BC Historical Newspapers

BC Historical Newspapers Logo

BC Historical Newspapers

Prince Rupert Journal Sep 22, 1911

Item Metadata

Download

Media
prj-1.0311921.pdf
Metadata
JSON: prj-1.0311921.json
JSON-LD: prj-1.0311921-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): prj-1.0311921-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: prj-1.0311921-rdf.json
Turtle: prj-1.0311921-turtle.txt
N-Triples: prj-1.0311921-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: prj-1.0311921-source.json
Full Text
prj-1.0311921-fulltext.txt
Citation
prj-1.0311921.ris

Full Text

Array />
V
The Journal
$2.00
a year
VOLUME   II.
f'
t^V-
£
Ptinu tlnput htmM
Published  Twice  a   Week.
PRINCE   RUPERT,   B.   C.   FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER  22,   1911.
ice, Five Cents.
NO. 28.
CONSERVATIVES  SWEEP  COUNTRY
ELECTORATE REJECTS
OFFER OF RECIPROCITY
Canada Decides to Conserve Her Own Resources for the
Benefit of the Country—Sir Wilfrid Laurier Goes
to Defeat—Nany Ministers of the Crown
are among those who suffer at
the Hands of the Voters
The electors of the Dominion of
Canada yesterday acquitted themselves in a manner that must have
an important bearing upon the Imperial policy of the British people.
In no uncertain manner, they rose
in their strength and declared
against a reciprocity pact formulated at Washington and accepted by
the Laurier government and attempted to be railroaded through the parliament of the country without the
will of the Canadian people being
|e' taken on it.
Forced to an appeal to the people
by the Conservative party under R. L.
Borden, the country responded in no
uncertain way, expressing its disapproval of any such trade alliance and
returning to power by a very decided
majority the Conservative party.
Unpopular Move
Sir Wilfrid and his government undoubtedly, in the earlier stages of
the reciprocity movement, felt that
they had struck what was going to
proie popular in the country. Before
the fight was far advanced they
found they had misjudged public
opinion. From that time on the cry
went forth, "save who can," and
every Liberal member and minister
was obliged to fight for his own political life in his own constituency.
Appeals to the "white plume" by Sir
Wilfrid and the sentimental aspect
as to his asking for power just one
term longer failed to save the premier and his party.
On smaller issues, that would not
havo affected the future of Canada
and even of the Empire to the extent that this would have done, there
can be little doubt that Sir Wilfrid's
appeal would have been listened to.
The Canadian people, Irrespctlve of
party, would have felt inclined to
give the veteral Liberal premier one
more lease of power.
It was not left for Sir Wilfrid to
retire on his own initiative.    He was
doomed to go down to defeat on a
broad question to which his govern-
..rnent had committed themselves.
Signal Defeat
The defeat was a signal one. The
cabinet of Sir Wilfrid has been completely routed. Hon. W. S. Fielding
and Hon. W. Patterson, the ministers
who represented Canada in the negotiations, both went down to defeat.
Hon. Sir L,yon Mackenzie King, Sir
'10 Frederick Borden, Hon. Geo. Graham
and Hon. William Templemen all
were numbered among the defeated
ones.
The figures available now show
that the-House of Commons has practically reversed itself. Out of the 221
members in the last parliament there
were 133 Liberals, 85 Conservatives
and 3 Independents. Figures now
available put the standing of the
parties at 128 Conservatives and 86
Liberals. These figures will be revised somewhat but Conservatives
seem assured of a good working majority, which will be welcome to all.
The exact distribution of these
seats is not known but at a late hour
last night the returns showed the
following which gives an idea of
the relative standing of the parties
in the eastern provinces: Ontario, 69
. Conservatives, 14 Liberals; Quebec,
21 Conservatives, 37 Liberals; Nova
Scotia, 8 Conservatives, 9 Liberals;
New Brunswick, 5 Conservatives, 4
Liberals; Prince Edward Island, 2
Conservative, 2 Liberals.
In This Province
In British Colubia there is every
reason to believe tbe province has
gone solidly for the Conservatives.
Only one seat is in doubt and that is
the local one, Comox-Atlin.
Hon. William Templeman went
down to defeat by a majority of 567.
The vote stood: G. H. Barnard,
2.966;   Hon.  Mr.  Templeman,  2,399.
In Vancouver, Mr. Stevens, the
Conservative, had a still more pro-
********.   ******
LATE   RETURNS
* This afternoon just before the ♦
* Journal went to press the Do- *
* minion   government   wire   was *
* put in order.    The returns re- *
* ceived show that the Conserva- *
* tives  won   Winnipeg,  Man.,  St. *
»  John   Co.,   N.   B.,   Queens-Shel- *
* burne, Cumberland, N. S., King *
* ston,    Hants,    Hamilton    East, *
»  Hamilton West, Ontario South, *
* Ontario     Centre,     Ottawa     (2 *
* seats),   Lincoln,   West   Huron, *
* Brant,    Peel,    Dufferin,    South *
* Grenville, Norfolk. *
* The Liberals won Antlgonish, •
* Cape Breton, Bonaventure, Cha- *
* teuguay,    St.    Hyacinthe    City, *
* Glengarry. *
nounced victory,  winning by a ma-
jorlty of 2,748.    His vote was 6,125.
PROSPECTS  GOOD
Coal  Mine  of  Britisii  Pacific  Company Is Showing
Up Well
W. G. McMorris of Vancouver is
in the city, having come over from
the Queen Charlotte Islands, where
his coal mine is being steadily de
veloped by the British Pacific Company. Mr. McMorris says the property Is showing up much better than
he had hoped for it. There is no
question that there is abundance of
coal and that of the best quality.
Quite a large force of men is at
work putting up the buildings to
be used, opening up the trail and
developing   tVie   niinne.
A delay in getting powder over
has prevented the work being pushed
as fast as would otherwise have been
the case. His visit to Prince Rupert
at present is in connection with the
powder supply, a launch loaded with
this necessary commodity having
failed to arrive as expected.
**************
BORDEN WINS
* R. L. Borden was elected in *
* Halifax by a small majority.      *
* •
***************
Box Social
The Ladies Aid of the Baptist
Church will hold a box social In Melntyre Hall on Monday the 25th Inst,
at 8 p. in. Everyone invited. The
Indies lire requested to bring a box
with good things to eat for two. The
gentlemen will purchase the boxes.
Mr. Frank Ellis, known as the popular auctioneer, will have charge of
the sale. Games and a general good
time. Your presence Is requested.
 o	
Captain John Irving is in the city.
* *     *
C. V. Bennett left on a holiday trip
by the Prince Rupert today.
* *     *
Mr. Duncan of Duncan & Gray,
Victoria, is in the city.
* *    *
Mrs.  George Tlte and  family  returned yesterday from the south.
*,    *    •
Miss Aggie Glaholm of Nanalmo Is
visiting her sister,  Mrs. Young.
* *     *
R. Brutinel of the Prince Rupert
Hydro-Electric Company has returned to the city.
* •     *
Mr.  George  of  the   Hudson's  Bay
Company, Is paying a business trip J
to the city.
AN EXPLANATION
Duncan Rots Finds  it Necessary  to
Repudiate His Organ for
False Report.
He Apologizes lo George H. Cowan
und Puts Himself in
Right Light
At the public meeting on Wednesday evening George H. Cowan read a
letter received from Duncan Ross
which explains itself and which also
throws some light upon the tactics
adopted in the recent campaign. The
letter was as follows:
Prince Rupert, Sept. 20, 1911.
Geo.   H.  Cowan,  Esq.,
Royal Hotel, City.
My Dear Cowan—The News of this
evening credits me with saying at the
Liberal rally last night: Hot Shot for
Mr. Cowan," "He is generally in a
state of inebriety at the time he gets
up to speak." The reporter, in shouts
of enthusiasm that greeted my remarks, didn't catch me accurately.
What I did say was that you were
generally "inebriated with the exuberance of your own verbosity,"
which as you know is a borrowed
phrase and was one applied to a
greater man than either of us—W. E.
Gladstone. I think your politics are
absolutely rotten but I have known
you for a great many years and regarding your worth as a private citizen, I haven't one word of objection
to offer. I regret the error in publication because I have never yet hit
an opponent below the belt and if
your politics were as good as your
personal habits you would easily be
one to be looked up to in the public
life of this country. I trust, therefore, that you will make use of this
letter at your meeting tonight because politics in this country would
be more attractive if free from personalities.
Sincerely yours,
DUNCAN  ROSS.
 o	
BOXING   CONTEST
Bailey and Nelson are in Training in the
City for Match Next Wed-    .'
nesday.
Victoria Hover May Be Seen at Work
in  Bis  Quarters  at  the
Windsor Hotel
On Wednesday evening, September
27, a boxing contest is to be put on
in the city under the auspices of the
Kaien Island Club at the club rooms.
The match is for 16 rounds between
Joe Bailey of Victoria and Oscar Nelson of Vancouver, both of them with
good records as lightweights. Nelson
has been here for a week, training
at the Kaien Island Club. Bailey
reached here yesterday by the Princess May and Is training at the
Windsor Hotel Club rooms at 3 and
8 each afternoon. The public are at
liberty to visit the rooms and see him
at  work.
This boxing bout is creating a lot
of interest and will be largely attended. Nelson Dunn will likely referee
the match. The men are to make
133 pounds at 3 o'clock on the afternoon of the match.
Good preliminaries are being arranged for the evening also.
CLEMENTS ELECTED
Returns from the soutli as the
Journal goes to press makes the
election of Mr, Clements sine.
Five polling places in Comox-
Atlin, not iiicliiiling Cumberland,
Comox, Di'iiiiinn Island and
other large centres, give him
10(1  of  a   majority.
His return now is certain.
J.
J.
Sloan
went
BOU
th
this
morn-
Ing
on
business.
*    *
 o'-
*
Mr. Blake Wilson of P. Hums &
Co. arrived In the city on Wednesday
and went on lo Hazelton on business.
Election Returns
Prince Rupert
 H                 Clements Ross
Booth  1    60 89
Booth   II    55 95
Booth   III    51 99
Booth IV    60 114
Total Vote   226 397
Majority for Ross   171
Skeena District
Clements    Ross
Prince Rupert    226 397
Port Simpson    10 6
Georgetown         1 6
Digby Island      2 12
Hardscrabble         3 5
Goose Bay    20 13
Cedar Vale       7 5
Kitselas       19 17
Kitsumkalum       17 9
Hazelton    98 81
Aldermere       15 17
Sealey          3 19
Skidegate         7 5
Jedway         4 6
Queen Charlotte City . .     7 14
Stewart        63 44
Telqua      12 11
Kispiox     7
Mile 44      10 23
Shandilla         7 S
Breckenridge         4 2
Red  Cliff        7 9
Copper City         9 11
Littleton       26 11
The Big Tunnel      1 12
Skeena Crossing      4 7
Twenty Mile      8 10
Lome Creek      8 5
Glentana       4 9
Bitter Creek   12 3
Port Essington    28 36
Atlin District
Atlin       21 22
Telegraph Creek         3 16
Discovery       16 17
Spruce Creek        5 13
Boulder Creek        2 3
Bennett     2 l
Lawn Hill      4 4
Porcher Island    21 25
Alberni District
Estevan Wireless      1 2
Alberni       87 63
Cumberland    112 131
Yale-Cariboo
A  few  figures  from   Yale-Carboo
were   received   locally   from   points
north of Ashcroft.    These gave the
following  figures:
Mc
Burrell Donald
34
2
10
42
4
17
4
CONSERVATIVES OF CITY
CELEBRATE VICTORY
Although Defeated in Prince Rupert They Rejoice in the
Overthrow of the Liberal Party—Speeches made
by H. S. Clements, George H. Cowan and
Others After the Returns are
Received
4
6
13
0
3
were
Quesnel      57
Soda Creek    10
150 Mile      18
Barkerville      23
Anders         7
Stanley       13
Shepherds       2
South Fort George ....   35
Fort George      3
Fraser Lake      8
Harpers          8
Hydraulic         4
Quesnel Forks       4
In   addition   to  these   there
ore votes for Johnson, the Socialist,
as  follows:   South  Fort George,  10;
Harpers, lj Quesnel Forks, 1.
Comox-Atlin
In Comox-Atlin it has been difficult to get any figures approaching
final ones. This morning by wireless Vancouver reported "eight polling stations Comox-Atlin give Clements majority seventy," which Indicates that Vancouver looks upon
Mr. Clements ns the probable victor.
It Is not known definitely whether
Prince Rupert wns Included In these
figures, but it Is presumed It was.
If that Is the case the seat is undoubtedly Conservative as the outlying sections in the south will
strengthen Mr. Clements, it Is believed.
A message to the Journal a little
later from Vancouver gave the Alberni results as, Clements 87, Ross
63.
In reply to the Inquiries of the
south as to the situation last night
a message was sent by wireless stating that as far as heard from in the
north the majority for Ross was
about 188.
It is presumed that these figures
were Included In the estlmnte made
in the south.
R. J. Balfour of Vancouver, a well
known insurance man, paid a visit
to Prince Rupert this week. He entered fully Into the election excitement and will return later to look
after business.
Election day in Prince Rupert
proved to be an exciting one
and the city's first election in so far
as Dominion politics are concerned
brought everyone up to the highest
pitch of enthusiasm.
There was created here a sentiment that Prince Rupert of all places
in the country would benefit from
reciprocity in connection with the
Alsaskan trade and in the halibut
industry. While this was undoubtedly an incorrect view of the situation,
yet it had a marked effect upon the
results.
More subtle influences also were
at work, and in the belief that Sir
Wilfrid was likely to be returned to
power, the theory of the "loaves and
fishes" was made to do service by
the supporters of Duncan Ross.
Works carried on by the Dominion
government on Digby Island and
elsewhere in the district also had
their effect, while the open announcement that Foley, Welch & Stewart
were backing Mr. Ross was also used
to their fullest extent.
In spite of these and the argument
that Prince Rupert could not afford
to be other than with the govern-
entm in power, the vote did not reach
the limit which the more sanguine
Liberals expected; namely, three-
quarters of the total vote polled. A
considerable number of votes from
Digby Island and from up-river-
points were also brought in to Prince
Rupert in order to swell the Liberal
majority in the hope of saving bets
| and making a good showing for the
party  here.
In one voting place on Porcher Island /the Conservative scruitineer
challenged a number who landed by
launch, when six refused to take the
oath.
Concede  the  City
The Conservatives realized that
Prince Rupert was to go against the
party and devoted itself to counteracting the influences being used
along the Skeena with good effect.
In spite of the fact that Liberals said
fliat there could be nothing to the
contest along the Skeena owing to
the fact that the railway contractors
were with Air. Ross, the vote from
Prince Rupert to Aldermere broke
practically even, showing the hold
the Conservatives retained upon the
independent  voters.
Locally, the campaign was conducted for the most part in the most
! spirited but at the same time friendly
spirit. Mr. Ross personally, in his
speeches and his actions, conducted
a fair campaign. He had a support,
however, that did not conduct such
a fight in all instances.
A  Good  Fighter
On the other side, Mr. Clements,
in his whole campaign, showed splendid spirit throughout and In every
respect conducted Iris campaign In a
manner that reflected the highest
credit upon himself. Ills supporters.
without exception, put him in the
front rank as a political campaigner.
He avoids all personalities and conducts a clean fight from start to finish. When the returns were coming
In no one In the Conservative committee rooms showed more interest
in the victories of the party than he
did, even at a time when II was very
problematic whether he was himself
elected or not. His statement that
he was more concerned In the returns of his party throughout British
Columbia and Canada than In his personal campaign was exemplified nt
every stage. Prince Rupert Conservatives can well feel proud of their
representative, who proved himself
a fearless fighter, a considerate foe,
and "one of the boys' always.
Unfortunately, the Dominion telegraph line suffered interruption
north of Ashcroft by a fall of snow
or by some wilful Interference with
lit, This cut off communication with
the outside, to the annoyance of the
local superintendent, Mr. Dowling,
and his staff. The wireless station
at Digby Island came to tbe relief
of the city and did what it could
to supply the loss, but this was necessarily  liimted.
Returns  Delayed
When it became assured that the
Conservatives had swept the country
the Conservative committee rooms
became the scene of the wildest enthusiasm. The first hint was conveyed in a brief despatch saying:
"The Associated Press says there has
been tremendous gains all over by
the Conservatives." This was greeted enthusiasm, but there still remained a doubt as to whether the
country had returned the party.
The boys had not long to wait,
however, for soon there came the
message that the Conservatives had
swept the country and many ministers had gone down to defeat. The
hopes of fifteen years of opposition
had at last been fulfilled, and with
one grand shout the committee rooms
rang with cheers, which were repeated and again and again repeated,
H. S. Clements being most prominent
in the rejoicing.
Speeches followed, George H.
Cowan being forced to address the
crowd. He said he was especially
happy because he had an abiding
faith in the people of Canada. He
had a faith that they would not hand
over this country to foreigners.
Mr.   Clements   Speaks
Speeches followed in natural order
and Air. Clements was forced to address  the audience.
H. S. Clements was cheered to
the echo and hoisted upon a chair,
the crowd demanding a speech. When
he could be heard the popular
standard bearer of the Conservative
party opened by referring to the satisfaction he felt at the victory won
by the party in Canada. If there
was one desire of his heart that superceded nil others in the campaign,
it was to see that the party was returned to power. On behalf of his
supporters, as much as for himself,
he had tried to win the constituency
ind he was satisfied he had won.
In future, as the member of the
riding, if it was found he was elei'ted,
he would take care of the constituency and he would nol forget the
boys who had so manfully stood by
him in the campaign, He would, as
in the past, fight for the masses of
the people against unjust corporations. He would show them he could
fight.
Mr. Clements paid a compliment to
what Mr. Cowan had done and expressed his satisfaction at the services he had rendered.
He assured them that he was not
going lo leave the city for a few
days. He was going to stay with the
boys in Prince Rupert for a few
days. He would, if necessary, until
the organization was completed
which would pul the Conservative
party in such shape lhat It would he-
ready for a federal or provincial election any time. Whether lie could
afford It or not. his interests were
here, nnd he would give tbe time to
0 as he said.
If necessary, he would come lo
Prince Rupert and live, and never
would he sacrifice the Interests of the
constituency,
Mr. Clements closed with ringing
cheers which were repeated time and
time again.
G.   II.   Cowan
George H. Cowan followed on the
demand of the crowd. He said he
was especially happy because he had
an abiding faith in the people of
Canada. He had faith that they
won Id not hand over tills country to
foreigners.
He wns not disposed to treat this
In a light vein.    It was far more than
(Continued on  Page Eight)
■ .'..■.    r'e.^ite.v.a PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Friday,   September  22,   1911.
THE HUB OF THE HAZELTON DISTRICT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
ON THE MAIN LINE OF THE GRAND TRUNK PACIFIC
REGISTERED TOWNSITE
THE PROSPERITY OF EVERY GREAT CITY IS DUE TO ITS GEOGRAPHICAL LOCATION
The most important Townsite! The most talked of Townsite along the line of the GRAND TRUNK PACIFIC RAILWAY
NOTICE
New Hazelton Townsite Section 1
Now being offered for sale Is Not a
Grand Trunk Pacific Promotion
Townsite. NEW HAZELTON Town-
site was selected by the experts of
a syndicate of successful men as the
geographical location for a big city.
They bought the land, realizing the
wonderful resources of the Hazelton
District, the Mines, the Distributing
Centre for hundreds of miles, and
many other reasons.
We ask you to investigate in your
own way all of the statements in this
advertisement. Should you join us
by buying lots you will know that
your investment is guarded by every
means known to human foresight,
and the judgment of a body of successful   men  known   to  you  all.
Your profits should eclipse the
story of Edmonton, Calgary, Regina,
Moose Jaw or Prince Rupert.
Don't be classed among the failures who will suy, "I wish I hud
known." Don't stand idly by and
see your neighbors reap the profits
on Real Estate while you reap
nothing but your salary. Put your
savings to work in that sure coming
City—NEW HAZELTON.
NEW   HAZELTON   is   out   of   the
damp belt, and many people who
spend the whole year in the district
say the winters are not severe—
plenty of sunshine and dry air.
Taken from Official Bulletin, B.C.,
No. 22, Page 23: —
"On the Upper Skeena, about a
distance of 50 miles, there are large
tracts of land on both sides of tbe
river, which, as far as soil and climatic conditions are concerned, I
would consider ideal for successful
growing of fruit as well as for other
branches of agriculture. Potatoes,
and all garden produce, grow to perfection."
HAVE VOl' CONFIDENCE OF
MERCHANTS ON THE GROUND?
Many Lots already purchased by
the keenesl business men of Hazelton (Old Town). Vou can safely
follow the judgment of such men.
NEW HAZELTON should be the
centre of a busy population of thousands within a year. Wiry not? During tlie least year there was an average of over two new towns created
in the Canadian West every week.
We are all here to share in this
most wonderful prosperity.. We offer
you an opportunity to participate in
the progress of the best town for
investment on tire line of tlie Grand
Trunk Pacific.
NEW HAZELTON Railroads Open
New Country.
Railroads have been the great
feature in the growth of Western
Canada.
NEW HAZELTON, located on the
Grand   Trunk   Pacific   Railroad   is
attracting the attention of the whole
world, as all important towns do on
the main line of the Grand Trunk
Pacific Railroad.
Stores are going up. Newspaper
plant now moving on the Townsite.
Two or three General Merchandise
Stores, Drug Store ( Bank, Restaurants, and in fact many lines of trade
are now arranging to open in NEW
HAZELTON, Section One. Activity is
in that part of the Townsite known
as  Section One.
The story of NEW HAZELTON is
well known to the public. It is a
'townsite being offered to the public
by successful business men. There is
positively no Railroad Company or
Townsite Promoter financially interested in the land. Tne owners have
undertaken to make NEW HAZEL-
TON a city of importance in British
Columbia. NEW HAZELTON promises to be the most profitable city
to the Grand Trunk Pacific along its
main lines.
Offices of Foley, Welch & Stewart,
contractors building the Grand Trunk
Pacific Railroad, will be located in
NEW HAZELTON. The Chief Clerk,
Paymaster and Purchasing Agent are
preparing to, and will, build homes
in NEW HAZELTON, Section One.
NEW HAZELTON, the hub of the
Hazelton District, will be the natural
headquarters for what promises to
be the most active and sensational
new city in the fastest growing part
of the world today on account of
the wonderful Lead, and Zinc Mines,
the Groundhog Mountain Coal Fields,
the Vast Agricultural Country tributary to the coming principal city in
British Columbia on the Grand Trunk
Pacific  Railroad.
The Grand Trunk Pacific Railroad
is now running regular trains over
100 miles out of Prince Rupert. The
G. T. P. Officials, and also the
G. T. P. Contractors, ssy that the
Railroad should be running to Mile
164 this winter, and will reach NEW
HAZELTON next summer. Grading
is now under way as far along the
line as 30 miles east of NEW HAZELTON. The grading is about finished from Prince Rupert to NEW
HAZELTON. Many mines are getting ready to ship ore. Some of the
mines being developed are:—Silver
Cup, American Boy, Silver Standard,
Sunrise and Sunset, Lead Ring, Erie
Babine.     Most  of  the   ore  in  NEW
INVESTMENTS
Made in towns with the
RIGHT KIND OF COUNTRY
RIGHT KIND OF RESOURCES
RIGHT KIND OF PEOPLE
will surely be big paying
investments. This is the
kind  of town you  find at
New Hazelton, B.C.
HAZELTON mines is high grade
Silver-Lead, similar to ore in the
Siocan District in East Kootenay,
B. C, and similar to some ores found
at Leadville, Col.
Buy Lots
TERMS ARE EASY
Look them over again, and think
of this money making investment.
OUT OF CITV INVESTORS
Can reserve one or more Lots by
wire or letter. State price of Lots
and number required, and we will
make the best available reservation
for you.
Remember NEW HAZELTON is
not a gift Townsite and when you
buy a lot in it you are investing your
money on the business judgment of
the most successful men in British
Columbia.
NEW HAZELTON Townsite had over
a Quarter of a Million Dollars Invested by a few Business Men before
the Lots were offered for sale. NEW
HAZELTON is a Business Man's
Townsite. All the G. T. P. and Local
History was carefully considered.
The Engineer's Reports as to grades,
opportunities for Side Tracks necessary to handle the thousands of
freight cars were examined. Then
they invested in NEW HAZELTON.
They paid In Cash for NEW HAZEL
TON  and   nearby   Lands  over  Two
Hundred and Fifty Thousand Dollars.
That is a wonderful sonnet written
by John J. Ingnlls on the subject of
Opportunity, but tbe real fact Is,
Opportunity does not knock once on
each man's door. Opportunity plays
a continual anvil on every man's portals—but, of course, if he is knocking ut tlie time he will not hear
Opportunity when she knocks.
Clipping from Omineca Herald,
Saturday, September 9, 1911: —
JUST ONE   NEW  HAZELTON
THE  SPOKANE  OF  CANADA
All Interests Combine to Roost the
New Town—Campaign Has Started—Natural Resources Guarantee a Dig Population—Contractors' Headquarters,
The New Hazelton campaign has
started. For the next few months
the very best efforts of some of the
greatest advertising men and real
estate firms in Britisii Columbia will
be devoted to Boosting New Hazelton. The different interests have
combined to make this town one of
the foremost In the province. A careful study has been made by experts
and they are all agreed that there
cannot be too much boosting. The
natural resources are here and they
are now being developed in a way
heretofore unknown. Everything is
now on the move. Mining has this
week had a stimulation that was not
dreamed of. During the two previous
weeks several big deals were put
through which meant the bringing in
of mining men known the world
over. Agriculture has been very sue.
cessful this year and the farmers
have had bigger crops than ever.
They are all getting on their feet
and buying machinery as fast as it
can   be   brought   into   the   country.
This week Charles S. Meek, president of Standard Securities, Ltd.,
Vancouver was In town and completed  arrangements  with   the  sur-
PRICES:
BUSINESS LOTS
33x120 (according to location)
Terms one-third cash, balance 1 and 2 years, at 6 per   cent
$350 to $500 per lot
Prices on Residence lots
$100 to $300
Terms $10 cash; $10 per month; No interest; or one-third cash; balance 1 and 2 years at 6 percent.
Make Cheques, Drafts, Money or Express Orders payable to Northern Interior Land Company, Ltd.
veyors to lay out his company's
property. This work has already
been started and it will be finished
in another ten days.
It Is on the Northern Interior
Land Co.'s property that so many
of the old Hazelton business men
have purchased lots and are prepared
to build, many this fall. It Is from
this point that the business section
will start and grow, and where high
values will prevail.
There    will    be    the    one    town
instead of several as might have
been. This means a great deal; In
fact, mnily hundreds of dollars to
the people of the old town, who have
been wondering where the town
would be. From now on New
Hazelton will be introduced to the
world in a manner that no other
town  can   equal
The gentlemen associated in the
boniitig of this New Townsite they
now call NEW HAZELTON, paid out
in actual cash before a lot was sold
Over u Quarter of a Million Dollars.
NEW HAZELTON
Where the Grand Trunk Pacific
Railroad has Sixty Acres of right-of-
way and track grounds.
NEW HAZELTON is reported by
Engineers to be the only available
spot in the Skeeua or Bulkley Valleys
for many miles each way wliere it
would be possible to have Railroad
Yards large enough to handle the
Hazelton District's business.
NEW HAZELTON affords a long,
nearly level stretch of land suitable
for Immense Yards, which will be
required to handle the thousands of
cars of ore and coal that will be
shipped from the mines in the
Hazelton District.
TheG.T.P.     <
Capital of Grand Trunk Railway
and the Grand Trunk Railway Systems, $447,808,032.
Over 50,000 Stockholders, G. T.
and G. T. P. Millions of people boost
for Grand Trunk Pacific Townsites.
Maximum grade of G. T. P. is 21
feet to the mile, one-fifth of any
other Trancontlnental Railroad in
Canada or the United States.
NEW HAZELTON is the Town
that everybody is talking about, and
tnere are no two opinions ss to its
opportunities for investments. The
reason is obvious.
NEW HAZELTON Is Situated near
the junction of the Skeena and
Bulkley Valleys.
The Northern Interior Land Co.
Ltd., paid cash for and own (Section One) NEW HAZELTON TOWN-
SITE and guarantee to deliver to
purchasers of lots an Indefeasible
Title upon receipt of final payment.
ADDRESS ALL CORRESPONDENCE TO
NORTHERN INTERIOR LAND CO., Ltd.
Prince Rupert, B.C., P. 0. Box 1515
PRINCE RUPERT OFFICE FOR SALE OF LOTS
JEREMIAH H. KUGLER. LTD.
2nd Avenue Between 5th and 6th Streets
R11 Friday, September  22,  1911.
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Educating the Indians
The civilizing of the Indian and
the casting of his mentality into an
approximately Anglo-Saxon mold is
one of the problems of the people of
this continent.
To teach him our culture and our
methods, including work, to which
he takes none too kindly, is the object of the Indian School at Sardis.
This industrial school, the largest in
the province, is named the Coqua-
leetza, meaning, in the Indian tongue
of the Pacific Coast, "the place of
cleansing," from the fact that the
Indians used to camp on the banks
of s clear stream on the western
boundary of what is now the industrial farm and wash their clothing—that is, occasionally.
The name seemed acceptable to the
Methodist Church of Canada, under
whose direction the school is being
run, and who paid the expenses of
the building, in all, $25,000. The
government grant for each child of
$230 defrays the expense.
The school, which is under the
principalship of R. H. Cairns, who
for a number of years taught in the
schools of Vancouver, Is interesting
because of the manner in which the
teaching is being done, where It is
done and the fact that there are fea-
j'.res on the industrial end of the
proposition that should not be confined entirely to schools of this
nature.
The School Farm
The enrollment is over ninety.
Half of the pupils go to school In the
morning and the other half in the
afternoon. The school has twenty
acres which are kept as productive
as any of the farms of the Chilliwack valley. Mr. Cairns is himself
a practical farmer, and is assisted by
a man who has made a study of the
territory and understands how to
make the greatest profit at the least
outlay.
Last year, from one acre of tumps
the crop was seventy tons, while two
years ago they took $500 worth
of tomatoes from a single acre. There
is In all five acres under garden at
the present time, outside of the five
acres of potatoes wliich the school
has every year. Mr. Cairns has on
the farm one crop regarding which,
despite the large yield on other produce he is extremely enthuiastic. This
is the cattle cale introduced a few-
years ago by the Farmers' Institute.
This crop, which Is used In feeding
the twenty head of cattle owned by
the school, has somewhat the general appearance of turnips, that is,
as far as the tops are concerned,
with the exception that it is far more
prolific, literally covering the field
to a height of two feet with a solid
mass of the richest milk producing
food.
The farm is apparently as well
managed as any in the valley, despite the fact that the work is all
done by niemers of the school, who
take more interest in farming than
might be expected by those conversant with the habits of the Siwash.
Industrial  Training
The industrial end of the institution, taken as a whole, means that
habits of work are being inculcated
into the minds of the children. This
in after life, despite the deteroriab-
ing influences of the camps to which
many of them go back, have in a
a great majority of cases resulted in
making them not alone law-abiding,
but also valuable citizens. A number of graduates of the school are at
carpenter work, the only trade taught
in the school if farming is not a
trade. One of these who left the
school last year is now employed in
Prince Rupert at a wage of $5 a day.
The school, where, five days out
of the week, the children, some of
whom are of a larger growth, are
taught half a day, compares favorably with that found In the average
western city, both as to tlie order
kept by the children and the general
fitness of the teachers for their duties.
One of the school rooms has been
called by the superintendent of education one of the best in the province. In this department the tiring
that appeals most to the visitor is
the absolute difference there is between it and any other schools in
the province. It is really on a clear
clear day like holding school out of
doors in the shade. It Is a large,
tent-like structure, so arranged that
all the side can be lowered or raised
as desired, the idea always being to
have the school protected from the
wind and at the same time absolutely
open to fresh air. It is exactly the
method in use in the large number
of sanitariums for the treatment of
consumption,as in New Mexico, Arizona and Colorado. The Indian is
especially open to the ravages of the
white plague and Mr. Cairns built
this school on the principle that
what is good as a cure should ss a
preventltive   be   even   betier.     That
the results bear him out is evidenced
by the fact that the drug bills and
doctor's attendance for the year for
a large family of 100 was $152, a
large part of whicn went for an
occulist's examinationof the eyes of
some of the pupils.
The Pupils' Mentality
Asked as to the mental calibre of
the students', the teachers said that
they would not say that they were
quite as bright as the average white
pupil in the common school, but the
fact that some In the higher classes
were juggling with the mysteries of
algebra and geometry showed that
there was a great possibility of developing them mentally. Mr. Cairns,
however, to somewhat modify the
suggestion contained in the statement of the teachers, said that his
boys and his girls, he thought learned more quickly than the conglomeration of European and Orientals that
largely fills the schools of Vancouver.
Mr. Cairns said further that the
development of our British Columbian aborigines has been and is being materially retarded by the immorality of a large class of the
whites with which the Indian conies
in contact. He said that it was difficult enough to make a few years
snatched out of the lives of a few
of our Indians count during a whole
lifetime of camps, that it was hard
enough for those whose feet they
had placed on the ladder towards,
mental, moral and physical manhood
to combat the ignorance and superstition which was the result of centuries without bringing to bear on
them the cunning, scheming demon-
ism of a certain class of man, white
in  color.
 o-i	
HISTORY OF BISON
Story  of   instruction   of  the   Mighty
Herds Never Told Accurately,
Says Washington Herald
The destruction of the immense
northern herd of bison, which is declared to have numbered 4,000,000
head at the beginning, never has been
told with any degree of accuracy.
To this day the whole of the vast
west is scarred and pitted with their
groovelike trails and basinlike wallows, which are permanent records
of migratory marches and daily dust
baths of these heavy beasts, says the
Washington Herald.
The buffalo was of vast importance to the Indian aborigines; its
tendons or sinews supplied strong
strings for sewing and bows by which
they forcibly drove their deadly arrows tipped with poison for hunting
or for warfare; its straight foreleg
bones armed the squaws with clubs
to kill the wounded prostrate warriors of the enemy in battle by hitting them on a tender part of the
head; Its horns were used for goblets and material for making spoons;
its skin afforded warm clothing for
their bodies in winter, and also efficient covering from rain and cold for
their tents or tepees; and its flesh
provided the healthiest, strongest and
most savory meat, together with the
aboriginal potato and maize, or Indian corn, for their chief food.
In the autumn the animals migrated to warmer climates, and with
their departure fresh meat was not
obtainable. This led to the provision by the natives of a preparation
of buffalo meat which was preserved
for a great length of time, and called
by the natives of South Africa "biltong"; by the Indians of South America "tassaga," and by the aboriginal
natives of North America "pemmi-
cnn."
The lean meat was cut into narrow, thin strips like ribbons and
hung on trees, lines, poles or brush
to dry thoroughly In the sun and
winds; the meat also was shaved or
scraped In small quantities clean
from the bones, and well dried over
ir fire, il was then pounded in fine
powder. Carefully sewed, water
light hags were made of the animal's hide, with the hairy side out
and the' fleshy side within, The
suet or fat was melted boiling hot,
and the marrow, boiled in water
from the bones, was skimmed off
and added to the boiling Tat. The
fruit of the June berry and Saskatoon berry was added to the powdered meat to improve the flavor, and
the whole was pressed into the skin
bags and the boiling fat was poured
in and thoroughly mixed so as to
saturate completely the whole mass.
The bags were then sewed up water
and air tight and heavily pressed, to
make their contents solid and In as
small bulk as possible. ,
 o	
Grandpa—I am giving you this
cent, Willie, because you have been
a good little boy.
Willie—Yes, grandpa; but please
don't expect nie to sit around like
Sunday school all day again at the
same ; rice.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
"'ARE NOTICE that th'rty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince nupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the northeast corner
of C.L. 4471; thence east 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence west
80 chr.Ins; thence north 80 chains,
to place of commencement.
AUSTIN M.  BROWN.
Dated July 17, 1911.
Skeena Land Listrict—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKri NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described ss follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the southeast corner of C.L. 4472; thence west 80
chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence south
80 chains to place of commencement.
AUSTIN M.  BROWN.
Dated July 17, 1911.	
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. O, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows*.—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the southeast corner of C.L. 4472; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south
80 chains'to place of commencement.
AUSTIN M. BROWN.
Dated July 17,  1911.	
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. O, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the northeast corner
of C.L. 4471; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east
80 chains; thence north 80 chains to
1 lace of commencement.
AUSTIN M.  BROWN.
Dated July 17, 1911.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the south corner of
C.L. 4410; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south
SO chains; thence east 80 chains, to
place of commencement.
AUSTIN M.  BROWN.
Dated July 17,  1911.
Skeena Land  District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the southeast corner of C.L. 4470; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south
80 chains, to place of commencement.
AUSTIN M.  BROWN.
Dated July 17, 1911.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, b. O, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for s license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the northeast corner
of C.L. 4469; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east
80 chains; thence north 80 chains,
to place of commencement.
AUSTIN M.  BROWN.
Dated July 17,  1911.
Skeena Land  Dislrict—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, P. C, by occupation
sadler, intend lo apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 64O acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the northeast corner
of C.L. 4469; thence east SO rhati;.:;
thence soulh SO chains; thence west
80 chains; thence north SO chains to
place of commencement.
AUSTIN  M.  BROWN.
Dated July 17, 1911.
Skeena Land  District—District  of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Piince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the south corner of
C.L.4475; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence south
80 chains; thence west 80 chains to
place of commencement.
AUSTIN M.  BRO.vN.
Dated July 17,  1911.
Skeena Land  District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin Al. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as foi-1
lows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile north of the northeast corner of C.L. 4477; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence north
80 chains, to place of commencement.
AUSTIN  M.  BROWN.
Dated July 17,  1911.	
ikeerea Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Henry Edenshaw, of
Masset, B. C, occupation storekeeper, intend to apply to the Chief Commissioner of Lands for a license to
prospect for coal and petroleum on
and under 640 acres of land on Graham Island described ss follows: —
Commencing at a post planted on the
west shore of West River, one mile
easterly from the mouth of said river; thence south SO chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence north 80
chains; thence west 80 chains to the
place of commencement.
HENRY EDENSHAW.
Dated July 17,  1911.
Skeena    Land    District—District    of
Queen  Charlotte  Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Charles Lamb
of Blair, Nebraska, I". S. a., occupation farmer, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing st a
post planted about 4 miles west and
4 1-2 miles north from the southwest corner of Lot 99i; tlience south
80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
theuce north 80 chains; t eenee east
80 chains to point of commencement;
containing 640 acres.
CHARLES LAMB.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated  July  16   ±911. A-15
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to tb| Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the northeast corner
of C.L. 4474; thence east 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence west
SO chains; thence north 80 chains, to
place of commencement.
AUSTIN M. BROWN.
Dated July  17,  1911.	
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty dayB
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. O, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows'—Commencing at post planted
at the southeast corner of C.L. 4477;
thence east 80 chains; thence north
80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains, to place of
commencement.
AUSTIN  M.  BROWN.
Dated July 17, 1911.	
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. O, hy occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
at the southeast corner ofC.L.4478;
thence north 80 chains; tnence east
80 chains; uience south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains, to place of
commencement.
AUSTIN M.  BROWN.
Dated July 17,  1911.	
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, Intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
at the southeast corner of C.L. 4467;
thence north 80 cliains; thence east
80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains, to place of
commencement.
AUSTIN  M.  BROWN.
Dated July 17,  1911.	
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
at the southeast corner of C.L. 4465;
thence north 80 chains; thence east
SO chains; tlience south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains, to place of
commencement.    ,
AUSTIN  M.  BROWN.
Dated July 16, 1911.	
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Henry Edenshaw, of!
Masset, B. C, by occupation store-:
keeper, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described ss follows:
Commencing st a post planted on
the west shore of the West River,
about one mile easterly from the
mouth of said river; thence east 80
ehains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south
80 chains, to place of commencement.
HENRY EDENSHAW.
Dated July 17,  1911.
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that Edward H.
Port, of Prince Rupert, B. C, occupation farmer, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following described lands:— Commencing
at a post planted in the South West
Corner, on the shore line of Lake
Lakelse; thence 20 chains East, to
South West Corner of Lot 684;
thence 30 chains North, following
along the West line of Lot 684 to
post; thence South, following along
the shore line of said Lake to point
of commencement, containing about
40 acres.
EDWARD H. PORT,
By C.  N.  Pring, Agent.
Dated June 26,  1911. 6-26
6-26
Queen Charlotte Land District—District of Skeena
TAKE NOTICE that S. Barclay
Martin, Jr., of New Westminster,
occupation engineer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:-—Commencing at a post planted at the
northeast corner of ungazetted lot
1428, said lot being T.L. 39979;
thence north and following the
westerly shore of Massett Inlet 80
chains; thence west 20 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east
40 chains, more or less, to the point
of commencement, and containing
240 acres, more or less.
S. BARCLAY MARTIN, Jr.
Dated July 21, 1911. i
Skeena    Land    District—District    of
Queen   Charlotte  Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Hattie Sutherland of Blair, Nebraska, U. S. A.,
occupation housewife intends te
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about 5
miles west and 2 1-2 miles north
from the southwest corner of Lot
991; thence west 60 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 60
chains; thence south SO chains, to
point of commencement; containing
about 480 acres.
HATTIE SUTHERLAND.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated  July  16   1911. A-15
Skeena    Land    District—District    of
Queen  Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Abram Sutherland of Blair, Nebraska, U. S. A.,
occupation insurance agent, intends
to apply for permission to purchase
the following described lands: —
Commencing at a post planted about
5 miles west and 2 1-2 miles north
from the southwest corner of Lot
991; tlience east 80 chains; thence
north 80 cnains; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains, to
point of commencement; containing
640 acres.
ABRAM SUTHERLAND.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated  July  16,  1911. A-15
Skeena   Land   district—District   of
Queen  Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Miriam Hal-
ler of Blair, Nebraska, U. S. A., occu.
pation housewife, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted abor-* 5 miles
west and 1 1-2 miles north from
the southwest corner of Lot 991;
thence east 80 chains; thence north
80 cnains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains, to point of
commencement; containing 640
acres.
MIRIAM  HALLER.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated July  16.  1911. A-15
Skeena   Land   District — District   of
Queen  Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that W. G. McMorris of the City of Vancouver in
the Province of Britisii Columbia,
occupation, broker, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted on an Island
in Skidegate Inlet about 500 yards
east from the mouth of Slate Chuck
Creek, separated from the mainland
of Graham Island at high tide;
thence south three chains; thence
east ten chains; thence north three
cliains; thence west ten chains to
point of commencement, containing
two acres, more or less.
W. G. MCMORRIS,
Dated   July   29,   1911.       Locator.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that James Mullin
of Murdo, South Dakota, occupation
farmer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 4 1-2 miles west
and 1 1-2 miles nortli from the southwest corner of Lot 991; tnence east
40 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 40 chains; tlience north
SO chains, to point of commencement;  containing 320 acres.
JAMES   MULLIN.
Georgo S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated July  16.  1911. A-15
Skeena Land rMstrict—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Henry Edenshaw, of
Masset, B. C, by occupation storekeeper, intend to apply to the Chief
! Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 01O acres of land on
Qraham Island described a? follows:
Commencing al 0 post planted on the
bank of west River, about one mile
easterly from the month of said river; thence west SO chains; thence
soutli 80 chains; tlience east SO
cliains; thence no-th SO chains, to
place of commencement.
HENRY EDENSHAW.
Dated July  17,  1911.
Skeena Land District—District of
of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that James G.
Crombie, of Prince Rupert, occupation auditor, Intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:— Commencing at a
post planted at the northwest corner, 55 chains east and 20 chains
south from northeast corner of Lot
1116 (Horry Survey), Coast Dist.,
range 5; thence 20 chains east;
thence 25 chains, more or less,
south to Angus McLeod Pre-emption; thence 20 chains west; thence
25 chains, more or less, north, to
post of commencement, containing
5 0 acres, more or less.
JAMES G.  CROMBIE.
Fred  Bohlen, Agent.
Dated June 14.  1911. 6-23
Skeena    Land    District—District    of
Queen  Charlotte  Islands
TAKE NoTICE thnt Belle Lamb
of Blair, Nebraska, occupation housewife, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands: — Commencing at a
post planted about 4 miles west and
4 1-2 miles north from the southwest corner of Lot 991; tlience nortb
SO chains; tlience west SO chains;
thence south SO chains; thence east
SO chains, to point of commencement;   containing 640  acres.
BELLE  LAMB.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Hated  July  16,  1911. A-15
Skeena    Land    District—District    of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that I, Charles
Percy Hickman, of Naas Harbour,
occupation constable, intend to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:— Commencing at a post planted on the
east shore of Naas Bay, about two
miles in an easterly direction from
Lot 3, marked C. P. H, S. W. corner; thence east 20 chains; thence
nortli 40 chains to the shore; thence
along the shore line to the place of
commencement, containing 40 acres,
more or less.
CHARLES  PRECY HICKMAN.
Dated  June 7,  1911. 0-30
Skeena Land  Dislrict—District  of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on nnd under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the southeast corner
of C.L. 447.e; thence west 80 chains;
tlience north 80 chains; thence east
80 cnains; thence south 80 chrins,
to place of commencement.
AUSTIN  M.  BROWN.
Dated July 17, 1911.
Skeena    Land    District—District    of
Coast   -Range V.
TAKE   NOTICE   thai     I,     Joseph
Skeena Land  District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Henry Edenshaw, of
Masset, B. C, by occupation storekeeper, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum on
and under 64 0 acres of land on Graham Island described as follows: —
Commencing at a post planted on the
west shore of West Lever, ahout one
mile easterly from the mouth of said
river; thence north SO chains; thence
west 80 cliains; tlience south SO
chains; thence east 80 cliains, to
place of commencement.
HENRY EDENSHAW.
Dated July  17,  1911.
20 cliains;  tlience cast    40    chains;
thence  south   20  chains along short
of  Lakelse  Lake;   thence  west     4C
chains to point of    commencement
containing 120 acres, more or less
JOSEPH PASTL.
George Hlr, Agent.
Dated  Mny  5,  1911. 6-2
Skeena   Land   District—District
of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that Victor H.
Reynolds, of Hull, Massachusetts, occupation chauffeur, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described land: Commencing at a post plant red at high water
mark on the northerly side of the
entrance to a small unnamed cove on
the west coast of Pitt Island, ahout
one-quarter mile seeuth of the entrance tee Kitkatla summer village;
thence east forty cliains: thence
south twenty chains; thence west
forty chains; thence north ten
chains more or less to high water
mark; thence following along high
water mark arc.rnd the head of the
cove back to the commencement, and
containing sixty (60) acres more or
less.
VICTOR  II.  REYNOLDS.
J. H.  Pillsbury, Agent.
Dated Fob. ISth, 1911.
LINDSAY'S CARTAGE a STORAGE
V. McDonald, Manager
All kinds of legitimate detective work
handled   for  companies  and   Individuals.     Business  strictly  confidentla'
P. O. Box SOU — Phone 210
G. T. P. CARTAGE AGENTS
Office at H. IJ. Rochester, Centre St.
LADYSMITH  COAL
Is handled by us.   All orders receive
prompt attention.   Phone No   68.
I- .'RINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Friday, September 22, 1911.
I
prince Kupert journal
Telephone  138
Published twice a week on Tuesdays and Fridays from the office of
publication, Third Avenue, near
McBride Street.
Subscription rate to any point In
Canada, $2.00 a year; to points outside of Canada, $3.00 a year.
Advertising rates furnished on
application.
O. H. NELSON,
Editor.
Friday,  September  22,   1911.
THE   ELECTION
With telegraph wires down and the
means of communication cut off, it
must be a little uncertain yet as to
the results of the eleetion yesterday.
Latest figures, however, received by
wireless, put the seats as far as heard
from in tire Dominion as 128 Conservative and 86 Liberal, which is
an assurance that the government has
been  defeated.
The results are eminently satisfactory to the Conservative party and
in keeping with the contentions of
that party that Canada must gain
by a change in the administration
we rejoice in the victory of the Conservative party and believe that the
return of Mr. Borden and his party
will be in the interests of the Dominion as a whole and we have no
misgivings about turning affairs over
to Mr. Borden.
Tire leader of the Conservative
party is a man of recognized ability.
He has qualities that will make him
one of the best premiers the country
has ever had. The qualities were
such that while of the greatest advantage to one in power, handicapped
him somewhat in attaining power.
He is essentially an administrator.
The very points that go to make an
able administrator often stand in the
way of a man as a good winner of
elections. This has been true in the
case of Mr. Borden. There are men
who would perhaps have succeeded
where he failed at the polls, but once
ii. office he is all that could be desired by any party or by any country.
With the joy of success there is a
tinge of regret that a leader with
the many excellent qualities that Sir
Wilfrid Laurier possessed, should
suffer defeat. Under less serious
conditions than faced the country on
the present occasion Sir Wilfrid's opponents might even have wished him
another term in office with retirement without the humiliation of defeat, which in view of his years
cannot fail to be felt by the retiring
premier. In view of the dangerous
waters into which he was steering
the country a change of pilots was
Imperative.
Judging from his speeches, Sir
Wilfrid will now retire from public
life and spend his remaining days in
private. That his days may be long
and unsullied, will be the wish of
every citizen of Canada. He has
earned his rest in the service of his
country.
The advent of Mr. Borden to power will be followed by more marked
ability, we believe, in the line of constructive legislation. We have confidence that the new premier will
make an enviable, name for himself
among the public men of the nation.
He brings with him ripe judgment,
vigorous health and sterling integrity  with  his advent to power.
The advantages of rejecting reciprocity have been dealt with at
length during the campaign. We
agree that the electors took a wise
course in rejecting the offer from the
United  States.
Tlie effect of the election in the
Old Land cannot fail lo be marked.
It will have an effect that will be of
decided advantage to the whole of
Canada. This part of tlie Empire has
made a name for itself in the stand
it lias taken In the election that must
place it very high in the estimation
of not only the Motherland and other
pails erf the Empire but it will win
the respect of all nations for the Brit-
is!] Empire.
Locally the contest was a keen one.
It is now over and should be forgotten to a large extent. There are
other things to face, and Prince Rupert cannot afford to give time to
fighting battles that are past.
The Conservative party after long
years of opposition can well be excused for feeling highly elated at
their success. The Liberals must feel
the defeat just as keenly. The victors will doubtless temper their
elation with moderation, while the
vanquished must take their position
philosophically. We can all unite to
do the best for our city and our
country.
WHAT A  CHANGE
Prince Rupert experienced quite a
severe frost last evening and the sun
is shining gloriously today.
***************************
* News of the Province      |
* *
**************************
NELSON—A. Gordon French, the
noted metallurgical chemist, announces that the experiments which
he has been conducting in Nelson for
some months past with a view to
discovering a satisfactory treatment
for refractory zinc ores of the Kootenay have been crowned with complete success and that the recently
formed French Complex Ore Reduction Company, Limited of Vancouver,
has determined to erect in Nelson
a large smtelr for treatment of ores
by the new process. The experiments have been watched with the
keenest interest by mining men and
it success will be of vast importance
to the mining industry of the in,
terior, as they will remove the greatest impediment to the prosperity of
many of the districts. In many mines
having large bodies of ore operation
has been handicapped and in some
cases made unprofitable by the penalty imposed by the smelters on zinc.
The new process is expected to render working of huge bodies containing millions of tons of ore profitable
and will mean a tremendous increase
in mining activity in which Siocan
and Kootenay will benefit enormously. In connection with the new
smelter it is proposed to erect a factory for the manufacture of dry batteries. Zinc wliich will also be produced from the zinc extracted by the
new process and mangenese dioxide
will be a by-product. Mr. French has
many important inventions to his
credit and is well known to mining
and smelter men in Great Britain,
Canada and the United States. Mr.
French also announces that platinilm,
palladium and iridium are undoubtedly present In paying quantities In
the dyke of the Qranite-Poorman
mine. He was the first discoverer
of these metals and his discovery,
ridiculed at the time by persons who
had only a theoretical knowledge of
conditions, has since proven to be
correct.
COAL MINES JUDGMENT
VICTORIA—Judgment has been
given by Chief Justice Hunter for
James Dunsmuir in the action
brought in the supreme court against
liiin by Sir William Mackenzie, president of the Canadian Northern Railway, in respect to the sale of the
Wellington collieries in June, 1910.
In the case brought by Mr. Dunsmuir
against Sir William Mr. Dunsmuir
is also the winner and is to receive
the collected accounts since the trans-
fer thnt belonged to the old firm, and
has established the his right to the
value of coal In the C. P. R. hunkers at Vancouver which was delivered
before the transfer of slock. Mr.
Dirnsmuir's right to the dividend of
$700,000 is also established in the
verdict of the court. In reference
to ships used in connection with the
coal business, the decision is that
the scows, barges, etc., used in tlie
business would go in the transfer,
but no vessel which was ordinarily
used in connection with the business
of the mine would pass. His Lordship Intimated that there was nothing to be gained in reserving Judgment,  and   ire   was  glad   to  see  the
parties to the agreement had reduced
it into a short and commodious scope,
a difficult matter with such large Interests at stake. Two things stood
out very clearly in the agreement;
first, that there was an intention on
the part of one of the parties to buy
all the coal In sight, and the other
was that the vendor was to remain
in beneficial enjoyment of the property until he was paid in full.
SELLS LAND
VANCOUVER — Joseph Martin,
K. C, member for East St. Pancras
division of London in the British
House of Parliament and one of the
large landed proprietors of Vancouver is reported to have just completed a deal for the sale of a one-half
interest in s large block of land in
the east end of the city for the sum
of $315,000. The property reported
to have been disposed of by Mr. Martin lies in the southern part of what
was Hastings Townsite till that district was annexed to the city some
months ago. The land lies between
Charles Street and Tenth Avenue and
between Nanaimo Street and Boundary  Road.
TO INCORPORATE ALBERNI
PORT ALBERI—The call for a
public meeting of the townspeople
of Alberni to discuss the question of
municipal incorporation resulted in
the court bouse being crowded. The
majority was in favor of taking immediate steps to incorporate the
town, but a compromise was reached
with the minority, which thought the
time was not yet ripe.
AGAINST GIN-MEN
VANCOUVER — That Magistrate
Shaw's remarks about prison sentences for gun-men were meant as
serious warnings and not as idle
threats, was made patent in the police
court when Sterling Edwards and an
Italian were summarily dealt with
for carrying concealed weapons. Edwards had discharged three shots
through the door of a house on Shore
Street, and His Worship doubled up
on each shot, sending him to jail for
six months. The other man will have
a month to reflect in.
COMPLIMENTED CANADIANS
VICTORIA—Captain I. C. Harris
of No.. 3 Company of the Fifth Regiment, C. G. A., who is now on his
way back to Victoria, accompanied
by Sergeant Gordon, Gunner Penketh
and Gunner Staden, after the great
victory over the Britisii artillerymen
at the Isle of Wight, was warmly
complimented by Lord Roberts following the practice in which the Canadian gunners won such a high
place. The remarkable shooting of
the Canadian gunners in command of
the young Victoria officer was the
subject of much praise in the British press, which considers the performance more creditable owing to
the fact that during the practice
there was a mis-fire on one of the
two guns used, with the result that
one gun only was used for the remainder of the series, seven rounds
being fired from the one gun without the time limit being exceeded.
 o —
The garrulous old lady in the stern
of the boat had pestered the guide
with her comments and questions
ever since they had started. Her
meek little husband, who was hunched toadlike in the bow, fished in
silence. The old lady had seemingly exhausted every possible point in
fish and animal life, woodcraft, and
personal history, when she suddenly
espied one of those curious paths of
only unbroken water frequently seen
on small lakes wliich are ruffled by a
light  breeze.
"Oh, guide, guide," she exclaimed,
"what makes that funny streak in
the water—?No, there—right over
there!"
The guide was busy rebaiting the
old gentleman's hook and merely
mumbled "U-m-nim."
"Guide," repeated the old lady in
tones that were not to be denied,
"look right over there wliere I'm
pointing and tell me what makes
that  funny streak in the water."
* *
* *
Ferguson's j
p
&
o
The Nost Popular
SCOTCH
WHISKEY
The British Columbia Company
LIMITED.
AUTHORIZED CAPITAL $100,000.::  PAID UP CAPITAL $41,500
DIRECTORS:—Reginald C. Brown, President; J. C. Maclure, Vice-
President; H. E. Marks, Managin g Director; Capt. B. Na»h, William
McNalr, R. A. Bevan, and F. C.   Williams, Secretary.      :-:      :-:
INTEREST 4 PER CENT. DEPOSITS
This Company acts ag Executors, Administrators, Transferee* and
Secretaries to Public Companies.   Commercial, Industrial and other
business propositions underwritten.    Issues  made on the
London and New Tork Stock Exchanges.
TIMBER, COAL, LANDS, and
COMPANY ORGANIZATION
Head Office for Canada, 203, 208, 210, 215 Carter-Cotton Building,
VANCOUVER, B.C.
in the World
* Sole Agents for British Columbia *
CLARKE BROS.
3rd Ave. |
$ Melntyre Block,
I
!     Phone 39
X
I P.O. BOX 319
*
*
*
**************************
Dent Gloves
We have secured, direct
from the manufacturer, the
selling agency for this very
superior line of Gloves, thus
saving the jobber's profit, and
can sell them very much
cheaper than they are ordinarily sold for. A portion of
our stock has just arrived, including Men's Tan Dressed and
Mocha Undressed Kids, both
lined and unlined.
Cadet Tan and Mochas,
Suede and Full Dress in men's
sizes, as well as a complete
line of Wool Lined and Wool
Gloves and Mitts for winter
use. Remember, ive buy these
direct and sell them for
less than they are ordinarily
sold for,
SLOAN & CO.
Sixth St. Alder ISlk
PRINCE RUPERT
The guide looked up from his baiting with a sigh.
"That? Oh, that's where the road
went across the ice last winter."
The Staneland Co. Ltd
-IS THE-
Paint Supply House
of British Columbia
ALL GOODS ARE GUARANTEED
WRITE FOR PRICES AND SAMPLES
The Staneland Co. Ltd
836-840 Fort Street, VICTORIA, B.C.
The Graham Island Oil Fields, Limited.
CAPITAL   STOCK,   $1,000,000.00
We are offering for sale a very limited amount of shares of stock
25 CENTS PER SHARE; PAR VALUE, $1.00
These shares are going quickly, and will soon be off the market
The Mack Realty & Insurance Co.
SEI/LING AGENTS
I '       ■■■■—■™P*|
Replenish
the
Pantry
High-Class....
Grocery
Stock
to choose from
EVERYTHING CLEAN AND FRESH
Goods for the Table to Suit the Most
Fastidious  Housewife
p..................^
S MERRYFIELD'S !
■       CASH GROCERY      !
L—       ' -    „J
2nd Avenue
Prince  Rupert,
B.C.
Real
Estate
INVESTMENTS
Real
Estate
List Your
Properties
with
Uncle Jerry
JEREMIAH H. KUGLER   -   -
He Sells Buildings He Sells Contracts
He has Houses to Rent
He Buys Lots He Builds Homes
He Buys Leases He Loans Money
He Has Farms for Sale
He Sells Houses He Rents Stores
JEREMIAH H. KUGLER   -
Special Bargains in
KITSELAS LANDS
FRANCOIS LAKE LANDS
LAKELSE LANDS
HAZELTON  DISTRICT   LANDS
BULKLEY VALLEY LANDS
KISPIOX VALLEY LANDS
PORCHER  ISLAND LANDS
KITSUMKALUM   LANDS
SAND,   GRAVEL  AND   MARBLE   DEPOSITS
-*L Friday,  September  22,  1911.
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
SPORTS
The champion Vancouver A. C. lacrosse team has lefa for Toronto to
play ofr the mann Cup, emblematic
of the Canadian amateur championship. Fifteen players are making
the trip, and are accompanied by
Secretary H. Fowler and William
Clark, one of the most enthusiastic
supporters of the club. The boys
will play in the Queen City on September 30 and October 7, and they
are confident that they will return
with the trophy. Two matches are
to be played for the trophy, the aggregate number of goals scored to
count.
Every member of the challenging
team is a homebrew and played his
first lacrosse on the Vancouver lots.
J. McGeer, goalkeeper, is 21 years
of age and has been a member of
the V. A. C. team since 1907, although he was out of the game last
year. Previous to that he played
with the juniors on Mount Pleasant.
Jimmy Is one of the best stops in
the business and has been playing
great lacrosse this season.
Fred Matheson, point, is a member of the Matheson family, which
has been represented in Vancouver
lacrosse for many years. He is a
' "dc-ther of George and Waldo Mathe-
:*m, both members of the Vancouver
club. Fred is 22 years of age, and
has been playing regularly on the
V. A. C. team since 1908. He can
go into any professional ranks any
time he cares to make a change, as
he is a clever defence man and is
a tower of strength in front of the
flags.
Frank "Punch" Burns, cover point,
is 24 years old. He broke into lacrosse with the junior teams here a
few seasons ago and joined the
V. A. C. In 1907. "Punch" possesses
the weight and speed, and home
players find him a pretty hard proposition to elude. He is another player who Is ripe for faster company.
C. McCuaig, first defence, is one
of the cleverest stick handlers in
amateur company. He plays a
steady game, and always can be depended upon to help out the home.
McCuaig is 24 years old, and was a
member of the Mount Pleasant team
before joining the V. A. C. There
are very few defence fielders who
have anything ou him.
C. Donohue, second defence, played his first lacrosse with the old
East End Crlscents, a junior team
organized some years ago by the late
Al Larwill. He Is one of the heaviest! men on the team, and Is a
speedy fielder. Donohue is 25 years
old, and has been with the champions since 1908.
Earl Matheson, third defence, is
21 years old. He got his first lessons in lacrosse from his brothers,
George and Waldo, and lias developed
into a fine fielder. Earl has been
playing regularly with the V. A. C.
since 1907.
C. Fierheller, centre, 24 years of
age. Although be joined the team
first in 1907 he has not played regularly, but got back Into the game
again this season and has been giving a fine display at centre. He
was also a member of the V. A. C.
senior basketball team.
S. Gunn, captain and third home,
is probably the best home fielder in
the B. C. League. He. is 24 years of
age and has been playing with the
V. A. C. since 1908. In 1907 he captained the Fairviews, when they won
the city championship. Gunn could
bold his place on any senior club,
but he is satisfied to remain with
the V. A. C. boys and is confident
that his team will bring the Mann
Cup west this year.
Billy Peacock, second home, 24
years of age, is the only member
of the team who is married. He
joined the ranks of the benedicts
last year. Billy is a bard worker
from atari to finish, and will always
take a chance against any defence.
He was one of the first members
of the champion team.
R. Knight, first home, aged 27
years, is one of the cleverest and
trickiest home players in the business, lie has played lacrosse
around Vancouver for a long lime in
juniorf, Intermediate and senior company. He went east with the Argonauts In 1904 and was also a member of the V. A. C. team last year
when they made an unsuccessful attempt to lift the Mann Cup. Bobby
has been on many champion teams
and hopes to photographed with the
Mann Cup after the next matches.
Bob Murray, outside home, 2er
years of age, played with the V.A.C.
team since 1907. He also turned
out. on a few occasions with the Vancouver team a few years ago. Bob
is a big fellow and has a dangerous
shot. He Is always good for a couple of goals or more in every game.
Arthur Wright, inside home, 20
years .old, is the youngest member
of the team. He played with the
V. A. C. juniors in 1907-8, and the
following year graduated into intermediate company. He came ahead
fast, and last year got a chance on
the senior team and made good from
the start.
D. Crookall, spare home, 25 years
old, played with the old Mount
Pleasant intermedites until 1908,
when he joined the V. A. C. team.
A. Gilmour, spare home, 24 years
old, jolnned the team last year and
is always ready when called upon
to fill a vacancy on the scoring end.
H. Painter, spare defence, 24 years
old, picked up his first lacrosse stick
on Fairview and was a member of
that champion team of 1907. This
year he threw in his lot with the
V. A. C. and has been playing fine
lacrosse.
JOHNSON TO FIGHT
Despite the statements made in
London concerning the future plans
of Jack Johnson, heavyweight champion of the world, Hugh Mcintosh,
tire well known Australian promoter,
asserts that Johnson will sail for
Australia on the steamer Orvieto,
leaving the Old Country on October
4. His fight with Bombardier Wells
will take place In London on October
2.. Mcintosh also stated that he is
taking no risk with Johnson, having
insured the champion with Lloyds'
for $25,000, the underwriters assuming all risk in the event of the colored fighter refusing to go through
with his matches. ,
It was announced by Mcintosh
that Jack Lester and Bill Lang will
meet in a return match here on September 30. This will be the third
meeting between Lester and Lang. In
the first fight lhe American was disqualified in the sixth round, and the
fight awarded to Lang, Lester being
awarded the decision on points. Lester won the Australian heavyweight
title by virtue of his victory over the
local heavyweight. After his next
fight Lester will leave immediately
for Vancouver en route to New York,
where he will meet Jim Flynn.
KNOCKOUT  BLOW
The revival of boxing has brought
out much talk of champions. The
thing that makes a champion Is a
combination of boxing skill with a
punch. Some people think that a
knockout blow Is a heavy wallop delivered with the push of a battering
ram. Quite the opposite. The real
knockout blow is a sharp, jarring
blow, not a crusher. Of course, some
fighters can deliver the crusher with
a sudden snap that gives It the deadening qualities. Without the snap
tbe heaviest punch is merely a violent shove.
Fitzsimmons was the hardest hitter of his time. Fitz was very exact
and deliberate in placing his fists.
He had the knockout points studied
out, and knew just the kind of a blow-
that was most effective in each
place. He drove in his blows with
the sudden snappy quality that
stuns. Jeffries learned his style of
hitting from Fitzsimmons, but he was
more of a battering ram—a crusher
—than Fitz. He didn't knock his
men out as quickly, although he
knocked them out. ,
Kid McCoy was master of the
knockout delivery. He didn't strike
a heavy blow—measured in pounds—■
at all, but by simply twisting his
wrist he could give it a sudden impact that knocked out many opponents.
Peter Msher wasn't very big or
phenomenally strong, but he had an
awful "wallop." JPeter drove his
right straight across, ending the blow
with a jolty snap. It was often a
knockout.
Sam Langford is the heaviest hitter in the ring today, not excepting
Champion Johnson. Langford's
hooks have terrific speed and snap,
and the weight of bis huge arms and
thick body add to the effect.
RETAINS ENGLISH  RULES
tlnue to  play  rugby  football  under
California universities will continue to play Rugby football under
tlie rules of the English Union. Advices to this effect were received yesterday by R. V. Woodward, an offi-
I'inl of the Vancouver Rugby Union,
from William Unniack, a San Francisco sport writr rend one of the most
enthusiastic supporters of the Rugby
game in the southern state. He,
played a lone hand against tire rules
committee of the two universities and
succeeded In having the college Rugby officials adhere to the real article,
although for a time It looked as If
the graduate managers apd other
members of the rules committee
would go through with the proposal
to alter the rules. In the event of
this step being taken It was practically certain that the Callfornlans
would be suspended by the English
Union and It would thus mean the
severing of relations between British Columbia clubs and the American
e'olleges. Mr. Unniack Instituted a
vigorous campaign In the interests
of Rugby and be woii a great vl-
tory, the committee finally deciding
to defer any action regarding
.iianges In the rules until next year.
In this fight he was supported by
the presidents of both universities,
but it was his splendid work that
undoubtedly saved the game in the
south. British Columbia clubs and
even clubs around San Francisco
threatened to retire from further
competition with the universities if
they made any change in the rules,
and this undoubtedly bad much to
do with the rules committee deciding to stand by the original rules.
Now that the matter has been definitely settled and the threatened
trouble has blown over the British
Columbia clubs will go ahead with
their arrangements to send a combined Vancouver-Victoria team to
California next month. Messrs.
Mackay and Evans are representing
Vancouver and Messrs. Spaulding
and Scott, Victoria, in selecting a
team. Already forty players have
signified their intention of trying out
for places on the team. The players will leave Vancouver about October 25 and will travel south In a
special car.
Mrs. Jabbe—Jones practically
lives in his automobile.
Mr. Jabbe—Has to; he sold his
home to buy it.
New Knox Hotel
ARTAUD & BESNER
Proprietors
The New Knox Hotel is run on the
European plan. Flrst-clas service.
All the latest modern improvements
THE BAR keeps only the best
brands of liquors and cigars.
THE CAFE is open from 6.30 a.m.
to 8 p.m. Excellent cuisine; first-
class service.
Board, $1 a Day — Beds, 50c and un
First Avenuo   Prince Rupert
***************************
j storage!
* *
* Household Goods and Baggage *
* given careful attention. *
* Forwarding,   Distributing   and *
* Shipping Agents f
I TRANSFERERS J
* *
* Prince    Rupert    Warehousing *
X and   Forwarding   Co. *
* First Ave.,  near  McBride  St. X
* *
* DOUGLAS SUTHERLAND,     *
% Manager. *
X   P. O. Box 007 Tlione 202 $
* *
* *
.<*************************
4 Per Cent 4
On a Checking Account
is what our depositors receive.    Start saving today by opening an account with us.
$1.00 is enough to begin with
The Continental Trust Company, Limited
Second Avenue, Prince Rurert, B.C.
Double Weekly Service
S.S. PRINCE RUPERT & S.S. PRINCE GEORGE
Sail for Vancouver, Victoria and Seattle
Mondays and Fridays at 8 a.m.
S.S. PRINCE JOHN for Port Simpson, Naas and Stewart, Wednesdays, 1 P. M.    For Masset and Nuden Harbor, Thursdays, 12
P. M. For Skidegate, Hose Harbor, etc., Saturday, 1 P. M.
RAILWAY SERVICE TO COPPER    RIVER,    mixed    trains from
Prince Rupert Mondays, Wednesday and Saturdays, 1 P. M.;
returning Tuesdays, Thursdays and Sundays, 4 P. M.
THE GRAND TRUNK RAILWAY   SYSTEM,   connecting   with
trains from the Pacific Coast, operates a frequent ard convenient
service of luxurious trains over its DOUBLE TRACK route between
Chicago, Toronto, Montreal, Quebec,   Halifax,     Portland,     Boston,
New York and Philadelphia.
Atlantic Steamship bookings arranged via all lines
Full information and tickets obtained from the office of
A. E. McMASTER
Freight and Pasenger Agent, G.
P. Wharf.
The Thompson
: Hardware Co.
-Second Avenue—
Paints. General Hardware,
Oils, Stoves and Ranges.
#
The
World's Greatest
Highway
Let us plan your
THE WESTHOLME LUMBER GO.
LIMITED
We handle all kinds of
Building Supplies
First Avenue Telephone 180
YOU ARE SURE OF
Engine Reliability
IF  YOU  RUN  A
Fairbanks - Norse Marine Engine
OVER 125,000 IN USE THROUGHOUT THE WORLD
TWO
CYCLE
FOUR
CYCLE
HEAVY
DUTY
MEDIUM
DUTY
■
Runabout
Type
MOST  COMPLETE  LINE OF GASOLINE ENGINES IX
THE WORLD
Write for Catalog P10
The Canadian Fairbanks Co., Ltd.
101-107 WATER STREET      .
Local Agent—F. M. DAVIS     ■
VANCOUVER, B. C.
. PRINCE RUPERT
Trip East
OR TO
Europe
We liKo to answer enquires.
Agent  for all  Atlantic  lines.
Cnll on or write:
Skeena Land  District—District of
Coast, Range 5.
TAKE NOTICE that T. H. Hughes,
of Lakelse Valley, occupation farmer,
intends to apply for permission to
purchase the followirg described
lands:—Commencing at a rost planted at the southeast corner of Lot
4128; tlience 40 cliains north; thence
40 chains east; thenc-3 40 chains
south; thenco 40 chains west to point
of commencement, and containing
160 acres, more or less.
TOM HUGH HUGHES.
Dated June 5, 1911.
Skeena  Land  District—District
of Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that Thomas Stewart, of Prince Rupert, occupation
accountant, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing st a
post planted 40 chains north from
the southwest corner of Lot 1733;
thence west 40 chains; thence south
40 chains; thence east 40 chains;
thence north 40 chains to point of
commencement.
THOMAS STEWART.
John  Kirkaldy, Agent
Dated July 7, 1911.
WATER   NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that an
application will be made under Part
V of '..ie "Water Act, 1909," to obtain a licence in the Queen Charlotte
Islands  Division   of  Skeena  District.
(a) The name, address and occupation of tlr ' applicant—Orland P.
Merrill; Massett, Graham Island,
B. C.j prospector.
(If for mining purposes) Free Miner's Certificate No	
(b) The name of the lake,
stream or source (if unnamed, the
description i-s)—Ain Lake and Ain
River.
(c) The point of diversion—At
or near Ain Lake.
(d) The quantity of water applied for (in cubic feet per second)
—700.
(e) Tire character of the proposed
works—Dam, flume, pipe line and
power  plant.
(I)     The  premises on  v'll h  t."e
water is to be used  u*. •       ..  	
—Near mouth of Ain River.'
(g) 'J he purposi ■ ' _•• ' \; ' •
waier is to be ucei—Ce'-> ' *
power.
(h) If for irrigation, dese: '*■■ ■ >
land to be Irrigated, giving acre■•■.-••
J. G. McNAB,
General Agene.
Excursions!
Let us tell you all about the cheap
HOUND  TRIP EXCURSIONS
to all Towns and Cities In Eastern
Canada -nd  United States
Via
The Great Northern
Choice of Return  Route
Tickets to the Old Country by all
Lines.      Ttl:e    any    Steamer    from
Prince Rupert.
ROGERS STEAMSHIP AGENCY
Phone 11<> Second Ave
Prince Rupert, B.C.
(1) If the water Is to be useJ for
power or for mining purposes, describe the place where the water is
to be returned to some natural channel, and the difference in altitude
between point of diversion and point
of return—Near mouth of Ain River
about 150 feet below point of diversion.
(j) Area of Crown land intended
to be occupied by the proposed
works— About 10 acres.
(k) This notice was posted on
tbe tenth day of June, 1911, and application will be made to the Commissioner o.i the fourth dav of September, 1911.
(li Give the names and addresses
of any riparian proprietors or 11-
censepr who or whose lands are
likely io be affected by the proposed
works, either above or below the
outlet—None.
(Signature)  ORLAND P. MERRILL,
(P.  O.  Address)   Masset,   B.   C.
George S. Mayer, Agent,
(P.   O.  Address)   Masset,   B.   C.
Note—One cubic foot per second
is equivalent to 35.71 miner's Inches.
Free Employment
Office
|t <2» .;• .j..;..;. .j».;«♦> ►** <. .j. ♦;« <«»;«.$..;«•*« »;• •>.;«»> .;•.;.-.;•>.;«»> ♦$• •> ^* ►;« *\* .j. %, ►;« ♦;« •;« *;* .;•»;. *> *> •;> ■>> *> •;• •
GROUND
Floor Space For Rent
IN THE
HART BUILDING
Corner of Second Avenue and Sixth Street
The Best Rusiness Corner in
Prince Rupert
For all kind-, of help. Cooks, waiters, dishwashers, hotel porters, all
kinds of laborers or mechanics, call
up  178  or call at the
FREE EMPLOYMENT OFFICE
GRAND HOTEL
Headquarters U,r Coe>l . and Walters
Queen   Charlotte   Islands   Land   District—District of Skeena
TAKE NOTICE that Aimee Merrill, of Massett, B. C, occupation
housewife, inte" ds to apply for permission to pre- ,rect for coal and petroleum over the following described
area:—Commencing al a post planted
on the west shore of Kuiulls Island,
Masselt Inlet, five miles south of tho
most northerly point of said Kundla
Island; tlience east SO chains; thence
soutli Sn chains; thence west 80
chains; thence nortli so chains, to
point ef commencement; containing
•!40 acres,  more or les^.
AIMEE MERRILL.
Orland P. Merrill, Agent.
Dared  August   28    1911,
Jermiah H. Kugler, Ltd.
ROGERS & BLACK
Wholesale Dealers In
BUILDING   MATERIAL,     CEMENT.
LIME,   HAIR-FIBRE PLASTER
COKE,  BLACKSMITH COAL,
COMMON BRICK, PRESSED BRICK
SHINGLES AND LATH
NEW   WELLINGTON   COAL
All   orders   prone    ly   filled—see   us
for ,  ices.
PHONE 1111 PHONE 110
Queen  Charlotte   isianrls  r.and   Dis-
trie-t    nisti'ec.  of Skeena
TAKE NOTICE thai Margarel A.
Merrill, of Chlcagi. Illinois, occupation housewife, Intends to apply for
permission to prospect for coal and
petroleum over the following descrlb-
ed area:—Commencing nl a peist
planted on the west shore of Kundls
[Bland, Massetl Inlet, five miles
south of the most northerly point of
said Kundls Island; thence east 80
chains; the ce north so chains;
tlience west 80 chains; thence south
80 chains, to point of commencement; containing 640 acres, more or
less.
MARGARET A.  MERRILL.
Orlanrl   I'   Merrill,   Agent.
Dated August 28, 1911.
(
For Neat Job Printing
nee the Journal Man
T.I. 138
*
V
/
■'* ****************** ********************
•V******* .
 LADYSMITH
COAL
ROCHESTER & MOeNRCE, Phone 116 -*t*W..V
-:■■■
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Friday, September 22, 1911.
PROPERTIES  STAKED
'I
Well
Known   Prospector  of  Hazelton
Returns From the Northern
Interior.
Winnipeg  Syndicate Will Commence
Active  Development on Properties   Next  Season
Phil McDonald arrived in Hazelton last week from a trip to the
north, where he staked fifty-two
square miles of anthracite coal
claims. A Winnipeg syndicate is behind him, and active developments
will be commenced with the opening
of next season, says the Inland Colonist, referring to well known citizen here.
It was twelve years ago that Mr.
McDonald was an employee on the
Yukon telegraph construction gang,
working with the gang which was
constructing from Telegraph Creek
soutli. Working through theh country In theh direction of Groundhog
Mountain, when, in the vicinity of
what is known as 6th and 7th Cabins,
he discovered the croppings of several seams of coal. He took several
specimens which he then intended
an analysis on later for his own satisfaction, but at that time did not
look forward to the day when he
would probably be able to dork up a
big enough deal to actually handle
this large area.
Last year when the big rush was
on to Groundhog Mountain, and all
kinds of capital was going there, he
recalled his own discovery of twelve
years ago and decided to make an
effort to interest capital in it. In
this he was successful, with the result that he now has staked and has
sn Interest in fifty-two square miles
of anthracite coal claims on which
there are five known seams running
from six to fourteen feet in width.
These seams, he is positive, are a
continuation of the Groundhog
seams, and are right on the line of
the proposed G. T. P. Railway to the
Yukon.
 o	
PLACER MINING
Town of Manson Is Said to Re Likely
to See Renewal of Mining
Activity
That the old of Manson, which
once had a population of 10,000 or
more, and whose diggings produced
many millions of dollars in the 60's,
is likely to come into prominence
again as a centre of unexpected
placer mining activity in that part
of British Columbia, is the firm belief of Percy H. Fraser, managing
director of the Royal Standard Investment Co., Ltd. He bases this on
certain reports received from his
agents, who have just staked eleven
hydraulic creek leases and one hydraulic lease, all in the Germanson
•Creek  district.
"I have received a report from
my agent, in which be tells me of
our Germanson Creek properties that
he has panned outhlmself seven and
one-half cents to the pan and he has
only started to work on it. We have
also received a communication from
W. B. Steele, the deputy mining recorder at Manson, who has been in
that part of the country for the past
fourteen years, who says 'the wealth
of this country is something big, and
if a man was to try to tell about it
and have outsiders really grasp the
situation correctly, that alone would
be an achievement.' "
 o	
ATTACKS BANQUETS
Wealth and Privilege in London Centre Mercilessly
Criticized
that the City of London is s rather
small place. It consists of about a
square mile of land In the heart of
Greater London, which has grown
for many miles on every side of it.
The city proper is the financial district, and while its population does
not exceed 10,0000, the land is prob
ably the most valuable real estate
to be found any where on earth.
Land in the City of London is usually valued, not by the front footage,
nor even by the square foot; but by
the square inch. Some of it is worth
$2.50 per square inch; some is worth
more. In this square mile is to be
found more great monuments of the
past than in any equal territory in
the world. It is the great shrine of
the Empire, or, as one writer has
said, the main valve of the heart of
the Empire. Yet it is ruled by a
little oligarchy who elect a Lord
Mayor, 26 aldermen and 206 councillors by a total vote that would not
elect an alderman in Ward Two.
In olden times the elections in London Town used to be held on St.
Thomas' Day, because then the citizens, journeymen and apprentices
were all at home. The result of the
election might fairly be considered ss
expressing the wishes of the majority
of the citizens. Now, although the
elections are still held on St. Thomas'
Day, the city is almost empty at this
time. The tens of thousands of business men who are entitled to vote
because they have places of business
in the city are spending the holiday
season at home or in the country.
Practically none of them live in the
city, for to do so would be like one
of our Front Street merchants living
on Front Street. On election day
city is practically deserted by the
majority of the people who are entitled to vote there, and only the
small resident population, plus the
caretakers and a few unlucky clerks
who are without votes, are left inside
of Temple Bar. What happens is
well illustrated by a recent election
in Farrington Without, a city ward
with 4,000 qualified voters.    Of this
number the winning candidate polled
less than 400 votes.
There would be no ground for
alarm at the apathy of the electorate
were the City of London an ordinary
municipality. It Is true it has a
small tax rate; it has hardly any
poverty within its borders, and no
social problems to worry about. Outside, in Greater London, some of the
world's greatest social and municipal
problems are being grappled with by
the County Council. The city acknowledges no responsibility for
these, although it is the very hub
from which the whole life of the
greater city radiates. It is content
to elect its Lord Mayor, invite the
Prime Minister to the Guildhall banquet, and play host to distinguished
visitors. It also seizes the opportunity to make the King stand at
Temple Bar and politely request permission to enter the anient city. II
does these little and more or lee r
picturesque things, and one other
thini*- chat maddens its critics. It
fairly drips with money. It has been
piling up wealth for a thousand years
and more. lis income is about a
million pounds a year.
In olden times many a king was
willing to buy the support of the
London burghers by grants of land
elsewhere, and on occasion, too, the
burghers were ready to buy some ot
the rights they now enjoy from some
hard pressed monarch. Thus their
special privileges have been accumulating on the one hand, and their
material wealth on the other. The
City of London owns valuable land
in Ulster, and in other parts of the
British Isles, Including some rich
slices of Greater London. About the
only great outlet it has for its income is through the Guildhall, where
the banquets are probably the richest
since the time of Lucullus. Its expenditure has attracted the hungry
eye of Lloyd George, and some of
the stout aldermen tremble '.when
they consider the fate of the Lords.
 o	
A Boston oil man was putting
down a well in virgin territory.    He
was keeping the fact a profound secret, in order to secure leases without difficulty if he got a good well.
But he arranged a code telegram to
be sent him as soon as the drill
reached sand. In order that the
news might not leak at the telegraph
office he told the driller that the
sentence, "Pine trees grow tall"
would mean that he had'struck oil.
The driller promised to follow instructions. In a few days the telegram arrived. It read: "Pine trees
grow tall. She's spurting clean over
the derrick."
J. L. PARKER
MINING ENGINES
Prince Rupert, B. C.
Open for Consultation and Mine
Examination
remporary Address: —
Prince Rupert Inn
Skeena   Land   uistrict -— District   of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Burton Vivian
Brewer, of Vancouver, occupation
clerk, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about two miles north
from the northeast corner of Lot
993; thence west 80 chai»s; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains, to
point of commencement; containing
640 acres.
BURTON VIVIAN BREWER.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated July 31, 1911.
FREDERICK PETERS, K. C.
Barrister, Solicitor and Notary Public
Office in
EXCHANGE BLOCK
WM. S. HAr-eL, L. D. S. D. D. S.
*.-:    DENTIST   :-:
Crown and Bridge Work a specialty
All dental operations skillfully
treated. Gas and local anaesthetics
administered tor the painless extraction of teeth. Consultation free.
Offices, Helgerson 3k., Prince Rupert
NICKERSON-ROERIG COMPANY
CUSTOMS AND MERCHANDISE
Brokers, Forwarding Agents,
Storage, etc.
Hw*Suy S&itsfeiaory Reeeegt
A Conservative London paper lias
been attacking the Guildhall banquets, says the Mail rrrirl Empire. It
points oul thai more than half the
guests ni the famous functions are
aldermen und their wives, whose table' manners nre celebrated rather for
their gusto than their tl«>!i«-:ir-\-. The
paper asserts thai tire people of
greater London have boon humiliated
in the eyes of distinguished foreigners in whose honor these "feeds"
have been given by the rather scandalous behavior of the members of
the corporation and their hearty families. The Guildhall banquets ought
to be abolished, and their place taken
by feasts that will be more nicely
conducted, and more thoroughly representative of tire British people.
Guests who judge the country by
what they see of their hosts at City
of London banquets do an Injustice
to the nation. Other papers have
echoed the cry, and sny that the time
has come, now that the House of
Lords has been reformed, when the
old City of London should be taught
to mend its manners in more directions than one.
Most people are aware, no doubt,
Good, Sound Reasons for
MONARCH Economy
Monarch Ranges are built so that they can
never have "air leaks"—
For around every opening into the body there
is a   Malleable   Iron frame to which the
steel is riveted.
No putty is needed in such joints.    They are
air tight when new and stay air tight.
If these other ranges were built In this way
they might be economical too.
Investigate this matter of rivet construction
versus stove bolts and stove putty.    It's
important to every  one  using  or  buying
a range.
SOLD AND GUARANTEED BY THE
Kaien Hardware Co.
Telephone 3 Third Avenue
FOR SALE
Lot 56, Blk. 34, Sec. 1, $5,000; 1-3 cash, bal. 6 and 12 months.
Lots 33 ami 34, Blk 5, Sec. 1,    $4,000;  half cash.
FOR RENT
STORES, OFFICES AND DWELLINGS
FIRE INSURANCE in old English, Canadian and American
companies, at tariff rates. Policies good as collateral at All Banks,
and all written in our own office. PLATE GLASS, ACCIDENT
and MARINE INSURANCE
J. W. POTTER
ARCHITECT    AND    STRUCTURAL
ENGINEER
Re-lntorced Concrete a Specialty
—o—
Law-Butler Building - Prince Rupert
H. Gordon Munro   W. Nicholson Lailey
NUNRO & LAILEY
ARCHITECTS
PRINCE RUPERT, B. C.
P. O. BOX 14
PRINCE RUPERT
HAYNOR BROS.
PUNERAL   DIRECTORS
and
PROFESSIONAL  EMBALMERS
DR.  W. B.  CLAYTON-
DENTIST
Office  In    the    Westenhaver   Block
Over  Orme's Drug   Store.
Prince Rupert
Skeena  Land   District — District  of
Queen ^.rarlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Edgar J.
Young, of Vancouver B. O, occupation painter, Intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing st a
post planted two and one-half miles
north of the northeast corner of Lot
993; thence west 80 chains; thenco
north 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; containing 640  acres.
EDGAR J. YOUNG.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated July 31, 1911.
Skeena   Land   District--District  of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Margaret
Merrill, of Chicago, Illinois, U.S.A.,
occupation housewife, intends to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing st a post planted about three
miles west, and one-half mile north
from the southwest corner of Lot
991; thence west 40 chains; thence
south 60 chains; thence east 40
chains; thence north 60 chains, to
point of commencement; containing
240 acres, more or less.
MARGARET MERRILL.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated August 7, 1911.
Skeena   Land   District — District   of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Arthur W.
Nelson, of Chicago, Illinois, U.S.A.,
occupation clerk, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 3 ml'es west and
one-half mile north from the southwest corner of Lot 991; thence east
80 chains; thence south 60 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence north
60 chains, to point of commencement; containing 480 acres, more or
less. ARTHUR W. NELSON.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated August I, 1911.
Skeena  Land   District — District  of
Coast, Range v.
TAKE NOTICE that Alice Munro,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for per-'
mission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted on the west shore of
Lakelse Lake and about one and one-
half miles distant in a southwesterly direction from the southwest
corner of Lot 3982, Skeena Land
District, District of Coast, Range 5;
thence west 40 chains; thence north
40 chains; thence east 60 chains,
more or less to the shore of Lakelse
Lake; thence following the shore of
said lake to point of commencement;
containing 200 acres, more or less.
ALICE MUNRO.
Dated  August  12,  1911.
Skeena  Land   District — District   of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Norman
Hurst, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation clerk, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described Iands:—Commencing at a
post planted about three and one-
half miles north and one mile west
from the northwest corner of Lot
992; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains thence south 80 chains, to
point of eomniencement; containing
640 acres. NORMAN HURST.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated July 31, 1911.
M.M. Stephens & Co. Ld.
REAL ESTATE
Phone 222
LOANS       INSURANCE
Office: Third Avenue
INVESTMENTS
P. O. Box 275
°Ji°JiDJi°JiaJi°iEjyi°iyisJisjyiai°JiaEJiai^
I
1
I
I
I
1
I
I
1
I
1
H
Ie
H
  d
1
Prince Rupert Hardware & Supply  |
Company, Ltd. ||
I
[5
□ llnlfF
HOTEL
ENAMELWARE
HAVE JUST RECEIVED A SMALL SHIPMENT OF HOTEL
ENAMELWARE ESPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR USE IN
HOTELS, RESTAURANTS AND CAMPS. WE GUARANTEE
THEM TO LAST TWICE AS LONG AS ORDINARY ENAMEL
WARE.
A CALL IS SOLICITED
THIRD AVENUE
PHONE 120
Skeena   Land    District—District   of
Queen   Charlotte  Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Eliza Sutherland, of Blair, Nebraska, U. S. A.,
occupation housewife, intends to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing st a post planted about 2%
miles north and 5 % miles west from
the northwest corner of Lot 992;
thence east 60 chains; thence north
80 chains; thence west 60 chains;
thence south 80 chains, to point commencement; containing 480 acres.
ELIZA SUTHERLAND.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated August 25, 1911. s22
Skeena    Land    District—District    of
Queen  Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Aimee Merrill, of Masset, B. C, occupation
housewife, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described, lauds:—Commencing at a
post planted about 2% miles north
and 5% lies west from the northwest corner of Lot 992; tlience east
60 chains; thence south SO chains;
thence west 60 chains; tlience north
8 0 cliains, to point of commencement;   containing 4S0  acres.
AIMEE MERRILL.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Daled August 25, 1911. s22
Skeena   Land   District — District   of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Frank Gray,
of Blair, Nebrasaka, U.S.A., occupation farmer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 2 miles west and
•nh mile north from the southwest
corner of Lot 991; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south
SO chains, to point of commencement; containing 640 acres.
FRANK  GRAY.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated July 29, 1911.
Skeena  Land   District — District  of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Wirt A.
Stevens, of Chicago, Illinois, U.S.A.,
occupation civil engineer, Intends to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing st a post planted about two
miles west and one and one-half
miles north from the southwest corner of Lot 991; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south
80 chains, to point of commencement;  containing 640 acres.
WIRT A. STEVENS.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated July 29,  1911.
Skeena  Land   District — District   of
Queen Charlotte Inlands
TAKE NOTICE that C. Verne
Brewer, of Vancouver, occupation
clerk, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted three and one-half mil t
nortjf and one mile west from th.
northwest corner of Lot 992; thence
east 80 chains; thence south 8*
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
north 80 charhs, to point of commencement; containing 640 acres.
C. VERNE BREWER.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Datedo July 31, 1911,
Skeena  Land   District — District  of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that John Henry,
of Vancouver, occupation contractor,
intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted two and one-half miles north of
the northwest corner of Lot 992;
thence west 80 chains; thence south
40 chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence north 40 chains, to point of
commencement; containing 320 acres.
JOHN HENRY.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated July 31,  1911.
Skeena   Land   District — District   of
Queen Charlotte IslandB
TAKE NOTICE that William Robert Little, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation mason, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about two and one-half
miles north from the northwest corner of Lot 992; tlience east 80
chains; thence south 40 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence north
40 chains, to point of commencement;   containing  320  acres.
WILLIAM ROBERT LITTLE.
George S. Mayer, Aifent.
Dated July 31,  1911.
Skeena  Land   District — District   of
Queen  Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Harry Martin, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
artist, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted two and one-half miles
north of the northeast corner of Lot
993; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence i west 80
chains; tbence south 80 chains, to
the point of commencement; containing 640 acres, more or less.
HARRY MARTIN.
' George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated July 31, 1911.
Skeena   Land   uistrict — District   of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Allan Orr, of
Masset, B. O, occupation carpenter,
intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted three and one-half miles north
and one mile west from the northwest corner of Lot 992; thence west
80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence south
80 chains, to point of commencement; containing 640 acres.
ALLAN ORR.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated July 31, 1911.
Skeena  Land  District — District  of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Christina Orr,
of Masset, B. C, occupation housewife, Intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted about four miles west and three
and one-half miles north from the
northwest corner of Lot 992; thence
west 80 chains; thence north 80
chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains, to point of commencement; containing 640 acres.
CHRISTINA ORR.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated August 7, 1911.
Skeena  Land   District — District   of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Ellen Ives, of
Mnsset, B. C, occupation housewife,
intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted about four miles west and three
and one-half miles nortli from the
northwest corner of Lot 992; thence
east SO chains; tlience nortli 80
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains, to point of commencement; containing 640 acres.
ELLEN IVES.
George S. Mayer, .^gent.
Dated August 7, 1911.
Skeena   Land   District — District   of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Fred Jackson,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation painter, Intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted about two miles north from the
northeast corner of Lot 993; thence
west 80 chains thence north 40
chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
south 40 chains, to point of commencement; containing 320 acres
FRED JACKSON.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated July 31,  1911.
Skeena  Land   District — District  of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Stanley Hol-
brook, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation clerk, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about two miles north
from the northeast corner of Lot
993; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 40 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south 40 chains, to
point of commencement; containing
320 acres.
STANLEY HOLBROOK.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated July 31, 1911.
Skeena   Land   District — District  of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Joseph C.
Merrill, of Chicago, Illinois, U.S.A.,
occupation retired, Intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about four and
one-half miles west and one-half mile
north from the southwest corner of
Lot 991; thence north 20 chains;
thence west 60 chains, more or less,
to the Ain River; thence following
shore of river in a southerly and
easterly direction to point of commencement; containing 120 acres,
more or less.
JOSEPH   C.   MERRILL.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated August 2. 1911.
Skeena   Land   District — District  of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Patrick O'Connor, of Vancouver, B. C., occupation
foreman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about two miles north
from the northeast corner of Lot
993; tbence east SO chains; thence
soutli SO cliains; Ihence west SO
I'hains; tbence north SO chains, to
point of commencement; containing
640    acres.
PATRICK O'CONNOR.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated July 31, 1911.
Skeena  Land   District — District  of
Coast, Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that William H.
Hargrave, of Vancouver, B. C., occupation banker, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted on the west shore of
Lakelse Lake, and about one and one-
half miles distant In a southerly
direction from the southwest corner
of Lot 3982, Skeena Land District,
District of Coast, Range 5; thence
40 chains west; thence 8n chains
south, more or less, to the shore of
Lakelse Lake; thence following the
shore of said lake to point of commencement; containing 160 acres,
more or less.
WILLIAM H. HARGRAVE.
Dated August    	 (
Friday,  September  22,  1911.
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
*****************************************************
j     BY AUTO TO HAZELTON    j
* .**
******************************************************
' v
An international industrial romance of almost half a century ago,
the complete history of which ahs
never been written and is virtually
unknown to the present generation,
is to play an Important part in the
pathfinding tour of the three Seattle
motorists who are now en route to
Hazelton In an attempt to capture
the Challoner & Mitchell trophy,
which is to be the reward of the
first car to reach Hazelton overland
—this being a point farther north
than any motor car has ever yet
penetrated under its own power. The
challengers for "First-to-Hazelton"
distinction have already successfully
negotiated the dreaded Snoqualmle
Pass—believed to be the most difficult point on the long journey until
the end of the Stoney Creek road
from Fort George is reached, and the
true "cross-country" work begins—
and at last reports were making excellent progress in the vicinity of
Midway, says the Colonist, referring
to this tour which is now on. Travelling In a "Flanders 20," fully
equipped to slash their way through
the forest of that portion of inland
British Columbia between the terminus of the Stoney Creek road and
the Bulkley Valley, the party expects to find material aid in their
enterprise in what is known as the
old Telegraph Trail, cut northward
to Hazelton in the years of 1865-6
and '7, in an endeavor to place the
capitals of Europe and of North
America in telegraphic communication by the way of Alaska and the
Bering Strait. This line was decided
upon, it is a matter of history, because many scientists and business
men were convinced that a telegraphic cable underneath the Atlantic was
an impossibility. The work of constructing the overland telegraph proceeded until one day the men at the
wire-end in the desolate north received a massage that the cable had
been completed and was working successfully. ,
Hazelton, a town today of probably S00 inhabitants, is within sixty
miles of the Alaska 'border. It is
surrounded by mountains and dense
forests, its sole communication with
the outside world ss bet being by
the river route. For some time the
government of the province has been
engaged in the development of a road
construction programme which will
ultimately link up the northern areas
of which Hazelton is one of the lm
portsnt centres by means of a high
way traversing the Bulkley Valley
and connecting with tlie main Cariboo road at or near Fort George
Messrs. Challoner & Mitchell
through the Pacific Highway Association, about a year ago offered a
nandsome gold medal to the owner
or pilot of the first automobile to
reach Hazelton by the overland
route, and although several have essayed the trip, none as yet has sunc
ceeded in winning through. For this
reason the attempt of the Seattle
car is being watched with peculiar
interest, not only by the motorists
of America, but by the government
officials of the works department.
For many miles, between Fraser
Lake and Hazelton, it is believed
that the old Telegraph Trail will be
found the advisable route. This
landmark of forty-six years ago, the
relic of a fiasco in which the world
in that day was intensely interested
an'd in which hundreds of thousands
of dollars were invested, may provide at least a pack horse road, and
with soem work upon it by the government may in years to come form
a link in the great overland highway
to Alaska. In 1865 a corporation
independent of the Western Union
Telegraph Company, but comprised
principally of the heavy stockholders
of that concern, was ttormed and
capital stock subscribed for the construction of a telegraph line that
should reach from the cities of the
across the American continent north
to Alaska and across that territory
to the Bering Sea, crossing Bering
Straits at their narrowest point and
passing thence through Sibera and
into Russia and the capitals of Europe. At first an effort was made
to secure the support of the Western Telegraph Union, but a few of
the stockholders regarded it as a
visionary scheme, itnpractica If not
impossible. The reason for desiring
the line was that a strong syndicate
was at the time engaged with more
or less prospect of success in laying
the first Atlantic cable, and many of
the members of the company feared
that upon completion of. the cable—
If It were a success—the Western
Union would lose its large share of
the world's telegraph business.
The cable was being laid by the
Great Eastern, at that time the largest ship afloat. Much trouble was
experienced and some of the Western
Union's shareholders and trustees
argued  that the cable would never
"make good"; and that in case it
failed, an effort to string wires overland to Europe woui.. be unnecessary.
The independent company, however,
formed, and the project pushed forward. Telegraph lines already were
in . operation to San Francisco and
up the Pacific Coast to the Puget
Sound country. These were extended
by contractors to the Canadian boundary, where Colonel William Bulk-
ley was placed in sole charge of the
enterprise through Canada toBerlng
Straits. With an army of more than
one thousand men all told, he took
up the work, extending the line to
New Westminster, tlience east and
north through the town of Hope and
over the Hope Mountains, and tbence
along what is now known ss the old
Cariboo Road. From Quesnel the
line took a northerly direction past
Fraser Lake, through the famous
Bulkley Valley and on to the village
of Hazelton.
The struggle of the rugged pioneers of the construction force, their
wars with savage nature, with the
elements and with the Indians, the
tragedies of death and burials in
unknown graves in these primeval
portions of the Pacific Northwest
might fittingly form the theme for
countless frontier romances of today, although the difficulty of collecting data grows with each year,
for the survivors, now scattered far
and wide, are constantly' growing
fewer. Ithough supplies then could
be carried into the interior only by
men or packhorse, great stores
(worth many thousand dollars) were
collected by Colonel Bulkley in the
valley that bears his name, and there
headquarters were established for the
campaign that was to carry the line
on through laska.
This work required about three
years. In 1867, with vast quanties
of wire ready to be moved northward
out of Bulkley Valley, and with his
army of stalwart men thoroughly
trained to their work and inured to
hardships, on the eve of starting forward from Hazelton, word was flashed over the wire which kept the force
in touch with civilization that the
Great Eastern had arrived at her
Atlantic port, completing her laying
of the line of sub-A"tlantic cable
bringing the Old and New Worlds
into almost Instant touch with one
another. First messages had been
flashed under the ocean and the enterprise was admitted by all, reluctantly by man, successful.
Colonel Bulkley was thereupon Instructed to drop the entire work of
the overland telegraph. His men
were at once discharged; the great
stores of provisions were deserted—
abandoned to the plundering Indians
and the bands of elk, antelope and
deer that at that time roamed the
country in bands of many thousands,
riundreds of tons of hay and grain
had been piled up for packhorse supplies. These furnished nourishment
for the wild herds the following winter. The thousands of tons of wire
were left ss they were piled, and
with the Indians later built many
wierd, unique traps and dwellings.
They used wire freely In the construction of their homes, and with it also
they built Strang suspension bridges
over tbe northern gorges, some of
which  endure  to   this  day.
This same trail bears further historical, interest, for it was the route
taken by misguided hundreds during
the Klondike rush of 1897-8. Scores
of lives were lost at that time, the
trail being marked by the bones of
forgotten men and beasts. Up to
date, no one has been known to travel
j'as far as Hazelton even by wagon.
And yet, Manager Sands of the
E-M-F. Northwest Company of Seattle, who is piloting the "Flanders
20" on its present expedition, started out with the expectation of reporting "O.K." from Hazelton in less
than three weeks' time. On the day
of his departure be received a message from Mayor Dllllng of Seattle
to be delivered to the government
agent nt Hazelton, and thereby has
been given the impression that the
completion of his journey by motor
car is obligatory. The distance to
be traversed is practically 1,000
miles. . The first severe test of both
car and men began with the second
day's journey, when they entered
Snoqualmle Pass, a rugged slit in
the Cascade Mountains through
which no other machine has travelled
this year. Two days of strenuous
toll were required to get the car
through to Gold Creek, only three-
fourths of the way through the pass.
The balance of the journey was negotiated with less difficulty.
 o-	
"Tommy, did you give your
brother the best part of the apple
as I told you to?"
T-immy: "Yessum; I gave him the
seeds. He can plant 'em and have
a whole orchard."
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE
NOTICE is hereby given that the
reserve existing over Crown lands on
the Morrlce River, Range 5, Coast
District, notice of which bearing date
of May 5th, 1910, was published in
the Br'tlsh Columbia Gazette of May
5th, 1910, is cancelled in so far as
it relates to the lands surveyed as
Lots 3881, 3882, 3883, 3884, 3885,
3886, 3887, 3888, 3889, 3890, 3891,
3892, 3893, 3894, 3895, 3896, 3897,
3898, 3899, 3900, 3901, 3902, 3903,
3904, 3905, 3906, 3907, 3908,, 3909,
and 3910.
ROBERT A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Department of Lands, Victoria, B. C.
September 12, 1911. s22-d22
"PUBLIC   INQUIRIES  ACT"
HIS HONOR the Lieutenant-Governor in Council has been pleased to
appoint the Honourable Albert Edward McPhllllps, K. O, President of
the Executive Council; tbe Honourable Price Ellison, Minister of
Finance; Charles Henry Lugrin, of
the City of Victoria, Esquire; and
William Harold Malkin, of the City
of Vancouver, Esquire, to be Commissioners under the "Public Inquiries Act" for the purpose of enquiring into and reporting upon the
operation of the "Assessment Act,
1903," with respect to its practical
bearings on the financial requirements of the Province.
The said Commissioners will hold
their meetings on the dates and at
the places mentioned ' hereunder,
namely:—
Victoria at the Executive Council
Chamber, Parliament Buildings,
Monday and Tuesday, 25th and 26th
September at 10 a. ni. At the Courthouse or the Government Office at
the following places:—
Nanaimo, Wednesday and Thursday, 27th and 28th September.
Vancouver, Friday and Saturday,
29th and 30th September.
New Westminster, Monday, 2nd
October.
Revelstoke, Wednesday, 4th Oct.
Golden, Thursday, 5th October.
Cranbrook, Saturday, 7th October.
Fernie,  Monday,  9th  October.
Nelson, Wednesday, 11th October.
Rossland, Thursday, 12th October.
Grand Forks, Friday, 13th October.
Princeton, Saturday, 14th October.
Merritt,  Monday, 16th October.
Kamloops, Tuesday, 17th October.
Suinnierlsnd, Thursday ,19th Oct.
Pentlcton, Friday, 20th October.
Kelowna, Saturday, 21st October.
Vernon, Monday, 23rd October.
It is requested that all persons who
are interested In the matter aforesaid,
and who desire to be heard, will not
fail to be present at the meetings
of  the  Commisioners.
PRICE ELLISON,
Chairman.
Treasury Department, Victoria, B. C.
September 13, 1911. s22-o23
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE.
NOTICE is hereby given that the
reserve of a parcel of land situated
on Graham Island, notice of which
appeared in the British Columbia
Gazette on the 25th of February,
1909, being dated 23rd February,
1909, is cancelled to permit of the
lands being acquired by pre-emption
only and for no other purpose
ROBT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Department of Lands,
Victoria, B. C, April 5th, 1911.
4-14—7-5
PUBLIC HIGHWAYS
Province of British Columbia
NOTICE is hereby given that all
Public Highways in unorganized Districts, and all Main Trunk Roads in
organized Districts are sixty-six feet
wide, and have a width of thirty-
three feet on each side of the mean
straight centre line of the travelled
road. THOMAS TAYLOR,
Minister of Public Works.
Department of Public Works, Victoria. B. C, July 7, 1911.    jyl8-ol8
NOTICE
111 the matter of an application for
the  issue  of  a  duplicate  of  the
Certificate   of  Title  for  Lot   361,
Range 5, Coast District:
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
it  is  my  intention  to  issue  at  the
expiration  of  one  month  after  the
first publication  hereof a  duplicate
of the Certificate for the above described lands in the names of Truman S. Baxter and Albert D. Durham,
which   Certificate  of  Title   Is  dated
?5th    November,    1909,   and   numbered 4 4 1.
WILLIAM E.  BURRITT,
District  Registrar.
Land Registry Office, Prince Rupert, B. C, August 14, 1911. alu-sl5
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE.
Notice is hereby given the the
reserve existing by reason of the
notice published in the British Columbia Gazette of the 27th Decern
ber, 1907, over lands on Graham Island, formerly covered by Timber
Licences Nos. Nos. 37055, 37056 and
37057, which expired on the 6th day
of November, 1909, and the lands
embraced within Timber Licence No.
37059, which expired on the 25th
day of January, 1909, Is cancelled
and that the said lands will be open
for pre-emption only under the provisions of Section 7 of the "Land
Act" after midnight on June 16th
1911.
ROBERT A.  RENWICK,
Deputy  Minister  of  Lands
Lands Department,
Victoria, B. C,
9th March, 1911.
Form of Notice  (Section 34)
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that Edward Chesley, of the City of Prince Rupert,
B. C, occupation trainman, intends
to apply for permission to purchase
the following described land:—Commencing at a post planted about half
way between Mile Post 77 and Mile
Post 78 on the Main Line of the
Grand Trunk Pacific Railway from
Prince Rupert and about fifty (50)
feet west of the right-of-way of the
said Railway; thence north eighty
(80) chains; thence west forty (40)
chains; thence south eighty (80)
chains; thence east forty (40) chains,
to the point of commencement; and
containing three hundred and twenty
(320) acres more or less and which
land was located by me on the 26th
day of August, A. D. 1911.
EDWARD CHESLEY.
Dated August 28, 1911. 85
Form of Notice (Section 47)
Skeena   Land    District—District   of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that George W.
Kerr, of the City of Prince Rupert,
occupation butcher. Intends to apply
for permission to lease the following described land:—Commencing at
a post planted about three hundred
(300) yards west of Mile Post 79
on the line of the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway track from Prince Rupert; thence south eighty (80)
chains; thence west forty (40)
chains; thence north eighty (80)
chains; thence east forty (40) chains
to the place of commencement, and
containing three hundred and twenty (320) acres more or less, and
which land was located by m'e on
the 26th day of August inst. A. D.
1911.
GEO.  W.  KERR.
Dated August 28, 1911. s5
Form of Notice (Section 47)
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that George A. Mc-
NichoII, of the City of Prince Rupert, railway superintendent by occupation, intends to apply for permission to lease the following described
land:—Commencing at a post.planted about three hundred (300) yards
west of Mile Post 80, on the line of
the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway
track from Prince Rupert; thence
north eighty (80) chains; thence
west forty (40) chains; thence south
eighty (80) chains; thence east forty
(40) chains to place of commencement and containing three hundred
and twenty (320) acres, and which
land was located by me on the 26th
day of August, A. D. 1911.
GEORGE A. McNICHOLL.
Philip T. Chesley, Agent.
Dated August 29, 1911. s5
Hazelton  Land  District—District of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that John Gabriel,
of Aldermere, B. C, Prospector, intends to apply for a licence to prospect for coal and petroleum over the
following described I.*nds:—Commencing at a post planted five miles
east and one mile south from the
mouth of Kitnayakwa River; tlience
south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains, to point of
commencement.
JOHN GABRIEL   Locator.
Dated July 10, 1911.
Hazelton  Land  District—District of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that Vivian
O'Brien of Copper City B.C., prospector,
intends to apply for a licence to
prospect for coal and petroleum over
the following described lands: —
Commencing at a post planted four
miles east and four miles north from
the mouth of Kitnayakwa River;
tbence south 80 chains; thence east
SO chains; thence north SO chains;
thence west 80 chains, to point of
commencement.
VIVIAN O'BRIEN, Locator.
Dated July  10,  1911. sl
Hazelton   Land  District—District  of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that John Gnbriel,
of Aldermere, B. C, Prospector, intends to apply for a licence to prospect for coal and petroleum over the
following described lands:—Commencing st a post planted four miles
east and four miles -north from the
mouth of Kitnayakwa River; thence
west 80 chains; thence south 80
cliains; thence east 80 chains; tbence
north 80 chains, to point of commencement.
JOHN GABRIEL, Locator.
Dated July 10, 1911,
Hazelton  Land  District—District of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that Vivian
O'Brien of Copper City B.C., prospector,
intends to apply for a licence to
prospect for coal and petroleum over
the following described lands: —
Commencing at a post planted three
miles east and three miles north
from the mouth of Kitnayakwa River; thence south 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence north 80
chains; tlience east 80 chains, to
point of commencement.
VIVIAN O'BRIEN, Locator.
Dated July 9, 1911. sl
Form of Notice (Section 47)
Skeena   Land    District—District   of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that John A. Kirkpatrick, of the City of Prince Rupert, dry goods merchant by occupation, intends to apply for permission
to lease the following described land,
bounded as follows:—Commencing
at a post planted about three hundred (300) yards west of Mile Post
79 oh the 'line of the Grand Trunk
Pacific Railway track from Prince
Rupert; thence north eighty (80
chains; thence west forty (40)
chains; thence south eighty (80
chains; thence east forty (40)
chains to place of commencement,
and containing three hundred and
twenty (320) acres more or less, and
which land was located by me on the
26th day of August A.D. 1911.
JOHN A. KIRKPATRICK.
Philip T. Chesley  Agent.
Dated August 29, 1911. s5
Hazelton   Land  District—District  of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that John Gabriel,
of Aldermere, B. C, Prospector, intends to apply for a licence to prospect for coal and petroleum over the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted three miles
east and three miles north from the
mouth of Kitnayakwa River; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains, to point of
commencement.
JOHN GABRIEL, Locator.
Dated July 9, 1911. sl
Form of Notice (Section 47)
Skeena   Land    District—District   of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that Alexander
Faulds, of the City of Vancouver,
B. C, occupation mining engineer,
intends to apply for permission to
lease the following land, bounded as
lease the following described
land, bounded as follows: —
Commencing at a post planted
on the south bank of the
Shamos River (sometimes called
Shames River) about three-quarters
of a mile west from the Grand Trunk
Pacific Railroad and en the south
bank of said river; thence south
eighty (80) chains; thence west forty
(40) cliains; thence nortlr eighty
(80) chains; tlience east forty (40)
chains to the point of commencement,
and containing tliree hundred and
twenty (320) acres more or less, and
which land was located by me on the
25th day of August, A. D. 1911.
ALEXANDER FAULDS,
Philip T. Chesley, Agent.
Dated August 25, till 1.
Hazelton  Land  District—District of
Coast. Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that John Gabriel,
of Aldermere, B. C, Prospector, intends to apply for a licence to prospect for coal and petroleum over the
following described lauds:—Commencing at a post planted 4 miles
east and 2 miles north from the
mouth of Kitnayakwa River; tbence
south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains, to point of
commencement.
JOHN* GABRIEL, Locator.
Dated  July  9,  1911. sl
Hazelton   Land   District—District  of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that John Gabriel,
of Aldermere, II. C, Prospector, In-
:ends to apply for a licence to prospect for coal and petroleum over the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted 4 miles
east and 2 miles north from the
moutli of Kitnayakwa River, tlience
south 80 chains; theuce east SO
chains; thence nortli 80 chains;
thence west 80 cliains, to point of
commencement.
JOHN GABRIEL, Locator.
Doted  July  9,   1911 sl
Hazelton   Land   District—District  of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that Vivian
O'Brien of Copper City B.C., prospector,
intends to apply for a licence to
prospect for coal and petroleum over
the following described lands:—■
Commencing at a post planted 4
miles east and 2 miles north from
the mouth of Kitnayawka River;
thence nortli 80 chains; thence west
80 chains; tlience soulh 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains, to point of
commencement.
VIVIAN O'BRIEN, Locator.
Dated July  9,  1911. sl
Hazelton   Land   District—District  of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that Vivian
O'Brien of Copper City B.C., prospector,
intends to apply for a licence to
prospect for coal and petroleum over
the following described lands: —
Commencing at a post planted 4
miles east and 2 miles north from
the mouth of Kitnayakwa River;
thence north SO chains; tbence east
80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains, to point of
commencement.
VIVIAN O'BRIEN, Locator.
Dated  July   9,   1911. sl
Hazelton   Land   District—District  of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that John Gabriel,
of Aldermere, B. C, Prospector, intends to apply for a licence to prospect for coal and petroleum oyer the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted 3 miles
east and one mile north from the
mouth of Kitnayakwa River; thence
north SO chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains;
theuce east 80 chains, to point of
commencement.
JOHN GABRIEL, Locator.
Dated  July  9,  1911. sl
Hazelton   Land   District—District  of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that John Gabriel,
of Aldermere, B. C, Prospector, intends to apply for a licence to prospect for coal and petroleum over the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted 4 miles
east and one mile north from the
mouth of Kitnayakwa River, thence
south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; tlience north 80 chains;
tbence east 80 chains, to point of
commencement.
JOHN GABRIEL, Locator.
Dated July  10,  1911. sl
Hazelton Land District—District of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that Vivian
O'Brien of Copper City B.C. .prospector,
intends to apply for a licence to
prospect for coal and petroleum over
the following described lands: —
Commencing at a post planted three
miles east from the mouth of Kitnayakwa River; thence north 80
ehains; thence west 80 chains;
thence soutli 80 chains; thence east
SO chains, to point of commencement.
VIVIAN O'BRIEN, Locator.
Dated July 9, 1911. sl
Hazelton  Land  District—District  of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that John Gabriel,
of Aldermere, 13. C, Prospector, intends to apply for s licence to prospect for coal and petroleum over the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted tliree miles
east from the mouth of Kitnayakwa
River; thence south 80 chains;
tbence west SO chains; thence north
so chains; thence east 80 chains, to
point of commencement.
JOHN GABRIEL, Locator,
Dated .Inly 9.  1911.
Hazelton   Land  District—District  of
CoaBt, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that Vivian
O'Brien of Copper City B.C., prospector,
intends to apply for a licenee to
prospect for coal and petroleum over
the following described lands: —
Commencing at a post planted 4
miles east and one mile north from
the mouth of Kitnayakwa River!
thence south 80 chains; thence east
80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
tbence west SO chains, to point of
commencement.
VIVIAN O'BRIEN, Locator.
Dated  July  10,  1911. sl
Hazelton   Land  District—District  of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that John Gabriel,
of Aldermere, B. C, Prospector, intends to apply for a licence to prospect for coal and petroleum over the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted 4 miles
east from the mouth of Kitnayawka
River; thence south SO chains;
thence east. SO chains; thence north
SO chains; thence west 80 chains, to
the point of commencement.
JOHN GABRIEL, Locator.
Dated  July   10,   1911. sl
Hazelton  Land   District—District  of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE      NOTICE      thai       Vivian
O'Brien of Copper City B.C., prospector,
intends to apply for a licence to
prospect for coal and petroleum over
the following described hinds: —
Commencing at a post planted five
miles east and two miles nortli from
the mouth of Kitnayakwa River;
tlience south 80 chains; thence east
80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains, to point of
commencement.
VIVIAN O'BRIEN, Locator.
Dated July 9, 1911. sl
Hazelton Land District—District of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that John Gabriel,
of Aldermere, B. C, Prospector, intends to apply for a licence to prospect for coal and petroleum over the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted five miles
east and two miles north from the
mouth of Kitnayakwa River; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; tlience south SO chains;
tbence west 80 chains, to point of
commencement.
JOHN GABRIEL, Locator.
Dated July 9, 1911.
Hazelton   Land   District—District  of
Const, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that Vivian
O'Brien of (upper city B.C., prospector,
Intends to apply tor a licence to
prospect for coal and petroleum over
tiro following described lands:-—
Commencing at a posl planted four
miles east and one mile soutli from
the mouth of Kitnayakwa River;
thence south 80 chains; thence west
80 cliains; thence north 80 chains;
tbence east 80 chains, to point of
commencement.
VIVIAN O'BRIEN, Locator.
Dated  July  9,  1911. sl
Hazelton  Land   District—District  of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that Vivian
O'Brien of CopperClty B.C., prospector,
intends to apply for a licence to
prospect for coal and petroleum over
the following described lands: —
Commencing at a post planted four
miles east from the month of Kitnayakwa River; thence south So chains;
tlience west SO chains; thence north
sn chains; thence e'lint mi cliains, to
point of commencement,
VIVIAN O'BRIEN, Locator.
Dated July 10, 1911
Hazelton  Land   Districl    District  of
Coast, Range 5
take     NOTICE     thai     Vivian
| O'Brien of CopperClty B.C., prospector,
intends   to   apply   for   u   licence   to
prospect for coal and petroleum over
the    following    described    lauds: —
I Commencing at a post planted  five
I miles east from the mouth of Kitna-
lyakwa River; tbence east 80 chains;
tbence south  SO chains;  thence west
SO  chains;  thence nortlr  80 chains,
to point of commencement.
VIVIAN O'BRIEN, Locator.
Dated July 10, 1911. sl
Hazelton   Land   District—District  of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that John Gabriel,
of Aldermere,  B.  C,  Prospector, intends to apply for a licence to pros- j
pect for coal and petroleum over the I
following     described     lands:—Com-1
mencing at a post planted four miles i
east   and   one   mile  south   from   the I
mouth of Kitnayakwa River;  thence
east   SO   cliains;    thence   soutli    80
chains;     thence    west    80     chains; [
thence north  80 chains, to point of
commencement.
JOHN* GABRIEL, Locator.
Dated July 9, 1911. sl
Hazelton   Land   District—District  of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that John Gabriel,
of Aldermere, B. C, Prospector, Intends to apply for a licence to pros-
pecl for coal und petroleum over the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted 5 miles
ecst from the mouth of Kitnayakwa
River; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence south
80 chains; tbence west 80 chains, to
point of commencement.
JOHN GABRIEL. Locator
Dated July 10, 1911. al PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Friday, September 22,  1911.
ISLAND RESOURCES
i
Writer From Queen Charlottes Tells of
the Vast Riches That Await
Development.
Oil and Coal Will Soon Be on Commercial   Basis—Other
Products
Writing to the Queen Charlotte
Islander under the nom de plume of
Skookum, a writer points out the
opportunities for investment there in
a very graphic way.    He says:
If the riches, now dormant on land
and in the sea, on and adjacent to
Queen Charlotte Islands, were in
other country the capitalists would
be "tumbling over one another" to
exploit them. Timber, coal, oil,
asphaltum, tar, gold, copper, fish,
and many other natural products,
lie at our very door, and what is
being done?
A few companies advertise "shares
for sale" in Vancouver, and we have
two coal plants and one oil derrick
at work. On some of the islands a
few hardy men are developing cop
per and gold propositions. Otherwise, there is little progress being
made.
We, old pioneers, wonder why men
come to this country and take all of
the "plums." There is reason, and
good reason, for our loss of everything that goes to make men wealthy
We fear to risk a few dollars, and
must be content with paying for
"shares," when we could own some
of these "mines of wealth."
The coal is below the surface—
just staring men in the face—yet
we are not shipping a ton. The oil
drill at work on the west coast, is
down to oil, and those enterprising
men deserve a bonus for their "grit."
■The fisheries are sending out, by
foreign boats, millions of tons of
halibut; yet how many of our fishermen are making money from the
vast beds of fish on the banks of
our islands?
We have gold, copper and silver
mines; but the owners would have
great difficulty in convincing any one
that they are worth anything.
Our timber is the best on the Pacific Coast—where are our mills and
pulp works?
Everyone appears to be waiting for
the railway to link the east and west.
Let me tell you a short story: "Fifty
years ago a young man arrived here
with the Royal Engineers. The government granted him 150 acres of
unsurveyed land anywhere in the
colony. He took it up where Vancouver now stands and sold it for
$50. Today the land is worth millions. The many is old and gray
and is working for wages in Victoria." Is that luck or foresight?
,We are waiting for others to come
in and take everything in sight, and
then we will complain of the "foreigner and capitalist hogging the
whole show."
The Queen Charlotte Islands look
good to me. All I have—and that
is little enough—is invested here.
We require capital, and we need immigrants of the right stamp. The
world is moving and we must move
with it. There is a great future
before the islands and a'l of our
people should be "in at the start."
Things may not look so very "rosey"
now; but the coming army of immigrants must have homes, and where
can they find better than Queen Charlotte Islands? Capital is wary, we
all know; but how many capitalists
have crossed Hecate Straits and looked over the islands? Capitalists can
wait for the poor prospector to show
results; but there appears to be only
a few timber men and a farmer, now
and then, heading this way. "We
have the goods," said the government, and some live representativej
of capitalists should come here and
look over the ground. It appears tc
me that a number of us have sleeping sickness." This island, with Its
potentialities, is unsurpassed in any
other part of the world. Let a fe*«
of the tourists turn toward Graham
Island for fishing, camping, or in
looking over our mountains and
dells. Let. us form "Mooster Clubs,"
no matter how small. Let us write
to the outside press and show what
we have. For goodness sake let the
people pull together for mutual benefit and have these islands advertised
as they should be. The natural
wealth of Queen Charlotte Islands
must be developed. This will, naturally, come with the completion of
the railway; but why wait? Opportunity never reaches out to those
who will sit down and cavil over
petty affairs. We want population;
we want capital; we want advertising. Until the "moss-backs" were
killed off or driven out of Vancouver
Island, did they make any progress?
Not much. Now look at thai island
and   compare   it   with   twenty  years
ago. It is "boom, biff, bing" there
now. Let us be up and doing, likewise.
 o	
NEWS  OF  SKIDEGATE
Changes    in    the    Queen    Charlotte
Island Centre—Houses
Going Up
Mr. Laroux has sold his hotel to
Mr. Depope, and has opened a gro
eery store on the grounds of the
Queen Charlotte Packing Co., generally known as "The oil works."
Mrs. E. C. Stevens, with her family , has gone to Vancouver to spend
a few months. She has the best
wishes of all residents here.
Mr. Melntyre, from Ikeda wireless
station, spent a few days among his
friends last week at Skidegate and
Queen Charlotte City.
James Hunter Is building a nice
little house at the sand spit. It will
be  his  own  home.
THE OIL PROSPECST
C. D. Emmons Tells How Work is Going
Forward on Graham
Island.
He  Has  No  Doubt  Whatever  as  to
the Results in the Petroleum
District
C. D. Emmons, the expert on oil
who has been prominently identified
with the petroleum development on
Graham Island, is in the city after a
visit to the location near Otard Bay
where work is in progress drilling
for oil.
On Wednesday another party of
men arrived here and were met by
Mr. Emmons. These are on their
way to the drilling spot and will
dpulicate the force already there, expediting the work.
Asked as to whether he felt satisfied there was oil In the location referred to, Mr. Emmons says he knows
there is. There are two classes of
petroleum there, one being of an
asphalturm base and the other of the
parafine base.
Just as soon as a plant can be
got on the ground Mr. Emmons will
start work in another basin on Graham Island.
The drill now at work has already
gone down 580 feet. Without proper
trails it is found very difficult whenever anything goes wrong to get the
parts or supplies in and delays often
follows.
Mr. Emmons says the boring is
proceeding satisfactorily, and at
about 800 feet oil should be located.
Already small veins have been passed
through, but these are not of commercial value.
Mr. Emmons was asked concerning the local company's holdings and
expressed the opinion that there
should be good results from them.
Part of the holdings, in fact, he regretted he had not taken up himself.
PROSPECTS EXCELLENT
Oil   Is  Assured  on  the   West  Coust
of Graham
Island
A. A. McPhail of the B. C. Oilfields, Ltd., has just returned from
he west coast and reports that ex-
■ollent rri;.ress is "ling :eade on
the property held by this company al
Blue Creek, where drilling operations have been carried on for some
weeks, says the Queen Charlotte
Islander.
Mr. McPhail said that it was about
three months since they left Queen
Charlotte with the drill and after
more or less trouble, ss was to be
expected on an uncharted coast, the
machinery was landed nnd In four
weeks the drill was In active operation, with a splendid camp outfit for
the comfort of the employees.
"We had the the usual trouble
getting through the surface wash,
but since the shales were reached
the work was routine. The blue
shales were passed and also the block,
containing many marine fossils, nnd
we nre now In limestone. At the
present drilling considerable oil Is
met with, plainly showing the presence of oil with increasing depth, and
In the near future indications plainly show oil sands will be encountered, In what quantities it is Impossible to state."
 o	
Tiger  Shark
Mr. Elliot of the Graham Island
Collieries discovered and killed a ten-
foot tiger shark. The presence of
one of this species of shnks In Mas-
set! Inlet Is entirely unprecedented,
as in tlie case of nil northern waters. The creature wns killed after
a smart tussle, snys the Queen Chnr-
lotts Islander.
CLOSING MEETING
George H.  Cowan of Vancouver Gave
Vigorous Speech on Night
Before Election.
H. S. Clements Praises Work Done
by His Supporters During
the Fight
On Wednesday evening, In Melntyre Hall, the electorate of Prince
Rupert had the opportunity of hearing issues of the day dealt with In
a most able manner by George H.
Cowan, ex-M. P. for Vancouver. Mr.
Cowan spoke at great length, taking
nearly two hours. This left but a
short time for H. S. Clements, the
candidate, to address himself to the
electorate. The latter did not deal
with the questions of t.ie hour, therefore, but contented himself largely
with expressing, his thanks to the
workers throughout the riding and
giving advice as to voting early the
following day. William Manson,
M.P.P., presided, and the audience
was a most enthusiastic one.
Mr. Clements, as he entered the
hall with Mr. Manson and Mr. Cowan, was given a most hearty reception. It was several minutes before
the  cheering subsided.
Mr. Manson took little time In his
introductory remarks and proceeded
to give the meeting over to Mr.
Cowan.
The latter was exceedingly well received. He took an early opportunity
to meet the slanderous allusion to
him in the News, where Duncan Ross,
the Liberal candidadte was reported
as stating that Mr. Cowan generally
rose to speak in a state of inebriety.
Mr. Cowan produced a letter from
Mr. Ross in which the 'atter expressed regret that he had been mis-
reported and that he had not made
this statement. The letter appears
in another column and is self-explanatory.
Mr. Cowan expressed a doubt as
to whether Mr. Ross was the candidate or whether It was the John Gilpin Cowper which they read so much
about in the News. The tactics of
the News as exemplified in such misrepresentations as were made in the
election branded that paper as a disgrace to journalism.
The Oriental question was dealt
with, Mr. Cowan branding the insinuations as to his employing Japanese
as an old political gag and a false
one. It had been used against him
in Vancouver years ago and he had
met it and secured nearly the unanimous vote of the labor men there.
He traced the history of the Laurier
government on this very question of
Oriental labor legislation, showing
that the Ottawa government had refused to take advantage of the clause
In the Anglo-Saxonn treaty whereby
it was specified that the governments
of the different parts of the British
Empire were to be at liberty to legislate as to the immigration. The
Larier government persisted in making a treaty with Japan where the.
Japanese government was to regulate
the immigration with Canada with
the result that over 8,000 passed in
in ten months, whereas not more
more than 240 a year were to be al
allowed to enter. Britishers and
others from the countries of white
population were obliged to have $50
in their pockets before entering, but
the Jap got the advantage of not
requiring the restriction. Surely, he
argued, the white man should be able
to enter as freely as the Jap.
But when they came here the situation was made worse, inasmuch as
wnite men could not obteiiu licences
to fish. These were given out by tie
Dominion government to Bib Kelly,
who dictated the Liberal policy for
out by such bosses as he to the Jap-
British Columbia, and  were farmed
The situation was intolerable and
the white population should be given
at least equal rights with the Japanese.
In the matter of reciprocity, Mr.
Cowan dealt with It from the broad
standpoint of the country at large
and also from the standpoint of
Prince Rupert Itself. He did not believe a single argument could be
put up In favor of Prince Rupert
voting for reciprocity. This move
meant injury to the seaports and in
all these ports they found the electorate lined up against the pact. It
would mean that the carrying trade
would be diverted In the direction of
United States ports instead of towards Canadian shipping points.
Prince Rupert's future was indeed
a bright one ns the terminus of the
G. T. P. The trade of the Canadian
prairies should go through Prince
Rupert and Vancouver rather than
through the United Stntes ports.
In concluding, Mr. Cowan made
reference to the advantages of British
preference ns compared with reciprocity with the United Stntes.    He
alluded to the objections raised by
the Liberals to what they designated
as playing to the British ilag. He
said he hoped the time would never
come when it would be regarded as
any disgrace to wa\e the British flag.
Mr. Cowan 6nt down amdist thunderous applause.
Mr. Clements was given a hearty
reception upon rising to speak. He
expressed his satisfaction with the
loyal support that had been given
him during the campaign, and wanted the electorate to regard him as a
friend, always ready to do whatever
he could to help them. As in the
past, he would stand for the masses
against corporations getting what
they  were  not  entitled   to.
The meeting closed with cheers for
Clements and the singing of "God
Save the King."
CONSERVATIVES CELEBRATE
(Continued From Page One)
a political gain. It was a gain to
the men who believed in the sanctity
of the home and of allegiance to
Britisii connection.
He referred to the fact that they
had fought a policy originating in a
foreign country—a policy intended to
to benefit a foreign country and to
snap the ties between Canada and
the Mother Country. When the public men of the United States declared that this was what was intended
he felt the people of Canada would
be true to the tradition of the race
that gave them the liberty they had
today.
In Prince Rupert, he had observed
that the agent of a great corporation
had tried to get the electorate. While
a majority had been got against the
party in this city, he could not be
Iieve this vote represented the right
sentiment of the people. The vote,
he believd, in larg part, was got by
indirection. He did not believe that
the men who had come here and
hewn out a city from the solid rock
and made improvements greater than
any other city had ever made in the
same time were in accord with the
policy that it had been sought to
put upon the people of Canada.' The
man who had laid so truly, and so
well, the foundation of this city, if
they had expressed their true sentiments, it would be in accord with the
whole of Canada today. This had
been a crucial time in Canada. The
country was at the parting of the
ways, as President Taft said. Canada had chosen the course which
meant to keep the gates open with
the Motherland. Canada, he felt
sure, would march down the ages as
the very foremost of the family of
nations recognizing the great mother
of those nations.
W. Manson
Amidst thunderous applause Mr.
Cowan concluded and the audience
demanded that W. Manson speak.
Amidst prolonged cheers, he expressed his satisfaction at the turn
affairs had taken. He had been
pleased to assist Mr. Clements in the
fight, and in that campaign, he was
delighted with the way Mr. Clements
had acquitted himself. He had
proved himself s good fighter.
Dr. Clayton
Dr. Clayton felt proud that he was
one who enlisted under the Union
Jack. He never felt as proud as
he did at that time.
M. M. Stephens
M. M. Stephens was forced to
speak, although he said he was too
hoarse to speak. It was the proudest
hour of his life, he said. He thanked
those who assisted in the work of
winning the victory. He was sorry
he could not give a majority In this
city, but when It was considered what
corporations were against them It
was not to be wondered at.
Procession Formed
The crowd became Impatient to be
on the move and a procession was
quickly formed, while several of the
homes of the leading Liberals were
visited and serenaded, the procession
being headed by the Union Jack. At
different points "God Save the King"
was sung with a vim.
Later during the night George H.
Cowan was escorted to the dock and
given a royal send-off as he went on
board the Prince Rupert. He was
forced to speak again from the gangplank of the steamer, when he expressed his satisfaction at the results
and his good will towards the Conservatives of Prince Rupert.
Peter Black of the Central Hotel
and Corley & Burgess of the Royal,
good workers In the Conservative
cause, were visited and serenaded by
the crowd, after which the procession
broke up with the singing of "God
Save the King."
 o	
Vigorous Old Englishmen
The cable from London has briefly
announced what to Americans will
seem a remarkable fart, the celebration of the ninety-second birthday of
Dr. Atkinson, who for fifty-five years
has   been   master of Clare  College,
Cambridge. This master of one of
the famous colleges of Cambridge
University is still hale and vigorous
and doing good service in his position, where he 'has superintended/
the education of the sons, grandsons and possibly the great-grandsons of his own students. This record surpasses that of Dr. Busby, who
died in his ninetieth year in 1695,
after having been head master In
Westminster School for fifty-five
years.
These instances of long-extended
usefulness in high scholastic stations
are readily equalled in other walks
of life in England. Lord Halsbury,
for instance, the leader of the Insurgent faction of the House of Lords
in its present contest with the Commons is eighty-six. Gladstone at 83
became for the fourth time prime
minister. Lord Lyndhurst in 1856
made a speech against the proposal
to create new peers, of which Lord
Campbell, who did not live him, said
it was "the most wonderful ever
heard." It would have been admired
for a man of thirty-five, and from a
man of eighty-four it was miraculous.
He made his last speech In parliament at ninety-one. Lord Brougham
continued his manifold activities to
within a short time of his death at
ninety.
 o	
WATER  NOTICE
This is Julius F. Rochau, who left
Kansas City, Mo., July, 1910, and
whose relatives desire to get in touch
with him. For any information concerning his whereabouts and leading
to his location, Charles H. Frye,
Ninth Avenue and Columbia Street,
Seattle, Wash., U. S. A., will pay a
reward of $200.
If Mr. Rochau sees this, it will be
to his advantage to communicate
with Mr. Frye at once, as everything
is all right and there is no reason
why he should not return to his
family immediately.
 o	
"I punished you merely to show
my love  for you,"  said  the father.
"T-that5s all right," sobbed the
little fellow. "It's a good thing I
ain't b-big enough to return your
love."
Wiggings—Do you know that your
chickens come over into my yard?
Jiggings—I supposed they did, for
they never come back again.
I, Andrew Christian Skjelbred, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, occupation
farmer, give notice that on the 24th
day of September, I intend to apply
to the Water Commissioner at his
office in Prince Rupert, for a licence
to take and use 3 cubic feet of water
per second from hot springs on the
border of Lake Lakelse in the Skeena
Land Division of Coast District. The
water is to be taken directly from
the springs and is to be used on Lot
8279, for sanitarium purposes.
Dated August 24, 1911
AND.   CHRISTIAN SKJELBRED.
9-5 Prince Rupert, B. C.
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar
TAKE NOTICE that Marion Mc-
Diarmid, of London, Ontario, occupation nurse, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described land:—Situated on the
Kitwancool River; commencing at a
post planted at the northwest corner and about 5 1-4 miles distant in
a northwesterly direction from the
north end of Kitwancool Lake;
thence south 80 chains; thence east
80 chains; thence north 80 chains;'
thence west 80 chains to point of.;
commencement, and adjoining Lot
1878 to the north; and containing
640 acres, more or less.
MARION McDIARMID.
Daniel McDonald, Agent.
Dated July 24   1911. A-15
Form of Notice (Section 47)
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Const, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that Philip T.
Chesley of the City of Prince Rupert,
occupation prospector. Intends to apply for permission to lease the following described land, bounded as
follows:—Commencing at a post
planted on the south bank of the
Shamos River (sometimes called the
Shames River) about three-quarters
of s mi'e west from the Grand Trunk
Pacific Railway and on the south
bank of the said river; thence north
eighty (80) chains; thence west
forty (40) chains; thence south
eighiy (80) chains; thence eart forty
(40) chains to point of commencement, and containing three hundred
and twenty (320) acres more or less,
and which land was located by me
on the 25th August, A. D. 1911.
PHILIP T.  CHESLEY.
Dated August 28, 1911.
***********+********♦*****
FOR RENT
Store    building    on     Second
Avenue    at    Seventh    Street.
Low   Rent.
JEREMIAH H. KUGLER, LTD.
**************************
**************************
I 75 x 100 Feet I
* ASK    For Lease on Third *
I UNCLE     Avenue at Ninth     |
* JERRY Street J
| JEREMIAH H. KUGLER, LTD. |
GRAND HOTEL
WORKWOMAN'S HOME
25c
Rooms 50 Cents
Spring Beds, Clean
White Sheets
Best in Town for the Money
FIRST AVE. AND SEVENTH ST.
J. Goodman, Proprietor
Corner Eighth and Fraser Street!
Clinton Rooms
Newly remodelled and furnished.
Board and lodging. Home cooking
a specialty. Mrs. Anderson, Prop.
Rooms, $8 Per Week
NOTICE.
A book Is kept in the Olty Clerk's
Office in which to enter the names
and addresses, etc. of citizens of
Prince Rupert desiring employment
on City work. All desiring employment should register at once.
ERNEST A. WOODS,
City Clerk.
Form of Notice  (Section  34)
Skeena   Land    District—District   of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that Philip T.
Chesley, of the City of Prince Rupert, B. C, occupation prospector,
intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described
land:—Commencing at a post planted
about half-way between Mile Post
77 and Mile Post 7S on the main line
of the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway
from Prince Rupert, and about fifty
(50) feet west off the said right-of-
way of the said railway; thence
south eighty (80) chains; thence
west forty (40) chains; thence north
eighty (80) chains; thence east forty
(40) chains to point of commencement, and containing thee hundred
and twenty (320) acres more or less
and which land was located by me on
the 26th day of August, A. D. 1911.
PHILIP  T.   CHESLEY.
Dated  August  28,  1911.
TO WATER TAKERS
On account of scarcity of water
the supply will be cut off between
the hours of 9 p. m. and 5 a. m.
during the dry weather.
WM.   MAHLON   DAVIS,
tf Supt. of Water Works.
NOTICE is hereby given that on
the eleventh (11th) day of October
next application will be made to the
Superintendent of Provincial Police
for the grant of a licence for the sale
of liquor by retail in and upon the
premises known as The Copper City
Hotel, situated at Copper River,
Skeena District, upon the land described as Lot A, Block 312, Copper
City, Skeena District, B. C.
Dated September 11, 1911,        s-5
HARVEY CREECH,
Applicant.
LAND  FOR  SALE
TAKE NOTICE that I will receive
tenders for the parcel of land known'
as Lot 1105, Range 5, Coast District,
Province of British Columbia. This
is one of the choicest pieces of land
lying along the Skeena River and
contains about 155 acres. The land
is Crown granted. Terms cash. Tenders must be In before the 5th day
of October, 1911. The highest or
any tender not necessarily accepted.
For further particulars apply to the
undersigned.
D.   G.   STEWART,
Assignee of H. C. Breckenridge.
Box 225,  Prince Rupert,        s-15
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that T. M. Turner,
of Lakelse Valley, occupation farmer, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands: — Commencing at a post
planted oh the Omineca & Hazelton
right of way and adjoining the N. B.
corner of Lot 518; thence west 17
chains to corner of Lot 3996; thence
north 20 chains; thence following
right of way to point of commencement.
T. M. TURNER,
John Kirkaldy, Agent.
Dated 14th June, 1911. 7-4

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.prj.1-0311921/manifest

Comment

Related Items