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Prince Rupert Journal Sep 2, 1910

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legislative hdb^
New Welllnjton
Coal
is the best
ROGERS I BUCK
Sole Auents
Peine* Bttpiyt
•■t\
High-Class
Job Printing
In all Lines
VOLUME  1
Published Twice a Week
PRINCE RUPERT, B.  C,   FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 1910.
Price, Five Cents
NO.  23.
THE  DISTRICT PACK
Skeena  River  Has  Put  Up  a  Large
Quantity Daring
Season.
Inspector Puts the Nnmber of Cases
In the Territory at About
450,000
John T. Williams, Dominion Fishery Inspector In this district, paid
a visit to the city this week on official business. According to his estimate of the fishing season In his district there will be about 450,000
cases put up this year. His estimate
shows that there has been quite an
advance in the amount put up on
the Skeena as compared with the
earlier estimates of the fishing men.
There is still some fishing going
on this river so that it is impossible
at the present to tell just what the
final figures will be. Mr. Williams,
however, puts it at about 200,000
cases Instead of 150,000 as has been
figured upon in some quarters.
Then, again, there is still fishing
going on on the Naas. It is impossible, therefore, to tell accurately
what that section of the district is
going to do. He puts the pack there
at 140,000 cases, possibly.
Mr. Lord, of Port Nelson, who was
likewise In the city this week, thinks
that the outlook for sohoes is not
very good. He had prepared for
quite a run, but up to the time he
left they had not o une in quantity
and he feared there would not be as
maney as expected. The pack would,
therefore be but an average one on
the Naas.
In Rivers Inlet the pack, accord
Ing to the inspector, will reach 35,-
000 cases, and in the other scattered
parts there will be probably about
70,000 more put up. The returns
from the fishing industry represent
about  S3,000,000.
 o	
BRITISH INVESTORS
Steel Works are Reported to be in View
in Southern Part of
Province.
Norton   Griffiths   And   Party   Have
.Made Important Purchases in
British  Columbia
Preliminary details for the establishment of steel works in British Columbia by British capitalists are now
being worked out. The chief spirit
behind the enterprise which will represent an investment of between $4,-
000,000 and $5,000,000, is Norton
Griffiths,- M.P., of London, Eng. Mr.
Griffiths and party, including the
Earl of Dunmore, a wealthy Scottish
peer, and Mr. Harry Brlttain, a well
known London journalist, recently
visited Vancouver. The visitors were
then guests of Premier McBride on
a trip to Fort George.
Mr. Griffiths Is one of the richest
men in England.
Takes Option on Ore Land
Mr. Griffiths has taken a thirty-
day option on a big deposit of iron
which Is located within three miles
of the main line of the Canadian
Pacific railway, and less than 200
miles from Vancouver. He expressed
himself as well pleased with the engineers' reports and agreed to cable
to England for an expert to make an
Independent examination. There Is
said to be an enormous tonnage
available. The ore can be trammed
down to the r.iilway tracks.
Works in  Vicinity of Mine
It Is understood that the proposed
steel works will be located In the vicinity of the mine in order to reduce
manufacturing costs to a minimum.
Mr. Griffiths has also under consideration the purchase of a large
area of coal lands In the vicinity of
Jasper Park, east of Yellowhead Pajss
and In proximity to the routes of
the Grand Trunk Pacific and Canadian Northern Railway*. The coal
Is said to be Ideally adapted for coke-
lng purposes. In the event of a deal
being closed the coke product will
be shipped to the steel works. Railway facilities will be provided with
the completion of the Canadian
Northern, whose tracks will probably
be connected with those of the Canadian Pacific railway below Kamloops.
The coal lands will also be examined by a mining engineer In the employ of Mr. Griffiths.
TRADE WITH JAPAN
Mikado's Government Gives Notice That
Commercial Treaty
Ends.
German  Influence is Being Exerted
in Direction of Securing Advantages in Orient
Japan has formally given Great
Britain one year's notice denouncing
the commercial treaty between the
two countries negotiated ten years
ago and to which the Dominion subsequently became a party. The treaty
wll lexpire In July of next year. The
serving of formal notice Is an indication of the itnention of the Japanese
government to negotiate an entirely
new arrangement in harmony with
the spirit of a higher protective tariff, to go into operation a month later
or in August, 1911. Formal notices
denouncing other commercial treaties existing with other uoctnsire
ies existing with other countries has
also been served.
This was the news brought from
the Orient by Mr. C. A. Harris, Canadian trade commissioner In Japan
who arrived in Vancouver on the Empress of Japan recently. Mr. Harris
who formerly resided at Vernon, is
acompanied by his wife. Mr. Harris
crossed the Pacific for the sole purpose of attending the annual meeting
of the Canadian Manufacturers' Association to be held In Vancouver
next month. His mission is to impress upon manufacturers the various opportunities for increasing
trade with the Mikado's kingdom.
Mr. Harris has filled his present position for over a year.
Germans In It
A London despatch says that with
Teutonic foresight, Germany began
preparing long ago for a possible renunciation by Japan of its old commercial treaties with the United
States and the European powers.
The German ambassador at Toklo
baron Mumm von Schwarzensteln, is
in Berlin working hard on the draft
of the new German-Japanese com
mercial treaty, which is to replace
the expiring convention on July 17:
1911. For months past the ambassador has been sending home material,
and Kerr con Syburg, German consul-general at Yokohama, has been
busily engaged for some time at the
foreign office in Berlin In working
out statistics. In addition Herr
Thiel, German consul at Kobe, has
furnished tne home authorities with
a mass of useful reports.
 o	
BACK  FROM  OBSERVATORY
C. H. Topp, of Victoria, Tells of Rich
Territory in North
C. H. Topp, of the firm of Gore &
McGregor, surveyors of Victoria, returned to the city last evening from
Observatory Inlet, where he was engaged In surveying a townslte locat'
ed at the head of Alice Arm. Mr.
Topp is very favorably impressed
with that section of the country and
says there Is a very good townsite
there. He found the country full ot
prospectors.
The locations there show good
prospects and he was impressed with
the immense bodies of ore that were
exposed.
Just before he left a rich property
was reported to have been discovered
by McDougali. The outlook was so
good that two investors were already
on the ground in an effort to secure
the rights which Mr. McDougali has
obtained.
HONOR THE FLAG
In Future  the British Ensign  Must
Have First Place in Procession
In Winnipeg hereafter there will
be no processions in which people
can display all kinds of national
flags either excluding or relegating
to the background the British flag.
A recent bylaw states that In every
procession or parade in which the applicant for any such license shall
display any national flag or flags,
the said applicant shall display the
British national flag unfurled of not
less than four and one-half feet
by nine feet In size at the head of
such procession or parade. If any
flags of other nations are displayed
In such procession or parade, the
same shall be unfurled under or behind the British national flag, and
for every flag of any other nation so
unfurled or displayed .'it least two
British national flue's of the samo
size and  dimensions.
PRINCE RUPERT IS
GOOD INVESTMENT
CITY CAS SUPPLY
City Council Has Passed Bylaws to Provide for Local Improvement.
Question of Rights   on   the   Streets
Will   be  Put  to  a
Test
British Capital Finds Good Opening Here While Local
Man by Foresight Cleans Up Large Sum on
Business Property.
Local News
H. F. McRae & Co. have changed
their offices. They are now occupying quarters on Second avenue, near
McBride street.
* *    *
There is to be a meeting of the
executive committee "of the Skeena
River Agricultural and Industrial
association in the Board of Trade
rooms this evening.
* *    *
The young men of the city were
the hosts at a most enjoyable dance
given in Mclntyre's Hall last evening.
The floor was in good condition and
there were just enough present to ensure a first class time. Kauffman's
orchestra provided the music which
was, therefore, of the best qun'lty.
A buffet supper was served about
midnight after which dancing was
prolonged some time.
EMINENT PRELATE
Archbishop Bourne  of   Westminstei
Made Hurried Trip lo Coast
Ai'chbisnop Bourne, head of the
Catholic church in England, paid a
visit to the Pacific Coast a few days
ago. His trip was a hurried one, having to return east to attend the
Eucharistic congress in Montreal.
The archbishop arrived at Quebec
on the Empress of Britain. After
visiting the Archbishops of Quebec
and Montreal he proceeded west,
stopping at various points.
While travelling Archbishop
Bourn has at his disposal a private
car sent to him by the Instructions
of Mr. C. M. Hays, president of the
Grand Trunk Railway Company.
Accompanying Archblshon Bourne
were his secretaryfi Dr. Jackson, and
Mgr. Joseph Butt, Chancellor of the
Archdiocese of Westminster.
The purchase this week by British
capital of the Helgerson block is the
best guarantee that investors can find
in Prince Rupert the very best avenue in which to put their capital.
O. M. Helgerson, who is recognized
as one of the shrewdest of real estate dealers in the city, has, during
his short residence in the city, not
only made very quick returns but
satisfied with good results has enabled others to step in and make
money.
The Helgerson block on the corner
of Third avenue and Sixth street, in
what is now the heart of the business
life of the city, has just been sold by
Mr. Helgerson to Cliff Ford, of London Eng., who is seeking investments in this part of the world. The
block, which has just been opened
up for business and has every foot of
it occupied at good rents, was sold
for $54,000. The transaction is a
cash one.
The sale represents a splendid
profit to the original owner. He
bought the lots for $17,500, and the
building cost about $16,000, so that
the returns to Mr. Helgerson were
quite  good.
He   has   faith   in   Prince   Rupert,
| however, and is satisfied to give some
one else the opportunity to make a
good profit while he utilizes the
money obtained In further invest-
ments. Quick returns is hit mottc
and the giving of others a chance U
do something also.
That Mr. Ford has reafji, :o be
gratified with his investment is proved by the fact that the building represents a rental of over $5<"i a month
so that the returns will be large.
Mr. Ford has also purchased from
Mr. Helgerson the corner of Third
avenue and Eighth street for $20,-
000.
Mr. Ford is a financier of considerable note. He has investments In
several continents, but this is his
first visit to British Columbia. Mr.
Ford says that outside of Ottawa he
has seen no place In Canada in which
he would rather live than in Prince
Rupert.
He will probably make further investments before leaving on his return trip to London.
The transaction is hut another evidence that investors still have their
eyes turned to Prince Rupert and
that nowhere on the coast can better
results be obtained than from Investments here.
READY FOR   MONEY
Tsimpsean Company Has Filed Its Plans
With the City
Council.
LIGHTING THE CITY
Engineers Engaged  in  Formulating
Scheme for Furnishing Temporary
Facilities.
Council Does Not Intend to Alienate
the Distribution Part of the
Business
The city engineer, with the assistance of Mr. Durant, Is engaged
In forinu atlng a policy which alms
at giving the city an electric light
system at an early date so that there
may not be darkness this winter, it
is not likely, however, that a plant
will be obtainable in Vancouver.
Among those best informed on the
subject it will not likely be possible
to find what is wanted in the way
of large dynamos in that city.
The policy of the council is to control the distribution system in the
city for all time. It is possible,
therefore that an early start may be
made on putting in the lines throughout the city which would be necessary no matter what the future policy
may be with respect to the general
supply of power. If the city in the
end decides to generate the power for
all time or makes an arrangement
with some other company to supply
it in quantity, the distribution system will be required in any event.
There is, therefore, nothing to prevent a start being made on the putting in of the necessary part just as
soon as the council decides exactly
that It is going to instal a plant.
The station where the power will
now be generated even if the power
is supplied later in bulk, will be a
necessary part of the distribution
system, being the central station for
the city.
 o .
TO IMPORT GAME MUDS
Prairie Chickens to he Secured From
Manitoba to Stock Districts
Taking advantage of the provisions
of the Manitoba Game Art in this
respect Hon. Dr. Young has communicated with the responsible minister of the sister province requesting
permission for the securing, through
the chief game warden of Manitoba,
of a number of the birds and animals
indigenous to the prairie province.
It Is expected that this step Is preliminary to the Introduction of a considerable number of prairie chickens
for the purpose of stocking those
areas of British Columbia favorable
for their development in numbers
and strength. The Columbia grouse,
more generally known as the pralriii
chicken, shares with the grey goose
the honor of being the great game
bird of Manitoba, and there are many
districts of this province in which
undoubtedly It can be acclimatized
successfully, to prove a valuable addition to the great game asset of
British Columbia.
. o —
In the police court this morning
Samuel Pierce was convicted of supplying an Indian woman with liquor
and was fined $200 and costs or two
months In jail
The Tsimpsean Power Company, of
which Mr. Brutinel is the manager,
has taken occasion to file its plans
relative to the laying of gas mains
along the streets of the city with the
council. This move is calculated to
bring to a crisis the question of what
rights the company has on the streets
of the city.
The Tsimpsean company is incorporated under special charter granted by the legislature in 1907 when
Prince Rupert was only a prospective
city. The company under its charter
which gives the right to supply gas,
etc., on the Tsimpsean Peninsula,
contends that it may proceed with its
work without danger of molestation
by the city.
This right which is claimed Is disputed by the city and It may be that
the city council will offer objection
to the company proceeding with its
work on the streets and thus bring
the matter to a crisis.
Accompanying the plan showing
where gas mains were to be constructed, the Tsimpsean company
forwarded a letter through its solicitor, L. W. Patmore. The letter was
a; follows: —
P.e Tsimpsean Light & Power Company.
Dear    Sirs:—On    behalf    of    the
TsimiiSean Light & Power company,
I   l>eg  to  submit  herewith  for  your
approval plans of the proposed location of the mains for conveying the
gas from the proposed gas works ot
. the Tsimpsean Light & Power Company   in   Prince  Rupert  to  eonstim-
mers.     If  you  have  any   preference
as to the parts of the streets in which
it is proposed  to lay these mains, 1
would like to have from you a statement of such preference so that they
may be laid according to your desire.
Kindly take this matter up without
delay and notify me either that the
plans  submitted  are  satisfactory  to
your body  or state your  preference
with regard to the location   of    the
mains and pipes so that we may proceed  at  once  with  the  undertaking.
I might say on behalf of the company that the proper application under their charter was made to the
Chief Commissioner of Public Works
for the province before the city was
incorporated asking for permission to
proceed with the undertaking and as
to the approval of the laying of the
gas mains in the streets, and that the
Chief Commissioner asked this company to deal directly with  the city
when the same should be Incorporated and withheld the consent required.     We  have  on   file   this   written
refusal. You will consequently understand  that  this  company  has  done
everything   in its power as required
by its charter.    The size of the mains
we propose to lay are six inches in
diameter,    high     pressure   weldless
Mannesman pipes. Yours truly,
L. W. PATMORE.
The company's plans aim at beginning at once on the laying of mains
according to Mr. Brutinel, so as to
ensure gas for lighting and heating.
At the present time a rough estimate
as to the demand that will be put on
the system Is being made.
The company has coal measures on
the Queen Charlottes unci borings are
already being made with the objeel
In view of testing these. These will
be the ultimate source of aupply for
the raw material from which will be
produced the gas for local consumption.
Mr. Brutinel snys Ms company will
supply gas at the same rates as prevail in Vancouver.
Hank nf Montreal Has Been Furnished  With Copy in Order to
Ensure Loan
There was a short session of the
city council last evening, the principal object of the meeting being to
finally pass the two bylaws for local
improvement in section one, and at
Seal Cove. There being no adverse
petition against these, they were reconsidered and passed and copies
were supplied Mr. Clancy of the
Hank of Montreal, who forwarded it
to headquarters In order that the
question of the money to carry on
the work may be at once disposed of.
There should be little delay as tbe
copy went forward on last evening's
steamer.
Light Plant Location
The city council has practically
decided to put in its own light plant
for the meantime at least. The question of where to locate it is giving
the aldermen some concern. Following the advice of Mr, Burns, of the
city engineer's staff, there would be
decided advantage in locating it
towards the heart of the city instead
of at one side. The advantage would
be that there would be a decided saving in the cost of wiring, and if a loss
of voltage was to be avoided a larger
wire would be required to bring the
current any length.
The mayor and aldermen are busy
considei ing the question of sites.
Contractors Explain
S. P. MoMordie & Co. wrote that
in making their tender for work on
Second avenue, they had made it out
on their own calculation and not on
the basis of twenty per cent and
eighty per cent of earth and rock.
The council adjourned until Tuesday evening.
■ o	
STAND OF COUNCIL
Aid. Pattullo Makes an Explanation as
to Conference With President Hays.
Question is One of Who is to Make
a Proposition Relative to a
Settlement
AUSTRALIAN  DEFENSES
British Naval Officers Have Gone to
Antipodes to Report
The commission of British naval
officers who, at the request of the
Australian commonwealth government, left England recently for Australia, consists of Admiral Sir Reginald Henderson, Capt. Haworth
booth, Lieut. J. A. Slee, and Staff
Paymaster Manisty. Admiral Henderson's mission Is to report upon
the organization of the Australian
navy and the question of the naval
defence of the commonwealth.
At the council meeting a few evenings ago, Aid. Pattullo made an
explanation relative to the matter
of dispute between the G.T.P. and
the city as to assessment on the reserve property. In doing so he explained that there appeared to be
some misunderstanding on the part
of the public as to what the situation
was. He stated that when the conference took place with Mr. hays the
latter had been asked what proposition he had to offer. Mr. Hays had
said that he was not making any
proposition. His company expected
some proposition from the city.
Aid. Pattullo said he took the ground
that the city was not in a position
in make an offer to tbe company un-
ifcr the circumstances, if Mr. Hays
would make a proposition, however,
in the matter the council would see
that It was pul before the people.
Aid. I'altuiio al the council meeting stated Hint in his opinion this
was the only ground that could be
taken   by  them.
EXAMINING MINES
Minion Men From South  Have Gone
Into Interior of Province
There arrived in the city on the
(J. T. P. steamer Prince Rupert on
Wednesday, Alexander Faulds, M.E.,
and A. to. McMorrls, both of Vancouver. Their presence In the city
was sufficient to arouse a suspicion
that there was some kind of mining
deal in prospect. Neither were ready
to reveal much as to their plans, another reason for believing that they
are making some important move.
They left the following morning
by the Inlander for Hazelton. They
expect to be back In about three
weeks time.
in
v\ THE   PRINCE   RUPERT   JOURNAL
Friday, September 2, 1910
SALMON SITUATION
Pacific Coast Output According to Those
Interested in the
Business
The Whole Pack lor the Year Under
Review ami Compared With
Other  .Seasons
The salmon pack of the Pacific
Coast for the season of 1910 will
show a heavy falling off from that of
last year and from present indications will be the smallest for six
years, states the Pacific Fisherman.
While nearly every district has had
a prosperous season and packers will
without exception net good returns
for the summer's operations, the
short years in several of the districts,
together with an unexpected falling
off In the total of the Alaska production will bring the figures for the
coast total down below what they
have been showing since 1904.
The Pacific Fisherman reviews the
conditions as they appeared on August 5.
Heavy falling off in Alaska pack,
caused by 300,000 case shortage at
Bristol Bay and reduction in the
Pink pack in Southeastern Alaska.
Off year on Puget Sound, with a
pack of sockeyes that will total
scarcely over 200,000. Also oft yead
on Pinks and very few of this ca-
riety packed.
Estimated shortage on the Columbia river of about twenty per cent,
with run dwindling daily and little
prospect of improvement.
Off year on Fraser river, with a
pack of sockeyes up to August 5 of
not to exceed 115,000 cases, but possibility of further packing.
Fairly good season In Northern
British Columbia, with pack of red
salmon or sockeyes up to the average.
Coast districts just starting to
pack and good season anticipated but
pack will probably not exceed from
100,000 to 150,000 cases.
Alaska
Reports from various portions of
Alaska are definite enough to indicate a falling off In the total pack
of this district that will be severely
felt in the already badly deprived
markets of the country.
The Bristol Bay figures show that
the big red salmon producing section of the north has fallen far short
of its output of last year. Present
reports, which are virtually correct
and final, indicate a total of 834,000
cases, a falling off from the pack of
1909 of over 315,000 cases and from
the pack of 1908 of 336,000 cases.
This makes a very serious void In the
pack of the Alaska Red and means a
distinct loss to the packers, as the
markets are in such condition as to
really absorb a pack of twice these
dimensions at fully as good a price
as the packers will lie enabled to
charge for this year's pack. The figures on Bristol Bay are as follovs:—
No. Canneries. Cases.
Alaska Packers Assn. . . .7     450,000
North Alaska Salmon Co. 4     110,OfC
Naknek   Packing Co	
Red Salmon Packing Co. 2       61,000
Alaska Portland Packers'
Association    1       46,000
Alaska Fishermen's Packing Company 1       43,000
Columbia   River   Packers
Association 1       38,000
Northwestern Pish Co...l      38,000
Bristol   Packing  Co 1       26,000
Alaska Salmon Co 1       22,000
Total    19     834,000
Cases.
1909 Bristol Bay Sal  pack 1,147,695
1908 Bristol Bay Sal, pack 1,170,285
1907 Brl itol Bay Sal. Pack     761,405
In   the   lice!   Salmon   dlstrli
Cenl i'l   Mi ka, Incl idlng i hose dl i-
rard to iic westward,
VA i]li:!iu Sound Is behind both
ed      ..    pinks.    As u  rule  :he
cortlon  of pinks packc 6
■    11, bul Ihe latest reports In !; i ti il
were putti " a
good proportion of the pink salmon
be  i ise of the red shortage, but even
hat wc uld nol be able to fill their
:        I nn hi  reports from Orca and
Km ; ik, somewhal old. Indicate ! that
thi      ■ . .■ dl il I; ■ ■   ■   .    also 1 ehtnd
bul  Chignil ore opti-
■■ tl  ■   lut to a  full ; ack.    It
the pi " ■   i ' '■'
' II also 1        complete ]   cits.
i
,' Is behind ldcrabl;
■
act
p in I
■ ■
■    I i lty
In s ■■  ' ill pr ii     ■ ■in.
.1   lis-
edly lill .Heir cans and end with an
average pack, most all of which Is
pink salmon.
The run of pinks it the straits
north of Ketchikan has been an average one and packers are doing well,
but south of Ketchikan the run has
been very poor and canneries will
probably not lill their cans. The pack
of reds in this district is about up to
last year and a few chums are also
being packed.
Both cl the plants outside of
Prince of Wales island were up to
the average on their red pack according to latest reports, but it is
impossible to estimate their pink production as this Is a late district and
the run was just then starting.
Present Indications are that the
pack in Alaska will fall below the
2,000,000 case mark for the first
time in five years.
Puget Sound
The big falling off from last year's
totals occurs on Puget Sound, where
the sockeye pack will total scarcely
over 200,000 cases, as compared with
slightly over a million cases last year.
The fact that It Is an off year on
pinks will also prove a big factor In
reducing thihs grade's pack, which
last year amounted to 361,455 cases.
Counting the full pack of cohoes and
the pack of chums the same as last
year, this district will undoubtedly
show a loss in the totals of at least
1,100,000 cases. Of course last year
was not only a big fourth year, but
the very largest fourth year In the
history of the Industry. It was recognized at the outset that the pack
would be small this season, and the
outcome Is no worse, and possibly a
little better, than the cannerymen anticipated. The run of Sockeyes to
date has continued through about
four weeks. At no time has it been
heavy, although trap catches during
the height of the run were good for
an off year. At the present writing
the run has fallen off almost entirely,
nnd while there may be a late spurt,
packers are scarcely expecting it and
look upon their pack of sockeyes as
being complete. The pack of pinks
is a negligible quantity and it is too
early yet to predict the size of the
fair pack of cohoes.
Fraser River
The salmon pack on the Fraser
river up to Saturday night, August
6, was 130,000 cases and with two
weeks of good fishing ahead, the
150,000 cases for which the packers
prepared will, it Is believed, be obtained. While the fish were scarce In
the early days of the run, they have
come along splendidly during the
past two weeks and the pack will
come up to expectations. The fishermen have found the game a lottery,
however, for the boat averages have
varied considerably. Thus on July
26 the high boat on the river took
159 fish, while the next day the
catches varied from 111 fish to 30
fish. The illegal sale of sockeyes to
Americans resulted in an officer being placed at Canoe Pass and Instructions being given to the Restless and Georgia to keep a valient
patrol. On July 29 the canneries received a large quantity of fish, and
nine canneries, taken at random, returned a total catch of 46,000 salmon. The average catch for the 20
canneries on the river totalled about
50,000 fish a day. But of course
some days the catch was more than
double this nnd on others the boats
were not very successful.
Northern British Columbia
The pack in northern British Columbia is complete and this appears
to he the only district on the Coast
that has equalled last year's totals.
The canneries in the north enjoyed a
prosperous season. It Is estimated
that the puck Is about as follows:
Cases.
Skeena River   150,000
Iii-.' rs Inlet       1.11,000
Naas      25,000
wit. Ide  Plant             70,000
^.tiitiiiiiiiiB'iiriiiiiBiiiisitiiBcisiBiiiBnniiniiniiiiniiniiiiuiiiiiiHiiiiiiniiniiniiBiiiBiii^
HAYNOR BROS.
I House Fumishersl,,l;;™::,r,'0''',"1•"""""""'
Block, corner of Second
Avenue  and  Eighth  Street.
■   Some snaps in slightly damaged  goods  which   we  want  to  clear  ■
W out  before moving  into new quarters in Manson lilk., Third Ave.   j
| FUNERAL  FURNISHERS 1
a ■
*iMIBIIIBIBIBIIIBIIIB!»BiBIBIBMIBIBIBIBIBIBIBIBISiniBB«IBIBIBIBIBIBIBIBIB«IBlBIBlBIBlIIBBIBIBIBl»
Total     ..876,000
In tl   .    c';       ■ ■ i he ' annerles did
bo  much   boll      than exp icted
ihat a. spi    ' ■ •■ ■ of cans re-
il d. The cannerl on Rivers In-
lel averai I abotil ITT i asea to a
boat for the Beason.
Columbia   River
While the Impression (its generally
prevailed   thai   the salmon   pack  on
the Columbia ftiver Is ahead or last
year, this Is not the case according
to    the   packet b  the: is i es.    They
I  Im that tho pai      C en      d    ilmon
Is fully twen      cr    nt bel iw that of
I ■    it  v.-: lie the
gued .■  11
for i     ' ■   '        '    Ihe last f
i.
hat many of I
r Chi i    ,
'. er of
■
..
• ill   'all nteriall
i c  nc ■'     I at of
last year the pack of mild cured and
cold storage fish Is much better—
considerably better—than that of
last year at this time, as during June
and July the fish ran very large In
size and few small ones were taken.
This naturally decreased the canned
salmon pack and increased the output of the cold storage houses. While
considerable money may be lost on
Chinese contracts on the river this
year, this Is a condition which It not
likely to be repeated again to so large
an extent, as many of the plants are
installing the new sanitary process,
which requires much less Oriental
labor. The following plants will use
the new process next year: P. J. Mc-
Gowan & Sons, Union Fishermen Cooperative Co., Elmore & Co., Sanborn
Cutting Co., Columbia River Packers' Association, J. G. Megler & Co.,
Warren Packing Co., and F. A. Seu-
fert.
Washington and Oregon Coast
The pack In these districts Is
scarcely far enough along to secure
any definite idea as to its size. The
pack on Grays Harbor has been a
good one so far, and the packers
both on the Washington and Oregon
coast are looking for a good season.
Three new canneries have been erected for operation during the fall season along the Oregon coast and several of the Elmore canneries closed
last year will open up this season.
The coast pack should therefore run
ahead of that of last year, providing
the run of fish is as good as expected.
— o	
RESOURCES OF  INDIA
COLONIAL REGIMENT
General  Progress Is  Being Made in
That  Part of  the  Empire
A statement containing the progress and conditions in India for the
years 1908-09 has just been issued
by the British colonial office.
In accordance with arrangements
with the Chinese authorities a limited number of chests of opium were
exported by the government of India. The export of Bengal opium was
reduced from 48,000 chests In 1907-
08 to 45,000 chasts last year. The
gross earnings of the railways fell
below the budget estimate of £2,414,-
800, In consequence of bad harvests
and the general stagnation of trade.
The total debt of India on April 1,
1908, was £246,034,071, and £256,-
684,069 was the total debt outstanding on March 31, 1909. Of this
amount £182,213,141 is in respect of
railways and £30,738,991 for irrigation works, the balance, £43,731,437,
being described as "ordinary."
Forty-seven per cent of the land of
India is held by peasant proprietors.
The land revenue last year totalled
£19,759,060 and the net opium revenue amounted to £4,64S,700, the
highest total since 1902, when the
return stood at £2,S49,955. Nearly
one-third of the land cultivated is
under rice. One-tent li wheat Is
grown. The cotton crop yielded
!),lit:),DUO bales. Co-operative credit
soc "lies have been started by the
government as an experiment to help
the poorer classes in cultivating the
soil. Special forest laws have been
enacted, and a staff oi trained forest
officers has been organized to carry
on the work of systematically conserving the forests of India. At
present the reserve' forests cover an
area of 94,000 square miles.
Tlic output of minerals in India
has shown a marked Inct ease in the
last six years, thai calculated last
year being £7,334,000, an increase
of seventy per cenl comp ned with
tho outpitl of 1908. In - I ir large
ludi Btrlc -■■ capital to the am anl of
£13,632,000 was em; lo .1 last year
in 232 cotton mills, I'-r 1 g , - ilier
74,080 looms, and £7,393 0 10 In the
jute mills, having 29,4 3 looms.
There were also six ' i len mills,
nine paper mills, 11T factories belonging to Mi" state, and 2,473 run
by private companies.
. aptain of the Boys' Briga le
; ma  to add   11 emits  to his
'Nov .    ou  I        '  '  ■  i
ly un-
: each of
c
:    oi     little lad  apj ■•-.
tate.    "Whal
■.■■'.■■   ■ ,   ■ a
■
." lick."
'
Corps Raised From Oversea Dominions
Will Bear Late Ruler's
Name.
King Edward's Horse Will be Official
Title For the New Fighting
Body
"His Majesty has been pleased to
approve of the regiment of yeomanry
now styled the 'King's Colonials'
being in future designated 'King Edward's Horse (the King's Oversea
Dominions Regiment).' " ThiB announcement appeared In the Gazette
and the change of title was the outcome to an evolution in the status
of the King's colonials through which
the affectionate regard in which King
Edward was held throughout his
over-sea dominions may continue to
find a living expression. The idea
of personal service freely given by
the subjects of his outer empire for
the maintenance of that stability
which is the greatest guarantee of
the peace of the world is most happily inspired to preserve the memory
of one whose motto for so many
years was "Ich Dlen," and who was
universally loved as the peacemaker.
The change of title has been specially approved by King George,
whose knowledge of his father's
wishes and whose comprehensive
grasp of the defensive problems of
the empire give great value to his
gracious consent. Thanks to a munificent gift from Lord Strathcona and
to other liberal contributions, the
future of King Edward's horse, rests
upon a solid foundation, and the
gradual expansion of the corps and
Its influence throughout the empire
may be anticipated with confidence.
History of Corps
The King's Colonials were raised
in November, 1901, and through the
Influence and keen personal sympathy of King Edward, who was
pleased to become honorary colonel,
were enrolled in the forces of the
crown as a regiment if Imperial Yeomanry. The ralson d'etre of the
King's Colonials was to commemorate the personal service rendered in
South Africa to the empire by the
over-sea dominions, and to enable
citizens of the different states domiciled or temporarily resident in
England to qualify themselves for
the defence of the empire. The
qualifications for King Edward's
horse are that the recruit shall be
born In a dominion or crown colony,
or that he shall come of parents born
In a dominion or crown colony, or
that he shall have lived in a dominion or crown colony for not less than
five years, while all who join the
regiment give an undertaking to fight
for the empire In the case of national
emergency wherever their services
may be required. The finance and
administration of the regiment are in
the hands of a committee composed
of men of standing drawn from all
parts of the empire, the chairman, of
which is Sir Arthur Blgge. The committee of administration may hope
liinl King Edward's Horse may not
only prove an efficient fighting machine, but may also achieve valuable
educational work i nd may, us ll wi
aci as ,-i ciearini : ise tor \ lews on
the widelj .T:" m i 'ol I : s of defence with v.■! Ich Lhe vai lous poi lions
of the empire re nnfronted. King
Edward's horse, loo, will no doubt
prove a rendezvous for members of
the dominions' locr-.l forces who may
be on n visit to this country, and
who could hardly fail to be attracted to the" headquarters of this imperial corj
Source of Supply
The   | radi al   creation   of  an   im-
ial - ne 'al si Ij synchrln-
izi s    with    the    enlai ged    nc li  i: les
w! Ich cerl ilnly :'     ahead    of    tho
ing's o '      inioi       igiment,
Is hoped tin    l.h       -. I    n
ii      will pi luabl      ■ ■) ce ot
of i        tri      d and qui
i ti '        elr rs In I
fore -.        well
ithoi not be able to i
tim     to  qualify        ofi leers  or
uctors,  but  who will not allow
their military training to become
rusty. As may be seen by the army
list, expansion has been sought in
an obviaus direction by means of alliances which have been formed during the past four years between the
corps which is now King Edward's
horse and local regiments of the Canadian, Australian and South African
forces. These affiliations are likely
to grow and to Increase the number
desirous to serve their time, if possible, In King Edward's Horse.
The enlisted strength of the regiment at present Is 472 officers and
men, and Included In this number
are 38 Rhodes scholars and representatives from every over-sea dominion. It may be mentioned that
the Rhodes trustees contribute to
the funds of the regiment, thus giving practical proof of their approval
of King Edward's horse as a factor
In Imperial education and federation.
SELLING WARSHIPS
Germany   is   Very Business-like In
Her Transactions
The sale by the German admiralty
of two old German battleships, the
Woerth and Brandenburg, for 12,-
500,000 apiece to the Turkish government Is causing the rBitish public
to wonder why Great Britain cannot
drive similar bargains for her many
obsolete warships. It Is stated that
Turkey wished to buy some discarded British vessels, and that this was
impossible owing to the conditions
Imposed by the British Admiralty,
which, when It sells an old ship. Invariably stipulates that It must be
broken up and deprived of all fighting qualities before It leaves the
country.
The two German ships sold to Turkey were launched in 1891 and 1892.
Their displacement is 10,000 tons,
and their armament consists of six
short eleven-inch guns, with a secondary battery of 4-1 inch and 3.4
inch pieces. They are thus contemporary with the British Centurion
and Barfleur, ships of the same size
and of high speed, each armed with
four ten Inch and ten six inch guns.
Inese two British warships were
sliold by auction last month, the Barfleur fetching $132,000, and the Centurion $131,000 or about one-twentieth of the sum which Germany Is
now to receive for similar units.
These figures, however, do not really
represent the difference in price received, for the German ships are being sold with armament, equipment
and ammunition complete, whereas
the British battleships were stripped
and cleared out when placed In the
sale list.
The difference, however, Is very remarkable, and It is being asked why
the British authorities could not relax their cast Iron rules and obtain
better prices for obsolete British war
vessels.
—THE-
Oliver
Typewriter
—FOR—
Seventeen Cents a Day
Please read the headline over
again. Then its tremendous significance will dawn upon you.
An Oliver Typewriter—the standard visible writer—the most highly
perfected typewriter on the market
—yours for 17 cents a day!
The typewriter whose conquest of
the commercial world Is a matter of
business history—yours for 17 centi
a day!
The typewriter that 13 equipped
with scores of such ccnveLiences as
"The Balance Shift"—"Tha Ruling
Device"—"The Double Release"—
"The Locomotive Base"—"The Automatic Spacer"—"The Automatic Tabulator"—"The Disappearing Indicator"—"The Adjustable Paper Fingers"—"The Scientific Condensed
Keyboard"—all
Yours For 17 Cents a Day
We announced this new sales plan
recently, just to feel the pulse of the
people. Simply a small cash payment—then 17 cents a day. That
is the plan In a nutshell.
The result has been such a deluge of applications for machines
that we are simply astounded.
The demand comes from people of
all classes, all ages, all occupations.
The majority of inquiries has
come from people of known financial
standing who were attracted by the
novelty of the proposition. An impressive demonstration, ot the immense popularity of the Oliver Typewriter.
A startling confirmation of our belief that the Era of Universal Typewriting is at hand.
A Quarter of a Million People are
Making Money With
EXAMINATION    FOR    INSPECTOR
OF STEAM BOILERS AND
MACHINERY
Examinations for the position of
Inspector of Steam Boilers and Machinery, under the "Steam Boilers
Inspection Act, 1901," will be held
at the Parliament Buildings, Victoria, commencing November 7th
1910. Application and instruction
forms can be had on application to
the undersigned, to whom the former
must be returned correctly filled In
not later than October 24th, 1910
Salary $130 per month, Increasing at
the rate of $5 per month each year
to a maximum of $180.
JOHN PECK,
Chief Inspector of Machinery,
New Westminster, B.C
The
Washington Cafe
A PLACE TO EAT
Peats  For  Ladies
Everything Clean and Tasty
Prices Reasonable
IV.  !'.  CARPENTER, PROPHIKTOI
Second  Avenue, near Seventh Street
LAND PURCHASE NOTICE
Coast Land District—District of
Skeena.
TAKE  NOTICE   that  wc,   George
Hie and Robert Corlett, of Little Canyon,   B.C.,  occupation    farmer    and
farmer, intend to apply for permission   lo  purchase  the  following described   lands:—Commencing   at   a
plantc I    I  i he so tth-east por-
l situated and lying
about two m / Little Canyon,
:'  'li bank of the Skeena
, I        ■       '   en   [.and Dl
■ [Co   ■.  thence  norl   n ly,
thence    easterly,    tl en i i    southei ly
iround the     i     I of the Island back
i  tho  i      ■     ' h iginnlng  ai d   Incl    Ing 30 i      i, more or less
"■■'■:   T "     LLETT.
Dated August 1, 1910. A19
Trje.
OLIVER
Typewriter
The Standard Visible Writer
The Oliver Typewriter is a moneymaker, right from the word "go!" So
easy to run that beginners soon get
In the "expert" class. Earn as you
learn. Let the machine pay the 17
cents a day—and all above that Is
yours.
Wherever you are, there's work to
be done and money to be made by
using the Oliver. The business world
is calling for Oliver operators. There
are not enough to supply the demand.
Their salaries are considerably above
those of many classes of workers.
"An Oliver Typewriter ill
Every  Home!"
That ts our battle cry today. We
have made the Oliver supreme In
usefulness and absolutely Indispensable In business. Now comes the
conquest of the home.
The simplicity and strength of the
Oliver fit it for family use. It Is becoming an important factor in the
home training of young people. An
educator as well as a money maker.
Our new selling plan puts the
Oliver on the threshold of every
home in America. Will you close
the door of your homo or office on
this  remarkable Oliver opportunity?
Write for further details of our
easy offer and a free copy of the new
Oliver catalogue.    Address:
R. C. BEAN
Prince Rupert Agent
Coneral   Offices:   Oliver   Typewriter
Building, Chicago, 111.
CANCELLATION  OF  RESERVE
NOTICE is hereby given that Ilia
reserve existing on'Crown lands in
the vlt inlty of *! hi *•• Lake, nnd
situate in Cassiar District, notice of
>■" ;c h b taring date .lone 30lh, 190D.
was i ul llshed In ;i' ■ British Columbia Gaze tte, dated July 2nd, 190S, la
cancelled.
ROBERT A. RENWICK,
Deputy Commissioner of Lands.
I,amis Department,
Victoria, B. C, June 16th, 1910
i First insertion .Inly 5.)
M
r Friday, September 2, 1910
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
1    FINANCIAL RECORD
Remarkable as was the demonstration by American Telephone of its
ability to finance 80 per cent of its
construction requirements out of
earnings during the first six months
of the current fiscal year, the management is confident that a still better record will be made In the second half year, and that by 1911
American Telephone will be easily
paying 95 per cent of new construction out of current earnings.
ThlB Is a new note and financial
New England has not grasped Its
significance. The transition of
American Telephone of four years
ago, with $133,000,000 stock and
possible $300,000,000 of outstanding
obligations, taking the system as a
whole, to a national enterprise with
over $750,000,000 assets and controlling through Western Union over
$1,000,000,000 of capital, has been
so rapid that the dominant New England ownership has not had time to
adjust itself to the other equally
important fact that the old days of
burdensome financing have forever
passed.
This does not mean that American
Telephone will not do any financing
or pretty regular financing in years
to come, but that old saying in State
street that American Telephone
shares are a good investment, and
the company must have $40,000,000
to $50,000,000 new capital each year
has lost Its truth. There is good
reason to believe that the bulk of
such financing as comes will be for
collateral purposes—either the acquisition of new companies or the
loaning of funds for telegraph expansion.
In the first six months of the current year American Telephone gained 308,000 stations, including stations of the Bell lines proper and
connected licensee or affiliated independent stations. This at the rate
of 616,000 per annum, and compares
with a total Increase in stations last
year of 778,000. This decrease In
the face of the fact that the company
is spending this year at the rate of
$42,1100,000 per annum in new construction compnred with $28,000,000
in 1909, an increase of $14,000,000,
or 50 per cent, is puzzling until
analyzed.   The explanation Is this:—
In 1909 American Telephone connected with 405,061 sub-licensee or
Independent telephone stations. In
the first six months of this year the
number was but 73,000, or at the
rate of 146,000 per annum. At the
same time the Increase in Bell stations proper was 234,935, against
167,691 for the six months to June
30th last. This means that the gain
in stations of the Bell line proper
upon which, of course, only American
Telephone money is spent, is rum
ning at a rate of 40 per cent greater
than in 1909
The slowing down in affiliation
with independent stations is only
natural. American Telephone has
about cleaned up the available field.
Like Alexander, It has no more
worlds to conquer. The connection
with independents for the four years
to December 31st last was at the rate
of 317,000 per annum. This year
It is at the rate of 146,000 per annum, or less than half.
 o	
B. C. COAT OF ARMS
the amended arms and crest substituted in the official book for overseas dominions.
WELCOMED  CANADIANS
Toronto Militia Regiment Received at
Liverpool in Royal Fashion
The steamer Megantic, with the
Queen's Own Rifles of Toronto, on
arrival at Liverpool on its way to
Aldershot to go into camp, was met
by the deputy lord mayor, the officer commanding the district and his
staff, with General Murray and Captain Clive representing the war office.
The first to come ashore was the
pioneer squad, followed by Sir Henry
Pellatt and his officers. The deputy
lord mayor, In welcoming Sir Henry,
dwelt on the importance of the trade
between Liverpool and Canada. He
pointed out the great benefit derived
from cultivating good friendship as
the present visit would do.
Sir Henry replied briefly, after
which the regiment disembarked. The
soldiers lined up on the landing
stage, whence they marched through
cheering multitudes to the London &
Northwestern railway station. There
they entrained for Aldershot. The
Irish Rifles formed a guard of honor.
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Brenton
Brown, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation insurance agent, intends to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands in the vi-
inity of the Kitwancool or Chean
Wein Valley:—Commencing at a
post planted at the north-east corner and about ten miles distant In
a north-westerly direction from the
north end of Kitwancool Lake,
thence south 80 chains, thence east
80 chains, thence north 80 chains,
thence west 80 chains to point of
commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
BRENTON BROWN.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 1,  1910. Jy8
-District of
Subscribe  for  The  Prince   Rupert
journal now.
LAND Pl'RCHASE  NOTICES
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte.
TAKE NOTICE that the Queen
Charlotte Whaling Company Limited,
of Victoria, British Columbia, occupation manufacturers, intend to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about fifteen
chains south of a small creek on the
west side of Rose Harbour, Moresby
Island, thence west forty chains,
thence north forty chains, thence
east forty chains, thence southerly
following the sinuosities of the foreshore line forty chains, to the point
of commencement.
Queen Charlotte Whaling
Company Limited,
Per Sydnev Charles Ruck, Agent
Dated July 14th, 1910.
Rose Harbour, Q.C.I.       . A5
Skeena Land District—District of
C^r\ ^fiiflT1
TAKE NOTICE that Reginald
Davey, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation machinist, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands, In the vicinity of
Citwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-west corner and about 6 *4
miles distant in a north-westerly direction from the north end of Kitwancool Lake, thence south 80
chains, thence east 80 chains, thence
north 40 chains, thence west 40
chains, thence north 40 chains,
chains, thence west 40 chains to a
point of commencement, and containing 480 acres (more or less).
REGINALD   DAVEY.
James to. Smith, Agent.
Dated  May  30,  1910. Jy8
Government   Will   Not   Accept   Decision of Herald's College
An official publication entitled
"The Flags, Badges and Arms of
the British Dominions Beyond the
Seas," has been received by the provincial secretary from the head of the
colonial office. In this publication
the Arms of Britisli Columbia are
given as they were originally revised
some months ago by the Herald's
College, but not accepted by the provincial authorities.
In consequence of the protest entered nt that time the supporters and
crown were restored, the former (the
deer and the mountain goat) being
one of the most characteristic features of the provincial arms. In the
suggested coat of arms for the province the surmounting crown, which
has so long been carried as a conspicuous figure of the Britisli Columbia Arms, was eliminated being replaced for some reason not explained
nor easily understood, by a Roman
Crown inserted in the centre of the
flag. Correspondence resulted in the
restoration of the supporters and the
crown surmounting, the latter being
somewhat altered in form and arrangement. At the same time the
demi-sun was transposed from the
top to the bottom of the arms. The
government Is not at all disposed to
accept the first proposed arms as contained in the recent publications, and
will at once communicate with t'.ir
colonial office with a view to having
Coast Land District-—District of
Skeena.
TAKE NOTICE that Elijah
Rounds, of Victoria, B.C., occupation
j Stewart, intends to apply for permls-
|slon to purchase the following de-
iscribed lands:—Commencing at a
I post planted one-half mile north,
and one-half mile east, of Nettie A.
Lairds N. E. corner of application to
purchase, and 300 feet east of Ana-
ham Lake trail, marked E. R.'s
south-west corner, thence 40 chains
east, thence 40 chains north, thence
40 chains west, thence 40 chains
south to point of commencement,
and containing 160 acres, more or
less. ELIJAH  ROUNDS.
Vincent  M.   Schibner,  Agent.
Dated May 25, 1910. jn2^
LAND  PURCHASE  NOTICE
Skeena Land District—District of
/^o cc j nr
TAKE NOTICE that John Cherry,
of Victoria, B. C, occupation mattress maker, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-east corner and about 14 miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence west 80 chains, thence
south 80 chains, thence east 80
chalnB, thence north 80 chains to
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
JOHN CHERRY.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 3, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District-
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Jessie Stead-
man, of Victoria, B. C, occupation
married woman, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following described lands, in the vicinity of
Kitwancool or Chean Weill Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-east corner and about 614
„_iles distant in a north-westerly direction from the north end of Kitwancool Lake, thence south 80
chains; thence west SO chains, thence
north 80 chains, thence east 80
hains to point of commencement,
and containing 640 acres, more or
less. JESSIE STEADMAN.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated  May  31,  1910. JyS
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassia
TAKE NOTICE tbat Bruce Older-
shaw, of Victoria, B. C, occupation
jeweller, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of the
Citwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing   at   a   post   planted   at
he north-west corner and about 7 %
miles distant in a north-westerly direction from the north end of Kitwancool Lake; thence south 80
chains, thence east 40 chains, thence
north 80 chains, thence west 40
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 320 acres, more or
less. BRUCE OLDERSHAW.
James to. Smith, Agent.
Dated May  31,  1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Ol ^^Ifl Y
TAKE NOTICE that Echo Dudgeon, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
assistant dentist, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of the
Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-east corner and about 7 %
miles distant in a north-westerly direction from the north end of Kitwancool Lake, thence south 80
chains, thence north 80 chains,
thence east 80 chains to point of
commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
ECHO DUDGEON,
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated May 31, 1910. Jy8
LAND PURCHASE NOTICES
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Sarah Ward,
of Victoria, B. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. E. corner and about 22 milec distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north 80 chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence south 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or ;ess.
SARAH WARD.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 6th, 1910 Jy8
LAND PURCHASE NOTICES
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that George Mc-
Baln, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
merchant, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kltwancool or Chean Weln Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. W. corner and about 26% miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north 80 chains, thence
east SO chains, thence south SO
chains, thence west 80 chains to
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
GEORGE  McBAIN.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 8th, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Catherine
Welsh, of Vancouvfci, ti. O, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands in the vi-
vinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Frederick
Tutt, of Selkirk, Manitoba, occupation merchant, Intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands In the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. W. corner about 14% miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north 40 chains, thence
east 40 chains, thence south 40
chains, thence west 40 chains to
point of commencement, and containing 160 acres, more or less.
FREDERICK   TUTT.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 3, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Henry Van
Wyck, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation hotel keeper, Intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands In the vicinity of Kltwancool or Chean Weln
Valley:-—Commencing at a post
planted at the north-east corner and
about 20 miles distant in a northwesterly direction from the north end
of Kitwancool Lake, thence south 80
chains, thence west 80 chains, thence
north 80 chains, thence east 80
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 640 acres, more or
less. HENRY VAN WYCK.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated  June   6th,   1910. JyS
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE* that Minnie Clarke
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool   or   Chean   Wein   Valley: —
Valley: ■—Commencing    at    a    post'Commencing at a post planted at the
planted at the S. E. corner and about
17% miles distant in a north-westerly direction from the north end of
Kitwancool Lake, thence north 80
chains, thence west SO chains, thence
south 80 chains, thence east 80
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 640 acres, more or
less. CATHERINE   WELSH.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June  4, 1910. Jy8
N. to. corner and about 28% miles
distant and in a north-westerly direction from the north end of Kitwancool Lake, thence south 40 chains
thence east SO chains, thence north
LAND PI liCHASE NOTICES
Skeena Land District—District of
fflsfliiir
TAKE NOTICE that Leihi Cherry,
of Victoria, B. C, occupation married woman, Intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at tne
S. E. corner and about 21 miles distant in a north-weBterly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north 80 chains, thence
west SO chains, thence south 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
LEIHI   CHERRY.
James to. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 6th, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
llfiflQf O y*
TAKE NOTICE that John Grieve,
of Vancouver, B. C., occupation
agent, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands In the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wien Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. E. corner and about 20 miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north 80 chains, thence
west SU chains, thence soutii 80
chains, thence east SO chains to
point of comemncement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
JOHN GRIEVE.
James to. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 6th, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE unit Alfred E.
Partington, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation broker, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of
Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. E. corner and about 15% miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north 80 chains, thence
west 80 chains,    thence    soutii     80
40 chains, thence west 80 chains to chains, thence east 80 chains to the
point of commencement and containing  320  acres,  more or  less.
MINNIE  CLARKE.
James to. Smith, Agent.
Dated  June   Sth,  1910. Jy8
K
PHONE 138
FOR
LETTER HEADS ENVELOPES
BUSINESS CARDS
VISITING CARDS       STATEMENTS
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
ALFRED E.  PARKINGTON.
James to. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 3, 1910. Jy8
m
Prince Rupert Journal
w
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that George Williams, of Winnipeg, man., occupation
clerk, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool
or Chean Wein Valley:—Commencing at a post planted at the S. W.
corner and about 16% miles distant
in a north-westerly direction from
the north end of Kitwancool Lake,
thence north 40 chains, thence
east 40 chains, thence soutii 40
chains, thence west 40 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 160 acres, more or less.
GEORGE WILLIAMS.
James  W.  Smith,  Agent.
Dated June 4, 1910. Jy8
LAND Pl'RCHASE NOTICES
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that William
llunie Grant, of Stewart, B.C., occupation engineer, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a
post marked W.II.G.'s S.W. Cor., and
planted adjoining Alfred Manson's
corner post, thence 80 chains north,
along to. N. Harrison's west line,
tliense east 80 chains, thence south
80 chains, thence west 80 chains, following Alfred Manson's north line to
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
WILLIAM HUME GRANT.
Frank  R. Strolm,  Agent.
Dated July 2, 1910. Jy22
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that The Canadian
Fish and Cold Storage Company, of
Vancouver, B. C, occupation mercantile and manufacturing, intends
to apply for permission to purchase
the following described lands: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-east corner of lot 34, Range 5,
Coast District, thence south 20
chains, thence east 40 chains, thence
north 25 chains more or less to the
shore line, thence' following along
the shore line to the point of commencement and containing 90 acres,
more or less.
The Canadian  Fish  &  Cold
Storage Company Limited.
J. H. Plllsbury, Agent.
Dated July 14, 1910. Jyl9
Skeena Land District—District of
f^Q CGI or
TAKE NOTICE that William
S'mpson, of Lindsay, Ont., occupation hotel-keeper, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands In the vicinity of the Kltwancool or Chean Weln
Valley:—Commencing at a post
planted at the south-east corner and
about 7% miles distant in a north
westerly direction from the north
end of Kitwancool Lake, thence
north 80 chains, thence west 80
chains, thence south 80 chains,
thence east 80 chains to point of
commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
WILLIAM SIMPFON.
James to. Smith, Agent.
Dated  May 31,  1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that George Tutt,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation den-
1st, intends to apply for permission
0 purchase the following described
anils in the vicinity of the Kltwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—Commencing at a post planted at the
north-east corner and about 8%
miles distant in a north-westerly direction from the north end of Kitwancool Lake, thence south 4 0
chains, thence west 40 chains, thence
north 40 chains, tnence east. 40
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 640 acres, more or
less. GEORGE TUTT.
James to. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 1, 1910. JyS
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Lome Thompson, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
dentist, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of the
Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:
Commencing at a post planted at the
south-west corner and about 8 %
miles distant in a north-westerly direction from the north end of Kitwancool Lake, thence north 80
chains, thence east 40 chains, thence
south 80 chains, thence west 40
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 320 acres, more or
less. LORNE THOMPSON.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 1, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District ot
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Edward Cas-
pell, of Cayley, Alberta, occupation
merchant, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of the
Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. W. corner and distant about 15%
miles in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kltwancool
Lake, thence south 80 chains, thence
east 80 chains, thence north 80
|chains,- thence west SO chains to
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
EDWARD CASPELL.
James to.  Smith, Agent.
Dated June 3, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Casslu.
TAKE NOTICE that Thomas Sills,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation machinist, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in tne vicinity of Kltwancool or Chean Weln Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. to. corner and about 26% miles
distant In a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence south SO chains, thence Ipoint of commencement, and contain-
east    80    chains,    thence  north   80|ing  160  acres,  more  or less.
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that John Reidr
of Vancouver, B, C., occupation
broker, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. W. corner and about 15% miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north 4 0 chains, thence
east 40 chains, thence south 40
chains, thence west 40 chains to the
Skeena Land District—District 01
TAKE NOTICE that Charles Gei-
ger, of Victoria, 1). C, occupation
clerk, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Comemncing at a post planted at the
S. E. corner and about 19 miles distant In a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kltwancool
Lake, thence north 80 chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence soutii 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
CHARLES GIEGER.
James W.  Smith,  Agent.
Dated June 4th, 1910. Jy8
chains, thence west 80 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
THOMAS  SILLS.
James to. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 8th, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Sarah Cox,
of Monarch, Alberta, occupation marled woman, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands In the Kltwancool or
Chean Wien Valley:—Commencing at
a post planted at the N. to. corner
and about 4% miles distant In a
north-westerly direction from the
north end of Kltwancool Lake, thence
south 80 chains, thence east 80
chains, thence north 80 chains,
thence west 80 chains to point of
commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
SARAH COX.
James W. Smith, Agent
Dated May 31st, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that William Wallace, of Toronto, Ont., occupation
insurance agent, Intends to apply for
permission to purchase tht- following
discribed lands In the viol ilty of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Comencing at a post planted at the
N. E. corner and about 26% miles
distant in a north-westerly dlrecr on
from the north end of Kltwancool
Lake, thence south 80 chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence north 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to the
point of commencement, containing
640  acres,  more or less.
WILLIAM   WALLA CE.
James to. Smith, Agent.
Dated  June  8th,   1910. JyS
Coast Land District—District of
Skeena.
TAKE NOTICE that I, George A.
Poole, of Prince Rupert, occupation
printer, intend to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted on the north-east shore
line of Smith Island, distant about
one mile south-east from Lot 38, and
marked "G. A. P.'s North-west Corner Post," thence 20 chains south,
thence 80 chalnB east, thence north
to shore line, thence following shore
line to point of commencement, containing 160 acres, more or less.
GEORGE ARTHUR POOLE.
Dated Satvrday, July 2, 1910.
(First Insertion July 5.)
JOHN  REID.
James to. Smith, Agent.
Dated  June   3,   1910. Jy8
Skeena Land  District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Grace Cess-
ford, of Victoria, B. C, occupation
married woman, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of
Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. E. corner and about 23 miles distant In a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kltwancool
Lake, thence south 80 chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence north 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
GRACE CESSFORD.
James to. Smith, Agent
Dated June 6th, 1910. JyS
Skeena Land  District—District  of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Henry Hemming, of Victoria, 11. C, occupation
hotel keeper, intends to apply for
permission to purchase i. following
described lands In the vicinity of Klt-
wancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. 10. corner nnd about 21 miles iIIb-
i:iin, in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kilwancool
Lake, thenee south SO chains, thence
wesi 80 chains, thenee north 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to the
liolnl of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
HENRY   HEMMING.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Hated June 6th, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land  District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Samuel John
McDlarmld, of Monarch, Alberta, occupation farmer, intends to apply for
permission to purchase Hie following described lands In the Kitwancool or Clieun Weln Valley.:—Commencing at a post planted at the N.
E. corner and about I n. miles In a
north-westerly direction from the
north end of Kltwancool Luke,
thenee south 80 chains, thence west
SO chains, thence 1101 ih 80 chains,
thence east 80 chains to point of
commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
SAMUEL JOHN McDIARMID.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated May 31st. 1910, Jy8
Skeena Land District- District of
TAKE NOTICE that Annie Oownn,
of  Victoria,   B.   C,   occupation   married woman, intends to apply for per-  I
mission   to   purchase   the   following
described lands in tlie vicinity of Kit- Valley:.—Commencing
wancool or Chean Wein Valley:—j planted at the N. E. corner and about
Commencng at a post planted at the 119 miles distant In the north-west-
N. W. corner and about 23 miles dls-jerly direction from the north end of
tant In a north-westerly direction , Kitwancool Lake thence Booth 80
from the north end of Kitwancool chains, thence west 40 chalnB, thence
Lake; thence south SO chains, thence ; north 40 chains, thence west 40
east 80 chains, thenee north 80'chains, thence north 40 chains,
chains, thence west SO chains to the thence east 80 chains to point of
point of commencement, and con- commencement, and containing 480
mining 640 acres, more or less. acres, more or less.
ANNIE COWAN. NELSON   GO WEN.
James to. Smith, Agent, j James W. Smith, Agent
Dated June 7th, 1910. Jy8 '     Dated June 4th,  1910. Jy8
.Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE      NOTICE      that      Nelson
t'.owen,   of   Victoria,   B.   O,   occupation mining engineer, intends to apply  for  permission   to  purchase  the
owing described  lands  In  the vl-
nlty of Kitwancool or Chean  Weln
at     a     post '
prince Rupert 3fottmal
Telephone 138
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Published twice a week on Tuesday!
and Fridays from the Office of publica
Thii-'iLAvenue near McBride St
tion,
Subscription J rate to any point in
Canada, $2.00 n year: to points outside
of Canada, 83.00 a year.
AdverUsiugM'ate furnished on application.
O. H. NELoON,
Editor.
that liquor cannot be brought into a Hie commission to make investiga-
no-license district. The following is 1 tions under the new law. It is scarce-
section 127: ly likely that the commerce court
"Every one who by himself, his will be created and be in operation
clerk, servant or agent, in violation   before some time early in the coming
year.
Friday, September 2, 1910
Friday, September 2, 1910
AN IN\ ESTIMATION
In  connection  with  a case  In the
police court this week the name of
one of the police officers was brought
in In a manner to reflect upon his
conduct while on duty.    The case is
one that the   police   commissioners
should    assuredly   investigate.    The
officer is entitled to being exonerated
by  the  commission  If  he   was  not
guilty of misconduct or  If  he  was
guilty he should be made an example
of.    There Is no better way of effectively   checking    abuses    In    police
circles as well as In other lines than
by prompt action on the start. We do
not   believe   in   condemning   police
officers  on   the  mere   charges   preferred by the denizens of the restricted section of a city but In this in
stance more than ordinary publicity
has been given  to reports  and  the
fullest  Inquiry  should  be  made so
that information that 'cannot be obtained In a court of   law    may    be
forthcoming and justice done to all
concerned.
Incidentally we may state that we
believe that the police, even if their
occupation is a trying one, should be
expected to always act in a proper
manner if the laws which they are to
enforce are to be respected. We,
moreover, believe that with a uniformed force now in the city a little
drilling of the men so that they may
learn the common duties of their
office and present a smart appearance
would not be lacking. A slovenly
style in a police officer is as obnoxious
to the public as it is in a soldier.
QUESTION OK FORM
The  explanation   offered   by   Aid.
Pattullo  before  the council  regarding the G. T. P. reserve matter may
be ethically correct, but it does not
afford a solution of the matter. The
citizens of Prince Rupert, we believe,
are   less   concerned   in   the   ethical
aspect   of   the   situation   than   they
are in the practical side of it.   If the
mountain will not come to Mahomet
it Is up to Mahomet, we suppose, to
beat a trail to the mountain.    In a
matter that may be fraught with as
much importance to the city as this
question  involves,  citizens care not
anything about the method of doing
the work.    The results are all that
concerns them.    We do not want to
handicap the council In making the
best arrangements possible with the
G.T.P.  We  have  confidence  enough
in the business ability of the members of the council  to believe that
they may be working out a  policy
that may result In a settlement that
will bring the most satisfactory results to both sides.    It Is not always
wise on  the part of the council  to
fully reveal  its hand  and  we  hope
that the question is receiving the attention at its hands that it deserves.
The assessment on the G.T.P. reserve seems  to  be  very exorbitant.
The company is entitled to the greatest consideration at the hands of the
city  because  its  policy  can  be  one
of expedition   with   respect   to    the
place or one of retarding the development.    The future of the city Is assured  but  the  immediate  future  is
something   about   which   every   one
resident   here   has   the  deepest   concern.
The company can, if it sees fit, expend a very considerable amount of
money in the city in the next few
years, which would mean a lot to the
place nnd attract capital here. We
have no wish to stampede the council. The members of Unit body have
their responsibilities in the matter,
but we hope that there will be no attempt to |el mailers of order or precedent stand in the way of good
Judgment, especially in a case like
this where so much may be involved
of part 2 of this act:—-
"(a) Exposes or keeps for sale any
intoxicating liquor;   or, *
"(b) Directly or indirectly, on any
pretense, or by any. device, sails or
barters, or In the consideration of
the purchase of any other property,
gives to any other person any 1 ltcxl-
cating liquor;  or
"(c) Sends, ships, brings, or carries, or causes to be sent, shipped or
brought, or carried to or into any
county or city any intoxicating liquor; or,
"(d) Delivers to any consignee or
other person or stores, warehouses,
or keeps for delivery any intoxicating
liquor so sent, shipped, brought or
carried;
"Shall, on summary conviction be
liable to a penalty for the first offense of not less than fifty dollars
or imprisonment for a term not exceeding one month, with or without
hard labor, and for a second offence, to a penalty of not less than
one hundred dollars or for Imprisonment for a term not exceeding two
months with or without hard labor,
and for a third and every subsequent
offence, to Imprisonment for a term
not exceeding four months, with or
without hard labor."
In addition to this, I would like
the business men to know what Mr.
T. H. B. Witter, a merchant of Nova
Scotia, now a merchant in Vancouver, says in regard to this matter:—
"Merchants should vote for it because  the money spent   for    drink
would be used to purchase clothing
and provisions.   Fathers should vote
for   it   because  a   great   temptation
would be removed  from their sons.
Every good citizen  should  vote for
it because it would raise the moral
standing of the people in every community where the law is enforced."
This gentleman has labored for 40
years  and  is  one  of  the  most  respected merchants of the east.     Evidence of this kind  could be multiplied and therefore, the question of
"blind pigs" is within the power of
the people to prevent if they determine that the law shall be enforced.
It is a simple proposition and only
needs men with moral backbone to
accomplish all that is needed.    We
have found  in  our long experience
that the fear of losing a few orders
has played a larger part and has been
a stronger factor in the opopsltlon to
these beneficent acts of parliament.
If Prince Rupert will follow the lead
of other larger cities  where conditions are pretty much the same so
far as logging, mining, fishing, emigration and tourists are concerned,
they will do a good thing for themselves and set an example to other
cities   of  British   Columbia.
D.  SPENCER,
Supt. Local Option for B.
 0	
ASIATIC QUESTION
General  liotlut Says He Opposed Introduction of Chinese
FRUIT PACKING ACT
Clause Relating to Fruit Sold by Retailers is Made More Strict
C.
NEW RAILROAD  LAW
Recently   Passed   Regulations   Come
Into   Force   in   the   U.   S.
COMMUNICATIONS
The Journal does nol npceaanrilv endorae
the views vxpri-naed in this nolurnn hut believes in the frvpat  diacuaainn  of public  con
cerns provided it ia done
l a proper waif.
TDK SCOTT ACT
The business men of Prince Rupert are somewhat doubtful fespect-
ing the operation of the Canada Temperance Act because they do not
know the difference between the act
of  25  years  ago  and   today.       The     ,.,,,....m-
amendment of 190S distinctly states j ments to the commerce court or to
The new United States road law
is now effective. Immediately upon
the passage '•l the act sixty days ago,
sections of the law relating to the
suspension of rates went into effect.
Since that time the interstate commerce commission has been operating
under the law.
It is now the intention of the commission to take any formal notice of
the effectiveness of the law by the 1
issuance now or at any future time
of a formal statement concerning its
provisions. All of them are assumed by the commission to be well understood.
A conference was held by the commission with representatives of the
telegraph and telephone companies
concerning the law as it applies to
them. The companies expressed a
desire to do all In their power to
facilitate the work of the commission, so far as it might relate to
them.
Heretofore, of course, as common
carriers under tiie law, the telegraph
and telephone companies will have
to file reports with the commission
concerning their business, just as the
railroads now do. The officers were
informed also, that, after today, no
franks for messages could legally be
issued, except as governed by the
anti-pass provision of the Hepburn
act. After today, therefore, the issuance and use of telegraph and telephone franks are barred by the statute.
The long-and-short-hatil provision
of the recently enacted law, while it
becomes effective at once, actually
will not be operative for six months,
as that time Is allowed for the carriers to adjust with the commission
their tariffs with respect to that provision.
No announcement yet has been
made by President  Talt  of appoint
Copies have been received of the
amendments to the inspection and
sale act, part 9, referring to fruit and
fruit packages. Section 3 of clause
No. 321 is amended so that In place
of the words, "specimens not less
than medium sizes," the phrase "Includes no culls," Is used.
The other clause of the act of
more interest to fruit packers In the
Kootenays Is No. 322. This remains
unchanged.
Section 321 is as follows: "No person shall sell, or offer, expose or have
In his possession for sale, any fruit
packed:
"(a) In a closed package and Intended for sale, unless such package
is marked as required by the provisions of this part;
(b)   In  a   closed   package   upon
which package Is marked any designation which represents such fruit as
of:   (1)   fancy quality,  unless such
fruit consists  of well  grown  specimens of one variety, sound, of uniform and at least normal size, and
of  good   color   for   the   variety,   of
normal shape, from from worm holes,
bruises, scab and other defects, and
properly packed;  (2) No. 1 quality,
unless such  fruit consists   of    well
grown specimens   of    one    variety,
sound, of not les than medium size,
and of good color for the variety, of
normal shape and not less than 90
per cent free from scab, worm holes,
bruises and other defects, and properly packed;   (3) No. 2 quality, unless   such   fruits   includes   no   culls
and consists of specimens of not less
than nearly medium size for the variety and not less than 80 per cent
free from worm holes and such other
defects as cause material waste and
properly packed.
(c) In any package in which the
faced or shown surface gives a false
representation of the contents of
such package; and it shall be considered a false representation when
more than 15 per cent of such fruit
is substantially smaller in size than
or inferior In grade to or different
in variety from the face or shown
surface of susch package.
Section 322, dealing with fruit
falsely marked and packed, Is as follows:—
Whenever any fruit in any package
is found to be so packed tbat the
faced or shown surface gives a false
representation of the contents of the
package, any inspector charged with
the enforcement of this part may
mark the words falsely marked" In
plain and indelible manner on the
package.
2. Whenever any fruit packed 4n a
closed package is found to be falsely
marked, the safd Inspector may efface
such false marks and mark the
words "falsely marked" In a plain
and indelible manner on the package.
3. The inspector shall give notice,
by letter or telegram, to the packer
whose name Is marked on the package, within twenty-four hours after
he marks the words "falsely mark-
General Botha received an ovation
at Pretoria on his arrival there.
Speaking in English, he said in reply
to the allegation of Sir P. FitzPat-
rick that he had acquiesced in the
Introduction of Chinese labor Into
the South African mines, that he told
Lord Milner that the Boers would
never agree to the Introduction of
the Chinese, and he had consistently
opposed that course.
For Job Printing of all kinds
the Journal man.
SKEENA DISTRICT
Ferry, Kitselas, Skeena River.
IN ACCORDANCE with chapter
78, R. S. B. O, 1897, "Ferries Act,"
the Government of British Columbia
invite applications for a charter for
a ferry to ply across the Skeena
River at Kitselas,
Applications will be received by
the Honourable the Minister of Public Works up to and including the
16th of September next.
The limits of the ferry shall extend for a distance of one mile above
and one mile below said point.
The charter will cover a period expiring on the 31st, March, 1912.
The ferry shall De operated whenever  required   between  7   a.m.   and
7 p.m., very day excepting Sundays.
Applications shall give a description of the scow or boat it is proposed to use, and method of operation.
Applications shall state the tolls It
is proposed to ask for—
Each adult passenger.
Each child (not in arms) under 13
years.
Each head of cattle, horse, mule or
donkey.
Each calf, sheep, goat or swine.
Each vehicle with one horse and
driver.
Each cart or wagon with one horse
and  driver,  loaded.
Each vehicle with two horses and
driver.
Each vehicle with two horses and
driver, loaded.
Each parcel of twenty-five pounds
and under.
Freight     parcel     of    twenty-five
pounds and under.
Freight, per one hundred pounds
and under, non-perishable goods
Freight, per one hundred pounds
and under, perishable goods.
The Government of Britisli Columbia is not necessarily bound to accept any application submitted.
F. C. GAMBLE,
Public Works Engineer.
Department of Public Works.
Victoria, B.C., 15th August, 1910.
land intended to be irrigated, giving
acreage.
(1) If the water is to be used for
power or mining purposes describe
the place where the water is to be returned to some natural channel, and
the. difference in altitude between
point of diversion and point of return: Water will be returned at
mouth of Cloyah River, 55 feet.
(j) Area of Crown land intended
to be occupied by the proposed
works.
(k) This notice was posted on the
thirteenth day of August, 1910, and
application will be made to the Commissioner on the fifteenth day of
September, 1910.
(1) Give the names and addresses
of any riparian proprietors or licensees who or whose lands are llke'y
to be affected by the proposed works,
either above or below the outlet:
Owners of lots 130, 131, 632, and
972.
(m) The boundaries and area of
the Municipality are as follows:—
4. The said City of Prince Rupert
shall be bounded as follows:—
Atlantic Steamship
 Agency	
WATER NOTICE
ed
NOTICE Is hereby given that an
application will be made under Part
V. of the "Water Act, 1909," to obtain a licence In the Skeena Division
of Coast District.
(a) The name, address and occupation of the applicant Is The Municipal Corporation of the City of
Prince Rupert, County of Atlin, B.C.
(If for mining purposes) Free
Miner's Certificate No.
(b) The name of the lake, stream
or source (If unnamed, the description is), Cloyah Lakes.
(c) The point of diversion, at the
foot of the Lower Lake.
(d) The quantity of water applied
for (In cubic feet per second), 150.
(e) The character of the proposed
works, dam, pipe-line and power
plant.
(f) The premises on which the
water is to be used (describe same),
The Power site at mouth of Cloyah
River.
(g) The purposes for which the
water is to be used, Power.
(h)   If for irrigation describe the
The Standard of the Empl
ire
Burrell's Warranted Genuine
WHITE LEAD AND LINSEED OIL
SOLE AGENTS IN WKSTERN CANADA'-
The Staneland Co. Ltd
836-840 Fort Street, VICTORIA, B.C.
Commencing at a post on the shore
of Shawatlan Passage, in Range 5,
Coast District of British Columbia,
and being the southeasterly post of
Section 9, Prince Rupert Townslte;
thence along the boundary of Section 9 as follows: South forty-three
degrees forty-seven minutes (43deg.
47min.)   west   astronomical,   a   distance of four hundred and fifty-one
and seventy-seven hundredths (451.-
77)  feet;  thence north elghty-tbree
degrees thirty-seven minutes (83deg.
37mln.)   west  astronomical,   a   distance of one thousand five hundred
and seventy-two hundredths (1,500.-
72) feet; thence south twenty-seven
degrees twenty-three minutes fifteen
seconds (27deg. 23mln. 15sec.) west
astronomical, a   distance   of    three
thousand four hundred and seventy-
three    and   seventy-five hundredths
(3,473.75) feet; thence south thirty-
five     degrees     fifty-eight   minutes
thirty-four  seconds   (35deg.   58min.
34sec.) west astronomies', a distance
of two thousand   and fifty-one    and
twenty-five    hundredths   (2,051.25)
feet; thence north sixty-two degrees
sixteen minutes twenty seconds  (62
deg. 16min. 20sec)  west astronomical, a distance of one thousand one
hundred and  twenty-four and eight
hundredths  (1,124.08)  feet;    thence
south    forty-seven    degrees    twelve
minutes ten seconds  (47deg. 12min.
lOsec.) west astronomical, a distance
of   four    thousand    eight   hundred
(4,800) feet, more or less, to a post
being   the   north-easterly   corner   of
Lot  1,194, Range  5, Coast District;
thence  along   the   southerly   boundary of Lot 1,994 south fifty-nine degrees forty-two minutes thirty-eight
seconds (59deg.  42min. 38sec)  west
astronomical,   a   distance   of    three
thousand eight hundred and six and
sixty-eight    hundredths     (3,806.68)
feet;   thence   south   forty-seven   degrees seven   minutes    five    seconds
(47deg. 07min. 05sec.) west astronomical, a distance of two thousand
six  hundfed  and  three and  seventeenths (2,603.7)  feet; thence south
seventy-nine degrees forty-one mln-
uates forty-three seconds (79deg. 41
mln.   43sec.)   west   astronomical,  a
distance of one thousand three hundred and forty-one and twelve hundredths      (1,341.12)    feet;    thence
south fifty-two degrees forty-six minutes    twenty-four   seconds    (52deg.
46min. 24sec.) west astronomical, a
distance of two thousand two hundred and forty-seven and ninety-six
hundredths (2,247.96)   feet; thence
south sixteen  degrees     one minute
nineteen seconds  (16deg. Olmln. 19
sec.)  west astronomical, a distance
of three thousand one hundred and
sixty-nine    and    ninety-eight    hundredths      (3,169.98)    feet;    thence
north  seventy-nine  degrees  twenty-
two  minutes   (79deg.   22mln)   west
astronomical, a distance of five hundred and thirty and sixty-four hundredths (530.64) feet, more or leBS,
to a post on the shore of Prince Ru-
per Harbour; thence west astronomical one thousand three hundred and
twenty   (1,320)   feet;   thence north
astronomical a distance   of    twelve
thousand  nine  hundred  and  thirty-
six   (12,936)    feet;     thence    north
sixty-one degrees and thirty minutes
(61deg.  30mln)   east, a distance of
twenty-three thousand seven hundred
(23,700) feet to a point opposite the
centre point of Shawatlan Passage;
thence along the centre line of Shawatlan Passage to a point due west
of  the   point    of     commencement;
thence due west to the point of commencement; the land area contained
within said boundaries consisting of
about two thousand   (2,000)    acres
and being shown  on  the registered
plans of Prince   Rupert    Townslte,
registered  at   Prince   Rupert  Town-
site,  registered  at  Prince Rupert.
(n) Approximately the number of
inhabitants: Five thousand.
(0)    The
Through  tickets and excursion
rates to
England, France, Germany,
and all
Scandinavian Ports.
Call or write for rates to any
part of the world. I am also
agent for all American steamers
to and from Prince Rupert;
Northern Pacific Railway; Alaska Pacific Express.
J. H. ROGERS
Oeneral Steamship and Railway
Agent, Prince Rupert, B.C.
Canadian Pacific  R'y
Steamers leave Prince Rupert for Vancouver,
Victoria, Seattle
Princess Beatrice, every Monday at 1 p.m.
Princess May or Princess Royal
every Saturday morning.
Steamers lease Vancouver
Princess Beatrice every Thursday night.
Princess Royal every   Saturday
night at 11 o'clock.
Union Steamship Co'y
of B.C. Ltd.
The new Steel Passenger Steamer
"Camosun"
PRINCE RUPERT every Sunday at 9 a.m. Mr Vancouver,
arriving Monday afternoon.
For Stewart City on arrival from
Vancouver Friday night.
Northbound, leaves Vancouver
Wednesdays at 9 p.m.
Steerage Fare $5.00
The "Camosun" is the only steamer
on the run having water-tight bulkheads and double Dottom, thus ensuring safety of passengers in case of
collission or wreck.
J. H. ROGERS,   Ticket Agent
HAYNOR BROS,
FUNERAL  DIRECTORS
and
PROFESSIONAL EMBALMERS
DR. W. B. CLAYTON
DENTIST
—o—
Office  in   the   Westenhaver  Block,
Over Orme's Drug   Store.
Prince Rupert
WM. S. HAj^L, L. D. S. D. D. S.
:-:   DENTIST   :-:
Crown and Bridge Work a specialty.
All dental operations skillfully
treated. Gas and local anaesthetics
administered for the painless extraction of teeth. Consultation free.
Offices, Helgerson Bk„ Prince Rupert
J. H. PILLSBURY
CIVIL     ENGINEER
Surveying,   Designs,   Estimates,   etc.
Room  7,   Exchange  Block,
Corner Third Ave and Sixth  Street
Prince Rupert
Grand Trunk Pacific  Steamships
For VANCOUVER, VICTORIA, SEATTLE.
Connecting   with   Eastbound   Trains
"Prince Rupert" sails every Thursday, 8.30 p.m.
"Prince  George"   sails   every Monday 8.30 p.m.
FOR STEWART:
"Prince Rupert" sails Wednesdays 8 p.m.'
"Prince George"  sails Sunday   at 8 p.m.
Steamer for Masset, Klncollth.Naas  Bay  and   Port  Simpson,  Sundays, I p.m.
For Skldegate,  Queen Charlotte City,   and   other   Moresby Island
points, Wednesday, 1 p.m., returning via Queen Charlotte City.
Tickets, reservations and Information    from
A. E. McMASTER
Freight' and  Passenger Agent, G. T. P. Wharf.
place of the proposed
reservoir for storing: The Cloyah
Lakes.
(p) The means by which it Is proposed to store the water: By a dam.
(q) The area or the reservoir site
or sites at each foot in depth above
the outlet:  Six square miles.
(r) How it is proposed to acquire
the land necessary for the purpose-
By purchase or otherwise.
(s) Approximately the number of
Ssloo66' inteDded t0 be lmP°"rided,
(t) Whether it is proposed to
lower the water In any natural lake
or standing body of water, and If bo
then:—
(1) The anticipated extent of the
lowering.
(2) The means proposed to be
adopted to lower and refill.
(3) The nature and character In
detail, of the works proposed to be
constructed to provide for the dis
charge and penning   back    of    the
jTlanT'    Dam   pipe--1Ine   and    Power
THE MUNICIPAL CORPORATION
OF TrfE CITY OF PRINCE
„   ,.    . RUPERT.
By Its Agent, F. S. Clements
A16.
G. to. NICKIORSON & CO.
CUSTOMS AND MERCHANDISE
—o—
Brokers, Forwarding Agents,
Storage, etc.
J.  to.  POTTEII
ARCHITECT    AND    STRUCTURAL
ENGINEER
Re-inforced Concrete a Specialty
—o—
Law-Butler Building - Prince Rupert
GRAHAM ISLAND —"The surest
sign of the progress of a town or
district Is Its newspaper—live, active, hustling." "The Masset Review," Masset, Q.C.I.
The Thompson j
Hardware Co.;
—Second Avenue—
Paints. General Hardware,
Oils, Stoves and Ranges. Friday, September 2, 1910
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
LINDSAY'S CARTAGESSTORAGE
G. T. P. CARTAGE AGENTS
Office at H. B. Rochester, Centre St.
—o—
LADYSMITH COAL
is handled by us.  All orders receive
prompt "attention.  Phone No. 68.
Some Rock
Bottom
Prices
Set Di for Iiratmmt
Rupert City Realty & Information Bureau, Ltd.
MIHCE IVTEIT,
B.C.
The Roland Rooms
Splendid Accommodations
Newly Furnished
Hot baths;  right down town;  good
table board all round
RATES, FIFTY CENTS AND UP
Fred Stork
General Hardware
...Complete Line of...
VALVES
Pipe'and Pipe Fittings
CANCELLATION  OF RESERVE
NOTICE is hereby given that the
reserve existing on Crown lands in
the vicinity of Babine Lake, situate
In Range 5, Coast District, notice of
which was published in the British
Columbia Gazette, dated December
17, 1908, is cancelled in so far as
said reserve relates to lots numbered 1519, 1518, 1617, 1516, 1515,
1510, 1507, 1506, 1506A, 1503 1601,
1502, 1512, 1511, 1505, 1604, 1513,
1514, 1609, 1508, 1530, 1527, 1628,
1529, 1531, 1532, 1533, 1634, 1635,
1537, 1539, 1536, 1538, 1540, 1641,
1544, 1543, 1545, 1546, 1542, 1547,
1548, 1649, 1560, 1520, 1621, 1522,
1523, 1524, 1525, 1526, and 1661.
ROBERT A. RENWICK,
Deputy Commissioner of Lands.
Lands Department,
Victoria, B. O, June 16th, 1910.
(First Insertion July 6.)
C. D. NEWTON
Real Estate
Money to Loan
Notary Public
Exchange Block
Comer 3rd Aoenue and 6th Street
P.O. Box 226   Tel. 226
Hear
the
Truth
There's nothing about a set of
harness that requires such careful
attention, In both leather and workmanship, as traces and collars, there's
where the strain lies, there's where
we excel, though we are just as
watchful as to every other detail of
a complete set of harness, be it for
heavy or light work.
B. C. Saddlery Company
Limited
MANUFACTURERS OF SADDLERY
Jobbers of Leather, Harness, Saddles, Whips, Trunks and Valises,
Pads, Blankets, Rugs; Harness Soaps
and Dressings.
566 YATES STREET
VICTORIA, B.C.
NEWS OF THE PROVINCE
Items of General Interest From Centres in British Columbia.
Deal in Mines
Nelson.—A bond has been secured
on Waterloo and Fontenoy properties
in Camp McKinney by Victoria capitalists and the work of unwatering
will begin this week. The Waterloo
was owned by the Waterloo Gold
Mining Company, the controlling Interest being vested In Dennis Clark,
most of the remaining stock being
in the hands of Spokane capitalists.
The death of Mr. Clark tied up the
property. The Fontenoy adjoins the
Waterloo, the leading stockholder In
the controlling company being ex-
Lleutenant-Governor Dunsmuir. The
claim was held for many years by
Hugh Cameron, who sold it for J20,-
000. Internal friction in the purchasing company let to a shut-down.
The Fontenoy deposit consists of
a white quartz vein well mineralized
with galena and carrying good values
In silver and gold. Another fact that
makes the Fontenoy valuable Is that
it Is In a position to catch the Waterloo vein which carries high gold
values.
The Waterloo has a well-equipped
stamp mill which has turned out a
considerable amount of bullion. The
present deal was effected by Messrs.
Louis Hind and C. A. Cane and development work will go on under
Mr. Cane's direction.
Follows City's Example
Vancouver.—The B. C. Telephone
Company will shortly remove its
poles from all the streets In the section of the city bounded by Seymour,
Hastings, Pacific and Beatty streets,
and place them In the following
lanes: ane between Seymour and
Richards, from Pacific to lane between Dunsmuir and Pender; lane
between Richards and Homer, from
Drake to lane between Homer and
Hamilton from Smythe to lane between Dunsmuir and Pender; lanes
between Hamilton and Cambie, and
Cambie and Beatty as far as they
run. The application for the change
of pole route was laid before the
board of works and granted.
The company also asked that It be
given permission to lay underground
conduits on Thurlow street from the
lane between Pacific and Harwood
to the lane between Evelelgh and
Melville, thence to Burrard, and also
across the school grounds between
Hamilton and Beatty streets on
Dunsmuir street. The board approved
of the plan.
Some time ago the B. C. Electric
railway was asked to move Its poles
on Georgia street between Cardero
and Chilco. A letter was received
from Manager Rummel, of the light
and power department, enclosing a
communication from Col. Tracy, during his time of office as city engineer,
in which the company was given a
location. The request was, therefore
made that the city bear the expense
of moving. The city engineer was
given full power to deal with the
matter.
Mill  Merge!"
Victoria.—Four of the largest lumber companies in the province have
been merked. The new corporation
which will be known as the Canadian
Pacific Lumber Company, is capitalized at $5,000,000, and includes the
present Canadian Pacific Lumber
Company, of Port Moody; the Bank-
ley Sound Cedar Company, of Port
. »** .J, »J. ►*« ♦;« »J, »J* .j. .j. «J,,;» »J« .j. Of .j,...... .j, .j* »j,... »J» »j»
Don't
Forget I
We have the stock and when *
you want to select a Diamond *
Ring, a Wedding Present, it is £
no trouble for you to find some- *
thing that will suit you.   Our •:•
stock is composed of the best .;.
goods  that  the  factories  pro- J
duce and we guarantee every- *
thing sold here. •:•
Bring us your   Watch    and S
Jewelry repairing If you want *
It properly done. *
C. B. WARK
;«$ «j« t-jt *;« tjt *j» »j« *j« *j»»;
* ♦** »!* *£• •!• »!• ♦»*»!«»** •J*
Clarmont Rooms
Sixth Avenue near Fulton Street
Comfortable, Homelike Rooms; Newly Furnished Throughout; Bath
Rooms  with   Hot  and
Cold Water
Rates, .113.00 a Week   and   Upwards
Mrs.   Annie  McGrath,   Proprietoress
Alberni; the Anglo-American Lumber Company, Vancouver, and the
Gibbons Lumber Mills, Arrow Lakes.
The timber holdings which have
been merged approximate 135 square
miles of valuable limits, and the
total capacity of the four mills at
present Is about 300,000 feet for a
working day of ten hours.
The company Intends to erect a
large mill at New Alberni, on land
which It now owns, upon the completion of the E. & N. railway extension from Nanaimo, which will
give it access to Victoria. It is expected that a large trade with tbe
Orient will be built up from this
mill, and the intention is to make it
one of tbe finest on the island.
The company's officers and directors are: President, M. Carlin, Victoria; first vice-president, Robert W.
Gibson, Victoria; second vice-president, J. D. McArthur, Winnipeg;
manager, Thomas Meredith, New
Westminster. Directors: Messrs. C.
G. Major, New Westminster; Geo. E.
Carbould, New Westminster; W. W.
Fraser, Winnipeg; D. C. Irwin, Vancouver;   Rand  Gibbons,  Revelstoke.
J. F. Hale will have charge of the
present mill at Alberni. When the
proposed new mill Is e^cted the mill
now operating will be devoted entirely to the production of shingles,
and the management of the two
plants will be in Mr. Halle's hands.
The Vancouver mill will be managed
by Mr. McAfee, and the Arrow Lakes
mills by Rand Gibbons.
BUYING COAL
How the V. S. Conducts its Purchasing of Fuel For Year
The United States buys about
seven million dollars worth of coal
every year for use in th navy, In the
public buildings in Washington and
other cities and for other purposes,
about one-third of it—mainly coal
used in public buildings—on specifications under which prices are fixed
according to the value or quality of
the coal delivered by the successful
bidder. A definite standard of
quality for the coal thus purchased
Is specified by each bidder and this
standard is considered in awarding
the contract. If the value of the coal
furnished Is below the standard fixed
a discount Is made from the standard
price; if Its value is above the standard an allowance Is made for the excess of value and a proper sum Is
paid In addition to the contract price.
The value Is determined by tests
and analyses made by the Geological
Survey on samples taken from the
coal furnished by the contractor.
These analyses and tests show the
quality of the coal In terms of fixed
carbon, volatile matter, sulphur, ash,
and moisture, and especially its heating value in British thermal units,
as determined by calorimetrlc tests.
Until within a few years the agents
of the government, in buying coal, relied upon the integrity of the dealer
and the reputation of the mine or district from which the coal was obtained, and these formed the only possible assurance that the coal was
equal In quality to the grade to be
furnished. The new method has been
so successful that it will probably be
gradually extended to cover a larger
share of the goevrnment's fuel supply.
A full statement of this method of
buying coal Is contained in a recent
bulletin of the United States Geological Survey (Bulletin 428), entitled
"The purchase of coal by the government, with analyses of coal delivered
for the fiscal year 1908-09," by G. S.
Pope.
The bulletin includes a statement,
of the factors affecting the value of
coal, a description of the methods
adopted for sampling and testing, a
form of specifications used under the
new plan, a list of government contracts for coal for the fiscal year
1909-10, and a table of analyses of
coal furnished for the fiscal year
2908-9.
At a performance of "Dora" many
years ago In a Western city, when
Mary Morrison made her exit to
bring on her little Willie of four
years, she was shocked to find a
lubberly boy of at least fourteen;
and, as he was the only Willie at
hand, on he must go, though he was
well-night as big as his mother.
The Farmer Allan of the play, being
equal to the emergency, instead of
Inquiring, "How old are you, my little man?" endeavored to remedy the
matter by saying, "How old are you,
my strapping boy?"
CHURCH AMUSEMENTS
Methodist Conference Considers the Question of Time Honored
Prohibition.
Less Restrictive Rules Are Adopted
in Legislative Gathering at
Victoria
The specific restrictions in the
Methodist Church discipline dealing
with tbe moral conduct of Its members have been swept away, and In
their place has been substituted a
general admonition as to good conduct, such as Is consistent with a
Christian life. The change was effected by the general conference at
Its meeting In Victoria. So has ended what will go down in Methodist
church history as the famous footnote controversy.
The footnote around the abrogation substitution or retention ot
which a bitter discussion raged, came
before the conference through a report from a Commission on Rules appointed at the last quadrennium. This
commission was composed of 35 men,
among them the most prominent
figures in Methodism in the country.
Their report suggested a substitution
for the footnote, but It was not of a
character to meet with favor at the
conference.
The footnote read as follows: "The
general rules are to be understood
as forbidding neglect of duties of any
kind, Imprudent conduct, indulging
in sinful tempers or words, the buying, selling or using of intoxicating
liquors as a beverage, dancing, playing at games of chance, encouraging
lotteries, attending theatres
races, circuses, dancing parties, patronizing dancing schools, taking sucii
other amusements as are obviously
of a misleading or questionable
moral tendency and all acts of disobedience to the order and discipline
of the Church."
The commission's report pointed
out that these rules should not comprise the code to be enforced, bul
merely epitomized tne godly life
which Methodists ought to lead. It
went on to recommend such changes
in the clause as would allow more
liberty of action to the members of
the church.
"Now we can dance if we like," re
marked one delegate, on hearing the
suggested changes. A burst of laugh
ter greeted this sally.
Mr. Justice MacLaren, of Toronto,
said that the present was the first
attempt to interfere with this portion
of the church's discipline. It was an
attempt to deal with principles which
had been partly laid down by John
Wesley himself and ratified by succeeding conferences. The matter had
agitated several conferences and was
a theme of grave importance to the
church itself. Whatever was done
should be the result of mature deliberation, as the principles of Methodism were Involved.
Another delegate said that thousands of would-be Methodists were
standing outside the church waiting
until the restrictions under discussion were removed.
At a later discussion on motion ot
Professor W. W. Andrews, of Sack-
vllle, N.B., seconded by the Rev. Dr.
J. White, of New Westminster, and
almost unanimously adopted by the
conference, the footnote was obrogat-
ed and the following substituted.:
"Forasmuch as these rules are to
be Interpreted by the enlighted
Christian conscience according to
the principles of Christian liberty
revealed In God's Word, our members are earnestly admonished that
they guard with great care their
reputation as servants of Christ; and
in the case of those amusements and
practices which are of a hurtful and
questionable tendency I hey engage in
none injurious to their spiritual life
or incompatible to their allegiance
to Jesus Christ, their Master."
When the adjourned discussion on
he report of the Commission on
Rules was resumed, the air In the i
assembly hall was charged with
electricity. Delegates sprang io their
feet with amendments to the report.
Another matter of considerable
public interest arose out of a report
presented by the committee on temperance, prohibition and moral reform. Attention was drawn to the
action of the minister of justice in
pardoning two men who had pleaded
guilty to the publication of obscene
literature. It was intimated that the
general conference could not afford
to pass over this "gross Insult" to
common decency without protest.
The Rev. Dr. S. D. Chown of Toronto, chairman of the committee,
reporting, said that the matter of
Skill and King was a very large public question, but one which would not
bear discussion before the general
conference.     He  would  ask  that  a
committee of 35 men should be appointed to draw up a memorial for
presentation to the Dominion government. The memorial should deal
with the specific cases of Skill and
King, and also with obscene literature generally, and the necessity fur
its prohibition. The commission
should have such a personnel that its
findings would be accepted without
question.
A committee of the most prominent names of those attending the conference was appointed to deal wtih
the matter.
Another recommendation of this
committee to be adopted was that of
giving the general secretary power
to call a meeting of any confc-renci
committee throughout the Dominion
at any time. This Involves the question of the general board dealing
with questions which may be purely
local In character, and also means an
addition to the personnel of that
board.
Dr. Chown pointed out that the
new arrangement would prove of
considerable value In re tifylng
social evils of perhaps a moment's
growth which could be dealt with at
once.
Mr. N. W. Rowell, K.C. of Toronto,
speaking to this recommendation,
was of opinon that the limit had been
reached in the number of the personnel of the t'jard. H-! W'.uld regret
to see any permanent enlargement.
The church should get e'ergymen and
laymen lu icialitles to do their own
work.
Mr. J. Gibs'.n, of luwrgoll, said
that the Ontario conference had
found it necessary to increase It?
organization by leaps and bounds.
Ontario had already .lone ten times
more than the genera, conference
now propose 1 doia^. The worst
feature of the Methodist conference
was that it had passed resolutions
and was without the machinery to
put them into effect. He strongly
urged an increase to the personnel
of the board.
The Rev. A. M. Sandford, of Vancouver, deprecated the idea of giving
the board power to legislate on matters which were purely of local interest.
The recommendation of the tern
perance committee was finally adopted, the composition of the board to
consist of the chairman, treasurer,
general secretary and field secre
tarles.
On the recommendation of the
committee an amendment has been
made to the discipline allowing for
the appointment of district temperance secretaries in every district of
the church. Hitherto there has only
been two secretaries in each district, the financial secretary and
Sunday school secretary.
In sympathy with the Chinese government's crusade against the traffic
in opium, the general superintendent and secretary have been instructed to draw up a memorial to be forwarded to the British government
asking that power to use all Its Influence to help China In the work
upon which she is engaged.
The report of the commission on
rules further recommended a change
In a clause In the discipline which
states that a probationer should take
no steps about marriage without first
consulting his brethren. The new
clause reads that when about to enter
the married state he should consult
his superiors in office to whose authority he is submitted.
The Rev. A. J. Irwin of Mount
Forest, on the submission of this
recommendation, said that any one
who didn't know enough about
choosing a wife would have a sorry
outlook. He did not think the matter was one In which a man would
display good sense by consulting Ills
brethren.
Personals
Dr. Kergln has been ill the city
this week.
• *     *
Hugo Ross and G K Killam. of
Winnipeg, after inspecting the Stewart mines, went soutii last night.
• *     *
Mrs. O. H. Nelson, Third avenue,
will be at home on the second Thursday of each mouth.
• *     *
VV. M. Brewer, M.E., and J. L.
Parker, M.E., of the Pacific Metals
Company of Victoria, have returned
from a trip In the direction of Hazelton, where they looked Into some
mining properties.
• *    *
A. D. Tennant, who Is Interested In
the Red Cliiie mine, returned last
evening on the Prince Rupert. The
work at the mine Is going forward
he says In the most satisfactory way.
The tunnelling is in excellent ore
and prospects are really better than
had been expected.
• *    •
W. E. Staneland, the head of the
Staneland Paint Company, of Victoria, is in the city. Mr. Staneland
maintains an agency in this city for
his different supplies. He is here at
the present time in that connection.
The future of Prince Rupert, he regards as such that he must keep In
the closest touch with the business
life here.
• *     *
The many friends of E. Kent
Strathy, who up to a few weeks ago
was the manager of the local branch
of the Union Bank, were agreeably
surprised to see him step off the
Prince Rupert on her arrival here
on Wednesday. Mr. Strathy's visit
was a hurried one in connection with
private business. He had just reached Edmonton with his family when
he found it necessary to make the return trip.
 o	
RHODES AS PEACEMAKER
How Great Empire Builder Brought
Natives to Peace
Mrs.  Margaret L.  Woods gives a
vivid description in the Cornhill of
the fashion In which    Cecil Rhodes
ended the Matabele war:   One who
had been a trooper in   the    British
camp at the time, In pointing out the
site of Rhodes' tent and of the meeting with the Matabele chiefs, told us
the story as it struck "the man who
was there," but seeing things from
the    outside    only.    He   told  how
Rhodes had  lived  for six weeks In
his isolated tent.    "Then," said he,
"one evening Mr. Rhodes was talking
with Baden-Powell and some of them
and he said to them, "I believe the
Matabele are as tired of the war as
we are, and if someone of Importance
would  Just  walk  over  unarmed   to
their camp and offer them favorable
conldtions of peace, they would come
In.'    And the others said  that was
all very well, but who was going to
it    Mr. Rhodes   didn't    make    any
answer to that, but next morning we
couldn't find him In his tent, nor yet
in the camp.
There was a rare hunt for Mr.
Rnodes, and at last it came out he
had gone over to the Matabele camp
with three of his friends, and was
making peace with the chiefs." . . .
One can imagine that host of splendid fighting men—muscles of steel
and skins of smoothest bronze, with
shield and-assegais, and all their war
gear, gat„ered on the hillside in the
early morning sunlight, watching the
approach of the White Chief and his
little band.     So  be came and  stood
■imong them—toiallv unarmed, alone
The laughter caused by the fore-1 (,x,.p||t   ro,,  ,|is  ,„,„,.,,,,„„,.  .„„,   ,„.,,
other men, who carried no arms except revolvers. There passed first
the elaborate courtesies of savage
greetings, and then the Indaba began.
First the White Chief Inquired what
were   those   grievances against  his
going statement led the chairman to
remark that tbe conference was engaged In discussing principles of the
church, and that these should not
be treated lightly.
The Rev.  Dr. S. Bland, of Winnipeg, said that the clause as It. readi,,. ..,,,.,
savored of the idea that women were  War,    This opening pleased  tbe  In-
dangerous things.  (Laughter.) ,,„n,1S|   K]]n   explained   ,,„.,,.   grlev.
Tbe   Rev.   Dr.   to.    I    .->:,. ling,   Of | ance8 .„   ,„„Kth      „-,„,,,   ,,„  ,,.„,   „„.
tened to nil and promised redress, be
addressed them In his turn, reproving them sternly for 'heir cruelties
to women and children.    They beard
Winnipeg, said the conference seem-'
ed to be in a funny mood, but the)
questions before them were any-'
thing but funny.    It was of the grav-!
est possible Importance to a minister ih|m  shamefaced   like  chidden   chil-
the kind  of woman  he married.    It , ,|ren
would probably determine his future
success or otherwise.
The recommendation carried.
 o	
An earnest elder of a church in
Alberta, participating In a service at
which prayers for rain were offered,
sent up this petition:
"O, Lord: You know we need rain
and need It bad. We haven't had
even a smell of rain for two months.
What we need is a real rain—none of
your little drlzzle-drazzles, but a
regular gully-washer and road-
wrecker!"
At length he asked the momentous question, "Is il to be peace
or war?" and the chiefs advancing
laid their assegais at his feet. The
war was ended.
Rhodes was almost completely
silent during his walk back to tbe
British camp. But once he spoke,
and touched a string that vibrates.
"It is scenes like this," be said,
"which make life worth living."
WANTED—Good   sales    girl;    easy
work; short hours.   Apply Simon's
Fair, Third avenue. PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Friday, September 2, 1910
LUMBERMEN'S  CASE
I
The Claims of British Columbia Timber
Interests Ably Presented.
Sir   Wilfrid   Laurier   Hears   Representations During His Tour
to West
G. F. Gibson, who presented the
case for the lumbermen of British
Columbia before Sir Wilfrid Laurier
on his recent visit, reviewed at length
the situation as affecting that Industry.   He said:—
"We desire to bring once more to
your attention certain matters relat
Ing to our industry. We refer first
to the rough lumber Importations
We think that there is no other Industry in Canada which In Its operation contributes so largely proportionally under the customs duties as
the lumber maunfacturing industry.
Tools, saws, machinery, belting,
camp supplies and foodstuffs are all
protected. Further, to an extent not
realized in other parts of the dominion, we are handicapped in our operations by certain regulations which
check the immigration to this province of the class of people we require
to help in our mills. This is further
aggravated by the fact that settlers'
transportation rates apply only as far
west as Calgary, and our province is
thus shut out from any benefits
which may accrue to immigrants in
the matter of cheap transportation.
Disadvantages Geographically
"Our geographical situation subjects us to the heaviest cost for
transportation of supplies, and also
subjects us to the heaviest freight
charges In sending our goods to the
market. The same cause cont*'ibutes
to the increased cost of living, and
necessitates the paying of a higher
scale of wages here than in the prov-
ineesh further east, and when it is
taken into account the varloush hazards our raw material, our plants
and stocks are subject to by fire and
by storm, we feel that in the matter
of protection of our industry in our
natural markets less consideration
had been extended to ours than to
any other industry in this dominion.
As to Duties
"The duty levied by the United
States on both our rough and dressed
product, practically shuts us out of
that market and a large proportion
of the mills in this province is
wholly confined to the nearby Canadian markets In disposing of their
products.
"Notwithstanding all this, we are
subjected to an unfair competition in
our market, no more than 75 per
cent of our total cut, from the Importations of American lumber coming in duty free, which lumber Is in
all respects as favorably situated and
frequently more so as ours In the
matter of freight rates and transportation, and so makes use of our market as a dumping ground for surplus
stock.
"We respectfully submit that such
conditions impose a serious hardship
upon our Industry.
"Further, when we consider that
the greater bulk of our foodstuffs
(all amply protected) are purchased
by us from the provinces lying to the
east of us, we feel more than ever
that the arrangement of our customs
tariff is not at all an equitable one
as regards the lumber manufacturers.
"Some idea of what this Importation means as an economic loss to
the lumber interests of this country
and the Industries and labor associated with them can be gathered from
the  following  figures:
"During the year ending aMrch 31,
1910, pitch pine, which is a direct
competitor with the British Columbia
fir and enjoys the advantage of
cheaper transportation to our eastern markets nnd cheaper labor in its
production, entered into Canada duty
free to the exient of 10,000,000 feet,
valued at $416,000; square limbers,
$60,000; plunks and boards, not
dressed   more   than   one  shlde,   7 7,-
000,  feet, $1,621,000;  total, $2,-
0S7,UU0.
Free Imports
"During the three months ending
June 30, 11)10, 39,000,000 feet of
lumber, valued at $475,000, came
Into Canada duty free.
"A large part of the value of lumber lies in wages paid for its manufacture. On this basis during the
fifteen months ending June 30, 1910,
It is estimated that not less than $2,-
Oun.OOO In wages which should have
been paid to Canadian wage earn
ersh, was paid to alien labor for the
manufacture of lumber In a country
from whose markets our lumber Is
debarred.
Need  Protection
"The   lumber   manufacturers!!   of
British Columbia respectfully maintain that under such conditions as
the foregoing, it Is the duty of our
government to preserve for them the
natural, and to a large extent their
only market, and in the contemplated
negotiations for reciprocal trade relations with the United States, we
trust you will see that when lumber
comes up for discussion, the interest
of the lumber manufacturer will be
their first consideration
Conditions whim existed a few
years ago as to lumber supplies, have
altogether changed
"It Is a fact that in the manufacture of lumber In British Columbia
from the time of lis Inception where
actual loss has not. been Incurred, the
profit realized from it has been less
than could have been derived from
the investment of the same capital in
ordinary mortgage securities.
"The subject of cedar shingles, the
manufacture of which is also a very
Important industry in this province,
giving employment to a great number of men, requires the very special
attention of your government.
American Shingles Free
American shingles are admitted into Canada duty free. Canadian shingles going into the States pay a duty
of 50 cents per M. Until August 5,
1909, the American duty was thirty
cents per M, but from that date under the provisions of the Payne-Ald-
rich bill it was advanced to the first
named figure, and the volume of
business, which in spite of the 30
cent handicap had been very considerable, has now almost ceased.
Shingle  Industry
"We contend that it is not reasonable to expect any one industry in
this Dominion to bear an undue share
of the burdens common to all, and
this ocr industry has been doing for
years, and once again earnestly present to your government our request
for relief."
 o	
A MIGHTY ARMADA
King  George  Recently Reviewed Vast
Naval Forces off
Torbay.
Leviathan Vessels   of   British Fleet
Took Part in the Picturesque
Exercises
A. description of the mighty armada reviewed off Torbay by King
George is given in the London Daily
Express:—
Once more the weather cleared up
for the benefit of the King. When the
morning gun boomed from the
Dreadnought at 8 o'clock, the spit of
flame found lurid reflection in a
dense sea fog, through which the
royal yacht loomed like a shadow.
People ashore murmured, disappointed at the pitiful weather. On
Monday wind and rain caused the
abandonment of the royal programme. Today fog and drizzle
promised to bring about a like result.
But as the morning wore on there
came an improvement. What sailora
expressively term the "dirt" that was
obscuring the bay began to thin and
roll up. One after another the forms
of the warships stole out, shrinking
to their proper proportions as they
stood forth in clear-cut shape.
The land stealthily unfolded its
panorama, and presently the sun
gleamed down on the waters.
The over-night arrangements had
been that at 4 o'clock In the morning the "Blue" force of the late
manoeuvres, commanded by Admiral
Sir Edmund Poe, and comprising the
Atlantic and Mediterranean fleets,
should put to sea, and that six hours
later the "Red" force, commanded
by Admiral Sir William May, and
comprising the home fleet and
cruiser squadrons, should leave In
search of the "Blue" enemy and
bring him to action.
The whole fleet unmoored ship at
dawn nnd remained riding to single
anchor, but not a vessel bad stirred
from her berth at gunfire.
As the fog cleared away, two or
three cruisers moved out of the lines
and wont off, grey and smoking, seawards. Signalling was carried on by
searchlights, for bunting and semaphore were scarcely distinguishable.
Then several destroyers came from
Dartmouth, having on board nearly
all the cadets from the Royal Naval
college there. Among them was the
Prince of Wales, who was transhipped with a hatch to the Dreadnought,
but shortly afterwards went in a
steam pinnace to the royal yacht, at
the top of the gangway steps of which
the Queen was waiting to receive
him, The weather cloths, which had
been laced around the royal yacht's
decks to meet Monday's gale, had
not yet been removed.
On the battleships and cruisers
blue jackets in No. 1 rig and marines
in scarlet tunics clustered along the
sides in readiness for some coming
event. About half-past ten Admiral
May went alongside the royal yacht
in his steam barge, and the King, in
the undress uniform of the admiral
of the fleet, stepped aboard the tiny
craft, which flew the royal standard
from Its diminutive mast.
The little craft passed across the,
head of the great armada and made a
leisurely progress between all the
lines.
As she pased each ship in succession the side was manned and the ensign lowered to the dip. His Majesty,
who seldom had his hand removed
from his brow In acknowledging the
running salutes, frequently interrogated Sir William May. The weather
steadily mended during this long
tour of Inspection.
The Atlantic and Mediterranean
battleships steamed away seawards,
led by Admiral Sir Edmund Poe In
the Exmouth. Shortly afterwards the
home fleet, led by the Dreadnought,
steamed eastward in column of divisions.
Out in the offing a series of tactical evolutions was carried out, first
by squadrons and finally by the entire fleet collectively.
Battle exercises of a realistic character, and on a scale of grandeur,
owing to the number of ships engaged, were gone through.
Seven Dreadnoughts, two Lord
Nelsons, three Invincibles, eight King
Edwards, six Queens, four Duncans,
two Triumphs and five Majesties
formed the colossal battle fleet, not
to mention a whole seaful of cruisers.
The King followed all the exercises
with the keenest attention, and expressed deep satisfaction at the smart
tactical work which he witnessed.
NEW PI LP WORKS
Mnckenize  &  Mann  Invade Another
Field of Enterprise in B, C.
(Special to The Journal)
Ottawa, Sept. 2.—The Canadian
Power & Paper company, with a capital of $10,000,000, and headquarters
in Toronto, has just been incorporated to carry on in all branches the
business of manufacturers and dealers In pulp and paper. It is apparently a Mackenzie & Mann concern,
as the incorporation is In the name
of Messrs. F. H. Phippen. K.C.,
Gerard Ruel, G. F. McDonnell, R. H.
Temple and A. J. Reid, of the legal
staff of the Canadian Northern railway.
The pulp limits for the most part
are said to be in British Columbia.
COAL CLAIMS
Skeena  District—Queen  Charlotte
Islands.
To all to whom it may concern:—
NOTICE Is hereby given that I, the
undersigned, intend to apply for a
license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum upon the following lands
situate on Graham Island, one of the
Queen Charlotte Group, In the Province of British Columbia, and more
particularly described as follows, viz:
Commencing at a stake planted one
and a quarter miles west of the
north-east corner of Louis Inlet, and
marked "P. C. Coates' S. E. Corner
Claim No. 1," thence west 80 chains,
thence north 80 chains, thence east
80 chains, thence south 80 chains to
the place of commencement.
Staked June 14th, 1910.
Dated this 28th day of July, 1910.
P. C. COATES,
By his Agent, Wm. Edward Laird,
A9
COAL CLAIMS
Skeena  District—Queen  Charlotte
Islands.
To all to whom it may concern:—
NOTICE is hereby given that I, the
undersigned intend to apply for a
icense to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum upon the following lands,
situated on Graham Island, one of
the Queen Charlotte group, in the
Province of British Columbia, and
more particularly described as follows, viz:—Comemncing at a stake
planked at the S. E. corner of P. C.
Coates' Claim No. 1, and marked
"Wm. Penman's S. W. Corner, Claim
No. 1," thence east SO chains, thence
north 80 chains, thence west 80
chains, thence south, 80 chains to the
Place of commencement.
Staked, June 14th, 1910.
Dated this 28th days of July, 1910.
WM, PENMAN.
By his Agent, Wm. Edward Laird.
A9
LAND  LEASE   NOTICE
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that The Canadian
Fish & Cold Storage Company Ltd.,
of Vancouver, occupation Mercantile
and Manufacturing, intends to apply
for permission to lease the following described land:—Commencing at
a post planted at high water mark
on the westerly side of Prince Rupert Harbor and distant about 110
chains from the north-east corner of
Lot 443, thence west 20 chains,
thence south 20 chains, thence east
5 chains, more or less to high water
mark, thence following along the
chlgh water mark to the point of com-
-mencement and containing 20 acres
more or less.
The Canadian  Fish  and  Cold
Storage Company, Limited,
J. H. Pillsbury, Agent.
I    Dated June 20th, 1910. Jyl2
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that John Cox, of
Monarch, Alberta, occupation farmer, intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described
lands, situated in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Comencing at a post planted at the
north-west corner and about five and
one-quarter miles distant in a northwesterly direction from the north end
of Kitwancool Lake, thence 80
chains south, thence 80 chains east,
thence 80 chains north, thence 80
chains west to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres,
more or less.
JOHN COX.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated  May  30, 1910. Jy5
LAND PURCHASE NOTICES
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Phillip Williams, of Sydney, Nova Scotia, occupation accountant, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein
ley:—Commencing at a post planted
at the S. E. corner and about 16%
miles distant in a north-westerly direction from the north end of Kitwancool Lake, thence north 80
chains, thence west 80 chalnB, thence
south 80 chains, thence east 80
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 640 acres, more or
less. PHILLIP WILLIAMS.
JameB W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 4, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Annie Grieve,
of Victoria, B. C, occupation married woman, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands In the vicinity of Kltwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. W. corner, and about 17 % miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence soutii 40 chains, thence
east 40 chains, thence south 40
chains, thence east 40 chains, thence
north 80 chains, thence west 80
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 480 acres, more or
less. ANNIE  GRIEVE.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 4, 1910. Jy8
LAND PURCHASE NOTICES
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Pearl Caspell
of Cayley, Alberta, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. E. corner and about 15% miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kltwancool
Lake, thence south 80 chains, thence
west 40 chains, thence north 40
chalnB, thence west 40 chalnB, thence
north 40 chains, thence east 80
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 480 acres, more or
less. PEARL CASPELL.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 3, 1910. jy8
LAND PURCHASE NOTICES
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Ethel Welsh,
of Vancouver, B. O, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
south-east corner and about 10 miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kltwancool
Lake, thence north 80 chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence south 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to
point of commencement and containing 640 acres, more or lesB.
ETHEL WELSH.
James W. Smith, Agent
Dated June 1st, 1910. Jy*
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Mary Brown,
of Vancouver, B.C., occupation married woman, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of
the Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—Commencing at a post planted
at the North-east corner and aboul
ten miles distant in a north-westerly
direction from the north end of the
Kltwancool lake, thence south 80
chains, thence west 40 chains, thencs
north '0 chains, thence west 40
chaint thence north 40 chains
thence east 80 chains to point ol
commencement, and containing 480
acres, more or less.
MARY  BROWN.
Jaines W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June  1,  1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that James Alexander McDonald, of Monarch, Alberta, occupation farmer, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands, situated in
the Kitwancool or Chein Wein Valley:—Commencing at a post planted
at the N. E. corner about five and
one quarter miles distant in a northwesterly direction from the north
end of Kltwancool Lake, thence south
80 chains, thence west 80 chains,
thence north 80 chains, thence east
80 chains to point of commencement,
and  containing  640  acres,  more or
JAMES ALEXANDER MCDONALD
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated May 30, 1910. Jy5
Coast Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that I, Ernestine
A. Roney, of Prince Rupert, occupation married woman, intend to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted on the north
bank of the Skeena River about half
a mile south of Geo. T. Church's preemption, thence west 10 chains,
thence north 40 chains, thence east
to the Skeena River; thence southwest following the bank of the
Skeena River to the place of beginning, and containing about 80
acres.
ERNESTINE A. RONEY, Locator.
W. A. Roney, Agent.
Dated July 7th, 1910. Jy22
Coast Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that I, J. Adolph
Perry, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation
book-keeper, intend to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted on the north bank of the
Skeena River, about a mile west of
Lot 31, thence north 40 chalnB,
thence east 80 chains to lot 31,
thence south 40 chains to bank of
Skeena River, thence west about 80
chains following north bank of
Skeena River to point of commencement, and containing about 320
Acres
j. ADOLPH PERRY, Locator.
Wm. A. Roney, Agent.
Dated July 16th, 1910. Jy22
Coast Land District—District of
Skeena.
TAKE NOTICE that I, Mary M.
Roney, of Stillwater, Minnesota, U.
S.A., occupation married woman, intend to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands.
Commencing at a post planted on the
north bank of the Skeena River at
the south-east corner of Geo. T.
Church's pre-emption, thence north
40 chains, thence east 40 chains,
thence soutii to the bank of the
Skeena River, thence south-west following the Skeena River to the place
of beginning and containing about
120 acres.
MARY M. ROENY, Locator.
W.  A.   Roney,   Agent.
Dated July 8th, 1910. Jy22
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that John Henderson, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
agent, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. ,W corner and about 25 miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north SO chains, thence
east 40 chains, thence south 80
chains, thence west 80 chains to
point of commencement and containing 320 acres, more or less.
JOHN   HENDERSON.
James to. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 7th, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Laura Gordon
of Victoria, B. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. E. corner and about 18 miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence south 40 chains, thence
west 40 chains, thence north 40
chains, thence east 40 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 160 acres, more or less.
LAURA GORDON.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated  June   4,   1910. jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Walter Marke
of Toronto, Ont., occupation traveller, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool
or Chean Wein Valley:-—Commencing at a post planted at the N. E.
corner and about 27% miles distant In a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence south 80 chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence north 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to the
point of commencement and containing 640 acres, more or less.
WALTER MARKE.
James W. Smith, Agent
Dated June Sth, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Richard
Howie, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation dentist, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of
Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. E. corner and about 24% miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence south 80 chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence north 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
RICHARD HOWIE.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June  7th,  1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Violet Gelger,
of Victoria, B. C, occupation married woman, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands In the vicinity of Kltwancool or Chean Weln Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. W. corner and about 23 % miles
distant In a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kltwancool
Lake, thence south 80 chains, thence
east 40 chains, thence north 40
chains, thence east 40 chains, thence
north 40 chains, thence west 80
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 480 acres, more or
less. VIOLET GEIGER.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 7th,  1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Sandford
Burton, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation mining engineer, Intends to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands In the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Weln
Valley:—Commencing at a post
planted at the N. E. corner and
about 23% miles distant In a northwesterly direction from the north
end of Kltwancool Lake, thence south
SO chains, thence west 80 chains,
thence north 80 chains, thence east
SO chains to point of commencement
and containing 640 acres, more or
less. SANDFORD BURTON.
James to. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 7th, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Henry Welsh,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
printer, intends to apply foi permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. E. corner and 11 miles distant
In a north-westerly direction from
the north end of Kitwancool Lake,
thence north SO chains, thence west
80 chains, thence soutii 80 chains,
thence east 80 chains to point of
commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
HENRY WELSH.
Jaines W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 2, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Frederick
Welsh, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation clerk, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-east corner about 11 miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence south SO chains, thence
west 40 chains, thence north SO
chains, thence east 40 chains to
point of commencement, and containing 320 acres, more or less.
FREDERICK  WELSH.
James to. Smith, Agent
Dated June 2,  1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiiti.
TAKE NOTICE that James Welsh,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation machinist, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. to. corner and about 12 miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence south SO chains, thence
east 20 chains, thence north SO
chains, thence west 20 chains to the
point of commencement and containing 160 acres, more or less.
JAMES WELSH.
James W, Smith, Agent.
Dated  June  2,  1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Marguerette
Burns, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission ,o purchase the
following described lands In the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein
Valley:—Commencing at a post
planted at the N. E. corner and distant about 12 miles In a northwesterly direction from the north
end of Kitwancool Lake; thence
south 80 chains, thence west 20
chains, thence north 80 chalnB,
thence east 20 chains to point of
commencement, and containing 160
acres,  more or less. , /
MARGUERETTE   BURNS.
James W. Smith, Agtit
Dated June 2, 1910. Jyg
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles F.
Burns, of Moncton, New Brunswick,
occupation auditor, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein
Valley:—Commencing at a post
planted at the south-west corner and
about 12 miles distant in a northwesterly direction from the north
end of Kltwancool Lake; thence
north 80 chains, thence east SO
chains, thence south 80 chains
thence west SO chains to point of
commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
CHARLES  F.  BURNS.
James W. Smith, Agent
Dated  June. 2,   1910 jyg
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE   NOTICE   that   James   Jar-
dine, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
merchant, intends to apply for permission   to   purchase   the   following
described lands in the vicinity of Kltwancool or Chean   Weln    Valley-
Commencing at a post planted at the
iN. W. corner and about  18 miles
| tant in a   north-westerly    dire
from   tiie  north  end   of   KItwai      >1
Lake, thence south 80 chains   th    r
east    80    chains    thence north   ' I
chains,  thence west  SO   chains    to
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
JAMES JARDINE
James to. Smith, Agent
Dated June 2, 1910. jyi
Skeena Land District—District of
OflSSifl.!*
TAKE NOTICE that Norman Cle-
land, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation printer, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of Kltwancool or Chean Weln Valley:—
Comencing at a post planted at the
S. E. corner and about 26% miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kltwancool
Lake, thence north 80 chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence south 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
NORMAN  CLELAND.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 8th, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that John McDIar-
mld, of Lucknow, Ont., occupation
farmer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in th« vicinity of the
Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley-
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. to. corner and about 13 miles distant  In  a north-westerly    direction
(r.°£. ^ north end of Kltwancool
Lake; thence north 80 chains, thence
east 40 chains, thence south 80
chains;   thence  west   40   chains  to
Fn°. U°n commencement, and contain-
tn> 640 acres.
JOHN  McDIARMID
n , .,  t    James W' Smi,h. Agent
Dated June 2, 1910. jig ■*=—"»-
Friday, September 2, 1910
THE   PRINCE   RUPERT  JOURNAL
• ii? »*« **« *j4 ♦;« *j »* ;*;« *j» •;* »j* »j» *ji *jt ♦** *♦«»}»♦!« •$« *j* C* *♦* *»* **■• •J* *** ***• *»* *** *!* *!* *** "I* *J* *t* **♦ *** *** **« **•* •** *** ♦** *** 4" *** **1
NEWS IN THE WORLD OF SPORTS
♦*•**** ********* ******* * * ***
CANADA'S ASPIRANT
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There is a strong likelihood of
World's Champion Arnst rowing on
Toronto Bay. Eddie Durnan, of that
city, the well-known professional
sculler, who defeated Sullivan, of
England, eight years ago, Is training daily, and Is In excellent condition. According to the terms of today's meeting between Barry and
Arnst, the latter must go to England
to give his unsuccessful challenger
a race on the Thames. Arnst then
Intends going home to New Zealand,
passing through Vancouver en route
to his home.
"I have written to Billy Field,
ArnBt's manager," said Lou Scholes
"asking Arnst to stop off In Toronto
to meet Durnan."
Lou, whose reputation as an amateur sculler Is world-wide, Is in close
touch with Durnan.
"We row together eevry day on
Toronto bay," he said, "and I can
say that Eddie is in tip-top shape. In
my opinion he has a royal chance to
defeat Arnst, and It looks as If the
Toronto public would have an opportunity of seeing him do it."
Durnan Is now arranging a matched race with Wray, the American
coast.
MAY FIGHT IN VANCOUVER
That Hugh D. Mcintosh, the world
famed fistic entrepreneur, Is looking
towards the Pacific coast as the scene
of one of his big encounters, was
made known when he Informed a
representative of the News-Advertiser In Vancouver that In all probability he would arrange for a meeting of Bill Lang, the Australian
heavyweight, and Stanley Ketchel, to
take the place of the fixture in Philadelphia, which was called off owing
to an accident befalling Ketchel. If
Mr. Mcintosh desires are fulfilled,
the match will take place in Vancouver before the end of October, and
would be a twenty-round contest
with six-ounce gloves under the rules
of the National Sporting club.
Patrons of the noble are of self defence in Vancouver will hall this Intimation with pleasure; a fight between two of the champions of the
boxing arena under the control of
Hugh D. Mcintosh, who has done
much to make the "game" what It
should be, and has won a reputation
as the most successful fight promoter
of today, would indeed be a red letter fixture for the sporting community of this district.
Mr. Mcintosh looks upon Vancouver as an excellent centre for such a
contest, and during his brief stay in
the city he ascertained the existence
of a desire for a big fight carried out
on business-like lines, and the fact
that Vancouver Is located easy of
access for sporting fans of Seattle
and other surrounding cities,
prompts him to favor it as an excellent site for the meeting between
Lang and Ketchel.
INTEREST IN SPORT
One of the most encouraging signs
of modern Italian life is the increasing interest shown in sport of all
kinds, and especially in physical
education. In the current number
of the Nuova Antologia Ce.ner.il llom-
piani considers its desirability from
a military standpoint. For boys up
to the age of 16 years he asks a diminution of brain work and a larger
number of hours out of doors; for
young men on the eve of being summoned to do their military service lie
prefers hoarding-establishments, organized on military lines, to regular
military colleges; nnd for men who
have dune their service bul are still
liable to occasional recall, he would
establish a system of exemptions
rrom that onerous obligation, provided that they keep themselves physically lit and frequent rifle clubs.
General Bompianl hopes by tl
nienns to benefit the physical condition of the citizen soldier, while
at the same lime Interfering as little
as possible with his ordinary bread-
winning avocation.
There  is  no  doubt  that  the  physique of the I'alian youth has greatly
improved  during  recent   years,   nnd
some- of the best athletes—Dorando
Pietri, foi i sample—have owed the
excelji.: i  condition to the I
rory   military   s ir\; e,   jit
same ci  n i '   coi
to the dlmli I al ■ n ol  lllltni
'•:.   1 IXG LA
■:-. :  in i,    formi r    I
weight chami Ion
Bign id with '
club to play one in bor Dn
September ->. tic ilns
ster. Burns will receive $1,000 for
the afternoon's work, and will play
outside home, going up against Tommy Gifford, the famous defence man
of the world's champions. Burns will
train with the Vancouver team every
night this week.
The Canadian fighter is completing
arrangements to take an Indian lacrosse team on a tour of Australia
next year.
RETAINED CHAMPIONSHIP
Once again Robert Powell, formerly of Victoria, and one of the most
prominent tennis players of the H»-
ciflc northwest, , has captured the
Scottish championship.
The erstwhile Victorian, writing to
his friends in that city, states that
he has just returned from the north
where he was successful in the defence of the cup which he won last
year. The tournament took place
as usual at Brldge-of-Allan. Mr.
Powell does not mention with whom
he played In the final.
NATIONALS TO COME WEST
By defeating Cornwall In the factory, the Nationals of Montreal cap-
turned the champion of the National
Lacrosse Union and will be the next
challengers for the Minto cup, at
present held by New Westminster.
VICTORIA CHAMPIONS
In the closest and best match of
the Pacific northwest tournament the
Victoria cricket team Saturday afternoon defeated Vancouver by 13 runs.
Capt. L. V. York, of the Capital
eleven, having won the toss, elected
to go to bat and in the forenoon play
the locals ran up a score of a little
over a century. This was not considered anything like sufficient to assure Victoria a victory.
On that account the performance
of the Vancouver team in the afternoon was followed with Intense Interest by the 800 or more spectators
who had gathered. However, the
Vancouver batters found it difficult
to stand against the trundling of the
home team's fast and deadly bowler
Louis York. Wickets fell fast and
Vancouver was still eighteen short of
the mark when eight of their men
had retired. But four more were
added when the final couple of wickets went down and the cup had fallen Into Victoria's possession for the
1910 season. Both teams were ac
corded an enthusiastic ovation.
GAMA IS THE RAGE
Gama, the Hindu wrestler, who
took London by storm when he threw
Dr. Roller, the American grappler,
who was once spoken of by Frank
Gotch himself as the likely world's
champion, seems to be a wrestler ot
the Fred Beel type with more weight
and strength than the Wisconsin
wonder ever carried. The Hindu
stands but five feet seven and one-
quarter Inches, but his chest measurement of forty-seven inches, with
a waist line of thirty-five and othei
measurements to match. But for all
this chunky build the Indian appears
to be able to move round. English
exchanges to hand with an account
of the match show Gama to havo
had the best of the argument almost
all the way through. The Daily
Chronicle expert writes In part ot
the match as follows: —
(lama showed his wonderful
strength by the easy way in which
he lifted Roller from his feet and
threw him to the floor. The American
went down three-quarters on hist
back, but oft the mat, and the two
were made to resume standing up
with the Indian In complete posses-
slon or his body hold.
■ dan a tlu"■'■ his man down again,
and quick as a lightweight, [ell upon
him and hugged him until Roller was
forced to drop his right shoulder,
the lefl h ing already on the floor.
.',11 this happening In the space of
a little more than :i minute nnd a
half caused one to think kindly of
the  A in n-    I' at   iie bad  not  bad
time to show bis ability owing to the
speed of I lie Indian's movements.
One always likes to think Ilk i tha
of a stranger, but in the second and
lai i   bout,   Rollc i   c;:!  havs li ne  to
ihow   his  quality, I I
iwn, then   wo    I      Ions lit-
[c
her .■ '   '    X 0 '     1
■  c       i ■  • mat,
I fooled
nine feinting,, the
|  instead   of
fact thai     . ho in a  few
short minutes of wrestling had developed a respect for his opponent
that showed itself almost painfully.
The Indian toyed about by diving for
the legs and then looking at his opponent to watch what he did. It was
apparent to the veriest trio In wresting that each time the Indian dived
the American went all off his balance, and was painfully open to attack,
straightened up  more  quickly  than
After the last dive the Indian
usual, went straight for a hold, and
threw Roller to the floor once more.
The American Btraightway was in a
hopeless plight, but a bit of loose
attacking by Gama (consequent, perhaps, upon the lack of seriousness
with which he regarded the opposition) enabled the American to wriggle to a position flat on the mat.
With the Indian on top there was
every chance for Roller to display at
least some amount of defensive
wrestling that could be considered ot
the highest class.
He failed, however, to show much
knowledge of how best to counter
Gama's attack; In fact, Roller appeared to be conscious of little besides the fact that he was being
opposed by a stronger and more
clever wrestler; that he was In no
end of a tangle.
As the lost babe in the wood would
cuddle tha fallen leaves that made
for him a couch, so did Roller cling
to that mat, oblivious, as far as could
be judged by movements, as to what
was going to be done to his discomfort, but conscious, so very conscious,
that something distasteful was going
to happen. The use of legs in defensive work was apparently unknown to the American, who failed
to show himself as being in anything
like the same class as Gama.
As a "contest" the affair was absurd; in fact, Roller did not wrestle
well enough to give one an idea of
how good Gama is. You could only
be conscious of the fact that the Indian was uncountable degrees superior to the American.
There Is more than a chance of
Gama being seen in Montreal this
winter, for It is altogether likely that
George Kennedy, the Canadian promoter, will connect with the new sensation.
ON BISLEY TEAM
Canada's big annual rifle meet, the
D. R. A., has concluded at Ottawa
The attendance was the greatest and
the shooting the best in the history
of the D.R.A. Western men were
conspicuous in all the matches and
were generally found near the top.
British Columbia sends two men to
Bisley, Lieut. lMlne and Sergt. Mos-
crop. They just made the team, getting 19th and 20th places with scores
of 350 each.
The final stage for the Governor-
General's was won by Corp. Roberts,
Grenadiers, Toronto, who took the
gold medal and $200, with a score
of 193. He captured this prize, which
is the plum of the meet, with the
last shot fired on the range.
All the other competitors had finished and Roberts was told he had
to get the bull with the last shot' to
take first place. With $200 at stake
and with no sign of nervousness, he
sighted deliberately and fired. There
was a cheer from assembled riflemen when the bullseye signal went
up at the butts.
The highest British Columbian in
the match was Lieut. iMlne, flth,
Vancouver, who won $15 with 1SS.
Pte. Rev. Simpson, 102nd, Nelson,
was eighth, winning $10 with 1S7.
The IBsley team for the year Is ns
follows: Col.-Sergt. Freeborn, 13th,
358; Lieut. .Morris, 46th, 353; Lieu'.
Melklejohn, 43rd, 354; Pte. Car-
mi hac t.  103rd,  353;   LI  nt. Splttal,
C. V.S.C., 362; aMjor Mi '  11, 9:lst,
353; Sergt, Hall, G G.F.G., 3H2;
Lieu! Corp. Tradner, R.C.R., 3f,l;
1.: ut. Milne, 6th, D.C.O.R., 850;
Sergt. Armstrong, 13th, 357; Pte.
Clifford, 10th R.G., 356; Major Ross,
2nd Dragoons, 354; Pte. F. Bibby,
77th, 355; Sergt. Batles, 10th R.G.,
353; Sergt. Pattlnson, -13rd, 362;
Sergt. Russell, G.G.F.G., 352; Lieut,
Vlorrl 1, ISth M.R., 351; Sergt. Martin, 103rd, 351; Sergt. Moscrop, Cth
D C.O.R., 350.
.-    . , ,. -.,.-,. ...
•    ■ ■ -      1 ho 1    1 got n
w! I 1 Jac]    ' and !
f
irap sport c
Ion to 1     ■ ■        1 Cor!
1     ■       '    t men and cl
.: ! ■ .   ■ " ■
.   I ■     :   ' 1     tori
1 1 tl no adequi to ci
Johnson's kidding, but It is generally supposed thai right there Corbett made a deep-dyed and bloodthirsty resolve to have ree-venge on
the big chocolate drop, and that he
is scouring the world for any likely
looking youngster who can hand
Johnson one hard enough to put him
on the blink and send him to dippy
land while the referee counts ten.
The "future hope of the white
race," according to Jas. J. Corbett, is
a farmer boy, hailing from the "show
me" state of Missouri, county of Gentry. His name is McLeod—Miles
McLeod, but you pronounce is just
as though it were spelled "McLeed."
And the remarkable thing about
this youngster of 28 years Is that he
has never done any fighting—that is
professional fighting. Of course, he
puts on the gloves once In a while
with the neighbor boys, any one of
whom he can whip with one hand
tied behind him, but he isn't a professional—yet. He has everything to
learn, but—and R'b a great big but—
he has not old tricks to unlearn.
Stood up by the side of Johnson he
would tower five and three-quarter
inches above the black man. He is
as strong as a bull, and just as wiry,
agile and quick as you can get 'em.
He Is not a college bred man. He
Is just a farmer boy, a physical giant,
but does not claim to be much of an
athlete. But he is willing to train,
and be is anxious to fight.
This Is what he has to say about
himself:
"If Mr. Corbett says I can lick
Johnson, I'll sure enough lick him.
I've never seen a man I'd refuse to
fight, and I am anxious to fit myself
to meet the negro. I want to fight
him, and will fight, providing the
match can be arranged and Mr. Corbett has sufficient confidence in me."
And when he goes into training he
will not have to quit smoking or
drinking, because he never began to
smoke or drink. He has lived a clean
mental, moral and physical life, and
when it comes to material fitness,
well—he has pitched a whole lot of
Missouri hay, and shoved a plow
around miles of Missouri fields, and
he has gone to bed early and got up
early, and eaten clean wholesome
food prepared by his mother.
Corbett got a gooc look at McLeod, in Chicago, when the latter's
brother, Walter, pointed him out to
Corbett. Corbett was enthusiastic
about the Missouri lad, and it is generally believed by the initiated that
he is going back to Missouri some
day and take Miles in hand And,
again, it lsn"t Improbable that Mc
Leod will begin to train on his own
initiative.
HcLeod's parents are of Scotch descent. They are of the sober, industrious law-abiding type, and they
don't take very kindly to their son's
pugilistic aspirations. Mr. McLeod
is firm in his purpose, and is willing
to tote the "white man's burden"
and wrest back the supremacy of
his color whenever Corbett gives the
word.
Anyway, keep him well in mind,
because he Is almost sure to bob up
on page one of the newspapers some
day.
In comparison with Johnson, McLeod shows more of the perfect man.
He is five and three-quarter Inches
taller, has the advantage of nine and
a half inches in reach, and Is broader
across the shoulders and deeper of
chest. Johnson Is bulkier than the
Mlssourlan in arms and limbs. The
following figures will show where
McLeod has the advantage over the
negro:—
McLeod.    Johnson
Age (years)   28 32
Height (Inches) 78 72%
Reach  (Inches)    81% 72
Cheat, expanded (in.) .49 39%
Chest, normal  (In.)..44 36%
Waist (Inches)    41 34%
Biceps (Inches)   16 18 %
Forearm (Inches 13 14%
Wrist (inches)      8 10%
Thigh  (inches)    23 25%
Calf (Inches)   16 15%
Ankle  (Inches)    10% 10%
Neck (Inches)    16 17%
Weight (pounds) ...236 205
 0	
THE  LIQUOR ACT
Attorney General Advises Municipalities to Follow General Act
Hon. W. J. Bowser when interviewed regarding the working out of
the new liquor act, which has now
been in operation for about a month,
said:
"it has worked out even better |
than I anticipated. We find that a
great many municipalities, such as
Kamloops, Nelson and Grand Forks,
and even Vancouver, are all falling
into line with It, and virtually accepting the provincial as their municipal regulations, so in that way we
are securing the uniformity we aimed at. One thing I am very much
in favor of it that all municipalities
should, if possible, have the same
hours for opening and closing bars
as we have adopted. Otherwise It
must follow that when the bars are
NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that application will be made to the Legislative Assembly of the Province of
British Columbia at its next Session
for an Act to incorporate a company
with power to construct, equip,
maintain and operate a line or lines
of railway of standard guage with
any kind of motive power for the
conveyance of passengers and freight,
and with all the powers contained
in the "Model Railway BUI": Commencing from a point at or near
Port Simpson, or Work Channel, In
the Coast District, British Columbia,
by the most feasible, desirable and
practicable route to a point on the
Eastern boundary of the Province of
British Columbia, via the South-west
side of Work Channel to the Skeena
River; thence up the North side of
the Skeena River to a point near
Hazelton; thence to the junction of
the Bulkley River; thence up the
right bank of this River eight (8)
miles to the Suskewa River; thence
up this River by a low divide to the
head of Babine Lake; thence to the
north end of Stuart Lake; thence
north of McLeod Lake to the Mls-
nlcblnca River; thence up the MIs-
nlchlnca River by Summet Lake to
Pine River Pass; thence north-westerly to head ot Pine River, and down
ihis River to Moberley Lake; and
thence by the Peace River to the
Eastern boundary of the said Province of British Columbia; and with
power to construct, operate and
maintain all necessary bridges, roads,
ways and ferries; and to build, acquire, own and maintain wharves and
docks In connection therewith; and
to build, acquire, own, equip and
maintain steam and other vessels and
boats, and to operate the same on
any navigable waters; and with
power to build, equip, operate and
maintain telegraph and telephone
lines in connection with the aald
Railway and branches, and to transmit messages for commercial purposes, and to charge tolls therefor;
and to generate and to sell electricity
for the supply of light, heat and
power; and with power to expropriate lands for the purposes of the
Company; and to acquire lands,
money bonuses, privileges or other
aids from any Government, municipal corporation or other persons or
bodies; and to levy and collect tolls
from all persons using, and on all
freight passing over any of such
roads, railways, ferries, wharves and
vessels built by the Company; and
with power to connect with and make
traffic or other arrangements with
railway, steamboat, or other companies:
Dated at Victoria, B.C., this 11th
day of August, 1910.
BARNARD & ROBERTSON,
A19.       Solicitors for the Applicants.
closed in one place, the late drinkers
will drift off to an adjoining municipality, where they are still open.
In this way the good effect of the
act would be to a large extent nullified."
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* 1
I   THE JOURNAL     i
*
♦
Is the Official Advertising
Medium for the City
of Prince Rupert
FOLLOW THE TREND OF THE CITY'S
PROGRESS BY SUBSC; '::   IG
FOR THE PAPER
■
Tho Journal aim     tl .. co R
and
:
i " t
:   >
■1 Ml "\
1    -'
•:-
w&.
:   ' --I;
j THE   PRINCE   RUPERT  JOURNAL
Friday, September 2, 1910 '
I
AN  INVESTIGATION
Poiice Court Case Became One of Enquiry
Into Police Officer's
Conduct
Magistrate Exonerates the Guardian
of the Law From Charge of
Impropriety
This week the charges against
Florence Russell, one of the Comox
avenue women, were heard by Police
Magistrate Carss. The cases developed into more or less of an Inquiry into the conduct of a member
of the police court, Sergt. Regan.
Alex Manson prosecuted on behalf of
the city, while L. W. Patmore appeared as counsel for the accused.
Two charges were laid against the
woman, that of being drunk and disorderly and that of keeping a house
of ill-fame.
The evidence for the prosecution
was largely that of the police officers
Sergt. Regan who made the arrest,
and Police Officer McEwen, who assisted him. They testified that the
woman was drunk and was in front
of her house on the morning in question about four o'clock. The chief
of police and other officers testified
she was drunk when she reached the
station.
Sergt. Regan was subjected to a
searching cross examination by Mr.
Patmore. He denied that he was
drunk himself. He had not been
drinking for six weeks before that
time. He never went into Italian
Jim's place that night and asked for
a drink. He denied that he struck
the woman or that he used undue
force in making the arrest. He denied also that his conduct was Improper in the house or In any other
house that night. The woman was
in front of her house and used abusive language to him. She resisted
arrest. He did not refuse her request to return to the house and
put on different garments. He was
suffering, he said, from rheumatism
and left the next day for Harrison
Hot Springs.
Police Officer McEwen's evidence
was largely corroborative of Sergt.
Regan as to the woman's conduct.
He said the woman had said later
that she would have pleaded guilty
but Mr. Patmore told her not to do
so.
"It that so?" laughingly asked Mr.
Manson of the opposing counsel.
"it Is only one of the police lies,"
returned Mr. Patmore, "there are
lots of them."
Walter Scrimgeon, who worked at
the Comox Club, testified that the
accused appeared to be drunk.
Under cross examination he said
he never tipped Regan. He denied
that he had ever told the woman
that he had told Regan to go home
and sober up.
Francis Nelson, who was selling a,
new kind of lamp, was on Comox
avenue on the night in question and
was called by the defence. He heard
a disturbance and as the blind of the
house where it took place was up he
had stopped and looked in.    He saw
Municipal Notice
TENDERS FOR PLANK ROADWAY
AND GRADING
Sealed tenders endorsed "Tender
for i'lank Roadway, etc." will be received by the City Clerk until Wednesday noon, September 7, 1910, for:
il) The construction of a 1 G-foot
plank roadway and trestle on Second
street between First and Third avenues.
(2) Grading and close cutting on
Second  street.
Plans, profiles and specifications
may be seen and form of tender obtained at the office of the City En-
gin".-r.
Tiie lowest or any tender not
necessarily accepted.
ERNEST A. WOODS,
WM. M, DAVIS, City Clerk.
City Engineer. A30-S2
Regan strike the woman and then
throw pictures and other things at
her. Regan was drunk at the time.
He was so drunk that he stuttered.
He had on the same night been in
Jim's place and Regan had asked for
drink.
Florence Russell herself denied
she was drunk, but said that Regan
was intoxicated and had come in and
acted improperly. He had knocked
her down.
Another woman from Comox av-
enuv gave evidence that Regan had
been in her place and acted improperly on the night In question.
Mr. Patmore during the examination of his witnesses called to the attention of the magistrate that the
stories told by them were quite different from what they had told him
as counsel. He explained that it was
impossible to get these women to
make any statements that reflected
on the police because they feared
persecution Just as was being done
in the case before the court. He
argued that the whole case was one
of attempting to get even with this
woman which was not right. If a
restricted area existed there should
be no persecution allowed but all
should be treated alike.
xne magistrate dismissed the ease.
He said he did not think that Regan
was drunk. Even believing the evidence for the prosecution he could
not convict. Under the act it was
not only necessary to prove that the
person was drunk, but that a disturbance was being created. There
was no disturbance, he believed, up
to the time of the arrest. There was
no evidence of the case being one of
violation under the vagrancy clause.
In the absence of a bylaw of the city
dealing with the conditions he could
not convict.
The police magistrate the next day
banded down a written judgment in
the case in which he entirely exonerated Sergt. Regan, giving as his
opinion that there was nothing to
show that he was guilty of impropriety in connection with the matter.
Upon the conclusion of the hearing of the charge of being drunk and
disorderly, the prosecution asked
that the second charge that of conducting a house of ill fame, be heard.
Mr. Patmore said here was a first
class instance of persecution. This
was not a prosecution, but a persecution.
Evidence was produced by the
police that the woman was a resident
of Comox avenue in the "restricted
district." That she admitted herself
the character of life she led, The
chief said' she lived on Comox avenue, "a district set aside for the
purpose."
Mr. Patmore argued that there was
no doubt in the minds of all as to
the character of Comox avenue. The
authorities knew of It. In a prosecution, however, actual proof had to be
produced. There would have been
nothing of this case had the woman
not been mixed up In the Regan case
It was a case of persecution. Why
should this woman be fined If the
others were not?
This morning the police magistrate
gave judgment on the second count.
He found the woman guilty and after
severely reprimanding her, inflicted
a fine of $15 and costs, which was
paid.
 o  •
J. H. Lawson, superintendent of
the shipping firm of R. P. Rlthet &
Company, paid a visit to Prince Rupert this week. He arrived by the
Prince Rupert, making the round trip
on her and taking advantage of a
holiday to see what is taking place
in the northern part of the province. In company with some friends
he made a tour about the streets of
this city, expressing himself as more
than satisfied with the progress that
the place had made in the short
time since the sale. He was quite
delighted with the townsite and looks
forward to a rapid development.
EVANGELISTIC MOVE
Municipal Notice
TENDERS FOR PLANK ROADWAY
AM) GRADING
Sealed tenders endorsed "Tender
for I'lank Roadway, etc.," will be
received by the City Clerk until
Wednesday noon, September 7th,
1910, for: —
(1) The construction of a 10-foot
planK roadway on Fifth, Sixth,
Seventh,  Eighth  and  Fraser streets.
(2) Grading and close cutting on
above streets.
Plans, profiles and specifications
may be seen and form of tender obtained at the office of the City Engineer.
The lowest or any tender not
necessarily accepted.
ERNEST A. WOODS,
WM. M. DAVIS, City Clerk.
City Engineer. A30-S2
Aid. Harrison, of the city of Kingston, Ont., accompanied by his wife,
wns nn interested visitor to the city
this week. He was one of the delegates to the Methodist Conference
at Victoria but made up his mind
tbat he could not go back east without paying a visit lo the city ot
Prince Rupert. He was most agreeably surprised to see the progress
that had been made in the short
time, As an alderman of tbe city
where he lives he was naturally Interested in tbe municipal difficulties
which present themselves here. He
realizes that the council will have Its
own troubles in getting the city well
graded. At the present Kingston has
passed that stage and the irreat difficulty to be faced there is that of
paving.
"Did you ever hear her say anything particular about me?"
"No, she Is never very particular
what she says about you."
Methodist  Conference Takes  Steps   to
Have Such Inaugurated.
Action  Arises  as   Result of  Appeal
Made by Prof. Bland of
Montreal
Victoria, Sept. 2.—"The mass of
the people in Canada are becoming
more and more inattentive to the
need for public worship We want
some great forward impulse to meet
the pressing needs of the church today. While we have been seeking
to adjust Christian principles to the
social, Industrial and political life of
the nation, we have missed the urgent appeal of evangelism."
Prof. C. E. Bland, of Montreal,
who was responsible for the above
utterances, made a striking appeal
for a widespread revivalist movement in the Methodist church before
the general conference.
"The revival of the evangelistic
note is the great need of the ch.ireh,"
he said. "When we return to our
homes we will be questioned, and not
without reason, about what we have
done in removing the list of practices with regard to moral conduct.
We will be questioned about our
action regarding church union. But
if we go back with a decision to revive evangelistic methods in the
church, I believe that there will be
widespread joy throughout our whole
connexion. Our Sunday night meetings are almost a thing of tho past.
Other features of our creed are going
or are gone. Pastoral visiting is not
as strong or widespread as it used
to be."
Prof. Bland's appeal, which aroused the enthusiasm of the delegates,
arose through a report of the committee on evangelism. This report
recommended the appointment of a
powerful committee to deal with the
subject during the ensuing quadren-
nium.
General Superintendent Dr. S. B.
Chown, and Rev. Dr. T.E. Shore, of
Toronto, spoke strongly on the need
of a  revivalist  movement.
The report was referred back to
the committee, who conferred with
the speakers mentioned and outlined
methods whereby an evangelistic
campaign will be inaugurated
throughout Canada.
 o	
A NEW FLAG
The Design For Standard for Queen
Mother Alexandra a Peculiar One
A new flag has been especially designed for Queen Mother Alexandra,
and now flies from Buckingham
Palace, where she has continued to
reside since the death of King Edward VII. The new flag is a strange
combination of the British and Danish flags in about equal proportions.
It is chiefly remarkable zoologically.
The field of the flag is filled with silhouettes of quaint beasts that never
were on sea or land.
A careful observer can count about
twenty of them. Mostly they are lionlike. On the British half of the flag
there are seven lions, six passant,
one rampant. Denmark not only contributes some quaint lions of her own
to her half of the flag, but throws
In two horses, a winged dragon, a
swan, a falcon, a goat and a seated
bear.
An explanation of the meaning of
the various Danish symbols may be
of Interest. The three red lions on
a blue ground in the top left corner
of the flag represent the original
national coat of arms of Denmark,
the number having reference to the
three principal sounds of Denmark,
and the color to the sea. Tho two
lions In the top right band corner
represent Schleswlg. Below is another Hon, with water Hies beneath
it, as an emblem of Ihe King's
sovereignty over the people of Gotland. The dragon typifies His Majesty's rule over Wenden, on the Pomeranian coast.
Sweden is represented by the three
crowns on the left side of the shield.
The white falcon stands for Iceland,
the white bear for Greenland and the
goat for the Faroe Islands, in which
goat breeding is a staple industry.
On the smaller shield in the centre are represented the titles of the
King of Denmark, who, besides being
Lord of the Goths and Wendish people, is Duke of Schleswlg Holsteln,
Stormarn, Ditmarsken, Lauemborg,
Oldenborg and Delmenhorst.
The nettle leaf in the top left corner of the small shield represents
llo'stein, the swan Stormarn, the
horse's head Ditmarsken, and the
man on horseback Lauemborg. Oldenborg is represented by the two
beams on the left of the small central
shield and Delmenhorst by the golden cross on the right.
************ ****•:••:•*•:•*•:. ***•:•
!   MARINE NEWS   |
i>*************************
LUMBER  FOR   CITY
The tug Edith has brought in a
scow of lumber for the Westholme
Lumber Company. A large part of
the lumber is Intended for the streets
of the city and will be delivered as
soon as It is possible to place it.
AUSTRALIAN LINE
The New Zealand Shipping Company has sold Its interest In the Canadian-Australian royal mall line to
Huddard & Parker of Melbourne,
owners of the steamship Zealandla.
They, cojolntly, with the Union
Steamship Company of New Zealand,
will carry out the existing contract
for the Vancouver service till July
31,  1911.
The Aorangl, which was taken off
the run in January last, after some
fourteen years' service, was owned
by the New Zealand Shipping Company, while the big Zealandia, now in
Vancouver, is the first of the Hud-
dart, Parker boats.
RUPERT CITY  RETURNS
The familiar lifies of the steamel
Rupert City have again appeared in
the harbor. Shortly before noon yesterday the big steamer drew into the
G. T. P. wharf with a heavy cargo
for the G. T. P. and Foley, Welch &
Stewart. She brought a large shipment of coal which was most welcome to the officials of the line who
were at their wits' ends to know what
to do for a supply until the timely
arrival of the freighter.
When the G. T. P. took over the
fleet of Capt. S. F. Mackenzie, the
Rupert City was not included. Since
that time, however, the increasing
trade has made it necessary for the
company to charter her, and it. Is reported the company has taken an option for purchase. She is to be operated purely as a freighter and upon
proving her suitability for the trade
will depend likely whether she will
be bought.
The G. T. P. have determined not.
to interfere with the running schedules of their palatial passenger
steamers Prince Rupert and Prince
George. To handle any considerable
amount of freight on these necessb
tates delays and the management accordingly will turn over all the heavy
freight to the steamers Rupert City
and the Henriette. The passenger
vessels will then carry only perishable goods such as can be loaded and
discharged in the time at present allowed.
It is reported in Vancouver that
the steamer British Columbia, a new
vessel on the coast, has been purchased by the Grand Trunk Pacific
and that she will replace the Bruno
on the Queen Charlotte-Prince Rupert run.
The Rupert City brought In addition to the large coal cargo, a large
consignment of dump cars for the
railway contractors.
NEW COAST STEAMER
The growth and Importance of the
shipping trade of this coast is well
exemplified In the latest move in
local shipping, the advent of the Balcom Steamship Company as a serious
factor In the business between Victoria and the north. The company
is securing a steamer for the northern trade about the same size as the
Princess Charlotte, although she- is
not quite so speedy. The name of
the steamer is not given, but it Is
understood that she will be a fine
boat and will be fitted as a first class
modern passenger and freight carrier. Capt. Balcom, the head of the
new Arm, says:—
"The steamer which Is offered to
me, and which I shall take if she
proves to he up to the specifications,
has been plying between Spain and
London and Liverpool, engaged in
the fruit trade. She Is 33fi feet long
and has a cargo capacity of 1,760
tons dead weight. One great feature
of*her fittings Is that she has refrigerator space for 300 tons.
' The speed of the boat Is 16 knots,
and she Is in every way adapted to
the service between Victoria and the
north. I am going to England next
month, and if the steamer proves to
be all right she will be fitted with
modern housework, her accommodation In that respect being at present
of the ocean variety.
"We are at present," continued the
captain, "operating the John L.
Card to and from Puget Sound In
the general freighting business, and
we take the Gralner and the Selkirk
whenever we can get them. These
handle the business so far. I expect
to see the business of these coast
cities grow by leaps and bounds,
however, and there will be plenty of
"WHERE  QUALITY IS KING.'
GEO. D. TITE
Furniture Dealer
3rd. Avenue
Prince Rupert
An inspection of our stock
of House Furnishings will
convince you. For quality and
economy you will leave us a
satisfied customer.
Dininj Room Furniture, Sideboards,
Butffti, Pining Tibia, 6ft.
■nd 6ft. EitMiiloii
Dlnlnf Rhui Chain, Ourtered Oik with
Luthtr Setti, Golden or Early En|Hih
finish. Prices rutin! from
Just Received a
Handsome Line of
Iron Beds, Springs and
Mattresses, al) sizes
WINDOW BLINDS
Manufactured here to lit any
window  up  to 10  feet  wide.
Tapestry and Lace Curtains,
Poles and Trimmings
Special orders for Upholstering
of any kind.
$22.50 to $50
Wicker Chairs and Rockers
i  GEO. D. TITE,    -    3rd Ave.
SHERWIN & WILLIAMS
PAINTS
COVER THE EARTH.
WE   ARE   SOLE   AGENTS
CARLOAD JUST ARRIVED
Ready Nixed Paints,
Paints Ground in Oil,
Paints Ground in Japan,
Varnishes, Shellac, etc.
Water Stains
and
Decotint
IN ALL COLORS
Prince Rupert Hardware & Supply
Company, Ltd.  ™qs. pum u».
The Westholme
Lumber Company, Ld.
We carry the largest stock of
Building Supplies in the North.
Quotations given on short notice in all lines.
Rough and Dressed Lumber
Shingles and Lath
Mouldings and Cases
Doors and Windows
We handle Plaster and Lime at reasonable prices
Get our quotations for all classes of buildings.
 FIRST AVENUE
OFFICE AND
WAREHOUSES
business for everyone to do. We
have taken the Pacific Coast Construction Company's wharf and shall
use that In future for our work."
Capt. Balcom is an experienced
shipping man. He was engaged for
a number of years in trading to
Somh America, and knows that coast
well.
 o	
It Is told of an English professor
that he once wrote on the blackboard
in his laboratory:
"Prof. Atherton Is pleased to Inform his students that he has this
day been appointed honorary physician to her Majesty the Queen."
In the course of the morning he
had occasion to leave the room, and
found on his return that some student had considerately added to the
announcement .these words:
"God save the Queen!"
 o	
Monday being a public holiday,
Labor Day, the city council Is taking
a long rest. It will not meet again
until Tuesday evening.
 LADYSMITH	
COAL
H. B. ROCHESTER,  -   Centre Street

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