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Prince Rupert Journal Sep 27, 1910

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Array New Wellington
Coal
is the hest
ROGERS & BUCK
Sole Agents
ftitprt Btmtnal
High-Class
Job Printing
In all Lines
t:
VOLUME  1
Published Twice a AVeek
PRINCE  RUPERT, B.  C, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 1910.
Price, Five Cents
NO. 30.
THE GREAT TOURIST
CENTRE OF NORTH
G.T.P. is Devoting Attention to Making This a Spot Where
Travellers Will Make Their Headquarters
While Covering the Northern
Part of the Province.
There is abundance of evidence
that the G. T. P. has In view a decided policy with respect to the development of this as a great tourist
centre. Next year will see this policy
being well advanced according to the
latest indications and travel should
be diverted this way to a considerable
extent.
The opportunities for building up
a great tourist centre here are unexcelled. The city Itself, exemplifying
as it does the creation of a modern
City springing from a wilderness into
a populous centre in tbe course of a
few years, has an interest all its own
Tourists from all parts of the world
will he anxious to avail themselves of
the opportunity which is thus to be
presented to them. But the city Itself
Is not all there is to offer. In an age
like this when there is an increasing
demand for a retreat from the ordinary routine of business the trip along
the coast from Seattle, Victoria and
Vancouver to Prince Rupert offers an
ideal opportunity for the man of business to get away for a few weeks
from the ordinary vocations and enjoy a sea voyage with all the terrors
eliminated which an ocean trip has
for those accustomed to living inland.
With headquarters at Prince Rupert, there are excellent opportunities to be afforded for enjoyable outings, and it is quite evident that the
G. T. P. Is now preparing to thoroughly advertise the scenic beauties
of the north.
J. C. Swan, the official photographer of the Grand Trunk company, nnd
one of the world's greatest photographers, has made a very valuable
collection of photos for the company.
After his trip across the province
with the party of artists a stop-over
was made here during which time Mr.
Swan  made a valuable collection  of
views of the city and the harbor. Mr.
Lett, the colonization agent of the
company, also made a tour up the
Skeena and took a number of additional views of the scenery along that
route to supplement the collection
made by Mr. Swan.
Of the scenery aloijg the Skeena
the party were enraptured. Mr.
Swan expects to return again next
year and take adidtional views. He
will try to make the trip in May
when the best results from photography will be available. All of the
party are agreed that the Skeena
river section of the route, with its
never ending variety in the way of
mountain and river Is unexcelled anywhere. This section of the route will
soon he open to the world by way .of
the first section of the railway. It
will be open to travellers next summer and from the opening of the
passenger trade there should be a
heavy traffic drawn from the vast
army of tourists who are always
waiting to invade a new territory.
Mr. Swan will, when be goes south,
spend a few days in Vancouver, in
Victoria, and in Seattle, taking views
to be used in the publicity work of
the company.
Some idea of the immense number
of views taken by Mr. Swan can be
realized when the information is
given that be is sending two trunks
of negatives forward to Montreal to
be developed. Mr. Swan holds medals
from all the great explsitions for his
finished work. He makes enlargements measuring eight feet in length
and claims to lead in this line of
work.
Mr. Russell, the painter in oils, who
was a member of the party, says that
it can only be a short time before the
needs of the trade will require one
i Continued on  Page  Four)
PRESS   DESPATCHES
Judge Mabee Will Hear Complaints on
Behalf of Western
Canada.
It Is Alleged That Discrimination is
Made lo Offset Small Profits
in   East
(Special to The Journal)
Winnipeg, Sept. 27.—Enquiry into
the methods of the telegraph corporations In the matter of carrying press
despatches In Canada will doubtless
be the subject of a ruling from Judge
Mabee, chairman of the railway commission. The commission has been
hearing complaints' from the Winnipeg Board of Trade and the Grain
Exchange, In which it Is alleged that
the companies are discriminating
against the West to make up for
small profits earned in the East.
Judge Mabee postponed the case,
Intimating that he would petition the
Minister of Justice to appoint counsel
to represent the people In the inquiry.
 o	
IS WBL)
PLEASED
Henry McOondless  is  Satisfied  With
His Investments Here
Henry McCandless, of McCandless
Bros., clothiers of Victoria, is spending a few days in the city. He will
visit Stewart before going south. Mr.
McCandless belongs to the vast army
of Investors that realize that their
money Is perfectly safe ln Prince Rupert. He owns property here and
Is perfectly satisfied to hold on to It.
His visit here has more firmly established him ln his conviction that the
Investment ln an absolutely safe one.
To see the substantial work that Is
being done here and to see wharves
like the government and other companies are putting In Is, he says, sufficient to warrant the conclusion that
there Is an Immense future promised.
PHOTOS  OF CHINESE
Those Leaving for China Must Go Before
the Wonderful
Camera.
Check   is   to   be  Kept   on   Orientals
Who   Return   Free  of
Head  Tax
(Special to The Journal)
Vancouver, Sept. 27.—Hereafter
Chinese leaving on a visit to their
homeland and exempt from the head
tax if they return within a year must
go before the camera for the purpose of identilication. The new. regulation is authorized by the Ottawa
authorities.
 o	
ENTERS UPON MINISTRY
MUST PAY IN CASH
Property Owners Using the Street For
Excavations Will Be
Charged.
Council   Endorses   Majority   Itecom-
nieiidation of the Committee
The city council has endorsed the
report of the streets committee relative to dumping excavation material
on the streets, and fixed a rate of
2 5 cents a yard as the sum to be collected. This will be required in cash
and is made in two specific cases. One
is the application of Mr. Barker, and
the other of Mr. Potter. The report
stated that Aldermen Lynch and
Barrow of the committee favored
making the payment in cash, while
Aid. Hilditch, another member of the
committee, was in favor of a bond
being given.
Aid. Hilditch presented a minority
report on the subject setting forth
that he favored a bond being issued
payable   upon   demand   by   the   city,
Aid. Barrow said that Aid. Lynch
and himself had come to the conclusion that a cash bond was the better method in view of the fact that
the city solicitor pointed out difficulties to be encountered in giving a
bond. The charge of 25 cents a yard
would not be much.
Aid. Hilditch thought that a bond
endorsed by a second party would
be a perfectly safe measure.
Aid.  Mobley said  he  had  changed
*****   *   *
VERDICT AGAINST CRIPPEN   *
(Special to The Journal)
London, Sept. 27.—The coroner's jury has returned a
verdict declaring that Belle
Elmore Crippen was murdered
by her husband, Dr. Crippen.
The evidence presented convinced the jury as to the identity of the murdered woman.
Rev. Mr. McLeod Gives Fullest Satisfaction to Haptist Congregation
Rev. W. H. Mcl.eod, the new pos-
tor for the First Baptist church here,
preached morning and evening to
very pleased audiences. Mr. McLeod
is a young man and possesses in large
measure the vigor of youth which is
so essential in the building up of a
church In a new city like this. The
Baptist congregation Is very well
pleased with their new pastor and
entertain all hopes that he will do a
great work here in the Christian Held.
Mr. McLeod is a very forcible
speaker, and has great powers of Illustration. He has quite elaborate
plans on foot, aiming at the Increasing of interest ln the work of the
church. Among these Is the starting
of a young men's union which will
take the form of a Baracca class on
Sunday afternoons, along with the
regular Sunday school classes, and
will be a means of social gatherings
during the week. Being deeply Interested in young men, Mr, McLeod intends to make all young men feel at
home In the church.
his mind somewhat in this matter.
He had done this because he had
heard remarks from properly owners
that they would dump Ihe excavations on the street now so as to get
rid of it cheaply as it was felt that
later on it would be stopped. He
thought property owners should
therefore be charged.
Aid. Pattullo, in moving the adoption of the report, stated that the
position he took was that no permit
should be granted to dump on the
street unless building was to follow
imemdiately.
Aid. Barrow said all the members
of the committee were agreed that
permits should be granted only to
those who were to build and not to
allow promiscuous clearing.
Tha report was adopted.
FOR NAVAL COLLEGE
Competitive   Examination  For
Entering Halifax Institution
Cadets
Tests   Will   lie   Held   at   the   Pacific
Coast As  Well As in
the  East
I Special to The Journal)
Ottawa, Sept. 27.—The first general competitive examination for
cadets entering the naval college at
Halifax will be held under the civil
service commission November 9 at
Victoria, Vancouver, Nelson, anil also
at eastern centres.
 o	
QUESTION OF HOURS
Dispute
Arises  With  Respect to the
Labor on   the
Streets.
Contractor is Anxious to Expediate
Work and Insists Upon Prolonging the Time of Men
The Fraser house on Eighth street
and Fraser street, has been closed
down for repairs and a general overhauling. The rooms will be opened
in a week or so under a new name
and under the new management of
Mrs. Anderson. She expects to make
it one of the highest classed rooming houses in the city.
STARTING   SERVICE
(Special to The Journal) »
" Victoria, Sept. 27.—The train *
* service on the Alberni branch *
* of the E. & N, Is ready now *
* as far as Cameron Lake.    It *
* will be inaugurated next week. *
* The service will be Tuesdays, *
* Thursdays  and   Saturdays  at *
* the start. *
A difficulty has arisen in connection with a contract on the streets.
S, P. McMordie, who is anxious to
push work while the good weather
prevails, has insisted that the work
be prosecuted at the rate of ten hours
a day. With the contract calling for
an eight hour day as a minimum
Mr. McMordie was agreeable to pay
for the extra two hours put In, but
not agreeable to work stopping at
the conclusion of the eight hours.
The matter came up at the council
last evening and His Worship volunteered to use his good offices with
the contractor to try to effect a settlement of the difficulty, although it
was contended that Mr. McMordle's
contract did not preclude his doing
as he was doing.
His Worship was unable to find
the contractor today so nothing has
been done.
At the council meeting.last night
the subject was introduced by Aid.
Hilditch.
Aid. Hilditch wanted to know If
the mayor or city solicitor had done
anything to adjust the difficulty between Mr. McMordie and the men employed by him. He would like to
know if the contract was drawn up
in such a way that Mr. McMordie
could discharge men who did not
work overtime. If this was so, the
contract had not been drawn as It
was the intention to do by the council.
His Worship said his understanding was that the contract was intended to provide for an eight hour day
at $3 a day as the minimum wage.
That was tbe spirit of the contract.
He was going to take the matter up
(Continued on  Page Four)
TENDERS FOR POLES
Council   is   Making   Progress  Towards
Electric Lighting of
Slreets.
Seal   Cove   site   Will   be   Available
For City Only on Short
Terms
The subject of the temporary electric lighting system is still occupying
the attention of the mayor and council. Mr. Durant has returned from
Vancouver with the announcement
that a part of the plant is already in
Vancouver ready for shipment.
Announcement was made at last
night's meeting of the city council
by AJd. Mobley that there was little
prospect of the city being able to obtain the Seal Cove site for electric
plant purposes for longer than a
month at a time and on condition
that they would vacate on short notice as the company had other uses
to which it was to be put.
Aid. Pattullo also asked that the
committee looking for a site should
he granted power to deposit a small
sum as an option to hold any property that was thought suitable.
This permission was granted.
Aid. Mobley further explained that
he did not think there would be much
risk In placing a temporary plant at
the cove as it could be done very
cheaply and the cost of moving would
be little more later on than at present. A small plant for temporary
purposes could be put In there and
after It was started an additional
plant could be installed on another
site to be selected. This would ensure an earlier start In lighting.
After the second plant was started
the other could be removed.
There is thus every prospect for
a temporary plant being in running
shape in & very short time.
Tenders were opened last night for
supplying electric light poles. Three
tenders were received  as  follows:-—
McLean & Mclnnes, who offer poles
at  7  cents  per lineal  foot.
F. England, whose offer was 7'i
cents a foot for 30 foot poles; 8%
cents for 35 foot poles; 9'«. cents for
40 foot poles, and 10% cents for 45
foot poles.
J. Y. Rochester was prepared to
simply poles not less than 8 inches
in diameter at the top at 9 y.. cents
for 35 foot poles, and 11% cents for
45 foot ones.
The tenders were referred to the
light i.nd telephone committee.
 o	
Manager Sweet, of the G. T. p,
Inn, has returned from a trip south
In connection with the opening of the
bar in the Inn.
UNIVERSITY  SifE
Vancouver Has  Been Selected  as   the
Best Place for
It.
Report of Commissioners is in Favor
of the Mainland, Point Grey
lie-in;; Named
(Special to The Journal)
Victoria, Sept. 27.—The report of
the University Commission appoinied
by the provincial government, has
decided upon Vancouver as the best
site for the institution. The report
of the commissioners is dated June 28
It was, however, nol received until
a week ago .Monday, and taken up at
the Wednesday sitting of the executive council. The report is us follows:—
"Victoria, June 28, 1910.—To His
Honor, the Lleutenant-Governor-in-
Council.
"Sir:—The University Site Commission begs to submit the following
report: In accordance with the provisions of the University Site Commission Act, 1910, your commissioners
have visited and made a careful examination of several cities and rural
districts suggested as suitable university sites and have selected as the
location for the university the vicinity of the city of Vancouver.
"We have the Honor to be, Sir,
your obedient servants, tsigned) —
R. C. Weldon, chairman; G. Dauth,
C. C. Jones, O. D. Skelton; Walter C.
Murray, secretary.
The report Is accompanied by a
further report in which Point Grey
is recommended as probably the best
point. It is recommended that 250
acres he used as a campass and 700
acres as an experimental area for agriculture and forestry. Other sites
are suggested should this not. be
available.
The report of the commissioners
was to be final.
MURDERER IN WINOTPEG
Man Shoots His Wife and Then Coin-
mils Suicide
(Special to The Journal)
Winnipeg, Sept. 27.—Samuel Trite
shot his wife fatally and then turned
the revolver on himself, dying instantly from the wound. The tragedy
was the result of a quarrel.
to. H. Hargraves, of the Eastern
Townships Bank, relumed last evening to Vancouver, after spending a
few days in the northern part of the
province. Mr. Hargraves says his
trip was one of pleasure purely.
RESERVED CREW
Ship Wrecked Party on Island Picked
Vp by Passing Steamer
(Special to The Journal)
Melbourne, Australia, Sept. 2 7.—
The mates boat containing thirteen
of the crew of the ship Carnarvon
Bay, wrecked a week ago on King
island, landed on the island. Later
they were rescued by a passing
steamer and taken to Tasmania.
THE EXVV OF THE COAST *
Mayor Stork, after a visit to *
Woodworth   Lake   last week *
where the work in connection *
with the future water supply *
for the city is In progress, has *
returned  delighted    with    the *
prospects.   He Is satisfied that *
when the city has put In Its *
necessary  pipe    line   and    Is *
drawing water from that place *
it will have a supply that will *
make It the envy of the other *
cities of the coast. *
Very   satisfactory  progress *
Is being  made   by the engln- *
eer's   department    there    and *
His Worship   says   It   Is   an- *
nounced   by   those In  charge *
that In about a year's time af- *
ter work starts the water will *
be delivered hero. A dam will *
be    necessary    to    raise    the *
water so as to carry it along *
the route intended.    Th is dam
will approximate 20   feet    In *
height. *
The lake, says Mayor Stork, *
Is an Intensely deep one.    Its *
source of supply is the moun- *
tain    sides   surrounding   the *
place so that the quality Is of *
the best.    There Is abundance *
of water and the city will be *
a favored  place  Indeed  when *
this Is put In. •
SECTION ONE READY
FOR CONTRACTORS
Tenders Will Be Called Within a Few Days for the Different Parts of the Work Yet Remaining to
be Started in Business Portion
of the City.
The city engineer has reported to
the city council that he has the plans
ready for the completion of work in
Section one. He forwarded plans to
the council last evening. Te report
:overs all that remains of sect inn one
not now under contract, and in a
plan prepared by Col. Davis the dlf-
ferent sections arc set forth according to the contracts to be let.
The matter wns rferred to the
treets comimttee who will take up
ihe subject of the specifications and
the contracts and will report all as
curly a date as possible. There was
a disposition last night on the part
of the council to rush the work along
but owing to trouble having arisen
over the question of contracts and
the hours of labor, it was deemed
best to have the forms gone Into by
the committee In an effort to overcome any such difficulty In future.
The engineer's report stated thai
there will be about 50,000 cubic
yards more filling than there would
be space for in the section. He recommended that the levels about the corner  of  Eighth   street  and  Third  av
enue ami between McBride and First
Btreeta on First, Second and Third
avenues be raised considerably so as
in provide for additional filling, if
this were done and retaining walls
pul up the lilllng could be considerably Increased. Tha alteration of
the grades could l> • made anytime
within the next month or six weeks
without any disadvantage in connection willi the work as the contracts
were let with provision for altering
the grade from time to time.
Aid. Hildltch said he had found
out how the engineer had arrived at
his estimate of the surplus rock. He
estimated that the rock would expand at the rate of fifty per cent in
removing, while muskeg was given
Its full contents. Aid. Hilditch
thought these conditions would not
carry out. The muskeg would be
lost In the rock and there would be
a large shrinkage. He was not opposed to the altering of the grades,
but If It were simply to get additional
dumping ground he did not think
that was necessary.
The report was referred to the
streets committee. THE   PRINCE   RUPERT  JOURNA^.
ThesifeF,. SeptemBjer 27", I»19
JOHN HENDRY ON
TARIFF QUESTION
Retiring President of the Canadian Manufacturers Association Deals With Subject and With
Transportation Matters
in Speech.
At the gathering of the Canadian
Manufacturers' Association held in
Vancouver last week, John Hendry,
of Vancouver, the retiring president
delivered a speech that contained
food for considerable thought. Mr.
Hendry is one of the best known men
in British Columbia. His long connection with the lumber interests,
followed by a meteoric advent into
tbe transportation business and the
field of electric power and various
other commercial propositions, has
made his name familiar not only in
British Columbia but all over the
continent. Entering the railway
business as the controller of the V.
W. & Y. charter, he came into a
batt'e with some of the leading officials of American lines in touch
with J. J. Hill. Although he had
had no previous experience in this
line of enterprise, he showed his
ability by winning out. The Stave
Lake power proposition at Vancouver owes its initiation to the business
ability of Mr. Hendry who found the
money for it. Success has crowned
the efforts of Mr. Hendry, who is
now ranked as a multi-millionaire.
Success has in no wise spoiled him
for he takes the same interest in
affairs as ever and is respected
wherever he is known.
In his speech before the Canadian •'
Manufacturers, Mr. Hendry, among i ■:-
other things, dealt with the subject
of reciprocity with the United States
and protection, and also with the subject of transportation facilities. His
remarks on these points were as follows:
"In this expression of my views I
do not wish it to be assumed that 1
am cf the opinion any serious harm
has alieady beci. dojie; my object has
rath'- been to call atteminu to a tendency which seems to be leading us
Into dangerous paths, more especially
since it has now brought us face to
face w'th what is after all thj most
impoitant i."=sue confnnting is as
businecg men today. I refer to the
desu'e of the United States fir a
treaty of reciprocity with us.
Tables Arc Turned
"The history ot our trade relations with the United States has of
late been so frequently and thoroughly reviewed by the press from one
end of Canada to the other that there
is no need for me to make anything
more than a passing reference to It
on this occasion. I desire, however,
to emphasize the contrast between
the reciprocity situation as it pre-
sents itself today, and as it presented itself forty years ago. At that
time it was Canada who came forward as the suppliant, anxious to secure a market in the United States
for her natural products. Today it
is tbe United States that comes forward as the suppliant, anxious to
secure a market in Canada for her
manufactured products. When we
were the suitors to such  extremities
000,000; so that notwithstanding her
less favorable geographical situation
and her smaller consuming power,
the .Mother Country has taken 40 per
cent more of our products than the
United States. Are we now to turn
our backs upon those who have befriended us and with whom, God willing, it is In our power to build up
the greatest and grandest empire
the world has ever known? I for
one sincerely hope not.
Protect ion Necessary
"Next, I maintain that Canada today cannot afford reciprocity with
the United States unless it be confined to a limited number of natural
products. Splendid as has been the
progress of our manufacturing industries under the policy of protection,
they are still dwarfed in comparison
with the gigantic establishments
operating  on   the  other  side  of  the
John   Hendry   of   Vancouver,
retiring   President   of   the
(.'.'iiiiiiliuii Manufacturers'
,* V V V V V *»
Association ^^^^^^^
!«.j. .j. .j.»;. ►;« .j* .j, .j* <i».;. £. <j« »j« »•« »j. »j. .**
4the   prosperity   we    now    erfJTTy    by
Snatching at something that Is void
border. By the consolidation of capital and by the specialiation of output the United States industries have
grown tremendously powerful, so
powerful, indeed, that in time of depression, despite our tariff wall, they
can sweep this country from end to
end, leaving idle machinery, unemployment and poverty in their trail.
To reduce our tariff at their bidding
for the purpose of accepting some
doubtful advantage made attractive
under the guise of reciprocity would
be nothing more or less than acquiescing in our own Improvishment.
"Not that I believe the trade situation between Canada and the United
States is incapable of improvement.
I regard it as quite conceivable that
some few changes might be effected
that would be beneficial to all and
injurious to none. But so long as
Canada is as prosperous and as independent as she is, why emulate
the dog In the fable and jeopardize
ourselves threatened with national
bankruptcy if our petition was refused. Today it is the boast of those
who seek our favor that they are the
most prosperous nation in the world,
and yet they openly proclaim their
desire still further to enrich themselves by exploiting the markets
which it has cost us forty years of
toil, of perseverance and of self-
denial to build up. When we made
the overtures they did not need our
trade and they unceremoniously rejected ocr offer. Today when the
overtures are all on their side, we
find ourselves sufficiently independent to do without their trade, and
while I would not for one moment ad-
vocate that we should return evil for
evil, there are reasons which compel
me to express the hope that their
present offer will be politely considered, but firmly declined.
"Canada today stands in no need
of reciprocity with the United States.
Forced by their policy of rigid isola-
tion lo look elsewhere for markets,
we have cast about us and have found
those markets. Some of them wo
have built for ourselves with a protective tariff, by means of which we
and without substance, a mere reflection held up to our gaze in the mirror of reciprocity.
Past Dealings
"Our past dealings with the United
Slates do not encourage the hope that
we would have anything to gain by
entering into negotiations with them.
Many years have passed since the
Behring Sea award was made, but I
am credibly informed that the United
States has not yet made to Canada
the payment called for by the terms
of that award. Their claim a.id
arguments in the fisheries disputa
recently arbitrated at The Hague give
little evidence of a spirit of friendliness toward us; on the contrary
(hey show us very clearly that Ihe
United States would gladly have
availed themselves of any technicality however trivial In order to deprive us of our most cherished rights
and possessions. Our tariff encounter with them in March last was another illustration of fair dealings as
viewed from their standpoint; after
first providing themselves with a
club In the shape of a maximum tariff, they Invited us to a so-called
friendly negotiation,  from which, in
have provided ourselves with a popu- jduec ourse, they emerged the richer
lation of consumers within our own jbya number of valuable trade conces-
borders. Others we have found byislons, while we were told to content
joining hands witli Mother England, | ourselves with the reflection that we
who,  unlike  the  United   States,  was j might have fared worse
glad to come to our assistance in our
time of trouble. Last year our exports of merchandise to the United
States were $110,000,000; lo the
United   Kingdom   they   were   $149,-
"It Is with a people actuated by
such motives, a people who In the
least have shown no disposition to
granl us favors or even to deal with
us, that we are now asked to nego
tiate, and when I express my belief
that the United States will approach
the negotiation with a determination
to secure for themselves as much as
possible without giving us anything
substantial in return, I feel sure that
I am only giving utterance to a suspicion, unfortunate, but deep rooted,
that prevails among all classes and
in nearly all parts of the Dominion.
Grain Growers' Case
"I am aware, of course, that in
some quarters there is a desire for
reciprocity with the United States.
The grain growers of the middle west
are both loud and insistent in tTfeir
demands not only for reciprocity, but
for a general lowering of the tariff,
if not for free trade. Supporting this
agitation are a large number of newspapers that seem to be fond of
dilating upon the hardships of pioneer life in the west, the consequent
necessity for making the burden ot
taxation for the western settler as
light as possible, and the desirability
of placing an immediate and effective
check upon the advance in the cost
of living by throwing down our tariff
walls and giving free access to the
cheap goods of foreign countries.
"As regards the advance in the
cost of living, a splendid answer to
those who hjy all responsibility for
that advance upon the tariff is afforded by a report recently prepared under the direction of the minister of
labor. Even the most cursory examination of the charts with which
this report is illustrated will make it
quite evident that the advance In the
wholesale price of agricultural products since 1890 has on the average
been three times as great as the advance in the wholesale price of manufactured goods. Whatever increase
there has been in the selling price
of manufactured goods is probably
more than accounted for by an increased cost of the raw material entering into those products, combined
with an improvement in the quality
of the goods themselves. From the
figures of. the report the assumption
may reasonably be drawn that the
manufacturer has demonstrated his
ability under a protective tariff to
offer the public a better article for
less money The reason for this is
that the tariff, by giving him a market, has enabled him to specialize his
product, to increase his output, to dis
product, to increase his output, to
distribute his fixed charges over a
larger volume of business, and so to
reduce his unit of cost of production.
Transportation Charges ■ i
"But that is not all. For the productive processes he carries on he
has to surround himself with armies
of workmen who, with their families,
supply the farmer with a market al
his very door for practically everything he produces In the absence of
this great consuming population at
home it would be necesary for the
farmer to market his wares abroad,
in wlreh case the fruit of his labors
would be largely swallowed up ii)
transportation charges. The fact
that the average increase in the value
of arm products during the past
twenty years has been 35 per cent as
against an average increase of about
10 per cent In the manufactured
goods, shows very clearly that the
farmer, not the manufacturer, has
been the chief beneficiary under our
policy of protection, and if the report of the minister of labor has done
nothing else, it would have more than
justified itself by the service it has
rendered in exploding the theory,
long and stubbornly held by so many
of our economists, that the tariff Is
simply a means of enriching the manufacturer at the expense of the community at large.
"Bnt If the tariff is a benefit and
not a burden to the farmer, what is
the explanation of the uneasiness and
discontent that one so frequently
meets with In the middle west? It
certainly does not. arise from a general failure to obtain a fair return
upon the capita] and labor invested in
agriculture, for no other section of
the Dominion is today enjoying so
large a measure of prosperity, The
tariff situation is or should be
known beforehand to all who come
west to take up land; they enter upon their work with their eyes open
and one seldom if ever hoars of a
man who turns back dissatisfied; on
the contrary, they keep pouring
themselves onto the land in thousands and tens of thousands, and it
is the rule rather than Ihe exception
that the poorest and humblest laborer among them all reaches in a few
years a position of independence in
that land of opportunity. What then,
is the explanation of the uneasiness
which exists?
Transportation Needed
"In my humble opinion what tha
west, what the entire Dominion needs
above all else is transportation—
more railways and better service.
Tiie railway Is the advanced courier
of settlement; It is the factor of
greatest  importance  in  the  develop
ment of our resources; and' in: the en
largement of our commerce. By itl
proximity or by its remoteness ara
values  measured.
"Ever since confederation this
principle has been recognized and
acted upon by Canadian statesmen on
both sides of politics-. Tn 1889 our
country had only 12.5S5 miles of
railway; In 1899 It had 12,250; in
1909 It had 20.104. In the last 20
years our railway mileage has been
practically doubled'. Today we boast
of a greater mileage per head of
population than any country in the
world, yet we have done nothing
more than make" a beginning towards
the mileage we ultimately hope to
operate.
"And what Is ft costing us? Up to
1909 the Dominion government contributed subsidies to railways, in
cash, $135,550,000; provincial governments, $35,588,000, and municipalities, $17,825,000. Add to the
above land grants of 55,116,000
acres, worth at the low valuation of
$3 per acre, $165,348,000, together
with the expenditures on the Grand
Trunk Pacifies between Monctton and
Winnipeg, which up to June, 1910,
were $33,301,000, and it is safe to
say our railway policy has cost every
man, woman and child in this country $55, not to mention other obligations they have undertaken by
guaranteeing the bonds of the Canadian Northern and the Grand Trunk
Pacific railways.
"Nor it this all. The Improvement
of our inland waterways, undertaken
long before the movement of grain
from the west to the Atlantic seaboard became a factor ln the transportation problem has been of untold value In cheapening the cost of
haulage. Today there Is the keenest
rivalry between Canadian and United
States transportaion interests for the
honor of carrying our grain from the
head of the lakes to tidewater, and of
this the producer in the west surely
gets the benefit.
"Up to March 31, 1909, our capital expenditure on the canals of the
Dominion was $94,311,000. Of this
amount $77,273,000 was expended
prior to 1900, when the great forward movement towards the settlement of the middlew est was initiated. The cost of inland waterway improvements therefore may be said to
have fallen largely on the east.
Similarly it may be shown that it was
largely the money and the credit of
the east that has covered the west
with a network of 'railways it now
possesses.
"Does the east regret the expendi
ture.? Dm we hear, comnlftints from
manufacturing interests that they are
being taxed too heavily to provide'
adequate.- transportation: facilities fertile farmers? Quite the opposite;
manufacturing interests today ln all
parts of the Dominion stand shoulder to shoulder for a vigorous policy
of railway development. Regardless
of what it may cost, they insist ea
the Immediate opening up of such avenues of communication as will bring
eastern, central and western Canada
into, the closest relationship one with
another, and at the same time enable
our agricultural classes to reach the
world markets with the maximum
despatch and the minimum expense.
Let the grain growers of Alberta,
Saskatchewan and Manitoba join
hands with us in a policy of this
kind; le them co-operate with us in
building up a prosperous, a united
and self-contained country; let them
link their commercial destinies with
the empire rather than with the
Untted States out of whose markets
they may be legislated at a moment's notice, and I feel satisfied
they will quickly be the richer and
the happier for It."
.—__:—o	
BRITON'S COAL  INDUSTRY
In and about the coal mines of
the United Kingdom, in the year
1909, there jvere employed 1,042,435
persons, an Increase of 26,185 as
compared with 1908. Of this number
80.7 per cent were employed below
ground and of the 195,617 surface
workers, 5,963 or 3.05 per cent were
females.
The total amount of coal produced
in the United Kingdom last year was
263,774,312 tons, an increase of
2,245,517 tons over the production
of  1908.
Compared with 190S, there was an
increase of 44 in the number of accidents and 145 In the number of
deaths. Of the total 1,453 persons
killed, 96 were under 16 years of age
as against 86 in the preceding year.
The non-fatal accidents reported during the year were 5,525, a decrease of
68 compared with 1908.
The death rate of miners in England was, ln 1909, 1.43 as against
1.32 in 1908.
No statistics are published for
1908 by several countries ln which
mining is carried on, namely, Bolivia,
Brail, China, Persia and Turkey, or
for the ore mines and quarries of the
United States; so that the figures
given probably fal considerably short
of the real total. More than half
the persons engaged were employed
irf getting coal alone, Great Britain
showing upwards of 972,000, the
United States 590,00*. Germany
667,000, France nearly 195,000,
Russia, (1907) nearfy 165,000, Belgium 145,000, Austria nearly 132,
000 and Indfa 129,00.
The total amount of coal produced in 1908 was 1.068 mfllion toiiB,
the va"ue of which was estimated at
more than 409% million pounds ster
ling. The quantity and value, compared wfth 1907, showed a decrease
of 49 million tons, and more than
eight and a half million pounds sterling respectively. The main sources
from which were obtained the fuel
supply of the world for 1908 were as
under in meetre tons: United States,
377,250,000, an increase on 190t of
53,535,000, value £109,305,000;
Great Britain, 265 726,000, an increase of 6,403,000 value £116,599,-
000; Germany, 215,286,000. decrease 9,554,000, value £'5,140.01)0;
Austria-Hungary, 48 966,000, decrease 1,0S8,000, 'lilt £14.926,000;
France, 37,284,000 denreasa 631,-
000, value £23,694,000; Russia, 25,-
059,000, increase 941,000, value not
stated; Belgium, 23,558,000, Increase
147,000, value £15,223,000.
The
Washington Cafe
A PLACE TO EAT
Seats For Ladies
Everything Clean and Tasty
Prices Reasonable
to.  F.  CARPENTER,  PROPRIETOR
Second Avenue, near Seventh Street
LAND PURCHASE  NOTICE
Coast Land Dlstrlct-
Skeena.
-District of
TAKE NOTICE that we, George
Hie and Robert Corlett, of Little Canyon, B.C., occupation farmer and
farmer, Intend to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted at the south-east portion of an Island situated and lying
about two miles below Little Canyon,
near the south bank of the Skeena
river, Range V, Skeena Land District,
District of Coast, thence northerly,
thence easterly, thence southerly
around the shores of the Island back
to the point of beginning and Inclosing 30 acres, more or less
GEORGE HIE,
ROBERT CORLETT.
Dated August 1, 1910.
A19
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THE JOURNAL   s 1
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A
Is the Official Advertising
Medium for the City
of Prince Rupert
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^^.>.j,^..j..;.^.*:..:*»:*i,:..;«i>i,:.",t«i->.;.''>»:«i-:«»;.i->i';*i->*>i->ij*<..:.»>»>i,:«»><.»:.c':. ij- *i- -t- -> »> -> "i* ►> -j- <- <* i-j* <♦ -> -j- <» ^- *> *?» ^-. »j. <* ^» <•;•< -j. .;* .-> Tuesday, ISefltember 3^ t9lQ
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
SALMON RULES HIGH
Canned .Product Shews Very Considerable
. Advance in
.Prices.
Stock*. Are Hard to Get At Increased
Rates—British Trade
Firm
Although canned salmon opened
this season.at.an advance on the
highest record opening prices, yet resales of futures have been made at
an advance of 10c a dozen for Alaska
reds and for pinks 7%c per dozen
at Sau Francisco and 5c.per dozen
Puget ..Sound. Even at these advances.it is hard to get any stock, for
in nearjy every instance canners have
to pro rate on their deliveries, and
this cutting down makes lirius, fortunate in getting salmon, .wary In
selling .to others until they see bow
much their regular trade wil take,
says tbe Commercial -News Pickled
Salmon is higher for spot and will
open higher for 1910 pack. The last
sale of Alaska red. in barrels was at
$8 per barrel, and lie buyer eaj's that
ten days, ago be »anted to till an
order but could not find a seller. A
report 1b..current, that one parcel ot
over 1,500 barrels- v/as badly stored
and is no good or subject to condemnation,.!! offered for sale.
The pack of canned salmon an this
coast this.year will be around 3^.700,-
000 eases, .but, as stated abov.e, all
has been sold and the trade is crying
for more. The total pack as given
out official)}' of British Columbia
sockeyes this year is 543,525 cafes,
against 90,7,920 cases, in 1909, 5i}2,-
698 cases in .1908, 547,459 cases in
1907, and 62,6,160 cases in 1906. The
pack of Puget Sound sockeyes this
year aggregates 66,23.2 cases one-
pound tails, 8,6,384 cases 1-lb. flats,
and 138,491 ceases halves, making .a
total of 2 921,107 cases -of 48 pound}-
to the case. Tl(* pack of Britisli Columbia and Puget Sound combined
aggregate 416,132 case>:, against.
1,870,185 cases :h*st year.
The   English    markets    are   very
1 strong and tending up, according to
■ the London Grocer*' Gazette, August
27th,  which says:
During the week tbe American
packers have named their prices for
. domestic use for .tit*- United States,
and as these aru several -shillings
higher than are at present ruling on
the spot here, considerable buying of
new season'* British Columbia pack
has resulted, especially for 'i-pmind
flats, at dearer rates. There is much
more, activity on the spot, and in the
confident expectation 'that prices for
new season's will be much higher,
and in view of ihe short pack, business bus been done ir A'lueka at «n
advance of 6d. The demand froti
the country continues exceptionally
good, and there is every indication |
that the'market will be a strong and
advancing one, especially for one-
pound flats. The Celtic has arrived
at Liverpool with 1,000 case*.
trails'to'Hie varions'showings Of ore
End opened up thedeidges in a number of plate's.
The  assayer-'s  report   on   samples
submitted    has    just    been received
LAND  Pl'RCHASE   NOTICE
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that John Cherry,
.tnf  Victoria,  B.   C,   occupation   mat-
and gives .values running up as high  tr?ss maker, intends to apply for permission to purchase me following de-
as $146 per ton, and there Is no
doubt but that the claims have everything in sight that has returned high
values on Nine Mile and Four Mile.
The big.ledge appears to be twenty-five or more feet in width and
well mineralized. No boundary has
yet been found. In several places ore
has been uncovered; in veins up to.
two feet or more in width that has
every appearance of high-grade rock,
being galena with some gray copper
and an occasional lump the size of
.a bean of the high grade silver mineral that hns given such astonishing
scribed lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-east corner and about 14 miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kltwancool
Lake, thence west 80 chains, thence
south 80 chains, thence east 80
chains, thence north 80 chains to
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
JOHN  CHERRY.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 3,  1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE     NOTICE     that      Brenton
.Brown,  of Vancouver,   B.C.,  occupa-
values on Four Mile. hill.    Situated  tion insurance agent, intends to ap-
at au elevation of only a few hundred'ply  for permission  to  purchase the
feet above, the level nf  the  Skeena, I following described lands  in  the vi-
, , .... 'vlnitv  of  the  Kitwancool   or   Chean
surface work can be continued until ™\l* ValIey:_Commenclng at a
late in the fall. The wagon roadjnost planted at the north-east cor-
north of town reaehet.a point within Iner and about ten miles distant in
two miles of the claims and the Rob--1''1 north-westerly direction  from the
north end of Kitwancool Lake,
thence south 8 0 chains, thence east
SO chains, thence north 80 chains,
thence  west  80   chains   to   point  of
bison  lake irail  almost  touofces the
property.
Four claims  on  Nine  Mile  moun-   ..
tain, owned iby James .Latham   S   B ' commencement,  and   containing  640
ti cres, more or less.
BRENTON BROWN.
SUnger and Chas. Sanbt-rg have been
banded to Charles L. Hanson of Victoria. No price was announced. The
pnospects involved in. the deal are
the Dawson .Fraction, joining the
Sunrise group on the south, and the
three claims of the Silver Bell group,
joining the salver Cup.,-group on the
north and east. Mr. Hanson wili let
a contract for 'considerable work this
fall and winter if satisfactory • ar-
rairgi'ments can be made
Another strike of galena ore is reported this week and the samples
brought into town by Ole locators
look as fine as anything yet found in
that:3jne. Five.men are interested
in the .group of claims thai have been
staked, A. H. Ritlsd&le, Gordon Mc-
LePan, John Salt, Fred OFster and
H. B. Thoen. Thnce ledges have been
discovered with a width <W two or
three feet and all tarrying good ore.
From town the claims are about thirty-six miles, three mliles off -.the Babine trail, the point wherethey turn
off being about thirty-three miles out.
This leaves the new :fmd aborn eighteen miles from the surveyed line of
'the railway with 2 -water grade for
the entire-.distance. Mr. Rldsdale is
much elated over the discovery and
luoks to see,quite a stir;in the locality
as the country elosi by is very
promising ami there is ie-very reason
to aspect further locations.
 _—0	
Consul Charles L. Hoover, of Madrid, '.reports thut almonds -and'chestnuts .-are more largely paten in Spain
*han peanuts. 'The peanuts sold at
stands in Madrid are ttnroastetL
small and inferior. Nearly all sweetmeats 'being made of almonds, con-,
foctionei's make, very little ut.se of
peanuts.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 1, 1910. JyS
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
• TAKE NOTICE that Jessie Stead-
rnan, of Victoria, B. C, occupation
married woman, intends to apply for
permission to purchase tbe following described lands, in the vicinity of
Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-east corner and about 6%
miles distant in a north-westerly direction from the north end of Kitwancool    Lake,    thence    south    80
hains; thence west 80 chains, thence
north SO chains, thence east 80
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 640 acres, more or
less. JESSIE STEADMAN.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated May 31,  1910. JyS
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassia
TAKE NOTICE that Bruce Older-
shaw, of Victoria, B. C, occupation
jeweller, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of the
Citwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at
he north-west corner and sfcout 7 V2
miles distant in a north-westerly direction from the north end of Kitwancool Lake; jthenee south SO
chains, thence east 40 chains, thence
north 80-chains, thence west 40
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 320 acres, more or
less. BRUCE OLDERSHAW.
.James W.  Smith, Agent.
Dated May 31,  1910. JyS
LAM) PURCHASE NOTICES
:..\\:>
•I RCHASE NOTICES
LAND PURCHASE NOTICES
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Sarah Ward,
of Victoria, B. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kltwancool or Chean Weln Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. E. corner and about 22 mllec distant in a north-westerly    direction
from the north end of Kitwancool from the north end of Kitwancool j from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north 80 chains, thence j Lake, thence north 40 chains, thence j Lake, thence north SO chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence south 80 east 40 chains, thence south 40 west SO chains, thence south 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to the j chains, thence west 40 chains to'chains, thence east 80 chains to the
po'nt of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or .ess.
SARAH WAR:).
James W. Smith, Agenl.
Dated June 6th,  1910 Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that George Mc-
Bain, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
merchant, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool   or   Chean   Wein   Valley
Skeena Land District—District of       Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar. » Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE th£U l'lt-'..-.i.ir TAKE NOTICE that Leihi Cherry,
Tutt, of Selkirk, Manitoba, occupa-j of Victoria, B. C, occupation mar-
tion merchant, intends to apply for!ried woman, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following (permission to purchase the following
described lands In the vicinity of Kit- j described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—j wancool or Chean Weln Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the 1 Commencing at a post planted at tne
S. to. corner about 14% miles dis- S. E. corner and about 21 miles distant  in  a   north-westerly     direction-tant   in   a   north-westerly   direction
point of commencement, and contain- j point of commencement, and containing 160 acres, more or less. |ing 640 acres, more or less.
FREDERICK   TUTT. LEIIII   CHERRY.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 3, 1910. JyS
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Henry Van
Wyck, of Vancouver, U. C, occupation hotel keeper, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands in  the vicin-
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June^th, 1910. Jy8
ity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein
Commencing at a post planted at the ! Valley: —Commencing at a post
S. W. corner and about 26*4 miles planted at the north-east corner and
distant in a north-westerly   direction  about  20  miles  distant  in  a  north-
frorn   the  north   end   of  Kitwancool 1 westerly direction from the north end | from   the   north   end   of   Kitwancool
Lake, tlience north SO chains, thence I of Kitwancool Lake, tlience soutii SO  Lake, thence north SO chains, thence
Skeena Land District -District of
Cassiar.
TAKE .NOTICE that John Grieve,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
agent, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wien Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. E. corner and about 20 miles distant   in   a   north-westerly   direction
east 80 chains, thence south 80
chains, thence west 80 chains to
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
GEORGE  McBAIN.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 8th, 1910. ,Iy8
•Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Catherine
Welsh, of Vancouve., ti. O, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands in the vl-
vinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein
chains, tlience west 80 chains, thence
north 80 chains, tlience east 80
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 640 acres, more or
less. HENRY VAN  WYCK.
James to. Smith, Agent.
Dated "June   6th,   1910. JyS
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Minnie Clarke
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool   or   Chean   Wein   Valley
Valley: —Commencing    at    a    post 1 Commencing at a post planted at the
planted at the S. E. corner and about
17 V2 miles distant in a north-westerly direction from the north end of
Kitwancool Lake, thence north 80
chains, thence west SO chains, thence
south 80 chains, tlience east 80
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 640 acres, more or
less. CATHERINE  WELSH.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June  4, 1910. Jy8
N. W. corner and about 28 % miles
distant and in a north-westerly direction from the north end of Kitwancool Lake, tlience south 40 chains
thence east SO chains, thence north
40 chains, tlience west 80 chains to
point of commencement and containing 320  acres,  more or less.
MINNIE  CLARKE.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated  June   8th,   1910. Jy8
west SO chains, thence soutii 80
chains, tlience east 80 chains to
point of comemncement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
JOHN GRIEVE.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 6th, 1910. Jy8
DEVELOPING   CENTRE
Coast Land District—Distriat of
Skeenn.
TAKE NOTICE that Elijah
Rounds, of Victoria, II.C, occupation
Btewart, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post  planted  one-half   .mile    north,,
Ske*na Laud District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Echo Dudgeon, of Vancouver, B.l C, occupation
assistant dentist, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of the
Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-east corner and about 7 %
miles distant in a north-westerly direction from the north end of Kitwancool Lake, thence south 80
chains, thence north 80 chains,
thence east 80 chains to point of
commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
ECHO DUDGEON,
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated May 31, 1910. JyS
Letter Heads, Envelopes,
Statements, Business Cards
Visiting Cards, etc., etc.
Prince Rupert Journal
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiiu.
TAKE NOTICE mat Alfred E.
Parkington, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation broker, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of
Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. E. corner and about 15 V2 miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north 80 chains, thence
west 80 chains, tlience soutii 80
chains, tlience east 80 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
ALFRED E.  PARKINGTON.
James W. Smith,
Dated June 3, 1910.
  ! Lairds N. E. corner of application to
! purchase, and 300 feet east of Ana-
;Mines Opening Up in the District That ham Lake tra'l-   marked    e. r.'s
Promise to Give Valuable < ^T*' T^ f™™ £° ^
I east, ithence 40 chains north, thence
j 40   chains  west,     thence  40  chains
south   to   point   of   commencement,
and  containing  160  acres,  more or
less. ELIJAH   ROUNDS.
Vincent  M.  Schibner, Agent.
Dated May 25, 1910. jn2i
Returns.
Mines   Opening   up   in   the   District
That Promise to Give Valuable
Returns
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that- William
and one-half mile east, of Nettie A. ISirapaon, of Lindsay, Ont, occupation hotel-keeper, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following dfcscribed lands in the vicinity of the Kitwancool or Chean Weln
Valley:—Commencing at a post
planted at the south-east corner and
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Edward t!as-
pell, of Cayley, Alberta, occupation
merchant, intends to apply for permission lo purchase the following do-
scribed lands in the vicinity of the
Kitwancool or Cbean Wein Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. W. corner and distant about 15.%
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Thomas Sills,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation machinist, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kit-
Agent.
Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that George Williams, of Winnipeg, .nan., occupation
clerk, intends to apply for permission'
to purchase the following described
lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool
or Chean Wein Valley:-—Commencing at a post planted at the S. W.
corner and about 16% miles distant
in a north-westerly direction from
the north end of Kitwancool Lake,
thence north 40 chains, tlience
east 40 chains, thence soutii 40
chains, thence west 40 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 100 acres, more or less.
GEORGE WILLIAMS.
James  to. Smith,  Agent.
Dated June 4,  1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that John Reid,-
of Vancouver, B. C., occupation-
broker, intends to apply for permission to purchase the 'following described lands In Ihe vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Weln Valleys-
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. to. corner and about 15% miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
wancool   or   Chean   Wein   Valley:—  ..
Commencing at. a post planted at the j ,,m   ,he   "orlh   Gn(i   of   Kitwancool
N.  W. corner and about 26%   miles !ne' t,ienc(- norUl 4(l Chains, thence
from   the  north   end   of  Kitwancool \ from   the  north  end   of   Kitwancool
Lake, thence south 80 chains, thenco j Lake, thence south SO chains, tlience
miles   in  a   north-westerly  direction : distant in a north-westerly direction I e,as^   40   chains,   thence     south     40
  'chains, thence west 40 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing  160  acres,  more or less.
JOHN  REID.
James to. Smith, Agent.
Dated  June  3,   1910. jyg
Optimism with respect to the mining district with Hazelton as Its centre Is running high and a steady activity Is reported. The last copy of
the Omlneca Herald contains the
news that after returning from a
visit to the properties, R. P. Trimble of Portland, Ore., has bonded the
two groups of claims located on
Rocher de Boule mountain by W. S.
Sargent and Colin Monroe for $66,-
000; two deals being made on the
claims, one of the groups going for
$40,000, and the other for $25,000.
Business at home demands Mr, Trimble's attention and he left Friday
morning for Portland, accompanied
by W. J. Gearln, a son of ex.U. S.
Senator Gearln of Oregon. If he Is
able to return in time this fall, work
will be started and kept up all winter. If he Is unable to do this operations will be delayed till next spring.
On the north side of the hill north
of Hazelton, and not much more than
four miles and a half from town,
the claims recently located by Long,
McBaln and Latham are showing evidences of wealth that add materially
to the prospects of the Hazelton district becoming a mining camp of the
first rank. Although only staked
within the last month, the locators
have   with   great   energy   cut   good
LAND PURCHASE NOTICES
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that William
Hume Grant, of Stewart, B.C., occupation engineer, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a
post marked W.H.G.'s S.W. Cor., and
planted adjoining Alfred Manson's
corner post, thence 80 chains north,
along W. N. Harrison's west line,
thense east 80 chains, thence south
80 chains, thence west 80 chains, following Alfred Manson's noiih line to
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
WILLIAM HUME GRANT.
Frank R.  Strolm, Agent.
Dated July 2, 1910. Jy22
about 7% miles distant in a north
westerly direction from the north
end of Kitwancool Lake, thence
north 80 chains, thence west 80
chains, thence south 80 chains,
thence east 80 chains to point of
commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or lees.
WILLIAM SIMPSON.
James to. Smith, Agent.
Dated  May 31,  1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that The Canadian
Fish and Cold Storage Company, of
Vancouver, B. C, occupation mercantile and manufacturing, intends
to apply for permission to purchase
the following described lands: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-east corner of lot 34, Range 5,
Coast District, thence south 20
chains, thence east 40 chains, thence
north 25 chains more or less to the
shore line, thence following along
the shore line to the point of commencement and containing 90 acres,
more or less.
The Canadian  Fish  &  Cold
Storage Company Limited.
J. H. Plllsbury, Agent.
Dated July 14, 1910. Jyl9
Skeena Land District—District of
fiODttf fly*
TAKE NOTICE that George Tutt,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation den-
iet, Intends to apply for permission
o purchase the following described
ands in the vicinity of the Kltwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—Commencing at a post planted at the
north-east corner and about 8%
miles distant In a north-westerly direction from the north end of Kltwancool Lake, thence south 40
chains, tlience west 40 chains, thence
north 40 chains, thence east 40
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 640 acres, more or
less. GEORGE TUTT.
James to. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 1,  1910. Jy8
east 80 chains, thence north 8 0
chains, thence west 80 chains to
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
EDWARD CASPELL.
James  W. Smith,  Agent.
Dated June 3, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles Gei-
ger, of Victoria, b. C, occupation
clerk, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands ln tbe vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:-—
Comemncing at a post planted at the
S. E. corner and about 19 miles distant In a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kltwancool
Lake, thence north 80 chains,'thence
west 80 chalnB, thence soutii 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
CHARLES GIEGER.
James W.  Smith, Agent.
Dated June 4th, 1910. Jy8 j
east 80 chains, thence north SO
chains, thence west 80 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
THOMAS  SILLS.
James to. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 8th, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land DUcrlct—District"of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that William Wallace, of Toronto, Ont., occupation
insurance agent, Intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
dlscrlbed lands In the vi.!' iky of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Comencing at a post planted at the
N. E. corner and about 26 M> miles
distant in a north-weBterly dlrocron
from the north end of Kltwancool
Lake, thence soutii SO chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence north 80
chains, thence east SO chains to the
point of commencement, containing
640 acres, more or less.
WILLIAM WALLACE.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated  June   8th,   1910. Jy8
-DlBtrlct of
-District of
Skeena Land District
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Lome Thompson, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
dentist, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of the
Kltwancool or Chean Wein Valley:
Commencing at a post planted at the
south-west corner and about 8%
miles distant in a north-westerly direction from the north end of Kitwancool  Lake,    thence     north     80
Skeena Land District-
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Sarah Cox,
of Monarch, Alberta, occupation mar-
ied woman, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands ln the Kltwancool or
Chean Wien Valley:—Commencing nt
a post planted at the N. W. corner
and about 4 M. miles distant ln a
north-weBterly direction from the
north end of Kltwancool Lake, thence
south 80 chains, thence east 80
chains, thence north 80 chains,
tlience west 80 chains to point of
commencement, and containing 640
teres, more or less.
SARAH COX.
James W. Smith, Agent
Dated May 3l8t. 1910.
Coast Laud District—District of
Skeena.
TAKE NOTICE that I, George A.
'oole, of Prince Rupert, occupation
irinter,  intend  to apply for  permis-
Skeena Land  District—District of
Cassiar.
Skeena Land Dlstriel     District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Grace Cess-
ford, of Victoria, 13. C, occupation
married woman, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described   lands   in   the   vicinity   of
Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:	
Commencing at a post planted at the
N, E. corner and about 23 miles distant In a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kltwancool
Lake, thence soutii SO chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence north 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
GRACE CESSFORD.
JnmeB to. Smith, Agent
Dated June Oth, 1910. Jy$
Skeena Land District- District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that  Henry  Hemming,  of Victoria,  B.  C,  occupation
TAKE NOTICE that Samuel JohnI^rmlsslon"to purchaw th  "follow^
McDIarmid, of Monarch, Alberta, oc- !,,.Hi£ £, d ' n                      '        ^
cupation farmer, intends lo apply for wancool   or   Chean  Weln  Valley-—
permiBsion  to   purchase   the  follow- Commencing at a posl planted at the
nig described  lands in  the  Kitwan- x. „;. Boro0? aml eTbout 21 miles dK
cool or Chean  Wein Valley:—Com- tant,  in  a  north-westerly  direction
menclng at a post planted at the N. [rom   tbe   „,„.,„   en„   #-fc£J2!e«S
miles in a Lake, thence south so chains, thence
north  end    ot    KltwancooI^La^ ^L^C^^lT^JnTto Z
thence south  SO  chains,  thence west £to   of*co m   ,C-   neSt. and co\°uZ°
S0   chains,   thence  noiih   so   chains, i„g 640 ,-'■■■'   i.i.nn
tlience   east   SO   chains   to   point   of
E. corner and about 4'i
north-westerly   direction"
commencement,   and   containing   640
acres,  more or less.
SAMUEL JOHN McDIARMID.
James to. Smith, Agent.
Dated May 31st,  1910. Jy8
Skeena* Land District—"District of-
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Annie Gowan,
f   Victoria,   B.   C,  occupation   married woman, intends to apply for permission   to   purchase   Ihe   following
acres, more or less.
HE.VItY   HEMMING.
James to. Smith, Agent
Dated June 6th, 1910. Jyg
scribed lands:—Commencing at a
post planted on the north-east shore
line of Smith Island, distant about
one mile south-east from Lot 38, and
marked "G. A. P.'s North-west Cor-
,ner Post," thence 20 chains south,
chains, thence east 40 chains thence thence 80 chains east, thence north
south 80 chains, thence west 40 j 10 shore line, thence following shore
chains to point of commencement, j line to point, of commencement, con-
and containing 320 acres, more or italnlng 160 acres, more or less
less. LORNE THOMPSON. GEORGE ARTHUR POOLE.
James W. Smith, Agent. I     Dated Satrrday, July 2, 1910.
Dated June I, 1910. Jy8 ' (First Insertion July 5.)
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Nelson
Gowen, of Victoria, B. C, occupation mining engineer, intends to apply for permission to purchnse the
following described  lands  In  the vl-
'".',   '»   >:""'- "   f"»""i''''   'I*  described lands in the vlcfnityof KlS  vV,nov:-Comm"nrlnB°r ***? 'nolS
Camming a?^----^- I ^"^ at ^ * E' COrn-r 'lnd a^
Conimencng at a post planted at the 19 miles distant In the north-west-
N. W corner and about 23 miles dis-;erly direction from the north end of
ant In a north-westerly direction Kitwancool Lake thence south 80
rom the north end of Kltwancool Chains, thence west 40 chains thence
Lake; thence south SO chains, thence, nortl, 40 chains, thence west 4 0
east 80 chains, thence north 80 chains, thence north 40 etaatnY
chains, thence west 80 chains to the thenco east 80 chains to point of
point of commencement, nnd con- Commencement, and containing 480
tainlng 640 acres, more or less. 'acres, more or lew       oma,mng   4S0
Ta^u-'V'm^'     , NELSON   GOWEN.
James to. Smith, Agent. james w. Smith, Agent
Jy8       Dated June 4th,  1910. Jy8
Dated June 7th, 1910. PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Tuesday, September 27, 1910
prince Bupert journal
Telephone  138
Published twice a week on Tuesdays
ami Fridays from the office of publication, Third Avenue near McBride St.
Subscription rate to any point in
Canada. $2.00 a year; to points outside
of Canada. $3.00 a year.
Advertising"jrate furnished on application.
(). H. NELaON,
Editor.
Tuesday, September 2 7, 1910
PRINCE RUPERT'S PROSPECTS
Cities in the south are beginning
to realize what the position of
Prime Rupert will be when the G.
T. !'. is completed. They recognize
that there are immense potentialities
locked up ready to be opened
in t lie great country stretching
from a line midway between the C.
P. R. line anil the G. T. P. and extending far north over a vast area,
provided with navigable rivers and
lakes for hundreds of miles and embracing a territory through which
branch lines of railway to act as feeders to the main artery of traffic can
easily be built.
The Saturday Sunset of Vancouver
thus speaks of the situation: "This
question of opening the Eraser is one
of vital importance to the coast cities.
If tiie scheme is feasible it cannot be
undertaken too quickly, for unless
some such route is provided Edmonton will certainly monopolize the
trade of the North until the G. T. P.
is linked with Prince Rupert. After
that it will be a case of competition
between Edmonton and the G. T. P.
terminus with Vancouver and Victoria securing only the crumbs. With
the Fraser river opened from Lytton
to Fort George the coast cities would
then be in position to give commercial battle to Edmonton from the
very beginning. Without it we will
have to patiently wait for the slow
building of railways while Edmonton is in the meantime firmly establishing her trade."
The Victoria Colonist follows this
up with the statement that it heartily
endorses the Sunset's views of the
situation. The south is therefore
rising to realize what the future
prospects of Prince Rupert are.
 o	
RECOGNITION OF BOY SCOUTS
City Council Does Not Peel Inclined
to Settle Differences
At the council meeting last evening the question of the Boys'
Scouts came up for a little discussion in an informal way. It was introduced by Aid. Mobley who stated
that he had been asked to bring this
up as those interested wished to
have official recognition by the council.
Some little discussion followed in
which different members of tbe council expressed their willingness to do
whatever they could to aid in the
work, but they did not see how the
Council could do anything beyong
giving a sort of moral support to the
proposition.
It was explained that there was
some differences in the matter relative to the appointment of trustees.
His Worship explained that he had
been approached In the matter but
had told those interested to get together and select the trustees and
officers desired. The council would
then, be supposed, be willing to give
a sort of moral support to the proposition. The first thing for those concerned to do was to agree among
themselves as to the officers.
ENJOYABLE DANCE
The Kaien Island Club on Friday
evening established an enviable reputation as entertainers. The successful way in which the initial dance
given in the rooms of the organization was carried out puts the club In
a rank that other social bodies will
find difficult lo keep pace With.
The function from first to last in
ill its arrangements reflected the
highest credtl upon the committees
in charge and the whole club. The
society of the city was well represented and all acknowledged that it
was never excelled in the history of
social gatherings in the city.
The patronesses were Mrs. Stork,
Mrs.  Manson and Mrs. McMullin.
The floor committee consisted of
Messrs. F. II. Mobley, A. M. McLeod
and C. II. Orme, while the members
of the decoration committee were
Messrs. to. M. Lailey, Ray Bowers, C
aV'ughan and John R.  Beatty
Kaufmann's orchestra provided the
music. The ballroom was very prettily decorated witli flags and electric
lights, while the supper room also
was very neatly embellished.
The supper, which was served by
the Exchange Grill, was very tasty,
and was enjoyed by all.
' c"t •> *> •5' «■> »> cjt *• *;. »!♦ »> * & i> ►> ►> ♦ i*» «•> ►> *!• * <2» ►> »>
I    MARINE NEWS   j
V"'* *»* *** *** *** *** "»* *•* '*' '*' T *** *** '»* *»* **' *•*/•* *»-' *2* *** *t* *»* *»• i«*
To Arrive
Tuesday,  Sept.  27.—Humboldt from
Skagway.
Prince   Albert  from  Queen  Charlotte City.
Wednesday, Sept. 28.—Prince Rupert
from Vancouver.
Thursday,   Sept.   29.—Prince   Albert
from Stewart.
City of Seattle from Skagway.
Friday,    Sept.    30.—Camosun    from
Vancouver.
Cottage City from Seattle.
Saturday,   Oct.   1.—Princess   Royal
from Skagway.
Humboldt from Seattle.
Prince Albert from Masset.
Sunday,    Oct.    2.—Camosun       from
Stewart.
Prince  George from Vancouver.
.Monday, Oct. 3.—Prince Albert from
Stewart.
Princess Beatrice from Vancouver.
To Depart
Tuesday,   Sept.   27.—Humboldt   for
Seattle.
Wednesday, Sept. 28.—Prince Albert
for Stewart.
Thursday,  Sept.  29.—Prince  Albert
for Masset.
City of Seattle for Seattle.
Friday, Sept.. 30—Camosun for Stewart.
Cottage City for Skagway.
Saturday, Oct. 1.—Princess Royal for
Vancouver.
Humboldt for Skagway.
Sunday,  Oct.  2.—Camosun  for Vancouver.
Prince .Mbert for Stewart.
.Monday,  Oct.   3.—Prince George for
Vancouver.
Prince Albert for Qteen Charlotte
City.
Princess  Beatrice for Skagway.
C.  P.   R.   WINTER SCHEDULE
The new autumn and winter schedule of the C. P. R. coast line steamers
engaged In the trade with northern
ports, has been announced by
the officials of the company. This
new list of sailings affects the
steamers Princess Royal and Princess
Beatrice, tbe Amur and Tees. The
schedule becoems effective on October 1.
By this new schedule, the Beatrice
and Royal leave Vancouver as formerly, on Saturday nights at 11 p.m.
and call at Swanson Bay, Prince Rupert, Port Simpson, Ketchikan, Juneau and Skagway on the northbound
trip, arriving at the latter port six
days after the departure from Vancouver. Lying one day at Skagway
to discharge and take on cargo, the
vessels will leave on Thursday nights
on the southbound trip and will arrive in Vancouver four days later.
Southbound vessels will not leave
Prince Rupert earlier than 7 a.m. on
any day of sailing.
The Amur will leave Vancouver on
Tuesday nights at 11 p.m. and will
sail every other week. She will call
at all northern ports of importance
and will take on cargo at each place.
By special arrangements with the
master or purser, calls will be made
at Hickey's cannery, on Smith Inlet,
when business warrants a stop. The
Tees, engaged in the trade out of
Victoria, will leave that port on the
7th and 14th of each month for Clayoquot and way ports, calling each
way at all ports. The Tees will
also sail on the 20th of each month
for Holberg.
WILL NOT CO.ME XORTH
From Australia comes the news
that San Francisco will be the north
Pacific terminus of the new steamship line to be subsidized by New
Zealand to be inaugurated October
22 with the steamers Aorangl and
Matai, there being no Intention of
continuing this line to Vancouver.
It Is proposed to arrange with the
present Canadian-Australian line for
a call at Auckland, The new line
will run from Wellington to San
Francisco via Ratatonga unci Papeete
and does not propose to compote with
the present Spreckles lino from Tallin to San Francisco, although the
connecting line which tranships cargo
nnd transfers passengers at Tahiti,
will be abandoned.
The chambers of commerce are
protesting against the establishment
of the new line in favor of an improved Canadian-Australian service
witli New Zealand calls.
CAMOSUN   TO   REPAIR
On her return to the south the
Camosun will undergo repairs, missing one trip to the north. The vessel
met with a hlshap near the Naas
damaging her shaft. She did not
reach here until early yesterday
morning.
THE GREAT TOURIST
CENTRE OF NORTH
(Continued from Page One)
or two tourist hotels to be located
between Prince Rupert and Hazelton.
But the line of the railway Is not
the only interesting feature for the
tourist. There are dozens of side
trips about this district that will all
have attractions of their own and
enable the visitors to the city to enjoy Several weeks of he most pleasing outings. There is Metlahkatla,
t lie famed Indian city, with a vast
store of romance surrounding it and
which will he a tourist attraction.
The harbor Itself wfth its vast
stretches offer unexcelled opportunities for outings. The Queen Charlotte islands, with a beach near Mas-
set that cannot fail in time to become world famous as a camping
ground, are within a few hours run
of the city. The salmon fisheries
with their never failing interest to
the sightseer, are within a few minutes ride by train.
Altogether there are opportunities
for building up a tourist trade that
the G. T. P. will not be slow to take
advantage of. It seems practically
decided that their big hotel which
will be run in conjunction with the
chain of high class hostelrles across
the continent on their line of rail and
in Victoria and Vancouver, shall be
built on the reserve overlooking the
harbor from the top of the bluff between the G. T. P. wharf and the
Government wharf. No more commanding position could be selected.
High above the station and the
wharves there will be a view from it
of all that is transpiring on the
waters of the harbor. The surrounding area fronting on First avenue
can be transformed into a delightful
hotel grounds that can never be shut
In, but will always occupy a preeminent position among the features
of the city.
QUESTION OF HOURS
(Continued from Page One)
with Mr. McMordie. He did not want
to see any technicalities in this.
There was nothing relative to overtime in the contract. His idea was
that it should be optional as to
whether the men worked overtime
at the regular rate.
Aid. Barrow said that he felt that
the council was elected on the principle of an eight hour day without
any overtime. The other side was
pledged to the same.
Aid. Hilditch said Mr. McMordie
had a body of men In his employ at
the start that was a credit to the city.
They were just the kind of men that
were wanted. Their place ,vas being
taken by a class that he had opposed
all along.
His Worship said that he had gone
twice to see Mr. McMordie but had
not found him. He would trp to see
him tomorrow.
Aid. Hilditch thought that the
mayor should in arriving at a basis'
insist upon the re-instatement of the
dishcarged men.
STREET IMPROVEMENTS
Finance Committee Has Matters Referred   to  It
Several matters relating to street
work were referred to the finance
committee by the council last night.
The residents of Sixth avenue, who
asked a road to Summit avenue, desired the work done as asked for
provided it could be done on the
principle of being repaid during a
period covering twenty years.
Mr. Perks asked to be reimbursed
for removing rock from the street ln
front, of his place as it had saved the
work being done by the city.
A roadway was asked for on Ninth
avenue, from McBride street to
Young street.
Municipal Notice
LOCAL  IMPROVEMENT NOTICE
TAKE NOTICE thai the Council of
Iii"- Municipal Cnrporition of Hie
City of Prince Rupert intends lo
malte the following lr.cal improvements:
A 16-foot plank rordway from the
intersection of McBride street and
Eighth avenue to thi intersection 'f
Eighth avenue and Hay's Cove Circle,
and to assess the final cost thereof
upon the property fronting or abutting thereon, or to be benefitted
thereby, and that a statement and
diagram showing the lands proposed
to be so especially assessed for the
said improvements or work is now
filed ln the office of the City Clerk,
and is open for Inspection during office hours.
The estimated cost of the work Is
$6,731.
Dated at Prince Rupert this 27th
day of September, 1910.
ERNEST A. WOODS,
S27 City Clerk.
VAST RESOURCES OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Hon. Richard McBride at Banquet of Canadian Manufacturers Tells Easterners of Possibilities of
the Province—Imperial Spirit
Breathed.
At a banquet given in Vancouver
lo tbe delegates of Ihe Canadian
.Manufacturers' Association, Premier
McBride delivered an address which
was calculated to do much for the
province. In no uncertain way Hon.
Mr. .McBride put the vast resources
of British Columbia and the opportunities for business in the Pacific
province prominently forward. In
part the  Premier said:—
"The distance between the Atlantic
and Pacific coasts is steadily diminishing with the development of transportation and so also the distance
which separates the Motherland from
British Columbia. 1 think that only
yesterday the Victoria press told of
the mall being delivered In Victoria
from the old country in e, tltUc ~ .-er
nine days. I can remember, and I
am not a very old man, when it took
thirty-nine days. The president referred in his address to Imperialism
which is back of everything we do
in British Columbia. We British Columbians are good Canadians but we
are still more intense Britishers!
(Aplause). I can say to Mr. Rowley
tbat he never more truly expressed
the sentiments of the Dominion when
he spoke of the Imperial sentiment
which is evident throughout the Dominion.
Diverse Resources
"No province of the Dominion possesses in itself such a wealth and diversity of natural resources as British Columbia, and all in the initial
stages of development. (1) Our fisheries account for over thirty per cent
of the total catch of Canada; (2) our
mines have produced since their inception $347,800,000, and 300,000
square miles of mineralized ground
are not yet prospected; (3) our timber brings in over $12,000,000 a year
and (4) our agricultural and fruit
lands, hardly scratched, over $8,000,-
000.
"While our population is still
small, our accomplishments are large.
We have created a trade totalling
close to $50,000,000 annually; established manufactures and industries
yielding over eighty million dollars
a year—and, remember, we are still
at the beginning of things.
"British Columbia, with its area of
395,000 square miles, is the largest
province in the Dominion, and could
contain within its borders Ontario,
Manitoba, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island, with
some 10,000 square miles to spare.
Her coast line, from Juan de Fuca
straits to tbe head of Portland canal
measures 7,000 miles, while an estimate of the extent of inland navigable waters totals 2,500 miles.
Fishing  Industry
"The fisheries of our coast employ
about 12,000 men. British Columbia
stands first In the production of salmon; nine-tenths of her annual output may be credited to that fish,
while her catch of halibut is ten
times more than that of the Atlantic.
In Nanaimo harbor 22,500 tons of
herring (4 5,000,000 pounds) were
caught last year. Deep-sea fishing for
cod and halibut, oyster culture, the
manufacture of fish oils and fertilizers, the canning of crabs, clams and
other shell fish, the exportation of
fresh fish in cold storage, and the
preserving of sardines, anchovies and
other small fry, are industries which
might well attract the attention of
capital. The European countries bordering the North Atlantic give employment to over a million fisher
folk. Experiments have established
the fact that half an hour's trawling
on the Atlantic coast of Canada will
bring up more fish than can be captured in six hours In the North Sea
Hshing grounds, and, as it Is conceded by the best authorities on the
subject that British Columbia's fisheries are immensely more productive
than those of the Atlantic, it follows
that our fisheries would support a
million people without taxing them to
an appreciable extent.
Riches in Timber
"The timber of Vancouver Island
and the coast is remarkable for its
size and its unsurpassed quality as
lumber. The Douglas fir grows to a
height of 300 feet—the average tree,
most prized by the lumberman, averaging 125 to 150 feet. Cedar, pine
and hemlock also attain larger
growth than in Eastern Canada. In
the interior the size of the trees Is
smaller, but they make excellent
lumber suited to every purpose.
Roughly, British Columbia's forest
and woodland estate" consists of 182,-
000,000 acres, but figures are not
now available to show what quantity
might be classed as merchantable
timber. Various estimates have
been made as to the available quantity of commercial timber, and these
differ materially. The less optimistic
of our timber experts, however, agree
that about one-fifth—or 36,000,000
acres—of the whole may be so classed; whoch would yield, on the extremely modest basis of 10,000 feet
to the acre, three hundred and sixty
billion feet annually for 100 years,
or at the present rate of cutting for
four centuries.
"There are thousands of miles of
pulp and paper making woods which
are still practically undisturbed.
Enough has been done to convince
those interested that the manufacture of paper-plup and paper is destined to become one of our leading
and most, profitable industries.    The
DURESCO
The King of Water Paints
FIRST IN THE FIELDEEEEFOREMOST EVER SINCE
TSOLE AGENTS IN WESTERN CANADA-
The Staneland Co. Ltd
836-840 Fort Street, VICTORIA, B.C.    '
mm
GRAND TRUNK PACIFIC STEAMSHIPS
For VANCOUVER, VICTORIA, SEATTLE.
Connecting   with   Eastbound   Trains
Prince Rupert sails every Thursday, S.30 p.m.
Prince George sails every  Monday, S.30  p.m.
FOR  STEWART:
Bruno sails every Sunday at 5 p.m.,   returning  Monday evening  to
connect with Prince George, southbound.
Uruuo sails Wednesday, 5 p.m., returning   Thursday   evening, connecting with Prince Rupert  southbound.
FOR MASSET—Bruno sails 10 p.m. every Monday, returning Tuesday night, and for Skidegate  and  other  Moresby   Island   Ports,
Bruno sails 10 p.m. Thursday, returning Saturday.
Tickets, reservations and Information    from
A. E. McMASTER
Freight and  Passenger Agent, G. T. P. Wharf.
paper makers of the United States
are clamoring for raw material, and,
so far as British Columbia Is concerned, they can have it on one condition, and that is that they shall set
up their plants within our borders
and manufacture the raw product into paper. The province will supply
the wood and the waterpower to
grind it, but it must be exported in
its perfected form.
Agricultural Lands
"It is difficult to estimate with
exactness the extent of our agricultural lands. Roughly speaking It is
estimated forty-six million acres of
arable and pasture land are in what
(Continued on Page Five)
Atlantic Steamship
 Agency	
Through tickets and excursion
rates to
England, France, Germany,
ami all
Scandinavian Ports.
Call or write for rates to any
part of the world. I am also
agent for all American steamers
to and from Prince Rupert;
Northern Pacific Railway; Alaska Pacific Express.
J. H. ROGERS
General Steamship and Railway
Agent, Prince Rupert, B.C.
Union Steamship Co'y
of B.C. Ltd.
The new Steel Passenger Steamer
"Camosun"
PRINCE RUPERT every Sunday at 9 a.m. for Vancouver,
arriving Monday afternoon.
For Stewart City on arrival from
Vancouver Friday night.
Northbound, leaves Vancouver
Wednesdays at 9 p.m.
Steerage Fare $5.00
The "Camosun" is the only steamer
on the run having water-tight bulkheads and double bottom, thus ensuring safety of passengers in case of
collission or wreck.
J. H. ROGERS,   Ticket Agent
HAYNOR  BROS.
FUNERAL   DIRECTORS
and
PROFESSIONAL  EMBALMERS
DR. to. B. CLAYTON
DENTIST
—0—
Office   ln    the    Westenhaver   Block,
Over Orme's  Drug   Store.
Prince Rupert
WM. S. HAl,L, L. D. S. D. D. S.
:-: DENTIST :-:
Crown and Bridge Work a specialty.
All dental operations skillfully
treated. Gas and local anaesthetics
administered for the painless extraction of teeth. Consultation free.
Offices, Helgerson 3k., Prince Rupert
J. H. PILLSBURY
CIVIL     ENGINEER
Surveying,  Designs,   Estimates,   etc.
Room  7,  Exchange Block,
Corner Third Ave and Sixth  Street
Prince Rupert
G. W. NICKERSON & CO.
CUSTOMS AND MERCHANDISE!
—o—
Brokers, Forwarding Agents,
Storage, etc.
J.  to.  POTTER
ARCHITECT     AND     STRUCTURAL
ENGINEER
Re-inforced Concrete a Specialty
—o—
Law-Butler Building - Prince Rupert
GRAHAM ISLAND — "The surest
sign of the progress of a town or
district is its newspaper—live, active, hustling." "The Masset Review,"  Masset, Q.C.I.
The Thompson
Hardware Co. :
-Second Avenue
Paints General Hardware,
Oils, Stoves and Ranges. Tuesday, September 21, 1910
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
 LADYSMITH	
COAL
H. B. ROCHESTER,  -   Centre Street
IN THE COUNTY COURT OF ATLIN
HOLDEN AT ATLIN
In the matter of the Estate of Thomas D. Kearns, deceased, Intestate
All parties having claims against
the above Estate are required to forward the same, with full particulars
thereof, duly verified, to the undersigned, not later than the sixteenth
day of February, 1911, after which
said date the Estate of the said deceased will be distributed amongst
those entitled thereto.
Dated at Atlin,   B.C.,  this    nineteenth day of August, A.D. 1910.
PATRICK FOLEY,
AG-OS Administrator.
Portland Canal Short Line Railway
Pursuant to Section 7 of the Navigable Waters Protection Act (R. S.
Can. cap 115) notice is hereby given
that there has been deposited in the
office of the Minister of Public
Works at Ottawa and a duplicate in
the Office of the Registrar of Titles
at Prince Rupert, plans and description of the site and side elevation of
a proposed railway wharf and trestle
approach thereto to be constructed
near the mouth of Bear River at
Stewart, British Columbia, and that
one month after the first insertion of
this notice the Company will apply
to the Governor-in-Council for the
approval thereof.
Dated at Victoria, British Columbia, this ICth day of September,
1910.
GERARD RUEL,
Chief Solicitor.
EBERTS & TAYLOR,
S23 Agents at Victoria, B.C.
LAND PURCHASE  NOTICES
Omineca Land District—District of
Coast, Range Five.
TAKE NOTICE that E. Lucas, of
West Carnie, Out., occupation banker,
Intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted at the southwest corner of lot
2287, District of Coast, Range Five,
and marked E.L.'s N.W. corner,
thence east SO chains, thence south
8" chains, thence west 80 chains,
thence north 80 chains to point of
commencement, containing 040 acres
more or less.
E. LUCAS,
Steven McNeill, Agent.
Dated Sept. 22, 1910. S27.
The Saving Habit
is the foundation of Independence. Begin saving now by-
opening an account with the Bank
of British North America and
making regular Weekly or
Monthly deposits.
jfi.oo starts a Saving! Account
and Interest is compounded at
highest current rates.
The Bank of
British North America
74 YEARS IN BUSINESS
Capital and Reserve over
$7,000,000.
Prince Rupert Branch—
E. STONHAM, Manager.
VAST RESOURCES OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA
(Continued from Page Four)
Omlneca Land District—District of
Coast, Range Five.
TAKE NOTICE that to. G. White-
sides, of South Bend, Ont., occupation bank clerk, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted at the southeast corner
of lot 1729, District of Coast, Range
Five, and marked G.G.W.'s N.E. corner, thence west 40 chains, thence
south 80 chains, thence east 40
chains, thence north 80 chains to
point of commencement, containing
320 acres, more or less.
to. G. WHITESIDES,
Steven McNeill, Agent.
Dated Sept. 22, 1910. S27
IN THE SUPREME COURT OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA
In Chambers before the Honourable
Mr. Justice Gregory.
Between:
John  Jacobs,    Frank Johnson    and
Charles Carlson, carrying on business as contractors under the firm
name or style of Hawkins & Co.,
Plaintiffs.
And
C. Peterson, C. Larson, and C. Anderson, Defendants.
UPON the application of the Plaintiffs and upon reading the affidavits
of James Allan Aikman sworn herein on the 20th and 21st days of September   instant,   and   filed,  and   the
Exhibits   therein   referred   to,   it   is
ordered  that  service  of the  writ  of
summons in this action upon the Defendants C. Peterson and C. Larson,
be effected by serving Lewis W. Patmore,  Barrister-at-Iaw,  with  a copy
of the writ of summons herein, and
a copy of this Order, at Prince Rupert, In  the Province of British  Columbia, and by publishing notice of
the said Writ of Summons and Order
In     the    Prince   Rupert  Journal,   a
semi-weekly paper,  pi 'dished  in  the
town of Prince Rupert, in the Province     of    British   Columbia,   for   six
Issues thereof, and thai the said Defendants, C. Peterson and C. Larson,
be required to appear to the Writ of
Summons In this action within eight
days from the last publication in the
said newspaper or from  the service
of the said Lewis to. Patmore, whichever shall last happen, and that the
same shall be good and sufficient service of the Writ of Summons herein;
And, it is further ordered, that the
costs of, and incidental to this application be costs In Ihe cause.
(Signed)       F. It. GREGORY, J.
No man is as Important as his wife
would like to think he Is.
D. D. Dewar and Mrs. Dewar, of
Victoria, accompanied by T. A. Simpson, of Banff, Scotland, left, last
nightf or the soulli, after spending a
day in the city. Mr. Dewar for some
time has represented the famous distillers, James Simpson & Son, and
his trip with a member of the Arm
was for the purpose of looking over
the new city of Prince Rupert. Mr.
Dewar has made many friends on the
coast since taking up his home here.
may be called the Southern Belt. A
large portion of this is covered with
timber too valuable to sacrifice even
in the promotion of agriculture. This
does not include the most southerly
district of British Columbia where
there are about three million acres
occupied and immediately available
for cultivation.
"In the Central Belt, lying between
the 52nd and 56th parallels, the
country to be served by tbe Grand
Trunk Pacific railway, the arable
and pasture land is estimated at
eleven million acres; while the
Northern Belt, between tbe 56th and
60 th parallels, including the great
plateaux of Cariboo, Cassiar and
Omineca, may be credited with at
least an equal quantity of cultivata-
iwson, whose
estimates have invariably been found
correct, considered six million four
hundred thousand acres of that country fitted to wheat growing, and as
it is in the same latitude as Vermillion, Alberta, where the best wheat
in the world is grown, we may accept his opinion without question.
Fruit Growing
"The progress made so far in agriculture has been principally confined
to the Southern Belt. The advancement made, particularly In fruit
growing, Is wonderful. Ten years
ago the total orchard area was 7,460
acres. Today the fruit acreage has
increased to over 100,000 acres. The
quality of our fruit is unsurpassed.
Year after year it has taken the gold
medal at the Royal Horticultural Society's Exhibition in London, and the
highest awards at other exhibitions
in England, Scotland, Ireland and
Wales. At the International Apple
Shows held In Spokane, British Columbia apples have been awarded
numerous prizes—in one instance
taking 13 prizes out of 14 entries—
in competition with twenty-two
States. Fruits culture is mainly con-
lined to the southern districts, but
apples, pears, plums, cherries and
small fruits are grown as far north
as Hazelton, on the Skeena River,
and it is expected that experiment
will show that successful orchards
may be raised in many parts of the
Central Belt.
"A striking proof of the great Importance of the fruit industry is the
enterprise of Vancouver in instituting
the first Canadian National Apple
Show, which opens In Vancouver October 31st, which Maxwell Smith has
worked so strenuously to secure for
Vancouver and at which there will
be exhibits from all parts of the continent.
Dairying Industry
"Dairying is another great Industry still In Its Initial stages. The
number of creameries has doubled In
len years and the production of butter has increased 2,500 per cent, yet
j we Imported $3,000,000 worth of
I butter and cheese last year. There
is no country under the sun better
suited to dairying and this branch of
agriculture affords opportunity to
thousands, and the same remark applies to poultry raising. We Import
over $2,000,000 worth of poultry
and eggs annually and the prices on
the local market place them in the
class of luxuries. It is interesting to
note that the value of poultry and
eggs annually produced in the United
States exceeds that of lumber, coal
and Iron.
"We have easily ten times as much
agricultural land as Japan with her
fifty million producing over 22,000,-
noo bushels of wheat ln 1909,
double that of Sweden. with over
5,000,000 people over half of whom
are engaged In agriculture and producing over 6,000,000    bushels    of
wheat in 19^8—and the greater part
of Ev.-eden lies north of the sixtieth
parallel—north of the northern
boundary of British Columbia.
Mineral Wealth
"The mineral output of the province for 1909 was $14,443,025. The
gross output of coal In long tons,
2,400,000.
"The greatest coal field of British
Columbia, or of Canada, is the Rocky
Mountain coal field, of which 80 per
cent is In British Columbia, and 20
per cent in Alberta. The present
British Columbia (1909) gross output of coal for the whole province is
2,400,600 tons, and at this rate of
production East Kootenay coal fields
can keep up this supply for 15,000
years.
"Dr. Henry S. Poule, of Nova
Scotia, In the employ of the geological survey, says in his report, made
in 1903, as to ceal still remaining In
the ground: 'The quantity of coal
exceeding two feet in thickness within a vertical depth of 4,000 feet an
estimate of 600,000,000 tons would
seem conservative.' This does not
include other promising fields in
East Kootenay, Northern British Co-
lumoia and Peace river.
"The Rocky Mountain coal nelds,
lying on either flank of the main
range of the Rocky Mountains, respectively in the provinces of British
Columbia and Alberta, are undoubtedly the most extensive deposits in
Canada, and, what is more important
from a commercial point of view, are
the only large coal fields of first class
coal at present known on the Pacific
slope between Alaska and Mexico.
Immense Field
"While It has been a matter of
common knowledge in British Columbia that these deposits were large
it Is questionable if more than a few
people recognized their wonderful extent or the enormous influence which
they must have on the future of the
country. What this influence must
be can best be demonstrated by the
illustration of what the coal deposits
of Pennsylvania have done for that
state—they have made it probably
the greatest manufacturing state of
the Union—and the condition of
Western Canada today is that of the
Eastern United States fifty years ago,
except that we may look forward to
a more rapid development due to the
more general progress of the rest of
the continent, and the improved
transportation and other facilities
now available.
"It seems, therefore, that Eastern
British Columbia Is destined to be,
from the possession of its coal fields
alone, the Pennsylvania of the Pacific
slope, and that at no distant date.
"The estimate coal in the Rocky
Mountain coal fields is no less than
44,130,000,000 tons, of which some
36,000,000,000 or 81 per cent, of
the whole, is in British Columbia,
practically all of it availab'e from
the valley of the Elk river.
Other Minerals
"The tonnage of ore, exclusive of
coal,  was  2,057,713  tons.
"The value of the output of the
lode mines for the yoar was $13,-
791,141, practically all of which Is
smelted in the province.
"The value of the output of our
placer mines is estimated at $477,-
000.
"The output of the smelters of the
province is approximately $13,800,-
000, and it is worthy of note that
one of the smelters in the tonnage of
ore treated is among the first three
largest smelters In the world.
"It must be borne in mind that the
country is not yet nearly prospected,
and I might mention the recent discoveries on the Portland Canal—
where there are already some 1,500
people at Stewart, and where Mackenzie & Mann are building a railway
and propose to treat tbe ore there.
Sporting Centre
"No country peopled by white men
surpasses British Columbia in opportunity for the hunter and angler. Our
vast solitudes are the home of a great
variety of wild animals and birds and
our coast and inland waters teem
with fish. The grizzly and several
other species of bears, elk, moose,
caribou and smaller deer nf many
kinds, panthers, wolves, mountain
sheep, goats, lynx, wild cat, foxes
and many fur-bearing animals, are
plentiful, and water fowl and game
birds are numerous and widely distributed. In the southern districts
are pheasants, black game and capercailzie, Imported and climallzed,
while partridge, grouse and prairie
chicken as indigenous and are found
in all parts of the province. The
game fishes Include salmon, steel-
head and several species of trout,
charr, sea bass and black bass. The
fame of the province as a hunting
g: iund has spread abroad and every
year sees an Increasing number of
big game hunters from Europe, who
are invariably delighted with their
success In securing trophies. At the
recent sporting exhibition In Vienna
the display of British Columbia game
in charge of Mr. Warburton Pike,
was one of the chief attractions, securing several first prizes.
"Some of the states of the union to
the soutii of us obtain large revenues
from exploitation of their big game.
The state of Maine boasts of the revenue from her protected big game
and you could put that state In the
smallest coanty of British Columbia!
(Applause.)
Open Harbors
"One of British Columbia's greatest assets is her climate. Our harbors
are open the year round and there is
no ice to contend with in navigation.
The coast climate is exceedingly mild
while as for our northern country,
let me say that the Russian province
of Tobolsk, which lies north of ths
4th parallel, supports a population
of 1,500,01)0 and in the census year
of 1900 produced over 21,000,000
bushels of grain besides large quantities of dairy produce and live
stock."
A voice: "What about Quebec?"
The Premier: "My friend, Quebec
has a good climate and so have we—
only more of it! (Laughter and
cheers.)
"This province is peculiarly adapted to the comparatively cheap utilization of the power of falling water.
It is safe to say that on Vancouver
Island 500,000 horsepower may be
cheaply developed.
"Within one hundred and fifty
miles of the city of Vancouver it is
estimated that hydro-electric development may deliver five hundred thousand horsepower should that amount
be required. At Adams' river, above
Kamloops, is another magnificent
power site. On the Kootenay river,
near Nelson, with Its own hydro-electric power plant at Bonnington Falls,
installed at a cost of over $350,000,
is, I believe, prepared to furnish
power at a maximum of $30 per
horsepower fer annum for manufacturing purposes. The Pend d'Oreille
river, south of Nelson, is also capable of developing some fifty thousand
horsepower at moderate cost. On the
west flank of the Rockies are many
smaller power possibilities. On Willow river, within twenty miles of
Fort George, a company is even now
undertaking the development up to
some twenty thousand horsepower as
required. Near Prince Rupert the
Katahda river may be made to furnish about ten thousand horsepower.
At the points already specified we
have nearly one million horsepower,
concerning which we have some definite information or partial development. The full extent of the province will enormously exceed this
though at present it is impossible to
make an accurate estimate.
G. T. P. Road
"To secure population we must
have convenient and cheap transportation and this is being supplied
as fast as possible. The Grand Trunk
Pacific will provide a great central
trunk line, with branches extending
north and south, while the Canadian
Northern railway will serve a large
extent of territory in the valleys of
the Upper Fraser and Thompson
rivers and down through the fruitgrowing districts of Kamloops and
Nicola.
"The railway mileage today approximates 1,700 miles and there is
under construction over 400 miles of
railway, while the completion of the
Kettle Valley, C.N.R. and G.T.P.
main lines will add 1,300 miles to
the railways.
"In manufacturers the province
produces about $30,000,000 annually. The operation of the Tehuantepec
railway has already permitted some
fifty manufacturing firms In Nova
Scotia and New Brunswick to do
business with British Columbia, and
the Panama canal will give still further relief, but the truj solution of
the problem is the establishment of
factories here from which the
prairies can be suplied at half or less
than the present freight rates. We
have the raw materials and the power
to run the machinery, why not utilize
them?
"Our merchant marine is steadily
increasing. The navigation returns
for 1909 show that 5,000 sea-going
vessels sailed from British Columbia
ports In the year, while there were
20,000 vessels engaged In the coasting trade, representing in all over
9,000,000 tons of shipping.
Must Manufacture Here
The assembly rose to Its feet in
enthusiasm when the premier said:
"We hear talk of a ecrtain nation
wanting to come into Canada for our
raw materials. Her manufacturers
must have them. Well, they can come
and get their raw materials If they
want to, but," raising his hand to
lend emphasis to his remarks, "on
one condition, and one only. And
that one condition is that they must
build their mills here and manufac-
CHAMPIONS OF THE WORLD    *
New Westminster, Sept. 27.
—By a score of 11 to 1 on
Saturday New Westminster lacrosse team established its
claim to retain the Minto cup,
by defeating the Nationals of
Montreal. The Westminster
team thus remains the champions of the world.
CHURCH IS OPENED
Port Essington Has  New Building to
Take Place of One
Burned.
Opening Services of Interesting Character Wore Held There on Sunday Evening
ture from their raw materials in this
province of British Columbia!" For
two minutes enthusiasm reigned,
some of the members breaking Into
song.
"What does the future hold for
us? It is a question that you must
pardon us in answering if we seem
too optimistic. I feel satisfied, however, that we have already sufficient
evidence in the past to say that we
can expect in the future to count the
population of British Columbia, not
by thousands as we do not, but by
millions. (Applause.) British Columbia needs no vain boasting to reassure herself!" (Applause.)
"We out here," he concluded,
"say that while you come to British
Columbia from Ontario and Quebec,
we western Canadians are just as
proud of Toronto and Quebec, and
with as much reason, as yourselves
are! (Aplause.) When we say this
we mean to Invite you to feel the
same toward British Columbia—to
feel that when we speak of our mines
and timber and our agricultural and
marine resources, they are every
whit as much your inheritance as
they are ours. He would be recreant in his duty who returns to the
east feeling other than that the west
is as much his as ours. We are all
loyal Canadians and with you easterners join in the strongest support
in one king, one flag and one empire!" (Loud and continued applause.)
 o	
G. Starrett, one of the directors of
the Canadian Fish and Cold Storage
Company, left for the south last night
after spending a few weeks here.
(From Our Own Correspondent)
Port Essington, Sept. 26—The first
service was held In the new Episcopal
church here on Sunday evening. It
will be remembered that the English
church was destroyed here some
three months ago, and work on the
new church has been going on for
some time now. The building has
been completed and the first service
was held on Sunday evening.
Rev. F. Rushbrook has had a very
strenuous time building the new
church, having done a great deal of
the work himself, but his labors have
been rewarded, for he has certainly
got a very nice little house of worship for his small but faithful flock
in Port Essington. Archdeacon Col-
lison, of Kincolith, preached a very
effective sermon last evening, and remarked that his first sermon ever
preached in Port Essington was in a
room belonging to Mr. Robert Cunningham, over twenty-five years ago.
He was delighted to be able to address a congregation here once again.
Rev. R. VV. Gurd, of Claxton, B.C.,
was present at the opening ceremony, accompanied by his daughter,
Miss Rita Gurd. There were quite a
large number of people present.
The church was beautifully decorated with fresh cut flowers. The
singing was also excellent. Mrs.
Doris Cameron sang a very fine solo
In a clear rich contralto.
 o ■
Personals
LOTS FOR SALE
IN
Ellison
AND
Prince
Houses, Stores, Offices to Rent.
MONEY TO LOAN
C. D. NEWTON
Real Estate        Exchange Block    Notary Public
Judge Young has returned from
Atlin.
* t     *
Harvey Creech, of Copper City, Is
in the city for a few days.
* *    *
Miss Olga Instett has returned
from a visit to Portland, Ore.
* *     *
Aid. Smith has gone to Camrose,
Alberta, for a trip. He will inspect
a ranch he owns there.
* *    * t
John  G.  Johnston,   of  Vancouver,
was in the city this week. He returned south last evening.
* *    *
•J, Fred Ritchie left yesterday afternoon for Stewart. He will be absent from the city for several days.
* *     *
F, II. Worlock, of Victoria, representing the Phoenix Brewery of that
city, has returned from Stewart.
* *     *
J. L. Parker of the Pacific Metals
company, has returned from a trip to
Ketchikan and Goose Bay.
* *     *
On Sunday the Salvation Army
commenced services here under
Major Morris who introduced the new
officers for this fort.
* *     *
Among the arrivals on the Prince
George Sunday was C. H. Topp, formerly city engineer of Victoria. He
resigned a few months ago to go Into
private practice as a member of Ihe
well known firm of Gore & McGregor.
Mr. Topp left yesterday for the
Queen Charlotte IslJnds on business
for the firm.
* »     *
Mr. Long, the manager for Ihe
Bank of British North America, arrived this morning on the Cottage
| City from Skagway. He formerly had
charge of the hank in Dawson. Mr.
Stonham, who lias had charge of the
bank since Its opening here, will
leave In a few clays to resume his In-
spectora] duth
ill
TIME TO ItlV
Knzelton Nine Mile Mining Company
Offering Shares ul Special Price
The new li tin of l'\ T. Bowness
Brokerage Company is offering a
special opportunity to investors to
get in on the rich mining district
aboul Hazelton. The Hazelton Nine
Mile Mhiing Company, with what
promises to be sonic of the very best
propositions In a great camp, Is
placing a block of Bhares at special
prices  through   this  firm.
The property is controlled by men
who are on the ground and have
known the possibilities. With the
opening up of the Interior these
mini's will become very valuable. The
shares are put on at the price advertised in .'mother column for a
limited time only, PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Tuesday, September 27, 1910
THE HAGUE AWARD
COAL NOTICES
Full Text of Decision Given in Fishing
Natter Affecting Atlantic
Coast.
The Question of  What Constitutes a
Bay is  Brought   I'p  Before
the Tribunal
The full text of The Hague tribunal award on the fisheries case as it
affects the Newfoundland and Canadian Atlantic coast contains interesting Information, It is one of the
most Important matters ever submitted to an international court of
arbitration. These questions and
answers are:—
Question 1.—To what extent are
the following contentions or either of
them justified.
It is contended on the part of
Great Britain that the exercise of the
liberty to take fish, referred to in
the treaty of 1818, which the inhabL.
tants of the United States have forever in common with the subjects of
his Britannic Majesty, is subject to
tbe consent of Newfoundland.in the
form of municipal laws, ordinances
or rules, as, for example, the regulation in respect of (1) the hours,
days or seasons when fish may be
taken on the treaty coasts. (2) The
methods, means and implements to
be used In the taking of fish or in
the carrying on of fishing operations
on such coasts. (3) Any other matters of similar character relating to
fishing, such regulations being reasonable.
It is contended on the part of the
United States that the exercise of
such liberty is not subject to limitations or restraint by Great Britain,
Canada or Newfoundland unless they
are appropriate and necessary for
the protection and preservation of
the common rights in such fisheries,
and unless ihey be reasonable in
themselves and fair as between local
fishermen and fishermen coming from
the United States, and not so framed
as to give an advantage to the former over the latter, and unless their
appropriateness, necessity, reasonableness and fairness be determined
by the United States and Great Britain by common accord, and the
United States concurs in their enforcement.
Britain  Supreme on Const
Answer.—The right of Great Britain to make regulations without the
consent of the United States as to
the exercise of the liberty to take
fish, referred to in article 1 of the
treaty of October 20, 1818, in the
form of municipal laws, ordinances
or rules of Great Britain, Canada,
or Newfoundland is inherent in the
sovereignty of Great Britain.
The exercise of that right by Great
Britain is, however, limited by the
said treaty in respect of the said liberties therein granted to the inhabitants of the United States In that
such regulations must be made bona
fide and must not be in violation ot
(1) appropriate or necessary for the
protection and preservation of such
fisheries, or (2) desirable or necesary
on grounds of public order and morals, without unnecessarily interfering with the fishery itself, and in both
cases equitable and fair as between
local and American fishermen, and
not so framed as to give unfairly an
advantage to the former over the latter class, are not inconsistent with
the obligation to execute the treaty
In good faith, and are, therefore,
reasonable and not in violation of
tho treaty.
Reasonable   Regulations
For the decision of the question
whether a regulation is or Is not
reasonable, as being or not being ln
accordance with the dispositions of
the treaty and not in violation there
of, Ihe treaty of 1818 contains no
special provision. The settlement of
differences in ibis respect thai might
arise thereafter was left to the or
Unary means of diplomatic Intercourse. By reason, however, of the
form in which question one is put,
and by further reason of the admission of Great, Britain, by her counsel
before this tribunal, thai it is not
now for either of *he parties to the
treaty to determine the reasonableness of any regulations made by
Great Britain, Canada or Newfoundland, the reasonableness of any such
regulation, if contested, must be decided, not by either of ihe parties,
but by impartial authority ln accordance with the principles herein
above laid down, and ln the manner
proposed In the recommendations
made by the tribunal.
in virtue of article 4 of the agreement, the tribunal further decides
that article 4 of the agreement Is, as
stated by counsel of the respective
parties at. the argument, permanent
in its effect, and not tremlnable by
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that I, K. M. Mc-
Innes, of Prince Rupert, occupation
mariner, intend to apply for a
license to prospect for coal and petroleum on the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted on the south shore of Crow Bay,
thence north 80 chains, thence west
80 chains, thence south 80 chains,
thence east 80 chains to post marked
K.M.McI.'s S.E. corner.
Dated August 18th, 1910.
SI 6 KENZIE McLEOD MclNNES.
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that I, K. M. Mc-
Innes, of Prince Rupert, occupation
mariner, intent! to apply for a license to prospect for coal and petroleum over the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted on the soutii shore of Crow Bay,
tnence north 8 0 chains, thence east
80 chains, thence south 80 chains,
thence west 80 chains to post marked
K.M.McI.'s S.W. corner.
Dated August 18th, 1910.
S10 KBNZIB McLEOD MclNNES.
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that I, K. M. Mc-
Innes, of Prince Rupert, occupation
mariner, intend to apply for a license to prospect for coal and petroleum over the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted on the soutii short of Crow Bay,
thence south 80 chains, tlience west
0 chains, thence north 80 chains,
tlience east 80 chains to post marked
K.M.McI.'s N.E.  corner.
Dated August 18th. 1910.
S16 KENZIE McLEOD MclNNES.
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that I, K. M. Mc-
Innes, of Prince Rupert, occupation
mariner, intend to apply for a li-
ense to prospect for coal and petroleum over the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted on the south shore of Crow Lake,
thence south 80 chains, thence east
0 chains, thence north SO chains,
thence west 80 chains to post marked
K.M.McI.'s N.W. corner.
Dated August. 18th, 1910.
S16 KENZIE McLEOD MclNNES.
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Reginald
Davey, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation machinist, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands, in the vicinity of
vitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—-
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-west corner and about 6 "4
miles distant in a north-westerly direction from the north end of Kitwancool Lake, tlience south 80
chains, thence east 80 chains, thence
north 40 chains, thence west 40
chains, thence north 40 chains,
chains, thence west 40 chains to a
point of commencement, and containing 480 acres  (more or less).
REGINALD   DAVEY.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated  May  30,  1910. Jy8
NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that application will be made to the Legislative Assembly of tbe Province of
British Columbia at its next Session
for an Act to incorporate a company
with power to construct, equip,
maintain and operate a line or lines
of railway of standard guage with
any kind of motive power for the
conveyance of passengers and freight,
and with all the powers contained
in the "Model Railway Bill": Commencing from a point at or near
Port Simpson, or Work Channel, in
the Coast District, British Columbia,
by the most feasible, desirable and
I practicable route to a point on the
Eastern boundary of the Province of
British Columbia, via the South-west
side of Work Channel to the Skeena
River; thence up the North side of
the Skeena River to a point near
Hazelton; thence to the junction of
the Bulkley River; thence up the
right bank of this River eight (8)
miles to the Suskewa River; thence
up this River by a low divide to the
head of Babine Lake; thence to the
north end of Stuart Lake; thence
north of McLeod Lake to the Mis-
nichinca River; thence up the Mis-
nichinca River by Summet Lake to
Pine River Pass; thence north-westerly to head of Pine River, and down
ihis River to Moberley Lake; and
thence by the Peace River to the
Eastern boundary of the said Province of British Columbia; and with
power to construct, operate and
maintain all necessary bridges, roads,
ways and ferries; and to build, acquire, own and maintain wharves and
docks in connection therewith; and
to build, acquire, own, equip and
maintain steam and other vessels and
boats, and to operate the same on
any navigable waters; and with
power to build, equip, operate and
maintain telegraph and telephone
lines in connection with the said
Railway and branches, and to transmit messages for commercial purposes, and fo charge tolls therefor;
and to generate and to sell electricity
for the supply of light, heat and
power; and with power to expropriate lands for the purposes of the
Company; and to acquire lands,
money bonuses, privileges or other
aids from any Government, municipal corporation or other persons or
bodies; and to levy and collect tolls
from all persons using, and on all
freight passing over any of such
roads, railways, ferries, wharves and
vessels built by the Company; and
with power to connect with and make
traffic or other arrangements with
railway, steamboat, or other companies:
Dated at Victoria, B.C., this 11th
day of August, 1910.
BARNARD & ROBERTSON,
A19.       Solicitors for the Applicants.
COAL CLAIMS
the expiration of the general arbitration  treaty of  1818   between  Great
Britain and the United States.
Foreign  Crews  on  Vessels
Question 2.—Have the' inhabitants
of the United States a right to employ
as members of the fishing crews of
their vessels persons not inhabitants
of Ihe United States?
Answer.—In view of the preceding
considerations, this tribunal is of the
opinion that the inhabitants of the
United States, while exercising the
liberties referred to in the said articles, have a right to employ as members of the fishing crews of their vessels persons not Inhabitants of the
United States; but ln view of the preceding considerations, the tribunal
to prevent any misunderstanding as
to the effect of its award, expresses
the opinion that non-inhabitants employed as members of the fishing
crews on United States vessels derive
no benefit of Immunity from the
treaty, and it Is so decided and
awarded.
Reporting to Customs
Question 3.—Can the exercise by
the Inhabitants of the United States
of the liberties referred to be subjected without the consent of the United
States to the requirements of entry
or report at customs houses or the
payment of light or harbor or other
dues, or to any other similar requirement or condition or exaction?
Answer.—The requirement that an
American fishing vessel should report
if proper conveniences for so doing
are at hand, it not unreasonable, for
the reasons stated in the foregoing
opinion There should be no such
requirement, however, unless there
be reasonably convenient opportunity
afforded to report, in person or by
telegraph, either at a customs house
or to a customs official, but the exercise of the fishing liberty by the Inhabitants of the United States should
not be subjected to the purely commercial formalities of a report of entry and clearance at a customs house,
not to light, harbor or other duties
not imposed upon Newfoundland
fishermen.
Imposing Restrictions
Question 4.—Under the provision
of the said article that the American
fishermen shall be admitted to enter
Skeena  District—Queen  Charlotte
Islands.
To all to whom it may concern:—
NOTICE is hereby given that I, the
undersigned, intend to apply for a
icense to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum upon the following lands
situate on Graham Island, one of the
Queen Charlotte Group, in the Province of British Columbia, and more
particularly described as follows, viz:
Commencing at a stake planted one
and a quarter miles west of the
north-east corner of Louis Inlet, and
marked "P. C. Coates' S. E. Corner
Claim No. 1," thence west 80 chains,
thenee north 80 chains, thence east
80 chains, thence south 80 chains to
the place of commencement.
Staked June 14th, 1910.
Dated this 28th day of July, 1910.
P. C. COATES,
By his Agent, Wm. Edward Laird.
A9
COAL CLAIMS
Skeena  District—Queen  Charlotte
Islands.
To all to whom It may concern: —
NOTICE is hereby given that I, the
undersigned intend to apply for a
Icense to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum upon the following lands,
situated on Graham Island, one of
the Queen Charlotte group, in the
Province of British Columbia, and
more particularly described as follows, viz:—Comemncing at a stake
planked at the S. E. corner of P. C.
Coates' Claim No. 1, and marked
"Wm. Penman's S. W. Corner, Claim
No. 1," thence east 80 chains, thence
north 80 chains, thence west 80
chains, thence south, 80 chains to the
dace of commencement.
Staked, June 14th, 1910.
Dated this 28th days of July, 1910.
WM. PENMAN.
By his Agent, Wm. Edward Laird.
A9
LAND   LEASE   NOTICE
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that The Canadian
Fish & Cold Storage Company Ltd.,
of Vancouver, occupation Mercantile
and Manufacturing, Intends to apply
for permission to lease the following described land:—Commencing at
a post planted at high water mark
on the westerly side of Prince Rupert Harbor and distant about 110
chains from the north-east corner of
Lot 443, thence west 20 chains,
thence south 20 chains, thence east
5 chains, more or less to high water
mark, thence following along the
high water mark to the point of commencement and containing 20 acres
more or less.
The Canadian Fish and Cold
Storage Company, Llmtted,
J. H. Plllsbury, Agent.
Dated June 20th, 1910. Jyl2
LAND PURCHASE NOTICES
Skeena Land District—District of
Pim^iftr
TAKE NOTICE that Phillip Williams, of Sydney, Nova Scotia, occupation accountant, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein
ley:—Commencing at a post planted
at the S. E. corner and about 16%
miles distant In a north-westerly direction from the north end of Kitwancool Lake, thence north 80
chains, thence west. 80 chains, thence
south 80 chains, thence east 80
chains to point of commer cement,
and containing 640 acres, more or
less. PHILLIP  WILLIAMS.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June  4,  1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Annie Grieve,
of Victoria, B. O, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following, described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. W. corner, and about 17 % miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence soutii 4 0 chains, thence
east 40 chains, thence soutii 40
bains, thence east 40 chains, thence
north 80 chains, thence west 80
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 480 acres, more or
less. ANNIE  GRIEVE.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 4, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that John Cox, of
Monarch, Alberta, occupation farmer, intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described
lands, situated in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Comencing at a. post planted at the
north-west corner and about five and
one-quarter miles distant in a northwesterly direction from the north end
of Kitwancool Lake, thence 80
chains south, thence 80 chains east,
thence 80 chains nortb, thence 80
chains west to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres,
more or less.
JOHN COX.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated  May  30,  1910. Jy5
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE thai Mary Brown,
of Vancouver, B.C., occupation married woman, Intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following described lands lu the vicinity ol
the Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—Commencing at a post planted
at the North-east corner and about
ten miles distant in a north-westei ly
direction from tbe north end of the
Kitwancool lake, thence south 80
chains, thence west 40 chains, thenco
north 40 chains, thence west 40
chains, thence north 40 chains
thence east 80 chains to point ol
commencement, and containing 480
acres, more or less.
MARY  BROWN.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 1,  1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that James Alexander McDonald, of Monarch, Alberta, occupation farmer, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands, situated in
the Kitwancool or Chein Wein Valley:—Commencing at a post planted
at the N. E. corner about five and
one quarter miles distant in a northwesterly direction from the north
end of Kitwancool Lake, thence south
80 chains, thence west SO chains,
thence north 80 chains, thence east
80 chains to point of commencement,
and   containing   640   acres,  more  or
JAMES ALEXANDER McDONALD
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated May 30,  1910. Jy5
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that John Henderson, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
agent, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. .W corner and about 25 miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north 80 chains, thence
east 40 chains, thence south 80
chains, thence west 80 chains to
point of commencement and containing 320 acres, more or less.
JOHN   HENDERSON.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 7th, 1910. Jy8
Coast Land District—District of
Skeena.
TAKE NOTICE that I, Ernestine
A. Roney, of Prince Rupert, occupation married woman, Intend to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted on tbe north
bank of the Skeena River about half
a mile south of Geo. T. Church's preemption, thence west 10 chains,
thence north 40 chains, tlience east
to the Skeena River; thence southwest following the bank of the
Skeena River to the place of beginning, and containing about 80
acres.
ERNESTINE A. RONEY, Locator.
to. A. Roney, Agent.
Dated July 7th, 1910. Jy22
Coast Land District—District of
Skeena.
TAKE NOTICE that I, J. Adolpb
Perry, of Vancouver, B.C.. occupation
book-keeper, intend to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted, on the north bank of the
Skeena River, about a mile west of
Lot 31, thence north 40 chains,
thence east 80 chains to lot 31,
tlience south 40 chains to bank of
Skeena River, thence west about 80
chains- following north bank of
Skeena River to point of commencement, and containing about 320
acreB.
J. ADOLPH PERRY, Locator.
Wm. A. Roney, Agent.
Dated July 16th, 1910. Jy22
[certain bays or harbors for shelter,
repairs, wood or water and for no
ether purpose whatever, but that they
shall  be  under such   restrictions as
j may  be necessary   to  prevent  their
(Continued  on   Page  Seven)
Coast Land District—District of
CSIf pan a
TAKE NOTICE that I. Mary M.
Roney, of Stillwater, Minnesota, U.
S.A., occupation married woman, Intend to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands.
Commencing at a post planted on the
north bank of the Skeena River at
the south-east corner of Geo. T.
Church's pre-emption, tlience north
40 chains, thence east 40 chains,
thence south to the bank of the
Skeena River, thence south-west following the Skeena River to the place
of beginning and containing about
120 acres.
MARY M. ROENY, Locator.
W.  A.  Roney, Agent.
Dated July 8th, 1910. Jy22
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Violet Gelger,
of Victoria, B. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands ln the vicinity of Kltwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. W. corner and about 23% miles
distant In a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kltwancool
Lake, thence south 80 chains, thence
east 40 chains, thence north 40
chains, thence east 40 chains, thence
north 40 chains, thence west 80
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 480 acres, more or
less. VIOLET GEIGER.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June  7th,  19*0. Jy8
LAND PURCHASE NOTICES
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Pearl Caspell
of Cayley, Alberta, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the folic wing described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Weln Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. E. corner and about 15% miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kltwancool
Lake, tlience south 80 chains, thence
west 40 chains, thence north 40
chains, thence west 40 chains, thence
north 4 0 chains, thence east 80
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 4S0 acres, more or
less. PEARL CASl'ELL.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 3, 1910. jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Laura Gordon
of Victoria, B. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase tbe following
described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—•
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. E. corner and about 18 miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence south 40 chains, thence
west 40 chains, thence north 40
chains, thence east 40 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 160 acres, more or less.
LAURA GORDON.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated  June  4,   1910. jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Walter Marke
of Toronto; Ont., occupation traveller, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool
or Chean Wein Valley:—Commencing at a post planted at the N. E.
corner and about 27% miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence soutii 80 chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence north 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to tho
point of commencement and containing 640 acres, more or less.
WALTER MARKE.
James  W. Smith, Agent
Dated June Sth, 1910. Jy8
LAND PURCHASE NOTICES
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Ethel Welsh,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
south-east corner and about 10 miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the nortb end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north SO chains, tlience
west 8 0 chains, tlience south 80
chains! thence east 80 chains to
point of commencement and containing 640 acres, more or less.
ETHEL WELSH.
James to. Smith, Agent
Dated June 1st, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Henry Welsh,
of Vancouver, B. O, occupation
printer, intends to apply foi permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. E. corner and 11 miles distant
ln a north-westerly direction from
the north end of Kitwancool Lake,
thence north 8 0 chains, thence west
80 chains, thence south 80 chains,
thence east 80 chains to point of
commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
HENRY WELSH.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 2,  1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Frederick
Welsh, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation clerk, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-east corner about 11 miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool'
Lake, thence south SO chains, thence
west 40 chains, thence north 80
chains, thence east 40 chains to
point of commencement, and containing 320 acres, more or less.
FREDERICK WELSH.
James W. Smith, Agent
Dated June 2,  1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiai.
TAKE NOTICE that James Welsh,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation machinist, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. W. corner and about 12 miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kltwancool
Lake, thence south 80 chains, thence
east 20 chains, thence north 80
chains, thence west 20 chains to the
point of commencement and containing 160 acres, more or less.
JAMES WELSH.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated  June  2,   1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassii
TAKE NOTICE that Marguerette
Burns, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission .o purchase the
following described lands ln the vicinity of Kltwancool or Chean Weln
Valley:—Commencing at a post
planted at the N. E. corner and distant about 12 miles in a northwesterly direction from -the north
end of Kitwancool Lake; thence
south SO chains, tlience west 20
chains, thence north 80 chains,
thence east 20 chains to point of
commencement, and containing 160
acres, more or less.
MARGUERETTE  BURNS.
James- to. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 2,  1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE' that Richard
Howie, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation dentist, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of
Kitwancool or Chean Weln Valley:—■
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. E. corner and about 24% miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence south 80 chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence north 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
RICHARD HOWIE.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June  7th,  1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Sandford
Burton, of Vancouver, B. O, occupation mining engineer, Intends to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands in the vicinity of Kltwancool or Chean Wein
Valley:—Commencing at a post
planted at the N. E. corner and
about 23% miles distant ln a northwesterly direction from the north
end of Kitwancool Lake, thence south
80 chains, thence west 80 chains,
thence north 80 chains, thence east
80 chains to point of commencement
and containing 640 acres, more or
less. SANDFORD BURTON.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 7th, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Pfl.""4iflr
TAKE NOTICE that Norman Cle-
land, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation printer, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands ln the vicinity of Kltwancool or Chean Weln Valley:—
Comencing at a post planted at the
S. E. corner and about 26% miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kltwancool
Lake, thence north 80 chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence south 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
NORMAN  CLELAND.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 8th, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles F.
Burns, of Moncton, New Brunswick,
occupation auditor, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the fol-
lowiug described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein
Valley:—Commencing at a post
planted at the south-west corner and
about 12 miles distant in a northwesterly direction from the north
end of Kltwancool Lake; thence
north 80 chains, thence eaBt 80
chains, thence south 80 chains,
thence west 80 chains to point of
commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
CHARLES F.   BURNS.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated  June   2,   1910 Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that James Jar-
dine, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
merchant, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands In the vicinity of Kltwancool or Chean Weln Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. W. corner and about 13 miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from tbe north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence south SO chains, thence
east 80 chains thence north SO
chains, thence west 80 chains to
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
JAMES JARDINE.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 2, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that John McDIar-
mid, of Lucknow, Ont, occupation
farmer, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands ln tho vicinity of the
Kltwancool or Chean Weln Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. W. corner and about 13 miles distant ln a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kltwancool
Lake; thence north 80 chains, thence
east 40 chains, thence south 80
chains; thence west 40 chains to
point of commencement, and containing 320 acres.
JOHN McDIARMID.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 2, 1910. Jy8 Tuesday, September 27, 1910
THE  PRINCE  RUPERT  JOURNAL
APPRECIATED CITY
Rev. W. Stevenson of Victoria Writes of
Great Future of the
Place.
Prince   Rupert   Strongly   Impressed
Visitor, Who Gives His Ideas
About It
Rev. W. Stevenson, of Victoria, in
his latest article published in the
Colonist dealing with his trip along
the coast of British Columbia, gives
attention to Prince Rupert. His ideas
respecting this place are logical and
are such as could be expected from
one who takes such an Interest In
human affairs as he does.    He says:
Before seeing Prince Rupert I had
heard much about it; its rain, its un-
evenness, and Its soggy ground. It
was said that nothing was ever
known to grow there but moss; and
that its inhabitants were in constant
danger of sinking into tbe bottomless
bog on which it is being built. And
so I did not expect much. I did not.
expect to find a city in the making
standing on good rocky ground, and
the sun shining on it as it does at
Victoria or Kamloops. I did not expect that one of the first invitations
I should receive would be one to
come and taste some fine strawberries raised in the neighborhood. But
this was my experience.
Approached by water, Prince Rupert has all the appearance of a
towsy-headed boy who receives your
Inspection with an air of defiance, as
much as to say: "You just wait a bit;
I'm not cafing what people say just
now. I haven't got by best clothes
on yet. I'm here just, and I'm going
to be a big fellow before some of
the wise people know where they
are." This Impression was fully
borne out by all tbat I saw and heard
of Prince Rupert
There is the harbor, one of the
'finest in the world, even if there is
anywhere anything to approach It.
Those who have whispered things
against Prince Rupert must surely
have bade good-by to their senses.
Eighteen months ago it was nothing.
It was only then being cleared of timber to make room for a townsite.
Now there is a considerable population, with three newspapers, fine
hotels, banks, churches, schools, and
several fine, big stores. But all this
would be sheer folly if nothing else
could be said about it.
The great asset of Prince Rupert,
next to its harbor facilities, is that
It is to be the terminus of the great
transcontinental railroad which is being fast hurried toward completion
by the Grand Trunk Pacific. As soon
as the line opens and traffic begins,
Prince Rupert will spring to worldwide fame as the young giant city of
the northwest coast.
Prince Rupert will not be able to
hold back. It will no more be able
to resist growing than a strong young
athlete can on entering his teens.
Any natural disadvantage which it
has at present are only tit talk for
babies and garrulous old people. It is
a wet climate to be sure; but who
ever knew of a wet climate that was
not a perfectly healthy place to live
in, other things being equal? There
are no decent roads at present, and
one must not step off the sidewalk, In
case he should put his foot In a hole.
But who cares for that? There Is
always bedrock to build on, and before long Prince Rupert will have
roads as strong and clean, and natural conditions as advantageous as
any city can boast In Northern
climes.
This article is not written by a
professional "booster." I have no
Interst in Prince Rupert more than
In Timbuctoo, but I could not help
feeling inspired by the vision of what
Prince Rupert Is yet to be; and of
what It will do for the millions of
people who are bound in time to
come this way, and find escape from
the crowded centres of European lifo
and welcome to a new world of freedom and hope and natural advantage.
I have no Interst in the real estate men. for whom Prince Rupert
stands for so much, and who are
there for the sole purpose of marking
off the newcomers who land In the
city. I would willingly send them out
to work with their hands as other
men have to work, but the fact that
these men are there in such numbers
is an indication of what is coming by
way of trade and of the consequent
rise ln land values. I have no sympathy with the gamble in land that
goes on In all these new places, but
I predict that large fortunes will bo
made of town lots in Prince Rupert
during the next ten years or more.
When I came back  that way It was
raining, but it was rain like a Scotch
mist, only that the air was clear and
mild.
As our ship steamed out of the
harbor, a vision rose before my eyes
of another giant city, teeming with
life and throbbing with energy; a
great meeting place for the mighty
currents of commerce between East
and West that will surge this way;
a city rich in magnificent architectural creations, flowing with wealth,
made beautiful by. happy homes,
schools, colleges, halls of learning,
and homes of science and art; over
the water beautiful suburban residences, and on the waters stately
steamers filled with happ^ people as
they pass to and fro, seeking for
pleasure or for health on the shores
of the many beautiful Islands by
which these water ways are studded.
And then I wished that I might live
to see Prince Rupert as It will be
twenty, fifty, a hundred years hence.
 o	
NEW STYLES OF WARSHIPS
Stories of a startling revolution In
the construction of future warships
comes from Portsmouth.
It is said that the next Dreadnought to be built there will have
motor engines, and consequently the
vessel will be without funnels, boilers, stokeholds, and the other prominent features In steam. This will
mean a construction wholly different
to the present type of fighting vessel,
as startling ln Its change as when
steam first superseded sailing.
At present the internal combustion
marine engine has only been used on
submarines and other smal craft.
Whether it has yet been brought to
such a pitch of perfection as to develop the 60,000 to 70,000 horsepower that would be required in the
next battleship is problematical.
A solution of the difficulty would
bring up to the dawn of a new era in
naval affairs, and place on the seas
smokeless squadrons of great speed,
with no funnels to hinder fore-and-
aft gun-fire, and an enormous saving
in space, which would be devoted to
increasing fuel and ammunition, thus
adding enormously to radius and effectiveness of action.
In other words, It would maku-the
might Orion, launched only a few
days ago, an obsolete vessel.
It is Interesting to recall that in
Mr. Max Pemberton's famous novel,
"The Iron Pirate," his wonderful ship
was driven by internal combustion,
and failed at the critical moment owing to the difficulty of lubrication.
 o	
GERMAN RELATIONS
How the Late King Hoped for Closer
Relations Between
Nations.
He Labored Always to Bring About
Peaceful Settlements of
Troubles
Lord Esher has contributed to the
September number of the "Deutsche
Revue" a remarkable article on
"King Edward VII and Germany," an
advance proof of which has been obtained by the Berlin correspondent
of the "Daily Telegraph." Lord
Esher deals mainly with King Edward's attitude toward Germany, and
declares that he loved the German
people and had "a real liking" for
the Kaiser, which was the basis of
their intercourse
Lord Esher describes as "nothing
but pure imagination" the notion
that King Edward directed the foreign policy of Great Britain, and
continues:
"He always recognized that the determination of the policy of Great
Britain was the affair of the minister
for the time being.
"The leaders of both political parties in the country found in him not
only a powerful ally, but also a positively unconquerable champion of
their foreign policy. The foreign
policy of the ministry in office was
In his eyes—under constitutional
government, one should be able tq regard this as a matter of course—the
policy of the nation, and, therefore,
also the policy which the sovereign
sanctioned.
"King Edward, for his part, never
doubted that he would surmount the
internal crisis which his ministers
threatened to bring about, in a peaceable manner, and without injury to
his prestige.
"He may have momonts of annoyance but he never lost courage, and
he was always conscious that he
would be able to win the majority
of his people for himself, without regard to the form which a momentary
majority in the lower house might
take.
"In  Internal affairs as ln  foreign
policy, the fundamental trait in King
E '.ward's character was courage.
"He was at one with the majority
of his people In the wish to maintain
the sea power of Great Britain on the
highest step which It must occupy if
it is to fulfil the purposes of national
defence and afford a guarantee for
the inviolability of British territory.
He had no ulterior thoughts, and
never had a hostile intention.
"Least of all would it have occurred to the king to look with feelings
of jealousy, of irritation, or of uneasiness at the governing power of
the German empire.
"King Edward was far too reasonable, his knowledge of the world was
too thorough, and his understanding
of the conditions of commercial
rivalry among the European states
too e'ear for him not absolutely to
appreciate the real meaning of the efforts of the German Emperor and
the German people to Increase German sea-power, and to peg out a
broader area for German colonial undertakings.
"He could not regard disarmament
of limitation of armaments under existing corcumstances as anything else
than a fantastical dream, and he
could never understand how any intelligent human being could believe
that he had ever proposed either the
one or the other to the German Emperor."
Lord Esher concludes his article
with a plea for the inclusion of Germany in the bond of friendship that
nd^v unites Great Britain and France,
and though he does not expressly say
so, he leads one rto believe that this
consummation would rave accorded
with the feelings and convictions of
King Edward. The mafc objects of
such a combination, he suggests,
would be a guarantee of the status
quo in Northern and Central Europe.
THE HAGUE AWARD
(Continued From Page Six)
taking, drying or curing fish therein,
orin any other manner whatever
abusing the privilege thereby reserved to them, is it permissible to impose restrictions conditional upon
the payment of light or harbor dues,
or entering or reporting at customs
houses or any similar conditions?
Answer.—It is decided and awarded that such restrictions are not permissible unless American fishermen
entering such bays for any oi me
four purposes aforesaid and remaining more than 48 hours therein
should be required, if thought necessary by Great Britain or the colonial
government, to report either In person or to a customs official, if reasonably convenient opportunity therefor
is aoffrded, and it is so decided and
awarded.
What is a Bay?
Question 5.—From where must be
measured the three marine miles of
any of the coasts, bays, creeks or harbors referred to in the said article?
Answer.—The tribunal decides and
awards that in case of bays, the three
marine miles are to be measured
from a straight line drawn across the
body of water at the place where it
ceases to have the configuration and
characteristics of a bay. At all other
places the three marine miles are to
be measured following the sinuosities
of the coast.
Rules of Procedure
Now this tribunal hereby recommends for the consideration and acceptance of the high contracting parties the following rules and methods of procedure for determining the
limits of the bays hereinbefore enumerated: (1) In every bay, not hereinafter speclflcially provided for, the
limits of exclusion shall be drawn
three miles seaward from a straight
line across the bay ln the part nearest the entrance at the first point
where the width does not exceed ten
miles. (2) In the following bays
where the configuration of the coast
and the local climatic conditions are
such that foreign fishermen when
within the geographic headlands
might reasonably and bona fide believe themselves on the high seas, tlie
limits of exclusion shall be drawn in
each case between tho headlines hereinafter specified as being those at and
within which such fishermen might
be reasonably expected to recognize
the bay under average conditions.
For the Bale des Chaleurs the line
from the light at Birch Point on Mis-
cou Island to Macquereau Point
light; for the Bay of Miramlchi, the
line from the light at Point Escum-
lnac to the light on the eastern point
of Tabuslntac Gully; for Egmont Bay
in Prince Edward Island, the line
from the light at Cape Egmont to
the light at West Point, and off St.
Anne Bay, In the province of Nova
Scotia, the line from the light at
Point Anconl to the nearest point on
the opposite shore of the mainland.
For Fortune Bay, In Newfoundland,
the line from Connalgre Head t0 the
light   on   the   southeasterly   end   of
The Westholme
Lumber Company, Ld.
We carry the largest stock of
Building Supplies in the North.
Quotations given on short notice in all lines.
Rough and Dressed Lumber
Shingles and Lath
Mouldings and Cases
Doors and Windows
We handle Plaster and Lime at reasonable prices
Get our quotations for all classes of buildings.
.   FIRST AVENUE
OFFICE AND
WAREHOUSES
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SHERWIN & WILLIAMS
PAINTS
COVER THE EARTH.
WE   ARE   SOLE   AGENTS
CARLOAD JUST ARRIVED
Ready Nixed Paints,
Paints Ground in Oil,
Paints Ground in Japan,
Varnishes, Shellac, etc.
Water Stains
and
Decotint
IN ALL, COLORS
Prince Rupert Hardware & Supply
Company, Ltd.  thos. dunn, m&
^^^mm^M^^Mu^^mmm^M^m^m^M
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—THE—
Oliver
Typewriter
—FOR—
Seventeen Cents a Day
Please read the headline over
again. Then its tremendous significance will dawn upon you.
An Oliver Typewriter—the standard visible writer—the most highly
perfected typewriter on the market
—yours for 17 cents a day!
The typewriter whose conquest of
tho commercial world is a matter of
business history—yours for 17 cents
a day!
The typewriter that is equipped
with^scores of such conveniences as
"The Balance Shift"—"The Ruling
Device"—"The Double Release"—
"The Locomotive Base"—"The Automatic Spacer"-—"The Automatic Tabulator"—"The Disappearing Indicator"—"The Adjustable Paper Fingers"—"The Scientific Condensed
Keyboard"—all
Yours For 17 Cents a Day
DIIDI
Brunet Island, thence to Fortune
Head; for or near the following bays,
the limits of exclusion shall be three
marine miles seaward, from the following lines, namely, for or near
Barrington Bay, in Nova Scotia, the
line from the light on Stoddart Island to the light on the south point of
Cape Sable, thence to the light at
Baccaro Point, at Chedabucto, and
St. Peter's Bay; the line from Cranberry Island light to Green Island
light, thence to Point Rouge for Mira
Bay; the line from the light on the
east point of Scatarie Island to the
northeasterly point of Caue Morien;
and at Placentia Bay in Newfoundland, the line between from Latine
Point on the eastern mainland to the
most southerly point of Red Island,
on St. Mary's Bay, in Nova Scotia,
shall, for the purpose of delimitation, be taken as the coasts of such
bays.
Hay of Fundy Excluded
It is understood that nothing in
these rules refers either to the Bay
of Fundy, considered as a whole
apart from its bays and creeks, or as
to the Innocent Passages through the
Gut of Canso, which were excluded
by the agreement made by exchange
of notes between Mr. Bacon and Mr.
Bryce, dated February 21, 1909, and
March 4, 1909, or lo Conception Bay,
whihe was provided for by the decision of the Privy Council in the case
of the Direct United States Cable
Company, versus the Anglo-American
Telegraph company, in which decision the United States have acquiesced.
On the Whole Treaty Const
Question (i.—Have the inhabitants
of the United States the liberty to
take fish In tbe bays, harbors and
creeks on that part of the southern
coast of Newfoundland which extends
from Cape Race to Rameau Islands,
or on the western and northern
coasts of Newfoundland from Cape
Race to Qulrpon Island, or on the
Magdalen  Islands?
Answer.—This tribunal Is of opinion that American inhabitants are en-
tilled to fish in the bays, creeks and
harbors of the treaty coasts of Newfoundland and the Magdalen Islands,
nnd It Is so decided and awarded.
Trading Privileges
Question 7.—Are the Inhabitants
of the United Stales, whoso vessels
resort to the treaty coast, entitled to
have, for those vessels when duly
authorized by the I'nited States on
lhat behalf, the commercial privileges on treaty coasl accorded by
agreement or otherwise to United
States trading vessels generally?
Answer.—For these   reasons    this
tribunal is of the opinion that the
inhabitants of the United States are
so entitled insofar as concerns this
treaty, there being nothing in its provisions to disentitle them, provided
the treaty liberty of Ashing and the
commercial privileges are not exercised concurrently, and It Is so decided  and  awarded.
Many a man who pretends to believe things winds up by believing
them.
NOTICE  TO CONTRACTORS
Graham Island  School
SEALED TENDERS, superscribed
"Tender for Graham Island School,"
will be received by the Honourable
the Minister of Public Works up to
and including Monday, the 1 Oth day
of October, 1910, for the errction and
completion of a small one-room
school building at Graham Island,
one of the Queen Charlotte Islands,
Skeena  Electoral  District.
Plans, specifications, contract and
forms of tender may be seen on and
after the 12th day of September,
1910, at the offices of John L. Barge,
Secretary to the School Board, Queen
Charlotte City; the Government
Agent, Prince Rupert; tbe Mining
Recorder, Jedway; and the Department of Public Works, Victoria.
Each proposal must be accompanied by an accepted bank cheque
or certificate of deposit on a chartered bank of Canada, made payable
to the Honourable the Minister of
Public Works, for the sum of $125,
which shall be forfeited if the party
tendering decline to enter into con-
trac. when called upon to do so, or
if he fail to complete the work contracted for. The cheques or cc rtl-
ficates of deposit of unsuccessful tenderers will be returned to them upon
the execution of Ihe contract.
Tenders will nol be considered unless made out on the forms supplied,
signed with the actual signature of
the tenderer and enclosed In the envelopes furnished.
The lowest or any tender not
necessarily accepted,
F. C. GAMBLE,
Public Works Engineer.
Public Works Department,
Victoria, B.C., September 7, 1910.
We announced this new sales plan
recently, just to feel the pulse of the
people. Simply a small cash payment—then 17 cents a day. That
is the plan in a nutshell.
The result has been such a deluge of applications for machines
that we are simply astounded.
The demand comes from people of
all classes, all ages, all occupations.
The majority of inquiries has
come from people of known financial
standing who were attracted by the
novelty of the proposition. An impressive demonstration of the Immense popularity of the Oliver Typewriter.
A startling confirmation of our belief that the Era of Universal Typewriting Is at hand.        «
A Quarter of a Million People are
Making Money With
©	
EXAMINATION    FOR    INSPECTOR
OF STEAM BOILERS AND
MACHINERY
Examinations  for   tho  position   of
Inspector of Steam Boilers and Machinery,   under   the   "Steam   Boilers
Inspection  Act,  1901,"  will  he held
! at    the    Parliament  Buildings,  Victoria,  commencing   November     7th,
j 1910.     Application   and   instruction
forms can  he  had  on  application  to
: the undersigned, to whom the former
must  be returned  correctly filled in.
not  later  than   October  24th,   1910.
Salary $130 per month, increasing at
Hie rate of $5 per month each year
-to a maximum of $isn.
JOHN  PECK.
Chief  Inspector of  Machinery,
New Westminster, B.C.
i te' En I %
The Standard  Visible  Writer
The Oliver Typewriter is a moneymaker, right from the word "go!" So
easy to run that beginners soon get
in the "expert" class. Earn as you
learn. Let the machine pay the 17
cents a day—and all above that Is
yours.
Wherever you are, there's work to
be done and money to be made by
using the Oliver. The business world
is calling for Oliver operators. There
are not enough to supply tha demand.
Their salaries are considerably above
those of many classes of workers.
"An Oliver Typewriter tn
Every  Home!"
That Is our battle cry today. We
have made the Oliver supreme ln
usefulness and absolutely Indispensable in business. Now comes the
conquest of the home.
The simplicity and strength of the
Oliver fit It for family use. It Is becoming an important factor In the
home training of young people. An
educator as well as a money maker.
Our new selling plan puts the
Oliver on the threshold of every
home in America. Will you close
the door of your home or office on
this  remarkable  Oliver opportunity?
Write for further detnils of our
easy offer and a free ropy of the new
Oliver catalogue.    Address:
R. C. BEAN
Prince Rupert Agent
General   Offices:    Oliver   Typewriter
Building,  Chicago,  111.
CANCELLATION   OK   RESERVE
NOTICE is hereby given that the.
reserve existing on Crown lands In
the vicinity of Babine Lake, and
situate in Cassiar District, notice of
which bearing date June 30th, 1909,
was published in the British Columbia Gazette, dated July 2nd, 1908, Is
cancelled.
ROBERT A. RENWICK*
Deputy Commissioner of Lands.
Lands Department,
Victoria, B. C, June Kith, 1910
(First Insertion July 5.)
mdmtm THE   PRINCE  RUPERT  JOURNAL
Tuesday, September 27, 1910
II
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The Hazelton Nine-Mile Mining Co'y.
^^^^ The Lead King =======
Men who foresee the possibilities of the Nine-Mile country are buying NOW. The thinking public
does not want investments which take such advertising as "luck," and "take a chance." The
people who are buying Hazelton Nine-Mile Mining Co. stock at 15c are those who have investigated.
This is no proposition for the sentimental.     Would you rather wait and pay more ?
50,000 Shares Only at 15c Per Share
-FOR  FURTHER  INFORMATION  CALL  OR ADDRESS-
The F. T. BOWNESS BROKERAGE CO.
PHONE 77
Office :   Dawson Building, Third Avenue, Near Sixth Street
PHONE 77
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INQUEST WAS  HELD
Coroner's Jury Find That Richer Fired
Shot on Thursday
Night.
The
Accused    Will   Come    Up
Preliminary Hearing on
Friday
For
The Inquest into the circumstances
surrounding the death of Joseph
Beaudoin last Thursday night was
concluded last evening before the
coroner, J. H. McMullin. The jury
consisted of J. R. Beatty, J. D. Allen,
Alex. McRae, John H. Johnston, J. H.
Thompson and John Vaughan. The
jury after bearing the evidence
brought in a verdict that the murdered man came to his death by a
shot In the breast fired by AlpBonse
Richer.
The preliminary hearing of the
charge against Richer will be gone
on with on Friday before tbe police
magistrate.
At the inquest last night Thomas
Keon was the first witness called.
He stated that he had seen Ri.'her
helping Beaudoin, who was very
drunk, home on Wednesday night.
The next morning Richer came and
asked witness for a clothes brush ti
brush the mud from Beaudoin's
clothing, and he also told witness
that he was going to town to get a
bottle to cheer Beaudoin up. Richer
himself was perfectly sober.
Dr. Tremayne stated that he had
been called for about 8.30 Thursday evening and was told that some
one was shot. He, along with the
police and Richer, hurried to the
scene of the shooting in a launch. Upon arriving at the shack he found
Beaudoin lying on the bed groaning.
He examined him slightly and ordered him to be taken to the hospital.
Upon closer examination It was found
that the bullet had gone through the
left side, thence to the right side,
culling the tenth rib, going under
ihe liver and through the diaphragm
Into the right lung and finally lldg-
Ing Itself in the slomach.
There was considerable hemorrhage In the chest. The doelor slated
that this, along wiib the shock, was
the rause of death.
Joe Sinclair testified that he had
known eBaudoln for several years.
He s:iw him last week On Friday
he identifier] Ihe body of the deceased
ns thai of Jos. Beaudoin.
David Slanstrotn, employed by
Foley, Welsh and Stewart as a hook-
keeper, staled that there was $277.70
on Hie hooks to the credit of Beaudoin.
Sergt. Regan, who accompanied
Dr. Tremayne to the scene of the
shooting, gave evidence very similar
to that of Dr. Tremayne. He also
slated that while at the hospital
Richer started to talk In French to
Beaudoin. Regan told him to talk
In English, because anything he
should say would be used In evidence
ngainst  him.    Richer started  to cry
and said that he had done It unintentionally. Beaudoin looked up at
Richer, murmured something, and
said that he should not have done it.
Richer told Regan that the two of
them had been drinking for three or
four days and that on Wednesday
night Beaudoin had robbed Richer
of $14. Thursday night they had
quarrelled over it, and at Richer was
sitting on the bed with the gun in his
hand it went off. Regan could not
find the $14 that Richer claimed
Beaudoin had stolen. The next morning Richer appeared at the police
station with the $14 which he
thought Beaudoin had stolen but had
not.
Upon examining the gun In court
last evening it was found that a
separate action was required to cock
the gun after it was loaded, otherwise the gun would not go off.
Sergt. Regan stated that he had
found two empty whiSky bottles and
one partly full in the shack occupied
by the men.
After the evidence bad been put
in the jury retired, shortly afterwards bringing in the verdict before
stated.
The deceased man has a brother in
West Superior, Wisconsin, and also
an uncle, a logger in Vancouver.
 o	
FIRE EQUIPMENT
Recommendations   Pass Council Authorizing Work to be Done
Tbe fire and water committee of
the city council made a report last
evening recommending a number of
items asked for by the Are chief. The
latter stated that the two hose reels
had arrived and the houses should
be erected for them. These, he recommended should be built so that they
could be moved. They should be 10
feet by 14 feet and 8 feet high and
could be built at a cost of $50 each.
One should be built at the corner of
Second avenue and Seventh street,
and the other at Third avenue and
Fifth street. He also recommended
the purchase of cable to be used in
pulling down buildings in case of
necessity in fighting Are. This should
have a hook on one end and a ring
on the other.
On the motion to adopt the report
of the fire committee, Aid. Hilditch
wished to know If anything was being done to Increase the water main.
It seemed useless to provide for additional connections unless the main
was Increased.
AH. Mobley explained that these
hose centres were Intended only to
facilitate using the hose they had.
No additional hose would be needed.
His Worship explained that the
six Inch pipe which was to have been
placed to continue to the street line,
had to be used to provide for an
increased supply from the pumps to
the reservoir.
Aid. Mclntyre suggested that as
the pipe was needed for this use ad
ditlonal pipe might, have been order
ed. It should all be done subject to
the city engineer's approval as he
was  well  aware  of   the  necessities.
The report was adopted.
TOOK HIS OWN LIFE
Mystery Solved Surrounding Disappearance of George Reid Who Murdered His Wife.
OPENING   LAKELSE
Man  Apparently Committed  Suicide
A cry Shortly Alter Taking
Life of Woman
George Reid, the murderer of his
wife at Clayburn, the police, believe,
was evidently insane when he put a
end to the life of his young wife a
few weeks ago for his body was found
floating in the Fraser river with the
throat cut from ear to ear last Tuesday morning by Joseph Louis, an Indian, near Pump House No. 2, Mats-
qui Prairie. The red man was in a
canoe at the time and after making
fast to the body hurried to Mission
where Constable Wilkfe of Vancouver, was then stopping with Constable Gammon. As soon as the provincial constable set eye upon the body,
he said: "That is the man." So well
had the officer studied the photograph of the murderer that he knew
every line. Not only did the clothes
worn by the dead man tally with the
description of those worn by Reid
when he disappeared, but the whole
get up was the same. However, to
make assurance doubly sure, the constable telephoned to the B. C. Electric Railway office at Vancouver, asking Mr. Porter to view the remains.
Mr. Porter, who is an employee of
the B. C. Electric Railway company,
and who with Mr. Rutledge was
boarding with the Reids at the time
of the murder without the slightest
hestitation identified the body as that
of .Reid.
From what has been learned from
witnesses and from scraps of circumstantial evidence, Reid wrote a foui
letter to the young men who boarded
with him and his wife. This letter
has never been made public. Then he
killed his young help-mate and fled
to the C. P. R. bridge at Mission, not
far from his home at Clayburn, which
it will be remembered lies just across
the river from Mission. There, It Is
surmised, he drew a sharp razor from
his hip pocket and slashed his throat
with frenzied fury, so that he severed
the jugular vein and cut deeply the
throat in a long wound extending
from ear to ear. Then he either fell
Into the rushing river below, or tumbled over through shock and loss
of blood.
Company Incorporated to Carry on Operations in That
District.
Companies Incorporated in the Province—Appointments Made by
Government
D. C. Yates, employed on the erection of the new Bank of Montreal
building on Third avenue, fell from
the wall a few days ago and was
badly injured. He was removed to
the Hospital and is making satisfactory progress.
 o	
A. to. Ross, of Vancouver, representing the underwriters, after spending several days in the city, went
soutii last night. Mr. Seeley will remain a few days to complete the
work.
The latest copy of tbe Provincial
Gazette contains notice of the Incorporation of the Lakelse Valley Development company with a capita]
stock of $200,000, divided into 4,000
shares.
The company is incorporated with
quite large powers, being authorized
to carry on all kinds of real estate
business with power to loan money
and do general financial, mercantile
and manufacturing business.
The personel of the company Is
not made kuown through the notice
but It is believed that a syndicate of
Vancouver men is behind the proposition. The company, judging from
certain powers given it, intends to
carry on a general colonization
scheme clearing tbe land and subdividing it for the intending settlers.
Tho following other companies
have been incorporated:—
Artley-Elford Boat Co. of Nelson,
with a capital of $50,000.
Canadian Mining Operators, Ltd.,
with a capital of $250,000.
Central B. C. Lands, Ltd., capitalized at $200,000.
Empress Electrical Works, Ltd.,
with a capitalization of $700 to take
over business of A. G. Teague.
Hose Investment Co., with a capital of $250,000.
Independent Liquor Company with
a capital of $25,000.
The Salmon Arm Fruit & Land
company, with a capital of $250,000.
Somer Park, Ltd., capitalized at
$250,000, to deal in petroleum and
other mining and industrial concerns.
Vernon Curling Rink Company,
capitalized at $10,000.
The Issue contains notice of the appointment of the following notaries
public: H. W. C. Boak, L.L.B., Vancouver, and Alfred Carmichael, Alberni.
 o	
The earth wrapped ln the soft mystery of a summer twilight Is as sweet
as a bride In her veil.
LINDSAY'S WAGE & STORAGE
G. T. P. CARTAGE AGENTS
Office at H. IJ. Rochester, Centre St.
—o—
LADYSMITH COAL
Is handled by us.   All orders receive
prompt attention.  Phone No  68.
The Roland Rooms
Splendid Accommodations
Newly Furnished
Hot  baths;   right down  town;  good
table board all round
RATES, FIFTY CENTS AND UP
Some Rock
Bottom
Prices
See Us For Investment
Rupert City Realty & Information Bureau, Ltd.
PRINCE RUPERT,
B.C.
IX THE SUPREME COURT OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Between:
John Jacobs, Frank Johnson, and
Charles Carlson, carrying on business as Contractors under the firm
name or style of Hawkins & Co.,
Plaintiffs.
And
C. Peterson, C. Larson, and C. Anderson, Defendants.
To C. Peterson, and C. Larson, of
Prince Rupert, in the Province of
Britisli Columbia:
\QV are hereby required to take
notice that a Writ of Summons was
issued In the Supreme Court of British Columbia, Victoria Registry,
against you, C. Peterson, and C. Larson, and C. Anderson, at the suit of
John Jacobs, Frank Johnson, and
Charles Carlson, carrying on business
as Contractors under the firm name
or sty'e of Hawkins & Co., on the
29th day of November, 1909, claiming to have it declared that the Defendants on or about the 15th day
of January, 1909, withdrew from the
partnership business then being carried on by the Plaintiffs and ceased
from said date to have any interest
therein, having abandoned the same
and that they thereby forfeited all
right in or to any of the monies
earned by such business under and
by virtue of a contract entered into
with D. A. Rankin In or about the
month of August, 1908, and completed on the 13th day of November,
1909, to do certain work upon a portion of the Grand Trunk Pacific Railroad near Prince Rupert in the Province of British Columbia, and for an
account and for a receiver, and that
you are thereby required to cause an
appearance to be entered for you at
the Victoria Registry of the Supreme
Court aforesaid and that In default of
your so doing the Plaintiffs may proceed therein and judgment may be
given in your absence.
And you are further required to
take notice that by an order of the
Honourable Mr. Justice Gregory
made ln the said cause on the 22nd
day of September, 1910, service of
the said Writ of Summons upon you
C. Peterson and C. Larson was ordered to be effected by serving Lewis
W. Patmore, Barrister-at-Law, with
a copy of the Writ of Summons herein and a copy of the order now being
recited and by publishing notice of
the said Writ of Summons and order
in the Prince Rupert Journal for six
issues thereof. And that you be required to appear to the said Writ of
Summons within eight days from the
last publication in the said newspaper
or from the service on the said Lewis
to. Patmore whichever should last
happen and that the same should be
good and sufficient service upon you
of the Writ of Summons in the said
action.
Dated this 23rd day of September,
1910.
Yours, etc.,
J. A. AIRMAN,
Solicitor for the Plaintiffs, whose address for service Is at the office of
the said J. A. Aikman, Imperial
Bank Chambers, corner of Yates
and Government streets, Victoria,
British Columbia. S27
Fred Stork
General Hardware
...Complete Line of...
VALVES
Pipe and Pipe Fittings
CANCELLATION  OF RESERVE
NOTICE Is hereby given that the
reserve existing on Crown lands ln
the vicinity of Babine Lake, situate
in Range 5, Coast District, notice of
which was published in the British
Columbia Gazette, dated December
17, 1908, Is cancelled in so far as
said reserve relates to lots numbered 1519, 1518, 1517, 1516, 1515,
1510, 1507, 1506, 1506A, 1503 1501,
1502, 1512, 1511, 1505, 1504, 1613,
1514, 1509, 1508, 1530, 1527, 1528,
1529, 1531, 1632, 1533, 1534, 1535,
1537, 1539, 1536, 1538, 15.40, 1541,
1544, 1543, 1545, 1546, 1542, 1547,
1548, 1549, 1550, 1520, 1521, 1522,
1523, 1524, 1525, 1526, and 1551.
ROBERT A. RENWICK,
Deputy Commissioner of Lands.
Lands Department,
Victoria, B. C, June 16th, 1910.
(First insertion July 5.)
Hear
the
Truth
There's nothing about a set of
harness that requires such careful
attention, in both leather and workmanship, as traces and collars, there's
where the strain lies, there's where
we excel, though we are just as
watchful as to every other detail of
a complete set of harness, be it for
heavy or light work.
B. C. Saddlery Company
Limited
MANUFACTURERS OF SADDLERY
Jobbers of Leather, Harness, Saddles, Whips, Trunks and Valises,
Pads, Blankets, Rugs; Harness Soaps
and Dressings.
B66 YATES STREET
VICTORIA, B.C.

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