fo:- this purpose, and It Is
noticed that our own outdoor workmen have an Instinctive desire for
black felt hats. Agricultural laborers In our South, and Mexicans also,
use opaque hats to a large extent,
and prefer those with wide brims.
The dinky little straw hats with narrow brims affected by city dwellers
afford no protection at all in the sun,
and may be the cause of must suffering as well as actual sickness If
the wearers do not remain constantly
in the shade. There Is need of a
great deal more knowledge of summer hygiene In order to combat the
fashions of our cities, which are
much nearer the tropics than we
realize.
EXAMINATION   FOR    INSPECTOR
OF STEAM BOILERS AND
MACHINERY
Examinations for the position of
Inspector of Steam Boilers and Machinery, under the "Steam Boilers
Inspection Act, 1901," will be held
at the Parliament Buildings, Victoria, commencing November 7th,
1910. Application and instruction
forms can be had on application to
the undersigned, to whom the former
must be returned correctly filled in,
not later than October 24th, 1910.
Salary $130 per month, increasing at
the rate of $5 per month each year
to a maximum of $180.
JOHN PECK,
Chief Inspector of Machinery,
New Westminster, B.C.
—the—
Oliver
Typewriter
—FOR—
Seventeen Cents a Day
Please read the headline over
again. Then its tremendous significance will dawn upon you.
An Oliver Typewriter—the standard visible writer—the most highly
perfected typewriter on the market
—yours for 17 cents a day!
The typewriter whose conquest of
the commercial world is a matter of
business history—yours for 17 cent*
a day!
The typewriter that Is equipped
with scores of such conveniences as
"The Balance Shift"—"The Ruling
Device"—"The Double Release"—
The Locomotive Base"—"THe- Automatic Spacer"—"The Automatic Tabulator"—"The Disappearing Indicator"—"The Adjustable Paper Fingers"—"The Scientific Condensed
Keyboard"—all
Yours For 17 Cents a? Day
We announced this new sales plan
recently, just to feel the pulse of the
people. Simply a small cash payment—then 17 cents a day. That
is the plan In a nutshell.
The result has been such a deluge of applications for machines
that we are Bimply astounded.
The demand comes from people of
all classes, all ages, all occupations.
The majority of Inquiries has
come from people of known financial
standing who were attracted by the
novelty of the proposition. An impressive demonstration of the immense popularity of the Oliver Typewriter.
A startling confirmation of our belief that the Era of Universal Typewriting is at hand.
A Quarter of a Million People are
Making Money With
TTje.
FIRE ALARMS
Sections  Without   Them   Will   Have
to Wait For Telephones
The announcement was made at
Saturday's evening s council meeting
that Mr. Arnott called attention to
the fact that ther was no fire alarm
in section six
Aid. Hilditch stated that there
were no fire alarms in sections seven
or eight.
Aid. Pattullo said there was no
communication yet
His Worship said the telephone
| was being constructed to these sections so that the diffl"ul!y would
i soon be overcome.
will  erect  a  $20,000  structure  for \ Northern Alberta, and the company
Intends lo establish a sheep ranch on
the model farm, which will In n
charge of an expert sheep rancher.
This will be the first sheep rancl to
he established on the Grand Trunk
Pacific west, where the lands l! particularly adapted for sheep r-lslng.
The farm will also be gradually
stocked with other classes of stock,
which will be Imported from prominent farms for the purpose.
On his return from the west last
Friday, Sir Ronald made a motor
tour of the district, travelling 210
miles to the east and south of the
city. He inspected a large area of
the coupany's lands in the district.
hotel, for two banks and for an offlco
building for the railway company.
Before leaving for the souh he arranged with the Stewart Trust Co.,
Ltd., to handle a part of the lots at
Stewart.
 0	
The Scotchman could not find his
ticket. On the conductor's second
round it was still missing. "What's
that in your mouth?" he asked. Sure
enough, there was the missing ticket.
The conductor punched it, and went
his way. "Ah, Weel," said Sandy, in
reply to his fellow passengesrs' banter, "I'm nae sae absent-minded as
ye wad think. Yon was a verra auld
ticket an' I was jist sucken off the
date."
 0	
Gerald—I have never kissed a girl
before.
Gerald ine—you have come to the
wrong place; I'm not running a preparatory school.—Town Topics.
 o	
For Job Printing of all kinds see
the Journal man.
The
Washington Cafe
A PLACE TO EAT
Seats For Ladies
Everything Clean and Tasty
Prices Reasonable
to.  F. CARPENTER, PROPRIETOR
Second  Avenue, near Seventh Street
COLORED UNDERWEAR
Medical  Papers Deal With  the Subject From Hygienic Standpoint
Colored underwear for hot, sunny
climates is advocated in a leading
editorial by American Medicine
(New York). When It was first suggested,  says  tills-  paper,  that  skins
LAND PURCHASE  NOTICE
Coast Land District—District of
Skeena.
TAKE NOTICE that we, George
Hie and Robert Corlett, of Little Canyon, B.C., occupation farmer and
farmer, Intend to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted at the south-east portion of an island situated and lying
about two miles below Little Canyon,
near the south bank of the Skeena
river, Range V, Skeena Land District,
District of Coast, thence northerly,
thence easterly, thence southerly
around the shores of the Island back
to the point of beginning and inclosing 30 acres,- more or less
GEORGE HIE,
ROBERT CORLETT.
Dated August 1, 1910. A19
OLIVER
Typewriter
The Standard Visible Writer
The Oliver Typewriter is a moneymaker, right from the word "go!" So
easy to run that beginners soon get
in the "expert" class. Earn as you
learn. Let the machine pay the 17
cents a day—and all above that Is
yours.
Wherever you are, there's work to
be done and money to be made by
using the Oliver.   The business world
calling for Oliver operators. There
are not enough to supply the demand.
Their salaries are considerably above
those of many classes of workers.
"An Oliver Typewriter In
Every Home!"
That is our battle cry today. We
have made the Oliver supreme ■ in
usefulness and absolutely indispensable In business. Now comes the
conquest of the home.
The simplicity and strength of the
Oliver fit It for family use. It Is becoming an Important factor in the
home training of young people. An
educator as well as a money maker.
Our new selling plan puts the
Oliver on the threshold of every
home in America. Will you close
the door of your home or office on
this remarkable Oliver opportunity?
Write for further details of our
easy offer and a free copy of the new
Oliver catalogue.    Address:
R. C. BEAN
Prince Rupert Agent
General   Offices:   Oliver   Typewriter
Building, Chicago, 111.
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE
NOTICE is hereby given that the
reserve existing on Crown lands In
the vicinity of BabirJc Lake, and
situate In Cassiar District, notice of
which bearing date June 30th, 1909,
was published In the British Columbia Gazette, dated July 2nd, 1908, Is
cancelled.
ROBERT A. RENWICK,
Deputy Commissioner of Lands.
Lands Department,
Victoria, B. C, June 16th, 1910
(First Insertion July 5.) Tuesday, August 29, 1910
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
***************.;..;,.;..:»*** -:•■:--:.
* i
%    British Troops for Tibet    *
* *
♦♦■H1*************':-*':--:-****'.-
Owing to unrest reported from
Tibet, and with a view to meet possible trouble, It has been decided to
hold Indian troops in readiness according to information received from
Simla. Sufficient supplies to relieve
the British trading agency at Gyantse
are to be quickly collected at Gna-
tong, which is in SIkkim territory,
should any such measures prove
necessary.
Unless that agency Is attacked, or
the government comes to the conclusion that an attack is imminent, no
advance will be made, and the sole
duty of the troops, if sent, will be
the protection of the British officers
and establishments at the trade agencies, i
The troops will remain strictly
neutral should the Chinese come into collision with the Tibetans, and
will withdraw as soon as events permit.
The troops which have been warned to be in readiness to start for
Tibet, if necessary, are the 2nd battalion of the 10th Gurkhas, stationed
at Almora, and the 48th Pioneers,
stationed at Allahabad, with one
mountain battery which has not yet
been selected.
The decision to have troops in
readiness and to collect supplies at
Gnatongis not due to the receipt by
the government of any definitely serious news from Tibet It is designed
solely to secure the protection of the
British trade agencies established in
Tibet in accordance with existing
treaties.
The British trade agent at Gyang-
tse is Captain Weir, who has with
him a small escort of Indian troops.
There is also a British agent at
Yatung.
* *
|      German Shipbuilding     |
**** ***** **** *******•;..> ***.•-
"Engineering" gives a complete
description of the new naval construction work at Hamburg of the
well-known Vulcan company of Stettin, who have won a front place
among the shipbuilding establishments of the world, due to the character of the ships built to the rapidity with which the work has been
carried out, and to the uniformly successful results attained As the depth
of the water for the floating of
ships to the Baltic from their Stettin
works was limited, the company decided to build new works In preference to extending their Stettin
works when the general development
of shipbuilding in Grmany, and the
need arose for increasing the warship
building resources of the country. A
yard suitable for undertaking repairs
on warships would, it was felt, be
more advantageous if situated on the
North Sea instead of on the Baltic.
Many possible sites, continues "Engineering," were considered, all of
them located on the North Sea, and
the position ultimately decided upon
on the Elbe combines with this advantage, from the naval standpoint,
close proximity to probably the greatest of the commercial harbors of the
continent—Hamburg. The Free
State of Hamburg welcomed the Stettin company, recognizing that the
existence of another such important
shipbuilding establishment on the
Elbe must prove beneficial to the
port. The Hamburg government
leased to the Vulcan company a suitable site on favorable terms for a
period of fifty years in the first Instance. All the ships entering or
leaving the port of Hamburg pass
within a few hundred yards of the
Vulcan works. The total area covered Is 232,000 square metres (about
67% acres. The building berths
number at present three, having reinforced foundations for keel-blocks,
extending to 825 feet, (190 feet and
590 feet In length, but, with an overhang forward and aft, especially forward, vessels up to 1,000 feet may
be constructed. At the present time
there arc In one of these berths an
Atlantic liner of greater size than
any vessel afloat and to steam at a
speed of 22 knots; In the other berth
there Is In course of construction one
of the latest battleships for the German navy. A fourth buildlngslip Is
contemplated when the necessity for
for this extension arises. The ironworks department is located at the
head of the three building berths.
The frame and beam-bending shed Is
arranged at the head of the fourth,
the proposed, building berth. The
wood-working departments, Including saw-mill, joiners' and cabinet
makers' shop, etc., are along the
western boundary, with the stores
and general offices at the southwestern entrance to the works, adjacent to the high road and railway. ■ The turbine-shops, enginee:
Ing    works,      boiler-shops,    copret
smithy and auxiliary departments are
arranged along the eastern boundary
near to the wharf, where ships are
moored while being fitted out. Accommodation is here provided for
two of the largest ships likely to be
built during the next few years.
 o	
CAPT. MIKKELSEN WRECKED
Well Known  Explorer Had  Narrow
Escape on Shores of Greenland
Capt. Mlkklesen's expedition,
which sailed June 20, 1909, on the
Danish ship Alabama in search for
the bodies of the Erlckson Greenland
expedition, was wrecked during the
winter on the coast of East Greenland, according to advices received
at Copenhagen.
Capt. Mikklesen and the entire
party were saved and succeeded in
effecting a landing on Shannon Island, off the coast, of King William
Land. From this point they were
rescued by another ship. The news
was brought from Tromsoe by a
steamer cruising in the Polar sea. ,
Capt. Mikklesen is well known on
this coast. He was the head of the
expedition that set out from Victoria
a few years ago to explore the Beaufort Sea, north of Alaska. The expedition was made on the schooner
Duchess of Bedford, named after the
patron of the expedition.
There is no more daring explorer
today than Capt. Mikklesen.
LAND PURCHASE NOTICES
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte.
TAKE NOTICE that the Queen
Charlotte Whaling Company Limited,
of Victoria, British Columbia, occupation manufacturers, intend to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about fifteen
chains south of a small creek on the
west side of Rose Harbour, Moresby
Island, thence west forty chains,
thence north forty chains, thence
east forty chains, thence southerly
following the sinuosities of the foreshore line forty chains, to the point
of commencement.
Queen Charlotte Whaling
Company Limited,
Per Sydney Charles Ruck, Agent
Dated July 14th, 1910.
Rose Harbour, Q.C.I.       . A5
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Reginald
Davey, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation machinist, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands, in the vicinity of
Citwancool or Chean Wein Valley:
Commencing' at a post planted at the
north-west corner and about 6%
miles distant in a north-westerly direction from the north end of Kitwancool Lake, thence south 80
chains, thence east 80 chains, thence
north 40 chains, thence west 40
chains, thence north 40 chains,
chains, thence west 40 chains to a
point of commencement, and containing 480 acres (more or less).
REGINALD  DAVEY.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated  May  30,  1910. Jy8
Coast Land District—District of
Skeena.
TAKE NOTICE that Elijah
Rounds, of Victoria, B.C., occupation
Stewart, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:-—Commencing at a
post planted one-half mile north,
and one-half mile east, of Nettie A.
Lairds N. E. corner of application to
purchase, and 300 feet east of Ana-
ham Lake trail, marked E. R.'s
south-west corner, thence 40 chains
east, thence 40 chains north, thence
40 chains west, thence 40 chains
south to point of commencement,
and containing 160 acres, more or
less. ELIJAH  ROUNDS.
Vincent M.  Schibner, Agent.
Dated May 25, 1910. Jn2i
LAND  Pl'RCHASE  NOTICE
LAND PURCHASE NOTICES
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that John Cherry,
of Victoria, B. C, occupation mattress maker, intends to apply for permission to purchase ihe following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Weln Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-east corner and about 14 miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence west 80 chains, thence
south 80 chains, thence east 80
chains, thence north 80 chains to
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
JOHN CHERRY.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 3, 1910. Jy8
I   Skeena Land District—District of
lTiel Sfif fl.1*
TAKE NOTICE that Sarah Ward,
of Victoria, B. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. E. corner and about 22 miler. distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north 80 chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence south 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or -ess.
SARAH WARD.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 6th, 1910 Jy8
Skeena Land District—District Of
PflRRiiir
TAKE NOTICE that Brenton
Brown, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation Insurance agent, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands In the vl-
vinity of the Kltwancool or Chean
Wein Valley:—Commencing at a
post planted at the north-east corner and about ten miles distant in
| a north-westerly direction from the
north end of Kltwancool Lake,
thence south 80 chains, thence east
SO chains, thence north 80 chains,
thence west 80 chains to point of
commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
BRENTON BROWN.
James to. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 1, 1910. JyS
Skeena Land District—District of
{"* r» q q -i o i" ,
TAKE NOTICE that Jessie Stead-
man, of Victoria, B. C, occupation
married woman, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following described lands, in the vicinity of
Kitwancool or Chean Weln Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-east corner and about 6%
miles distant in a north-westerly direction from the north end of Kitwancool Lake, theuce soutii 80
chains; thenee west SO chains, thence
north 80 chains, thence east SO
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 640 acres, more or
less. JESSIE STEADMAN.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated May  31,  1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Bruce Older-
shaw, of Victoria, B. C, occupation
jeweller, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of the
Citwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at
he north-west corner and about 7 %
miles distant in a north-westerly direction from the north end of Kitwancool Lake; thence south SO
chains, thence east 40 chains, thence
north 80 chains, thence west 40
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 320 acres, more or
less. BRUCE OLDERSHAW.
James W.  Smith, Agent.
Dated May 31,  1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
C i\ flS 1 i\ Y
TAKE NOTICE that Echo Dudgeon, of Vancouver, B. O, occupation
assistant dentist, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of the
Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-east corner and about 7 %
miles distant in a north-westerly direction from the north end of Kltwancool Lake, thence south 80
chains, thence north 80 chains,
thence east 80 chains to point of
commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
ECHO DUDGEON,
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated May 31, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that George Mc-
Bain, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
merchant, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands In the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley;—
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. W. corner and about 26% miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north 80 chains, thence
east 80 chains, thence south 80
chains, thence west 80 chains to
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
GEORGE  McBAIN.
James to. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 8th, 1910. ,Ty8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Catherine
Welsh, of Vancouve., IS. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands in the vi-
vinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein
Valley:—Commencing at a post
planted at the S. E. corner and about
17% miles distant in a north-westerly direction from the north end of
Kitwancool Lake, thence north SO
chains, thence west SO chains, thence
soutii 80 chains, thence east 80
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 640 acres, more or
less. CATHERINE   WELSH.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 4, 1910. Jy8
LAND Pl'RCHASE NOTICES
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Frederick
Tutt, of Selkirk, Manitoba, occupation merchant, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. to. corner about 14% miles distant In a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kltwancool
Lake, thence north 4 0 chains, thence
east 40 chains, thence soutii 40
chains, thence west 4 0 chains to
point of commencement, and containing 160 acres, more or less.
FREDERICK   TUTT.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 3, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
C^a no| flf*
TAKE NOTICE that Henry Van
Wyck, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation hotel keeper, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein
Valley:—Commencing at a post
planted at the north-east corner and
about 20 miles distant in a northwesterly direction from the north end
of Kitwancool Lake, thence south 80
chains, thence west 80 chains, thence
north 80 chains, thence east 80
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 640 acres, more or
less. HENRY VAN WYCK.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated  June   6th,   1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Minnie Clarke
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
|N. W. corner and about 28% miles
distant and in a north-westerly direction from the north end of Kitwancool Lake, thence south 40 chains
thence east 80 chains, thence north
40 chains, thence west 80 chains to
point of commencement and containing  320  acres,  more  or less.
MINNIE   CLARKE.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated  June   8th,   1910. Jy8
II
PHONE 138
FOR
!   LETTER HEADS ENVELOPES
BUSINESS CARDS
i!   VISITING CARDS       STATEMENTS
Prince Rupert Journal
m
LAND PURCHASE NOTICES
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that William
Hume Grant, of Stewart, B.C., occupation engineer, intends to apply for
permission to purchase tho following
described lands:—Commencing at ;i
post marked W.II.G.'s S.W. Cor., nnd
planted adjoining Alfred Malison's
corner post, thence SO chains north, |
along W. N. Harrison's west line,
thenso east 80 chains, thence south
80 chains, thence west 80 chains, following Alfred Manson's north line to !
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
WILLIAM HUME GRANT.
Frank  R.  Strolm, Agent.
Dated July 2, 1910. Jy22
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that William
Simpson, of Lindsay, Ont., occupation hotel-keeper, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of the Kitwancool or Chean Weln
Valley:—Commencing at a post
planted at the south-east corner and
about 7% miles distant In a north
westerly direction from the north
end of Kitwancool Lake, thence
north 80 chains, thence west 80
chains, thence south 80 chains,
thence east 80 chains to point of
commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
WILLIAM SIMPFON.
James VV. Smith, Agent.
Dated  May 31,  1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that The Canadian
Fish and Cold Storage Company, of
Vancouver, B. C, occupation mercantile and manufacturing, intends
to apply for permission to purchase
the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-east corner of lot 34, Range 5,
Coast District, thence south 20
chains, thence east 40 chains, thence
north 25 chains more or less to the
shore line, thence following along |
the shore line to the point of commencement and containing 90 acres,
more or less.
The  Canadian  Fish  &  Cold
Storage Company Limited.
J. H. Pillsbury, Agent.
Dated July 14, 1910. Jyl9
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that George Tutt,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation den-
ist, intends to apply for permission
o purchase the following described
anils in the vicinity of the Kitwancool or Chean Weln Valley:—Commencing at a post planted at the
north-east corner and about 8%
miles distant in a north-westerly direction from the north end of Kltwancool Lake, thence south 40
chains, thence west 40 chains, thence
north 40 chains, tnence east 40
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 640 acres, more or
less. GEORGE TUTT.
.lames to. Smith, Agent.
Dated June  1,  1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Lome Thompson, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
dentist, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of the
Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:
Commencing at a post planted at the
south-west corner and about 8 %
miles distant in a north-westerly direction from the north end of Kltwancool Lake, thence north 80
chains, thence east 40 chains, thence
south 80 chains, thence west 40
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 320 acres, more or
less. LORNE THOMPSON.
James to. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 1, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Edward Cas-
pell, of Cayley, Alberta, occupation
merchant, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of the
Kltwancool or Chean Weln Valley:
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. W. corner and distant about 15%
miles in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence south 80 chains, thence
east 80 chains, thence north 80
chains, thence west 80 chains to
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
EDWARD CASPELL.
James W.  Smith, Agent.
Dated June 3, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Charles Gei-
ger, of Victoria, b. C, occupation
clerk, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kltwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Comemncing at a post planted at the
S. E. corner and about 19 miles distant In a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north 80 chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence soutii 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
CHARLES GIEGER.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 4th, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassii_..
TAKE NOTICE that Thomas Sills,
of Vancouver, B. O, occupation machinist, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. W. corner and about 26% miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence soutii 80 chains, thence
east 80 chains, thence north 80
chains, thence west 80 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
THOMAS SILLS.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 8th, 1910. Jy8
LAND PURCHASE NOTICES
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Leihi Cherry,
of Victoria, B. O, occupation married woman, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at tne
S. E. corner and about 21 miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north 80 chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence south 80
chains, thence east SO chains to tbe
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
LEIHI   CHERRY.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 6th, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that John Grieve,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
agent, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wien Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. E. corner and about 20 miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north SO chains, thence
west SO chains, thence soutii 80
chains, thence east 8 0 chains to
point of comemncement, and containing 64 0  acres, more or less.
JOHN GRIEVE.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 6th, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land  District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE mat Alfred E.
Parkington, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation broker, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of
Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. E. corner and about 15% miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north SO chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence soutii 80
chains, thence east SO chains to the
point of commencoment, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
ALFRED E. PARKINGTON!
James to. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 3, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that George Williams, of Winnipeg, Man., occupation
clerk, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool
or Chean Wein Valley:—Commencing at a post planted at the S. W.
corner and about 16% miles distant
in a north-westerly direction from
the north end of Kitwancool Lake,
thence north 40 chains, thence
east 40 chains, thence soutii 40
chains, thence west 40 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing ItiO acres, more or less.
GEORGE WILLIAMS.
James to.  Smith, Agent.
Dated June 4,  1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that John Reid,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
broker, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. W. corner and about 15% miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north 40 chains, thence
east 40 chains, thence south 40
chains, thence west 40 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 160 acres, more or less.
JOHN REID.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated  June  3,   1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Sarah Cox,
of Monarch, Alberta, occupation marled woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands In the Kltwancool or
Chean Wien Valley:—Commencing at
a post planted at. the N. W. corner
and about i % miles distant In a
north-westerly direction from the
north end of Kltwancool Lake, thence
south 80 chains, thence east 80
chains, thence north 80 chains,
thence west SO chains to point of
commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
SARAH COX.
James W. Smith, Agent
Dated May 31st, 1910.
Skeena Land Dl&crict—District of
TAKE NOTICE that William Wallace, of Toronto, Ont., occupation
insurance agent, Intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
discribed lands in the vie: iky of Kltwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Comencing at a post planted at the
N. E. corner and about 26% miles
distant In a north-westerly direct on
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence south SO chains, thenee
west 80 chains, thence north 80
chains, thence east SO chains to the
point of commencement, containing
640 acres,  more or less.
WILLIAM  WALLACE.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated  June  8th,   1910. Jy8
Coast Laud District—District of
Skeena.
TAKE NOTICE that I, George A.
Poole, of Prince Rupert, occupation
printer, intend to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted on the north-east shore
line of Smith Islpnd, distant about
one mile south-east from Lot 38, and
marked "G. A. P.'s North-west Corner Post," thence 20 chains south,
thence 80 chains east, thence north
to shore line, thence following shore
line to point of commencement, containing 160 acres, more or less.
GEORGE  ARTHUR  POOLE.
Dated Katirday, July 2, 1910.
(First Insertion July 5.)
Skeena Land District—District of    ;
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Samuel John
McDiarmid, of .Monarch, Alberta, occupation farmer, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following described lands in the Kltwancool or Chean Wein Valley: Commencing at a post planted at the N.
E. corner and aboul 1% miles In a
north-westerly direction from the
north end of Kltwancool Lake,
thenco south 80 chains, thence west.
SO chains, thence nortb SO chains,
thence east 80 chains to point of
commencement, and containing 640
acres,  more  or less.
SAMUEL JOHN' McDiARMID.
.lames W. Smith, Agent.
Dated May 31st, 1910.' Jy8
^ke^ila-LaiTd"District-   District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Annl» Gowan,
of Victoria, B. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of Kltwancool or Chean Weln Valley: —
Oommencng at a post planted at the
N. W. corner and about 23 mlleB distant In a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kltwancool
Lake; thence south 80 chains, thence
east 80 chains, thence north 80
chains, thence west SO chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, morn or less.
ANNIE  GOWAN.
James to. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 7th, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Grace Cess-
ford, of Victoria, B. C, occupation
married woman, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of
Kltwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. E. corner and about 23 miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence south SO chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence north 80
chains, thence east 80 cluilns to the
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
GRACE CESSFORD.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 6th, 1910. Jy&
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Henry Hemming, of Victoria, B. C, occupation
hotel keeper, Intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of Klt-
wancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted nt the
\. E. corner and about si miles dis-
i.ini, in a north-westerly direction
from Hie north end of Kltwancool
Lake, thence south SO chains, thence
weBl 80 cictiins, thence north 80
chains, thence easi so. chains to the
point of commencement, and containing, 640 acres, more or less.
HENRY   HEMMING.
James to. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 6th, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land  District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Nelson
Gowen, of Victoria, B. C, occupation mining engineer, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands In the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Weln
Valley:—Commencing at a post
planted at the K. E. corner and about
19 miles distant In the north-westerly direction from the north end of
Kitwancool Lake thence south 80
chains, thence west 40 chains, thence
north 40 chains, thence west 40
chains, thence north 40 chains,
thence east 80 chains to point of
commencement, and containing 480
acres, more or less.
NELSON   GOWEN.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 4th,  1910. Jyg
\ PRINCE  RUPERT JOURNAL
Tuesday, August  30,  1310.
I
prince liiupert journal
Telephone  138
Published twice a week on Tuesdays
and Fridays from the office of publication, Tliird-Avemie near McBride St.
Suliscriptiou^rate to any point in
Canada. $2.00 a year: to points outside
el Canada, $i.00a year.
Advertising'rate furnished on application.
O. H. NEL.iON,
Editor.
Tuesday, August 30, 1910.
WERE TOO FAST
There has been a decided tendency
In certain quarters In the city of late
to criticize the city council for being
too slow in reaching Its decisions re
lative to street work. Saturday night
revealed the fact that It had been too
fast for some property owners who
had a protest to raise against the
method of assessing for local Improvements on corner lots. Which
has the council been, too slow or too
fast?
The presence of a strong repre'
•entative delegation at the meeting
ef of the council on Saturday evening
revealed the fact that the citizens of
Prince Rupert are not taking as active an interest In the affairs of the
council as is warranted. The mem
bers of the council are the servants
of the people. They are but human
and are liable to go astray In matters
of judgment from time to time. They
•re, we believe, no more prone to err
than the average citizen. They are
no less prone to err, however. They
are treading new paths in providing
for the city and should have the advice from time to time of all citizens
that have It to offer.
It behooves the residents of the
city to give to municipal affairs all
the time they can possibly spare for
that purpose so that the council may
be directed along right lines. Public
spirit and self interest demands tbat
course.
UNFAIR CRITICISM
A pernicious practice is creeping
into the discussion of municipal affairs in the city that cannot end any
other way than in an impairing ot
the service by the introduction of a
less desirable type of citizen who will
offer his services In a representative
capacity at the council board. There
is a tendency to ascribe to representatives on the council sinister motives whenever the policy they may
happen to advocate differs from that
held by the critics. The aldermen are
held up as dishonest and as having
private ends to serve.
Such criticism requires little men-
ta' exertion and we are sorry to say
too often appeals to the popular
fancy. It Is mischievous, however,
and the end of it, if persisted in, will
he that citizens of standing will not
be' anxious to serve the city. Prince
Rupert will find Itself in a position
where only men who have ends to
serve will offer themselves for election and the council will be accordingly Impaired in its usefulness.
Respectable citizens, while they
may not appear to pay much attention to such criticisms, cannot fail
10 be affected somewhat and will not
be anxious to take an office that
courts only coarse criticism. As the
servants of the people, the members
Df the council must be ready to have
their work reviewed, but a difference
of opinion can surely exist without
either side to the controversy being
rogues.
TAXES   ON'   TERMINALS
The city council has now on its
(lands a question which requires the
most careful handling by that body
if the Interests of Prince Rupert are
to be best conserved. It Is that of
adjusting the taxation question with
the G. T. P. with respect to Its terminals.
it is true that there Is ever a leniency to show little consideration
for large corporations In the matter
jf taxation, but In view of the relation which exists between the G.T.P.
and this city, policy may dictate an
entirely different course. There la
ao getting away from the fact that
for some years to come Prince Rupert must be what is commonly
known as a "one corporation town."
The influence of the G. T. P. must be
felt here to a far greater degree than
any other company. It Is desirable
therefore that as far as possible the
hest of relations should be maintained between the city and the company.
This does not mean that the G. T. P.
should be allowed to shirk responsibility which private residents must
aear. There will, however, be numerous ways In which the one can
assist the other without working any
hardship upon either.
If we are correctly informed, Mr.
Kays, of the G. T. P., does not ask
any consideration with respect to the
company's holdings in the subdivided section of the city. He is prepared
to bear taxes like any other property
owner. The dispute is with respect
to the assessment of the reserve
property which is not available for
subdivision or for sale.
That property comprises less than
340 acres and is assessed for about
1520,000 an acre. The total assessment put upon it is about the same
as that placed on the remainder of
the city property which appears a
rather heavy assessment, especiallj
In view of the fact that the valm
of the general city property Is de
pendent in no small measure upon
the uses to which the company ).uts
Its reserved property. There can be
no denying the fact that the company
and its undertakings creates the
values on the townslte.
This terminal site Is also pre
eluded from any speculative value as
It cannot be alienated by tbe com
pany. As we understand It, this will
become In common with the road and
Its stock subject in reality to a bond
mortgage In view of the advances
made by the Dominion Government
on the work. This will cover a period
of fifty years, during which time
the title cannot pass from the com
pany.
It is not an unusual thing for
cities to offer inducements to railway
companies to locate terminals. The
city of Victoria within very recent
years gave the C. P. R. a site for
Its big hotel with taxation exemptions and free water. It has never
been felt in Victoria that the city
lost anything by that. We do nol
know that Mr. Hays asked for any
exemption when he met the council
In view of all the circumstances such
a course might work an injustice upon private citizens. It is possible
however, that a compromise might be
reached between the company and
the city which would ensure a fixed
revenue which it must be assumed
from the stand taken by Mr. Hays,
would need to be considerably less
than is now attempted to be collected. The city council not having been
elected when the assessment was
made, cannot be charged with having
been parties to the valuation which
was made. The council could, therefore with the greater grace make
some amicable settlement in the matter.
The matter of a fair settlement
without creating any misunderstanding between the city and the.company is all the more important just
at this particular time. There are
public buildings to be erected, the
city having no property of its own.
An adjustment of the assessment
question might be coupled with some
understanding In this connection.
Then again the company has not
yet commenced construction upon Its
own necessary terminal buildings. It
has long been a subject of rumor
that the engineering staff of the company did not agree on the point as to
where the shops and works of the
company should be located. While it
has been understood that these were
likely to be placed on the reserve
in question, yet leading officials favor
another site at Porpoise Island. Companies on a matter of pique have before today altered settled plans respecting terminals in cities and the
reversal of the decision to put the
shops in the city and transfer them
to Porpoise Island might easily
enough follow an open rupture on
this point. There is, moreover, the
question of a drydock costing a million and a half besides other works
that have yet to be announced and
which if located within the townsite
would mean much in the value of
city property which are to be considered carefully before the city
council refuses to lend Its good of-
fles to arrange an amicable settle
ment.
TENDERS RECEIVED
Bids Put in For Grading Second Avenue
From McBride Street to
Junction.
A SPLENDID OITV
Many   Offer   to   do   the   Work   on
Section  One  Improvement
Scheme
Local News
"toe were quite surprised at the
number of people who turned out to
meet us In Prince Rupert, said E. M.
McDonald, M.P. for Pictou, on his
return to Vancouver from his visit
here with Sir Wilfrid's party. "There
must have been anywhere between
four and five thousand. Prince Rupert Is certainly a unique place, a
collection of hills and hollows, with
miles of planked streets. They have
plenty of work before them In leveling up the townslte, but the place Is
certainly the nucleus of a splendid
city. It has a magnificent harbor,
and from a scenic standpoint Is quite
beautiful. The trip to Prince Rupert
is certainly an Ideal holiday journey
in the summer time. We had the best
of weather both ways."
At Saturday evening's sitting nf
the city council tenders were received
by the council for the carrying out
of local Improvement work on Second
avenue In section one, from McBride
street to the junction of Second and
Third avenues. The work was divided Into four sections, some of the
tenderers submitting figures for only
one section.
The figures were referred to the
streets committee for report. Tbe
tenders were as follows:—
Mclnnes & Kelly, section one, 134,'
796.92, at the rate of $1.86 for rock
excavation, and 65c for earth work
for moving and replacing plank drive
way, 16 feet wide, $1.10 a running
foot.
R. A. McMordle & Co., section two,
$13,523.73, at $2.20 for rock, 85c for
earth, 7 cents a square foot for
handling 16 foot road way and 10%
cents for 24 foot roadway. Section
three, $29, 973.23, at $1.90 for rock,
80c for earth, 7 cents for handling
16 foot roadway, and 10% cents for
24  foot roadway.
Westholme Lumber Company, section one, $36,166.58; section two,
$14,332.59; section three, $32,276.-
1S; section four, $45,119.74, at the
rate of $2.24% for rock work, 79c
for earth, $'l.20 for handling 16-foot
plankways, and $1.75 for handling
-4-foot plankways.
Watson & Co., section one, $28,-
"i()4, at $1.75 for rock work, and 70c
ar earth work; section two, $14,963,
.11 $2.30 for rock, and $1 for earth;
:oction three, $31,550, at $2.20 for
Oi it and 7uc for earth; section four,
'.59,113, at $2.95 for rock, and $1
for earth; removing and replacing
planking at 90c for 16-foot, and
$1.30  for 24-foot.
S. P. McMordie & Co., section one,
$32,009, at $1.90 for rock, and $1
for earth; section two, $12,355, at $2
for rock, and $1 for earth; section
three, $29,718, at $2.10 for rock, and
$1 for earth; section four, $42,391,
at $2.30 for rock, and $1 for earth;
for handling plank roads, $1.50 for
16-foot, and $2 for 24-foot.
B. C. La Trace, section one, $41,-
089.60, at $2.60 for rock, and 70e
for earth; section two, $15,036.75,
at $2.40 for rock, and 65c for earth.
Section three, $37,823.35, at $2.70
for rock, and 65c for earth; section
four, $58,041.07, at $3.19 for rock
and 90c for earth; for handling
planking, $1.60 for 16-foot, and
$2.40 for 24-foot.
Campbell & Mitchell, section two,
$13,275, at $3 for rock, $1.30 for
earth, and $2 for handling 16-foot
planking.
W. H. Ferguson & Co., section one,
$29,365.97, at $1.80 for rock, 60c
for earth, $1.28 for handling 16-
foot plank, and $1.88 for 24-foot.
Ross & McColl, section one, $37,-
703.60, at $2.20 for rock, 98c for
earth, and $1 for handling 16-foot
planking.
E. Rosand &. Co., section one, $33,-
221.65, at $1.S" for rock, and $1 for
earth; section two, $15,195.95, at
$2.15 for rock, and $1 for earth.
City engineer, section one, $38,-
000; section two, $15,906; section
three, $38,000; section four, $65,-
000; all at rate of $2.50 for rock, $1
for earth, and $1.30 for handling 16-
foot planking.
 0	
Erskine Smith, of the Red Cliff
Mining Company at Stewart, went to
Stewart on the Prince George. A. D.
Tennant, representing British capital In the same mine went on from
here with Mr. Smith.
 0	
Mr. J'. II. Rogers has gone south
accompanied by Mrs. Rogers and
members of the family who have
been visiting here for some weeks.
Mr. Rogers will be absent only a
few weeks.
Miss Mercer, of Nanaimo, who has
joined the teaching staff of ihe
school, arrived in the city by the
Prince George.
.Miss Mebius, of the public school
teaching staff, returned by the Prince
George and has resumed her duties
here.
* *    *
The Typographical Union of this
city has in view the putting on of
an excursion on Labor Day, September 5. A committee Is investigating the matter now. It is proposed
to charter one of the river steamers
for a trip up the Skeena.
* •    •
The city Is calling for tenders for
the construction of a 16-foot plank
roadway on Second street, between
First and Third avenues, and for
the close cutting and grading of the
same. Tenders will be received up
to noon  next Wednesday.
* *    •
Tenders for grading and close cutting of a 16-foot plank roadway on
Fifth, Sixth, Seventh, Eighth and
Fraser streets are being oalle.1 foi
by the city council The tenders
must be In by September 7.
'»» >«. •     •     •    •    pjefS'fc
The arbitration proceedings In
the case of the G. T. P.'s right of
way through Haysport on the
Skeena, has been allowed to stand
over for a time owing to the absence
of one of the arbitrators. Mr. Cares
Is the nominee of the company, Mr.
Naden of the Haysport owners, and
Mr. Pattullo, the third arbitrator,
was appointed by Judge Young.
SKEENA DISTRICT
Ferry, Kitselas, Skeena River.
IN ACCORDANCE with chapter
78, R. S. B. C, 1897, "Ferries Act,"
the Government of British Columbia
invite applications for a charter for
a ferry' to ply across the Skeena
River at Kitselas.
Applications will be received by
the Honourable the Minister of Public Works up to and including the
15th   of  September  next.
The limits of the ferry shall extend for a distance of one mile above
and one mile below said point.
The charter will cover a period expiring on the 31st, March, 1912.
The ferry shall be operated whenever  required  between   7   a.m.   and
7 p.m., very day excepting Sundays.
Applications shall give a description of the scow or boat it is proposed to use, and method of operation.
Applications shall state the tolls It
Is proposed to ask for—
Each adult passenger.
Each child (not in arms) under 13
years.
Each head of cattle, horse, mule or
donkey.
Each calf, sheep, goat or swine.
Each vehicle with one horse and
driver.
Each cart or wagon with one horse
and  driver, loaded.
Each vehicle with two horses and
driver.
Each vehicle with two horses and
driver, loaded.
Each parcel of twenty-live pounds
and under.
Freight     parcel     of    twenty-five
pounds and under.
Freight, per one hundred pounds
and under, non-perishable goods
Freight, per one hundred pounds
and under, perishable goods.
The Government of British Columbia is not necessarily bound to accept any application submitted.
F. C. GAMBLE,
Public Works Engineer.
Department of Public Works.
Victoria, B.C., 15th August, 1910.
WATER NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that an
application will be made under Part
V. of the "Water Act, 1909," to obtain a licence In the Skeena Division
of Coast District.
(a) The name, address and occupation of the applicant is The Municipal Corporation of the City of
Prince Rupert, County of Atlin, B.C.
(If for mining purposes) Free
Miner's  Certificate No.
(b) The name of the lake, stream
or source (if unnamed, the description is), Cloyah Lakes.
(c) The point of diversion, at the
foot of the Lower Lake.
(d) The quantity of water applied
for (in cubic feet per second), 150.
(e) Tbe character of the proposed
works, dam, pipe-line and power
plant.
(f) The premises on which the
water is to be used (describe same),
The Power site at mouth of Cloyah
River.
(g) The purposes for which the
water Is to be used,  Power.
(h)   If for Irrigation describe the
Grand Trunk Pacific  Steamships
For VANCOUVER, VICTORIA, SEATTLE.
Connecting   with   Eastbound   Trains
"Prince Rupert" sails every Thursday, 8.30 p.m.
"Prince George"   Balls  every Monday 8.30 p.m.
FOR STEWART:
"Prince Rupert" sails Wednesdays 8 p.m.
"Prince George"  sails Sunday   at 8 p.m.
Steamer for Masset, Klncollth.Naas  Bay  and  Port Simpson,  Sundays, I p.m.
For  Skldegate,  Queen Charlotte City,   and   other   Moresby Island
points, Wednesday, 1 p.m., returning via Queen Charlotte City.
Tickets, reservations and Information    from
A. E. NcMASTER
Freight and  Passenger Agent, G. T. P. Wharf.
land intended to be irrigated, giving
acreage.
(i) If the water is to be used for
power or mining purposes describe
the place where the water is to be returned to some natural channel, and
the difference in altitude between
point of diversion and point of return: Water will be returned at
mouth of Cloyah River, 55 feet.
(j) Area of Crown land intended
to be occupied by the proposed
works.
(k) This notice was posted on the
thirteenth day of August, 1910, and
application will be made to the Commissioner on the fifteenth day of
September, 1910.
(1) Give the names and addresses
of any riparian proprietors or licensees who or whose lands are like'y
to be affected by the proposed works,
either above or below the outlet:
Owners of lots 130, 131, 632, and
972.
(m) The boundaries and area of
the Municipality are aa follows:—
4. The said City of Prince Rupert
shall be bounded as follows:—
Commenoing at a post on the shore
of Shawatlan Passage, in Range 5,
Coast District of British Columbia,
and being the southeasterly post of
Section 9, Prince Rupert Townslte;
thence along the boundary of Set*
tion 9 as follows: South forty-three
degrees forty-seven minutes (43deg.
47mln.) weat astronomical, a distance of four hundred and fifty-one
and seventy-seven hundredth! (461.-
77) feet; thence north eighty-three
degrees thirty-seven minutes (83deg.
37min.) west astronomical, a dla-
tance of one thousand five hundred
and seventy-two hundredths (1,500.-
72) feet; thence south twenty-seven
degrees twenty-three minutes fifteen
seconds (27deg. 23min. 15sec.) west,
astronomical, a distance of three
thousand four hundred and seventy-
three and seventy-five hundredths
(3,473.75) feet; thence south thirty-
five degrees fifty-eight minutes
thirty-four seconds (35deg. 58min.
34sec.) west astronomica', a distance
of two thousand and fifty-one and
twenty-five hundredths (2,051.25)
feet; thence north sixty-two degrees
sixteen minutes twenty seconds (62
deg. 16mln. 20sec) west astronomical, a distance of one thousand one
hundred and twenty-four and eight
hundredths (1,124.08) feet; thence
south forty-seven degrees twelve
minutes ten seconds (47deg. 12mln.
lOsec.) west astronomical, a distance
of four thousand eight hundred
(4,800) feet, more or less, to a post
being the north-easterly corner of
Lot 1,194, Range 5, Coast District;
thence along the southerly boundary of Lot 1,994 south fifty-nine degrees forty-two minutes thirty-eight
seconds (59deg. 42min. 38sec) west
astronomical, a distance of three
thousand eight hundred and six and
sixty-eight hundredths .(3,1306.68)
feet; thence south forty-seven degrees seven minutes five. seconds
(47deg. 07mln. OSsec.) west astronomical, a distance of two thousand
six hundred and three and seven-
tenths (2,603.7) feet; thence south
seventy-nine degrees forty-one min-
uateB forty-three seconds (79deg. 41
mln. 43soc.) west astronomical, a
distance of one thousand three hundred and forty-one and twelve hundredths (1,341.12) feet; thence
south fifty-two degrees forty-six minutes twenty-four seconds (52deg.
46mln. 24sec.) west astronomical, a
distance of two thousand two hundred and forty-seven and ninety-six
hundredths (2,247.96) feet; thence
south sixteen degrees one minute
nineteen seconds (16deg. Olmin. 19
sec.) west astronomical, a distance
of three thousand one hundred and
Blxty-nlne and ninety-eight hundredths (3,169.98) feet; thence
north seventy-nine degrees twenty-
two mlnuteB (79deg. 22mln) west
astronomical, a distance of five hundred and thirty and sixty-four 'un-
dredths (530.64) feet, more 01 less,
to a post on the shore of Prince Ru-
per Harbour; thence west astronomical one thousand three hundred and
twenty (1,320) feet; thence north
astronomical a distance of twelve
thousand nine hundred and thirty-
six (12,936) feet; thence north
sixty-one degrees and thirty minutes
(61deg. 30mln) east, a distance of
twenty-three thousand seven hundred
(23,700) feet to a point opposite the
centre point of Shawatlan Passage;
thence along the centre line of Shawatlan Passage to a point due west
of the point of commencement;
thence due west to the point of commencement; the land area contained
within said boundaries consisting of
about two thousand (2,000) acres
and being shown on the registered
plans of Prince Rupert Townslte,
registered at Prince Rupert Town-
site, registered  at  Prince  Rupert.
(n) Approximately the number of
Inhabitants: Five thousand.
(0) The place of the proposed
reservoir for storing: The Cloyah
Lakes.
(p) The means by which It Is proposed to store the water: By a dam.
(q) The area or the reservoir site
or sites at each foot In depth above
the outlet: Six square miles.
(r) How It Is proposed to acquire
the land necessary for the purpose:
By purchase or otherwise.
(s) Approximately the number of
acre feet Intended to be Impounded,
38,400.
(t) Whether It is proposed to
lower the water In any natural lake
or standing body of water, and If so
then:—
(1) The anticipated extent of the
lowering.
(2) The means proposed to be
adopted to lower and refill.
(3) The nature and character In
detail, of the works proposed to be
constructed to provide for the discharge and penning back of the
water. Dam pipe-line and power
plant.
THE MUNICIPAL CORPORATION
OF THE CITY OF PRINCE
RUPERT.
By Its Agent, F. S. Clements.
A16.
Atlantic Steamship
 Agency	
Through tickets and excursion
rates to
England, France, Germany,
and all
Scandinavian Ports.
Call or write for rates to any
part of the world. I am also
agent for all American steamers
to and from Prince Rupert;
Northern Pacific Railway; Alaska Pacific Express.
J. H. ROGERS
General Steamship and Railway
Agent, Prince Rupert, B.C.
Canadian Pacific  R'y
Steamers leave Prince Rupert for Vancouver,
Victoria, Seattle
Princess Beatrice, every Monday at 1 p.m.
Princess May or Princess Royal
every Saturday morning.
Steamers leave Vancouver
Princess Beatrice every Thursday night.
Princess Royal every   Saturday
night at 11 o'clock.
Union Steamship Co'y
of B.C. Ltd.
The new Steel Passenger Steamer
"Camosun"
PRINCE RUPERT every Sunday at 9 a.m. for Vancouver,
arriving Monday afternoon.
For Stewart City on arrival from
Vancouver Friday night.
Northbound, leaves Vancouver
Wednesdays at 9 p.m.
Steerage Fare $5.00
The "Camosun" is the only steamer
on the run having water-tight bulkheads and double bottom, thus ensuring' safety of passengers in case of
collission or wreck.
J. H. ROGERS,   Ticket Agent
HAYNOR BROS.
FUNERAL  DIRECTORS
and
PROFESSIONAL EMBALMERS
DR. W. B. CLAYTON
DENTIST
—o—
Office  In   the   Westenhaver  Block,
Over Orme's Drug   Store.
Prince Rupert
WM. S. HAl,L, L. D. S. D. D. S.
:-:   DENTIST   :-:
Crown and Bridge Work a specialty.
All dental operations skillfully
treated. Gas and local anaesthetics
administered for the painless extraction of teeth. Consultation free.
Offices, Helgerson Bk., Prince Rupert
J. H. PILLSBURY
CIVIL     ENGINEER
Surveying,  Designs,  Estimates,  etc.
Room  7,  Exchange  Block,
Corner Third Ave and  Sixth  Street
Prince Rupert
G. W. NICKERSON & CO.
—o—
CUSTOMS AND MERCHANDISE
—o—
Brokers, Forwarding Agents,
Storage, etc.
J.  to.  POTTER
ARCHITECT    AND    STRUCTURAL
ENGINEER
Re-lnforced Concrete a Specialty
Law-Butler Building - Prince Rupert
GRAHAM ISLAND — "The surest
sign of the progress of a town or
district is its newspaper—live, active, hustling." "The Masset Review," Masset, Q.C.I.
The Thompson
Hardware Co.
-Second Avenue—
i .   Paints. General Hardware,   . >
Oils, Stoves and Ranges.
-\ Tuesday, August 30, 1910.
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
LINDSAY'S CfflGE & STORAGE
G. T. P. CARTAGE AGENTS
Office at H. B. Rochester, Centre St.
—o—
LADYSMITH COAL
Is handled by us.   All orders receive
prompt attention.  Phone No  68.
Some Rock
Bottom
Prices
S« Oi Ftr Inmtwit
Rupert City Realty & Inform
ation Bureau, Ltd.
PRINCE I0PEIT,
I.C
The Roland Rooms
Splendid Accommodations
Newly Furnished
Hot baths;  right down town;  good
table board all round
RATES, FIFTY CENTS AND UP
Fred Stork
General Hardware
...Complete Line of...
VALVES
Pipe>nd Pipe Fittings
CANCELLATION  OF RESERVE
NOTICE is hereby given that the
reserve existing on Crown lands In
the vicinity of Babine Lake, situate
In Range 5, Coast District, notice of
which was published in the British
oolumbla Gazette, dated December
17, 1908, Is cancelled In so far as
said reserve relates to lots numbered 1619, 1618, 1617, 1616, 1516,
1510, 1507, 1506, 1506A, 1503 1501,
1502, 1512, 1511, 1505, 1504, 1513,
1514, 1509, 1608, 1530, 1527, 1628,
1529, 1631, 1532, 1533, 1534, 1635,
1537, 1639, 1536, 1538, 1540, 1641,
1544, 1543, 1546, 1646, 1542, 1547,
1548, 1549, 1550, 1520, 1521, 1522,
1523, 1524, 1625, 1526, and 1551.
ROBERT A. RENWICK,
Deputy Commissioner of Lands.
Lands Department,
Victoria, B. C, June 16th, 1910.
(First insertion July 5.)
TAXES ON CORNERS
Property Owners in Section One Has
Objection to Raise Before
Council.
Delegation, However, Found That it
Had Postponed Too Long
in Matter
C. D. NEWTON
Real Estate
Honey to Loan
Notary Public
Exchange Block
Corner 3rd Avenue and 6th Street
P.O. Box 226   Tel. 226
Some corner lot owners In section
one have an objection to the method
of assessment for local Improvement
work which the city council has
adopted. On Saturday night, headed
by Mr. Westenhaver, a number waited on the council only to find that
they had raised their protest too late.
Members of the council expressed
their regret that the subject was
not brought up while the method of
'assessment was under consideration
so that the objections might have
been fought out. As It now stood
there would have to be a complete
change If the proposals were followed and work started over again.
Mr. Westenhaver expressed the
opinion that the owners were over
.assessed on corner lots for the work
of local Improvement. Corner lots
were approximately to be charged
87% per cent above Inside lots. This
was excessive, he thought.
Aid. Pattullo wanted to know how
much more revenue a corner lot
would bring In than an inside lot.
Mr. Westenhaver said he did not
know. The assesor's valuation was
based on 37% as compared with 25
on corner lots as compared with inside lots. Prince Rupert was provided with a rough townslte. The
government and the G. T. P. had
provided planking to get around. On
the strength of that lots were sold
for about if 5,000,000. The city should
he thought, from the fact that a
large revenue was to be derived, provide common rough thoroughfares.
He did not think corner lots should
be made to bear extra cost in this.
Aid. Pattullo did not see how this
could be altered now. Tenders had
been called for a part of the work.
his Worship agreed with this.
Mr. Westenhaver had understood
from two of tho aldermen that he
could speak before the council. The
fact that the blocks were short ones
made the corner lots all the less
valuable proportionately. The cross
thoroughfares were very short so
that there was not the chance of a
great number paslsng along them.
Aid. Lynch said that the improvements of a street gave the means of
reaching a place of business. A corner got 125 feet of frontage on a
street. Other lots got 25 feet. The
owners of corner lots were not to be
charged five times as much, but only
a third more. He proceeded to show
that corner lots were utilized aa
business for every foot on the streets.
Inside lots, even where property was
worth high prices per foot frontage,
had the back section of the lots
worth nothing to anyone.
Mr. Westenhaver wished to know
If the land value was not the basis
upon which the city proceeded, rather
than upon improvements.
Aid. Lynch said that In the matter
of local Improvement the city acted
as trustees. In theory a corner lo'
would have 125 feet of street to Improve. The council as trustees, however stepped In and relieve.! them
somewhat.
In reply to a question, Mr. West
enhaver said that the value of the
corner lots was probably fairly estimated at a quarter more than inside
Mr. Westenhaver said that the
owner of corner lots paid for all they
got. Either the assessment of the
corner lots was too low or the basis
of taxation for local Improvement
was too high.
He felt that It was a most unusual
thing for a loading charge to be
levied against corner lots for short
streets.
In view of the fact that the matter had gone as far as it had, it was
felt to be useless for the deputation
to further urge its cases as the discussion could only result in an
academic discussion at best. The
deputation, therefore, withdrew.
 o
QUESTION OF GRADING
Aldermen Iadulge in Little Personalities
Upon Slight Provocation.
Place for Commencing Work In Section One is Sore Point With
Some of the Council
SEEKS INVESTMENT
SATISFIED WITH Ii. C.
Representative of Mackenzie & Mann Is
Paying Visit to
North.
. D. McRae, the Manager of Millside
Mills, Inspects Whaling Station
And   Fisheries
«">"H"t">'<i<"K'»»»»<"t"M"H">"H">"<"*
Hear
the
Truth
There's nothing about a set of
harness that requires such careful
attention, in both leather and workmanship, as traces and collars, there's
where the strain lies, there's where
we excel, though we are just as
watchful as to every other detail of
a complete set of harness, be it for
heavy or light work.
B.C. Saddlery Company
Limited
MANUFACTURERS OP SADDLERY
Jobbers of Leather, Harness, Saddles, Whips, Trunks and Valises,
Pads, Blankets, Rugs; Harness SoapB
and Dressings.
566 YATES STREET
VICTORIA, B.C.
Don't
Forget
We have the stock and when *
you want to select a Diamond *
Ring, a Wedding Present, It Is %
no trouble for you to find some- %
thing that will suit you.   Our *
stock is composed of the best .j.
goods  that  the  factories  pro- 4,
ducp and we guarantee every- *
thing sold here. *
Bring us your   Watch    and %
Jewelry repairing If you want ?
it properly done. *
[ C. B. WARK I
!» ♦
•■>»;. ♦$. *fi tjt ijhJ. *j» »;«.♦. »♦« tj. *>,;, t|i .j. (|i ,*«»;. igtifi »j. »•« .j.»»«.5.
Clarmont Rooms
Sixth Avenue near Fulton Street
Comfortable, Homelike Rooms; Newly Furnished Throughout; Bath
Rooms  with   Hot  and
Cold Water
Rates, $3.00 a Week   and   Upwards
Mrs.   Annie   McGrath,   Proprietorcss
There was developed at the meeting of the city council last evening
a little friction over the question
of the commencement of tbe grading
oh Third avenue In Section one.
Aid. Smith Innocently asked the
question how the work was getting
along in the city engineer's office
looking to the calling for tenders for
the work.
His Worship said he had made inquiries only recently and the work
was well in hand and a report could
be expected very shortly.
Aid. Barrow suggested that if
econd avenue was to be graded first
it might be as well to postpone action on Third avenue until Second
avenue was ready for use. He
thought it might be well for a decision to be reached as an engineering
expediency. It might be unwise to
have the two thoroughfares blocked
up at the same time.
Aid. Hildltch said that It was a
case for the citizens to decide.
Aid. Mclntyre advocated an early
start on Third avenue. The fact
that it was a main thoroughfare
made It all the more Imperative that
work should begin at once on It.
He was well aware of the fact that
work was commenced on Second avenue first. It was, he felt, only a
co-incident ithat four members of
the council lived on Second avenue.
Aid. Pattullo wanted to know If
Aid. Mclntyre Inferred that any alderman had Interfered with the engineer in his report. If he did he
would like to know who it was.
Aid. Hilditch said Aid. Pattullo appeared to want to be the scapegoat
for Second avenue.
Aid. Pattullo said he was not satisfied with such treatment.
Aid. Mclntyre said that it was apparently only a co-incident that four
of the aldermen lived on Second avenue. He was anxious to see Third
avenue graded as soon as possible.
He had not intended to treat this
seriously.
Aid. Barrow said that Second and
Third avenues were the only means
of reaching the city and it might be
very inconvenient to have both blocked at once.
Aid. Pattullo said he aprpeciated
a joke as well as any one but he did
not like the way Aid. Mclntyre introduced this reference. He saw
nothing to show that the engineer
had been influenced in holding back
his report. No such inference would
have been introduced had the cases
been reversed.
Aid. Smith said his only reason
for Introducing this was in order to
have the engineer kept stirred up
on It.
Ills Worship said that a start had
to be made somewhere. The engineering staff was very busy. He did
not like to keep after that staff al!
the time. There were incidental matters coming up all the time. He disagreed with any Insinuation that because there were a number of the
council living on Second avenue having anything to do with this.
Aid. Hilditch thought it peculiar
uiat Third avenue was held back until after Second avenue was attended
to In view of the fact that there were
buildings waiting to be constructed
on Third avenue. There wire no
such buildings waiting on Second avenue.
Aid. Pattullo said he had cltlclzed
the actions of aldermen. He never
criticized the motives of any aldermen. He would not have his motives
criticized as It wns contrary to the
rules and he would not stand for It.
The matter was then allowed to
drop.
A. D. McRae, the head of the big
mill on the Fraser In which the Mackenzie & Mann interests are the controllers, Is in the northern part of
the province at the present time. He
came north on the Prince George
when the Sir Wilfrid Laurier party
arrived. Since that time he has spent
little of his time in this city, however, having various Interests to look
into with which his company is concerned.
He has now gone to the salmon
canneries on the Skeena and will
cross over then directly to Rose Harbor to Inspect the whaling station
there. The Mackenzie & Mann interests have an option on the works
there In common with the rest of
the whaling Investment of the Pacific
whaling Company. Mr. McRae will
make an Inspection there and will
have information to lay before the
president of the company, Mr. Mackenzie, on his arrival on the coast
next week relative to the conditions
as he found them.
The fact that Mr. McRae : as covered so much of the teiritory contiguous to Prince Rupert d' ling the
past week wouid seem to Indicate
that the heads of the CanaJiar
Northern, with the vast amount of
capital now available for them in the
Old Land, are looking to Northern
British Columbia as the best investment.
Mr. McRae is one of the young
men to whom the Mackenzie & Mann
interests have assigned large responsibilities. He Is a man of wonderful
energy and exceedingly practical.
 0—	
ISrilisli  Investor  Has  Every  Confidence in the Pucific Province
INTERESTED IN COAL
Ernest Leverson, of Vancouver,
who represents British capital on the
coast, is a visitor to the city. He
is accompanied by Mr. Bechtel, who
also is the representative of capital
and who is paying a visit to British
Columbia to look Into what the province has to ofTer.
They went on to Stewart by the
Prince George, returning here again
last evening. Mr. Leverson has large
timber holdings on Work Canal near
here which he will visit during his
stay In the city and satisfy himself
as to the value of them. The area
has been cruised and Is reported upon as very valuable, but he wishes
to see It for himself.
Speaking generally of British Columbia, Mr. Leverson Is well pleased
with it as a field for Investment. He
has no hesitation In putting his
money Into this part of the empire,
believing that Its potentialities are
unexcelled anywhere In the world.
A noted statesman was very fond
of riding on horseback and being
vastly conceited about his fine figure,
wore stays to show It oft. One day
he was thrown from hla horse and
lay prone on the road. A farm laborer from a neighboring field ran to
his assistance. The first aid man began to feel the statesman all over
and suddenly yelled out to another
laborer: "Run, Jock, for heaven's
sake, for a doctor! Here's a man's
ribs running north and south Instead
of east and west!"
NEW POSTAGE STAMPS
Canadian    Issue    Will    Likely
Simultaneous With British
be
It is understood that while in London, en route to South Africa, Hon.
Rodolphe Lemieux, the postmaster-
general, will confer with the British
postal authorities in reference to the
new issue of postage stamps necessitated by the accession of King
George V.
No date has yet been fixed for the
issue of the new stamps, but it is
believed that an agreement will be
come to by which new stamps will be
Issued simultaneously In the United
Kingdom, the Domlnons and dependencies probably in June next, coronation month. Mr. Lemieux will probably submit designs for the new Ca-
natlon stamps to the king In person.
 0	
BEST WHALING SITE
LONG  LOST   NINE
Work to Resume on the Anaconda on
Queen Charlotte
Islands.
Measures   Nay   Be   Opened  to   Supply
Trade at Prince
Rupert.
Controlling  Interest  in   Vast Fields
Paid Business Visit Here
This Week
Mystery Surrounding Property Will
Apparently Never Re Entirely
Cleared Up
Rose Harbor is Taking Plentiful Supply
of  Mammals
Now.
New   Station   is   In   Full   Operation
Running to its Fullest
Capacity
Capt. Huff, managing director of
the Rose Harbor Whaling Station
on the southern end of the Queen
Charlotte group, is In the city, having come by the Amur. He brought
over with him a Japanese workman
at the station who had the misfortune to fall Into the steaming vat and
in consequence had to be brought to
the hospital here.
Capt. Huff reports that the whaling nt his station Is most successful
and that It Is proving the most desirable site for the purpose on the
coast. There are more whales available than the station Is able to handle. At the present there are about
120 men employed there, but of this
staff a number are engaged In the
building of additions to the station.
Only one whaler Is In operation
now, but the Germania on the west
coast of Vancouver Island will come
north in a few days to aid the William Grant in the work of taking
the mammals. The capacity of the
station at the present Is about three
whales a day.
Capt. Huff looks to the building
up of other Industries particularly
the milling business at the site of
the station.    With regard to the re-
The Anaconda Mine on Queeti
Cnarlotte Island, about which there
Is such an air of romance, is about
lo be worked on a commercial basis.
This Is the mine which was rediscovered a few years ago after being deserted for probably a century and
about the early history of which
there is no trace. When discovered
a few years ago there were trees of
a hundred years' growth on the old
dump. Indicating the time that had
elapsed since the working in the mine
had ceased. Up to the present them
has never been anything found to
indicate who were the men who sunk
a shaft for a depth of over a hundred
feet and then mysteriously disappeared.
There are Indications at the mine
that some crude smelting operations
were carried out by the original
workers who had a tramway from
the mine to the spot nearby where
the smelting was carried on. Along
the route of the tramline, however,
there Is a growth of vegetation which
includes trees from twelve to eighteen Inches in diameter, and showing
rings that Indicate that they have to
been growing there for well on lo
100 years.
The new owners of the property, a
Vancouver syndicate, embraces A. P.
Hale, A. E. Hale, H. Clarke, to.
Clarke, and W. T. Dunn. The Messrs.
Hale and H. Clarke arrived In the
city on Saturday and continued on to
Vancouver yesterday with samples of
the ore which will be assayed, They
have   been   clearing   the     mine     nf
water preparatory to beginning active work In the workings. They are
well satisfied with tha results of the
operations and will at once purchase
the necessary machinery to licgln
work In a systematic way.
The shaft will have to be straightened and a hoist put in. They will
then proceed at once on the face of
the tunnel that has been driven for
over a hundred feet along the vein.
Th workings are In solid ore, there
being about eight feet In width exposed. The ore Is of good value and
will they expect, give excellent returns to the owners.
Speaking of the mystery surrounding the lost mine, Mr.Hale says he
believes that It was worked about
1O0 years ago. He Is of the opinion
that the miners engaged there met
death at the hands of the Indians
who wiped out all trace of their murderous deed and nothing was ever
known of their fate. A skeleton was
found  near the place when  the dls-
There has been in Prince Rupert
this week C. Ross McAdam, of Vancouver who controls valuable coal
measures on the Queen Charlotte
Islands. The area embraces about
20,000 acres, part of which Is crown
granted, and was Included In the old
Cowgitz property where coal was
taken out nearly fifty years ago and
supplied to the ships of the British
navy in these waters.
Mr. McAdam visited the properties
a short time ago and Intended to
have gone on this time to the Islands
but was overcome by sickness resulting from an old Injury received, and
had, accordingly, to keep close to
his room at the Prince Rupert Inn.
There are parties Interested In the
claims and It is possible that Mr. McAdam may turn over the property
to interests that will at once take up
the development In order to supply
a market at Prince Rupert.
Should the deal pending not be
carried out, tht e are, according to
Mr. McAdam, others waiting to Investigate, and there Is every prospect
that they will 'nterest the necessary
capital in the project to fully develop
the mines and give to this city the
best coal to be found on the Pacific
coast. The output of the prospects Is
a rich anthracite which tests, according to the engineers who have examined it, very high. There is a
very low proportion of ash found In
it, also, so that it is of special value.
The properties are close to tide
water and are so situated that "the
ships of seven seas" can load there.
As a commercial proposition it has
been pointed out by the Western
Steel corporation that owns claims
adjoining these that "for navigable
purposes it may be considered nearer
San Francisco than Nanaimo on Vancouver Island It."
Mr. McAdam'a measures, according to his engineers, have seven
veins aggregating a total thickness of
42 feet. One of these veins has a
thickness of 17 feet. There have
been numerous tests made by engineers of repute upon these measures and the character of the coal
taken from them. These are all of
a most satisfactory character and Indicate the extreme richness of the
coal fields to be found on the Islands.
These will make Prince Rupert one
of the best supplied coal centres on
the coast If the engineer's opinions
are borne out by actual results. S.
G. Marsh, manager of the government test works at Cariboo, referring
to samples submitted to him from
the coal of Queen Charlotte Islands,
CONGRATULATIONS
The city council at Its meeting on Saturday night received what was regarded as
"honorable mention" in a
message from D. Morris, of
Ottawa, who was formerly
mayor of that city and who
has during the past year made
very heavy Investments on 'lie
Pacific Coast in Prince Rupert,, Vancouver and Victor.a
Mr. Morris congratulated the
council on taxing land values
only in the taxation of the
city.
It was decided to reply to
the message.
makes special mention of one sample that is taken from Camp Anthracite which Is Included In Mr, Mc-
Adam's holdings. The report on It
says "It Is an extrn good sample of
anthracite." The analysis of this
show the following: Moisture, 2.14;
lixed carbon, 113.72; volatile matter,
.78; ash, 3.86,
Mr. McAdam Is becoming quite a
booster for Prince Rupert. His visits
to the place has led him to believe
that It is to become the greatest centre on the coast and while he Is at
present concerned mostly In the coal
proposition he has taken occasion to
secure other things In the district
that will be developed by him, and
which will mean the creation here of
Important Industries that will assist
In the making of this the Important
point It is destined 0 become.
puted   option   on   the   whole   of  the
whaling Industry on the coast, which ; covery was first made but there wan I WANTED—Good sales girl; easy
Mackenzie & Mann have secured, j nothing to Indicate who the person! work; short hours. Apply Simon's
Capt. Huff had nothing to say. j had been. I Fair, Third avenue. PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Tuesday, August 29, 1910i
KILL OFF BEAVERS
Colony on Lulu Island Has Been Wiped
Out By Author
ity.
Busy Little Animals Were Too Much
For the Farmers of the
District
The passing of the beaver from
his haunts on Luiu Island marks an
interesting phase in natural life of
this part of British Columbia, says
the New Westminster Columbian.
During the past year the beavers in
this section of the Fraser Valley, protected by law from destruction at
the hands of hunters and trappers,
have multiplied rapidly. They cut
down trees and built dams across the
canals near the dyke on Lulu Island
JiiFt outside the boundaries of the
city of New Westminster In the municipal of Richmond, thus affecting
agricultural operations in this fertile section. As a result of representations made to the provincial
government as to the damage being
done by these animals, by residents
of the district, an order was passed
providing for killing them on Lulu
Island.
To C. S. Ferris, an old ,.lme resident of Lulu Island, who brought this
maiter to the attention of the government, was asisgned the task of
killing off hese beaver. This has
been done, the services of an ex-
prienced trapper being secured for
the purpose and a large number of
beaver being caught. As a result of
this the dyke and canals in Richmond and modern agricultural operations are not now injuriously affected by the misplaced energy of the industrious little animal.
The trapping of these destructive
beavers was instituted by the provincial govi .nment at the instigation of
Mr. Ferris, who was given a warrant
to trap them. He engaged an experienced t ,iper for the wort at $75
per month and succeeded in catching
19 of them. About that time other
residentsof the district who had received no permit from the government began trapping these animals,
and as a res> »i they soon disappeared. The beavc: is a very prolific
animal and so quickly did it multiply
on Lulu Island that at one point
within a space of two miles there
v>ere found no less than five beaver
dr.ms.
In an interview recently Mr. Ferris
gave a representative of the Brit'sh
Columbian an Interesting description
of the beavers found on Lulu Island
and some of their habn: and peculiar
characteristics.
Mr. Ferris pointed out that the
heaver Is properly termed one of the
first American engineers and that he
has construction which no engineer
has yet been able to fully explain.
It was the beaver, iaid Mr. Ferris,
who taught the people of this country how to dam their streams and direct theil currents of water into
plac es of usefulness. On Lulu Island
which is particularly well adapted to
the habits and nature of the beaver,
tne bank beaver Is found, as distinguished from the hill heaver which
banks streams between two hills. Thf
bank beaver lives on the low lying
level of a long grade, and Lulu
Island where there Is a six Inch fall
to the mile, proved admirable for his
purpose. Along the canals In Richmond grow alder, white blr'h, Cottonwood and poplar, which are th?
favorites of the beaver bo'h for food
and for use In constructing ills dams
and houses.
fin  Lulu Island the beaver felled
■se trees Indiscriminately Into the
canals which are I lie drainage outlets
of the country, blocking ihom up and
causing trouble generally. TTo ate the
branches, bark and leaves and left
the bare trunks. The farm of Mr.
Ferris, Richmond, 25 acres In extent,
was .. ■ of the places net affected In
■ iiis •• ,' and the dykes mil drainage
scheme were rendered of no avail.
\ftcr cutting clown the t 'ees and
trimming off tiie branches the beaver
cuts the trunks up Into small sections
exactly two feet in length and ioln<-
ed like a lead pencil. He takes these
to the bottom of the stream and fs
ens them there with a firmness which
no pile driver can equal or engineer
explain. After putting several nf
these In place he Intertwines the
whole with brush and brunches and
-• in with mud which he carries
oi his tall. He follows this work
up with another column of stakes
and thus builds a dam which he
raises to the height required.
Needless to say this work of the
beavers along the canals and by the
dykes on Lulu Island had a serious
''fleet oi, the farming community and
called   for  prompt  measures  which
were taken to rid this part of the
country from the effects of this animal which had become a pest in the
locality. Now anyone may drive over
the habitation of the beaver on that
part of Lulu Island and find the land
both drained and culivated, the erstwhile home of the beaver being replaced by land worth fully $1,500 per
acre.
During the years when the beaver
flourished on Lulu Island, protected
by law, an old Indian trapper used
to poach regularly In the canals in
Richmond and in this way secured
many an unlawful pelt. One night
he hitched his canoe to a beaver dam
while he went away to enjoy himself,
and upon his return he found the
joke on him for the Industrious
beaver had worked through the night
and had one end of the canoe firmly
embedded In the mud at the bottom
of the dam. After that the Indian
evidently discontinued his poaching.
When Mr. Ferris secured permit to
destroy these beaver, his trapper
took up this old canoe which had become a part of the dam and used it
In his work of catching the beaver.
 o	
INDIA'S TRIBUTE
Memorial  to King Edward is Beinj.
Arranged in That Country
Throughout India memorials to
King Edward VII are being arranged, but it has been widely felt that
so beneficent a reign should be commemorated by an All-India Memorial, to be erected in some central
spot. This feeling finds definite expression in an official proposal to
erect an equestrian statue of his late
majesty at Delhi. It is stated, in a
communication to the Indian Press,
thatt he scheme has received the
King-Emperor's approval, and that a
certain committee will shortly be
formed for the purpose of collecting
subscriptions and arranging all details in connection therewith, under
the presidency of the viceroy. While
the smallest contributions will be
acceptable, in order that the project
may be representative of ail classes
of his majesty's subjects in India, the
subscription lists will be limited to
five lakhs, and the balance not actually required for the statue at
Delhi will be expended in taking up
land for an ornamental garden. A
fair indication of native opinion on
this subject is afforded by the following comments of the "Indian Mirror." "We rejoice," remarks that
journal, "to see that the predominant
feeling among the masses and classes
is one of unflinching loyalty to the
British government. We notice with
particular pleasuret hat the chief
cities in India are to the fore with
practical suggestions for erecting
suitable memorials to the late sovereign. In Madras a sum of nearly
Rs20,000 has been promised or collected, and local committees have
been formed for raising more funds.
Bombay has held a great meeting,
and the memorial it proposes to
raise will assuredly be one befitting
its reputation. In the Punjab prominent non-officials have come forward
with substantial offers of subscription, and committees have been formed to canvas baaar shops, so that
even the poorest may have an opportunity to subscribe. The sum
already raised Is Rs60,000. The
United Provinces propose to raise an
Imperial memorial at Delhi in the
form of a statute of the late King-
Emperor. Calcutta's demonstrations
of mourning on May 20 last were of
an unparalleled magnitude."
 o	
MAY  NOT FLOATED
Little success has so far attended
the efforts of Captain Logan, representing the underwriters of the
steamer Princess May, In launching
her from her position on the reef at
Sentinel Island. Temporary ways
were built around the steamer, and
she was lifted off the rock, but the
tic effort to slide her Into the water
failed. She-moved a short distance
but did not get free of the reef.
It is quite evident  that the Santa
Cruz was  too  small  a   tug  for    the
work.    As the wreck is in American
wafers  the  Salvor  was  not   allowed
to operate these, and accordingly for
that reason the Santa Cruz was sent
i north to do the work.    The William
j Jolliffe, of the British Columbia Ma-
| rlne Railway Company, will now aid
i ir  the work.    Capt. Mcl.eod and the
ether officers  and the  crew  cf the
I steamer are staying by her and aiding in the salvage operations. As soon
as she is floated they will take her
to  Esqulmalt,   where  she    will    be
hauled out on  the British  Columbia
Marine Railway slip and tenders called for her repairs,
 o	
In figuring out the supporting
.itrength for theatre galleries, grand
stands and such structures, the
weight of a crowd Is estimated at
from 123 to 133 pounds per square
foot.
v T
%        Reliable Recipes %
«. *
***************.**********-!'
Scrambled Eggs With Ham.—
Scramble some eggs In the usual
manner, and just before they are
ready to serve add one cupful of finely minced cold boiled ham. Have
ready squares of nicely buttered
toast. Spread half of these with
the ham mixture; lay another slice
on *op of each, and serve at once.
Ramekins of Sweetbreads.—This
is a new way to prepart them: Put
ond and one-half cupfuls of rich
milk into the double boiler and heat
to the boiling point, then add one
large teaspoonful of cornstarch
rubbed smooth In one tablespoonful
of softened butter; cook four minutes; remove from the fire and add
the beaten yolks of three eggs, one
cupful of chopped sweetbread, previously par-boiled, a little salt, and
a dash of pepper and nutmeg; lastly,
the beaten white of eggs. Turn Into
ramekins, and bake twenty minutes
in a moderate oven.
Colonial Cake.-—An old colonial
recipe for yellow loaf cake calls for
one cupful of butter, two and a half
cupfuls of granulated sugar, six eggs,
a cupful of thin cream or rich milk,
one even teaspoonful of soda, two of
cream of tartar, four cupfuls of
pastry flour and one cupful of seed-
raisins. Cream the butter and sugar,
then stir in the yolks of the eggs.
Add the cream of tartar to the flour
and sift them together several times.
Add the soda to the milk and stir
the mixture into the butter, sugar
and yolks. Then beat the whole into
the flour and cream of tartar. When
smooth ad the raisins, and finally
fold the whites of the eggs whipped
to a very stiff froth, through the batter Do not stir the cake after the
whites are added. Butter a large
tube pan and fill it half full. After
i has baked and become cold, ice it
with a heavy snow-white icing that
will contrast prettily with the yellow of the cake. Citron sliced in
thin strips may be used instead of
raisins or in combination with them.
It Made a Difference
William B. Ridgely, former controller of the currency, said of a certain speculator recently:
"The man is as ingenious as a
horse trader's son who was once unexpectedly called upon by his father
to mount a horse and exhibit its
paces.
"As he mounted he leaned towards
his father and said:
" 'Are you buying or selling?' "
COAL CLAIMS
Skeena  District—Queen  Charlotte
Islands.
To all to whom it may concern:—
NOTICE is hereby given that I, the
undersigned, Intend to apply for a
license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum upon the following lands
situate on Graham Island, one of the
Queen Charlotte Group, in the Province of British Columbia, and more
particularly described as follows, viz:
Commencing at a stake planted one
and a quarter miles west of the
north-east corner of Louis Inlet, and
marked "P. C. Coates' S. E. Corner
Claim No. 1," thence west 80 chains,
thence north 80 chains, thence east
80 chains, thence south 80 chains to
the place of commencement.
Staked June 14th, 1910.
Dated this 28th day of July, 1910.
P. C. COATES,
By his Agent, Wm. Edward Laird.
A9
COAL CLAIMS
Skeena  District—Queen  Charlotte
Islands.
To all to whom it may concern:—
NOTICE is hereby given that I, the
undersigned Intend to apply for a
icense to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum upon the following lands,
situated on Graharr Island, one of
the Queen Charlotte group, In the
Province of British Columbia, and
more particularly described, as follows, viz:—Comemncing at a stake
"lanked at the S. E. corner of P. C.
Contes' Claim No. l, and marked
"Wm, Penman's S. W. Corner, Claim
No. 1," thence east 80 chains, thenee
north 80 chains, thence west 80
chains, thence south, 80 chains to the
place of commencement.
Staked, June 14th, 1910.
Dated this 28th days of July, 1910.
WM, PENMAN.
By his Agent, Wm. Edward Laird.
A9
LAND   LEASE   NOTICE
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that The Canadian
Fish & Cold Storage Company Ltd.,
of Vancouver, occupation Mercantile
and Manufacturing, intends to apply
for permission to lease the following described land:—Commencing at
a post planted at high water mark
on the westerly side of Prince Rupert Harbor and distant about 110
chains from the north-east corner of
Lot 443, thence west 20 chains,
thence soutii 20 chains, thence east
5 chains, more or less to high water
mark, thence following along the
high water mark to the point of commencement and containing 20 acres
more or less.
The Canadian Fish and Cold
Storage Company, Limited,
J. H. Plllsbury, Agent.
Dated June 20th, 1910. Jylj
LAND PURCHASE NOTICES
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Phillip Williams, of Sydney, Nova Scotia, occupation accountant, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein
ley:—Commencing at a post planted
at the S. E. corner and about 16%
miles distant in a north-westerly direction from the north end of Kitwancool Lake, thence north 80
chains, thence west 80 chains, thence
south 80 chains, thence east 80
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 640 acres, more or
less. PHILLIP WILLIAMS.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 4, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Annie Grieve,
of Victoria, B. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kltwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. W. corner, and about 17% miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence south 40 chains, thence
east 4 0 chains, thence south 40
chains, thence east 40 chains, thence
north 80 chains, thence west 80
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 480 acres, more or
less. ANNIE GRIEVE.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 4,  1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that John Cox, of
Monarch, Alberta, occupation farmer, intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described
lands, situated in the vicinity of Kit-
wane ool or Chean Weln Valley: —
Comencing at a post planted at the
north-west comer and about five and
one-quarter miles distant in a northwesterly direction from the north end
of Kitwancool Lake, thence 80
chains south, thence SO chains east,
thence 80 chains north, thence 80
chains west to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres,
more or less.
JOHN COX.
James to. Smith, Agent.
Dated  May  30,  1910. JyB
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that James Alexander McDonald, of Monarch, Alberta, occupation farmer, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands, situated in
the Kitwancool or Chein Wein Valley:—Commencing at a post planted
at the N. E. corner about five and
one quarter miles distant in a northwesterly direction from the north
end of Kitwancool Lake, thence south
80 chains, thence west 80 chains,
thence north 8 0 chains, thence east
SO chains to point of commencement,
and  containing  640  acres,  more or
JAMES ALEXANDER McDONALD
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated May 30,  1910. Jy5
Coast Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that I, Ernestine
A. Roney, of Prince Rupert, occupation married woman, intend to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted on the north
bank of the Skeena River about half
a mile south of Geo. T. Church's preemption, thence west 10 chains,
thence north 40 chains, thence east
to the Skeena River; thence southwest following the bank of the
Skeena River to the place of beginning, and containing about 80
acres.
ERNESTINE A. RONEY, Locator.
W. A. Roney, Agent.
Dated July 7th, 1910. Jy22
Coast Land District—District of
Skeena.
TAKE NOTICE that I, J. Adolpb
Perry, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation
book-keeper, intend to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted on the north bank of the
Skeena River, about a mile west of
Lot 31, thence north 40 chains,
thence east 80 chains to lot 31,
thence south 40 chains to bank of
Skeena River, thence west about 80
chains following north bank of
Skeena River to point of commencement, and containing about 320
acres.
J. ADOLPH PERRY, Locator.
Wm. A. Roney, Agent.
Dated July 16th, 1910. Jy22
Coast Land District—District of
Skeena.
TAKE NOTICE that I, Mary M.
Roney, of Stillwater, Minnesota, U.
S.A., occupation married woman, intend to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands.
Commencing at a post planted on the
north bank of the Skeena River at
tho south-east, corner of ueo. T.'
Church's pre-emption, thence north
•10 chains, thence east 40 chains,
thence soutii to tho bank of the
Skeena River, thence south-west following the Skeena River to the place
of beginning and containing about
120 acres.
MARY M.  ROENY, Locator.
W.   A.  Roney,  Agent.
Dated July 8th, 1910. Jy22
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Violet Geiger,
of Victoria, B. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands In the vicinity of Kltwancool or Chean Weln Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. W. corner and about 23% miles
distant In a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kltwancool
Lake, thenco south 80 chains, thence
east 40 chains, thence north 40
chains, thence east 40 chains, thence
north 40 chains, thence west 80
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 480 acres, more or
less. VIOLET GEIGER.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 7th,  19^0. Jy8
LAND PURCHASE NOTICES
Skeena Land District—District of
Ofl RfliiRT*
TAKE NOTICE that Pearl Caspell
of Cayley, Alberta, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. E. corner and about 15% miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence south 80 chains, thence
west 40 chains, thence north 40
chains, thence west 40 chains, thence
north 40 chains, thence east 80
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 480 acres, more or
less. PEARL CASPELL.
James to. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 3, 1910. jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
PflRsiftr
TAKE NOTICE thai Mary Brown,
of Vancouver, B.C., occupation married woman, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of
the Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—Commencing at a post planted
at the North-east corner and about
ten miles distant in a north-westerly
direction from the north end of the
Kitwancool lake, thence south 80
chains, thence west 40 chains, thenco
north 40 chains, thence west 40
chains, thence north 40 chains
thence east 80 chains to point ol
commencement, and containing 480
acres, more or less.
MARY BROWN.
James to. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 1, 1910. JyS
Skeena Land District—District of
On ^fii *i v
TAKE NOTICE that John Henderson, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
agent, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. ,W corner and about 25 miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north 80 chains, thence
east 40 chains, thence south 80
chains, thence west 80 chains to
point of commencement and containing 320 acres, more or less.
JOHN   HENDERSON.
James to. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 7th, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
.TAKE NOTICE that Laura Gordon
of Victoria, B. O, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—■
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. E. corner and about 18 miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence soutii 40 chains, thence
west 40 chains, thence north 40
chains, thence east 40 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 160 acres, more or less.
LAURA GORDON.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated  June  4,   1910. jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Ofissi&r
TAKE NOTICE that Walter Marke
of Toronto, Ont., occupation traveller, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following, described
lands in the vicinity of kitwancool
or Chean Wein Valley:—Commencing at a post planted at the N. E.
corner and about 27% miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kltwancool
Lake, thence soutii 80 chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence north 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to the
point of commencement and containing 640 acres, more or less.
WALTER MARKE.
James  W. Smith, Agent
Dated June 8th, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
0*1 ssiji r
TAKE NOTICE that Richard
Howie, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation dentist, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands In the vicinity of
Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. E. corner and about 24% miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kltwancool
Lake, thence south 80 chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence north 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
RICHARD HOWIE.
James to. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 7th,  1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
On Qfilfli*
TAKE NOTICE that Sandford
Burton, of Vancouver, B. O, occupation mining engineer, Intends to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands In the vicinity of Kltwancool or Chean Wein
Valley:.— Commencing at a post
planted at the N. E. corner and
about 23% miles distant In a northwesterly direction from the north
end of Kitwancool Lake, thence south
SO chains, thence west 80 chains,
thence north 80 chains, thence east
80 chains to point of commencement
and containing 640 acres, more or
less. SANDFORD BURTON.
James to. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 7th, 1910. Jy8
LAND PURCHASE NOTICES
Skeena Land District—District of
Ofl^SlllF
TAKE NOTICE that Norman Cle-
land, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation printer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands In the vicinity of Kltwancool or Chean Weln Valley:—
Comencing at a post planted at the
S. E. corner and about 26% miles
distant In a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kltwancool
Lake, thence north 80 chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence south 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
NORMAN  CLELAND.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 8th, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
O'issin,]"
TAKE NOTICE that Ethel Welsh,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation, married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
south-east corner and about 10 miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north 80 chainB, thenee
west 80 chains, thence south 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to
point of commencement and containing 640 acres, more or less.
ETHEL WELSH.
James W. Smith, Agent
Dated June 1st, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Henry Welsh,
of Vancouver, B. O, occupation
printer, intends to apply foi permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. E. corner and 11 miles distant
In a north-westerly direction from
the north end of Kitwancool Lake,
thence north 80 chains, thence west
80 chains, thence south 80 chains,
thence east 80 chains to point of
commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
HENRY WELSH.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 2, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Frederick
Welsh, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation clerk, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Klt-
wanoool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-east corner about 11 miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence south SO chains, thence
west 40 chains, thence north 80
chains, thence east 40 chains to
point of commencement, and containing 320 acres, more or less.
FREDERICK WELSH.
James W. Smith, Agent
Dated June 2,  1910. Jy8
Skeena Land Dlstriel—District of
Cassiici.
TAKE NOTICE that James Welsh,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation machinist, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Weln Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. to. corner and about 12 miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kltwancool
Lake, thence soutii SO chains, thence
east 20 chains, thence north SO
chains, thence west 20 chains to the
point of commencement and containing 160 acres, more or less.
JAMES WELSH.
James to. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 2,  1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Marguerette
Burns, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission .o purchase the
following described lands In the vicinity of Kltwancool or Chean Weln
Valley:—Commencing at a post
planted at the N. E. corner and distant about 12 miles In a northwesterly direction from the north
end of Kitwancool Lake; thence
south 80 chains, thence west 20
chains, thence north 80 chains,
thence east 20 chains to point of
commencement, and containing 160
acres, more or less.
MARGUERETTE  BURNS.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 2,  1910.- Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles F.
Burns, of Moncton, New Brunswick,
occupation auditor, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands In the vicinity of Kltwancool or Chean Wein
Valley:—Commencing at. a post
planted at the south-west corner and
about 12 miles distant in a northwesterly direction from the north
end of Kltwancool Lake; thence
north 80 chains, thence east 80
chains, thence south 80 chains,
thence west 80 chains to point of
commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
CHARLES  F.  BURNS.
James to. Smith, Agent.
Dated   June   2,   1910 Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that James Jar-
dine, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
merchant, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of Kltwancool  or Chean   Weln    Valley:	
Commencing nt a post planted at the
N. W. corner and about 13 miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence south SO chains, thenee
east 80 chains thenee north 80
chains, thence west 80 chains to
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
JAMES JARDINE.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 2,  1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Ofl fi R \ a Y
TAKE NOTICE that John McDiar-
mld, of Lucknow, Ont., occupation
farmer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands In tho vicinity of the
Kltwancool or Chean Weln Valley:	
Commencing at a ptist planted at the
S. W. corner and about 13 miles distant In a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kltwancool
Lake; thence north 80 chains, thence
east 40 chains, thence south 80
chains; thence west 40 chains to
point of commencement, and contain-
in i   320 acres.
JOHN  McDIARMID.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 2, 1910. Jy8
 mn imumu; Tuesday, August 29, 1910
THE   PRINCE   RUPERT   JOURNAL
NEWS OF THE PROVINCE
Items of General Interest From Centres in British Columbia.
I being experienced at Victoria. This
ceiuent shortage is seriously affecting
civic sidewalk work and in combination with a shortage of gravel, is
holding up progress on several of
the street works.
Captured Eagles
Fernie.—While mountain climbing
near Morrlssey on Sunday, Percy
Bean noticed a deer and a fawn on
the hillside near him. He crept cautiously through the brush endeavoring to get a better view of the pair
and while thus engaged he saw a
huge eagle alight on a jutting crag of
rock a short distance away. He Investigated and discovered a nest containing a pair of golden eaglets. He
was unable to get to the nest, but
he decided to get the eaglets nevertheless. Removing his shoe laces he
made a lasso and attaching It to a
sapling he aroused the curiosity of
the birds by sundry yells of an alluring nature. One of the birds rubbered over the cliff and Percy forthwith slipped tbe noose over its head
and unceremoniously yanked it off
its perch. He carried his prize down
the hill, fighting off the mother bird
at frequent Intervals. Here he met
his brother John, and they decided
to return to the aerie and secure the
other bird. This was captured by the
string method and both were brought
to the city. The birds are about
the size of a full grown hen turkey
and have a spread of wings of about
five feet. They are well feathered
and would have been able to fly before long. They are thriving in captivity and are capable of consuming
large quantities of neck steak. Percy
will raise the pair, notwithstanding
the fact that there Is a bounty for
their destruction.
Immense   Power
New Westminster. — Some time
within the next twelve months one of
the largest electric power plants in
British Columbia, that of the Western Canada Power Company, Limited
now being erected on the Stave River
about thlrty_-five miles east of New
Westminster, will be placed in operation. This plant is being installed
at a cost of $2,500,000, and when
completed will be capable of supplying 50,000 horsepower. The whole
country for a radius of 175 miles
around the plant may be supplied
with light and power, and electric
lines built throughout that section
of the province.
Peat Beds Near Vancouver
Vancouver.—For a period of ten
years, Vancouver's fuel supply could
be cut off, and yet Its citizens would
not have to eat their beef raw, or
stay in bed all day during the winter months to keep warm. Not a bit
of coal, of wood, gas or electricity
would have to be used, none of the
present day agencies for producing
heat employed, and yet the people
would be just as comfortable and
eat just as well cooked meals as they
have In the past.
Out in the Burnaby district lies
a barren, dreary stretch of land, four
miles in length, varying from two
and a half to three-quarters of a mile
In width, and beneath the scanty
vegetation that covers an apparently worthless marsh, lies the fuel
that some day the citizens of this
city will be using.
The land in question is a bog, a
typical Irish bog, and the substance
beneath the brush Is peat, used for
centuries as fuel in the Emerald Isle,
and pronounced to be one of the best
and cheapest means of producing
heat. Here, within seven miles of
the centre of this city Is the future
fuel supply, millions and millions of
yards of It, to be had by a simple
turning of a spade. Here is the
Piace e people will turn to when
the supply of wood grows smaller,
wnen the price of coal goes up a few
more dollars per ton.
Nor has this splendid eposlt of
nature's wealth been entirely overlooked by local people. At present,
there Is a plant operating on tho bog,
th deopslts are not being turned Into
fuel, but employed for the novel use
of bedding for rich men's horses.
This plant, owned by Mr. W. J. Kerr
oi New Westminster, is at present
turning out about twenty-five tons
of ground peat every day, and shipping it, In bales resembling baled
hay, to all the fashionable stables of
Vancouver, Victoria and Nanaimo.
Large Rive* Plant
Nelson.—The application of the
Pacific Exploration company for permission to erect a large electric
power plant on the Pend d'Oreille
river, near Waneta, has been granted
and plans of the proposed huge plant
with a dally capacity of 25,000 horsepower and so built that the capacity
may be doubled will be forwarded for
consideration of the lieu tenant-govern or-in-council.
The president of the new company
is H. C. Hall, of Nelson; J. W. Falls
is manager, and A. i. Lorch, secretary. A considerable amount of Nel-
Eon capital is involved. The promoters of the new enterprise expect to
furnish electric power to the Pend
d'Oreille valley, the Sheep Creek and
Ymir districts, and to the Orient,
Chewela and Metaline districts. On
the other side of the International
boundary the Northport smelter Is
expected to be another consumer of
poewr. It Is expected that the unlimited supply of power wil 1 immensely stimulate industrial and
mining developments. Rumors are
also in circulation that the C. P. R.
Is Interested in the project, and that
the power will be used for the electrification of Its transportation system on the Crow's Nest line.
City Material Misused
Victoria.—That city foremen are
delivering material taken from the
city streets to private parties, material taken from the city streets to
private parties, material which
should have been placed on the roadways where the city is now paying
money for filling, was the statement
by Mayor Morley at a meeting of the
streets committee o fthe Victoria city
council. The mayor stated that he
had personally investigated and had
found that city property is being given to private parties without charge.
He referred to Manchester street
from which material had been taken
to private property when but a short
distance away the Gorge ravine was
being filled In by the city which was
paying for the filling. The city engineer stated that this dumping on
private grounds was necessary because there is no civic property on
which to deposit the material. The
mayor stated that on Hillside avenue
material was being carted to private
property when the driver of the
wagon had to pass over a spot on the
roadway where the material could
have been used to advantage and that
too when the city is paying $1.20 per
yard for filling. The engineer will
make a full report on all such cases.
"White Wings" For Victoria
Victoria.—If the suggestion made
by the city engineer were adopted by
the city council, Victoria would have
what in other cities is termed a
White Wings brigade. The city engineer believes that the men engaged
In the street cleaning works should
be attired In white uniforms which
would add greatly to their appearance and at the same time make
them conspicuous objects in the
streets where the traffic is heaviest.
His recommendation was made to the
street committee last night, but It
was laid over for future consideration. The mayor failed to see the
necessity of putting the present members of the street cleaning fore In
uniforms as they are old men and
more or less lack organiaztion. But
when the street cleaning force is
property organized and younger men
are chosen for the work, then it
would be time enough to consider
the question of uniforms.
Speedy Construction
Kamloops—Speedy construction of
Canadian Northern Pacific grades
out of the city of Kamloops is indicated. T. H. Whie, chief engineer
for the Canadian Northern railway,
has been with the survey party at
Battle Bluff, where a long tunnel will
have to be driven. Mayor Robinson
had an interview with him concerning Canadian Northern matters. Mr.
White has, it is understood, received
instructions to forward at once to
Toronto the working plans of this
section of the railway. This is taken
to indicate the speedy letting of a
contract.
City Finances
Kamloops,—At a recent meeting
of the city council the half-yearly
report of the auditors was presented
and accepted. The report shows a
balance to the good of $12,600.70,
notwithstanding the marked deficit
in the waterworks and electri; lighting working accounts.
Shortage of Cement
Vancouver.—Local builders are
complaining of the continued shortage in cement, a condition which is
seriously interfering with building
operations. For the past month the
situation has been almost acute. Cement has been brought into the city
from Seattle and other points, but
so great is the demand that supplies
are Inadequate. Today a supply will
arrive from the Old Country on the
Blue Funnel boat, some 1,000 barrels, but this will only meet immediate demand and make no provision
for the future.   The same trouble is
Dream United Family
Vancouver.;—A mysterious dream
was the means of uniting the family
of Mr. Jas. Jones, a prominent resident of Vancouver. Mr. Jones, his
sister, Christina Jones, and his
brother, Robert, the latter two residents of Boston, took dinner together
recently, the first time in twenty-five
years. Mrs. J. Jones had a vision
in which she saw her brother-in-law
in a beautiful strip of land dotted
with small cottages. Following the
night of the dream Mrs. Jones wrote
to the parish preacher at her old
home in aWles. The 'jlnister upon
getting the letter discovered that a
wealthy touring party -was the long
lost brother and Bister. Cables were
exchanged. At the same time that
the Wales people started for Amer-
ice, Mr. and Mrs. Jones left Vancouver for Boston. The re-unlon with
all the blended joy and pathos took
place at the South Boston home of
Robert Jones.
COLOR OF WATER
Doubt Exists as  to the Real  Shade
of Pure Liquid
A New Town
Kamloops.—The work of building
the new town on the Fraser river opposite Kamloops, known as Fruit-
lands, is now In progress and under
the management of the Fruitlands
Company, of which R. M. Palmer, ex-
deputy minister of agriculture for
British Columbia is president. The
company have 10,000 acres of the
finest fruit lands of the province
available. They have subdivided this
into small holdings which are being
sold to incoming settlers to engage
In fruit culture under advantageous
circumstances. A $100,000 Irrigation
plant Is being installed by the company and many buildings are being
erected. The Canadian Northern
line will run through the town on
Its way to the Pacific Coast, thus giving satisfactory transportation facilities.
The buildings for the new town
are being erected by the firm of Snider & Brethour, of this city, Vancouver and Victoria. The company are
planning to invest some $400,000 in
buildings in Fruitlands and have already expended about $75,000 in this
work. Construction work has started
some four or five weeks ago and
the contractors now have a gang of
about 25 men at work erecting dwellings, stores and other necessary
buildings.
 o	
OVERESTIMATE LOSS
Report of Fire Warden on the Destruction by Fire in
Province.
Eight Lives Were Lost During Conflagrations in British Columbia
In July
A report of interest is that of Chief
Fire Warden Wynward C. Gladwin
as to the fire loss and forest protection work of July. From this document it is noted that there has been
considerable exaggeration of the
financial losses occasioned by the
fires ravaging the various timbered
areas of the province during July.
Mr. Gladwin estimates the total
losses of the month at $40,000 In
timber, and $317,760 in improvements, which latter include the various mining buildings falling prey
to the flames. No fewer than 401
fires received official attention during
the month, the government's expenditures in fire fighting amounting to
$40,163.53 in salaries and expenses,
while private companies or Individuals are credited with the disbursement of a further sum of $20,000,
making a total expenditure of $00,-
ooo.
Of the total of 401 fires, upwards
of 25 per cent are attributed to C.
V. R. locomotives. Eight lives In
all were sacrificed, six men perishing
in the fire at the Lucky Jim mine,
and two others—an Englishman and
i Japanese—being killed by falling
trees while engaged In fighting fires.
 o	
A little Boston boy and his mother
were studying the ancient mammals
and the subject was at that time uppermost In his mind. One day he
answered the door bell and announced to his mother than an ichthyornls
was at the door to see her.
Astonished, she asked, "What do
you mean?"
Returning from the door she again
addressed him, saying: "My son, that
was only a collector."
"Well," answered the learned Bos-
tonlan, "Isn't that a beast with a
bill?"
Strange as it may seem, the precise color of chemically pure water
Is still a matter of controversy. Common as water is, it comes so near to
being a universal solvent that there
is always a matter nf doubt whether
its color may not be due to minute
quantities of some dissolved or suspended impurity. In "Nature," London, W. H. Hartley, writing from
the Royal College of Science, Dublin,
gives reasons for supposing that the
color of perfectly pure water Is blue.
After noting the fact that "optically
pure water cannot be obtained by
distillation," he says:—
"Pure water was prepared by Tyn-
dall by melting clear block Ice in a
vacuum. Its color was blue when
seen through a tube three feet long.
"The color of a hard water which
has been softened by Clark's process
may be seen at the Colne Valley
water works, visible from the train
on the up-line just south of Watford
station, and at Joynson's paper works
at St. Mary Cray in Kent. When the
members of the Society of Chemical
Industry visited these works some
time ago, they were struck by the
very beautiful blue of the water. It
was even suggested that it had been
purposely colored with a very pure
blue dye. Water of similar purity,
containing very little mineral matter, being remarkable for its softness,
comes from the Greensand below the
London clay. Such blue water I
have noticed in the bedrooms and
bathrooms of the Euston Hotel, the
supply coming from an artesian well.
"There are two natural sources of
extremely pure water with which I
am acquainted, and I cannot believe
that the water from the second
source receives any color or appearance of blue through the reflection of
light by fine particles in suspension.
The first is in the Fairy Loch beside
Loch Lomond, situated on 3 little
promontory south of Tarbert. It is
difficult to see that there is any
color in the water except at a point
where it wells up from a fissure In
the rock and passes over a vein of
milk-white quartzite which crosses
the bottom; here It exhibits a beautiful blue color.
"The second source is the Wells
of Dee, situated In the Larig (Learg
Gruamach) at the foot of Ben Mard-
hul, and between It and Braerlach,
about half-way between Deeside and
Spreyslde. It is a smal tarln or pool
with  a  bottom like  that of  three
miles of the pass—nothing but large
pieces of splintered red granitic rock.
It stand about 2,700 feet above the
sea. The water, according to my
recollection, passes underneath broken rocks in a narrow rift in the
mountain side, and is derived from
the melting snow on its northern
slope near the summit, which is
1,598 feet (1,500 feet by my aneroid) higher and above all vegetation. The pool Is too small toi be
shown, but the stream which runs
out of it appears on the river of that
name. The bottom of the email pool
is visible everywhere, and Its apapr-
ent color varies In proportion to Its
depth, being dull red near the sides,
to a brownish-purple where It Is absolutely deepest. The pure blue color
of the water was only seen rn putting a white object, such ai t piece
of porcelain, Into It. The effect of the
blue color of the water on the light
reflected from the red rock at the
bottom Is to give It a purple tint.
"It Is evident that the blue to wholly due to the absorption of rays of
complementary color, because If it
were not, the reflection of blue rays
by suspended fine particles would be
seen against a dark ground on looking Into the water. As a matter of
fact, the water when undisturbed
on the surface was not visible; It was
very difficult to form any Idea of
its depth, everything on the bottom
being sharply defined. These observations were made under a diffused
and subdued light in a very clear atmosphere, the light being of a uniform intensity over the whole sky,
which was entirely covered with
small greyish clouds, no direct sunlight or blue sky being visible anywhere. A fact adverse to the view
that the blue could be reflected light
is that the light which escapes reflection has a reddish-golden color.
In a hazy atmosphere when the sun
is low and we look towards it, we see
the golden color; in the opopsite direction we see the blue opalescence.
The white light from the sky traversed the water In two directions to the
bottom, and then, by reflection, back
again, and it is safe to say that these
two opposite colors would neutralize
each other."
Morlarity had been badly hurt by
falling from a scaffold, and after the
ambulance had carried him away the
question of breaking the news to
Mrs. Moriarity came up. "Send Han-
nigan," suggested one of the gang.
"He's just the man to break the news
gradual—look how he stutters!"
NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that application will he made to the Legislative Assembly of the Province of
British Columbia at its next Session
for an Act to incorporate a company
with power to construct, equip,
maintain and operate a line or lines
of railway of standard guage with
any kind of motive power for the
conveyance of passengers and freight,
and with all the powers contained
in the "Model Railway Bill": Commencing from a point at or near
Port Simpson, or Work Channel, In
the Coast District, British Columbia,
by the most feasible, desirable and
practicable route to a point on the
Eastern boundary of the Province of
British Columbia, via the South-west
side of Work Channel to the Skeena
River; thence up the North side of
the Skeena River to a point near
Hazelton; thence to the junction of
the Bulkley River; thence up the
right bank of this River eight (8)
miles to the Suskewa River; thence
up this River by a low divide to tbe
head of Babine Lake; thence to the
north end of Stuart Lake; thence
north of McLeod Lake to the MIs-
nlchlnca River; thence up the Mls-
nichlnca River by Summet Lake to
Pine River Pass; thence north-westerly to head of Pine River, and down
this River to Moberley Lake; and
thence by the Peace River to the
Eastern .boundary of the said Province of British Columbia; and with
power to construct, operate and
maintain all necessary bridges, roads,
ways and ferries; and to build, acquire, own and maintain wharves and
docks in connection therewith; and
to build, acquire, own, equip and
maintain steam and other vessels and
boats, and to operate the same on
any navigable waters; and with
power to build, equip, operate and
maintain telegraph and telephone
lines in connection with the said
Railway and branches, and to transmit messages for commercial purposes, and to charge tolls therefor;
and to generate and to sell electricity
for the supply of light, heat and
power; and with power to expropriate lands for the purposes of the
Company; and to acquire lands,
money bonuses, privileges or other
aids from any Government, municipal corporation or other persons or
bodies; and to levy and collect tolls
from all persons using, and on all
freight passing over any of such
roads, railways, ferries, wharves and
vessels built by the Company; and
with power to connect with and make
traffic or other arrangements with
railway, steamboat, or other companies:
Dated at Victoria, B.C., this 11th
day of August, 1910.
BARNARD &  ROBERTSON,
A19.       Solicitors for the Applicants.
At the Hounslow Heath school
twenty-eight boys and fourteen girls
have cultivated a rod of ground each.
The cost of seeds and utensils was
under 2s per plot, and the value of
the yield is estimated at 25s for each
plot.
JsA \sAA kAai \sAA kA4 \\SsA kAd kiVal kAA kAJ kAA kAA kAA kA4 kA4 kAJ hA4 kAai kA4 atA.
*$cik>««««*«*««**{.{<*******^
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^WWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWI^ THE   PRINCE  RUPERT  JOURNAL
Tuesday, August 30, 1910.
SPORTS
SCULLING  CHAMPIONSHIP
Upon the most important river on
the east coast of Africa, llowing
through a succession of wide fertile
valleys and richly wooded plains, the
sculling championship of the world
has again been decided, the coveted
belt being retained by Dick Arnst,
who wrested the honor from Billy
Webb on the waters of Wanganui,
after flashing meteorlike into the
canopy of aquatics, and has now
downed Barry, the English champion.
Three years ago Dick Arnst did
not know how to sit in a boat; twelve
months later he was hailed as champion sculler of the world—an unique
record, truly, in the history of the
arena of sport. Arnst first shone as
a champion among champions when,
after a tremendous effort, he landed
the $5,000 Austral wheel race in
the most exciting finish ever known
on the bicycle track of Australia,
and his sensational jump made to
pass the leading cyclist, a few yards
from the winning post, is a matter of
athletic history. Following this victory Arnst gave his attention to the
gun and became one of the crack
pigeon shots of the Commonwealth.
Then his eyes turned in the direction
of the sculling championship, and
despite the fact he said he "knew no
more about pulling a boat than making a speech," his determination to
succeed was strong, and although he
upset his outrigger in his first essay
in a few weeks, passengers aboard
the ferry boats gliding the Parra-
matta river were surprised to see
Arnst skimming the waters with a
stroke which caused them to believe
Dick Arnst's boast anent securing
the world's sculling championship
was not an idle one.
Soon Arnst was among the nominators for sculling events and showed
his capabilities as an oarsman. Not
content with these successes he set
Out after the gem of the aquatic belt
.—the championship—and challenged
Webb of New Zealand, the holder.
Webb, dreaming, maybe, of easy
money, accepted. D|ck went into
training In real earnest. Sporting
writers sat down and wondered,
Webb trained and smiled. Arnst,
away over on the Wanganui, trained
and remained quiet.
Then, three days before the event,
came the news of a sensational trial
by the modest Dick. It awoke a
keener interest andonthe day of the
battle somehow Australia remembered the determination of modest Richard and prognosticated a close race
—but it would be too much to expect
that an almost novice would gain the
coveted title. Bye and by the crowds
waited in the streets for the result.
It came as a flash: "Arnst, Easily."
and then Australia was satisfied that
Dick Arnst was one of the wonderful
athletes of a decade. They say over
yonder If Dick only made up his mind
to enter the fistic arena he would
cause a good deal of worry to some
people.
The last race Arnst won by seven
lengths, in 20 minutes, 3-5 seconds.
Barry rowed out.
 o	
TO KEEP OLD SCHOOL OPEN
Two Divisions  Created  for Primary
Work in the City
The public school opened jester-
day with a good attendance of pupils.
The new school has not neen oulte
completed, so that 't is necesary to
open In the old building on Second
avenue. In the course of a few
days the main portion of the pupils
will be transferred to the new
school but the old school will be
kept open for the convenience of the
younger pupils residing in that section of the city.
Principal Hunter will take the
senior work in the new school, while
Miss Martin will be first assistant
there, taking the intermediate work.
In the primary work up to and in-
eluding the First reader, there will
be two divisions, division 3 and
divison 4. All pupils in that work
living on the old school side of Fulton street will attend the old school
where Miss Mercer will have charge.
All on the new school side of Fulton
will attend classes in the new school
under Miss Mebius.
 o	
MARINE NEWS   I
...........A......... .„-.,., ..,<■. t
FAMILIAR VISITOR
Municipal Notice
TENDERS FOR PLANK ROADWAY
AND GRADING
Sealed tenders endorsed "Tender
for r/lank Roadway, etc." will be received by the City Clerk until Wednesday noon, September 7, 1910, for:
(1) The construction of a 16-foot
plank roadway and trestle on Second
street between First and Third avenues.
(2) Grading and close cutting on
Second street.
Plans, profiles and specifications
may be seen and form of tender obtained at the office of the City Engineer.
The lowest or any tender not
necessarily accepted.
ERNEST A. WOODS,
WM. M. DAVIS, City Clerk.
City Engineer. A30-S2
Municipal Notice
TENDERS I nit PLANK ROADWAY
AM) GRADING
Capt. S. F. Mackenzie, who formerly operated a line of steamers between Prince Rupert and the south,
was a visitor to the city this week.
He came north in connection with
the Inverklp now unloading cement
here. Capt. Mackenzie was the consignee of the cement cargo which
was placed with Foley, Welch &
Stewart, and with the Canadian Fish
& Cold Storage Company,
The captain congratulates himself
Upon the expedition with which he
was able to deliver the goods, it being several weeks ahead of the time
specified. The cement, which is made
at the Green Island factory, near
Hongkong, is that used by the Imperial government in the docks at
Hongkong which is an assurance as
to its quality.
The Inverklp will load barley at
San Pedro for the United Kingdon,
after discharging here. She will make
the  voyage  by  the  Horn.
CITY WILL INSTAL
TEMPORARY PLANT
PLANS FOR CRUISERS
The firms which decided to tender
for the construction of vessels for
the Canadian navy will have to examine the plans in England. Though
construction will be carried out in
Canada, admiralty officials are not
anxious to have the plans sent for
even confidential inspection. It is
also argued that as most of the tenders will be made by British firms or
by British and Canadian firms allied, there is no reason why the plans
should be sent to Canada until the
work of construction begins.
NAVAL TENDERERS
Sealed lenders endorsed "Tender
for   Plank   Roadway,  etc.,"   will  bo
received by the City Clerk until
Wednesday noon, September 7th,
1910, for: —
(1) 'I'he construction of a 16-foot
plain; roadway on Fifth, Sixth,
Seventh, Eighth  and  Fraser streets.
(2) Grading and close cutting on
above streets.
Plans, profiles and specifications
may be seen and form of tender obtained nt the office of the City Engineer.
The lowest or any tender not
necessarily accepted.
ERNEST A. WOODS,
WM. M. DAVIS, City Clerk.
City Engineer. A30-S2
Meeting Tonight!
A meeting of the directors of the
Agricultural Association will be held
this evening In the Board of Trade
rooms at 8 p.m.    All come.
GEORGE D. TITE,
Chairman of Agricultural Assn.
Three Canadian firms, along with
three British firms, have been Invited
by the department of marine to tender for ships for the Canadian navy.
One British Columbia company—the
British Columbia Marine Works at
Bsquimalt—Is included in the Canadian list, the other two being the
Poison Iron Works, Toronto, and
the Collingwood Shipbuilding Company, Collingwood, Ont. The Old
Country firms Include Swan & Hunt-
I er Ilnrlnnd &■ Wolff, and Vlckers &
Maxim. In addition to these the
Thorneyeroft & Constance nnd Hawthorne firms are enquiring into the
matter. Air. Hunter, of the firm of
Hunter & Swan, is now on this coast,
and was a visitor to Prince Rupert
this week.
A few weeks back notices were
sent out by the department of naval
affairs Inviting responsible firms who
intended tendering on the construction of the ships of the Canadian
navy to submit their names and stating that if approved, they would be
privately shown the admiralty plans
upon  which to base their proposals.
As Intimated in the preliminary
notice sent out, the provisions of the
Rush-Bagot treaty preclude the construction of warships on the Great
Lakes of Canada, but It is understood that certain of the Canadian
firms are prepared to locate on the
seaboard in conjunction with some
of the British interests.
(Continued from Page One)
per lamp hour, or about 36 cents per
month for one lamp burned three
hours every night. The price of six
cents per k.w. hour for power, basel
on an eight hour service for 365 days
with a load factor of 50 per cent, is
equivalent to about 66 dollars per
horsepower year, charging for maximum demand. The city can, of course
fix its own rate to consumers; the
very reasonable figure of 12 cents per
k.w. hour will give the city a gross
profit of fifty per cent.
The initial Installation of 330 k.w.
will be sufficient to supply 5,000 carbon lamps In section one, with 80
clusters of tungstens; and 4,00 carbon lamps with 80 clusters of tungstens in the outlying sections.
The minimum demand guarantee
of 187,500 k.w. hours is about the
same as was figured on by the city
engineer to be supplied by a small
temporary plant for street lighting
in section one with a limited number
of carbon lamps. There is no possible doubt that the initial demand will
be several times this amount.
Other Propositions
The Continental Power Company,
which has' rights at the Hocsall
river and Wolf creek, some time ago
made a proposal which on motion
was read to the council.
The Tslmpsean Power Company
likewise had submitted to each member of the council a proposition
which was regarded as under consideration. This latter proposition
wasmade under threeseparate heads,
the first two lookingto steam power
and the last to the development of
water power at Woodworth lake.
This proposition was not read.
Aid. Barrow asked if this last
named company would be agreeable
to instal any one of these that the
city might select without being
bound to take the others.
Mr. Brutinel, who was present,
said he could not do that.
The first two propositions were
distinctly money losers to his company.
Temporary Plant
Aid. Barrow thought this tying of
the city up for a term of years was
too important for the council to decide off hand. He thought therefore
it would be wised to have the council proceed to take up the question
of Installing a city plant for temporary purposes at the foot of McBride
street.
His Worship said that in any event
no matter what system was adopted
the city would have to instal the
wires, the transmitters, etc., for distribution In the city limits.
Aid. Mclntyre thought that the
city had shown its unity In the matter for municipal ownership In the
case of telephones. He strongly
favored municipal ownership In a
general way. There might be reasons
for varying from it in some instances.
The poles would have to be put in by
the city anyway. They might perhaps
have proceeded with that before. He
thought it inopportune to deal with
any of the companies at present. The
Installation of a temporary plant by
the city would be the best now. It
would be unfair to the electroate to
enter Into a contract with any company just now. It would be taking
a snap verdict.
Withdrew Offer
Mr. Burtinel asked permission to
speak. He said that he would have
to withdraw his proposition. He understood when he submitted his proposition that the city was anxious to
get a supply of power at once. Now
as he understood it, the city appeared to be anxious to take time to Investigate the whole situation. His
company was not afraid of any such
investigation and did not want to
fore? the hand of the city at all. He
felt that his company had the power
that would eventually have to be
used by the city. He accordingly
withdrew his proposal.
Aid. Pattullo wanted to have the
city engineer's proposition considered. He would be more In favor of
adopting a plan that would aim at
supplying light to the whole city.
They might then with some reason
prohibit the use of gasoline.
The city engineer's report was
then read as published from time to
time in these columns.
Aid. Lynch explained that the
negotiations entered Into with the
sash and door factory was first
commenced in view of the question
of time. As far as the cost was concerned there would be very little difference. He believed that the $30,-
000 plant would have been the most
economical. The best thing to do was
io deal with the sash and door factory If It could be done, or falling
this put In a steam plant. The engineer's estimate was that the cost
would be ha'f a cent per hour for a
16-candle power lamp. Even if
three-quarters of a cent per 16-candle power per hour was required It
would not be excessive. He sugegsted
that the mayor and the city engineer
and the solicitor investigate tomorrow and see if some arrangement
could not be made with the sash and
door factory.
A Larger System
Aid. Pattullo favored putting in
the larger system. Next year would
come along and no settlement would
have been made for a permanent sys
tern.
His Worship said at first he had
strongly favored the sash and door
factory. It looked now as if it would
be Inadequate. The machinery to
be Installed there by the city would
cost over $6,000, with $3,650 for
rental from the factory. The cost
would be over $9,700, and would not
supply even section one. To InBtal a
plant on the street end on McBride
there would not be more than $5,000
additional which would serve longer.
He almost favored the $30,000 which
would be sure to serve the city for
two years.
Aid. Pattullo said that if the fire
risk was wiped out he would favor
the cheaper plant. This would not
be done, however, and he thought it,
better to instal a plant that would
wipe out the risk.
Aid. Hilditch said the sash and
door factory proposition seemed high
at first, but in view of the fact that
they would get It quickly, It meant a
lot. If this were not done it would
take until March to get the light. He
thought the city engineer was high
in his estimate. He thought there
were local men that if they called for
tenders would give an early installation at reasonable cost. The most
feasible proposition was to get the
sash and door factory if possible. If
that was not possible they should call
for tenders for the Installing of a
plant and the stringing of wires
within twelve weeks at the outside.
Might Hurry Work
Aid. Lynch thought perhaps the
engineer could instal the plant a
little quicker than was estimated. He
had himself installed a engine and
boiler about as big as this in two
weeks.
Mr. Burns, of the city engineer's
staff, being appealed to for information as how long it would take to Instal, said that the putting up of the
pole line was the longest task.
Aid. Smith did not favor tying up
with the sash and door factory. It
would be inadequate. There was to
be a cry from outlying parts, and no
power to give. If they were not going to get power from outside he
favored putting in a city plant and
doing it as quickly as possible.
Aid. Barrow said that as they were
assured that the cost per light was
not exorbitant, he thought the engineer might go ahead. He was glad
the sash and door factory proposition
was called off. The plant would only
be a temporary one, as he understood It.
Aid. Hilditch said he was informed that the plant could be installed in
about six or eight weeks. He felt
that It could all be got in Vancouver
and they might wire for It.
Aid. Pattullo wanted a concrete
proposition from the electric light
committee. If that were done they
could proceed at once. He wanted
to know exaotly what the machinery
was that was required.
His Worship said they might ask
Aid. Mobley, who was In Vancouver,
to Investigate.
Aid. Pattullo wanted to know
what was now proposed.
Milne's Weakness
His Worship said that he believed
that If Mr. Milne had taken this question up from the standpoint of putting the plant on land Instead of on
a waterfront lot with the greatly Increased cost, this would now be running.
Aid. Smith was satisfied that If the
council wanted to go into this the
committee could bring In a report
that would convey something definite.
Aid. Lynch said the committee
would require to ascertain where a
plant was available. If the mail service was waited for it would take a
long time.
Aid. Pattullo thought it would be
December before the light would be
got. There would be little chance of
getting much benefit from a plant
this winter. It would be well to do
the work so that an adequate plant
would be In for next winter.
A motion that the matter be referred to the electric light committee
to bring In a report as expeditiously
as possible was carried.
Mr. Durant thereupon stated that
he was ag*ent for the Canadian Electrical company, and had a lot of Information on hand which would be
of valuable assistance. He would be
willing to aid In every way In the
"WHERE QUALITY IS KING."
GEO. D. TITE
Furniture Dealer
3rd. Avenue
Prince Rupert
An inspection of our stock
of House Furnishings will
convince you. For quality and
economy you will leave us a
satisfied customer.
Dlnlnj Room Furniture, SUeboirdi,
Buffets, Dlnlnj Tabid. 6ft.
and 8ft. EitMuloi
Dlnlnj Room Chain, Onartmd Oik with
leather Seats, Golden or Early Enfllah
flnlah. Prices naiinj Iron
Just Received a
Handsome Line of
Iron Beds, Springs and
Mattresses, all sizes
WINDOW BLINDS
Manufactured here to lit any
window  up  to 10 feet wide.
Tapestry and Lace Curtains,
Poles and Trimmings
Special orders for Upholstering
of any kind.
$22.50 to $50
Wicker Chairs and Rockers
GEO. D. TITE,    -    3rd Ave.
SHERWIN & WILLIAMS
-PAINTS-
COVER THE EARTH.
WE   ARE   SOLE   AGENTS
CARLOAD JUST ARRIVED
Ready Nixed Paints,
Paints Ground in Oil,
Paints Ground in Japan,
Varnishes, Shellac, etc.
Water Stains
and
Decotint
IN ALL COLORS
Prince Rupert Hardware & Supply
Company. Ltd. thos. dunn, Mir.
mB\mmmB\mmmmBmmmmBmmmmmmB\msB
The Westholme
Lumber Company, Ld.
We carry the largest stock of
Building Supplies in the North.
Quotations given on short notice in all lines.
Rough and Dressed Lumber
Shingles and Lath
Mouldings and Cases
Doors and Windows
We handle Plaster and Lime at reasonable prices
Get our quotations for all classes of buildings,
FIRST AVENUE
OFFICE AND
WAREHOUSES
work proposed for a temporary plant
and believed he could save the city
considerable time and trouble.
Mr.  Durant'B  offer was  accepted
with thanks.
 o	
PLEASED WITH  MINE
J. A. Mara, of Portland Canal Company Returns From Inspection
J. A. Mara, one of the directors
of the Portland Canal Mining Company, returned last evening on the
Prince George from Stewart, where
he made an Inspection of the work In
progress there. He had Intended
waiting until Mr. Dickie arrived, but
came away on the same steamer as
the managing director went In on.
Mr. Mara says things look exceedingly good at the mine and the concentrator will be running in a couple
of weeks. He was very much encouraged with the prospects at the
Portland Canal property and feels
sure of Its permanent value.
He went on to Victoria last night.
 LADYSMITH	
COAL
H. B. ROCHESTER,  -   Centre Street
*

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