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Prince Rupert Journal Sep 13, 1910

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Array New Wellington
Coal
is the best
ROGERS & BLACK
Sole Agents
Ptinu
c.
J
ttnwl
High-Ciaus
.'c-b Printing
I] Lines
VOLUME   1
Published Twice a  Week
PRINCE  RUPERT, B. C,  TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 13, 1910.
Price,  Five  Cents
NO.   26.
RATES ARE REDUCED
Railway   Commission Makes  a   Ruling
Against the White Pass
Company
There Must lie No Discrimination in
Favor of One Concern Over
Another
(Special to The Journal)
Vancouver, Sept. 13.—The railway
commission has ordered a reduction
in freight rates on the White Pass
railway. This applies to rates on outbound ore and concentrates bound
to smelters in British Columbia and
Washington. The old rate of $3.ii0
has been reduced to $1.75 a ton to
tide-water at Skagway, and shippers
are to be entitled to the best ocean
rate the railway has hitherto obtained for friends. The company
must cease discrimination in favor
of the Atlas Mining Company.
The case was based on a charge of
J. H. Conrad, who alleged that excessive freight rates were imposed
on ores from Carcross to Skagway,
and on mining machinery and camp
supplies from Skagway to Carcross.
This case also covered that of the
board of trade of Dawson City and
White Horse, both bodies joining in
making a complaint of the freight
charges prevailing.
During the proceedings Judge
Mabee threw out the bombshell that
the evidence adduced showed that
the railroad had committed an illegality by allowing preferential rate
legality by allowing preferential
rates to one firm and also by not
having placed a' tariff on the file in
accordance with the clauses contained in the railway act.
Mr. S. H. Graves, solicitor, who Is
also a big shareholder in the company, and who held the brief in its
behalf, pleaded ignorance of the
clause in question, but maintained
that under the circumstances which
he cited, the railway was justified
In making a special rate where the
traffic was continuous. To this the
Judge replied that the only tariff
on the file was that concerning traffic
between Skagway and White Horse,
tbe rate being $3.75. In violation
of the law the company had made a
separate rate of $2 to one favored
party, and he minced no words in informing Mr. Graves that the railroad
was exposed to a heavy penalty. He
further remarked that no railway in
Canad could make an agreement with
one man and decline to come to similar terms with others. There should
be no discrimination for if there was,
al tlhe big shippers in the country
would absorb the business of the
smaller ones and bring about an intolerable situation. It really meant
that the railways would be placed in
a position to wreak damage in the
way of developing one concern and
Impovishlng others as they thought
fit.
. o	
TEST OF DAY LABOR
Small Contract Has Been Awarded on
City Engineer's
Report.
Work on Second Street Will Be Carried Out  Under His
Charge
A test is to he made In the city of
the day labor system of work. The
tender of the city engineer for work
on Second street was awarded the
contract last, night which will afford
a test of the system of work.
The report of the streets committee was that the tender of the city
engineer he accepted for planking
Second street, and also for grading
and close cutting; that the tender of
John Vlerfch be accepted for planking Fraser, Fifth, Sixth, Seventh and
Eighth streets; and that the tender
of Alex McLean be accepted for grading and close cutting these last
named streets.
Aid. Hildltch took occasion to state
that the committee In this case
recommended the award of the contract to the highest one because the
other was not in correct form.
The Intention was to throw out all
tenders  Incorrectly  drawn  out.  This
. i ill tender and II ••■ as a good
o... ...lunlty  to  make  it  known  that
REPORTS ON STREETS
City Engineer is Opposed to Granting
Many Petitions of
Citizens.
Reasons   For   Doing   so   Given   by
Col.   Davis  in   Each
Case
BASIS PROPOSED
FOR SETTLEMENT
Board of Trade Endorses  Recommendation  Made
Special Committee Which Went Into the Whole
Subject of the G.T.P. Assessment on
Railway Lands
By
SEWER PIPE  TESTS HISSED  THE   MAYOR
Vancouver Considers the Question of the Chief Kagistrate of Victoria Frustrated
Relative Values of ln Attempt to Dismiss the
Quite a number of recommendations were received in the matter of
roadways, etc., from the city engineer last evening by the council.
These were based on petitions referred  to him.
The engineer reported against the
putting of a plank roadway on
Fourth avenue betweer McBride
street and Hays Cove Circle without
proper grading farther than Young
street. The rough grading of the
whole section should be done if it
were to be planked.
Aid. Pattullo said that as there
were some good houses going up here
it would be advisable to have the
petitioners confer with the committee of the council In the matter.
The planking of Seventh street between First and Second avenues was
adversely reported upon by the engineer.   The report was adopted.
It was decided to adopt the report
of the engineer against grading Park
avenue and Eleventh street.
Tbe city engineer reported against
planking from Ninth avenue to Hays
Cove owing to the fact that the grading was soon to be done. The report was adopted.
The engineer reported against tha
petition for a roadway on Alfred
street between Eleventh avenue and
Hays Cove avenue. He recommended a walk from .NMnih avenue to Hays
Cove avenue.
Aid. Hildltch said that if houses
were to be built on the cheaper lots
plank ways must be provided.
Aid. Mobley sugegsted that this be
referred back to the committee with
the opportunity of conferring with
the petitioners.
Aid. Pattullo thought that plank
roadways should be allowed wherever
they were desired by the property
owners. These people paid taxes and
should have the walks.
Aid. Hilditch suggested that an
estimate of the estimated cost of the
work be obtained so that the petitioners might  have the Information.
Aid. Lynch agreed that plank ways
should be provided in all possible instances as the cost was not great and
the value of the lots would be increased beyond the cost.
The matter was referred back to
the committee.
The engineer reported against a
plank roadway on Summit avenue,
owing to the groin.d being so rough
that it could not be done without
grading.
The report was referred back to
the petitioners.
The fire and water committee
recommended that a stand pipe be
installed near Mr. Besseners. This
was adopted.
 o	
WORK  COMMENCED
Length    Width
in feet   in feet
Waterfront  Block  A    5,400       250
Waterfront  Block  C    2,000
Waterfront  Block  E    5,100       300
Section 2, Block E    1,400       225
Section 1, Block G    2,100       700
Section 7, Block G    4,600    ■   300
Section 6, Block G 1,000
Section 7, Block 1    1,400       300
Section S, Block 1    1,700       700
Section 6, R2	
Section S, R2	
Section 1, Rl	
Section 2, Rl	
Present
Proposed
Assessment
Assessment
$1,000,000*
$10,000
25(1,000
25,000
3,000,000
1,000,000
500,000
50,000
1,000,000
500,000
1,000,000
50,000
25,000
25,000
500,000
50,000
5,000
5,000
2,500
2,500
1,000
1,000
3,000
3,000
5,000
5,000
At a meeting of the Board of
Trade held last evening the report
of the special committee that took up
the .question of the G. T. P. assessment was endorsed without a dissenting voice. The basis upon which
it is proposed the city might proceed
in fixing the assessment is set forth
in the table given above. The various
blocks of land held by the railway
in the city are given with the waterfront measurement, the width, the
present assessment and the proposed ■ pressed their willingness to alter the
$7,291,500     $1,726,500     *
in value. It was evidently a very
heavy assessment that had been
struck.
Incidental to the settlement of the
question of the assessment the committee will recommend that the G. T.
P. be required also to grant the
necessary conveyance of park lands,
etc., to the city and make a settlement in the matter of all outstanding
questions in dispute.
The members of the committee ex-
Them.
Clay   And   Cement   .Are   Considered
And Matters Referred to city
Engineer
City Engiiiter
assessment.
The committee, which consisted of
A. J. Morris, Thomas Dunn, P. I. Palmer, P. to. Scott and E. E. Clarke,
had gone very fully into the whole
i,ui-stion and gave reasons fit the
meeting for their fixing of the proposed assessment and the radical reductions proposed. In this work it
was explained that the committee
had as a guide the values put upon
the land by the company itself where
they rented sections for business
purposes. For instance while the
assessment as it stood at present put
the values at as high as $590 a foot,
the company rented on a basis of
$200 a foot or in some instances less
proposed basis for settlement in any
particular If it could be shown that
it was not properly struck.
President Morris urged that any
one who had any suggestions to make
should do so so that there might be
no misunderstanding later.
No one present had any proposal
to make altering the figures and
without dissent the recommendation
passed  the board.
The committee was further empowered to proceed with the matter
in the way of bringing it up before
the city council. This will be done
without delay and an effort will be
made to bring about an adjustment
of the whole difficulty.
ATTRACTIVE  HOTEL
The work of grading section one
is a result of the letting of the contracts, has already begun. While the
contracts had not yet been signed
tip, some of the contractors were prepared to lose no time in starting,
feeling assured that It was only a
matter of form, unci accordingly
operations wen commenced.
Contractor Watson bus quite n
laruo force at work on Second nv-
ciiiii' near the Junction, close to
Lynch's store.
Others arc also preparing to atari
'i soon there will be a very court i able force engaged In the civic
work.
G.T.P. Will Erect an" Up to Date Building on Site in City of
Victoria.
Decision   of   Company   to   Construct
Has   Had   Reviving   Effect
Upon Trade
(Special to The Journal)
Victoria, Sept.   13.—Prior   to    his
departure from Victoria, Mr.' C.  M.
Hays, president of the Grand Trunk
RECEIVED   BY  KING
The city engineer of Vancouver reporting to the board of works on the
sewer pipe tenders referred to iiiiti
and a'so on the relative porosite of
clay and cement sewer pipe gives
some information that Is of interest
in Prince Rupert at this time, when
sewer pipes are to be purchased.
The bids for straight pipe, to be
delivered in four months' time were
as follows: Evans, Coleman & Evans,
clay, $19,315; Dominion Glazed Cement Pipe company, cement, $24,-
500; Gardiner Johnson company,
clay, $26,265. Tbe fight for the
award was between the first two concerns and the committee after hearing the relative merits of c'ay and
cement sewer pipe debated from Alpha to Omega came to the conclusion that the only thing to be done
was to have tests made by the city
engineer. The latter stated that the
cost of concreting the day pipe
would be in the neighborhood of
$8,050, but against this there was
the extra expense of hauling and
handling the heavied cement pip.
Porosity tests had been made with
the result that the clay pipe was
shown to have retained 96 per cent
and 99 per cent of water, while the
cement pipe samples only retained
47 per cent, and 50 per cent. Cement pipe which had been soaked in
iwater for three days held 75 .per
cent and S7 per cent. The engineer
had not yet held tests for crushing
and bursting resistance.
The representative of the clay pipe
agents made the claim that as the
other pipe did not come to the porosity specifications the contract could
not go that way. On the other hand
the representative of the Dominion
Glazed Cement company stated that
his kind of pipe was being used in a
large number of American cities, was
capable of resisting great pressure
and would hold water all right when
allowed to remain in a damp place
such as down in the earth for sewer
and drain purposes. Tho city engineer will make strength tests of
the two kinds of pipe and report at
another meeting of the board.
 o	
TIIE   ENGINEER  GROUP
'ublic Crowded Chamber And Show*
ed Disapproval of • ourse He
Was Pursuing
i Special to The Journal)
Victoria, Sept. 13—Mayor Morley's
repealed attempts to oust City Engineer Smith came to a head lust
night when tbe mayor recommended
tiie dismissal of the official from November 30.
In the lace of strong opposition,
the mayor crawled and agreed to
give the engineer a chance to defend
himself against the alleged charges.
It was pointed out thai no charges
bad ever been made and last night
Mr. Smith's enemies took pains to
say that they never made any against
him.
The public had crowded the council chamber and hissed the mayor
when he made the attempt to have
the official dismissed.
The city engineer has not been
long in office in Victoria, and from
tiie first Mayor Morley has attempted to belittle him. He was not the
mayor's choice for the position in the
fp'st place Co bitter did the mayor
become oi late in his criticism of the
official that he objected to the time
that Ihe engineer took In conversing
with the newspaper reporters of the
city.
NOTED VISITORS HERE
Prince  Rupert   Had   Important',',Party
Pay Short Call in', the
City
Sir .Mackenzie Howell, .1. S. WllliSon,
an I G. G. S. Lindsay Were Delighted With Place
Detachment  From  Canadian   Regiment
Presented an Balmoral
Castle
Sovereign    Expresses    Pleasure
Their  Visit  to   Him   And
Speaks of Results
at
(Special to The Journal)
Ottawa, Sept. 13—That the visit of
the  Queen's Own  Rifles  of Toronto
to the Old  Land  Is bearing  fruit  in
Pacific, spent some time in looking [establishing a sentiment of unity be
over the site upon which the G. T. P.
hotel In this city will be built. Details in connection with the laying
out of the grounds were considered
and it has been learned that Mr.
Hays has practically decided to havo
the hotel built from 66 to 80 feet
from the street. A half circle drive
leading lo the entrance from the cor-
tween the different parts of the imperial army is evidenced by a message received here. The Governor-
General has received a telegram from
the King which reads as follows;—
"1   have   had   tlie   pleasure   of  receiving at Balmoral o representative
detachment of the Queen's own Regl-
iiii'tit  of Canada and  of  hearing
their  success   at   the    manoeuvres,
'loviiicial
What
Assnyer    deports    I'pon
He   Found   ul   Atlin
(Special to The Journal)
Victoria, Sept. 13.—Tbe provincial assayer, Mr. Carmichael, in a report upon the Engineer group of
mines at Atlin, which he has just
made and which is published as a
bulletin, says as a result of his investigations there a few weeks ago
that the property contains a number
of small  quartz  veins carrying high
There arrived in the city by the
I'rince George on Sunday a party of
distinguished travellers. It Included
Sir Mackenzie Bowell of Brockville,
formerly Prime Minister of Canada,
G. G. S. Lindsay, K.C., of Toronto,
one of Canada's best known and most
popular financiers, and J. S. U'illison,
editor of the Toronto News, who was
accompanied by Mrs. Wllllson.
The party was taken about the city
of Prince Ruperl by Mayor stork,
who is an old friend of Mr. Lindsay,
and were given every opportunity to
see the city al Its best. They were
highly delighted with the prospects
and regretted thai they could nol all
remain over. They went on to Stewart where Mr. Lindsay stayed over
i day or two to look into tbe camp
as an Investment. The other members of the party went south last
night.
Sir Mackenzie, who is regarded as
the dean of the newspaper faculty in
values in free gold, which give good Canada, being still Identified with the
returns under the present primitive (newspaper business, had been on a
method of working. There are larger visit to the coast, visiting bis son,
veins, which, with a well-equlpepd |the collector of customs in V
plant and economical methods, would
probably  yield   a   large   tonnage  of
lower grade quartz which would pay
for treatment; these vein.- hould
first, however, be prospected and
carefully sampled.
ZANARDI  POWER
tier  of  Belleville   and    Government The spirit thus shown ley the Domln-
ion is a good augury of the future of
t ho Imperial army."
SELLING  ELLISON
Engineer Is
liiciiil  lie
Not
City
iii'liiii'd
to Take
to   lie
Actio
form   if
streets to the corner of Elliott and
Government will be constructed.
cows of flowers, ornamental fountains  nnd   shrubberies   will   form   a
tchen ( decoration In the gounds.
The hotel Itself will be constucted
'in a site 240 feel long and 125 feet
in  depth,    An  alleyway  en.tance  to
tie building will be buill loin Belle-
of the prem-
tenders must be  in  proper
they were to be accepted.
Aid. Barrow said that  the city en
gineer bad agreed to alter the sped'
lications somewhat in future so as tq j ville street  to the rear
conform to the more general practice
in this part of the country.
Later in the evening Aid. Hildltch
raised the question of sureties for
small contractors. He did not think
those taking contracts amounting to
a few thousand dollars should have
to go to all the trouble and expense
of   writing  away  and   securing  the  Hon Of the city fronting on the Jam
necessary   guarantees    as    now   required.
Other members of the council
agreed with this and it was decided
Town  l.ot> in  Divisional  Point   Have
Been Placed on the SInrket lien
('. D, Newton has be in appointed
agent for Prince Rupert for tin town
site of Ellison, the first di\ Islonal
point    on     the   G. T.  P,  platted  in
isos.
The announcement that  the G, T,
P. had purchased the site was receiv-  British   Columbia,    lie  lias  alreadylnol  recommend doing anything with
ed   with    great    satisfaction   among  pul   the  lots on  sale and   reports a  it al  present.
realty agents and owners of property  brisk market,
genera'ly In the city,    li is felt that.     The situation of Ellison
un miler. lie took advantage of the opportunity to comi norl li and was delighted thai he did so,
Mr. Wllllson, one of the best
known newspaper editors in Canada,
li making a trip pot tly t | ■ ■ :,.
■ '-'I partly in a liuslnes way, As
■" repri 11 ntatlve in Canada in a
news Bense of the London Tim..
■   ■'    ■ ■ ■    ol  ai 'tic I.    deal-
o   west    fot    that    b     it
il.    He al ■ i lug Infor-
ihal inn f b lo
Ion en  ihe   .
Mr.   i.he! ;■;    i     Id nl II   ■!     wiiii
I il   III ins   In
■   ■   .- . mid   .i
I  ol Crov Pass
' I   company   before   the   i ontrol
d ti  the III11 Interests.    His mis-
Is    o           Iin          He  will
end b  fi w days In  Prlnci   Ruperl
his i ■  urn and may possibly make
trip up i ne Skeena.   Mr, Lindsay is
of tie. representatives of capital
Aid. Barrow suggested that If the  'il111 is over a good fellow.    He Is re-
which Is council was not to act in the matter       " "',l Bna °s,e" '' ">' !,n llis ;ip-
Thi    II       tglneer I e   nted c
report on the 1'.t ■ .i1    j ower
■ I :.mi    of    Aid.    Bat I'"-      Col.
i - eported that I liei i   ippeared to
lie ii vasl amount of power a allable,
bat attempts so far conducted in the
,; i of hat nesslng I he I Idi id t ol
.'■ii' beyond I he expei Imental
lie agreed thai the oppot l in
wc re excellent at Zanardi for cat lying out the experiment, bul I e • ould
tiie  erection  of  the  hotel  will  con
siderably enhance in beauty that por
not far from Hazelton on the line of that his (Aid.  Barrow's) application
the g. T. P. and on the Skeena
river, was described in the last ls-
Bay causeway, as well as Increasing sue of the Journal. The site is re-
the value of surrounding property, garded as a strategic one in the de-
Tlie sals has given an impetus to velopment of the northern Interior
transactions in local property and aland  from  Ellison will   radiate    the
ai Ottawa should be allowed to pro-
c cl.    He suggested further that the
lime during which he should  be allowed   to  use  the  rights  should  be
lates,   and   by
intact witli )iIin.
all   who   come   In
s. Massey, of the city telephone
■■iff. received the welcome news a
limited so that if he did not do any- day or two ago thai he was successful
tiling he should not stand ln the way  In  winning second place In  the rare
mend  the contract .form so that [continued  brisk  movement is antici.
bonds might be given. |pated during the autumn months.
business routes into one of the rich-1 of others.
est districts of the province. The report was received.
de awing of Harry Salmon In Victoria.
Ho won $2,205 by It, THE   PRINCE   RUPERT   JOURNAL
Tuesday, September 13, 1910
MINES AT HAZELTON
R- G. Steele is Well Pleased With the
Outlook Near That
Town.
He
Sees no  Difficulty at all  in Getting tbe tire From the
Property
R. G. Steele, mining and mechanical engineer, went over .Vine Mile
mountain, from the Silver Cup claims
on Hie west to ilie east end of the
mineralized zone, including the Sunrise and tiie Lead King group owned by tiie Hazelton Nina Mine Mining
Company, returning to town at the
end of last week, says the Omlneca
Herald, lie went up principally to
examine the Silver Bell and the
claims owned by L. M. Woods and
others, near the Silver basin.
Mr. Steele quite agrees with the
opinion of all mining men who have
visted the hill that the formation
is sedimentary, cut by granitic intrusions.
Four deep basins have been cut
into the north side of the hill, in the
westernmost of which lies the Silver
Cup group and the claims of the
Silver Bell group, two in number,
owned by S. B. Slinger and others In
Hazelton.
At the upper tunnel of the Silver
Cup men are at present sorting out
and sacking for shipment the ore
broken last winter when this tunnel
was driven. Ore is being sacked at
the No. 2 tunnel as well and this tunnel is being driven ahead. The ore
in both places is of a very high grade.
The next place visited was the Silver
Bell. Here he found a ledge about
two feet wide.    Very little work has
AFTER THE COMBINES
Union of Canadian Municipalities Adopt
Report Dealing With
Subject.
\\.
1). Lighthall of Montreal   Warns
Public Respecting Picrpont
Morgan
BUILD  FROM  EAST
Unless Conditions Change G. T. P. Will
Not Award Further
Tenders.
One of the features of the opening
session of the tenth annual convention of the Union of Canadian Municipalities in Toronto on September 1,
was the note of alarm in the report
of tiie honorary secretary, to. D.
Lightliall, K.C., Montreal. Mr.
Lighthall made reference to troublesome combinations, and in this connection he mentioned the J. Plerpont
Morgan influence as being a menace
to Canada.
"We have found specially troublesome certain large combinations,"
said Secretary Lighthall in his report. "One was the Bell Telephone
Company, which as regards us, is an
essentially United States corporation
—a form of the American Bell Company, and follows its methods. After
years of contestation we obtained our
points, and it is now quiet. Another
Canadian origin, and which has
proved the most serious and deftly-
managed organization the municipalities have thus far had to fight, is the
Mackenzie-Mann combination, which
has pulled Otttawa political wires on
a large scale against our cities for
many years, and has been said to
'own the House.' Their enterprise is
admirable, but some of their methods
regrettable; perhaps we may expect
more agreement with them in the
future.
"But both are now overshadowed
been done, but the ore is of first rate|by a new combination to which the
Contractors  Object  to  Taking  More
Work Under Prevailing State
of Labor Market
quality.
Passing over the dividing ridge
where are located the Barber and
Barber Bill group where a vein was
seen from six to eight feet wide with
a varying widtli of ore of good quality up to two feet, the Sunrise group
was readied, consisting of four
claims, under bond to Prince Rupert
people for $00,000, and where work
is going ahead with four or five men.
Ore is being sacked rrom the open
cut in the ledge. While there he saw
them heave out a block of solid ore
weighing a ton and a half or more.
A little lower down the hill they are
driving a tunnel to intersect the same
vein.
In his own words Mr. Steele says:
"This, in my mind, is a splendid
showing. Going over the second
ridge into the next basin, the third,
the Hazelton-Nine Mile Mining Company have a staff of men prospecting
or, in other words, following up a
lead which I presume is the same
lead as the Sunrise, which looks very
promising. Over a small ridge we
then came into the fourth basin, occupied by tbe Lead King, where I
was informed a shipment of ore had
been made to the Trail smelter with
very favorable results. Some thousand feet fricir where Hie ore was
■taken for this shipment, is a cross
vein, thickness three feet six inches,
and exposed for about two hundred
feet, of very high grade ore. Tills
looks to be the most promising ledge
of any place on  the mountain.    At
attention of every Canadian citizen
ought to be directed. I refer to the
Pierpont Morgan influence. We have
it on good authority that this financial organization is so complete that
all the principal city franchises,
waterpowers and great resources
generally of Canada are mapped out
in New York for sytematic invasion
on the same lines as those of the
United States. Consequently terminal bills and power and canal bills
on a vast scale scientifically directed
have been appearing on the horizon
with powerful New York backing, for
the past three years, and constitute
one of the most formidable questions
affecting our national heritage."
The secretary's report contained
the following interesting clause in
connection with references to the
formation of the Union of Canadian
Municipalities:
"Evil tilings were being done by
unscrupulous financiers and politicians, which threatened the foundations of all iberty and honesty in
Canada. Acting on models which
disgraced the United States legislatures, public rights were being boldly
wrested from our communities by
organized corruption and fraud, and
even the greatest, municipalities were
flouted and defied, and their best citizens were in despair. The worst
feature of the matter was that dishonesty was thus held up to the
young of our nation as the sure avenue to success, and honor was syni-
oally regarded as a failure. Montreal,
The Grand Trunk Pacific railwaj
has abandoned the idea of calling for
tenders this fall for the building of
the 500 mile section, representing
that portion of the road between Aldermere,in the Bulkley valley and
Tete Jaune Cache, not under contract. Scarcity of labor is given as
the cause for this decislon.-
Thls was the announcement made
by Mr. Charles M. Hays, president of
the Grand Trunk Pacific railway,
prior to leaving Vancouver. This
bears out the opinion expressed by
Mr. Hays before he left Prince Rupert when discussing the situation.
Mr. J. W. Stewart, managing director
of Messrs. Foley, Welch and Stewart,
which built the line from Saskatoon
to McLeod river, 130 miles west of
Edmonton, and which also construct-
Mr. Hays that his firm declines to
accept an offer to bul'd the Alder-
ed the first 100-mile section out of
Prince Rupert, has formally notified
mere-Tete Jaune Cache division embracing the interior tableland of
British Columbia. He gave as a reason that the firm is losing money on
its contract for the construction of
the 140-mile section extending from
a point near Kitsilas Canyon on the
Skeena river to Aldermere. Although
paid ?3 per day laborers are very
scarce and the various construction
camps are so undermanned that little
progress with the work can be made.
The outlook for deriving a profit
from the building of the uncompleted
gap across central British Columbia
looked so unfavorable that Mr. Stewart threw up his hands. Under the
circumstances the railway had no
other alternative than to abandon Its
plans for hastening the completion of
the road.
It was realized that if Mr. Stewart,
with the immense resources at his
disposal, and with a vast plant virtually on the ground, could not see
his way clear to undertake the work
little likelihood existed of any other
firm being in a position to carry out
a contract.    Messrs. Foley, Welch &
f"
■MHiniiiHiiiiiMiiimiih
HAYNOR BROS.
I HnnfiA   Flirnicliorc     I'ocated temporarily, since the Are*  g
jg tlUUaC    1 Ul IIISIIC !■>   j„ Dwiedin Block, corner of Second   g
S =                                              =    Avenue and  Eighth  Street.                   ft
■ •                                           SS
g Some snnps in slightly damaged   goods  which  we  want  to   clear  ■
E out  before moving into new quarters in Manson Blk., Third Ave.. j§
I FUNERAL  FURNISHERS
vinnniiianniEwiniiiHiiiiiHiinHinwiiwiiiaiiiMimii
I
I
.5
Stewart is not only the richest but
enjoys the unique advantage of possessing a complete equipment which
is being utilized on the contracts now
being carried out. It owns on the
Skeena river a fleet of three steamboats, representing an Investment of
nearly $100,000. Any other firm undertaking the building of the big interior gap would have to Incur a vast
initial expenditure in getting Its
plant on the ground, both on the
eastern and western ends of the contract; and it would have to face the
same labor problems. Messrs. Foley,
Welch & Stewart In 'addition to their
contracts on the Pacific division, are
also building te section from McLeod
river to Tete Jaune Cache, on the
Fraser river, 45 miles this side of
the summit of the Rockies, at Yellowstone Pass; if these railway contractors could not control the situation and see an advantage in taking
the proffered work others could not,
to say the least, build the remaining
link with any prospect of financial
success.
The upshot of the whole affair Is
it is not improbable that construction
will only be pushed from the eastern
end, starting at Tele Jaune Cache,
This Mr. Stewart is perfectly willing
to do. If such an arrangement should
be effected it means a longer time
will be occupied in linking the coast
with the prairie provinces. Mr. Stewart has also made it quite clear that
although losing money he will carry
out his contract for building the 140-
mile section from Kitsilas Canyon to
Aldermere.
EXAMINATION    FOR    INSPECTOR
OF STEAM BOILERS AND
MACHINERY
Examinations for the position of
Inspector of Steam Boilers and Machinery, under the "Steam Boilers
Inspection Act 1901," will be held
at the Parliament Buildings, Victoria, commencing November 7th,
1910. Application and instruction
forms can be had on application to
the undersigned, to whom the former
must be returned correctly filled in,
not later than October 24th, 1910.
Salary H30 per month, Increasing at
the rate of $5 per month each year
to a maximum of $180.
JOHN PECK,
Chief Inspector of Machinery,
New Westminster, B.C.
•The
-0-
In a disastrous flood in France, in
1840, sixty thousand acres were inundated, and over six hundred bouses
were swept away.
It is officially estimated that in
the United Kingdom there are.about
nine million acres of land suitable
for afforestation, not now under timber.
Washington Cafe
A PLACE TO EAT
Seats For Ladies
Everything Clean and Tasty
Prices Reasonable
—THE,—
Oliver
Typewriter
—FOR—
Seventeen Cents a Day
Please read the headline over
again. Then its tremendous significance will dawn upon you.
An Oliver Typewriter—the standard visible writer—the most highly
perfected typewriter on the market
—yours for 17 cents a day!
The typewriter whose conquest of
the commercial world Is a matter of
business history—yours for 17 cents
a day!
The typewriter that is equipped
with scores of such conveniences as
"The Balance Shift"—"The Ruling
Device"—"The Double Release"—
"The Locomotive Base"—"The Automatic Spacer"—"The Automatic Tabulator"—"The Disappearing Indicator"—"The Adjustable Paper Fingers"—"The Scientific Condensed
Keyboard"—all
Yours For J 7 Cents a Day
to. F. CARPENTER, PROPRIETOR
Second Avenue, near Seventh Street
LAND PURCHASE NOTICE
Coast Land District—District of
Skeena.
TAKE NOTICE that we, George
Hie and Robert Corlett, of Little Canyon, B.C., occupation farmer and
farmer, intend to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted at the south-east portion of an island situated and lying
about two miles below Little Canyon,
near the south bank of the Skeena
river, Range V, Skeena Land District,
District of Coast, thence northerly,
thence easterly, thence southerly
around the shores of the island back
to the point of beginning and Inclosing 30 acres, more or less
GEORGE HIE,
ROBERT CORLETT.
Dated August 1, 1910. A19
Ad kAd kAd kAd kAd kAd kAd kAd kAd kAd kAd kAd kAd kAd kAd kAd kAd kAd kAd kA.
*;• i»J« ♦!• «5* *!« *J» *J« »J» »J» »J« *J» •$• «J« »J* *J* »J» »J» *■;• »J- *l* •£« *J* «J> *5» *J» «J« <{» *J« •!• ►S* *I* •?» "S* *3> •3*-** ■*!♦ *£* *!• *!* •»* *4* *&*!* •£"• •!* *S* *I* *!• •J"J*'«5* *5* •!* *J» *S» *S* *J**5**5» *i» «5» *!♦ *J*
1 i   THE JOURNAL
We announced this new sales plan
recently, just to feel the pulse of the
people. Simply a small cash payment—then 17 cents a day. That
is the plan in a nutshell.
The result has been such a deluge of applications for machines
that we are simply astounded.
The demand comes from people of
all classes, all ages, all occupations.
The majority of inquiries has
come from people of known financial
standing who were attracted by the
novelty of the proposition. An impressive demonstration of the immense popularity of the Oliver Typewriter.
A startling confirmation of our belief that the Era of Universal Typewriting is at hand.
A Quarter of a Million People are
Making Money With
TIje.
*
*
*
*
the bead of the basin and apparently tne larSe!"- of the municipalities, had
at the east, end of the mineralized
zone is the Silver Pick group of
three claims. Development work carried on by the locators has shown
up some very high-grade ore.
"Although tin? hill has been much
shattered on the surface, my opinion
is that as depth is attained the broken country will disappear and also
that the characteristics of the mineral will change, When a formation
ci,i rying a higher percentage of lime behalf of municipalities, Including
is reached, large replacemenl    areas; the    proposed   Toronto fi  Hamilton
just  fallen  before  an   unscrupulous
combine,
"It was not long before the grafters, large and little, began to realize
that a new force had entered the
field, and that, the municipalities,
when united, were not weak, but
roit'd be effective protectors of the
people."
The report also made reference to
several  figbts  successfully  made  on'
Is the Official Advertising
Medium for the City
of Prince Rupert
may be expected to be found,
railway bill before the Ontario legls-
"Consldering    the    difficulties    of latur0'   i""1   lh"   Montreal   Terminal
transportation and getllii" tho ore
from the hill, 1 myself do not. see any
difficulty at all in getting the ore
fi< in any of the .Nine Mile properties.
A good natural grade can be obtained up Salmon river, and the ore can
be dropped from the mines by gravitation to the railway.
"There is water power in abundance for all the mines; timber on tbe
lower reaches of the mountain, and
I am commissioned to go and examine coal situated almost at tje
foot, of the mines."
On an average, January, October,
November and December have afore
high winds than March, and February about equals that month in tills
respect.
The duration of British Ministries
for the past century has been very
little over three years.
railway and Toronto Terminal Railway bills before the Dominion parliament.
It was adopled with expressions of
gratification.    Mr.  .lames  I'aton, ex-
mayor   of   Cbarlottetown,   P.   E.   I.,
said he had no doubt thai Mr. Light- j
hell bad  saved thousands and  thou- j
sands of dollars to some of the cities. I
 0	
SHIPBUILDING  IN CANADA
Sir Robert Perks said in ti recent
interview that he expected to participate in negotiations for a shipbuilding plant to be located In St. John,
X.B., but before anything was done j
in this direction a subsidy would I
have to ho offered and bonuses given
for vessels turned out. A "shipbuilding plant could not be a success unless assured of continued work. It.
would not pay to start a plant to
build one ship for the Canadian navy
alone.
•I* *•* *!«»!«-!»ij* *!* *«« »!* *•• *•* »** *t**»* '** *»* **- »!* *•* »"• *»* *** *»• **• *!* *«* *t* **- »** »*- *♦- **' *'- *** *»' 'J* **- •»* *!* **- •■•* •!* *»* *♦* *»* *!* **• *»* *•* *•* *** *.4 eft
FOLLOW THE TREND OF THE CITY'S
PROGRESS BY SUBSCRIBING
FOR THE PAPER
.;. $ ►;..;, *;, ,j» *;« •> •>»;. »> * »>.;. $ »> »> * •> »> c> »> -> * .> »>.;.»;. •;. *> * .;*.;«.>.;. »>»;. .;* .j..;. ►> .j. *;. »j. *;. .$. .j. *;. .j. .>.;..;..;.
The Journal aims at keeping Prince Rupert
and new B.C. ever before the public eye. Send
it to your friends and any whom you wish to
interest in the coming Metropolis of the North.
-;•.;..;. ^..;.^.:..:.<.<..:.^..:..:..;..:..:..:..;.•:..;..:..;..;..:-.
. »> v *.;. »>.;. ►>.;. ►;. $.;..;. <,.;. *;«»;,,;,.;
^WWWWMWWWWWWWWWWWWWI^
OLIVER
The Standard Visible Writer
The Oliver Typewriter is a moneymaker, right from the word "go!" So
easy to run that beginners soon get
in the "expert" class. Earn as you
learn. Let the machine pay the 17
cents a day—and all above that is
yours.
Wherever you are, there's work to
be done and money to be made by
using the Oliver. The business world
is calling for Oliver operators. There
are not enough to supply the demand.
Their salaries are considerably above
those of many classes of workers.
"An Oliver Typewriter in
Every  Home!"
That is our battle cry today. We
have made the Oliver Bupreme In
usefulness and absolutely indispensable in business. Now comes the
conquest of the home.
The simplicity and strength of the
Oliver fit It for family use. It Is becoming an important factor In the
home training of young people. An
educator as well as a money maker.
Our new selling plan puts the
Oliver on the threshold of every
home in America. Will you close
the door of your home or office on
this remarkable Oliver opportunity?
Write for further details of our
easy offer and a free copy of the new
Oliver catalogue.    Address:
R. C. BEAN
Prince Rupert Agent
General   Offices:   Oliver   Typewriter
Building, Chicago, 111.
CANCELLATION  OF RESERVE
NOTICE Is hereby given that the
reserve existing on Crown lands ln
the vicinity of Babine Lake, and
situate in Cassiar District, notice of
which bearing date June 30th, 1909,
was published in the British Columbia Gazette, dated July 2nd, 1908, Is
cancelled.
ROBERT A. RL'NWICK,
Deputy Commissioner of Lands.
Lands Department,
Victoria, B. C, June 16th, 1910
(First Insertion July 6.) Tuesday, September TS, :t910
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
AN ANCIENT SHRINE
Discovery Hade on Island of Cyprus of
Early Greek Inscription.
Archaeological Research Assisted by
Shepherd's Casual iFind as
He Rested
Untouched by human hands for at
least seven centuries before Christ,
the shrine (Paphos in the classics)
of Aphrodite has been discovered at
Rantidi, in the southwest corner of
Cyprus. One of the discoverers, Dr.
Max O. Uichter, in his account in
the Times, says: "We became as excited as if we had drunk a whole
bottle  of Veuve  Clicquot."
The worship of Aphrodite (Venus)
is known to have been derived in
part at least from the Phoenicians,
who were In Cyprus some 3,000
years ago. Milton gives the other
names of the goddess, who was
Cupid's mother, in his lines: "As-
toreth, whom the Phoenicians called Astarte, Queen of Heaven." Ever
since 1S7S, when the English occupied Cyprus, they have conducted
archaeological research, notably at
Kouklia, but It has been reserved for
the Germans to discover the shrine
a short distance away at Rantidi, a
place mapped by Lord Kitchener in
his early days.
Doctor Richter was led to the discovery ln a way that reads like an
eclogue:
"One day a shepherd was sitting
on one of the ancient stoiielic Ids 'if
Rantidi. After playing for a long
time on his reed flute be grew tired
of his pastoral airs and began to
scratch with his long staff one of
the stones at his feet As he did so
he saw apearing on the .surfeie of
the stone In two regularly a.seled
lines most curious signs unknown to
him and quite different from the
Greek inscriptions lying about: in the
temple yard of Kouklia, bis village
home, Which he passed every day
witli  his flock."
Ultimately this stone reached Mr.
Clcauthis Pierides, expert In antiquities, who at once recognized the
Cyprian syllabic inscription. The
shepherd was invited lo a sumptuous
meal, and received a packet of tobacco, as well as a good baksheesh.
He returned to his village, engaged
some secret digegrs, and in a short
time ten inscribed stones or more,
counting what were broken, were
carried in mule carts to Limassoi, the
inaval port of Cyprus.
Doctor Richter was informed, and
located the spot with Doctor Koritz-
ky, last May. "The new, like the
old, road to Papho runs through Rantidi. After walking for about ten
minutes we lighted on the first field
of ancient remains. A thicket, more
or less dense, partially surrounds
them, and bushes grow between the
stones and over them. Unfortunately we had very little time at our dis^
posal. We were watched by three
mounted policemen, two of whom
were in uniform, while the third was
a detective most amusingly disguised
as a villager."
Doctor Richter regrets that English engineers had allowed stones
with precious inscriptions to be
broken for road ballast. He is now
negotiating with the German Professor Dorpfield and the British
museum for the excavation of the
sbrlne to. be completed by Germans.
 o	
AERIAL NAVY
Growth of tho System in Connection
Willi Germany
of Strasburg, but it proved:a failure.
In consequence tbe Prussian general
staff for many years took little in-
teiest in aeronautics, it was not until after the famous flight of Captain Renard, in the dirigible "La
France" in 1884 that the minister of
war founded a corps of aeronautical
engineers, of which the importance
steadily increased until in 1901 it
became a battalion of two companies provided with a complete
transport for its material.
In the meantime the study of aeronautics was carried on in the Bavarian army, which had the advantage
of the assistance of the brilliant inventor, Commandant Parseval. His
first Important discovery was that
of the "Kite Balloon" In 1893, an invention which offered more than double the stability of the ordinary captive, and allowed observations to
be carried out In comparatively
violent winds. Balloons of this kind
which owe their value to their shape
and air-ballonet were used In the
French army manoeuvres of 190S
and 1909 for the purposes connected
with wireless telegraphy.
Tbe next stage was marked by the
Zeppelin "dirigibles," beginning with
the airship which in 1900 manoeuvred over Lake Constance and was
destroyed soon after near its shed.
In 1906 a private company exploited the non-rigid airships designed by Commandant Parseval, and finally the authorities constructed the
semi-rigid military type known as
the "Gross," from its designer, Commandant. Gross, chief of the aeronautical battalion.
At present the German army has
in commission two "Parseval," one
Zeppelin," and three "Gross," besides an experimental balloon, and for
these airships two more companies
of aeronautical engineers have been
formed. Besides these military airships there are & number of "dirigibles" in private hands which could
be commandeered in time of war,
so that Germany has today at her
disposal a number of. airships far
exceeding that which other nations,
including France, could set in the
field against her"
LAND  PURCHASE  NOTICE
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that John Cherry,
of Victoria, B. C, occupation mattress maker, intends to apply for permission to purchase ihe following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-east corner and about 14 miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence west 80 chains, thence
south 80 chains, thence east 80
chains, thence north 80 chains to
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
JOHN CHERRY.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 3, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Reginald
Davey, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation machinist, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands, in the vicinity of
Citwancool or Chean Weln Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-west corner and about 6 %
miles distant in a north-westerly direction from the north end of Kitwancool Lake, thence south 80
chains, thence east SO chains, thence
north 40 chains, thence west 40
chains, thence north 40 chains,
chains, thence west 40 chains to a
point, of commencement, and containing 480 acres  (more or less).
REGINALD   DAVEY.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated  May  30,  1910. Jy8
Coast Land District—District of
Skeena.
TAKE       NOTICE     that     Elijah
Rounds, of Victoria, B.C., occupation
Stewart, intends to apply for permission   to   purchase   the   following  described     lands:—Commencing   at   a
post  planted   one-half    mile    north,
i and one-half mile east, of Nettie A.
Lairds N. E. corner of application to
purchase, and 300 feet, east of Ana-
I ham   Lake   trail,    marked     E.   R.'s
south-west corner,  thence 40  chains
east, thence 40 chains north, thence
40   chains   west,     thence   40   chains
south   to   point   of   commencement,
|and  containing  160  acres,  more  or
less. ELIJAH  ROUNDS.
Vincent  M.   Schibner,  Agent.
Dated May 25, 1910. jn21
LAND PURCHASE NOTICES
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Brenton
Brown, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation insurance agent, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands in the vi-
vinlty of the Kitwancool or Chean
Wein Valley:—Commencing at a
post planted at the north-east corner  and  about  ten  miles  distant  in
north-westerly direction from the
north end of Kitwancool Lake,
thence south 8 0 chains, thence east
80 chains, thouce north 80 chains,
thence west 8 0 chains to point of
commencement, and containing 640
acres, more  or  less.
BRENTON BROWN.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 1, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Jessie Stead-
man, of Victoria, B. C, occupation
married woman, intends to apply for
ncrmission to purchase the following described lands, in the vicinity of
Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-east corner and about 6%
miles distant in a north-westerly direction from the north end of Kitwancool Lake, thence soutii 80
bains; thence west 80 chains, thence
north SO chains, thence east SO
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 040 acres, more or
less. JESSIE STEADMAN.
James to. Smith, Agent.
Dated  May  31,  1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Sarah Ward,
of Victoria, B. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kltwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. E. corner and about 22 milec distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north 80 chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence south 80
chains, thence east 8 0 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or .ess.
SARAH WAR;).
James to. Smith, Agen:.
Dated June  6th,  19.10 Jy8
LAM) PURCHASE NOTICES
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that George Mc-
Bain, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
merchant, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Weln Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. W. corner and about 26% miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north SO chains, thence
east     80   chains,     thence  south   80
ains,  thence  west  SO    chains     to
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Frederick
Tutt, of Selkirk, Manitoba, occupation merchant, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. W. corner about 14% miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north 40 chains, thence
east 40 chains, thenee south 40
chains, thence west 4 0 chains to
point of commencement, and containing 100 acres, more o* less.
FREDERICK   TUTT.
James to. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 3, 1910. JyS
Skeena Land  District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Henry Van
Wyck, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation hotel keeper, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands In tbe vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein
Valley:—Commencing at a post
planted at the north-east corner and
about  20  miles  distant  in  a  north-
I.ANI) PURCHASE NOTICES
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Leilii Cherry,
of Victoria, B. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lauds In the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at tne
S. E. corner and about 21 miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north SO chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence south 80
chains, thence east SO chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
LE1I1I   CHERRY.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 6t.li, 1910. J.v8
Skeena Laud  District     District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that John Grieve,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
agent, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wien Valley: —
Commencing at a posl planted at the
S. E. corner and about 20 miles distant   in   a   north-westerly   direction
westerly direction from the north end from  the  nonh  end  of  Kitwancool
if Kitwancool Lake, thence south SO
chains, thence west So chains, thence
north   So  chains,   thence    east     SO
point of commencement, and contain- chains  to   point   of   commencement,
and   containing   640   acres,   more  or
less. HENRY VAN WYCK.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated  June  6th,   191u.. JyS
ing 640 acres, more or less.
GEORGE  McBAIN.
James to. Smith, Agent.
Dated .Tune Sth, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE   NOTICE     that    Catherine
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Minnie Clarke
Wdsb, of Vancouve., B. C, occupa- of Vancouver, B. C, occupation mar-
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassia
TAKE NOTICE that Bruce Older-
shaw, of Victoria, B. C, occupation
jeweller, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of the
Citwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing   at   a   post   planted   at
he north-west corner and about 7%
miles distant in a north-westerly direction from the north end of Kitwancool Lake; thence south SO
chains, thence east 40 chains, thence
north 80 chains, thence west 40
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 320 acres, more or
less. BRUCE  OLDERSHAW.
James W.  Smith,  Agent.
Dated  May  31,  1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Echo Dudgeon, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
assistant dentist, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of the
Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-east corner and about 7 %
miles distant in a north-westerly direction from the north end of Kitwancool Lake, thence south 8 0
chains, thenee north 80 chains,
thence east SO chains to point of
commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
ECHO DUDGEON;
James to. Smith, Agent.
Dated May 31, 1910. Jy8
tion married woman, intends to ap
ply for permission to purchase the
following described lands in tiie vi-
vinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein
Valley:—Commencing at a post
planted at. the S. E. corner and about
17*4 miles distant in a north-westerly direction from the north end of
Kitwancool Lake, thence north 80
chains, thence west SO chains, thence
south 80 chains, thence east 80
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 640 acres, more or
less. CATHERINE  WELSH.
James to. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 4,  1910. JyS I
ried woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands in tbe vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
N.  to. corner and about 28 %   miles
Lake, thence north SO chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence soutii SO
chains, thence east 80 chains to
point of comemncement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
JOHN GRIEVE.
James  to. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 6l.li, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE mat Alfred E.
Parklngton, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation broker, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of
Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—■
Commencing at a post planted at the
S.   E.   corner  and  about  15 Vi   miles
distant and in a north-westerly di-idistant in a north-westerly direction
rection from the north end of Kit- j from the north end of Kitwancool
wancool Lake, thence south 40 chains Lake, thence north Su chains, thence
thence east SO chains, thence north west 80 chains, thence soutii 80
40 chains, thence west 80 chains to chains, thence east 80 chains to the
point of commencement and contain- ] point of commencement, and containing 320  acres,  more  or less.
MINNIE   CLARKE.
James to. Smith, Agent.
Dated  June  8th,   1910. Jy8
ing 640 acres, more or less.
ALFRED E.  PARKINGTON.
km-
James W. Smith,
Dated June 3, 1910.
Agent.
Jy8
FOR
LETTER HEADS ENVELOPES
BUSINESS CARDS
VISITING CARDS       STATEMENTS
Prince Rupert Journal
Sfc
m
LAND PURCHASE NOTICES
In the Paris Temps, M. Reginald
Kami discusses the progress of military aeronautics In Germany. If the
destruction of two German "dirigibles" within au Interval of a few days
has paralyzed the progress of commercial aeronautics, the case is very
different, says M Kunn, with the
army. Indeed, on the very day of
the loss of the "Erbslob," with its
five occupants, airship manoeuvres
which are to last for three or four
weeks began at Metz.
"These manoeuxres," says M.
Kann, "are intended to demonstrate
the progress accomplished and to
throw light on the defects that re-
mainli and on the remedies which
the defects require. The German
army alone possesses sufficient balloons and sheds to render combined
experiments possible."
M. Kan goes on to point out that
the founder of German aeronautics
was an Englishman, Coxwell by name
who In 1870 offered his services with
those of two captive balloons to the
German army. An attempt to use bis
balloons was made during the siege
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that William
11 ii ine Grant, of Stewart, B.C., occupation engineer, Intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:- Commencing al ii
posl marked W.H.G.'s S.W. Cor., and
planted adjoining Alfred Manson's
corner post, thence 80 chains north,
along W. N. Harrison's west Une,
thense east SO chains, thence south
80 chains, thence west 80 chains, following Alfred Manson's north line to
iolnl of commencement, and containing tiiu acres, more or less.
WILLIAM   HUME GRANT.
Frank  R.  Strolm, Agent.
Dated July 2, 1910. Jy22
Skeena Land District—District, of
Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that The Canadian
Fish and Cold Storage Company, of
Vancouver, B. C, occupation mercantile and manufacturing, intends
to apply for permission to purchase
the following described lands: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-east corner of lot 34, Range 5,
Coast District, thence south 20
chains, thence east 4 0 chains, thence
north 25 chains more or less to the
shore line, thence following along
the shore line to the point of commencement and containing 90 acres,
more or less.
The Canadian  Fish  &.  Cold
Storage Company Limited.
J.  I-I.  Pillsbury, Agent,
.■ted July 14, 1910. Jyl9
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that William
Simpson, of Lindsay, Ont., occupation hotel-keeper, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands in the' vicinity of the Kitwancool or Chean Wein
Valley:—Commencing at a post
planted at the south-east corner and
about 7 % miles distant in a north
westerly direction from the north
end of Kitwancool Lake, thence
north SO chains, thence west 80
chains, thence south SO chains,
thence east SO Chains to point of
commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
WILLIAM SIMPP3N.
James to. Smith, Agent.
Dated May  31,  1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that George Tutt,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation den-
ist, intends to apply for permission
o purchase the following described
amis in the vicinity of the Kitwancool or Chean
menclng    at
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Edward Cas-
pell, of Cayley, Alberta, occupation
merchant, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of the
Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing at, a post planted at the
N. W. corner and distant about 15%
miles in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence south 80 chains, thence
east 80 chains, thence north 80
chains, thence west 80 chains to
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
EDWARD CASPELL.
James  W.  Smith, Agent.
Dated June 3, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Thomas Sills,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation machinist, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in  the vicinity of Kit-J S
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles Gei-
ger, of Victoria, h. C, occupation
clerk, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Comemncing at a post planted at the
S. E. corner and about 19 miles distant In a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north SO chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence south SO
chains, thence east SO chains to tbe
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
CHARLES GIKGER.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 4th, 1910. Jy8
wancool or Chean Wein Valley
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. to. corner and about 26% miles
distant In a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, tlience south SO chains, thence
east 80 chains, thence north 80
chains, tlience west. 80 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
THOMAS SILLS.
James W. Smith, Agent.
 Dated June Sth, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land Dl&crict—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that William Wallace,  of Toronto,    Ont.,     occupation
insurance agent, Intends to apply for
Skeena Land District—District  of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that George Williams, of Winnipeg, Man., occupation
clerk, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands in the vicinity of Kltwancool
or Chean Wein Valley:—Commencing at a post planted at the S. to.
corner and about 16% miles distant
in a north-westerly direction from
the north end of Kitwancool Lake,
thence north 4u chains, thence
east 40 chains, tlience south 40
c bains, tlience west 40 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 160 acres, more or less.
GEORGE WILLIAMS.
James  VV.  Smith, Agent.
Dated June 4,  1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that John Reid,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
broker, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
to.  corner and  about  15%   miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north 40 chains, tlience
east 40 chains, tlience south 4 0
chains, thence west 40 chains lo the
point of commencement, aud containing  160  acres,  more  or  less.
JOHN   REID.
James to. Smith, Agent.
Dated  June  3,   1910. Jy8
Dlstriel of
Skeena Land District
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Grace Cess-
ford, of Victoria, B. C, occupation
married woman, intends to apply for
j permission to purchase tho following
described   lands   in   tlie   vicinity   of
District of
Skeena Land District
Cassiar.
TAKE   NOTICE   that   Sarah   Cox,
of Monarch, Alberta, occupation marled woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase   the    following
Weln  Valley:—Com-i described lands in the Kltwancool or
post   planted at the .Chean Wien Valley:—Commencing at
wancool or Chean Worn Valley: —
Comencing at a post planted at the
N. E. corner and about 26% miles
distant in a north-westerly dlrocron
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, tlience south SO chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence north 80
chains, thence east SO chains to the
point of commencement, containing
640 acres, more or  less.
WILLIAM   WALLACE.
James to. Smith, Agent.
Dated  Juno   8th,   1910. Jy8
Dlstriel of
north-easl    corner  unci    about   8% |a post planted at  the N. to. corner
miles distant in a north-westerly dl- and aboul   4%   miles distant   In    a
rection from the north end of Kit-
wancool Lake, thence south 40
chains, thence west 40 chains, thence
i ot th   40  chains,    tlience    east    40
tins to point of commencement,
and containing 640 acres, more or
less. GEORGE TUTT.
James to. Smith, Agent.
Dated  June   1,   1910. JyS
north-westerly direction from the
nortb end of Kltwancool Lake, thence
soutii so chains, tlience east
chains, thence north 80 chains,
thence west 80 chains to point of
commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
SARAH COX.
James W. Smith, Agent
Dated May 31st, 1910.
-District  ol
Coast  Land  District-
Skeena.
TAKE NOTICE thai I, Geori e
Poole, of Prince Rupert, occupation
printer, intend to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post, planted on the north-east shore
line  of  Smith   Island,   distant   aboul
Skeena Land  District- District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Lome Thompson, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
dentist, Intends to apply for permission jto purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of the
Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:
Commencing at a post planted at the
south-west corner and about 8 %
miles distant in a north-westerly direction from the north end of Kitwancool Lake, thence north 80
chains, thence east 40 chains, thence
south 80 chains, thence west 40
chains   to   point   of   commencement,
and  containing  320  acres,  more  or jtalnlng 160 acres, more or less
less. LORNE THOMPSON. GEORGE ARTHUR POOLE
James to. Smith, Agent, j     Dated Satirday, July 2, 1910.
Dated June I,  1910. Jy8 I (First Insertion July 5.)
Skeena Land  District
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Samuel John
McDlarmld, of Monarch, Alberta, oc-
Icupation farmer, intends to apply for
Ipennis ion   to   purchase   Hie   following described   lands  In   the  Kltwancool or Chean   Weln   Valley:    Com-
menclng al o posl  planted al the \\
10. corner and  aboul   I '.-   miles in  a
north-westerly   direction    from    the
north  end     of     Kltwancool     Lake,
j j       ii'-e south  80 chains, I
chains,  th    .,     0    lialus,
' hence  east us  lo  ] olnl   of
ii .. ■ i C-- ..  t,  and   cot
. more or less.
1 ill EL JOHN McDIARMID,
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated Mi y 31st,  1910. Jy8
i   i Land  I il ii rici     Disti ci of
Cassiar.
N. E. corner and about 23 miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence soutii SO chains, thence
west Su chains, thenco north SO
chains, thence east SO chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres,  more or less.
GRACE CESSFORD.
.lames VV. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 6th, 1 910. JyS
Skeena Land Dlstriel     District of
Co Biar.
TAKE NOTICE thai Henry Hemming, of Victoria, I). ('., occupation
hotel keeper, Intends to apply for
i-i mission in fir c . . , [lowing
described landi in the vicinity of Klt-
wani not   or  CI ean   Weln   Valley: —
■ min Ing iii n post planted al the
13   cot tier and aboul 21  miles distant,   in   a   north-westerly   dlrec' Ion
'   ,: c  not Hi   ■ mi   of   Kit wancool
them       iuth 80 chains, tin ni 8
t I  i ■      ■   ,    thence    north    SO
SO chains to the
nt, and contaln-
'    ai        more or less,
HENRY   HEMMING.
Jan        .. .  Smith, Agent.
Dat. ,! Jui i   6th,  1910, Jy8
District of
'"      s> 111'.
TAKE     notice     that      Nelson
oweii,  of   Victoria,   B.   ('..   occupa-
one mile south-east from Lot 38, and   tant   in   a
A.  P.'s North-west Cor- ] frni
north-westerly direction
marked "G. A. P.'s North-west Cor- ■ frc?m the north end of Kltwancool
ner Post," thence 20 chains south, Lake; thence soutii 80 chains, thence
thence SO chains east, tlience north east 80 chains, thence north so
to shore line, thence following shore  chains, thence west  SO chains to the
TAKE NOTICE thai Annie Gowan, 'ice, mining engineer, Intends to ap-
of  Victoria,  It.  c.  occupation  mar- ply  tor  permission   to purchase  the
ried woman, intends to apply for per- following described lands in the vl-
iiii-sion   to   purchase   the   following clnlty of Kitwancool or Chean Wein
described lands in the vicinity of Kit- Valley:—Commencing    nt    a    post
wancool   or  Chean   Wein   Valley:— danted at the N. E. corner and about
Commencng at a post planted at the 19   miles distant  in  the  north-west-
N. to. corner and aboul 23 miles dis- , rly direction from the north end of
'line to point of commencement, con-
point   of commencement,   and     containing ti40 acres, more or less.
ANNIE GOWAN.
James to. Smith, Agent.
Dated Juno 7th, 1910. Jy8
Kltwancool Lake I hence south 80
chains, thence west 40 chains, tlience
north 4u chains, thence west 40
''ains,   thence     north     40     chains,
ence east 80 chains to .point of
commencement, and containing 480
acres, more or less.
NELSON   GOWEN.
James VV. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 4th,  1910. Jy8
•i PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Tuesday, September  13",  191(5
prince ISupert journal
Telephone  138
Published twice a week on Tuesdays
and Fridays from the otlice of publication, Third Avenue near McBride St.
Subscription rate to any point in
Canada, $2.00 a year; to points outside
of Canada, 83.00 a year.
Advertising'rate furnished on application.
O. II. NELoON,
Editor.
Tuesday, September 13, 1910
RAILWAY  ASSISTS CITY
The Importance of a city being a
railway centre such as Prince Ruperl
must eventually become is shown in
some l'i'c-eiil figures concerning the
C. I'. It. in relation lo Montreal's
commercial life.
Tiie Canadian Pacific Railway Co.
has 11,092 employees within the city
boundaries of .Montreal. This is
learnt from a census which has just
been taken Hum the official pay roll.
While a large number of those employees are unmarried the preponder-
ence of married over single is so
great that it is estimated that the
total number of persons dependent
upon these pay rolls for a living is
upwards of 30,000.
The average earnings per head of
those employed in the service of the
company is put down at $2 per day,
making on the basis of that assumption a total wage earned daily of
:>33,000, weekly of $231,000, and
yearly   of   $12,000,000.
The railway is thus responsible for
a very large addition to the population and the putting into circulation
of a vast sum of money.
VIINK Il'AL  SECURITIES
Sanford Evans, mayor of Winnipeg, and president of the Canadian
Union of Municipalities, at its recent
meeting gave some interesting facts
relative to municipal securities. In
his annual address he stated that
London was the best market, for the
larger Canadian municipalities. The
best results were obtained in London by issues of not less than C100,-
000. Bonds were regarded in London as a preferable form of security.
Securities in large volume were more
easily sold than small securities.
President Evans favored selling
through an agent rather than by tender, even if more were not realized
thereby. He claimed that there was a
disadvantage in advertising, as it had
a tendency to weaken prices of securities for Hie municipalities already on
the market.
With reference to the sinking fund
he said it should be levied and collected and kept intact as a single
fund. The municipality should provide for the redemption of its securities. Said he: "With regard to
the investment of the sinking fund,
I wish to advance the view that the
benefit of the general credit of the
municipality must be one of the objects in making a profit on the sinking fund. The main duty of the
trustee is, of course, to preserve the
integrity of the installments committed to their charge, and cause
them in earn, above the cost of administration, tiie interest upon which
the Installments were calculated, so
that the fund may amount to the face
of the debentures or stock at the
date of maturity. The rate of interest upon which the sinking fund is
calculated should never be higher
than the rate the securities themselves bar, and should, preferably, be
lower."
 o	
QUESTION  OF  ASSESSOR
There has been a suggestion made
In connection with the G. T. P. assessment dispute that in view of the
In-' thai the assessor had been appointed icy the provincial govern-
nii ii', iliiu therefore Hi" government
at Victoria was tiie only body to review Ills acts and grant any alteration In tbe assessment made by him.
While it would not be advisable to
excuse cither Hie Dominion or Ihe
Provincial government of any responsibilities it lias in connection
with the city, yet we do not believe
that the provincial government will
Interprel the situation as has been
suggested.
The appointment of an assessor
was made, as we understand it, by
the provincial government because
it was deemed wise to have Ihe assessment made early and thus enable
the city to secure the taxes at an
earlier period than would otherwise
have been possible. In tbe absence of
a regularly constituted council the
government took upon itself the duty
of naming an assessor whose work
was to pass Into the hands of the city
council as soon as that body was
elected. The government, we do not.
Imagine, will feel like assuming any
responsibility in connection with that
assessment. That was a matter which
passed to the council in the same
way as if Mr. Cuthbert had been
named by the council in the first instance.
(iOOl) MEAT CRUSADE
Sanitary   Officer   Issues   a   Warning
With  Respect to Dealers
At last evening's meeting of the
city council a report was received
from the sanitary officer in which he
stated that he had condemned and
had destroyed a shipment of meat to
lie city.
He had also visited a butcher shop
and found a side of mutton in an advanced stage of decomposition. This
had been destroyed and a warning
given that if ever such was found
again he would institute a prosecution against the offender.
BARGAIN  IS   MADE
Electric Outfit and Bailers of the Tie &
Timber Company
Bought.
City Council Concludes Negotiations
Regarding   Old   Lighting
Plant
RIGHTLY  PUNISHED
Dr. Jameson   Recalls  Haiti   Incident
And Condemns It
Dr. Jameson, In a speech which
he made at Durban recently, combated tbe objections of Natal to joining the Unionists. They were right,
he said, in not wanting racialism,
which was one cause of their hesitating attitude.
Referring to the raid, Dr. Jameson
said that though it was badly carried
out and thoroughly deserving of punishment, it was, nevertheless, a step
in the direction of federation, which
was Cecil Rhodes' policy. If, said
Dr. Jameson, he had the opportunity
of substituting another for the present government, he would form a
government of the best men of both
races.
The speech was enthusiastically received.
AIDING SMALL FARMERS
Imperial    Go\ eminent    Has    Taken
Steps to (iive Assistance
Lord Carringtin iias in.:- miiile an
announcement to Hie National Farmers' Union of tiie gratis: interest to
the small farmer, nnd, therefore, of
great Importance to all concerned in
the national wail-being, says Public
Opinion.
The government, be declares, has
decided to make it easy for the small
farmer to get capital by means of cooperative credit banks in the agricultural districts.   Here is what be said:
"We promise to take a leaf out of
the German hook and to follow what
has been so satisfactorily done In
Germany and in other parts of Europe. I have been considering
whether I could not devise a plan to
lay before my colleagues to give improved legislative, administrative
and financial facilities for the establishment on a sound basis of a satisfactory system of co-operative credit
hanks, especially for the benefit of
agriculture.
"We are backed up by the report
of the .Lords committee, on which
Lords Cromer, Herschell, MacDonald
and Welby served, and we are also
emboldened by the fact that this difficulty has been overcome In Germany, Belgium, Italy, France, and to
some extent in Ireland. It is in no
way a hare-brained scheme which I
am going to lay before my colleagues. I hope it will be a practical
and useful proposal which will be of
lasting and great advantage to that
great agricultural industry on which
we are all entirely dependent."
, ! o	
The initial slops in connection
with the formation of a local corps
of the Boy Scouts has been taken
here. Quite a number of boys at a
meeting held yesterday at the school
house expressed their willingness to
join  tbe organization.
li was stated by Aid. Mobley at !
last evening's meeting of the council that the engineer reported that
the flow of water into the reservoir
'in the mountain side was the lowest
ii had been. There was practically
none entering. He said that if it
were not for the water pumped up
there would be none available. Aid.
Mobley felt tbat the city should congratulate Itself upon having an engineer that showed such forethought.
 o	
At last evening's meeting of the
city council the action of the members of the council that met the directors of the B. C. Tie & Timber company on Saturday was endorsed and
it was agreed to purchase the plant
for $5,500. The meeting on Saturday
was held to be irregular and other
proceedings taken.
Aid. Hilditch, after the minutes of
the three last meetings had been
read, moved the adoption of the
minutes of the first two, but said he
considered the minutes of the last
meeting to be incorrectly so described. The meeting on Saturday afternoon was not a meeting at all.
Aid. Pattullo proposed that these
minutes be regarded as simply a
memorandum of what took place.
Notice had been telephoned to the
different members of the council that
there would be no meeting of tha
council. He proposed that the light
committee bring in a report and that
cou'd be adopted.
Aid. Hilditch objected to a precedent being established that a meeting
cou'd be called on such short notice
His Worship explained the situation. He believed it could not be regarded as a regular meeting. It bad
been the intention of the council to
meet the committee of the Board of
Trade. When the latter was not
ready telephone communications had
been sent out cancelling the meeting
of the council. Later be met the directors of the B. C. Tie & Timber
Company and it was decided to get
all the council possible together and
hold a meeting.
Later in the evening a recess was
taken and the Electric Light committee met and made a report to
the council recommending the purchase of the equipment referred to
for $5,500.
Aid. Hilditch had no objection to
the purchase providing there was information that the boilers were in
working order. If the boilers were
as reported upon a short time ago
in bad condition, he did not believe
in purchasing them.
Aid. Lynch said that after consideration it had been deemed advisable to purchase the plant at this
price. When the boilers were first
examined the intention was to instal
a smaller power for electric lighting.
Now it was about decided to instal
a higher power and these boilers
were believed to be in good shape.
His Worship said that the directors had at first offered to put the
boilers in shape for $7,500. He was
convinced the boilers bad not suffered much from the fire.
Aid. Mobley said that in his opinion outside of the fittings the boilers
were in as good shape as ever. The
directors were insisting that two of
these boilers were installed as part
of the electrical appartus. This the
directors insisted should he taken
over.    The committee felt it was just
as well to take the whole of the four
boilers over. The city was saving
money  by  the settlement.
Aid. Mclntyre felt he would like to
be sure the boilers were in shape. If
the lighting system were installed
quicker by taking this over it would
go a long way in inducing him to
take this over.
Aid. Pattullo said he was prepared
to vote for the recommendation. If
these were not taken over now and
new boilers were purchased the city
might find that it had to take these
boilers over also  in  the end.
Aid. Hilditch wanted a test made.
The report was adopted.
The electric light committee expect to make a report on an entire
D'ant for the city tomorrow evening.
SKEENA DISTRICT
Ferry, Kitselas, Skeena River.
IN ACCORDANCE with chapter
78, R. S. B. C, 1897, "Ferries Act,"
the Government of British Columbia
invite applications for a charter for
a ferry to ply across the Skeena
River at Kitselas.
Applications will be received by
the Honourable the Minister of Public Works up to and including the
15th   of  September  next.
The limits of the ferry shall extend for a distance of one mile above
and one mile below said point
The charter will cover a period expiring on the 31st,  March, 1912
The ferry shall be operated whenever required between 7 a.m and
7-p.m., very day excepting Sundays.
Applications shall give a description of the scow or boat it is proposed to use, and method of operation
Applications shall state the tolls it
fis proposed to ask for	
Each adult passenger
Each child (not ln arms) under 13
years.
ETonC0teame,UOt^mul6or
Each calf, sheep, goat or swine.
Each  vehicle  with  one horse and
driver.
Each cart or wagon with one horse
and   driver,  loaded.
Each vehicle with  two horses and
driver.
Each vehicle with  two horses and
driver, loaded.
Each parcel of twenty-five pounds
and under.
Freight      parcel      of    twenty-five
pounds and under.
Freight, per one hundred pounds
and under, non-perishable goods
Freight, per one hundred pounds
and under, perishable goods.
The Government of British Columbia is not necessarily bound to accept any application submitted.
F. C. GAMBLE,
Public Works Engineer.
Department of  Public  Works.
Victoria, B.C., 15th August, 1910.
WATER NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that an
application will be made under Part
V. of the "Water Act, 1909," to obtain a licence in the Skeena Division
of Coast District.
(a) The name, address and occupation of the applicant is The Municipal Corporation of the City of
Prince Rupert, County of Atlin, B.C.
(If for mining purposes) Free
Miner's  Certificate  No.
(b) The name of the lake, stream
or source (if unnamed, the description is), Cloyah Lakes.
-   (c)  The point of diversion, at the
foot of the Lower Lake.
(d) The quantity of water applied
for (in cubic feet per second), 150.
(e) The character of the proposed
works, dam, pipe-line and power
plant.
(f) The premises on which the
water is to be used (describe same),
The Power site at mouth of Cloyah
River.
(g) The purposes for which the
water is to be used,  Power.
(h)   If for irrigation describe the
The Standard of the Empire
Bun-ell's Warranted Genuine
WHITE LEAD AND LINSEED OIL
•soli; AGENTS IN WESTERN CANADA:
The Staneland Co. Ltd
836-840 Fort Street, VICTORIA, B.C.
Personals
Mrs. C. B. Wark has returned from
Victoria after spending a few weeks I
there.
* *     *
F.    II.    Worlock,   of   Victoria,    is
sp< tiding a few days in the city,
* *     *
Mr. and Mrs. .1. H. Westenhaver,
Miss Clapp of Chicago, Miss Clapp of,
Davenport. Iowa, nnd Mrs. C, D. tj,
Clapp of Chicago, arrived by the
[ Prince George on a visit to Mr. M.
1 Westenhaver of this city.
Grand Trunk Pacific  Steamships
For VANCOUVER, VICTORIA, SEATTLE.
Connecting   with   Eastbound   Trains
"Prince Rupert" sails every Thursday, 8.30 p.m.
"Prince   George"   sails   every Monday 8.30 p.m.
FOR STEWART:
"Prince Rupert" sails Wednesdays 8 p.m.
"Prince  George"   sails  Sunday   at 8 p.m.
Steamer for Masset, Kincollth.Naas  Bay  and   Port  Simpson,  Sundays, I p.m.
For Skidegate,  Queen  Charlotte City,   and   other   Moresby Island
points, Wednesday, 1 p.m., returning via Queen Charlotte City.
Tickets, reservations and Information    from
A. E. McMASTER
Freight and  Passenger Agent, G. T. P. Wharf.
land Intended to be irrigated, giving
acreage.
fi) If the water Is to be used for
power or mining purposes describe
the place where the water is to be returned to some natural channel, and
the difference in altitude between
point of diversion and point of return: Water will be returned at
mouth of Cloyah River, 55 feet.
(J) Area of Crown land intended
to be occupied by the proposed
works.
(k) This notice was posted on the
thirteenth day of August, 1910, and
application will be made to the Commissioner on the fifteenth day of
September, 1910.
(1) Give the names and addresses
of any riparian proprietors or licensees who or whose lands are like'y
to be affected by the proposed works,
either above or below the outlet:
Owners of lots 130, 131, 632, and
972.
(m) The boundaries and area of
the Municipality are as follows:—
4. The said Cily of Prince Rupert
shall be bounded as follows: —
Commencing at a post on the shore
of Shawatlan Passage, in Range 5,
Coast District of British Columbia,
and being the southeasterly post of
Section 9, Prince Rupert Townsite;
thence along the boundary of Section 9 as follows: South forty-three
degrees forty-seven minutes (43deg.
47min.) west astronomical, a distance of four hundred and fifty-one
and seventy-seven hundredths (451.-
77) feet; thence north eighty-three
degrees thirty-seven minutes (S3deg.
37min.) west astronomical, a distance of one thousand five hundred
and seventy-two hundredths (1,500.-
72) feet; thence south twenty-seven
degrees twenty-three minutes fifteen
seconds (27deg. 23min. 15sec.) west
astronomical, a distance of three
thousand four hundred and seventy-
three and seventy-five hundredths
(3,473.75) feet; thence south thirty-
five degrees fifty-eight minutes
thirty-four seconds (35deg. 58min.
34sec.) west astrononiica', a distance
of two thousand end fifty-one and
twenty-five hundredths (2,051.25)
feet; thence north sixty-two degrees
sixteen minutes twenty seconds (02
deg. lOmin. 20sec) west astronomical, a distance of one thousand one
hundred and twenty-four and eight
hundredths (1,124.08) feet; thence
south forty-seven degrees twelve
minutes ten seconds (47deg. 12min.
lOsec.) west astronomical, a distance
of four thousand eight hundred
(4.S00) feet, more or less, to a post
being the north-easterly corner of
Lot 1,194, Range 6, Coast District;
tlience along the southerly boundary of Lot 1,994 south fifty-nine degrees forty-two minutes thirty-eight
seconds (iifideg. 42min. 38sec) west
astronomical, a distance of throe
thousand eight hundred and six and
sixty-eight hundredths (3.800.6S)
feet; thence soutii forty-seven degrees seven minutes five seconds
(47deg. 07min. 05sec.) west astronomical, a distance of two thousand
six hundred and three and seven-
tenths (2,603.7) feet; thence south
seventy-nine degrees forty-one min-
uates forty-three seconds (79deg. 41
mln. 43sec.) west astronomical, a
distance of one thousand three hundred and forty-one and twelve hundredths (1,341.12) feet; thence
south fifty-two degrees forty-six minutes twenty-four seconds (52deg.
46min. 24sec.) west astronomical, a
distance of two thousand two hundred and forty-seven and ninety-six
hundredths (2,247.96) feet; thence
south sixteen degrees one minute
nineteen seconds (lGdeg. Olmin. 19
sec.) west astronomical, a distance
of three thousand one hundred and
sixty-nine and ninety-eight hundredths (3,169.98) feet; tlience
north seventy-nine degrees twenty-
two minutes (79deg. 22min) west
astronomical, a distance of five hundred and thirty and sixty-four hundredths (530.64) feet, more or less,
to a post on the shore of Prince Ru-
per Harbour; thence west astronomical one thousand three hundred and
twenty (1,320) feet; thence north
astronomical a distance of twelve
thousand nine hundred and thirty-
six (1.2,936) feet; thence north
sixty-one degrees and thirty minutes
(61deg. 30min) east, a distance of
twenty-three thousand seven hundred
(23,700) feet to a point opposite the
centre point of Shawatlan Passage;
thence along the centre line of Shawatlan Passage to a point due west
of the point of commencement;
thence due west to the point of commencement; the land area contained
within said boundaries consisting of
about two thousand (2,000) acres
and being shown on the registered
plans of Prince Rupert Townslte,
registered at Prince Rupert Town-
site,  registered  at Prince Rupert.
(n) Approximately the number of
inhabitants: Five thousand.
(0) The place of the proposed
reservoir for storing: The Cloyah
Lakes.
(li) The means by which It is proposed lo store the water: By a dam.
dl) The area or the reservoir site
or sites at each foot in deptli above
the outlet:  Six square miles.
(r) How it Is proposed to acquire
Hie land necessary for tbe purpose:
By purchase or otherwise.
(s) Approximately the number of
acre feet intended to be impounded,
38,400.
(t) Whether It Is proposed to
lower the water In any natural lake
or standing body of water, and If so
then:—
(1) The anticipated extent of the
lowering.
(2) The means proposed to be
adopted to lower and refill.
(3) The nature and character In
detail, of the works proposed to be
constructed to provide for the discharge and penning back of the
water. Dam pipe-line and power
plant.
THE MUNICIPAL CORPORATION
OF THE CITY OF PRINCE
RUPERT.
By Its Agent, F. !3. Clements.
A16.
Atlantic Steamship
 Agency	
Through tickets and excursion
rates to
England, France, Germanv,
and all
Scandinavian Ports.
Call or write for rates to any
part of the world. I am also
agent for all American steamers
to and from Prince Rupert;
Northern Pacific Railway; Alaska Pacific Express.
J. H. ROGERS
General Steamship and Railway
Agent, Prince Rupert, B.C.
Canadian Pacific  R'y
Steamers leave Prince Rupert for Vancouver,
Victoria, Seattle
Princess Beatrice,  every  Monday at 1 p.m.
Princess May or Princess Royal
every Saturday morning.
Steamers leave Vancouver
Princess Beatrice every Thursday night.
Princess Royal every   Saturday
night at  11 o'clock.
Union Steamship Co'y
of B.C. Ltd.
The new Steel Passenger Steamer
"Camosun"
PRINCE RUPERT every Sunday al '.i a.m. lot'Vancouver,
arriving Monday afternoon.
For Stewart City on arrival from
Vancouver Friday night.
Northbound., leaves Vancouver
Wednesdays at i) p.m.
Steerage Fare $5.00
The "Camosun" is the only steamer
on the run having' water-tight, bulkheads and double bottom, thus ensuring safety of passengers in case of
c-ollission or wreck.
J. H. ROGERS,   Ticket Agent
HAYNOR  BROS.
FUNERAL   DIRECTORS
and
PROFESSIONAL  EMBALMERS
DR.  to.  R.  CLAYTON
DENTIST
—o—
Office   in    the    Westenhaver   Block,
Over Orme's  Drug   Store.
Prince Rupert
WM. S. HAi,L, L. D. S. D. D. S.
:-:    DENTIST   :-:
Crown and Bridge Work a specialty.
All dental operations skillfully
treated. Gas and local anaesthetics
administered for the painless extraction of teeth. Consultation free.
Offices, Helgerson Bk., Prince Rupert
-I. H. PIIiLSBURY
CIVIL     ENGINEER
Surveying,   Designs,   Estimates,   etc.
Room   7,   Exchange   Block,
Corner Third  Ave and Sixth  Street
Prince Rupert
G. W. NICKERSON & CO.
—o—
CUSTOMS AND MERCHANDISE
Brokers, Forwarding Agents,
Storage,  etc.
J.   W.   POTTER
ARCHITECT     AND     STRUCTURAL
ENGINEER
Re-inforced Concrete a Specialty
—o—
Law-Butler Building - Prince Rupert
GRAHAM ISLAND —"The sureBt
sign of the progress of a town or
district Is its newspaper—live, active, hustling." "The MasBet Review," Masset, Q.C.I.
The Thompson
{Hardware Co.::
—Second Avenue—
..   Paints. General Hardware,
Oils, Stoves and Ranges. Tuesday, September 13,  1910
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
LINDSAY'S CARTAGE ft STORAGE
G. T. P. CARTAGE AGENTS
Office at H. B. Rochester, Centre St.
—o—
LADYSMITH  COAL
Is handled by us.  All orders receive
prompt attention.  Phone No  68.
Some Rock
Bottom
Prices
See lis For Investment
Rupert City Realty & Information Bureau, Ltd.
PRINCE RUPERT,
B.C.
The Roland Rooms
Splendid Accommodations
Newly Furnished
Hot  baths;  right down  town;   good
table board all round
RATES, FIFTY CENTS AND UP
Fred Stork
General Hardware
...Complete Line of...
VALVES
Pipe and Pipe Fittings
 LADYSMITH	
COAL
H. B. ROCHESTER,  -   Centre Street
►J»*jt»;«*j« <%. •*< *■;«»>»> *i* •jttjujt «j* •!« «5t >5» »j« *%> •!• «J« *S> •J**!* <£* »J*
Don't
Forget j
*
We have the stock and when *
, you want to select a Diamond *
[ Ring, a Wedding Present, It Is *
' no trouble for you to lind some- *
• thing that will suit you.   Our *
. Btock is composed of the best .;.
j goods  that  the  factories  pro- ||
:• duce and we guarantee every- *
'• V
;. thing sold here. *
;*       Bring us your   Watch and  "j,
► Jewelry repairing If you want *
•• it properly done. »>
C. B. WARK |
;«»jt tj« »j» tj«»;«»;«»;« tj. »*« tjt t-jt »;« *j»»j» *jt tjt »jt «j« *i* »ji *;» «j« tjt *j*tg*
Clarmont Rooms
Sixth Avenue near Fulton Street
Comfortable, Homelike Rooms; Newly Furnished Throughout; Bath
Rooms  with   Hot  and
Cold Water
Rates, .$3.00 a Week   and   Upwards
Mrs.   Annie   McGrath,   Proprietoiess
IN THE COUNTY COURT OF ATLIN
HOLIIEN AT ATIAN
CANCELLATION  OF  RESERVE
NOTICE Is hereby given that the
reserve existing on Crown lands In
the vicinity of Babine Lake, situate
In Range 5, Coast District, notice of
which was published in the British
Columbia Gazette, dated December
17, 1908, is cancelled in so far as
said reserve relates to lots numbered 1519, 1518, 1517, 1516, 1515,
1510, 1507, 1506, 1506A, 1503 1501,
1502, 1512, 1511, 1505, 1504, 1513,
1514, 1509, 1508, 1530, 1527, 1528,
1529, 1531, 1532, 1533, 1534, 1535,
1537, 1539, 1536, 1538, 1540,  1541,
1544, 1543, 1545, 1546,  1542, 1547,
1545, 1549, 1550, 1520, 1521, 1522,
1523, 1524, 1525, 1526, and 1551.
ROBERT A. RENWICK,
Deputy Commissioner of LandB.
Lands Department,
Victoria, B. C, June 16th, 1910.
(First insertion July 5.)
In the matter of the Estate of Thomas D. Kearns, deceased, Intestate
All parties having claims against
the above Estate are required to forward the same, with full particulars
thereof, duly verified, to the undersigned, not later than the sixteenth
day of February, 1911, after which
said date the Estate of the said deceased will be distributed amongst
those entitled thereto.
Dated at Atlin,   B.C.,   this    nlne-
i teenth day of August, A.D. 1910.
PATRICK FOLEY,
A6-08 Administrator.
LAND PURCHASE  NOTICES
C. D. NEWTON
Real Estate
Money to Loan
Notary Public
Exchange Block
Corner 3rd Avenue and 6th Street
P.O. Box 226   Tel. 226
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte.
TAKE NOTICE that the Queen
j Charlotte Whaling Company Limited,
I of Victoria, British Columbia, occu-
jpatlon manufacturers, intend to apply
for permission to purchase the fol-
owlng described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about fifteen
chains south of a small creek on the
west side of Rose Harbour, Moresby
Island, thence west forty chains,
thence north forty chains, thence
east forty chains, thence southerly
following the sinuosities of the foreshore line forty chains, to the point
of commencement.
Queen Charlotte Whaling
Company Limited,
Per Sydney Charles Ruck, Agent
Dated July 14th, 1910.
Rose Harbour, Q.C.I.       . A5
WANTED—Good   sales    girl;    easy
work; short hours.    Apply Simon's
Fair, Third avenue.
V:,VU:
Hear
the
Truth
There's nothing about a set of
harness that requires such careful
attention, in botli leather and workmanship, as traces and collars, there's
where the strain lies, there's where
we excel, though we are Just as
watchful as to every other detail of
a complete set of harness, he It for
heavy or light work.
B. C. Saddlery Company
Limited
MANUFACTURERS OF SADDLERY
Jobbers of Leather, Harness, Saddles, Whips, Trunks and Valises,
Pads, Blankels, Rugs; Harness Soaps
and Dressings.
500 YATES STREET
VICTORIA B.C.
BOILERS PURCHASED
Members of Council Debate the Merits
of Action Taken at Saturday's
Conference.
Electric Light  Committee Expect to
Make Concrete Report on Plant
Tomorrow  Night
The city council has made an arrangement to take over the whole of
the electrical outfit of the British
Columbia Tie & Timber Company, exclusive of the dynamo nnd tbe small
engine connected with it Tor the sum
of $5,500. The undertaking curries
wiili it the pole line, the wire, the
insulators throughout the city and
the boilers now at the mill site, together with the brick, some girders
of steel and other material that may
be on the ground connected with the
old lighting plant.
This arrangement was arrived at
after a discussion with the directors
of the company on Saturday afternoon. When the conference with the
committee of the Board of Trade failed the council considered the proposition with the B. C. Tie & Timber
company which had come up the day
before.
The council had had the advantage
of the engineer's estimate upon the
plant and also the estimate placed by
Aid. Lynch and Aid. Mobley, both of
whom have considerable information
relative to hollers and machinery.
It was only after considerable
"dickering" that the price as settled
was arranged for.
On Friday afternoon the city council held a special sitting to consider
a proposition to be made by the British Columbia Tie & Timber company,
the directors of which were in the
city. There were present on behalf of
the company, Robert Kelly, J. Ironsides, G. I. Wilson and Mr. Sewall of
Vancouver and D. H. Hays of this city
Being introduced to the council, Mr.
Wilson said the object of their meeting with the council was to try to
make some settlement relative to taking over the lighting plant as it
stood since the fire. The company,
at a heavy loss, had lighted the city
for the G. T. P. After the fire application was made to the government in the matter. The B. C. Tie &
Timber company offered the city,
through Mr. Manson and Mr. Clarke,
who were representing Prince Rupert
to turn over the plant as it then
stood for $7,500.
Company's Figures
Mr. Sewall then submitted the
figures In connection with the proposition. He said the offer was made
December 4, 1909, to Messrs. Manson
and Clarke representing the city of
the $10,526.72 worth of plant for
$7,500.
The plant had cost $22,315.77,
which with the additions put in later
at a price of $1,500 represented $23,-
815.77 of an investment.
The loss by the fire was put at
$8,065.03, which with a furthe'r reduction of $5,204.02 representing
fifty per cent of the wages made
$13,269.05, which should be reduced
leaving $10,305.72 as the value of
the plant.
The inventory of the material on
hand showed as follows: Material,
$3,802.07; fifty per cent of wages,
$5,204.02; additions, $1,500; making a total of $10,506, which on a
basis of 75 cents on tbe dollar represented about $7,500, the offer made
the city.
Aid. Pattullo wanted to know what
proposition the gentlemen wanted to
make.
Wants Offer From Council
Mr. Wilson said he had no offer to
make. They wanted an offer from
the council. The company would have
been willing to have put the plant
in good shape had the government
taken it at the time.
Aid. Pattullo wanted to know if
there wns any figure they thought it
was worth.
Mr. Wilson said he felt that the
$7,500 would be a fair proposition.
His Worship said doubtless the
company had spent a large sum on it
yet the city had to take Into account
what the poles, etc., were now worth.
The city would prefer to put in a
new line.
Aid. Mobley thought the only way
to arrive at a fair conclusion as to the
value would he to refer this to the
telephone committee which would
confer with the engineer and arrive
at an estimate. The poles were too
short to be of much value to the city
and the wires were broken in very
many places.
Aid. Hildltch thought it would be
necessary to arrive at the basis upon
Which it was to be valued, whether
from the standpoint of the cost to
the company or the value to the city.
Moral Obligation
Mr. Wilson said there was a tacit
understanding that the company was
to have a charter to light the city,
wliicb would have been valuable.
There was a moral obligation.
. id. Xaden thought that any moral
obligation the company might claim
to have would be against the provincial government. The city could not
be he'd responsible for that.
Aid. Pattullo moved that this be
referred to tbe light and telephone
committee to get an estimate placed
by the engineer on it.
Aid. Lynch in seconding the motion, thought it was only a business
like proposition to look into the value
of the plant. The council was only
acting as the agents of the people of
Prince Rupert.
The representatives of the company then retired.
After some little discussion, the
council adjourned, awaiting tbe report or the committee.
Final Negotiations
On Saturday afternoon the directors of the British Columbia Tie &
Timber Company met the council
again. It was explained to the directors that the pole line was of little
value to the city. The city would
be willing, however to make some arrangement to take over tbe boilers,
which, if in good shape, could be
used by the city.
Finally the proposition was made
that $5,000 would represent the
value to the city of the whole equipment. To this Mr. Kelly took exception at first. He thought this was far
too small a sum.
The council explained, ',/awever,
that they were taking considerable
risk in connection witli the boilers as
to whether they were in working
order.
Mr. Kelly said his company was
surely up against the worst bargain-
makers they had yet struck in the
person of the councillors. He thought
the figure was away out.
The aldermen held out, however,
Aid. Mobley and Aid. Lynch expressing their opinions that the price they
were offering was all that It was
worth. It was a liberal offer, they
said.
The question of the dynamo came
up, but Aid. Mobley said that was of
no use to the city. It would take
more to have It shipped away and
put in shape than it was worth.
The question of the value of new
dynamos being introduced, some
members of the company expressed
surprise that the city could get prices
such as they quoted when they (the
members of the company) had to pay
so much for their dynamos.
A  Definite Offer
Finally Aid. Naden moved, seconded by Aid. Lynch that the sum of
$5,000 be tendered the company for
the electrical apparatus, Including
the pole line, the wire, the transformers and the boilers.
The motion carried and the directors of the company were given an
opportunity to decide before they left
the next day.
Then Mr. Kelly, who said he was
anxious to wind the whole business
up proposed that they should give
$5,500.
This was turned down by the council, the members of which said they
would rather have the boilers delivered on the wharf and fitted up ready
and tested at an advanced price of
$1,500. They agreed that if the company would put the boilers on the
wharf in the shape indicated they
would give $6,500 for the outfit.
The directors did not want to
have Hie trouble of moving the boilers, but the council would not meet
the price suggested.
Finally the council agreed to give
the $5,500 if the company would include the bricks, girders, piping and
other material independent of the dy-
COMMITTEE TO FINISH
FISHING  INDUSTRY
Council    Decide   Not   to   Take   Any
Charge of Government Sewer
The question of taking over the
sewer work now being put in by the
provincial government was up for
discussion last night.
'It was explained that the government assumed responsibility for the
work up to the sum of $25,000.
Aid. Mclntyre, as a member of the
citizens committee charged with the
carrying out of the work, thought
it would be better to have it done
under the general supervision of the
city engineer. The work would not
cost more than $20,000 so that tbe
city would assume no responsibility
and it would ensure uniformity. He
added that "it is to be given to us
gratus by the government, showing
that some governments are generous
at any rate."
Aid. Pattullo was agreeable to the
council taking over the work on the
understanding that the city should
take no responsibility.
Aid. Mobley thought that as the
work was proceeding so expeditiously
and was nearly completed it would
be unwise for the council to take
it over as they might spoil it.
His Worship felt it would be wiser
to let the committee finish the work.
The report was filed.
Sir George Doughty on the Protection
of the Resources of the
Province.
A GREAT FUTURE
Prince Rupert Will Be Important Centre
for Trade Says Chas. M.
Hays.
Attempt Will Be Made to
duce Foreign Labor on
G. T. P.
'We    shall    make
appeal    to
namo and tbe small engine and at- either the dominion or the provincial
government for the right to hire for-
tachments.
Mr. Kelly wanted $6,000, but final- eign laborers on the construction of
ly  agreed   to   "split  the   difference"
and give it all for $5,750.
This was not agreeable to the
council, but Aid. Lynch made a
proposition that the oeuncil give
$7,250 If the boilers were put on the
wharf and  tested.
The directors finally decided that
in order to get rid of the whole matter they would take the $5,500 for
everything as indicated and it was
agreed to carry out the arrangements.
 o	
Local News
The Prince Rupert Progressive association had intended holding a public meeting th is evening in Mclntyre
hall to discuss the G. T. P. assessment. It was the intention to have
bad members of the council and
members of the Board of Trade pres-
Hie Grand Trunk Pacific railroad. It,
is not up to us, it is up to our contractors to secure men, and if they
cannot do it, then we jump on them.
We have given up the practice of announcing the date when the railroad
will be finished; we are doing our
share and are trusting to Providence
and luck for the rest."
This statement was made at the
Hotel Vancouver by Mr. Charles M.
Hays, president of the Grand Trunk
and Grand Trunk Pacific railroad systems before leaving for the East.
While Mr. Hays was optimistic as
a whole regarding the country, and
his road in particular, the labor question, the thorn in the side of the
builders, still seemed to bother him.
"The whole coast is suffering from
this same shortage of labor. Sawmills
connot hire men, the woods are full
of work, but no laborers go out,
builders and farmers over the entire
province are crying for help, but they
cannot get men. We are paying three
dollars  a  day  on   the  Grand   Trunk
ent, and go fully into the whole sub
ject. It has now been decided to [ for laborers and $3.50 for more skill-
call the meeting off for the present, j ed ones, we are giving the best of
Announcement  of  the  date   will   be | board  and  accommodations, prepay-
miide later.
G.  to. Arnott  has decided  to slic
ing the fare to the camp for the men,
and vet we are short about 5,000
men on  this end of the job.    There
cialize  In  connection  with  his  busi-! are plenty of laborers about this city,
ness interests here, and to do so has
taken in two partners, Benjamin Tillman, recently of Spokane, and William McPherson, who comes from
Ontario.    The Intention is in future
al idle, but we cannot get  these men
to go to work."
"We once tried the system of
bringing men over from the crowded    sections   of London, Edinburgh,
for each of the   partners    to    take | Glasgow, Liverpool, and othor crowd-
•barge of one branch of the business ed English cities, but we found that
which embraces  insurance,  real
late and manufacturers' agencies.
According to the citj engineer's
report read last evening the pro-
itisal  in  connection  with  the Third
He Advocates the Preservation of the
Trade for White Race Who Are
Now Losing Control
In tbe course of an exceeding interesting talk on fishery conditions '
as lie has found them in the province,
Sir George Doughty on his return
to Victoria, said that he was satisfied
that the reports of the fisheries which
he had beard before coming out here
were quite correct. "British Columbia," be said, "has In her fisheries
i.n enormous source of wealth All
kinds of fish abound in her waters,
but 1 am sorry to sec that thoy are
almost absolutely neglected. Il is
pitiable to see these fisheries in the
condition they are. Yellow labor
seems likely to dominate the situation. The only development I can see
is in salmon fishing, and even in
this branch, unless steps are taken
to bring In a white race of fishermen thoroughly organized and provided a market can be found tor
the fish, the people of the province
will lose control of this source of
wealth. For they must remember
that the money earned by the Japanese and Chinese fishermen menus impoverishment for the white race and
additions to the wealth of countries
which may one day be among the
potential enemies with whom Canada
may have to contend.
"The same classes of fish which
have made the fishery industry in
England so potential are to be found
in much greater abundance on this
coast. The fishery question is one
which the legislature of Hie province
should turn its attention io. Colonies
of white fishermen should be established on the coast who should not
only carry cm the industry but obtain
control of it. From such a source
as these colonies a naval reserve for
the new Dominion navy could be
created, so that not alone would tills
industry lie developed but hand in
hand with it would be created a
nucleus force for the protection of
your coasts against any possible
enemy.
"As your wealth increases and the
sources of It become more widely
known other nations will envy what
you possess. Together with Britain
maintaining her dominance of Hie
sea, as exemplified in the two power
standard, it is necessary that one
or more units should be stationed
on the Pacific Coast of this country,
ro' Tor war bul for the peace and
security of tbe nation. If you develop
this source of wealth of which I have
Ven speaking this wonderful proviso will have an asset, perhaps the
greatest of any which is possesses,
and I have told you how your
scheme of defence can be materially
i.ided by the exploitation of your
fishery resources by a white race.
"It is not easy to establish a fishery industry, but it can be accomplished and I can assure you that no
stone will be left unturned to bring
aboul this end, Efforts will be made
io secure races of fishermen living
n British Columbia, who will work
for the advantage of Canada along
the lines of material wealth and national security. When the Grand
Trunk Pacific gels its line through
to the coast it will offer means of
transportation for ycur products to
every market In the world. The C.
I'.it. al Vancouver can In large measure be of service in aiding the de-
velopmenl of your fisheries. In concluding my little talk to you en this
would suggest to the public
as soon as we landed them  here, or
took them oiii on the line, they quit,
and   would   not   work.     The   farms
drew some, the cities the others, and
vvc suffered the loss."
Regarding the general progress of mtbjecl
tvenue work should be ready beforo the west, aside from the labor ques- men of your province, whom 1 see
the end of the week. The engineer tion, Mr. Hays seemed well pleased have already done so much for your
reported upon various propositions to Mr. Hays Is espei tally struck with development by the good government
alter grades, finding It Impossible to the great future of the dty of Prince they have given yen, thai they ehould
do much in that line without work- Rupert. He declared last night that take good heed of the great futuro
ing alterations in various other cross  in the course of a few yeare the pre-  that  is In  store for your fishery  in-
streets and the
ready erected,
grade of buildings al-
Tbe Kaien Island Club is preparing for a formal opening of the new
club  rooms  on   September  L"!   by  u
seni town would b" a large city, and
thai within the next decade It would
be Hie metropolis of northern British
Columbia, the commercial, social and
business centre of that section of the
province, a great railroad and manu-
tini abov
sen ed to Hie white
■ all lei  II
I' ."
be
grand ball which will bo followed by faeturlng town, and a seaport that
a series of monthly social gatherings would rival any on the Pacific const.
this winter. Tho picturesque site Of "Prince Rupert is destined to lie-
the club room has been greatly ad- come a great city," said Mr. Hays,
mired by all visitors to the place, and l"and it will be only a matter of a few
has won the attention of all who j years after the completion of the
visit the city. jroad that It is one of the world's Im
portant seaports and markets. Prince
The government is inviting tenders , Rupert will be to northern British
for the rection of a one-room school j Columbia what Vancouver Is to the
Louse on Graham Island. Tenders southern section of tho province, and
will be accepted up to October 10 and I do nol think that tbe trade of either
may be made to the government will interfere with the other. As a
agent in Prince Ruperl. tho depart- whole, I am optimistic, and think
ment of public works at Victoria, tbe that, with the labor question once
secretary of the school board, Queen  nettled, we will have clear sailing."
Charlotte City, or the mlnlg recorder j        o
at Jedway. Particulars appear In the For Job Printing of all kinds see
advertising columns of the Journal,  the Journal man.
English Freemaiioiiry ins two
London Weeklies and one Illustrated
monthly devoted to its interests.
Postponed!
The Public Meeting which was called
for
TONIGHT, SEPTEMBER 18
Under the auspices of the Prince
Ruperl Progressive Association for
the purpose of discussing the G.T.P,
assessment has  been  postponed.
Hue notice will lie given of the
date when the meeting will be held.
F. M. LKNNIE,
.1. V. MACDONALD, Secy.-Treas.
President. PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Tuesday, September 13, 1910
SAVING THE FORESTS
Application Made Before Railway Commission on Behalf of
the Province.
 ft.
Assistance  is  Promised  by the  hotly
to Protect the Wooded
Areas
On behalf of the chief commissioner of provincial lands, Mr, II. A.
Maclean, K.C., deputy attorney general, at a recent sitting of the Railway Commission in Victoria, called
attention to tthe necessity of tbe railway companies being forced to take
greater care in the matter of the prevention of forest fires caused through
sparks from locomotives. The regulations should be so changed so far as
British Columbia is concerned, owing
to Hie peculiar conditions which prevail toi this province during the dry
months of the year. The recent investigation made by the provincial forestry commission, disclosed the fact
that too many fires had their origin
along the right-of-way of the railway
companies and this suggested that
possibly the prescribed mesh or net
placed In the funnels of locomotives
is too large allowing too many sparks
to escape. Another point was the
necessity, In the dry season, of better patrolling of the rights-of-way.
The lines are perhaps more or less
patrolled by section men and other
employees of the companies, but in
no other maimer. From July to September in this province there is practically little or no rain. In consequence the rights-of-way are veritable tinder beds and this year, a particularly dry one, many fires which
clearly originated on the rights-of-
way, have swept into the forests doing incalculable damage to what the
province believes is its greatest asset, its timber resources.
Insufficient Patrol
Mr. Maclean referred to the recent
report made by Chief Fire Warden
Gladwin whose allegations, if true,
Indicated the necessity of Instani action. Mr. Gladwin had reported that
the C. P. R. is not patrolling its
lines adequately, and there are not
enough men. If that company and
the Great Northern had taken charge
of all fires which originated upon
their respective rights-of-way the
government could have taken charge
of the fires elsewhere. The reports
referred to a number of forest fires
some of which had plainly started
from sparks from locomotive 13IS,
which had subsequently been transferred to another section of the C.
P. R. line and again started fires. Mr.
Gladwin reported that in fact tbe
C.P.R. had been starting fires every
day on its section in the Kootenay
country.
To a query by the chairman of the
board. Commissioner Maybee, Mr.
Maclean stated that the provincial
government has in summer the chief
fire warden and permanent sub-inspectors, which fire wardens are appointed for the dry'season. This
force is increased as occasion requires. Nearly all the government
road foremen are fire wardens and
are employed the year round.
"Is It conclusively shown In the report of the forestry commission that
these fires are due to 'the railway
companies?" asked Hon. Mr. Maybee.
"Prospectors and campers are often
responsible though It Is a common
thing to blame the railways."
"The report. I believe, states that
from seventeen to twenty per cent
are due to ther ailways," stated Mr.
McNeil, representing the. Great
Northern, and Mr, Maclean stated
Hint the report showed that of 202
fires reported thirty had been caused
by tins stalling on Hie railway rlght-
Of way through engine sparks, while
a greal number bail no cause assigned. 'Ibis showing, Ion, wns made in
a i ompat alii "ly small inei ic hi 'if the
pro iin". It was a matter. Mr. Maclean thought, which came within tic"
scope nf i i; . federal i.i'»6 us the proi -
Ince could nol enf i
against railway companies as con-
■ iv as could the Dominion.
Would Asslsl  Province
Chairman Mayhi e declared thai
the board was just as much all ■ ti
thg necessity of the protection of
tot si wealth as could he ihe province. Tiie board has been fully Investigating tiie whole matter but has
hail difficulty in arriving :ct a means
which will prove fair to all parties,
Under thi jurisdiction of Hi" board
there are at present in Manitoba and
a pari or Saskatchewan two inspectors, another covers Hie balance of
the latter province, and Alberta and
British Columbia. These men are experts on railway equipment. The
board lias also been In close touch
with the Dominion Forestry commission at Ottawa and arrangements
have been   made  whereby  the above
NOTICE
inspectors visit each member of the
Dominion fire ranger protection service and instruct him in the art of
locomotive inspection. By this means
the fire rangers can see that the regulations respecting locomotives so
far as the danger of fires is concerned, are enforced and to that extent
the work of supervision by the railway commission has been greatly extended. If British Columbia will furnish a list of its permanent fire wardens the board would be only too
glad to follow the same course of
instruction as is done In the east.
The board has had reports that the
railway companies are making every
effort to adopt proper equipment,
thcugh, of course, there are some engineers who are careless. Tho board
has recently instructed the railway
companies to take immediate steps to
clc an their rights-of-way of all dead
grass and inflammable matter which
might occasion (ire.
Mr. Maclean stated that the provincial government would doubtless
be very pleased to co-operate with
the board, but there was something
more required. It would not be practicable to absolutely clean the rights-
of-way, and there will always be danger from sparks from locomotives
falling on inflammable material.
What was most Imperative was a better system of patrol by the railway
companies.
Seek  Definition
Both Mr. .Maybee and Dr. Mills
wanted to know what the province
would consider "forest areas." Such
should be defined for the information
of the board. As to inflammable material on rights-of-way, why should
not the province enforce the Dominion regulations as it does the criminal laws? There was no reason why
the board should go about the country in the guise of common informers.
Both tr. McMullen and Mr. McNeill quoted figures to show the number of men now engaged in looking
after rights-of-way, the latter stating that the Great Northern had put
on extra patrol men, furnished with
speeders, which permitted them to
cover a large section of track.
Finally, on Mr. Maybee's suggestion, Mr. Maclean expressed his willingness to furnish tbe board with a
list of names of the permanent firewardens and to outline what, In the
opinion of the government, are the
forest areas of the province. When
this information is received the board
will instruct two of its experts to
proceed west and instruct tbe fire
wardens In points relative to locomotives from the standpoint of fire
prevention.
 . o	
PAY FOR LIGHT AS NEEDED
.Suggestion   for  City  Fathers  Taken
From German Practice
Why should sober-minded citizens
who are in their homes and safe in
bed by ten o'clock at night pay
lighting taxes for others, who, being
of a jovial turn of mind, prefer to
stay in cafes, clubs, or bars until
midnight and do not return home
until the early hours of the morning?
.Manifestly it is unfair, but in Germany this question has now been answered in a way which will please
the earnest taxpayer, and probably
prove a terror to the late night birds
says the Berlin correspondent of the
Pall Mall Gazette. To the village of
Zarkau, near Glogau, in Silesia, must
be given the honor of installing a
system of automatic lighting for the
streets The electric lights burn
every   night   from   the   outskirts   of
Glogau through the village of Zarkau iCoates'   Claim   No.   1,   and   marked
a distance of about a kilometre, until ^Wm. Penman's S. to. Corner, Claim
. ,    , , No. 1,    tlience cast 80 chains, thence
ten o clock ai a mutual cost to the n01.th 80 clulins, thence west 80
community in general. Then they chains, thence south, 80 chains to the
are switched out. I dace  of commencement.
Staked, June 14th, 1910.
Dated this 28th days of July, 1010.
NOTICE is hereby given that application will be made to the Legislative Assembly of the Province of
British Columbia at its next Session
for an Act to incorporate a company
with power to construct, equip,
maintain and operate a line or lines
of railway of standard guage with
any kind of motive power for the
conveyance of passengers and freight,
and with all the powers contained
in the "Model Railway Bill"; Commencing from a point at or near
Port Simpson, or Work Channel, In
the Coast District, British Columbia,
by the most feasible, desirable and
practicable route to a point on the
Eastern boundary of the Province of
British Columbia, via the South-west
side of Work Channel to the Skeena
River; thence up the North side of
Hie Skeena River to a point near
Hazelton; thence to the junction of
the Bulkley River; thence up the
right bank of this River eight (8)
miles to the Suskewa River; thenco
up this River by a low divide to the
bead of Babine Lake; thence to the
north end of Stuart Lake; thence
north of McLeod Lake to the Mis-
nichiiica River; thence up the Mis-
nlchlnca River by Summet Lake to
Pine River Pass; thence north-westerly to head of Pino River, and down
ibis River to Moberley Lake; and
thence by the Peace River to the
Eastern boundary of the said Province of British Columbia; and with
power to construct, operate and
maintain' all necessary bridges, roads,
ways and ferries; and to build, acquire, own and maintain wharves and
docks in connection therewith; and
to build, acquire, own, equip and
maintain steam and other vessels and
boats, and to operate the same on
any navigable waters; and with
power to build, equip, operate and
maintain telegraph and telephone
lines in connection with the said
Railway and branches, and to transmit messages for commercial purposes, and to charge tolls therefor:
and to generate and to sell electricity
for the supply of light, heat and
power; and with power to expropriate lands for the purposes of the
Company; and to acquire lands,
money bonuses, privileges or other
aids from any Government, municipal corporation or other persons or
bodies; and to levy and collect tolls
from all persons using, and on all
freight passing over any of such
roads, railways, ferries, wharves and
vessels built by the Company; and
with power to connect with and make
traffic or other arrangements with
railway, steamboat, or other companies;
Dated at Victoria, B.C., this 11th
day of August,  1910.
BARNARD &  ROBERTSON,
Solicitors for the Applicants.
A19.
COAL CLAIMS
Skeena  District—Queen   Charlotte
Islands.
To all to whom it may concern:-—
NOTICE is hereby given that I, the
undersigned, intend to apply for a
icense to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum upon the following lands
situate on Graham Island, one of tbe
Queen Charlotte Group, In the Province of British Columbia, and more
particularly described as follows, viz:
Commencing at a stake planted one
and a quarter miles west of the
north-east corner of Louis Inlet, and
marked "P. C. Coates' S. E. Corner
Claim No. 1," thence west 80 chains,
thence north 80 chains, thence east
80 chains, thence south 80 chains to
the place of commencement.
Staked June 14th, 1910.
Dated this 28th day of July, 1910.
P. C. COATES,
Bv his Agent, Wm. Edward Laird.
A9
COAL CLAIMS
Skeena  District—Queen  Charlotte
Islands.
To all to whom It may concern:—
NOTICE is hereby given that I, the
undersigned   intend   to   apply  for  a
icense to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum upon the following lands,
situated on Graham Island, one of
the Queen Charlotte group, in tho
Province of British Columbia, and
more particularly described as follows, viz:—Comemncing at a stake
planked at the S. E. corner of P. C.
At each end of this kilometre I
stretch, on an Iron cupboard lighted
by a tiny electric light. Those persons who are out after ten o'clock
wishing to have their way lighted
niusi Inserl a ten-pfenning pleci Into
Hie slot in the side of Hie Iron cupboard. Then the nine lamps placed
along this stretch burst forth into a
12-mInutt life, thus enabling the
i tiger '.i find his way in lightness
in  his  or  her  house.
The scheme'is working in a satis-
t'ac tory way, and ii seems quite proh-
ile the other German villages and
kau and Instal the automatic-lighting
towns will follow tha example nf Zar
system to be put into operation after
ten o'clock.
By   his   Agent,
WM.
Wm.
PENMAN
Edward   Laird.
A9
Willi in a year Germany lias added
"in hundred and thirty officers of
all ranks to her naval personnel, including one vice-admiral and one
i ear-admiral,
LAND   LEASE   NOTICE
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast.
TAKE NOTICE thai The Canadian
Fish ,"i Cold Storage Company Ltd.,
nf Vancouver, occupation Mercantile
and Manufacturing, intends to apply
for permission to lease He- following described land:—Commencing at
a post planted at high water mark
nn ihe westerly side of Prince Rupert Harbor and distant about 110
chains from '.he north-east corner of
Lot 443, thence west 20 chains,
thence soutii 20 chains, thence east
6 .li; ins. move or less lo high water
mark, thenee following along , the
high water mark lo the point of commencement and containing 20 acres
more or less.
The Canadian  Fish  and  Cold
Storage Company,  Limited,
J. H.  Pillsbury, Agent.
Dated June 20th, 1910. Jyl2
LAND PURCHASE NOTICES
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Phillip Williams, of Sydney, Nova Scotia, occupation accountant, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein
ley:—Commencing at a post planted
at the S. E. corner and about 16%
miles distant in a north-westerly direction from the north end of Kitwancool Lake, thence north 80
chains, thence west SO chains, thence
south 80 chains, thence east 80
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 640 acres, more or
less. PHILLIP  WILLIAMS.
James to. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 4,  1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Annie Grieve,
of Victoria, B. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kltwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
X. to. corner, and about 17% miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence south 40 chains, thence
east 40 chains, thenco soutii 40
chains, tlience east 40 chains, thence
north 80 chains, tlience west 80
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 480 acres, more or
less. ANNIE  GRIEVE.
James to. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 4,  1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that John Cox, of
Monarch, Alberta, occupation farmer, intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described
lands, situated in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Comencing at a post planted at the
north-west corner and about five and
one-quarter miles distant in a northwesterly direction from the north end
of Kitwancool Lake, thence SO
chainB south, thence SO chains east,
thence 80 chains north, thence 80
chains west to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres,
more or less.
JOHN COX.
James to. Smith, Agent.
Dated  May  30,  1910. Jy5
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that James Alexander McDonald, of Monarch, Alberta, occupation farmer, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands, situated in
the Kitwancool or Cbein Wein Valley:—Commencing at a post planted
at the N. E. comer about five and
one quarter miles distant in a northwesterly direction from the north
end'of Kitwancool Lake, thence soutii
SO chains, thenco west 80 chains,
thence north 80 chains, thence east
SO chains to point, of commencement,
and containing 640 acres, more or
less.
JAMES ALEXANDER McDONALD
James to. Smith, Agent.
Dated May 30, 1910. Jy5
Coast Land District—District of
Skeena. .
TAKE NOTICE that I, Ernestine
A. Roney, of Prince Rupert, occupation married woman, intend to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted on the north
bank of the Skeena River about half
a mile south of Geo. T. Church's preemption, thence west 10 chains,
thence north 40 chains, thence east
to the Skeena River; thence southwest following the bank of the
Skeena River to the place of beginning, and containing about 80
acres.
ERNESTINE A. RONEY, Locator.
to. A. Roney, Agent.
Dated July 7th, 1910. Jy22
The old constitutional maxim.
"The king can do no wrong," is literally true, his majesty's acts being the
acts  of  his   ministers,   who  are  ro- '■ franchise   except
The average number of gales occurring In a year is about sixty-six.
 o—	
All   citizens   of   Brazil   have   the
soldiers   and   beg-
sponsible to Hie House of Commons. | gars.
Coast Land District—District of
Skeena.
TAKE NOTICE that I, J. Adolph
Perry, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation
book-keeper, intend to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted on the north bank of the
Skeena River, about a mile west of
Lot 31, thence north 40 chains,
thence east 80 chains to lot 31,
thence south 40 chains to bank of
Skeena River, thence west about 80
chains following north bank of
Skeena River to point of-commence-
ment, and containing about 320
acres.
j. ADOLPH PERRY, Locator.
Wm. A. Roney, Agent.
Dated July Kith, 1910.         Jy22
Coast LaThd~Distl'Tct—"District of
Skeena.
TAKE NOTICE tbat I, Mary M.
Roney, of Stillwater, Minnesota, U.
S.A., occupation married woman, Intend to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands.
Commencing at n post, planted on the
north bunk of the Skeena River at
the south-east corner of Geo. T.
Church's pre-emption, thence north
40 chains, thenco east 40 chains,
tlience south to the bank of the
Skeena River, thence south-west following tho Skeena River to the place
of beginning and containing about
120 acres.
MARY M.  ROBNY,  Locator.
to.   A.   Roney,   Agent.
Dated July Sth, 1910. Jy22
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Violet Geiger,
of Victoria, B. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kltwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
X. W. corner and about 23 V2 miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence south 80 chains, tlience
east 40 chains, thence north 40
chains, thence east 40 chains, thence
north 40 chains, thence west 80
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 4 80 acres, more or
less. VIOLET GEIGER.
James W. S'nlth, Agent.
Dated  June  7th,  19'0. Jy8
LAND PURCHASE NOTICES
Skeena Laud District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Pearl Caspell
of Cayley, Alberta, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. E. corner and about 15 % miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence soutii SO chains, thence
west 40 chains, tlience north 40
chains, tlience west 40 chains, tlience
north 40 chains, thence east 80
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 4S0 acres, more or
less. PEARL CASt'ELL.
James to. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 3, 1910. jy8
Skeena Laud District.—District of
Cnssiar.
TAKE NOTICE thai .Mary Brown,
of Vancouver, B.C., occupatiou married woman, Intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of
the Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—Commencing at a post planted
at the North-east corner and about
ten miles distant In a north-westerly
direction from the north end of the
Kitwancool lake, thence soutii SO
chains, thence west 40 chains, thenco
north 40 chains, thence west 40
chains, thence north 40 chains
tlience east SO chains to point ol
commencement, and containing 4S0
acres, more or less.
MARY   BROWN.
James to. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 1,  1910. JyS
LAND PURCHASE NOTICES
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Ethel Welsh,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Weln Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
south-east corner and about 10 miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north 80 chains, thence
west SO chains, thence south 80
chains, thence east SO chains to
point of commencement and containing 64 0 acres, more or less.
ETHEL WELSH.
James W. Smith, Agent
Dated June 1st, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land  District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Henry Welsh,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
printer, intends fo apply foi permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. E. corner and 11 miles distant
in a north-westerly direction from
the north, end of Kitwancool Lake,
tlience north SO chains, tlience west
SO chains, thence south SO chains,
thence east SO chains to point of
commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
HENRY WELSH.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 2, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that John Henderson, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
agent,  intends  to apply  for  permission  to  purchase  the  following  described lands in tbe vicinity of Kitwancool   or   Chean   Wein   Valley:—Itant in
Commencing at a post planted at the i from   the   north   end  of   Kitwancool
S. .W corner and about 25 miles dis-  Lake, thence soutii SU chains, thence
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Frederick
Welsh, of Vancouver, B, C, occupation clerk, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-east corner about it miles dis-
north-westerly    direction
tant in a north-westerly direction west 40
from the north end of Kitwancool chains,
Lake, thence north SO chains, thence
east 40 chains, thence soutii 80
chains, thence west SO chains to
point of commencement and containing 320 acres, more or less.
JOHN   HENDERSON.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated Julie 7th, 1910. Jy8
-District of
chains,   thence    north     SO
thence   east   40   chains   to
point    of   commencement, and containing 320 acres, more or less.
FREDERICK  WELSH.
James VV. Smith, Agent
Dated June 2,  191 n. Jy8
District of
Skeena Land District-
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Laura Gordon
of  Victoria,  B.   C,  occupation  married woman, intends to apply for permission   to   purchase   tbe   following ICommencing at a post
Skeena Lund District
Cassia..
TAKE NOTICE that James Welsh,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation machinist, intends to apply for permission  to  purchase  the   following  described lands in  the vicinity,of  Kitwancool   or   Chean   Weill   Valley: —
lathed at the
described lands In the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—■
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. E. corner and about IS miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, tlience soutii 40 chains, thenco
west 40 chains, thence north 40
chains, thence east 40 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 1UU acres, more or less.
LAURA GORDON.
James to. Smith, Agent.
Dated  June  4,   1910. jyS
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Walter Marke
of Toronto, Ont., occupation traveller, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool
or Chean Wein Valley:—Commencing at a post planted at the N. E.
corner and about 27 V. miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, tlience south 80 chains, thence
west SO chains, thence north 80
chains, tlience east 80 chains to the
point of commencement and containing 640 acres, more or less.
WALTER MARKE.
James  VV. Smith, Agent
Dated June Sth, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE    NOTICE      that     Richard
Howie, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation dentist, intends to apply for permission   to   purchase   the   following
I described   lands   in   the   vicinity   of
j Kitwancool or Chean Weln Valley:—
'Commencing at a post planted at the
j N.  E.  corner and about  24%   miles
distant in a north-westerly   direction
from   the  north   end   of   Kltwancool
Lake, thence soutii SO chains, thence
west   80   chains,   thence     north     80
.chains, thence east 80 chalnB to the
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
RICHARD HOWIE.
Jaines to. Smith, Agent.
Dated June  7th,  1910. Jy8
N. to. corner and about 12 miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from tbe north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence soutii SO chains, thence
east 20 chains, thence north SO
chains, thence west 20 chains to the
point of commencement and containing 160 acres, more or less.
JAMES  WELSH.
James to. Smith, Agent.
Dated   June  2,   1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Marguerette
Burns, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission ,o purchase the
following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein
Valley:—Commencing at a post
planted at the N. E. corner and distant about 12 miles in a northwesterly direction from the north
end of Kltwancool Lake; thence
soutii SO chains, thence west 20
chains, thenee north 80 chains,
thence east 20 chains to point of
commencement, and containing 160
acres,  more or less.
MARGUERETTE  BURNS.-
James to. Smith, Agent.
Dated June  2, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles F.
Burns, of Moncton, New Brunswick,
occupation auditor, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Weln
Valley:—Commencing at a post
planted at the south-west corner and'
about 12 miles distant in a northwesterly direction from the north
end of Kitwancool Lake; tlience
north 80 chains, thence east SO
chains, tlience south SO chains,
tlience west SO chains to point of
commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
CHARLES  F.  BURNS.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated   June   2,   1910 Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Sandford
Burton, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation mining engineer, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands In the vicinity of Kltwancool or Chean Wein
Valley:—Commencing at a post
planted at the N. E. corner and
about 23 M: miles distant In a northwesterly direction from the north
end of Kltwancool Lake, thence south
SO chains, thence west SO chains,
thence north.80 chains, thenoe east
so chains to point of commencement
and containing 640 acres, more or
less. SANDFORD BURTON.
James to. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 7th, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Norman Cle-
land, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation printer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands in the Vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Weln Valley: —
Comencing at a post planted at the
S. E. corner and about 26% miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kltwancool
Lake, thence north 80 chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence south 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or lesB.
NORMAN   CLELAND.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 8th, 1910.
Skeena Land  District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE tlirtl James Jar-
dine, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
merchant, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of Kltwancool or Chean Weln Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
x. to. corner and about 18 miles distant   in  a   north-weBterly    direction
from   the  north   end  of  Kltwan I
Lake, thence Bouth 8(1 chalnB, thi n   ■
"'is'     80    chains    th   north   80
chains, thence west SO chains to
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
JAMES JARDINE.
James to. Smith, Agent.
Dated Juno  2,  1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that John McDiar-
mid, of Lucknow, Ont, occupation
farmer, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands ln tho vicinity of the
Kitwancool or Chean Weln Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. W. corner and about 13 miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kltwancool
Lake; thence north 80 chains, thence
east 40 chains, thence south 80
chains; thence west 40 chains to
point of commencement, and contaln-
ln|   320 acres.
JOHN McDIARMID.
■lames W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 2, 1910. Jy8 ^
Tuesday, September 13,  1910
THE  PRINCE   RUPERT  JOURNAL
PUBLIC OWNERSHIP
Subject Dealt With From the Standpoint
of Firm Believer in
System.
Address Given by Rev. H. Bigelow
Before Gathering in the City
of Vancouver
The lecture given by Rev. Herbert
S. Bigelow, of Cincinnati, in the First
Congregationa1 church in Vancouver, on "The high cost of living: Its
primarary cause," will scarcely be
considered by many as a satisfactory
answer to the question he propounded, but It contained much that Is Interesting and instruclve, especially in
a city like Prince Rupert that is just
beginning life.
In opening, the speaker said he
was interested In the experiment
Vancouver was making in a practical
application at least of the tax theory
populariezd by Henry eGorge. The
only disappointment he felt was that
this city should be the first on the
continent to blaze the way. He would
have liked to see a city on his own
side of the line the first to try it,
but as it remained the truth first
brought to light by a citizen of the
United States was first put in practice
by a Canadian city.
"The world has four invariable
way of treating a great truth," said
the speaker. "First, it ignores it;
second it ridicules it; third, it tries
to crucify it; fourth, it builds monuments to it; and this would prove to
be the history of the truth taught by
Henry George as it bad been by
every other."
He added tbat lie would speak not
so much as a political economist as
a preacher. He believed the world's
great social problems could be solved
if we only applied Christianity to
them. At present we apply Christianity only to the individual life,
be' it must be applied socially and
collectively before the world's great
evils could be cured.
High Cost of Living
Turning to tbe subject proper of
his discourse the speaker said that
in the United States they had had
several congressional committees at
work investigating the high cost of
living. The reports of these committees differed. One of the most popular theories was that the high cost of
living was due to the abundance of
gold. They said that modern methods of miging had so increased the
production of gold that Its value for
purchasing purposes was lessened
and so the cost of commodities went
up. That was a subject he would
not discuss, as he did not pretend to
be a financier. Democratic committees on the other hand attributed the
high cost of living to high protection; but to him it seemed that that
was what a protective tariff was
meant to do, and if it failed of that
it failed of its purpose.
Another group of causes was to be
found in high freight rates, watered
stock in companies anil railways, and
excessive charges for public utilities.
For example, a recent change in the
classification of the freight rates on
hay from the northwest states to the
Atlantic seaboard would mean a difference of $2.50, or in an average
year a cost of $6,000,000 more in
freight either to the farmers or consumers. They were beginning to understand that the fixing of freight
rates on public highways was a government function, and should not he
in the hands of private individuals.
It was true that by watering stock
and other such processes these companies very often disguised the high
profits they made. In Illustration of
tills tbe speaker gave instances of the
manner In which the huge Harrlman
fortune had been built up.
Solution Suggested
He considered that one solution of
the difficulty lay In the public ownership of public utilities. He had
seen an illustration or Hint In the
comparatively small city of Calgary.
There, in spite of offers of private
companies, the citizens had determined to own their street railway system. They had started with the
best of everything; had laid down the
most expensive rails and put on the
most up-to-date cars, and yet, with
only four cars running, it was found
that the profits earned were sufficient
to pay the Interest on the total Investment, and at this they charged
only the same rates as In the bigger
cities of Winnipeg and Vancouver,
yet today in that small city the street
car system was paying $30,000 a year
into the public treasury. The people
of Calgary had shown Independence
of spirit In another way. The private
electric light company has asked certain privileges and rights from the
council, and when denied said they
would cut off the lights in the streets.
The council said "Go ahead and shut
off your lights," and for a year the
people of Calgary carried lanterns
through the streets while the municipal system was being installed. The
private company was still running,
but the rates had been cuti n half
three times since the municipal system was installed.
.  Business Principles
Of course, municipal ownersbip
would not work of Itself. It must be
run on business principles, ai.d if
municipalities wanted business results they must reorgtnlzs their civic
government. It w i ill be absurd for
a business corporation to turn out. Its
experienced man.igers every year and
put In raw recruits, and yet that was
exactly what municipalities were doing. In his opinion It wouli be better to get a commission composed of
three or five practical men. and
have one elected evuvy year leaving
the rest in. Yju would thus secure
some continuity. Should any on.'
system of initiative, referendum and
recall.
Rev. Mr. Bigelow said that he himself came from a city that had the
worst reputation for graft In civic
government on the continent. He illustrated this by the story of a Cincinnati drummer who went into another town to do business and was
charged 25 cents for sending a long
distance telephone message. "Why,"
hefumed, "in Cincinnati I could telephone to hell and back for fixe
cents." "I have no doubt of it," was
the reply, "because it is all within
the city limits."
"However, occasionally they did
some wise things in Cincinnati. As
an instance, the city owned a steam
railroad, valued at $30,000,000
One of Morgan's syndicates came to
the city and offered $19,000,000 for
it, saying that if the city did not accept the offer they would refuse to
exchange business with their road, so
that in a few years it would become a
useless heap of junk. The city council accepted the offer, but there was
a provision in the charter that compelled them to submit it to the people, and the people turned It down
and still owned the road. You con id
buy a city council, you could buy a
party boss, you could buy a legislator
or congressman some times, but the
people you could not buy. Give the
people a concrete question to vote
upon and they will forget that they
are Grit or Tory, Republican or Democrat, and vote as seems best to
them in the public interest.
Monopoly  of  Soil
"But It is argued," said the speaker, "that you might have free trade
and ownership of public utilities and
still have poverty. They tell us that
in Germany they have public ownership and in England they have free
trade, and still they have poverty.
Well, no one can answer that question except those who have learned
political economy at the feet of
Henry George. All these other
remedies are crude so long as any
one is allowed to monopolize the
ownership of the soil in any country."
He continued that If we thought
the cost of gas or electriciay high, it
was possible to compare it with the
cost of production and get some redress, but against the man who
charged too much for land there was
no redress. A man owing a street
car service may charge too much, but
he does at least give somethingg in
return, but the man who owns the
land on which a city Is built puts on
it all that the traffic will bear and
gives no return whatever. His rent
is simply the capitalization of government and population that has
come into existence in spite of him.
Manhattan island, purchased from
the Indians by the Dutch for $2S
represented today property interests
of $4,000,000,000. Yet tlrls enormous amount wns purely a social
value held by eleven per Ci nt of the
population of that city, who had the
legal privilege of collecting $250,-
0110,000 a year from the labor and
commerce of tin people. Any tax upon the products of labor musl Increase the cost of living to the people, hut a tax upon land values simply decreased the value of land. Some
one had said truly that under the
present system of taxation If you robbed a hen roost you were only fined
only, but If you built one you were
fined every year.
The city of Chicago once owned a
square mile of land within the city
limits, and in their wisdom they put
it up for sale. In those early years
prices were not very high, and a few
lots they could not sell at all they
kept. On one of these lots today
stood the building of the Chicago
Tribune, which was paying to the city
a yearly ground rent of $47,000. If
Chicago still owned that square mile
of territory, she would have ground
rent enough to pay all her current
expenses and It would not be necessary to put a penny of taxes on the
people.    Had man been wise, Provi
dence seemed to have provided for
that. In the early years the land
was of practically no value, but then
there were no expenses for public
works, but as population increased
so the need for public improvements
increased, and the increasing value
of the land was there to provide
against It. It was like the milk rising in the mother's breast to satisfy
the infant's need.
Increase of Poverty
As it was, poverty increased with
population. In London one man in
seven was buried in a pauper's grave,
in New York one ln ten. And the
poverty of London and New York was
beginning to appear in Chicago and
San Francisco, and in time would
arrive in Vancouver unless we got
at the root of the matter and were
provided to meet it.
Of the suffering of the poor in
great cities as lied had himself observed it, Rev. Mr. Bigelow spoke
with a touching pathos that held his
audience spellbound. "In the name of
these broken hearts," he added, "we
plead for truer laws, laws that will
bring joy to the toiler while yet It
is day, and more hope when the night
is come."
In conclusion he said he believed a
better day was dawning. It had its
awakening in a measure brought into
the British Parliament a year ago by
that little Welsh solicitor, whom he
held to be the greatest statesman in
the world today, Mr. liloyd George,
but always It seemed to him behind
the foresight and courage of Lloyd
George and his policy of land taxation, loomed the spirit of Henry
George.
"And it makes me proud and glad
that British blood runs through my
veins, as it does through yours; that
the movement started by our bumble
California printer lias been taken up
and applied by your great British
Chancellor, who has raised a cry that
will echo round the world, a cry for
juster laws, more equal taxation, and
the right of every man to some share
in the land which the Divine Creator
has given for the use of all."
NEWS OF THE PROVINCE
Items of General Interest From Centres in British Columbia.
Increasing Plant
New Westminster. — If arrangements can be made with the C.P.R.
for additional water frontage on the
Fraser River adjoining their present
plant in this city, the B. C. Packers'
Association will erect a large add!-,
tion to the Columbia Cold Storage
Plant. They will also purchase another halibut fishing steamer io supplement the work of the Roman,
which will bring fish to the cold storage plant here.
Shortage of Supplies
Fort George.—A serious situation
exists in the Nechaco country owing
to the failure of steamers to navigate Fraser Lake. Many of the settlers are already sorely in need of
staple supplies, while the situation in
regard to the winter is even more
alarming. The shortage of stores In
the Nechaco Valley is accentuated by
the fact that a large quantity of supplies was accidentally burned not
long ago while awaiting transportation. It is understood that special
efforts will be put forth by the business interests of Fort George to cope
with the present situation, although
it is not improbable that the government may also be asked to assist.
The positive assurance of the completion of the Blackwater road before
the advent of winter, to furnish a dependable link of communication with
the outside world, would greatly relieve the anxieties of interestd settlers. This road the Hon. Thos. Taylor some time ago gave orders should
he rushed forward with the least possible delay, difficulty in obtaining
sufficient labor being the reason for
its non-completion ere this.
hance the serviceableness of the machinery of the department. In this
connection it is not improbable, in
view of the largely increased legal
business of the crown, that the deputy attorney-generalship may hereafter be divided.
Large  Fruit Export
i'enticton.—from now on the fruit
shipments for the remainder of Hie
season out of Penticton will average
over 500 boxes a day, or more than
half a carload every twenty-four
hours according to statistics compiled
from the reports of ranchers and
fruit men.
Last week shipments took a big
jump from about 150 to 300 boxes a
day. This was caused by the arrival
of St. John, Imperial and Carmen
peaches and early apples.
The Westholme
Lumber Company, Ld.
We carry the largest stock of
Building Supplies in the North.
Quotations given on short notice in all lines.
Rough and Dressed Lumber
Shingles and Lath
Mouldings and Cases
Doors and Windows
We handle Plaster and Lime at reasonable prices
Get our quotations for all classes of buildings.
FIRST AVENUE
OFFICE AND
WAREHOUSES
Northern Railway
Victoria.-—Advices have been received from the offices of the British
Columbia & Alaska Railway company
of which Mr. Jean Wolkenstein, of
New York, is president, that their
reconnaiaance surveys are now complete between Fort George and Quesnel, the second survey party sent out
by L. M. Rice & Company of Seattle
having reached Quesnel several days
ago. The men are now en route to
the coast. Mr. Walkenstein upon
his departure from Victoria a month
or more ago promised to communicate with the premier at an early
date, stating specifically what proposition It Is that his company desires
to present to the government with a
view to the future securing of some
measure of assistance for the road.
The line as projected Is to extend
from Lytton through the Chilcotin
country nnd Fort George to the Alaskan  boundary.
Strong  Law  Finn
Victoria.—Mr. Hugh A. McLean,
K.C., for the past twelve years deputy attorney-general of the province
of British Columbia, to which office
he was appointed during the brief regime of Hon. Joseph Martin, who has
tendered his resignation, will become
a partner In the well-known legal
firm of Messrs. Elliott & Shandley,
of this city. This will make a very
strong legal firm. R. T. Elliott, K.C.,
Is recognized as one of the best corporation lawyers and office men in
the province, while Mr. McLean
ranks high as a criminal lawyer.
For the time being, the inspector
of legal offices, Mr. J. P. McLeod,
will also act as deputy attorney-general. It Is quite probable, however,
that, later on, Attorney-General W.
.1. Bowser will work out in practicable form certain reconstruction plans
which have been obtaining his consideration with a view to further en-
Rnilding  nt Last
Revelstoke.—Grading for the construction of the Kootenay Central
railway is now in full swing. Work
is at present being done near Ward-
ner going northward, while another
crew of men is employed near Fort
Steele and some fifteen nyles have already been graded south from Golden. It is not likely that the rails
will be laid into Fort Steele before
•the snow flies, and possibly not before spring. When this branch of
the C. P. R. is completed between
Cranbrook and Golden it is said that
it, may be continued north along the
Columbia river, from Beavermouth to
the Big Bend country. The latter territory has fine mica deposits and
great mineral resources, besides immense timber areas. Sixteen C. P. R.
surveyors left Revelstoke recently to
meet anothr party that started from
Beavermouth. They are to conduct
and carry out a location survey for
this proposed C.P.R. branch through
the northern country.
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COVER THE EARTH.
WE   ARE   SOLE   AGENTS
CARLOAD JUST ARRIVED
Ready Mixed Paints,
Paints Ground in Oil,
Paints Ground in Japan,
Varnishes, Shellac, etc.
Water Stains
and
Decotint
IN  ALL COLORS
Prince Rupert Hardware & Supply  M
Company, Ltd.   thos. dunn, m*.        \s\
DnfaflriraftiiefLTiefrll^^
1836 1910
The Bank of
British North America
A  strong  British  Bank,   with
connections throughout the World
ESTABLISHED IN 1836
Paid Up Capital,
Reserve Fund   •
$4,886,666
$2,530,666
Cannot Identify
Victoria. —- Advices received by
Superintendent of Provincial Police
Hussey from the authorities at/Dil-
lin, Montana, where is held on a
charge of bank robbery the man
whom the police believe to be 1W1-
Iiam Haney, train robber and slayer
of Special Constable Isaac Becker,
near Ashcroft, in .Tune last year, Indicate that so far tho efforts of tbe
Los Angales police, two members
of which went to Dillon to make
more positive identification of the
suspect, have failed. These officers,
knew Haney when the latter served
time at Los Angeles, bul evidently
they cannot positively Identify the
man. Other officials of the I.os An-1
gcies departmenl will probably be j
sent to Dillon. The prisoner refuses to give any account of bis antecedents, nnd so far has succeeded In
balking attempts of the prison authorities to photograph him. This
leads the authorities to believe that
the man has a criminal record, which
he is endeavoring lo keep dark.
The Bank has Branches distributed throughout all of Canada,
and offices in London, Eng., New
York and San Francisco.
Special care given to Savings
Accounts, which may be opened at
all Branches with deposits of one
dollar and upwards.
Accounts of Firms, Corporations
and Individuals carried on the
most favorable terms.
Prince Ruperl Branch—
E. STONHAM, Manager.
Municipal Notice
TENDERS  1'OK   POLES
APPOINTMENTS  MADE
Provincial Government's Newest Offi-
culs According to Gazette Notices
Shipping Fir Seed
Quesnel.—The Hudson's Bay company from Quesnel are shipping over
two hundred pounds of fir seed today to the German Forestry association. These seeds are gathered
in the shape of cones, then dried and
threshed, and from about one hundred pounds of fir cones only one
pound of seed is obtained. These
seed when planted in Germany grow
rapidly, and in the course of a few
years, Canadians may visit a Canadian forest in Germany.
Last week's provincial Gazette
contains notice of the following appointments:—
.Matthew Mcliavin Andrew, of
Quesnel, to be official administrator
for the Cariboo electoral district.
George M. Gunn, of Creston, to nc
provincial constable from the Brat
day  of  September,   ID10.
To lie   notaries    public:    Edward
Roberts, of Fori George, and Cbarle
llazlitt   Cahan,  Jr.,  of   the  city   of
Vancouver, barrlstcV-at-law,
Perry Wright, of the city of Nelson,   to   lie  chief  clerk   ill    tile     laud
registry office at the city of Nelson,
from the first day of July, 1910.
Daniel C. Wilson, of the city ol
Nelson, to be a clerk in the land registry office at the city of Nelson, from
the  first day of September,  1010.
Mrs. Florence .M. B. Suttonmi be
acting mining recorder for Yale mining division and acting collector of
revenue tax for Ashcroft district,
during the absence on leave of William Dodd.
 o	
The presenl officially estimated
population of Greater London is
7,537,196
 o	
An admiral of the fleet of Great
Britain has a salary of $10,OHO.
Sealed tenders will be received by
the City Clerk up till 12 o'clock noon,
September 20th, for supplying Three
Hundred Cedar Poles for Electric
Light Line. Poles to be 35, 40 and
45 feet in length. Specifications may
be seen at office of City Engineer.
Tiie lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted.
ERNEST A. WOODS,
S13-16 City Clerk.
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS
Graham Island  School
SEALED TENDERS, superscribed
Tender for Graham Island School,"
will be received by the Honourable
the Minister of Public Works up to
and including Monday, the l'Uh day
of October, 1910, for the erection and
completion of a small one-room
school building at Graham Island,
one of tlie Queen Charlotte Islands,
Skeena  Electoral District.
Plans, specifications, contract and
forms of tender may be seen on and
after the 12th day of September,
1910, at the offices of John L. Ilarge,
Secretary to the School Hoard, Queen
Charlotte City; the Government
Agent, Prince Rupert; tho Mining
Recorder Jedway; and the Department of Public Works, Victoria,
Eaeli proposal must be accompanied by an accepted batik cheque
or certificate of deposit on a chartered bank of Canada, made payable
io the Honourable the Minister of
Public Works, for the sum of 1126,
which shall be forfeited If tin party
tendering decline to enter Into con-
trac when called upon to do bo, or
If he fail to complete i he work contracted foi. The cheques or certificates of deposit of unsuccessful nn-
derers will be returned to them upon
i lie   exei ul Ion of the contract.
Tenders will not be considered unless made oul on the forma sum.lied,
signed with the actual signature of
the tenderer and enclosed in the envelopes furnished,
The lowesi or any tender not
necessarily accepted.
F, C. GAM RLE,
Public Works Engineer.
Public Works Department,
Victoria, B.C., September 7, 1910.
Twin   Cities
Now Westminster.—In about eight
days the B.C.E.R, company will Inaugurate a fifteen minute service on
• e Interurban line through the municipality of Burnaby from New
West minster to Vancouver, A number of switches have been pul in
at various points between here and
Central Park to handle this service.
Home rule for Ireland was first
mooted by an organized association
in 1870.
	 THE   PRINCE   RUPERT  JOURNAL
Tuesday, September 13,  1910
* 14
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First Lots Now Offered For Sale
A chance of a lifetime to get in on the ground floor. This is your opportunity to invest in the first real inland townsite put on the
market by the G.T.P. Railway
THE FIRST DIVISIONAL POINT EAST OF PRINCE RUPERT
ELLISON is the first passenger and freight divisional
f ■ I 1 I Si 111 1 Point east °f F*rince Rupert.    It will be an important
x J A Grand Trunk Pacific town with a population of several
thousand before long. ELLISON is just east of the
fruit belt of Northern B.C. ELLISON Townsite is a
natural beauty spot. It is in the dry belt and the
climate is unsurpassed.
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ELLISON  I
Is the natural supply point for the
great and wealthy mineral belt of
that district. Coal, Silver, Lend,
Cold nnd Copper have been located in
large bodies tbat are rich in ore.
These are nil waiting for transportation, when tiie mining camps will
flourish.
Is situated on the banks of the
Skeena River, one hundred and
seventy-two miles east of Prince Rupert. Kllisoii is the natural bub of
the Buckley Valley, (tbe garden of
Prince Rupert). The land here has
proven this to be rich  for farming.
Two Hundred and Fifty Lots are Already Sold
PRICES FROM $250 TO $400
♦ ♦♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦■»♦♦♦«>♦♦«>♦♦♦♦«>♦♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»
TERMS:
One-Fifth down and 4 Semi-Annual
Payments at 7 per cent, per annum
-4>-»  ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦^♦>4>4   »♦■»♦»♦♦  ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»»♦♦♦»♦♦♦ T
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Naps and full particulars can be had from
C. D. Newton
Agent, Prince Rupert
.;..;«$.;.$.;.,;. ,•*$ •** »> •> *.;«*> •> •■« * ►:« «•> •> *> *> ••.♦ <" *> ♦ ►> »> ♦** *> ♦> ♦ *> *** *> *•* * *♦* * * * * **4 * *** * ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ **
F. E. Mitchell
Financial Agent, Victoria
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