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Prince Rupert Journal Jul 28, 1911

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OaJSL
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New Wdlineton
Coal
is the best
ROGERS ft BLACK
Sole Agents
mat fltajietrt lontrn
& Legislative jg
VOLUME  II.
Published  Twice  a  Week.
PRINCE   RUPERT,   B.   C.   FRIDAY, JULY 28, 1911
Price, Five Cents
AWti
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PREPARE FOR FIGHT
Local Conservatives  Have Named
Fourteen Delegates Who Will
Atte 11 (Invention.
the
Date for General  Gathering of the
Foi-ces Has Not Yet Been
Decided Upon
At a splendid gathering held in
Melntyre Hall on Tuesday evening
the Conservatives of the city made
choice of fourteen delegates who will
represent the local association at a
convention held later to name a candidate for Comox-Atlin In the approaching Dominion election. The
meeting was presided over by J. G.
Scott, first vice president of the association, in the absence of the president, J. A. Kirkpatrick. With him
on the platform were Wm. Manson,
M.P.P.; G. W. Kerr, second vice president, and the secretary of the association, Dr. W. J.  Quinlan.
Little time was occupied with
speech making, but with 150 members present it was deemed wise to
lose no time in proceeding to the
election of delegates.
Before proceeding to the work,
however, a vote of confidence in R.
L. Borden was passed on motion of
0. H. Nelson, seconded by T. F. MacDonald. This was followed by a vote
of confidence in Hon. Richard McBride as provincial leader and Wm.
Manson, the local member, the motion being moved by M. M. Stephens,
seconded by W. E. Fisher.
Mr. Manson, in a short speech, replied to the vote of confidence which
was passed with the greatest of enthusiasm.
Mr. Manson said that at the present time the interest centred not in
provincial politics nor In theh Dominion issues. He referred to the
good service that had been done by
Sir John A. MacDonald to the country and success which had followed
his national policy. The policy as
laid down by the Conservative party
had been closely followed by the Liberals upon attaining power. It appeared to be an unwise policy to
change that after so many years,
during which the country had prospered under It.
He objected to the Liberal party
appealing to the country without a
redistribution of seats. It meant
that Britisii Columbia was to be cut
off from three or four seats to which
she was entitled.
The argument that reciprocity
would be of great benefit to this
district because of the free entry
of fish to the United States was
touched upon. Mr. Manson pointed
out that under the high cost of living in the United States now there
was sure to be a cutting off of the
duty by the United States without
any treaty. Fish would be included
in that cutting down process and
Canada would not require to make
the concessions she was to make.
He advocated a strenuous fight for
the return to power of Mr. Borden
and his following. The signs of the
times pointed to a change and he
felt the Comox-Atlin district would
do its part In returning a good Conservative.
The selection of the delegates was
then proceeded with. There were a
large number of names put in nomination and the task of counting was
necessarily slow. The following was
the selection made, with the vote for
each one:
Wm, .Manson, M.P.P., 188; Frank
E. Cullin, 121; O. II. Nelson, 12.";
M. M. Stephens, 122; Dr. A. A. Melntyre, 106; J. E. Merryfield, OS;
L. Crippen, 08; O. Besner, 84; A.
Carss, 80; W. E. Fisher, SO; Dr. W.
J. Quinlan, OS; J. G. Scott, 51; Dr.
W. B. Clayton, 48; S. M. Newton, 47.
When the ballots were being
counted a programme of short
speeches, songs and recitations was
given. Harry Smith of Stewart made
a vigorous appeal for a good strong
fight being put up.
It is likely that a second meeting
will be held before the delegates
leave for the convention. At that
time it is probable the question of
the candidate will come up for
further consideration.
 o	
Resign Position
Two resignations from the police
force were accepted by the commissioners last week. They were those
of Police Officers Mansell and Miller. The former had been with the
police force for a long time. He
went soulh this morning.
WELL   SATISFIED
Investor From Kalispell, Montana, Is
Pleased With His Purchases
Here
Among those who went south this
morning by the Prince Rupert was
W. T. Booth of Kalispell, Mont. He
has been on a visit to Prince Rupert
looking over investments he has
here. Mr. Booth is one of the many
outsiders who was fortunate enough
to Invest here at the time of the sale
and is holding the properties he then
secured.
He is highly pleased with the outlook here and may probably make
his home in Prince Rupert later. He
expects to see a wonderful development in the city and vicinity.
In Kalispell and elsewhere in the
United States where Mr. Booth has
come In contact with investors he
says Prince Rupert is well known and
eyes are all directed this way. It
will undoubtedly open up with a
great rush when the proper time
comes.
 o— ■
LOOKS LIKE APPEAL
Sir Wilfrid Indicates in the House That
He is Going to Dissolve
Them.
Will Not Wait for New Distribution
of Seats  Before Testing
the Electorate
(Special to The Journal)
Ottawa, July 28.—Obstruction in
the House of Commons brings dissolution nearer and the government is
now nearly ready to ask the electors
to give their decision. Next week
will see the finish, after the house
has had a chance to discuss Sir Wilfrid Laurier's attitude toward the
Imperial conference.
C. L. Owen called attention to the
danger of men being thrown out of
employment by the stoppage of public works on account of supply for
the whole year not having been voted. He asked if supply would be
voted before a general election.
Sir Wilfrid Laurier replied: "Reciprocity is now engaging the attention of the house. It has been before us for six months. As far as
my information is concerned we
might vote today. As soon as we
have a vote on the bill we will take
up supply."
 o	
A. R. Barrow of the G. T. P. service has been spending a few days
in the city.
NEW CLUB HOUSE
Pioneer Organization of the City Has
Purchased Mr. Bacon's
Residence.
TO BENEFIT FARMING
Provincial Government Takes Steps to
Increase Local Farm Production.
Appointment   of   a   New   Official   Is
Made by Minister of
Agriculture
(Special to The Journal)
Victoria, July 28—Upon the recommendation of Hon. Price Ellison, E.
J. Bonavia has received the appointment of provincial crop and labor
commissioner. His duties, upon
which Mr. Bonavia has already entered, are to visit every section of
the province and carefully investigate the prevailing conditions as they
affect the agricultural Interests, particularly with the collection of information with respect to 'abor conditions generally, and report comprehensively to the minister so that
intelligent steps may be taken to
secure an adequate supply of labor
to meet the demands of the market.
This is intended to place the fruit
growing, stock raising, dairying and
mixed farming industries upon a better footing and appreciably augment
the total of British Columbia's home
roduct in food stuff essentials.
PROTEST TO MINISTER
Dr. Gordon's  Report Is Branded as
Misleading   and   Untrue—Open
Shop Is No Issue
The miners' eexcutive had a meeting in Fernie and wired Hon. Mac-
Kenzie King as follows:
"Newspapers have reported you as
stating to the house that the cause
of dispute here is the question of
closed or open shop, and that settlement of that point would practically
settle the strike. Your statement is
no doubt founded on the report of
Dr. Gordon, which is misleading and
not true. This matter was only Referred to casually by the board during the investigation, but would ap
pear to have been made the means
of apologizing for failure to settle
the real cause of dispute in the question of wages.
"We have offered at all times to
renew old conditions in the matter
of closed or open shop, providing the
same question  can be settled.
"Signed on behalf of the executive
ooard,
"W. B. POWELL,
"A. J. CARTER,,
"G. STUBS."
CENTRE FOR MINING
J. L. Parker is so Impressed With the
Development in the North That
He Will Open Office.
He Has Gone to Goose Hay to Investigate the Work  Going on  al
His   Mines   There
Among the arrivals in the city this
week were J. L. Parker, one of the
best known mining engineers in the
province, and J. Derrick McGregor,
the well known land surveyor of Victoria. They went by launch to
Goose Bay, where they have work
in hand. .Mr. Parker, as head of the
Pacific Metal Company, owns the
Red Wing group of claims at Goose
Bay. A contract has been let to
carry out development work on the
properties this summer. These
claims are close to the Hidden Creek
group, where the Granby company
has in view such extensive work.
Mr. Parker, who has been visiting
this northern part of the province
regularly for the past few years, has
decided to open an office here. The
growing importance of this part of
the province as a mining centre has
prompted him to take this step. It
indicates that Prince Rupert is to become the centre of the mining activity which is now partly opened in the
north. The means of communication are ever improving here and it
becomes therefore a convenient point
at which to centralize the business
pertaining to all parts.
In the meantime Mr. Parker will
make his headquarters, while in the
city, at the Prince Rupert Inn and
will deal with all correspondence addressed to him. He is ready to do
consultation work and examine properties for owners.
 o	
LEAVING FOR ORIENT
IX  HAZKLTOX  DISTR1
llabines Company Makes Good Showing for Work that Is
Done
Foreman Mike Callahan of the Ba-
bines Company's ground, adjoining
the rich Erie mine, is confining his
work at present to stripping the surface cropplngs of the three big veins
that have so far been uncovered, says
the Inland Colonist. He Is well
pleased with the looks of the vein
at the point of the work left off in
the upper drift by the former foreman, William Dalton, and as soon
as J. R. Talpey, the company's fiscal
agent, arrives he intends increasing
his force and drive ahead on that
drift. The ore showing at the point
where the $740 per ton in silver
assays were obtained looks very encouraging, and justifies the immediate installation of machinery for
the operation of compressed air
drills.
 o	
NAVY MAKES READY
JSLAND^ RESOURCES
rCTOR,A.- -
Ominous Action Taken  by the Admiralty in Connection With
Fleets.
Morocco  Question   Has  Led   to   Decided  Course—Ministry Gives
Assurances
J&
o^
J. W. Coover is Surprised to Find Such
Wealth as He Saw on Graham
Islands.
lie
Will   Invest   Heavily  in   the   District   Following
Investigations
A. J.
IJrnce  to  Relinquish   Post  of
Y. M. C. A. Secretary at
Victoria
ROAD ROLLER HERE
A. J. Brace, secretary of the Young
Men's Christian Association of Victoria, leaves for the Orient in October
next, where he will take charge of
the Y. M. C. A. work in connecton
with  the Chen-Tu  University.
 o	
Delays  Visit
According to the information received by Dr. Slocum, Mr. Harbeck,
the moving picture expert, will not
be able to come to Prince Rupert
on Saturday as was expected. He will
not arrive until Wednesday of next
week.
Delightful   Headquarters  Are   Bein;
Taken Over and Will lie Opened
ut Once
The Pioneer Cub of this city,
which has the honor of being what
the name implies, the first organized
in the city, is now in permanent
quarters. The residence of J. H. Bacon, which occupies such a commanding position on Fourth avenue, has
been taken over by the club by purchase and is now in possession ol' Hie
organization,
The furniture lias also become the
property of the Pioneers, so that the
organization starts off with first class
quarters, adapted in every way to
the needs of the club.
In connection with it there is a
dining room maintained for the convenience of the members, This will
serve a very important duty, the
bachelor members finding it a most
comfortable home with a charming
outlook over the harbor.
The  Plon er  Club   is  to  be  congratulated    upon    the    comfortable
home which it has acquired.
 o	
The May Roberts Company, which
has been playing in the Empress Theatre since Tuesday evening, is drawing full houses. The company is a
very creditable one. The leading
lady has strong suppoprt and the
public has recognized the enterprise
of the manager in putting on a series of good plays.
City Equipment for Macadamizing Streets
is Now in Full Operation.
MORROW'S   POSITION
Delivery of the Machine Was Made
Yesterday by Vancouver
Agent
The road rol'er for the city streets
has been delivered here. It arrived
by the Ena yesterday morning and
was brought up to Third avenue under the charge of the Vancouver
agent, Hugh I!. Gllmore. The engine is a Waterous one, made in
Brantford, and is one of the standard makes.
li is ten tons weight, which gave
a little concern to some of Ihe city
officials, who were suspicious of the
plank roadways that had to be gone
over. Planks were laid ahead of
the engine to form a roadway and
all went well with the locomotive.
Mr, Derry, of this city, was Instructed in the operating of the machine by Mr. Gllmore, who too kit
over the route and tried it out on
the rock covered roads.
Mr. Gllmore admits that the city
should not put it very actively into
work until at least a block has been
all covered with the crushed rock.
It should then be closed to traffic
and the roller put on it and kept
going until it is well pressed down.
If wagons are allowed to travel over
it before being consolidated the fine
rock gets to the bottom and the
coarse material conies to the top.
The rock crusher is working on
Third avenue and from now on portions of the roadways will be completed ready for regular service.
Well Known Politician in  the  North
it is Said May Win Nomination.
(Special to The Journal)
London July 28.—Leave has been
stopped on British warships and, according to Thursday's Globe, orders
were issued for the second division
of the home fleet to coal Immediately.
This has caused excitement in naval circles and is generally Tnterpret-
ed   to   mean   that  the   admiralty   is
preparing the fleet for quick action
in the event of any sudden developments   in   the   Anglo-German   crisis
over the Moroccan question.
Lloyd George's Words
Addressing a banquet given by the
bankers    of   London,   David   Lloyd
George, chancellor of the exchequer
referred  to Great Britain's continually   growing   property,    which,    he
said,   could   only  be  arrested   by  a
disturbance   of   the   world's   peace.
Therefore, he was ready at great sacrifice, to preserve peace, and  would
rejoice  at  the  success  of  the  arbitration  negotiations with  the United
States, but, he added, it was essential J
that  Great   Britain,   at  all   hazards
should maintain her place and prestige among the great powers.
If a situation were forced upon
Great Britain where peace could only
be preserved by the surrender of the
position it had won by centuries of
heroism and achievements, by allowing herself to be treated where vital
interests were concerned as though
she were of no account in the cabinet   of  nations,   then,  he  said,   em
it is a unique experience for a
man who for twenty-four years has
been searching the continent over
for natural resources to develop, with
the ultimate end In view of constructing railroads, to drop into a
country such as British Columbia and
see the enormous potential wealth
which is everywhere apparent, and
which is open for all to acquire."
This is one the statements made
by J. W. Coovert, a civil and mining
engineer of Portland, who has just
returned from Graham Island, where
he went to report on coal areas for
the John McLeod Company of this
city, and where he became so interested that he spent two months
looking over the island, says the
Vancouver World. "I would have
liked to stay a month longer," he
said, "for taken as a whole Graham
Island is the most wonderful undeveloped country 1 have ever seen.
'To an American, the greatest surprise is the undeveloped condition of
the country. In the United States
showings such as I saw would not
lie idle for twenty-four hours. It Is
astonishing to find showings in such
a crude condition.
I found there a large area of coal
lands, containing a bituminous product    equal    in   quality   to   any   coal
mined on the Pacific coast. Of course
you  must   understand   that   Graham
Island   Is   very  large,  and  a  great
many coal  claims have been  staked
which  In  the nature of  things  cannot  become   productive.     This   is   a
condition   which   exists  in   every   locality  where  coal,  or,  in   fact,  any
kind of mineral, has been discovered,
and does not affect the fact that an
enormous  tonnage of coal  will  ultimately be mined on the island.
"Incidentally    I    visited    the    oil
fields  on   the   northwestern   portion
of the island, and found there conditions   such   as   I   had   never   before
seen, and  I have inspected  most of
the oil fields on this continent. .Never before have I seen surface showings  so  favorable,  and you  can  say
without reservation that if oil Is not
found  in   that,  field,  all  the  knowledge  gained   by  years of experience
in   this business  by all  ihe epxerts
engaged  In  it,  might  as  well  be  set
aside."
Mr. Coovert expects to Bpend most
of his time in the future In this
province. After observing a very
small port Ion of the resources here,
the United states Is no longer at-
tractlve to him.
 o	
ARE   REORGANIZING
Will  Not  Be Tinned  I
if He does  Not
Get It
The supporters of George Morrow
In this city appear to be very sanguine with respect to their candidate at the next Dominion election.
Some of them go so far as to prophesy that he will undoubtedly capture the Liberal convention and run
under the banner of thai party as a
straight line candidate. Those opposed to Mr, Morrow, however, are
free lo announce thai such cannot he
the case and they ridicule the possibility of his getting into the fight
as the  party representative.
Those who have followed Mr. .Morrow's course know that he is likely
to achieve his ends in spite of very
decided difficulties, and knowing
ones on the outside, therefore, feel
that it is not beyond tlie range of
possibility that he will be the Liberal candidate named by the convention.
His friends say he will contest the
seat in any event, if not as the choice
of the Liberal convention, then as an
Independent Liberal.
The names of Duncan Ross and
William Sloan are still the most frequently heard mentioned as candidates in tho Liberal interests. Tiie
latter Is In Scotland on a visit and
II is not known whether he seeks the
nomination or not. if he wishes It
his claims are regarded us very
strong for It.
Liberal Party is Seeking to Revive Life
in the Forces in British
Columbia
May
-enter  Politic*
Province
phatlcally, peace at. that price would
(own Even be  a   humiliation   Intolerable   for  a
| great   country   like   England   to   endure.
National Honor
"National honor," said tlie chan-
cellor, "is no party question. TheJ lteporlcd Thai Well Known Judge
security of our International trade
Is nol a party question. The peace
of the world is more likely to be
secured i tall nations realize fairly,
what the conditions of peace must
be."
The sp h  made a  deep Impres-
eiiui mi the listeners. David Lloyd
George seldom makes an Incursion
Into the domain of foreign politics.
Ills audience, therefore, Interpreted
i he speech to mean thai the Moroccan situation is serious.
The Liberal morning papeprs
which refer to the facl that Chan-
cellor Lloyd George in his address
read the Importanl passages slowly
and carefully from a prepared manuscript regard his utterances as the
embodiment of the cabinet's view
and it is not doubted that it was a
hint to Germany with regard to Morocco, The papers express the hope
thai this word In Beason may pre-
ve-ni the' situation arising through
Germany's demands from becoming
critical.
Despite alarmist reports, the government announces that it entertains
im apprehension  <>( war.
Mr. and   Mrs.  Manson  nf Topeka
are. visiting ut tin- home of their sun.
\!e \. Manson, in ihis city.   They i re
anled by their two daughters.
Tin. Liberal party, i' is reported
from Vancouver, are aboul 'ee begin
a reorganizing campaign, li is said
that a promlnenl judge known in
political life familiarly as "Billy" Mc-
imix-- may forsake the bene h and
take again to political life, which he
l.i\es .-.I v,e-ll His work, ace ording
io the rumor, would be to organize
the whole province and then assume
the leadership us the date of eh i tlon
approached.
in connection with the proposition
to reorganize there is also a rumor
tlint the plant of the Saturday Sunset has been purchased in Vancouver
and a new morning dally to be called
The Sun will be issued in the Liberal interests Ihe-re.
MAY   VISIT  CANADA
i Special 'ee The Journal)
London, Julj 28. The Birmingham Daily Post announces
there Is a possibility that the
king will visit Canada during
the regime of the Duke of Can-
naughi  us  governor general. PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Friday, July 2S, 1911
%.****************************************************
* *
* *
| When His Ship Goes Down !
* _     _ ^ t ............
Doctors' mistakes, many of them
at any rate, are buried in the ground
says a writer in Munsey's. Those
made by lawyers are paid for by
their clients. But the mistakes made
by sea captains, no matter what they
may cost others, are in the end settled by the captains themselves. The
long roll of suicides tells the story.
There is never a voyage without
its sudden emergency, demanding
presence of mind, coo1 judgment and
skill. Let these qualities fall the
master mariner in his time of need,
and no matter what might have been
the strain on the body and brain,
his professional career is at an end.
There was Captain Frederick Wat-
kins, wlio commanded the City of
Paris when the old inman liner came
staggering 10 port with the Atlantic
waves swashing about her hold and
surging against her bulkheads, the
result of a fog-shrouded impact with
an iceberg. The liner was thronged
with passengers; the unforseen danger had came near to sending her
and her thousand souls to the bottom, but the energy, resourcefulness
and skill of her commander brought
her safe to port a deed to be long
remembered.
It was remembered up to a few
years ago, when a slight miscalculation on the part of Captain Watkins
sent his vessel upon the Manacle
rocks on the Cornish coast. Now you
may search all of the obscure places
of the earth and you may not locate him.
There was the Princess Victoria
Louise, of the Hamburg-American
line, which drove hard upon the coral
beach at Port Royal In the island of
Jamaica. The vessel was thronged
with tourists making a jaunt to the
West Indies. Fortunately the sea
was calm and there was no difficulty
in getting passengers ashore. When
the last had been safely landed the
captain went to his stateroom and
put a bullet through his brain.
The pitiable part of it all was that
he had no need to. It. was not the
brain he shattered that was at fault,
but the Kingston earthquake, which
had destrbyed the lighthouse. Groping for the lighthouse a few days
later, came another vessel of the
same line, the Prlnz Waldemar. Her
wreck lies a few hundred feet distant from that of her consort, mute
testimony to the skill of the navigators. Had the lighthouse been
there they would have found the
passage; failing it they found destruction.
There will be many to recall the
tragedy of the Oder, a North German Lloyd steamer, which was on
her way to her home port of Bremen when she struck on the island
of Socotra at the entrance of the
Red Sea. It was with extreme difficulty that the passengers were rescued. After all had been got ashore
Captain Preiffer shot himself. The
ship was lost.
Captain Griffith of the Mohegan
stood on the bridge of his fast sinking ship until the bridge engulfed
him. Deloncle of the French liner
Boiirgogiie sunk in mid-Atlantic by
collision with the Britisii steamship
Cromartyshire, was last seen on the
his vessel took the long dive. Bon
bridge, with hand on whistle cord, as
Goessel of the Elbe went down with
his ship, standing with folded arms
upon the bridge as the vessel slowly sank.
In the disaster to the steamship
Republic no blame was attached to
her commander, Capt. Ininan Sealby.
Yet he was dropped from the service,
and now, at the age of 60, is studying; law at the University of Michigan. All his sea career had been
with   tlie   White  Star  line,  and  for
116 years he had commanded Its vessel.
There was one case in which a
captain lost his ship because of too
great deference to the wishes of his
passengers. The vessel was the Norse
King. At the time of her undoing
she was making a cruise among the
Ionian islands, carrying 2e10 tourists.
The ship was keeping a course about
seven miles off the picturesque coast
of Zante, when a deputation of passengers came to Captain Wright and
urged him to stand closer inshore
that they might better see the region
which  Byron  had  immortalized.
He obligingly compiled. A few
hours later the Norse King was hard
aground on a jutting reef. The passengers were got safely ashore, where
they promptly held an indignation
meeting and signed a paper denouncing the captain, who had wrecked
his ship and his reputation in an
effort to oblige them. The vessel
became a total loss and the master s
certificate was suspended.
Of different stuff was a captain cf
a coastwise craft which a few summers ago carried a large number of
excursionists out from Halifax. On
the return trip a dense fog suddenly
hid the coast. With all the though-
lessness of inexperience a party of
the excursionists gathered forward of
the pilot house and sought to enliven the rather dismal homeward
journey by singing hymns. They
had hardly begun before the captain
appeared.
"You people stop that noise," he
commanded," "and go aft, and do it
now!"
They went. When the vessel was
safe alongside her pier one of the
party, a woman, sought the captain
and began berating him for boorish-
ness.
"My brother Is one of the owners
of this line," she said, "and when I
tell him of your discourteous conduct he will have you dismissed."
"When you tell your brother of
my conduct," the captain grimly replied, "you might add that when
I ordered you and your party away
from the pilot house I liad nothing
to guide me but the sound of the
whistling buoys, and that if I had
allowed your singing to drown that
sound the chances are that you would
not have any opportunity of making complaint!"
One inexcusable case of loss of a
vessel was the spectacular stranding
of the big China, of the Peninsular
and Oriental service, which was run
ashore on an island in the Red Sea
in 1897. Among the numerous passengers was Lady Brassey. It was
her birthday, and there was a special
dinner In honor of the occasion. The
captain was the commodore of the
line.
Lady Brassey sat at the right hand
of the captain. As was subsequently shown In the enquiry, he was so
engrossed in his fair neighbor's conversation that he paid no attention
to three notes which were sent to
him from the bridge. The notes
warned the captain that the vessel
was rapidly nearlng a certain point
and that Hie course should be altered.
Conceiving that he had done all that
was required of him, the officer of
the watch did nothing more, and before the dinner was over the vessel
struck.
That ended the captain's sea
career. It also ended any further
chance of mishap through the conversation of captains with passengers, as the line issued an order that
in future the commanders of its vessels would not be allowed to come
into social intercourse with voyagers.
The same rule now obtains with
all the big liners in the trans-Atlantic
service. If the captain makes a
round of the promenade deck once
a day, it is about as much as is
expected of him. He seldom goes
near the smoking room. He has his
meals served in his cabin and is
rarely seen in the dining room. In
rough weather he stands at his place
upon the bridge for long hours, day
and night.
 o	
Philosopher—To my mind there
are just two problems that confront
the world.
Student—And they are?
Philosopher—How to make money,
and how to get along without
money." <,
PUBLIC HIGHWAYS
Province of British Columbia
NOTICE Is hereby given that all
Public Highways in unorganized Districts, and all Main Trunk Roads In
organized Districts are sixty-six feet
wide, and have a width of thirty-
three feet on each side of the mean
straight centre line of the travelled
road. THOMAS TAYLOR,
Minister of Public Works.
Department of Public Works, Victoria. B. C, July 7, 1911.    jyl8-ol8
WATER  NOTICE
I, C. N. Pring, of Prince Rupert,
B. C, occupation broker, give notice
that on the 12th day of July I Intend tho apply to the Water Commissioner at his office in Prince Rupert, for a license to take and use
2.8 cubic feet of water per second
from Hot Springs on border of Lake
Lakelse in the Skeena Land Division of Coast District. The water is
to be taken directly from the Springs
and is to be used on Lot No. 3983,
for sanitary purposes.
Dated June 12th, 1911.
C. N. PRING,
6-13-lm Prince Rupert, B. C.
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE.
NOTICE is hereby given that the
reserve of a parcel of land situated
on Graham Island, notice of which
appeared in the British Columbia
Gazette on the 25th of February,
1909, being dated 23rd February,
1909, is cancelled to permit of the
lands being acquired by pre-emption
only and for no other purpose
ROBT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Department of Lands,
Victoria, B. C, April 5th, 1911.
4-14—7-5
You Can Avoid This
by sending your Clothes to the
PIONEER STEAM LAUNDRY
There qre Many
Reasons Why
IT   IS  TO  YOUR  INTEREST
We do first-class work and
are careful with your Garments. We can do your work
and return It within 48 hours
If necessary. We call for your
laundry and return It to you.
Should anything be lost or mlBplaced we will make It satisfactory.
When your Laundry goes to the Chinks there are many drawbacks. When you send It to us your money helps pay WHITE
LABOR.
PIONEER STEAM LAUNDRY
NOTICE.
In the matter of an application for
the issue of a duplicate of the Certificate of Title for an undivided
one-half of Lot 883, Group I,
Cassiar District:
Notice is hereby given that it is
my intention to issue at the expiration of one month after the first
publication hereof a duplicate of the
Certificate of Title to the above
mentioned land in the name of William Jordan Larkworthy, which Certificate is dated the 30th day of September, 1910, and numbered 326R.
WILLIaM  E.   BURRITT,
Di- l.rict Registrar.
Land Registry Office,
Prince Rupert, B. C,
May 26, 1911. J2S
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE.
Notice is hereby given the the
reserve existing by reason of the
notice published in the British Columbia Gazette of the 27th December, 1907, over lands on Graham Island, formerly covered by Timber
Licences Nos. Nos. 37055, 37056 and
37057, which expired on the 6th day
of November, 1909, and the lands
embraced within Timber Licence No.
37059, which expired on the 25th
day of January, 1909, is cancelled,
and that the said lands will be open
for pre-emption only under the provisions of Section 7 of the "Land
Act" after midnight on June 16th,
1911.
ROBERT A.   RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Lands Department,
Victoria, B. C,
9th March, 1911.
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that John Kir-
Kaldy, of Lakelse Valley, occupation
farmer, iu.. i to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 120 chains south
from the south end of Herman
Lake; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains.
JOHN  KIRKALDY.
Dated April 11, 1911. 5-5
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that I, V. W.
Smith, of Prince Rupert, occupation
contractor, intend to apply for permission to lease the following described foreshore:—Commencing at
a post planted about 2 miles in a
southerly direction from Port Simpson; thence northerly along high
water mark 25 chains and containing all foreshore between high and
low water mark.
V. W. SMITH,
Locator.
Staked 31st May,  1911. 6-6
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Flora Orr, of
Masset, B. C, occupation spinster, intends to apply for permission to purohase the following described lands:
—Commencing at a post planted
about 40 chains south and 80 chains
east of the N. E. corner of Lot 35;
thence north 80 chains; thence west
80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains, containing 640
acres.
FLORA ORR.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated November 26, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Arthur Ives,
Sr., of Masset, B. C, occupation hotel
keeper, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described Iands:— Commencing at a
post planted about 40 chains south
and 120 chains east of the S. E.
corner of Lot 35; thence south 80
chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence west
SO chains, containing 640 acres.
ARTHUR IVES, Sr.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 25, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast—Rang.; V.
TAKE NOTICE, that I, Minnie
Meredith, of Victoria, B. C, occupation a married woman, intend to
apply for permission to purchase the
following desoribed lands:—Commencing at a post planted about 40
chains distant and in a South direction from the Southeast corner of
Lot 1733; thence east 40 chains;
thence south 40 chains; thence weBt
40 chains; thence north 40 chains
to point of commencement, containing 160 acres more or less.
MINNIE  MEREDITH.
John Klrkaldy,
Agent.
Dated February  20th, 1911.
Skeena Land  District—District
of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that Joseph Edward Merryfield, of Prince Rupert,
occupation merchant, intends to apply for permission to lease the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about 10 chains
north from the northeast corner of
Lot 33; thence west 1500 feet to
shore of Smith's Island; thence following shore in a southerly direction
1200 feet; tbence east to shore of
De Horsey Island; thence following
shore in a northerly direction to
point of commencement.
JOSEPH EDWARD MERRYFIELD.
E. Spro, Agent.
Dated April 4, 1911. 4-7
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that Prince Ru-
pert Sand & Gravel Company, Ltd.
of Prince Rupert, occupation Industrial Company, intends to apply for
permission to lease the following described land:— Commencing at a
post planted at the Witness post on
the southerly boundary of Lot 4124;
tbence southerly following the sinuosities of the shore line 60 chains
more or less to southerly end of the
island; thence easterly 10 chains
more or less to low water mark;
thence northerly 60 chains more or
less along low water mark; thence
westerly 10 chains more or .eso to
the point of commencement.
PRINCE  RUPERT  SAND &
GRAVEL Co., LTD.
Per J. Y. Rochester, Agt.
Dated May 30, 1911. 6-2
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast Range 5.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles
James Gilllngham, of Prince Rupert,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply for permission to purohase the
followeing described lands:—Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner of Lot 992 and
marked C. J. Gillingham's N. E.
Corner Application for Purchase; I,
C. J. Gillingham, Intend to apply
for permission to purchase 320 acres
of land bounded, as fallows:—Commencing at this post; thence 80
chains south; thence 40 ohains west;
thence 80 chains north; thence 40
chains east to place of commencement.
CHARLES JAMES GILIINGHAX
Robeirt Osborn Jennings, Agent.
Dated January 5, 1911.
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that I, Joseph
Pastl, of Watson, Sask., occupation
farmer, intend to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:— Commencing at a
post planted about 30 cains In a
northerly direction from the N. E.
corner of Lot No. 2662 or T. L. No.
3 2598 at Lakelse Lake; thence nortli
20 chains; thence east 40 chains;
thence south 20 chains along shore
of Lakelse Lake; thence west 40
cliains to point of commencement,
containing 120 acres, more or less.
JOSEPH PASTL.
George Hir, Agent.
Dated  May  5,  1911. 6-2
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that Annie Kirkaldy, of Melville, Sask., occupation
married woman, Intends to apply for
p irmlsslon to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted 120 chains southwesterly from Herman Lake; thence west
80 chains; tlience south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence north
80 chains, containing 640 acres more
oi* less
ANNIE KIRKALDY.
John Klrkaldy, Agent.
Dated May 13, 1911. 5-19
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that George
Rudge, of Port Simpson, occupation
marble worker, Intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 2 miles In a
southerly direction from mouth of
Union Bay and on south side of Bay;
thence south 20 chains; thence west
20 chains; thence north 20 chains to
shore; thence following shore in an
easterly direction to point of commencement, containing 40 acres
more or less.
GEORGE RUDGE.
Lionel Crippen, Agent.
Staked 11th May, 1911. 5-23
For Job Printing of all kinds see
The Journal man.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte ■.;  ;ndB.
TAKE NOTICE that Lynn Suther.
land, of El Paso, Texas, U. S. A,, occupation auditor, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:-—Commencing at a
post planted about 40 chains south
and 120 chains east of the S. E. corner of Lot 35; thence north 80
chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains, containing 640 acres.
LYNN SUTHERLAND.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 25, 1910.
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Typewriter
—FOR—
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again. Then its tremendous significance will dawn upon you.
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The typewriter that is equipped
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Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Arthur W.
Nelson, of Chicago, 111., U. S. A., occupation clerk, Intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing
at a post planted about i% miles
north of the S. E. corner of T. L.
40859; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 ehains; thence south
80 chains; thence west 80 chains,
containing 640 acres.
ARTHUR W. NELSON.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 27, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Wesley Singer, of Masset, B. C, occupation farmer, Intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing ai a post planted about 4 miles north of the N. W.
corner of T. L. 40859; thence south
80 chalnB; thence west 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence east
80 chains, containing 640 acres.
WESLEY SINGER.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 27, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District ot
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that A. Walter De
Lisle, of Hasset, B. C, occupation
farmer, Intends to apply for permls-
slonu to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 40 chains south
and 120 chains east of the S. E. corner of Lot 35; thence south 80
chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence east
80 chains, containing 640 acres.
A. WALTER DB LISLE.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 26. 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Fred. A. De
Lisle, of Masset, B. C, occupation
farmer, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 40 chains south
and 120 chains east of the S. E. corner of Lot 35; thence north 80
chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains, containing 640 acres.
FRED.  A.  DE LISLE.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 25, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Frank Nelson,
of Chicago, III., U. S. A., occupation
clerk, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following de
scribed Iands:—Commencing at a
post planted about one mile north of
N. W. corner of Application to Purchase 6953; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence north
80 chains; tlience east SO chains, containing 640 acres.
FRANK NELSON.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 25, 1910.
Skeena
|Land   District—District
Coast—Range V.
of
TAKE NOTICE that William H.
Hargrave, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation banker, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lanas:—Commencing at a post planted on the west
shore of Lakelse Lake, and about
1V« miles distant and in a southwesterly direction from the S. W.
corner of Lot 3982, Skeena Land
District, District of Coast, Range V;
thence west 40 chains; thence south
80 chains, more or less, to the shore
of Lakelse Lake; thence following
the shore of said lake to point of
commencement, containing 160
acres more or less.
WILLIAM H. HARGRAVE.
Mancell Clark, Agent.
Dated  20th March,  1911.
GRAHAM ISLAND — "The surest
sign of the progress of a town or
district Is Its newspaper—live, active, hustling." "The Masset Review," Masset, Q.C.i
We announced this new sales plan
recently, just to feel the pulse of the
people. Simply a small cash payment—then 17 cents a day. That
is the plan In a nutshell.
The result has been such a deluge of applications for machines
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The demand comes from people ot
all classes, all ages, all occupations.
The majority of Inquiries has
come from people of known financial
standing who were attracted by the
novelty of the proposition. An Impressive demonstration of the Immense popularity of the Oliver Typewriter.
A startling confirmation of our belief that the Era of Universal Typewriting is at hand.
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The Oliver Typewriter is a moneymaker, right from the word "go!" So
easy to run that beginners soon get
in the "expert" class. Earn as you
learn. Let the machine pay the 17
cents a day—and all above that la
yours.
Wherever you are, there's work to
be done and money to be made by
using the Oliver. The business world
is calling for Oliver operators. There
are not enough to supply the demand.
Their salaries are considerably above
those of many classes of workers.
"An OUver Typewriter iu
Every Home!"
That is our battle cry today. We
have made the Oliver supreme In
usefulness and absolutely indispensable In business. Now comes the
conquest of the home.
The simplicity and strength of the
Oliver fit It for family use. It Is becoming an important factor in the
home training of young people. An
educator as well as a money maker.
Our new selling plan puts the
Oliver on the threshold of every
home in America. Will you close
the door of your home or office on
this remarkable Oliver opportunity?
Write for further details of our
easy offer and a free copy of the new
Oliver catalogue.    Address:
R. C. BEAN
Prince Rupert Agent
General   Offices:   Oliver  Typewriter
Building, Chicago, 111.
MISS HENNY WENNERS'lr.V
SWEDISH SPECIALIST
Electric, n acial and Scalp treatment;
Scientific Massage treatment for
rheumatism, nervousness and poor
circulation. Manicuring also Chiropody work. yO
Friday, July 28, 1911
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, Intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the southeast corner of CL. 4472; thence west 80
chains; tlience north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence south
80 chains to place of commencement.
AUSTIN M.  BROWN.
Dated July  17,  1911.
Skeena Land  District—District  of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the southeast corner of CL. 4472; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west SO chains; thence south
80 chains to place of commencement.
AUSTIN  M.  BROWN.
Dated July  17,  1911.
Skeena  Land  District—District  of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the northeast corner
of CL. 4471; thence west 80 chains;
thence south SO chains; thence east
80 chains; thence north 80 chains to
I.Iace of commencement.
AUSTIN  AI.  BROWN.
Dated July 17, 1911.
Skeena  Land  District—District  of
Queen Charlotte
"'ARE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin AL Brown, of
Prince rvupert, B. C., by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the northeast corner
of CL. 4471; thence east 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence west
80 chains; thence nortli 80 chains,
to place of commencement.
AUSTIN AI. BROWN.
Dated July  17,  1911.
Skeena Land  District—District  of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin AI. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply td the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for n license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the south corner of
CL. 441 0; thence north 80 chains;
thence west SO chains; tlience south
80 chains; thence east 80 chains, to
place of commencement.
AUSTIN  Al.  BROWN.
Dated July  17,  1911.
Skeena Land  District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin AI. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and undei ''40 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the southeast corner of CL. 4470; thence east 80
chains; thence north SO chains;
tlience west SO chains; thence south
SO chains, to place of commencement.
AUSTIN  M.  BROWN.
Dated July  17,  1911.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M, Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the northeast corner
of C.L. 4469; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 ('.nins; thence east
SO chains; thence north 80 chains,
to  place of commencement.
AUSTIN AI. BROWN.
Dated July  17,  1911.
Skeena Land  District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from tjate, l, Austin AI. Brown, of
Fiince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the south corner of
C.L.4475; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence south.
SO chains; thence west 80 chains to
place of commencement,
AUSTIN AI.  BRO.vN.
Dated July  17,  1911.
Skeena Land  District—District  of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile north of the northeast corner of C.L. 4477; tlience west 80
cliains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 8 0 chains; tlience north
SO chains, to place of commencement.
AUSTIN  AI.  BROWN.
Dated July  17,  1911.
Skeena Land  District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Henry Edenshaw, or
Alasset, B. C, occupation storekeeper, intend to apply to the Chief Commissioner of Lands for a license to
prospect for coal and petroleum on
and under 640 acres of land on Graham Island described as follows:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
west shore of West River, one mile
easterly from the mouth of said river; thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence north 80
chains; thence west 80 ehains to the
place of commencement.
HENRY EDENSHAW.
Dated July 17, 1911.
COAL JUNES ACT
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin AI. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply tc 1' % Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and unifer 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the northeast corner
of C.L. 4474; thence east SO chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence west
80 chains; thence north SO chains, to
place of commencement.
AUSTIN  AI.  BROWN.
Dated July  17, 1911.
Skeena Land  District—District  of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin AI. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows'—Commencing at post planted
at the southeast corner of C.L. 4477;
thence east SO chains; thence north
80 chains; thence west' 80 chains;
thence south 80 cliains, to place of
commencement.
AUSTIN M. BROWN.
Dated July  17,  1911.	
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin AI. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
at the southeast corner ofC.L.4478;
thence north SO chains; uience east
SO chains; >,ience soutli SO chains;
tlience west SO chains, to place of
commencement.
AUSTIN  Al.  BROWN.
Dated July  17,  1911.	
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin AI. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
at the southeast corner of C.L. 4467;
tlience north SO chains; thence east
SO cliains; thence south SO chains;
thence west 80 chains, to place of
commencement.
AUSTIN Al.  BROWN.
Dated July  17,  1911.	
Skeena Land  District—District  of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin Al. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B, C, by occupation
sadler, Intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 aires of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the northeast corner
of C.L. 4469; thence east SO chains;
thence south 80 cliains; thence west
80 chains; tlience north 80 chains to
.place of commencement.
AUSTIN M. BROWN.
Dated July 17, 1911.
Skeena Land  District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the southeast corner
of CL. 447.r>; thence west 80 chains;
tlience north 80 chains; thence east
80 chains; thence south 80 chains,
to place of commencement.
AUSTIN M. BROWN.
Dated July  17,  1911.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin AI. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
at the southeast corner of C.L. 4465;
thence north 80 chains; thence east
SO chains; thence soutli 80 chains;
thence west 80 cliains, to place of
commencement.     ,
AUSTIN  AI.  BROWN.
Dated July 16, 1911.   	
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Henry Edenshaw, of
Alasset, B. C, by occupation storekeeper, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:
—Commencing at a post planted on
the west shore of the West River,
about one mile easterly from the
mouth of said river; thence east SO
chains; thence north 80 chains;
tlience west SO chains; thence south
80 chains, to place of commencement.
HENRY EDENSHAW.
Dated July 17,  1911.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlote Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Wirt A. Stevens, of Chicago, 111., U. S. A., occupation civil engineer, Intends to
apply for permission to purchase
the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on
the shore of Alasset Inlet about one
mile northeast of the mouth of the
Ain River; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 40 chains more or less
to the eastern boundary of T. L.
35413; thence south along the
boundary of T. L. 35413 and
T. L. 35414, a distance of 80 chains;
thence east 40 chains, more or less,
to point of commencement, containing 320  acres more  or less.
WIRT   A.   STEVENS.
G. S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated Feb. 24th, 1911.
Skeena   Land    District—District   of
Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that I, Roy.
Chrisman, of Port Esslngton, B. C
occupation prospector, intend to apply for permission to lease the following described land:-—Commencing at a post planted about five
miles distant and in a southwesterly
direction from the point at the entrance to Captain Cove, Petrel
Channel, and on the northeast side
of McCauley Island; tbence west 20
chains; thence south 40 chains;
thence east about 20 chains to shore
of Petrel Channel; thence northerly
along shore line of Petrel Channel
to point of commencement and containing eighty acres more or less.
ROY CHRISMAN.
Dated April 11, 1911. 4-25
Skeena   Land   District—District   af
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that W. H. Fergu
son, of Prince Rupert, B. C, occupation civil engineer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Com
mencing at a post planted about one
mile southerly, following the sinuosities of the shore line from the
southwest corner of Lot 104, Range
V; thence 20 chains west; thence 20
chains south; tlience 20 chains west,
thence 20 chains south; thence 20
chains west; thence about 40 chains
south; thence along shore northerly
to point of commencement.
W. H. FERGUSON.
G. Hansen, Agent.
Dated April 22nd,  1911. 4-25
Skeena  Land   Dislrict—District  of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Henry Kdeiishaw, of
Alasset, B, C, by occupation storekeeper, Intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for n license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under onl acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:
Commencing at a post planted on the
bank of west River, about one mile
easterly from the mouth of said river; thence west 80 chains; Ihence
south 80 chains; tlience east 80
chains; thence north 80 cliains, to
place of commencement.
HENRY EDENSHAW.
Dated July  17,  1911.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Henry Edenshaw, of
Alasset, B. C, by occupation storekeeper, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum on
and under 640 acres of land on Graham Island described as follows: —
Commencing at a post planted on the
west shore of West River, about one
mile easterly from the mouth of said
river; thence north 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence south 80
chains; thence east 80 chains, to
place of commencement.
HENRY EDENSHAW.
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast
TAKE NOTICE that F. T. Saunders, of Vancouver, occupation master
mariner, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands:— Commencing at a
post planted about 6 miles northwest of Love Inlet on the north
east shore of Pitt Island; thence
soutli 20 chains; thence west 40
chains; thence nortli to shore;
thence following shore In a southeasterly direction to point of commencement , containing 80 acres
more or less.
FRANK TAUNTON SAUNDERS,
Locator.
W. Hamilton, Agent.
Staked 17th, Feb., 1911.
Skeena    Land    District—District    of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, i:. tends to
apply to the Aiinister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Commencing at post planted 6 V*
miles N. E. of the mouth of the
White River and the junction of the
Naas, marked Chas. J. Gillingham's
S. E. Corner; thence 80 chains
North; thence 80 chains West;
thence 80 chains South; thence 80
chains East to point of commencement and containing 640 acres more
or lt*ss
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles AI. Huff, Agent.
Dated March 4, 1911. 4-18
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
C^Q CD \ fl 1*
TAK.J NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B, C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Aiinister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land:—-
Comencing at a pt t planted 7 miles
N. E. of the mouth of the White
River and the junction of the Naas,
marked Chas. J. Gillingham's S. E.
Corner; theuce 80 chains North;
thence 80 chains West; thence 80
chains Soutli; thence 80 chains East
to point of commencement and containing 640 acres more or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles Al. Huff, Agent.
Dated March oth,  1911. 4-18
ihence 80 chains North; thence 80
cliains >.'est; thence SO chains
South; thence SO cliains East to
point of commencement and con-
..■ining 640 acies more or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that George Stanley Alayer, of Alasset, B. C, occupation farmer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following de-
Charles AI.  Huff, Agent. I scribed   lands:—Commencing   at     a
Dated Alarch 4th, 1911.
4-18
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Aiinister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Commencing at a. post planted about
8 milees N. E. of the mouth of White
River and the junction of the Naas
River, marked Chas. J, Gillingham's
S. E. Corner; thence 80 chains
North; thence 80 chains West;
thence 80 chains South; thence 80
chains East to point of commencement and containing 640 acres more
or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles  AI.  Huff,  Agent.
Dated Alarch 6th, 1911. 4-18
of
Skeena
of
Land   District—District
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Aiinister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land:—-
Commencing at a post planted 7 Vi
miles N. E. of the mouth of the
White River and ;he junction of the
Naas and marked Chas. J. Gillingham's S. E. Corner; thence 80
chains North; thence SO chains
West; thence 80 chains South;
thence 80 chains East to point of
commencement and containing 640
acres more or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAAI.
Charles M. Huff, Agent.
Dated March 5th, 1911. 4-18
Skeena   Land   District—District
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Commencing at a post planted about
8 miles N. E. of thi mouth of White
River and the junction of the Naas
River, marked Chas. J. GIHIngbam's
S. E. Corner; thence 80 chains
North; thence 80 cliains West;
thence 80 chains South; thence 80
chains East e.o point of commencement and containing 640 acres mo: j
or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles AI.  Huff,  Agent.
Dated March 6th, 1911. 4-18
Skeena    Land    District—District    of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gilllngham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land:—
Commencing at a post planted 7 xk
miles N. E. of the mouth of the
White River and the junction of the
Naas, marked Chas. J. Gillingham's
S. E. Corner; thence 80 »hains
North; thence 80 chains West;
thence 80 chains South; thence 80
chains East to point cf commencement and containing 640 acres more
or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles Al. Huff, Agent.
Dated March 5th, 1911. 4-18
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for a
license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Commencing at a post planted about
8 miles N. E. of the mouth of the
White River and the junction of the
Naas, marked Chas. J. Gillingham's
S. E. Corner; thence 80 chains
North; thence 80 chains West;
thence 80 chains South; tlience 80
chains East to point of commencement and containing 640 acres more
or less.
CHARLES  J.   GILLINGHAM.
Charles Al. Huff, Agent.
Dated March 6th, 1911. 4-18
post planted on tiie east shore of
Tsu Skundale Lake; thence east 80
chains; thence soutli 40 cliains, more
or less, to the north boundary of
T. L. 35413; thence west and south
along the boundaries of T. L. 35413,
to the shore of the Ain River; thence
northerly along the shore, back to
the place of commencement, containing 500 acres, more or less.
GEORGE STANLEY MAYER.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 28, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Robert Cross,
of Alasset, B. C, occupation farmer.
Intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted on the east shore of Tsu Skundale
Lake; tlience east 80 chains; thence
ncrth SO chains, to or near to the
S. E. corner of Lot 35; thence west
40 chains, more or less; thence
soutli 40 cliains, more or less; thence
west 40 chains more or less, following the southern boundaries of Lot
35; tlience soutli to the shore; thence
southerly along the shore hack to the
place of commencement, containing
500 acres, more or less.
ROBERT  CROSS.
AI. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov.  28, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands,
TAKE NOTICE that Christina Orr,
ot Masset, B. C, occupation married,
Intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described
lands: —Commencing at a post planted about 40 chains south and 3 miles
east of the N. E. corner of Lot 35;
thence south 40 chains; thence west
80 chains; thence north 40 chains;
thence east SO chains, containing 320
acres.
CHRISTINA ORR.
M. A. Merril], Agent.
Dated Nov. 25, 1910.
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
C^ri Q^l HI*
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Commencing at a post planted 6 '/t
miles N. E. of the mouth of the
White River and the junction of the
Naas, and marked Chas. J. Gillingham's S. E. Corner; tlience 80
chains Nortn; thence SO cnains
West; thence 80 chains South;
thence 80 chains East to point of
commencement and containing 640
acres more or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAAI.
Charles AI. Huff, Agent, j
Dated March 4th, 1911. 4-18
Skeena   Land   District—-DlBtrlct   of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE th;.t Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B, C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for a
license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Commencing at a post planted about
8 miles N. E. of the mouth of the
White River and the junction of the
Naas, marked Chas. J. Gillingham's
S. E. Corner; thence 80 chains
North; thence 8.0 chains West;
thence 80 chains South; thence 80
chains East to point of commencement and containing 640 acres more
or less.
CHARLES   J.   GILLINGHAM.
Charles M. Huff, Agent.
Dated  Alarch  6th,  1911. 4-18
Skeent Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Clara Orr, of
Masset, B C., occupation spinster,
intends to apply for permission to
purohase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted about 40 chains south and 80
chains east of the N. E. corner of
Lot 35; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence north
80 chains; thence east 80 chains, containing 640 acres.
CLARA ORR.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 25, 1910.
WATER NOTICE.
Skeena Land District—District ot
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Merton A.
Merrill, of Masset, B. C, occupation
prospector, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted at the S. W. corner of
T. L. 40787; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south
80 chains, more or less, to the shore
of Masset Inlet; thence easterly along
the shore back to the place of commencement, containing 640 acres,
more or less.
MERTON A. AIERRILL.
Dated Nov. 2u, 1910.
Skeena    Land    District—District-   of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Aiinister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Commencing at a post planted about
8 miles N. E. of the mouth of White
River and the junction of the Naas
River, marked Charles J. ullling-
ham's S. E. Corner; thence SO
chains North; thence 80 chains
West; thence 80 chains South;
thence SO chains East to point of
commencement and containing 640
acres more or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAAI.
Charles Al.  Huff,  Agent.
Dated Alarch 5th, 1911. 4-18
-District    of
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen  Charlotte Island.
TAKE  NOTICE  that  Robert  Fraser    Ogilvle, of Vancouver, occupation   banker,   intends   to   apply   for I al(epna   Tjand   District
permission to purchase the folowing i" Cassiar
described lands:—Commencing at a | _.—. MnTIn,, ,L, r,, .,,., .„ T
post planted about 2 miles west of L.TA15? N0"C,B "' ' Cl'"\? A
the southwest corner of A. P. 12-! Gillingham, ol Prince Rupert, B. C.,
037; thence east 80 chains; thence occupation contractor, intends to
north SO chains; thence west 80 apply to the Minister of Lands for
chains; thence south 80 chains to | a license to prospect for Coal and
olnt of commencement, containing Petroleum over 040 acres of land: —
4 0 nc.rftn Commencing at a post  planted  0-;.i
miles  N.  E.  of the mouth  of  While
640 acres.
ROBERT FRASER OGILVIE.
Arthur  Robertson,  Agent.
Dated Dec. 9, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that James G.
Crombie, of Prince Rupert, occupation auditor, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:— Commencing at a
post planted at the northwest corner, 55 chains east and 20 chains
south from northeast corner of Lot
1116 (Horry Survey), Coast DIst.,
range 5; thence 20 chains east;
thence 2 5 chains, more or less,
south to Angus AIcLeod Pre-emption; thence 20 chains west; thence
25 chains, more or less, north, to
post of commencement, containing
50 acres, more or less.
JAAIES  G.   CROMBIE.
Fred  Bohlen, Agent
Dated  June 14,  1911.
River and tha junction of the Naas,
marked Chas. J. Gillingham's S. E. j
Corner; thence 80 chains North; j
thence 80 chains West; thence SO j
chains South; tlience 80 chains East
to point of commencement and con-|
taining 640 acres more or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAAI.
Charles AI. Huff, Agent.
Dated Alarch ith, 1911. 4-18
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Cassiar.
TAKE     NOTICE   that   Charles   .1.
Gilllngham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation    contractor,    intends    to
apply to the  Aiinister of Lands  for
a license to prospect   for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Commencing at a post planted    six
miles N.  E.  of the mouth  of  White
River and  the junction  of the Naas
River  on   Canyon     Creek,     marked
6-23Chas. J. Gillingham's S. E. Corner;
NOTICE is hereby given that an
application will be made under Part
V. of the "Water Act, la09," to obtain a licence in the Queen Charlotte Islands Division of Skeena District.
la) The name, address and occupation of the applicant—Alerton A.
Merrill, Alasset, Q. C. I., B. C,
Prospector.
(If for mining purposes) Free
Miner's  Certificate  No	
(b) The name of the lake,
stream, or source (if unnamed, the
description Is)—I-in-tsua Lake, Tsu-
Skundale Lake and Ain River.
(c) The point of diversion—At T
near the outlet of Tsu-Skundale
Lake Into Ain  River.
(d) The quantity of water applied for (in cubic feet per second)
—1,000.
(e) The character of the proposed works—Power Plant, Dam,
Flumes, etc.
(f) The premises on which the
water is to be used (describe same)
■—At or near the mouth of the Ain
River.
(g) The purposes for which the
water is to be used—Generating
power.
(h) if for irrigation, describe
ihe land intended to be Irrigated,
giving  acreage	
(i) If the water Is to be used for
power or mining purposes, describe
tlie place where the water Is to be
returned to some natural channel,
and the difference in altitude between point of diversion nnd point
of return—At or near the mouth of
the Ain River, about 100 feet below
point of diversion.
(j) Area of Crown land Intended to be occupied by the proposed
works—10 acres more or less.
(k) This notire was posted on
the 28th day of November, 1910,
and application will be made to the
Commissioner on the 1st day of
June,  1911.
(1) Give the names and addresses of any riparian proprietors or
licensees who or whose lands are
likely to be affected by the proposed works, either above or below
the outlet—Don't know  of any.
(Signature)
A1ERTON  A.   AIERRILL,
(P.   O.   Address)   Masset,   B.   C.
NOTE.—One cubic eoot per second is equivalent lo 36,71 miner's
inches.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Carl Nelson,
of Chicago, 111., U. S. A., occupation
draughtsman, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about SO chains east
and 120 chains north of N. E. corner of Lot 35; thence south 80
chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence west
SO chains, containing 640 acres.
CARL NELSON.
Al. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated, Nov. 26, 1910.
Job   Printing  of  all   kinds   neatly
executed at the Journal Office.
Skeena    Land    District—District   of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE .NOTICE that Freadrick
.Madden, of Seattle, Wash., occupation laborer, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described land:—Commencing at a
post planted about two hundred feet
east of mile 77 on the south side of
G. T. P. Right-of-way; thence west
40 chains following the said Right-
of-way; thence soutli to bank of
Skeena River; thence east following
the sinuosities of said river until
due south of said post; thence north
to point of commencement, containing 130 acres more or less.
FREADRICK  .MADDEN.
Thos. L. Fay, Agent.
Dated April.27, 1911.
.",-111
NOTICE.
A hook is kept in the City Clerk's
Office in which lo enter the names
and addresses, etc. of citizens of
Prince Rupert desiring employment
on City work. All desiring employment should register at once.
ERNEST A. WOODS,
City Clerk.
Prince Rupert   Private   Detective
 Agency ——	
X. McDonald, Manager
All kinds of legitimate detective work
handled for companies and Individuals.    Business strictly confidential.
P. O. llox 803 — Phone 210
If you want the honey
That   comes   from   the   111ve
Take' up the phone and
Call one   double five.
■ ■"■'■.^■■■."■., ..
-       .-.    '  -,- PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Friday, July  28,  1911
prince iSupert journal
Telephone   138
Published twice a week on Tuesdays and Fridays from the office of
publication, Third Avenue, near
Mi Bride Street.
Subscription rate to any point in
Canada, $2.00 a year; to points outside of Canada, $3.00 a year.
Advertising rates furnished on
application.
0. H. NELSON,
Editor.
Friday, July 28,  1911
KEDISTRIBUTION
Our Ottawa correspondent expects
thai the government will close the
presenl session about the tenth of
August by dissolving parliament, says
the News-Advertiser. This would be
ex cted ui bring the elections on in
September, whereas it was shown the
other day by the chief government
organ that the election lists could
not be prepared until some time late
In October. The time between dissolution and polling could, of course,
be made longer than usual, or it
would be possible to prorogue parliament early in August and dissolve
in October.
Mime difficulty might be found in
the matter of supply. The money
voted before adjournment will be expended in August and the Opposition is not likely to allow the September and November supply to be
voted without discussion. Yet, if the
election should take place late in October, it would hardly be possible for
the new parliament to vote more supply before December.
But the objection which ought to
be fatal in an election In September
and, perhaps, any time this year, in
view of the slow progress of census
taking, is the fact that the Dominion
will not be fairly, honestly, or constitutionally represented by a parliament elected before redistribution.
The western provinces are a'l entitled
to nearly double their present membership in the House of Commons.
This Is census year and the representatives for the next ten years
ought to be based on the census returns. But the legal life of a parliament is five years, so that for half
the decade the people may be cheated out of their rights. Obviously
the redistribution act based on the
census returns ought to he passed be
fore the house is dissolved. Even
if that were done the length of this
parliament would not be more than
three years and two or three months
say, two-thirds the constitutional
period.
The only reason which can be
given for departing from the usual
and constitutional course is that the
reciprocity bill may be passed as soon
as possible. Now there would be no
objection to a direct appeal to the
people on this issue. On the contrary, it is highly desirable that the
people should pronounce upon It as
soon as possible. If the government
will accept the Conservative proposition and submit the question to a
direct "yes" or "no" vote of all the
electors the sooner the appeal Is made
the better. - pponents of this measure will welcome this test and cheerfully accept the verdict. In such a
vote every province will have exactly
the influence to which it is entitled
by its present population.
But according to the report the
government does not propose to do
this. It proposes to appeal to obsolete constituencies to elect a new and
unrepresentative parliament. It will
neither allow the pople to vote directly on the question itself, or wait
until an appeal may be honestly
made in a parliamentary contest to
the people now in the country. Does
any one see such urgent necessity
for reciprocity as to make it necessary to cheat the growing provinces
out of their representation in the
next parliament rather than delay
ratification a few months?
Canada has made several treaties
with the United States. Congress lias
not hurried with the ratification of
these  which  were endorsed.     It  has
held them up for a year or two, or
rejected them altogether, or ratified
them early, as suited the convenience
the legislators. In Canada this
time it is not a question of convenience. It is a question of justice and
constitutional right. If the people
want reciprocity they can say so now
by a referendum or within six months
under a fair parliamentary election.
The government has its choice of
these two honest methods, and
hould take one of them.
CUTTING THE THOS
.1.   .1.   Hill   Rejoices   in   Reciprocity
Agreement Because of Its Effect
in Cutting Off British Trude
avenue between centre line of 4th
street and 8th street, and to assess
the final cost thereof upon the property fronting or abutting thereon, or
to be benefitted thereby, and that a
Statement and diagram showing the
lots to be so especially assessed for
the said improvement or work is now
tiled in the office of the City Clerk
and is open for inspection during
office hours.
The  estimated   cost   of   the  work
Is $5,090.96.
Dated at  Prince Rupert this 28th
day of July, 1911.
ERNEST A. WOODS,
City  Clerk.
Wm. Maklon Davis, City Engineer.
8-1
James J. Hill, chairman of the
board of directors of the Great
Northern Railway Company, following the passage of the reciprocity
igreement between the United States
and Canada by the United States senate, declared in effect that the United Slates would profit more by what
It had "prevented than by what it
had gained." ,
In the passage of the measure the
venerable railway builder saw the
last vestige of what he is pleased to
term an "imperial trade federation"
disappear before the march of an
open  and  untrammelled market.
"lit is not what we have gained by
the agreement—that is most important—but what we have prevented,"
said Air. Hill. "In the comment on
the treaty, when it was pending,
nearly every argument for it spoke
of the good it would bring, and it
will bring good.
"But the good that it will bring
is only the smaller consideration of
the question. What would have
happened if we had not passed the
treaty? There would have been a
revival of a move for imperial federation, and if we had refused to
trade with our good neighbors we
should have been very sorry for it
for the opportunity was before us to
make a favorable agreement with
Canada, and it would not have been
before us again for many years.
"That is why I say that while the
treaty will mean much good for both
the United States and Canada, I be- [
lieve that it will stimulate trade on'
both sides, and that it will not be
long before everyone will see that
the wise thing to do was to act favorably upon it—the important point
Is, what was prevented.
"There is not the slightest doubt
that the situation was such that had
the vote in the senate been against
it the report would have gone over
the world and would have stimulated
activities elsewhere for obtaining
trade that we are in the best geographical position to handle, and In
England it would have meant the
beginning of action for such imperial
trade federation as would have shut
us out."
 o	
A resident in a small suburban
town had a visit from a German
friend who knew very ittle English
but played the violin well. One of
this resident's neighbor's gave a musical evening, and of course he and
his visitor were Invited. The German took his violin and when his
turn came he played one of his best
pieces, from one of the great masters.
When he had finished there was
an awkward silence and no applause.
The people were still looking expectantly at the German, who looked
disappointed and flustered. The silence grew  painful.
Finally the hostess quite red in
the face, edged over to the side of
the German's friend.
"Can't you get him to?" she whispered.
"What do you mean?"
"Why, now that he's got tuned up,
Isn't he going to play something?"
CITY  OF  PRINCE  RUPERT
Parties requiring dumping grounds
for excavated material are requested
i-e forward application to the City
Engineer,  before August  1, stating:
1st. The location of lot to be
graded.
2nd. Estimated quantity of rock
excavation.
3rd. Estimated quantity of earth
excavation.
4th. Date at which it is proposed
to erect building on excavated lot.
Applicants who have buildings already erected and those contemplating building in the immediate future
will receive preference.
WAI. MAHLON DAVIS,
City  Engineer.
E. A. Woods, City Clerk. 7-28
LOCAL IMPROVEMENT NOTICE
TAKE NOTICE that the Aluniclpal
Corporation of the City of Prince
Rupert intends to make the following
local improvements:
A seventeen' foot plank sidewalk
on the nortli side of 2nd avenue between McBride street and the centre line of 4th street, and to assess
the final cost thereof upon the property fronting or abutting thereon, or
to be benefitted thereby, and that a
statement and diagram showing the
lots to be so especially assessed for
the said improvement or work is now
filed in the office of the City Clerk
and is open for inspection during
office hours.
The estimated cost of the work is
$2,729.02.
Dated at Prince Rupert this 28th
day of July, 1911.
ERNEST A.  WOODS,
City Clerk.
Wm. Alalhon Davis, City Engineer.
8-1
LOCAL IMPROVEMENT NOTICE
LOCAL  IMPROVEMENT XOTIC1
TAKE NOTICE thai the Municipal
Corporation of the city of Prince Ru-
perl Intends to make the following
local Improvements:
A seventeen fool plank sidewalk
mi the nortli and south sides of 2nd
TAKE NOTICE that the Municipal
Corporation of the City of Prince
Rupert intends to make the following local Improvements:
A twelve foot plank sidewalk on
the north and south sides of 3rd
avenue between the centre line of 4th
street and 8th street, and to assess
the final cost thereof upon the property fronting or abutting thereon or
to be benefitted thereby, and that a
statement and diagram showing the
lots to be so specially assessed for
the said improvement or work is novy
filed in the office of the City Clerk
and is open for inspection during
office hours.
The estimated cost of the work is
$3,677.39.
Dated at Prince Rupert this 28th
day of July, 1911.
ERNEST A. WOODS,
City Clerk.
Wm. Alalhon Davis, City Engineer.
8-1
LOCAL IMPROVEMENT NOTICE
TAKE NOTICE that the Municipal
Corporation of the City of Prince
Rupert intends to make the following local improvements:
A twelve foot plank sidewalk on
the north and south sides of 3rd
avenue between AlcBride street and
centre line of 4 th street, and to
assess the final cost thereof upon
the property fronting or abutting
there on, or to benefitted thereby,
and that a statement and diagram
showing the lots to be so especially
assessed for the said improvement
or  work  is now  filed  in  the office
* * * * * * *.;. *.;. * *.;..;..;..;..;..;. * * * * * ***
t *
* i
* *
I Remember I
* £
I That we
j Import
j Our Wines I
direct from Europe; and that
no house in Prince Rupert can
equal them for quality. No
better can be bought anywhere
in the Province. We make a
specialty  of
Family Trade
and guarantee satisfaction
We  also   carry  a   complete  *
tie
stock of other *
Liquors       !
Try a glass of
Cascade
Beer
The best local  beer on  the
*   market.
CLARKE BROS.
Christiansen & Brandt Bid.
•••   Telephone 39       Third Avenue  *
* *
* *
* t
* *
**************************
of the City Clerk and Is open for inspection during office hours.
The estimated cost of the work is
$3,692.93.
Dated at Prince Rupert this 28th
day of July, 1911.
ERNEST A.  WOODS,
City Clerk.
Win. Alalhon Davis, City Engineer.
8-1
LOCAL IMPROVEMENT NOTICE
TAKE NOTICE that the Municipal Corporation of the City of Prince
Rupert intends to make the following
local improvements:
A seventeen foot plank sidewalk
on the soutli side of 2nd avenue
between AlcBride street and centre
line of 4th street, and to assess the
final cost thereof upon the property
fronting or abutting thereon, or to
be benefitted thereby, and that a
statement and diagram showing the
lots to be so especially assessed for
the said Improvement or work Is
now filed in the office of the City
Clerk and Is open for inspection during office hours.
The estimated cost of the work
Is  $2,734.23.
Dated at Prince Rupert this 28 day
of July, 1911.
ERNEST  A.   WOODS.
City Clerk.
Wm. Alalhon Davis, City Engineer.
8-1
Skeena   Land    District—District    of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE   NOTICE   that   Edward   H.
Port, of Prince Rupert, B. C, occu-
The British Columbia Company
LIMITED.
AUTHORIZED CAPITAL $100,000.::  PAID UP CAPITAL $41,500
DIRECTORS:—Reginald C. Brown, President; J. C. Maclure, Vice-
President; H. E. Marks, Managin g Director; Capt. E. Nash, William
McNair, R. A. Bevan, and F. C.   Williams, Secretary.      :-:       :-:
INTEREST 4 PER CENT. DEPOSITS
This Company acts as Executors, Administrators, Transferees and
Secretaries to Public Companies.   Commercial, Industrial and other
business propositions underwritten.    Issues made on  the
London and New York Stock Exchanges.
TIMBER, COAL, LANDS, and
COMPANY ORGANIZATION
Head Office for Canada, 203, 208, 210, 215 Carter-Cotton Building,
VANCOUVER, B.C.
DURESCO
The King of Water Paints
FIRST IN THE FIELD FOREMOST EVER SINCE
SOLE AGENTS IN  WESTERN CANADA! " *
The Staneland Co. Ltd
836-840 Fort Street, VICTORIA, B.C.
1 ■                      il
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Replenish
the
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Pantry
High-Class....
Grocery
Stock
to choose from
EVERYTHING CLEAN AND FRESH
Goods for the Table to Suit the Most
Fastidious  Housewife
1 MERRYFIELD'S |
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CASH GROCERY
I
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pation farmer, Intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following described lands:— Commencing
at a post planted In the South West
Corner, on the shore line of Lake
Lakelse; thence 20 chains East, to
South West Corner of Lot SS4;
tlience 30 chains North, following
along the West line of Lot 684 to
post; thence South, following along
the shore line of said Lake to point
of commencement, containing about
40 acres.
EDWARD H.  PORT,
By C. N. Pring, Agent.
Dated June 26, 1911. 6-26
6-26
The Thompson
Hardware Co.
—Second Avenue—
11   Paints. General Hardware,
''     Oils, Stoves and Ranges.
2nd Avenue
Prince Rupert,
B.C.
Real
Estate
INVESTMENTS
Real
Estate
List Your
Properties
with
Uncle Jerry
JEREMIAH H. KUGLER
He Sells Buildings He Sells Contracts
He has Houses to Rent
He Buys Lots He Builds Homes
He Buys Leases He Loans Money
He Has Farms for Sale
He Sells Houses He Rents Stores
JEREMIAH H. KUGLER
Special Bargains in
KITSELAS LANDS
FRANCOIS LAKE LANDS
LAKELSE LANDS
HAZELTON  DISTRICT   LANDS
SAND,   GRAVEL   AND   MARBLE   DEPOSITS
BULKLEY  VALLEY LANDS
KISPIOX VALLEY LANDS
PORCHER  ISLAND  LANDS
KITSUMKALUM   LANDS •»
/• *
ennaanwHiM
—^
Friday,  July  28,  1911
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
PROSPECTS BRIGHT
Review  of  the Political Situation
Throughout the Dominion
of Canada.
Conservative   Party   Is  in   Excellent
Form for tlie Coming Contest
of Ballots
After every general election the
political doctors of the defeated
party hold a post mortem to decide
what caused the disaster. They invariably return the same verdict of
"lack of organization." One Is
tempted to wonder why these wiseacres do not now aud then hold a
consultation before death; if there
Is anything wrong with the party
why not make a diagnosis when
there Is time to apply a remedy, says
an exchange.
Doth the Conservative party suffer from lack of organization?
We are apt to assume that the
Liberals are organized alright. It
Is the natural trait of human nature
to overrate the enemy. It is not a
bad trait; it is certainly preferable
to underrating the enemy. We
assume that the government has
enough prestige, influence and money to perfect an organization
throughout the county. Some people get Into the way of supposing
that a government can never be defeated. But governments are overthrown in spite of their Influence,
money and organization.j In 1905
the Ross government of Ontario had
an elaborate machine. It benefitted
from the policy of Sir Oliver Mowat
which centralized all power at Toronto. Y'et this orgaiiizat'on proved
absolutely useless against tlie public
opinion which swept the Ross government from power and inaugurated the Whitney government with a
magnificent majority. In 1908 the
government of Sir James Whitney
was confirmed in power, not by organization, but by the force of public opinion which nianfested itself
irrespective of party in giving Ontario its premier an increased majority. As a matter of fact Conservatives in the rank and file complained
that the Whitney government was
not interesting itself In carrying that
election. The people, however, were
so thoroughly attached to Sir James
and his policies that they took care
of the results without much aid from
the Liberals. No organizations, by
the Liberals, however perfect, could
have kept Ross In power in 1905 or
could have defeated Whitney in
1906.
But if the Conservatives backed by
a tremendous public opinion were
able to overthrow the Ross government in 1905 and to sustain the
Whitney government In 1908 it by
no means follows that organization
is not an important factor in deciding any election. The anti-reciprocity sentiment may count for a good
deal In the coming federal contest
and it may be so strong in some localities as not to require the aid of
political organization; but it Is none
the less true that "elections are not
made by prayers" and that they are
largely made by organization.
This word "organization" is loosely used. Many people complain of
the lack of organization without being at all able to point out how
things could have been better done.
It is clear at the outset that every
national party entering a national
campaign should have some national
organization. The party In control
of the government has this almost
automatically. The sixteen ministers
of the crown reside at Ottawa all
the year with large salaries, with all
their clerical help paid by the government and with every opportunity
to make a platform for the party and
to look after its candidates in various parts of the country. The Opposition lias no such advantage. The
leader of the Opposition and the
chief whip are always in Ottawa and
in close touch with one another and
with Opposition members of parliament. They must as things are at
present constitute themselves a national executive committee. It might
be better indeed if good men from
every province could stay here to
assist them at least during the national campaign, if they could do
so so much might be accomplished
in the way of agreeing upon party
policies and party platforms and in
allocating the speakers during a
campaign to the various ridings
throughout the country. The work
is being well done at present so far
as the Conservatives are concerned
by Mr. Borden, Mr. Perley and their
assistants at the Capital. Tons of
literature are being sent out and
the party has been happily united
upon an issue which will appeal to
every section of the country and will
avoid these troublesome bickerings
of racial creed which has disturbed
hot of the great political parties in
the past.
Perhaps an ideal condition of affairs would suggest the existence of
an efficient executive committee at
every provincial capita'. To some extent both parties nave come to rely
upon the possession of the provincial
government as a means of organization in each province. Thus it is
likely, taking the count by province,
that the Conservatives will be better
organized in New Brunswick, Ontario, Manitoba and British Columbia than elsewhere. Yet there are
many who believe that an efficient
committee having direction of each
province should De maintained during the can paign at each provlncla,
capital. Some one man of necessity
will have to take the laboring oar
If but such a man could be found.
At present organization in its usual meaning Is confined to the Individual riding and Is entrusted to the
candidate for parliament. He is naturally the man most Interested in
carrying the riding and at present
we have settled down pretty well to
the notion that each locality should
choose a local man lo represent It.
It must often happen, however, that
the gentleman nominated for parliament is not an experienced politician.
Yet upon him will devolve an enormous amount of labor. It is up to
him to see that every likely voter in
his favor is put upon the election
list. It is up io him to employ
scrutineers and to make as best he
can an organization throughout his
riding. This condition of affairs is
perhaps unavoidable. Some men are
born organizers and others are not.
Each candidate knows his own people better than any body outside that
riding can know them. Yet at the
same time lie might be assisted by a
suggestion from men from outside
who know in a general way the game
of politics and how it should be
played. In Ontario at the last election the Conservatives gained ten
seats when at the same time they
managed to lose ten seats which
they already had and thus merely
broke even.
The reports rrom the west seem
to Conservatives in the east to be
most encouraging. Even the Grits
are compelled to admit that Mr. Borden has shown great wisdom as well
as great courage by refusing to
budge an inch from his stand on
the reciprocity issue. President
Taft continues to unwillingly assist
the Conservatives by his speeches in
the United States. This is not unnatural nor does it reflect upon the
sagacity of the president. In commending the fact to his own people
he must necessarily seek to prove
that the bargain would be a good
one for the United States. He holds
no brief for Canada and necessarily
ignores her desires and ambitions altogether. He argues to his fellow
citizens that they will get the best of
it from this Knox-Fielding agreement. If the United States Is going
to get the best of It, it seems probable that Canada Is going to get the
worst of it. No doubt the opponents of reciprocity in the United
States are quoting the speeches of
Grit orators in Canada. This is all
legitimate enough and it Is up to
the Canadian voter to decide what
he thinks is the best for Canada.
So far as can be gathered from al!
reports it is not likely that the Liberals will make any gains as they
anticipated In the border counties of
Ontario and Quebec. Frontenac
county, for example, was one district
in Ontario which the government
hoped would go strong for reciprocity. Yet no one now disputes but
that Dr. J. W. Edwards, Conservative member for Frontenac, will be
re-elected. Dr. Edwards could have
been returned to the house by ac-
clamation if he had supported reciprocity; the fact that he Is opposing
reciprocity in spite of this tenipation
appeals to the judgment and con-
silence of his constituents. A prominent Liberal from Kingston who
was In Ottawa recently ventured the
assertion that Frontenac county favored  reciprocity.
"But will Dr. Edwards be defeated?" he was asked.
"No, of course not. Edwards will
carry his county because the Conservatives of that county have
enough confidence in him and In Mr.
R. L. Borden to believe that they are
doing what they believe to be right."
The return of the Murray government of Nova Scotia was not unexpected. The provincial government
in Nova Scotia combines the power
and patronage of the provincial government in Ontario plus almost complete control of municipal affairs.
Moreover, the principal revenue of
Nova Scotia is derived from leasing
the minerals which are vested In the
crown. All the great coal companies
are dependent upon the government
and are dragooned into supporting
it. Tlie Opposition, however, made
a gallant fight and defeated no less
than three ministers of the crown.
In   Halifax   there   were   unfortunate
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complications caused by the candidature of a labor man, who got many
Conservative votes and badly split
the Opposition. A. B. Crosby, Mr.
Borden's colleague from Halifax, is
authority for a statement that the
Conservatives will contest every riding in Nova Scotia next time and
with hopes of success. At that last
election many rock-ribbed Liberal
constituencies Bell away from the
government and the Opposition in
strongholds like Yarmouth, Digby
and Antigonish. It is significant that
Mr. Murray, who opened his campaign on reciprocity, was compelled
to formally withdraw that issue from
the consideration of the electorate.
The big steel and coal companies
notified him that they would have
to oppose his government if it held
up that issue, and the premier reluctantly issued a statement saying
that reciprocity is not an issue in
this campaign. Though he did this
at the time reluctantly, he afterwards
was glad of it. Many constituencies
were saved to the Murray government by the assurance that their
support of that government could
not be construed under the circumstance into any endorsement of reciprocity.
Dr. J. G. Rutherford, the efficient
veterinary general and live stock
commissioner for the Dominion, is
shaking the dust of the Laurier government from off his feet. The doctor believes that the government is
going up against a formidable opposition by advancing reciprocity. It is
also an open secret that his wood
word for pure, clean meat has been
sadly hampered by interference of
politicians. He Intends to settle in
the west and there is reason to be
lieve that he will soon become a fac
tor in the politics of Alberta. The
combination between Cross and Rutherford would give Premier Sifton no
little trouble. It would also make
Hon. F. Oliver lose a good deal of
sleep. The Alberta Conservatives
no doubt view with a good deal of
philosophy a good deal of philosophy
any clash between these two wings
of the Alberta Liberals. The men
behind this government have yet to
learn who serves his country best.
The needs of the country cut little
Ice with these gentlemen when the
temporary needs or the party are In
question.
 o	
;.<*.if*****.:••:«•>•;.>>•;.<. •!.»:..>?******i.**
| RAILROADS FO* PAWJri.18 |
* *... •;.»;* .;* *;• »;• »;•* * »i» »;•»;. .;* •;• •;*»;. **** * * * *
In the near future Americans visiting Europe will be able to journey
from any part of its principal centres,
such as Paris, Berlin or Vienna, to
Jerusalem, and to the principal cities
and ruins of Arabia and Persia by
means of the Iron road. Jerusalem,
the most sacred city in the world,
as well as the Holy City of Mecca,
will shortly be in direct railroad
communication with Europe, Then,
when the Bagdad project has progressed another stage or two, railroad journeys to the Euphrates valley, the alleged site of th Garden
of Eden, and where stood ancient
Nineveh, will be included in the
tourists' Eastern Itinerary.
The linking up of these ancient
Biblical places with Europe will be
accomplished by American dollars
and American brains. Indeed, what
the Americans are doing in Turkey
and also in the Asiatic dominions of
the Sultan in the way of roalroad
and transportation facilities is almost
incredible. When the Turkish parliament met In November last there
were submitted to it plans for the
construction of no fewer than 1,500
miles of railroad with mineral ami
Oil   rights   In   Asiatic   Turkey.     The
THE CONTINENTAL TRUST COMPANY, LIMITED
Authorized Capital     $500,000
Officers:
WILLIAM T. KERGIN, M. D„ Pres. DAVID   H.   HAYS,  First Vice-Pres.
M. J. HOBIN, 2nd Vice-Pres. & Mgr. JAY   KUGLER,   Secretary-Treasurer
C.  B.  PETERSON, Ass't Manager
Executor and Administrator Receiver or Assignee
Fiscal Agents Trustees
Real Estate and Insurance
Registrar and Transfer Agent Farm Lands a,,d M1,,es
Agent for Care of Real Estate Escrow Agents
Trustee Under Mortgages  and  Deeds of Trust Collections
SAVINGS DEPARTMENT
4 per cent on Deposits        SAFE DEPOSIT VAULT AND BOXES
We will be pleased to answer any inquiries regarding investments in
Prince Rupert and Northern British Columbia.
THE CONTINENTAL TRUST COMPANY, LIMITED
SECOND AVENUE
PRINCE  RUPERT,   B.  O.
various schemes were provisionally
accepted and have been referred to
a parliamentary committee for final
adjustment.
All this is the work of a powerful
American syndicate, at the head of
which is Dr. Chester. At first Germany entered a protest on the
ground that the proposal Involved
mining rights. But the Turkish authorities pointed out that the Americans asked for no kilometer guaran-
te and were entitled to them. The
trouble with the German railroad
builder in Turkey has been his demand for so much per mile guarantee by the government. The American, on the other hand, recognizing
hat there was nothing better than
a railroad, is willing to sink capital
into the enterprise and recoup himself on the result.
The government has determined to
carry the lines of the Hedjaz Railroad with all speed across the 285
miles of desert between Medina and
Mecca. Starting from Damascus, this
line runs almost due south through
wild and sterile country for more
than S20 miles to Medina, the burial
place of the Prophet Mohammed. It
is principally used for carrying Mohammedan pilgrims. At many of its
most important stations one can now
send telegrams In allmost any European language to all parts of the
world. Until quite recently they had
to be written in either Turkish or
Arabic. Tourists visiting Palestine
now ake use of this line for reach
Ing the rock-hewn city of Petra, on
the edge of the great Arabian desert.
It means a saving of at least twelve
days in the journey from Jerusalem.
This is, of course, by no means
the only railroad in Palestine. The
first to be opened was that which
connects the seaport of Jaffa with
Jersualem, built by the French, and
which will finally revert to Turkey.
The locomotives were constructed by
the French for work at Panama. The
distance between Jaffa and Jerusalem is 55 miles, and the journey occupies three hours and forty minutes.
The journey is a particularly interesting one, as the line passes through
the scenes of many Old Testament
events.
For many years this interesting
line could claim the distinction of
heing the only railroad in the Holy
Land. Now there are three others,
comprising those from Beirut to Damascus, from Haifa round the Sea
of Galilee to Damascus and tbe Hedjaz enterprise already referred to.
Beirut, on the Mediterranean, Is by
rail 91 miles from Damascus. Tin
journey takes nine and a half hours.
The railroad Is a narrow gauge, and
for climbing the mountain portion
I about twenty miles) a cogwheel and
rack system Is employed. Crossing
as It does the Lebanon, Ihe line
passes through some really beautiful
scenery.
A later railroad is that which runs
from Haifa, on the coast, to Hamas-
I'lis, around the Sea of Galilee. Skirting along the foot of Mount Carmel,
sai'red to the Prophet Elijah, the
railroad runs to Afuler, close to Nazareth. This Is the first stopping
place of any importance, Nazareth
today Is a flourishing town of 10,000
inhabitants, the majority of whom
are native Christians. It was originally intended to carry the track
around the western shores of the
lake. If this had been done Tiberias,
Magdala and Capernaum would have
been connected with the Mediterranean by rail. The engineers, however,
finally decided to run the iron road
around the southern extremity of the:
lake. The track passes through Setn-
akh, at the southern extremity of
the Sea of Galilee, from which boats
carry passengers across to Tiberias.
From   Seniakh  the  line  proceeds  up
VT8SBSM
Double Weekly Service
S.S. PRINCE RUPERT & S.S. PRINCE GEORGE
Sail for Vancouver, Victoria and Seattle
Mondays and Fridays at 8 a.m.
For STEWART Thursdays and Sundays S a.m.
Special reduced fare Sunday's boat J9.S0
return,   Including   meals   and   berths.
S.S.PRINCE ALBERT for Port Simpson, Naas River, Masset and
Naden Harbor, Wednesdays, 1 P.M., and for Queen Charlotte
Island points, Saturdays, 1 P.M.
RAILWAY SERVICE TO COPPER RIVER, mixed trains from
Prince Rupert Wednesdays and Saturdays, 1 P.M.; returning  Thursdays   and   Sundays,  5:20 P.M.
THE GRAND TRUNK RAILWAY SYSTEM, connecting with
trains from the Pacific Coast, operates a frequent and convenient
service of luxurious trains over its DOUBLE TRACK route between
Chicago, Toronto, Montreal, Quebec, Halifax, Portland, Boston.
New York nnd Philadelphia:
Atlantic Steamship bookings arranged via all lines
Full information and tickets obtained from the office of
A. E. McMASTER
Freight and Pasenger Agent, G. T. P. Wharf.
STORAGE!
Household Goods and Baggage •:•
given careful attention. *
',   Forwarding,   Distributing   and *
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the wild gorge of the Yarmuck, and
thence to Daraa, where it joins the
main line from Damascus.
Of the lines yet to be built in
Asiatic Turkey, one will extend from
Samson, on the Black Sea, in a southeasterly direction to a point near
the Persian border. This district
is expected to become a great oil
producing country and only capital is
needed to develop it. Another will
start from some point on the Mediterranean, not yet determined, and
stretch in a northeasterly direction
to Lake Van, crossing the other
line. Both these enterprises have
been proposed by Americans and
and they have met with the approval
of the Turkish government.
Few realize what this means in
the way of connecting the Asiatic
domiions of the Sultan and the kingdom of the Shah with Europe by
direct railroad communications. Another 180 miles and the Bagdad line
will reach Klllis, already joined up
with the Hedjaz enterprise. If the
Bosphorus has by that time been
spanned by a bridge, which has
already been suggested by the authorities in Constantinople, the Turkish capital will be in railroad communication with Damascus, Medina
and also with the rest of Europe.
It is also proposed to run a branch
line from Jerusalem to Zizah, thus
joining the Holy City with the Hedjaz route. This project has been
put forward by an American syndi-
cate, which also proposed to run the
track to ihe Dead Sea. It would be j
possible then to travel from Paris,
Vienna or any of the other centres
of Europe to Jerusalem by rail.
The moment the Bagdad line
passes Killls It crosses and recdosses
the rivers Euphrates and Tigris, be-1
lieved by many Biblical scholars to I
mark tee site of the Garden of Eden.
Today this vast territory is nothing
more than arid waste Infested bj
swamps. Traces of ancient irrigation cana's, however, may be detected, und it is somewhat interesting
to learn that an English engineering
firm has obtained a contract from
ilie> Turkish government to build a
dam hero, so that In the near future
the Garden of Eden may bloom
again.
Excursions!
Let us tell you all about the cheap
ROUND TRIP EXCURSIONS
to all Towns and Cities in Eastern
Canada and United  States
Via
The Great Northern
Choice of Return Route
Tickets to the Old Country by all
Lines. Take any Steamer from
Prince Rupert.
ROGERS STEAMSHIP AGENCY
Phone 116 Second Are
Prince Rupert, B.C.
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY CO.
B. C. Coast S. S. Service
m
Famous
Princess
Line
^^
Princess Royal
Saturday, July 29, 8 a. m.
SOUTHBOUND FOR
Vancouver, Victoria,
AND
Seattle
J. G. McNAB,
General Agent.
Free Employment
Office
For all kinds of help. Cooks, waiters, dishwashers, hotel porters, all
kinds of laborers or inochanlcs, call
up 178 or call at the
FREE EMPLOYMENT OFFICE
GRAND HOTEL
Headquarters for Cooks jumI Walton
ROGERS & BLACK
Wholesale Dealers In
BUILDING   MATERIAL,     CEMENT,
LIME,  HAIR-FIBRE PLASTER
COKE, BLACKSMITH COAL,
COMMON BRICK, PRESSED BRICK
SHINGLES AND LATH
NEW   WELLINGTON-   COAL
All   orders  promptly   filled—see   us
for prices.
PHONE IIII PHONE 1J6
For Neat Job Printing
nee the Journal Man
Tel. 138
II. Breckinridge has returned from
;e trip to Vancouver,
 o—
,1. Lavrock eif Vancouver, with a
party of surveyors, went over to Stephens island yesterday,
I \
J iMMBeMMM "^
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Friday, Ju'y  28,  1911
CAVE DWELLERS
•t i
It has been said that one-half of
the world does not know how the
other half lives.
This is absolutely and literally
true, so far as Montrealers, at least,
are concerned, for few of those living amid surroundings regarded as
more or less comfortablau d desirable, have any idea whatever of the
lives led by the thousands of low-
caste foreigners, who in recent years
have been swarming into the Dominion, and many of whom have remained in this city.
The average man and woman appreciates the fact that there are
many immigrants of this type working in Montreal, but has no more
knowledge how they are living here
than of the life these people led on
their native soil in Europe. It is
Impossible to estimate how many of
these foreigners are living in Montreal at the present time. The forthcoming census may establish the figure; but this is doubtful in view of
the fact that it is extremely difficult
for one not acquainted with their
mode of living to even locate many
of the people of this type in their
secluded and in many cases, underground homes.
Towards the mode of living indulged in my the thousands of Russians, Poles, Roumanians, and a
large percentage of Greeks and Italians, there has existed an apathy on
the part of the rest of the community which some day may cost dear,
for many of these rovels and burrows in which these foreigners are
housed are a menace to the entire
city from the standpoint of the public health.
During the past few days many
of these people were driven from
their sordid and underground surroundings hy the intense heat as a
badger is smoked from his hile.
Many of these places, situated in the
very heart of the city itself, are veritable holes, into which a ray of
light hardly ever penetrates, and
where sleep in spaces, ranging from
six to eight feet square approximately, more human beings to the square
feet than would be the case with
cattle in a railway car.
An entrance to these cellars or
caves, as they might be termed, is
usually effected by the initiated
through a lane or alleyway leading
from the street. Once this far, it
is then necessary to climb through,
perhaps, a broken fence and down
what is nothing more than a cavity
in the surface of the earth behind
some dilapidated building or other
on a side street.
Montrealers read last winter of
one of these foreigners, David Glass-
man, building for himself a cave in
the rubbish heap of the civic dumping ground near Victoria bridge, and
were appalled to think that the city
harbord such a man whose instincts
led him to such a mode of living.
But Classman's house on the side
of the dump heap was infinitely to
he desired by many of those existing in the heart of .Montreal. It had
tbe advantage of receiving a generous quantity of air, even though this
was slightly contaminated by the surrounding garbage; and Glassman
lead the run of his four by six hovel
to himself.
In each of the city caves or hovels
beneath the sordid houses of the
slums live dozens of foreign laborers, men, women and children of all
ages, but one type—the lowest. Into
them but little light and practically
no fiesh air ever enters; the heavy
atmosphere of ihe places is almost
nauseating to tlie accustomed nostril and the filth and squalor appalling. Classman's dump-pile home
was a palace to such  caverns.
It Is almost Impossible for one not
acquainted with the surroundings In
which these wretched people live to
learn anything of such places. There
Is, however, one man in the city
who knows the depth of sordidness
to which they have sunk ami who
is familiar with the approaches to
their hoyels,
Thai man is the Rev. Dr, W. Bowman Tinker, who lias established
himself among them and who has
worked In the capacity of missionary
In their midst for several years.
Aboul a year ago, Dr, Tucker succeeded In establishing a mission at
294 Cadieux street, and has been the
means of lifting the standard of the
people in whom he has interested
himself. The mission Is conducted
ei'i undenominational lines and daily
meetings are held throughout the entire year at the home and In the
various sections of the foreign quarter.
The first place visited was a quadrangle which simply seethed with humanity, great and small. It seemed
a veritable beehive of children, who,
as the visitors entered, came buzzing out of so many openings that
they seemed to appear aa If by Impish   magic.       In   conversation   with
some of the men, who spoke but
broken English, it was learned that
about eighteen families were housed
in the small enclosure, most of whom
were supported by organ grinders
and men who plied the pick and
shovel for the city.
Off Dumarais lane, leading by an
alley, after descending a flight of
steps in a shed, was found a cellar
of tliree rooms. At the foot of the
stairs was a stove, leaning against
which was a bed, whereon slept two
men. Opposite the stove, about
three feet distant, stood another bed,
and parallel to the latter was a
couch. One of the remaining two
small rooms had three beds, the one
towards the front of the house containing four. How it was possible
to place four beds in a cellar not
more than ten feet square would
puzzle the most ingenious, but to
these people it seemed only an ordinary accomplishment. Of course,
none of these beds could be moved
once placed, but house cleaning is a
tiling unheard of among these
people.
In this room of the four beds,
lay eight men, while another was
sitting tailor fashion on the floor
by a murky oil lamp sewing a patch
on his trousers. One woman was
also in the room.
Altogether in this cellar fifteen
persons were already housed, and it
was still early in the evening, the
other four or five lodgers not yet
having come in for the night.    ,
So far as could be ascertained, $8
was the monthly rental paid by the
family that kept the place, but each
of the men paid $2 a month to sleep
in it.
This, however, was a mild case to
another found in the cellar of a
house on St. Charles Borrome street.
The keeper of the subterranean
lodging house informed the visitors
in broken English that $7 was the
rent he paid, while $87 was the total
received from the twenty-three who
slept there. On descending the stairs
to this burrow one of the party tripper over a bed in the dork, coal oil
being used but sparingly; beside the
bed was a mattress. In a room off
the narrow ill-smelling hall, which
had an opening about a foot square
as a window, five beds were counted. In addition to these three men
were sleeping huddled t^ether on
the floor. There was no bed clothing on any of the beds, and the men
lay on them partially dressed. In
one corner of the room, a a candle
beside him, a man was endeavoring
to darn a heavy woolen sock. So
absorbed was he in his occupation
that, though the two visitors spoke
to the other men for some time, he
never looked up.
Nearly all the men were laborers
and earned from $1.25 to $1.75 a
day.
In two other places visited, to
which there were only rear entrances
tin-rough a yard four feet square,
were lodged twenty-eight men.
These cellars are very small, each
consisting of but two rooms.
 o— ■
ESTIMATING   LIMBER
Anheuser-Busch's
Budweiser
Its sale in many lands is due entirely and solely
because of its surpassing Quality and Purity. Its
nutritious properties come from the choicest Northern
Barley and its tonic properties from select Saazer
Bohemia Hops—its in a class by itself.
Bottled only {with corks or crown caps) at the
Report    Issued    Regarding    Growth
Along Proposed  Route of Hudson IJny Railway
Estimation of the timber along the
proposed route of the Hudson Bay
Railway was the main object of a
party sent out during the summer of
1910 by the forestry branch of the
department of the interior. The report of the bead of the party (J. R.
Dickson, B.S.A., B.S.F., assistant inspector of forest reserves) has Just
been  published.
The party comprised the chief
forester with three fiel dassistants
and five others, including cook, ca-
noemen, etc. They started at The
Pas and explored the country around
Mitlshto Lake, tlie Mitisho River,,
the Grass River system (iocludlng
VVekusko Lake and other lake ex-
piinsonsl), Pakwa (or Pakwahigan)
Lake Setting and Split Lakes, and
the Nelson River system, including
Cross, Slpiwest, Wintering and Landing Lakes. On tiie'ir return journey
the party came .by way of the Min-
ago t ir Pine) River, The total distance covered, following the route of
the proposed line, was aboul 235
miles.
At Intervals of three to si mxiles
along the route lines were run by
compass at right angles to the route
of travel. Each forester worked
alone and covered, on the average,
four to six miles per day.
Estimate of the Timber
The total number of tie available
In the district traversed is estimated
at 360,0001 these, at 3,000 to the
mile, would be sufficient for about
120 miles of road. The saw-timber
totals ahout nine and a half million
feet, board measure. Dead tamarack
and the largest of the close-grained
black spruce could be used for pile
timber. There is an Immense supply of fuelwood and pulpwood, but
a good deal of the young timber is
Anheuser-Busch Brewery
St. Louis, Mo., U. S. A.
North B. C. Liquor Co.
Distributors
Prince Rupert B. C
too small, as yet  even for pulpwood.
Spruce is practically the only timber large enough for ties and saw-
timber. Poplar, birch and jack pine
are found in quantity, but are "invariably too short, spindly, llmby and
crooked for any use save fuel and
pulpwood." Scarcely any live tamarack is found; the party did not
meet with 200 green tamarack the
over 10 inches in diametr during the
whole of the summer.
Timber Killed for Fire and Insects
The chief reason for the comparatively small supply of timber in the
district is the fact that fires have
so often run over ft. The greatest
of these occurred, respectively, 80
and 40 years ago, and few of the
parts in the region explored escaped
these. In many places, indeed, the
fires evidently leaped over the lakes
a mile in width| Even the coming
of the snow, which in most places
puts an end to even the largest forest fire, does not always quench the
fires, and they live all winter in
the dry moss and break out again
the next spring.
The attacks of Insects have also
caused much loss of timber in the
region. Barkbeetles are the greatest offenders. They have killed nearly all tbe tamarack and are now at
work on the larger spruce. They
attack live trees, which, having
been weakened or killed, are thrown
by the wind. A bad tangle of trunks,
branches and other debris results,
and finally a lightning flash sets fire
to it, and the fire, if not checked by
some fortunate circumstance, may
run over miles of country.
Prevention of Fires
The prevention of fire in this district  is  a   problem  of  the  greatest
difficulty. Throughout the region
there are practically no inhabitants,
and the area is of such vast extent
that, if a fire once starts, the chances
of stopping it, even with good patrol
system, would be far from bright.
Indians in this region seem much
more careful with fire than the white
men.
Rate of Griwth
Some attention was paid by the
foresters to the calculations of the
rate of growth of the different trees.
This was found to be slow, chiefly
on account of the cold wet soil
which results from lack of drainage
throughout the region. From Moose
Lake to Split Lake—a distance of
200 miles—the drop is but 340 feet,
an average of 20 inches to the mile.
Of this 340 feet of fall, almost one-
half Is included in three escarpments, which produce cataracts on
the rivers flowing into Hudson Bay.
The general level character of the
county results in the formation of
muskeg.
How Fast Do Trees Grow
In 100 years white spruce reaches
a diameter of 8 to 12 inches, poplar
of 8 to 10 inches and black spruce
of 4 to 5 inches. Jack pine will not
average 6 inches in diameter.
The author's conclusions in regard
to the timber are not very optimistic.
"There is probab'y enough timber
available to build the rough construction work of the Hudson Bay
Railway," is as far as he permits
himself  to go.
The topography, soil, vegetation
and climate of the country are briefly referred to, also the resources of
the country in regard to agriculture,
minerals, fish game and fill animals.
TIDES AT PRINCE iRUPERT, JULY, 1911
TE   AND   DAY
HIGH WATER      ||         LOW WATER
DA
Time| Ht| Time| Ht|| Time
Ht | Tlme| Ht
1
Saturday   ....
4:44
19.7
17:47
18.91
11:15
3.7
23:47
7.6
0
Sunday	
5:42
18.1
18:39
18.4,
12:05
5.3
3
Monday   ....
6:50
16.6
19:33
18.01
6:49
7.9
12:58
6.9
4
Tuesday   ....
8:06
15.6
20:29
17.81
1:58
7.7
13:56
8.3
5
Wednesday   .   .   .
9:21
15.3
21:24
17.9!
3:10
7.2
15:00
9.1
0
Thursday  ....
10:28
15.4
22:14
18.3
4:14
6.4
16:00
9.6
7
Friday	
11:22
15.9
22:58
IS.8
5:05
5.5
16:50
9.6
8
Saturday   ....
12:00
16.4
23:39
19.3
5:49
4.7
17:34
9.5
9
Sunday  	
12:50 17.0
6:28
4.0
18:14
9.2
10
Monday	
0:17
19.8
13:26
17.5
7:03
3.5
18:53
8.8
11
0:54
20.2
14:01
17.8
7:36
3.1
19:31
8.4
12
Wednesday .   .   .
1:30
20.4
14:35
18.1
8:08
2.9
20:08
8.1
13
Thursday   ....
2:06
20.4
15:08
18.2
8:41
2.9
20:45
7.7
14
Friday	
2:43
20.2
15:40
18.3
9:15
3.0
21:23
7.5
15
Saturday  ....
3:21
19.8
16:13
18.4
9:50
3.5
22:03
7.2
16
19.2
16:48
18.4
10:27
4.2
22:48
7.2.
17
4:46
18.3
17:30
18.3
14:07
5.0
23:43
7.0
18
Tuesday	
5:42
17.3
18:20
18.4
11:52
6.0
19
Wednesday   .   .   .
6:49
16.3
19:20
18.6
0:49
6.9
12:48
7.0
20
Thursday ....
8:14
15.8
20:26
19.0
2:03
6.4
13:57
7.9
21
9:38
16.0
21:33
19.8
3:19
5.3
15:13
8.2
22
Saturday  ....
10:48
16.8
22:34
20.8
4:28
3.9
16:21
8.0
23
Sunday 	
10:49
17.9
23:o2
21.8
5:26
2.3
17:22
7.4
24
Monday	
12:41
19.0
6:18
1.1
18:18
6.8
25
6:26
22.6
13:29
19.9
7:06
0.2
19:11
6.0
26
Wednesday  .   .   .
1:17
22.9
14:15
20.4
7:52
—.1
20:02
5.5
27
Thursday  ....
2:06
22.8
15:00
20.7
8:37
0.2
20:51
5.2
28
Friday	
2:53
22.2
15:44
20.6
9:21
1.0
21:39
5.2
29
21.1
16:27
20.2
10:04
2.3
22:28
5.5
3 0
19.8
17:09
19.5
10:46
3.9
23:18
6.0
31
Monday.   ....
5:18
18.1
17:52
18.7
11:28
5.7
The Time used Is Pacific Standard, for the 120th Meridian west. It
Is counted from 0 to 24 hours, from midnight to midnight.
The Height Is In feet and tenths of a foot, above the Low Water datum
adopted for the Chart. The Harbor datum, as established by the Grand
Trunk  Pacific   Railway,  Is  one  foot lower.
Skeena Land  District—District of
Coast, Range 5.
TAKE NOTICE that T. H. Hughes,
of Lakelse Valley, occupation farmer,
intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted at the southeast corner of Lot
4128; tlience 40 cliains north; thence
40 chains east; thence 40 chains
south; thence 40 cliains west to point
of commencement, and containing
160 acres, more or less.
TOM HUGH HUGHES.
Dated June 5,  1911.
Skeena  Land  District—District
of Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that Thomas Stewart, of Prince Rupert, occupation
accountant, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post .planted 40 chains north from
the southwest corner of Lot 1733;
thence west 40 cliains; tbence south
40 chains; thence east 40 chains;
thence north 40 chains to point of
commencement.
THOMAS STEWART.
John   Kirkaldy,  Agent.
Dated July 7, 1911.
WATER  NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that an
application will be made under Part
V of the "Water Act, 1909," to obtain a licence in the Queen Charlotte
Islands Division  of Skeena District.
(a> The name, address and occupation of the applicant—Orland P.
Merrill; Massett, Graham Island,
B. C.J  prospector.
(If for mining purposes) Free Miner's Certificate No	
(b) The name of the lake,
stream or source (if unnamed, the
description Is)—Ain Lake and Ain
River.
(c) The point of diversion—At
or near Ain Lake.
(d) The quantity of water applied for (in cubic feet per second)
—700.
(e) The character of the proposed
ivories—Dam, flume, pipe line and
power  plant.
11)     The  premises on  v.'ii.li   tin
..-: cer is to be used (desc-'lbe s"
—Near mouth of Aili River.
(g) The purposes for which I
water is to be used—General''
power.
(h)    If for irrigation, descril
land to be irrigated, giving acre
(I) If the water is to be used for
power or for mining purposes, describe the place where the water ia
to be returned to some natural channel, and the difference in altitude
between point of diversion and point
of return—Near mouth of Ain River
about 150 feet below point of diversion.
(j) Area of Crown land intended
to be occupied by the proposed
works— About 10 acres.
(k) This notice was posted on
the tenth day of June, 1911, and application will be made to the Commissioner on the fourth day of September, 1911.
(1) Give the names and addresses
of any riparian proprietors or licensees who or whose lands are
likely to be affected by the proposed
works, either above or below the
outlet—None.
(Signature)  ORLAND P. MERRILL,
(P.  O.  Address)   Masset,  B.  C.
George S. Mayer, Agent,
(P. O. Address)   Masset, B.  C.
Note—One cubic foot per second
is equivalent to 35.71 miner's Inches.
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that I, John Y.
Rochester, of Prince Rupert, occupation broker, intend to apply fir permission to lease the following described land:— Commencing at a
post planted on the northerly end of
an island in the Skeena River about
Mile 45 on tlie Grand Trunk Pacific
Railway; tlience north 1000 feet
more or less to low water mark;
thence westerly along the low water
mark 1000 feet more or less;
thence southerly 1000 feet more or
less; thence easterly 1000 feet to
the place of commencement.
J. Y. ROCHESTER.
Dated May 30, 1911. 6-2
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that T. M. Turner,
of Lakelse Valley, occupation farmer, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands: — Commencing at a post
planted on the Omineca & Hazelton
right of way and adjoining the N. E.
corner of Lot 51S; tlience west 17
chains to corner of Lot 3996; thence
north 20 chains; thence following
right of way to point of commencement.
T. M. TURNER,
John  Kirkaldy, Agent.
Dated  14th June,  1911. 7-4
Skeena    Land    Notice—District    of
Coast—Range V
TAKE NOTICE that Daniel W.
Beaton, of Prince Rupert, B. C, occupation carpenter, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about five miles
up the Exchumsik River from Its
mouth, and on its south bank; thence
east 40 cliains; thence north 40
chains; tlience .west 40 chains;
thence south 40 chains to place of
commencement.
DANIEL  W.   BEATON.
Dated June  14,  1911. J-ll
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that I, Charles
Percy Hickman, of Naas Harbour,
occupation constable, intend to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:— Commencing at a post planted on the
east shore of Naas Bay, about two
miles in an easterly direction from
Lot 3, marked C. P. IL, S. W. corner; thence east 20 chains; thence
nortli 4ti chains to the shore; thence
along the shore line to the place of
commencement, containing 40 acres,
more or less.
CHARLES PRECY HICKMAN
Dated June 7, 1911. 6-30
Skeena Land District.—District of
-..ceena.
TAKE NOTICE that the Canadian
Canning Company, Limited, of 224
Winch Building, Vancouver, B. C.,
occupation salmon caners, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted adjoining
a post marked W. N. about 300 feet
South of Wallace's wharf, Naas Harbour, B. C; thence east 20 chains;
thence south 20 chains; thence west
20 chains; thence following the
coast line In a northerly direction
back to the point of commencement
and containing forty acres more or
less.
CANADIAN CANNING CO., LTD.
Per G.  H. Leslie, Agent.
Dated  6th June,  1911. 0-26
■ —- /' /
~u
Friday, July 2S, 19il
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
(EDMONTON'S PLANS
Praise is Forthcoming   for the Public
Ownership Schemes of the
Western City.
Some of the Advantages Whirh Are
Claimed  for Tliis  Method of
Administering   Affairs
"The Edmonton Plan" is attracting the attention of the reading public wherever advanced municipal politics are being discussed. George R.
Stephens writes admiringly In Huron's Oklahoma magazine of Edmonton's achievements, which he depicts
under the caption "Something New
in City Government."
Says Mr. Stephens: Among these
was a man named Short, but whose
head bore no resemblance to the
name. He had ideas and dreams,
as well as energy, and could not
see why this fair new budding city
need follow in the ruts of older
ones. Here was a town a thousand
miles away from anywhere, Winnipeg being its nearest neighbor of any
consequence. He reasoned that the
old style of city government was a
rank failure; his could not be worse.
So he enlisted under his banner other
men who liked his suggestions well
enough to identify themselves with
him.
Among the things they settled
upon was city ownership of the telephone, electric light, street car and
water works systems. Out of these
things the people get service that is
service. I look for tlie city to be
called Saint Edmonton some day, as
they use the automatic acll system
aud have no "central" to swear at;
and as there is no private corporation owning sky-soaring light meters,
swearing is so unnecessary that people may eevntually forget how.
Then there is the tax system. You
are not penalized or taxed for putting up a building. If you have a
nice lot, worth, we will say, $5,000,
and put a house of equal value on
it, your taxes are not raised. The
speculator who owns a vacant lot
beside yours pays just as much as
you do on your improved property.
This principle holds good, whether
the house costs $500 or $500,000.
The ground is assessed at its cash
value by a board of non-partisan
assessors appointed by the council.
No attention is paid to buildings so
this plan tends to encourage building and to discourage the holding of
vacant lots. It surely must be a
success, for I have not yet heard one
man complain, and if heavy speculators object to It, I did not hear them.
Instead of taxing the business man
for his stock of goods they assess his
his floor space, and they value that
according to the kind of business
and its location. For instance, a
boarding house is rated at 50 cents
a square foot, while the bank, down
In the expensive part of town, Is
hoisted up to $7.50. The florist, who
is usually pretty well out from the
business centre, is assessed 25 cents
a foot. The druggist pays on a $4
valuation; ice cream parlors and millinery stores are valued at $2; printing offices and undertakers at $2.50,
and so on. Each business Is rated
according to its earning capacity and
location. The second floor has a
lower rate than the first, and the
third less still. Lawyers, doctors,
real estate men and all others have
a fairly adjusted rate, grading upward from a single desk space to the
large office with waiting rooms, private offices and various departments.
The system works. One proof is that
last year less than half a dozen persons appealed from the figures of
the assessors.
The tax is 17 mills, so one can
tell at any time just how much will
have to be paid. For instance, if
one has an office ten by ten feet in
size, containing 100 square feet, and
his official assessment is $2 lie multiplies the amount of space by $2,
which gives $200. This result, multiplied by the rate, gives $3.50. Not
so bad, is it? Well, it goes, and no
one is taxed spasmodically—one rate
this year and another next, nor out
of proportion to his neighbor.
Then they have something new In
the franchise line. In voting on the
question of issuing bonds for public
improvements all persons having
property worth $200 to $2,000 have
one vote; $2,000 to $4,000 two
votes; $4,000 to $8,00 Othree votes;
$8,000 and over four votes. All
banks and corporations have one
vote, and women who have property
to the value of $200 can vote on all
questions. If a man has not succeeded In gathering any financial
moss he cannot help to saddle any
indebtedness on the city; but if he
desires very much to vote, and has
been smart enough to carry a wife
with  property,  he has the  right of
franchise—if he presents the wife's
permission in writing. I will venture that the man who originated
that plank can get the votes of the
women for anything he wants.
This state of affairs did not all
come like a flash out of a clear sky.
The system was proposed by ex-
Mayor William Short, who deserves
thanks and medals and other good
things, and was sifted by his brainy
friends. It is not Iron clad, but may
be changed from time to time. Its
six years of use have demonstrated
its value.
Edmonton is a pretty little city,
having a population of about 30,000
people, so many of whom are from
the United States than one scarce
realizes that he is beyond the land
of the stars and stripes. There are
features of government here that
command our respect and attention,
and which are not only interesting,
but valuable. As another illustration, when a national dignitary
comes to town, the streets and public buildings are decorated, bands
hired, and whatever else may be necessary, all at the expense of the city.
What a howl would go up In the
cities of Oklahoma at such a procedure.
Edmonton builds the sidewalks,
and plants the trees and parkings
along the streets. But I will not go
into all the details, for that would
take a book. The people are quite
proud of the success of their city
and its government. It has attracted the notice of other Canadian
cities, some of which are trying the
experiment of city ownership of public enterprises. Its example is infectious, and just as we are now
I hearing of the Des Moines plan or
the Galveston plan, we may expect
to soon be hearing of the Edmonton
plan. Will we have the Oklahoma
City plan, or will we have another
election stolen?
 o	
»>^*>;.<.*.><e^..J.;.^.^,^.^..j,;..;..j,^,.;..j,^..j,;.^,
!      COLONIES CAIN      |
**************************
"It is the ins of today who are
the outs of tomorrow; and it is parliament that makes cabinets," le-
marked a visiting member of parliament from Ottawa in discussing
the results of the conference in London and the advantages which may
acrue from such a visit as is being
paid by the senators and members
of the overseas dominion.
"If the idea of mutual co-operation within the Empire is to spread,
it can only do so through Increased
intimacy between the elected repre-
senattives of the people of all its
self-governing parts. It is for that
reason that I, and I believe all my
colleagues, attach immense Importance to the first step forward taken
by the establishment of a permanent
parliamentary committee during our
visit.
"This committee, comprised of
men of both, or all parties, will be
a standing committee from parliament to parliament; it may meet in
one of the committee rooms of the
various houses of parliament. It
should be impossible for a member
speaking at Westminster to make
such a mistake as did Austen Chamberlain in quoting a reported speech
of Sir Wilfrid Laurier in the last
great tariff debate."
In conversation with other of the
visitors further details were obtained as to what is hoped for from this
corresponding committee of members.
"Apart from meetings of a large
number of our members in Ottawa
one year, in Australia or South Africa perhaps another, there is the
inestimable advantage that for any
of us who desire to work up any
particular question in detail during
the visit to Britain, to ATustralia, or
elsewhere within the Empire, the facilities for their doing so can be
arranged in advance, and much time
saved. The social advantages are
obvious, though by no means intended to be put in the forefront. The
first object is that a greater number
of men sitting on both sides of the
houses of the Empire should be
posted right up to date regarding
legislation and the current of parliamentary opinion upon the problems of the hour."
"I think," said another visiting
member of parliament, "that more
good to the Empire as a whole Is
coming from the greater knowledge
we Australians, Canadians and
Soutli Africans are getting of each
other, than even from the growth
of our intercourse with the statesmen and parliamentarians of the
Motherland. Until July 18 we are
guests of the Britisii parliament, and
as both hosts and guests hold varying views In the questions of the day,
It would be unseemly to make any
political speech until we resume our
liberty as ordinary visitors; then as
citizens of the same Empire, we certain y feel that it is our duty as
well as our right to discuss the po-
i ss,
THE JOURNAL
$2.00 a Year
| Job Printing |
If you want your printing
handled   expeditiously   by
thoroughly trained and ex
perienced printers have it
done at the Journal Office.
THE JOURNAL
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SL<
litical proposals as they are liable
to affect the welfare of the Empire
as a whole, just as freely in England, Scotland or even Ireland as we
do in our own self-governing part of
the Empire.
Addressing a meeting in the Whitehall rooms, Hon. G. E. Foster skillfully evaded, all political references,
but said many interesting things
about immigration and the lack of
knowledge which still existed as to
what the resources of Canada actually are, and what its population must
ultimately   become.     The .
enemies to a better knowledge of
each other among the people of the
Empire, he ascribed to "ignorance
and prejudice, or indolence and
apathy." "Some people," he added,
"would insist upon pursuing the
line of least resistance, even If it
took them miles out of their course;
they will not take the short cut
through the bush or over the fences
right ahead."
FUR FARMING
Novel  Way of  Meeting   Demand  for
Muskruts and
Mink
Dr. T, F. Burgen of Spokane and
his associates, including three experienced trappers, have leased two
thousand acres of land in the lake
district north of Athabasca Landing,
where they will raise mink and
muskrats on a commercial scale.
They began last month Dr. Burgen says of the enterprise:
"I do not know uiat there has
been a similar experiment tried, but
I have devoted all my spare time for
seven years to careful investigation
and I am convinced the project will
be a big success financial'}*.
"I was over the ground recently
and chose the location. I will get
about five thousand additional musk-
rats to put into the lake immediate
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
SIR EDMUND WALKER, C.V.O., LLD., D.C.L, President
ALEXANDER LAIRD, General Manager
CAPITAL, - $10,000,000 REST, - $7,000,000
DRAFTS ON FOREIGN COUNTRIES
Every branch of The Canadian Bank of Commerce is equipped to issue drafts on
the principal cities in the following countries without delay :
Grvece New Zealand Siberia
Holland                     Norway                     Soieelan
Iceland                       Panama South Africa
India                          Persia                        Spain
                   Ireland                     Peru                        Straits .Settlement.
Finland Italy
Formosa Japan
France Java
Fr'cfa Cochin China Malta
Geneeaeey     t Manchuria
Great Britain Mexico
*Bhe amount of these drafts is stated in the money of the country where they are payable ; that is they are drawn in sterling, francs, marks, lire, kronen, fleerins, yen,
taels, roubles, etc., as the case may be. This ensures that the payee abroad will
receive the actual amount intended. 233
J. M. CHRISTIE, Manager, Prince Rupert Branch
Africa Crete
Arabia #  Cuba
Argentine Republic Denmark
Australia Egypt
Austria-Hungary    Faroe Islands
Belgium
Brazil
Bulgaria
Ceylon
Chili
China
Philippine Islands Sweden
Portugal Switzerland
Roumania Turkey
Russia United States
Servia Urufruay
Siam West Indies, etc.
FREDERICK PETERS, K. O.
ly, although it is well stocked at
present. That we may get the best
price, we will choose one lake and
stock it with the dark rats, which
are of more commercial value.
"The rats require no food other
than that they can get themselves
except in unusual cases. We will
prepare for emergencies by growing
carrots, which will be fed to the animals at times if necessary. The
muskrat fur will be worth from 50
cents to $1 each.
"The mink will be much more difficult to handle and we will be
obliged to prepare pens and sink the
netting deep into thhe ground so that
they cannot escape. We will secure
500 when we uegin operations this
summer and should have several
thousands for commercial purposes
a year from this coming winter.
"We will be obliged to feed fish
to the mink, and ehese are in abundance on our lease. The mink furs
sell as high as $!), and are belter In
thhe north than iu the United Slates.
We will handle some cattle and
horses In connection witli the fur
farm, as our project will require hut
little attention a large portion of
tin'  year."
"Dr. Burgen has spent .much
time in the woods," says August
Wolf in Rod ai.d Gun. "lie has devoted his time to fishing, and came
to Spokane with the expectation of
changing his line of business, and
getting in the open air last fall."
Experienced trappers will assist in
the work, whi'e protection will be
given by the mounted pollcpe. All
material was packed from the Landing to Ihe mink and muskrat ranch.
A pack of dogs was taken along
with the other equipment.
-o-
"I wish I knew which one of
those young men to marry. I be-
tleve I slieiiilil consul! a fortune
teller."
"That's a good Idea. Consult
Bradstreet."
Barrister, Solicitor and Notary Public
 j	
Office in
EXCHANGE  BLOCK
WM. S. HAL.L, L. D. S. D. D. S.
:-:   DENTIST   :-:
Crown and Bridge Work a specialty.
All dental operations skillfully
treated. Gas and local anaesthetics
administered for the painless extraction of teeth. Consultation fres.
Offices, Helgerson Bk., Prince Rupert
NICKERSON-ROERIG COMPANY
CUSTOMS AND MERCHANDISB
—o—
Brokers, Forwarding Agents,
Storage,  etc.
J. W.  POTTER
ARCHITECT    AND     STRUCTURAL
ENGINEER
Re-inforced Concrete a Specialty
—o—
Law-Butler Building - Prince Rupert
HAVNOR   HROS.
FUNERAL  DIRECTORS
and
PROFESSIONAL   EMBALMERS
DR.  W. B.  CLAYTON
DENTIST
Office  in    the    Westenhaver   Block,
Over Orme's  Drug   Store.
Prince Rupert
LINDSAY'S CARTAGE a STORAGE
G. T. P. CARTAGE AGENTS
Office at H. B. Rochester, Centre St
LADYSMITH COAL
is handled by us.   All orders receive
prompt attention.  Phone No  68.
 LADYSMITH	
COAL
ROCHESTER & MONROE, Phone 115
Corner Eighth and Fraser Streets
Clinton Rooms
Newly    remodelled    and    furnished.
Board   and   lodging.   Home cooking
a specialty.    Mrs.   Anderson,  Prop.
Rooms, $3 Per Week
New Knox Hotel
ARTAUD & BESNER
Proprietors
The New Knox Hotel is run on the
European plan. First-clas service.
All the latest modern Improvements
THE BAR keeps only the best
brands of liquors and cigars.
THE CAFE Is open from 6.30 a.m.
to 8 p.m. Excellent cuisine; first-
class service.
Board, $1 a Day — Beds, 50c and op
First Aventi"   Prince Rupert
Hamblin's Bakery
Just Re-opened
Sale    counter    in    MERRYFIELD'S
STORE, Third Ave. and Fifth St.
Family trade catered to.  Will supply restaurants and steamers.
Cakes and Confectionery of all
kinds
THE WESTHOLME LUMBER GO.
LIMITED
We handle all kinds of
Building Supplies
First Avenue Telephone 180
GRAND HOTEL
WORKINGMAN'S HOME
25c
Rooms 50 Cents
Spring Beds, Clean
White Sheets
Best in Town for tlie Money
FIRST AVE. AND SEVENTH ST.
J. Goodman, Proprietor
"We'll," said he, anxious to patch
up their quarre' of yesterday,
aren't you curious to know what's
in this parcel'.'"
"Not very," replied  the  wife.
"It's something for the one I love
best  iu the world."
"Ah! (Icily) 1 Buppos it's that
smoker's companion you said you
wanted." PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Friday, July 28, 1911
IMMIGRATION FRAUD
!
Finding of Royal Commission in Connection With the Chinese
Question.
Chinamen Whom Is Is Recommended
Should He Arrested Are Safe
From   Capture
The report of Mr. Justice Murphy
of the supreme court of British Columbia, who was appointed a royal
commissioner to inquire into allegations of fraud in connection with the
Chinese immigration on the Pacific
Coast, has been tabled in the House
of Commons.
Some time ago the trade and com
merce department, being suspicious
of wrongdoing, sent an officer to investigate and subsequently the royal
commission was appointed. The general result of the inquiry was to
establish that for some years a system of wholesale entry of Chinamen
by fraudulent means has been going
on at Vancouver. Through connivance with the interpreter Yip On,
numbers of Chinamen escaped the
head-tax on the allegation that they
were merchants and thus entitled to
exemption.
Sir Wilfrid Laurier, tabling the
report, said Mr. Justice Murphy had
recommended the prosecution of certain people and a'so that the report
be not made public until these prosecutions had taken place. He had
learned, however, that the parties
whom it is proposed to prosecute
were now in China. Under the circumstances, he thought that even in
view of the royal commissioner's recommendations there was no reason
why the report should not be made
public.
The following are the finding of
Mr. Justice Murphy:
First—The charges both of personal and official misconduct against
the Hon. Mr. Templeman are found
to be entirely without foundation.
Second—The charge against certain members of the Liberal executive of Vancouver were shown to
be untrue.
Third—The existence was demonstrated of an intrigue on the part
of T. R. E. Mclnnes, with whom was
associated David Lew and Gordon
Grant, to establish some sort of connection with the administration of
the Chinese Restriction Act at the
port of Vancouver by obtaining control of the position of Chinese interpreter, and possibly other ways. Its
object was to serve some personal
end.
Fourth—Mr. Foster, government
secret service officer, was utilized to
advance this intrigue; to what extent
he was a dupe and to what extent a
participant, Is uncertain.
Fifth—Ample opportunity has existed at the port of Vancouver for
the illegal entry of Chinese into Canada in the various ways enumerated
in the body of the report.
Sixth—The administration of the
Chinese Restriction Act at Victoria
has been careful, and as effective as
detects in said act would permit.
Seventh—The port of Union Bay
Is practically a free port for the entrance of Chinese, and for smuggling
opium into Canada. The ships of
two lines running direct from the
Orient go there to coal before setting out on each return voyage.
Eighth—This condition of things
obtains in almost the same extent at
the ports of Nanaimo, Ladysmith and
Boat Harbor. No ships direct from
the Orient call at these ports to coal,
but tramp vessels carrying Chinese
crews are numerous.
Ninth—A system of direct fraud to
secure illegal entry of Chinese into
Canada as merchant exempts has
flourished at the port of Vancouver
probably since 1907. It is impossible to determine how many Chinese
have thus entered Canada, but it is
probable that the majority admitted
there under the Chinese passports
secured fraudulent entry.
Tenth—The interpreter, Yip On,
was directly concerned, and a participant in these frauds. This Is
probably true also of his parner, Nip
Sue Poy.
Eleventh—Numbers of Chinese
have probably entered Canada as exempt sons of merchants who did not
fulfil the law's requirements to entitle them to such free entry. This
has been accomplished:
(a) By wholesale registration of
Chinese as members of merchant
firms who possibly have a small interest in such businesses, but who
are not actively engaged in mercantile life, but are really laundrymen,
laborers, clerks, etc.; and
(b) By such persons and genuine
merchants as will bring in individuals as sons who in fact were no
blood  relations to them.
Twelfth—The method of idntifi-
cation in vogue at Vancouver until
last autumn was defective, and as
carried out practically valuless.
Thirteenth—The watch kept in
ships at the port of Vancouver up
to the same date was farcical.
Fourteenth—Mr. Bowell had no
connection with any wrongdoing, but
was negligent in the performance of
his duties in so far as they appertained to the admission of Chinese
into Canada. In fairness to him, it
must be stated that the dual position
of collector of customs and of comptroller of Chinese immigration, in recent years at any rate, have made
impossible demands upon his time.
Fifteenth—Some suspicion rests
upon the new interpreter, Poon Shun
Lung, in reference to the admission
of his two alleged sons in January,
1910, and likewise in reference to his
former connection, if his statement
is to be believed, with a firm in
Toronto regarded by the police of
that city as principally engaged in
illicit opium traffic.
Sixteenth—Under the act as at
present framed the gbvernment is dependent in a large measure on the
integrity of the interpreter, and in
the matter of the admission of new
merchants, wholly so.
Seventeenth—The charge that customs officials sold opium after seizure and appropriated the proceeds, Is
untrue.
Eightenth—The quantity of opium
coming into Canada is regulated simply by the demand for the drug.
Nineteenth—The quantity of opium coming into Canada is regulated
simply by the demand for the drug.
Nineteenth—Whilst more efficient
watching will prove a prenventlve,
total exclusion of opium cannot be
hoped for, and consumption must be
discouraged by drastic amendments
to the act on the lines suggested by
by the police officers of Vancouver
and Victoria above set out.
The following recommendations
are made:
First — That the digest of facts
forwarded herewith be submitted to
the department of justice for advice
as to whether they justify a criminal
prosecution of Yip on and his partner, Yip Sue Poy.
Second—In the event of such ad
vice being of an iffirmative nature,
that this report be not made public
until such prosecutions have been
launched, and at least the preliminary hearings held.
The reason is that the direct evidence of Yip Dit Chor, Yong Jem
Sun, and Fung Chang Ming will
doubtless be necessary. If it becomes known that criminal proceedings are in contemplation, there men
will probably disappear, and to locate them, as the experience of the
commission in searching for passport
men shows, will be a most difficult,
if not impossible task.
The commission recommends that
if practicable an arrangement be
made with the government of China
similar to that now in force with
Japan, whereby a fixed number of
Chinese only be allowed to enter
Canada in each year, the Chinese
government in issuing permits to
give preference to merchants. In return, the Chinese Restriction Act to
be made inapplicable to subjects of
China.
Although exonerating Mr. Bowell
from any charge of dishonest conduct, the commission is forced to
conclude that he was negligent in
this matter of Chinese Immigration.
As has been shown, he placed the
administration of the act virtually in
the hands of the interpreter. He
accepted the Chinese passports as
complying with the act, when in
truth they did not, as they were in
a language other than English or
French. He knew the farcical nature of the watch kept on ships at
Vancouver, yet failed to report it.
There is no doubt that opium enters Canada as freely as it ever did,
in fact, more freely, as there is now
no duty to pay. Assuming the law
has been or will be put into more
workable shape by amending it, the
department of justice might usefully
request the attorney general of
British Columbia to call the attention of all police officers, provincial
and municipal, to the fact that transgressions against it are criminal, and
not merely breaches of the customs
regulations.
 o	
PARCEL POST
Measure Will Be Introduced to Allow
for Introduction of Similar Systems  to  Old  Lands
In the House of Commons, W. F.
MacLean, resuming his address on
state ownership of telegraph and telephone lines, called for a system of
parcel post. He declared that the
only way to bring express companies
to time was to establish a parcels
post system. That, in his opinion,
would soon cut the express rates in
two.
The postmaster general replied
that Mr. MacLean's plea almost made
him a believer in telepathy.
"I have been for several days,"
said Mr. Lemieux, "working on a
plan to establish a parcels post system. It has proved a boon in England, France and Germany. It costs
more money to send a parcel from
one Canadian town to another or
from one province to another than it
does to send the same parcel across
the  Atlantic."
Air. Lemieux could not say whether the scheme was opposed by railways as charged, "but he said, "tiie
moment that It was announced that
we would establish a parcel post system in Canada this department was
simply flooded with petitions against
such a system. These petitions did
not come from cities, but were signed by farmers and country storekeepers,  and  the  argument which  they
used against the establishment of
thai system was that the departmental stores would get the benefit
of it. One pecularlty which struck
me at the time was that all these
petitions from every province were
couched in the same terms. They
were all either printed or typewritten and the language was the same.
There is apparently an organization
against the establishment of a parcels post. In my judgment the parcels post system would benefit the
farmers and benefit outlying districts, and I was surprised to find
these objections coming from farming districts and from storekeepers."
 o	
IN  THE  YUKON
Charles S. Johnston Brings Good Reports of New
Work
Charles S. Johnston, who performed the census work along the river
between Hootalinqua and Selkirk,
returned home .Monday on the steamer Dawson, having completed bis mission in a satisfactory manner.
From Carniacks, Mr. Johnston
went to Nansen Creek, which has
lately come into prominence as the
most recently discovered gold fled
in  Yukon, and l* ifirms all  that
has been said of it as a promising
producer. He found several men at
work on the creek, Tom Bee being
the most extensive operator. The latter has taken out upward of fifty
ounces of gold during the short time
he has been at work. He has a
steam thawer, the ground being
frozen at all points on the creek,
with a self-dumping hoist, and up
to recently, when water became
scarce, had been working six men.
Mr. Johnston says the pay streak
on the creek has a uniform width of
thirty feet and the gold is found in
the gravel from the surface to bedrock, which runs from four to seven
feet, making it an easy proposition
from a working standpoint. Timber
is scarce on the creek, but Its greatest drawback is the lack of a good
trail over which supples may be
transported. Already Bee and other
mine owners have expended $1,800
on a trail and they feel that they
are entitled to assistance from the
government.
Shafts have been sunk practically
all along the creek and uniform pay
of better than one cent a pan has
been found.
Mr. Johnston located a claim on
Nansen.
 o	
BLACK   COD  FISHERIES
Experienced   Men   Will  Be  Brought
to Take the Harvest of
the Sea
Mr. Rideout of the Queen Char-
lote Cold Storage and Black Cod
Fishing Company went south on the
Princess Beatrice yesterday after inspecting the proposition on the
islands. He has gone to engage a
few experienced fishermen to take
the fish so that he may carry out
further experiments.
Mr. Rideout, who is an experienced
fisherman from Newfoundland, is delighted with the outlook on the fishing grounds. He ranks the black
cod as the best fish taken in these
waters.
J. L. PARKER
MINING ENGINEER
Prince Rupert, B, C.
Open for Consultation and Mine
Examination
Temporary Address: —
Prince Rupert Inn
To the Ladies of Prince Rupert
Did you ever stop to think how much easier it would be for you,
if at the end of each month, you could pay all household bills
by check? We solicit your account and have special facilities
for handling it. Private writing rooms are provided for the use
of customers and individual attention is given each depositor.
We allow 4%  on Deposits and the use of checks.
The Continental Trust Company, Limited
 SECOND AVENUE	
o|E[D]|D][D]rD]ra][^
HOTEL
ENAMELWARE
HAVE JUST RECEIVED A SMALL SHIPMENT OF HOTEL
ENAMELWARE ESPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR USE IN
HOTELS, RESTAURANTS AND CAMPS. WE GUARANTEE
THEM TO LAST TWICE AS LONG AS ORDINARY ENAMEL
WARE.
A CALL IS SOLICITED
Prince Rupert Hardware & Supply
Company, Ltd.
THIRD AVENUE
PHONE 120
BIEIEIB|B[B|BIB|B|B|B!BIE!B|B!E|B|B|B|B|B|B|B|E|B|E
We Require Listings of Inside Business Property
Also Residence Property at Right Prices
MM. Stephens & Co. Ld.
Real Estate, Insurance and Investments,
Notaries, Nines, Timber
Box 275
PHONE 222
PRINCE RUPERT, B.C.
OFFICE THIRD  AVE.
Hee"St»y Satisfactory"Rueft
Good, Sound Reasons for
MONARCH Economy
Monarch Ranges are built so that they can
never have "air leaks"—
For around every opening into the body there
is a   Malleable   Iron frame to which the
steel is riveted.
No putty is needed in such joints.    They are
air tight when new and stay air tight.
If these other ranges were built in this way
they might be economical too.
Investigate this matter of rivet construction
versus  stove  bolts and  stove  putty.    It's
important to every  one  using  or  buying
a range.
SOLD AND GUARANTEED BY THE
Kaien Hardware Co.
Telephone 3 Third Avenue
The Big
Furniture
Store
We beg to announce to the public that we are going to
remain at the same old stand cor. 6th St. and 2nd Ave.
The rest of (lie month of July we are offering extraordinary values in all lines of HOUSE FURNISHINGS.   We are busy opening up new slock
anil plncing all broke.n lines and odd lots ou  the Bargain  Tables  for, quick selling.
NOTE PARTICULARLY THE VARIETY OF MERCHANDISE WE CARRY
Sole Agents for the
Ostermoor
Mattresses
**
V *
* *
FURNITURE, STOVES, LINOLEUM, CARPETS, FLOOR COVER.
INGS, REED AND RATTAN FURNITURE, BLINDS, CURTAINS, QUILTS,
COMFORTS, BLANKETS, SHEETS, PILLOWS, MATTRESSES, SPRINGS,
IRON AND BRASS BEDS. BEST LINES OF UPHOLSTERED COUCHES,
ARM CHAIRS, PARLOR SUITES, ENAMELWARE, CROCKERY, GLASSWARE, LAMPS, TABLE CUTLERY, SCREENS, PICTURES, MIRRORS,
WASHING MACHINES, BASKETS, FRUIT JARS, HAMMOCKS, SEWING
.MACHINES, BABY CARRIAGES.
* *
* *
* *
**
* *
**
* *
* *
**
* *
WE ARE CLOSING OUT THE
STOVE DEPARTMENT.
IF   YOU   ARE INTERESTED
CALL AND GET OUR PRICES
F. W. HART
Cor 6th Street & 2nd Ave
Phone 62      P.O. Box 230
••

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