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Prince Rupert Journal Oct 27, 1911

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 ***5
The Journal
$2.00
a year
Ptinu ftapiyl ^mmal
^T Legislative W/N
<g\
High Class
-   Job Printing
in all Lines
VOLUME II.
Published  Twice  a  Week.
PRINCE   RUPERT,   B.   C.   FRIDAY, OCTOBER  27,  1911.
Price, Five Cents.
m,j/*3C
BIDS ON CLEARING
Many Tenders on the Work That is to be
Done Gutting Away Timber at
Lake Woodworth
City Engineer Will Pass Upon These
and Report to the Council at
Next Meeting
*   *   *   *
********
WILL NOT OPPOSE
(Special to The Journal)
Montreal, Oct. 27.—The Quebec Liberal leaders will not oppose the cabinet ministers going
back for re-election. All will
be elected by acclamation.
•   *•*••*.   *****
The city council at its meeting
last evening opened tenders received
for the clearing of the shore of Lake
Woodworth. The work was divided
into five sections. Many of the tenderers bid only on one or two sections. The tenders have been referred to the city engineer, who will
report upon them at the next meeting of the council. He will also give
what he considers are proper figures
for the clearing by day labor.
There was a large attendance of
tenderers at the meeting last evening to hear the bids read. The council, on the suggestion of the mayor,
made this the first business of the
evening.
The tenders were as follows, the
figures being by the acre in each
case:
John Allen and Ralph Tyson—
Section 2, $255; section 3, $235;
section 5, $115.
John Engstrom and S. Bernster—
Section 3,  $249; section 5, $185.50.
O. H. Anderson and gang—Section
5, $419.
W. R. Morrison—Section 5, $134.
C. B. Schreiber    Co.—Whole 162
acres, $150 per acre.
A. Melquist and 12 men—Section
4, $127.50.
Thomas Duncan—Section 2, $460;
section 3, $450.
J. Hammer and 9 others—Section
1, $385; section 2, $240; section 3,
$210; section 4, $240; section 5,
$205.
" Harry Porrier and 3 others—Section 3, $170; section 4, $125; section 5, $110.
John Kirkaldy—Section 3, $225.
Arthur Carr—Section 1, $225; section  5,  $200.
Richard Carr—Section  4, $220.
M. Lofgren &.Co.  (10 men)—Section 1,  $279;  section  2,  $187;  section 3, $175; section 5, $116.
Mike Boskovich—Section 2, $400;
section 3,  $350.
Alex. Oman—Section 2, $210; section 3, $210; section 4, $185; section 5,  $170.
O. Bachand and two others—Section 1, $275; section 4,$200; section
5, $150.
M. K. Perich—Section 3, $250.
G.  Blelchrich—Section  3,  $251.
Milo    Tonson    Company—Section
$197.
Milo Thomson Company—Ssection
4, $202; section 5, $175.
H. Mlckelson and 9 others—Section 4, $125; section 5, $125.
Unsigned tender—Section 5, between 212 and 318, $149.
Arthur Miller and 9 others—Section 5, $200.
M. F. Robinson—Section 4, $265;
section 5, $235.
Westholme   Lumber   Co.—Section
, 1, $175; section 2 and 3, $250; section  4, $200;  section 5,  $215.
Stephen King and four others—
Section 1, $248; section 4, $193; section 5, $119; would only require
one section.
John G. Verlck and three others—
Section 1, $350; section 2, $250;
section 3, $275; section 4, $430;
section 5, $148.
Victor Olson—Section 1, $225;
section  2, $275.
Mike Manduslch Qompany—Section  2,  $265.
Eric Hansen and nine others—Section 4, $130; section 5, $125.
Old Tenders
The following old tenders, made
before the change, had not been
taken back by the tenderers and
were opened also. Most of them had
made new tenders. The prices are
for clearing only.
Fred Peterson—Section 4, $205;
section 5, $195.
Mike Tonich Company—Section 4,
$185.
Milo Tonson—Section 4, $190; section 5, $170.
Arthur Mullen and ten others—
Section 5, $200.
O. Bachand and two others—Section 1, $275.
It was moved by Alderman Hllditch that the tenders be referred to
committee of the whole next Tuesday
evening.
His   worship   said   the   engineer
should go through these and tabulate
the tenders.
Alderman Newton wanted to know
if the city engineer had not submitted figures on the basis of day
labor.
Alderman Hilditch explained that
he and others on the committee had
been verey busy all day and had neglected to call the engineer's attention to the tendering. He would say,
however, that his own estimate as
to the cost was $140 an acre for
section 1; *115 for sections 2 and
3, and $100 for sections 4 and 5.
Alderman Newton wanted an estimate as to what it would cost by
day labor.
On motion of Alderman Hilditch
these tenders were referred to the
city engineer to report upon and to
give an estimate of the cost of the
work by day labor.
 o	
DRILLING FOR COAL
Borings are to be Made on Graham Island
at Queen Charlotte
City
Stock   in   New   Company   Has   Been
Put on Sale by the
Directors
D. R. Young, the energetic advocate of the claims of Graham Island,
has arrived in the city on his way
to Queen Charlotte City, where he
is to begin work upon drilling for
coal right in the townsite.
Mr. Young has with him A. L.
Yarborough, J. H. Yarborougb and
C. Hodgson, expert drillers, who have
a plant with them and who will begin at once upon the task of finding
out just how low the coal lies.
A company has been incorporated
under the name of the Northern Anthracite Company, Limited. There
are the coal rights under 5,000 acres
of land and the exploitation of it is
to begin now. At the head of the
company Is T. S. Gore of Victoria,
who Is well known as an engineer of
standing in this province. The other
directors are A. S. Innes, of Victoria, J. C. Keith of Vancouver, Arthur
F. Hepburn and Christian F.> J. Galloway of Vancouver.
The engineers under whom the
work will be carried out are Hepburn
& Galloway, both members of the
directorate. The coal is expected to
be encountered at a depth of about
500 feet. The location of the measures is such that within 500 feet of
the probable situation of the shaft
deep water will be reached, which
makes the question of handling the
coal a simple one.
Mr. Young expects to have the
proposition in shape to begin the
actual work of preparing a mine in
a very short time.
The stock Is being put on sale here
as well as In Vancouver and Victoria.
The local agents are H. F. McRae
& Co., Second  Aveuu.*
 o	
REVOLUTIONISTS GAIN
POLICY AS TO WHARF
W. W. Foster, Deputy Minister of Public
Works, is Here Studying Conditions
in Connection with Work
He Will Make Representation to the
Government as to the Rest Method
of Administering
Rebels Have Captured the Government
War Chest of a Million
Dollars
Opponents   of   the   Present   Rulers
Seem to Re in the
Ascendant
(Special to The Journal)
Pekln, Oct. 27.—The revolutionaries have outflanked the Imperialists eighteen miles north of Hankow.
The rebels have captured the government's war chest of one million
dollars.
Everything points to the succesB
of the revolutionists now and a
change In the form of government
seems to be assured.
 o	
Ensign Johnstone of the Salvation
Army returned to the city by the
Prince Rupert.
W. N. Foster, deputy minister of
public works, Is in the city, having
arrived by the G. T. P. steamer on
Wednesday. His special mission is in
connection with the new government
wharf, which will be ready for use
In a short time now. Mr. Foster has
inspected the work in company with
William Manson, w.P.P. His visit,
he said, was to confer with Mr. Man-
son and others on the ground, and
following this he would prepare
a report for the government upon the
best method of handling the proposition. With this object in view, he
is conferring with all the different
interests concerned and following
this he wil! report to the minister
and the government, when the question will be settled.
In connection with the administration of the wharf the impression
seems to prevail here that it would
be a wise course for the provincial
government to administer the proposition itself, fixing the rates to be
charged and putting men in control
to administer it like any company
would do, the best interests of the
public being so served.
The city council so considers the
subject and at the regular meeting
last evening a resolution along that
line was passed on motion of Alderman Hllditch. The motion favors
the government fixing a fair rate of
charges and administering the wharf
itself. Failing that, It is urged that
the government fix the rates and
turn it over to the city on some
equitable basis to be administered by
the city. This resolution will be
placed before the deputy minister.
At the meeting in the police courtroom this afternoon the views of the
shipping men, merchants and all
others interested will be heard by
Mr. Foster so that he may report
upon them to the governmentn at
Victoria.
This afternoon the deputy minister
is meeting the members of the Board
of Trade and any others in the city
who have suggestions to offer along
the line of the best ways to administer the affairs of the wharf, the government being anxious to serve the
general public to the fullest extent.
Mr. Foster is paying his first visit
to Prince Rupert, andn is more than
delighted with the place. He is surprised to see the amount of work
that has been done on the streets
and approves of the solid way in
which the street work is being carried out.
There are several other matters
connected with the public works department which Mr. Foster is looking into during his visit to the city,
including the matter of the government buildings and any additions that
may be required to be made to them
Mr. Foster is an experienced moun
tain climber and predicts for the new
north a decided awakening in the
matter of tourists. During the last
camp of the Alpine Club, which was
attended by Mr. Foster, there were
many inquiries about the mountains
along the line of the G. T. P., with
desires expressed that a camp might
be held there. The opening of tbe
line, he propbeslses, will draw a tre
mendous tourist trade to the north
In which Prince Rupert will have an
Important place.
The splendid weather conditions
prevailing here also struck Mr. Foster, who will leave the city with a
very high opinion as to the opportunities that exist in the place.
 o	
Flags Available
On motion of Alderman Hllditch
last evening It was decided by the
city council to allow citizens the use
of the flags owned by the city for
decorative purposes in case they are
asked for a by a reputable citizen
and a deposit of $25 Is made to pay
for any damage or loss.
 o	
Numbering Houses
A letter was read at last evening's
council meeting from L. Bullock-
Webster asking if the city would take
over the extra figures used In numbering. He would furnish them to
the city at cost price in this case.
This was referred to the special committee having the work In band.
NO SPECIAL FAVOR
Appointment of Alderman Hilditch on
Water Committee was not
Understood
He  Was  Named  on  Thnt  Itody  for
One Distinct Purpose
Only
An impression Is sought to be conveyed that some move has been made
by Mayor Manson to give Alderman
Hilditch some special standing In
connection with the water proposition. It has more than once been
announced that Alderman Hilditch
has been put upon the water committee over the heads of other members.
The circumstances connected with
the move by which Alderman Hilditch
was appointed on the water committee as an extra member show that
the impression which it is sought to
create is altogether misleading. The
chairman of the public works committee was put upon the other committee, the water committee, for a
specific purpose and for that alone.
When that particular work was done,
namely, the preparation of the specifications for the council, his services
on the particular committee ended.
The reasons for placing him in that
capacity are patent to all who followed the proceedings of the council. Alderman Hilditch accompanied
the city engineer to Lake Woodworth
and looked fully over the ground. On
their return the proposition ot "ailing for tenders was discussed and
after considerable consideration it
it was decided that the water committee should prepare a set of specifications for submission to the council. Alderman Hllditch, as the one
member of the council who had visited the place and knew all the conditions therefore better than other
members of the council, was asked to
act on the committee for this purpose and for this alone. When the
work was done and the committee
had had the advantage of Alderman
Hilditch's advice as one who had seen
the location, his work was done and
he no longer acted.
There was no attempt, it is quite
evident, to give Alderman Hllditch
or any other member of the council
any special advantage over the
others. .
The matter came up before the
council last evening, when Alderman
Hilditch said the idea had got abroad
that he was chairman of the fire and
water committee. He explained that
he had been put on the committee
only to assist in preparing the, specifications. That work was now done
and he would like to be discharged,
if that step were necessary.
The mayor explained the situation
and did not think that there was
any need of his being discharged, as
he was only to serve for a specific
purpose.
Aid. Hilditch said both the News
and the Empire had referred to him
as chairman of the committee.
Alderman Newton said the Empire
had not referred to him as chairman,  but  simply as a  member.
The matter was then allowed to
drop.
STREET EXTENSIONS
Council Finds It Necessary to Refuse
any  Further  Works
•   *   *   •
COURT MARTIAL
(Special to The Journal) *
Ottawa, Oct. 27.—The depart- *
* ment of naval defence will court- *
* martial the officers of the Niobe *
* in  connection  with  the strand- *
Ing of the warship off Cape Sa- *
* ble last July.
Hospital   Dance
The Ladles' Auxiliary of the Prince
Rupert General Hospital will give a
dance this evening in Melntyre Hall.
The proceeds go to assist In the furnishing of the institution, a work
which has been done from the very
commencement by the Ladies' Auxiliary, thus relieving the general
board's funds to a marked extent.
The hospital ball is one of the events
in wliich all can join, feeling that
they are not only spending the evening in social enjoyment but that they
are also assisting materially a deserving institution. The demands of
the hospital increase with the growth
of the city and all the aid possible
is needed.
JAPANESE IN CONTROL
H. H. Stevens of Vancouver says Fisher-
ier of Province are Controlled
by Alien Race
Startling    Announcement   Made   by
the Newly Elected Member
for Vancouver
(Special to The Journal)
Vancouver,   Oct.   27.—H.   H.   Stevens,    the    member-elect    for    the
House of Commons, at an "at home
given  in   his  honor  last  night,  said
the  coast  and  deep  sea  fishing  of
the   province   was   controlled    by    a
Japanese--   secret   society   pledged   to
promote  the  interests  of  the  mem
bers to the detriment of the white
fishermen and that they have a mo
nopoly of the business.
This announcement aroused considerable feeling and there Is a demand for a full investigation into
the fishing regulations.
A petition was received asking for
a sidewalk on First Avenue from
Seventh Street to tbe Junction and
Eleventh Street as a work of local
Improvement.
This was referred to the public
works committee for report.
Later a report was received against
authorizing the work.
Alderman Hllditch said be la-
lamented the action the committee
had to take. The fact that the bank
hesitated about advancing any further money for street work until
some of the bonds were disposed of
made it essential to report against
this.
It was explained that the work
would cost about $450 and would
quite a few.
Other members of the council felt
that if possible something should be
done. It was finally laid on the table for two weeks and in the meantime the engineer will report
upon it.
 o	
Mrs. R. A. McMordie and children
left a few days ago by the Prim-ess
May for the south on a visit.
COMMISSION GO\ ERX.MEXT
Question    Is    Discussed    at    Some
Length at Meeting of Presbyterian  Club
The Presbyterian Club lias started
upon the winter season in an energetic way which augurs well for the
organization during the season. The
opening evening last Wednesday was
given up to a discussion of the subject of the commission system of
government as opposed to the present municipal form. The new hall
on Fourth Avenue was crowded and
a very interesting discussion took
place.    Mayor  Manson  presided.
The subject was introduced by G.
R. T. Sawle, who advocated tbe commission form of civic control. A
very free discussion followed in
which different views were expressed, some In favor of commission and
serine agalnsl It, The advocates of
Hie new system put forward tbe
argument that under It more direct
control was-obtained and quicker action by men better qualified for the
offices they were elected to fill,
Tbe opponents of the commission
form contended that after all ii mattered not what system were employed, the success depended upon the
arousing of sufficient public spirit
to' ensure the selection of good men
for office.
A programme of music was given
It was announced that the debate'
would be continued three weeks from
that night.
 o	
Among the latest arrivals in the
city are Mrs. Davis, wife of the city
engineer, and tber son and daughter.
They arrived by the Prince Rupert
on Wednesday and will remain In
the city permanently. They have
taken up house in the premises vacated by Mr. Wall on Emmerson
place. Mrs. Davis Is pleased with
all she has seen of the city so far,
while Colonel Davis, after sixteen
months' absence from his family, Is
more than delighted to again be al
home.
GETTING SUPPLIES
Foley, Welch & Stewart Will Have Good
Steamboat Service in
Interior
Indications  Point  tee  an Active Season Along Route of G. T. P.
Next Summer
The policy of Foley, Welch &
Stewart with respect to the getting
in of supplies along the route of
the G. T. P. between Tete Jaune
Cache and Aldermere would indicate
that fast time is to be made on construction work. Two of the seven
steamers that have been used on the
Skeena for the past few years will
leave tomorrow probably for Vancouver, to be there torn to pieces and
the machinery shipped by the C.P.R.
to Edmonton. This will be carried
in over the G. T. P. line to the head
of steel, near Tete Jaune Cache, and
teamed by sleighs in February to the
navigable waters of the interior.
Already the company has a mill
at work cutting up the timber that
will be used in construction. It is
being thoroughly dressed in apartments heated for the purpose and
will be used in constructing the hulls.
With the opening of navigation in
the spring the steamers will be ready
to enter upon their work of carrying
supplies to points along the route of
the road.
Captain C. B. Johnson, who Is to
remain in charge of the steamer service, will go south on the river craft
and will superintend the work in connection with their breaking up and
reconstruction.
It is not known yet whether the
steamer service on the Skeena will
be required for a part of next year
or not. Two vessels of the fleet will
be hauled out on Digby Island, awaiting the development this fall and
winter. If the work of construction
moves forward as fast as it is anticipated in some quarters it will Jhe
rails will be laid for carrying freight
early in the spring. If anything occurs to prevent this the steamers will
be available for service for a few
months until the rails are laid.
 o	
EX MINISTER DIES
J. D. Prentice, Formerly at Head of Department of Finance in Province,
Passes Away
He   Was   Well    Known   Manager   of
Ranching Company iu Lillooet
District
(Special to The Journal)
Lillooet, Oct. 27.—J. D. Prentice,
ex-minister of finance in tbe province, is dead. Mr. Prentice was manager of the Western Canadian Ranching Company.
Mr. Prentice was born in Lanarkshire, of Scotch parentage, in 1861.
He was educated at Fettus College,
Edinburgh. For a number of years
he was a member of the legislature
of British Columbia before tlie days
of party government. In 19000 be
entered tho governmenl of Hon.
.inures Dunsmuir as provincial secretary, and, In 1901, when J. T, Turner lefl for London as agent general
for the province, Mr. Prentice succeeded him as minister of finance.
With the passing of the Prior government he retired from politics, He
was a Conservative in politics and
during bis term of office established
a reputation for giving prompt replies to all who Bought an audience
with him. They were not left long
In doubt as to what bis stand would
be.
Mr. Prentice was a man of means
and as the bead of the large ranching companw with which he was
identified he represented very large
Investments.
Mr. Prentice took a deep Interest
in provincial affairs and was very
ardently attached to the ranching
branch of farming. Of late years he
bad resided most of tbe time at. Lillooet, spending only a few months
in Victoria each year.
 o	
Philip Chesley, the well known
prospector of the Skeena Valley, went
seiulb    by    the    PrlnceSB    Mary   this
morning.
/
L PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Friday, October 27 ,1911.
Sale of Lands for Unpaid Delinquent Taxes in the Prince Rupert Assessment District, Province
of British Columbia.
I HEREBY GIVE NOTICE that on Thursday, the 16th day of November, A.D. 1911, at the hour of 10 o'clock in the forenoon at the
Court House, Prince Rupert B. C, I shall offer for sale at public auction the lands In the list hereinafter set out, of the persons in the said
list hereinafter set out, for delinquent taxes unpaid by the said persons on the 31st day of December, 1910, and for necessary costs and expenses, including the costs of advertising said sale, If not sooner paid.
THE   LIST   ABOVE-MENTIONED
Delinquent Taxes
Name of Person Assessed.
Short Description of Property.
*s p o
2 p S
0 &m
Angoire, Oswald P Lot 3, D of 17, Simpson. Map 401 $
Allardyce, Alex Lots 1 & 2, D of 26, Simpson. Map 401   	
Anderson,  Chas Lots 3 & 11, C of 36, Simpson. Map  401   	
Andrews, Hugh    Lots 22 & 23, Block 1, Stewart.   Map  818   	
Armstrong, W.J.C. and Elmhlrst,
A   V Lot 21, Block 4, Stewart. Map 905	
Lot 18, Block 13, Stewart. Map 905	
Lot 20, Block 7, Stewart. Map 905	
Ablett, t-r.  . .' Lot 14, Block 6, Stewart. Map 905	
Atkinson, Jonathan Lot 9, Block 26, Queen Charlotte.  Map 934	
Alexander, The estate of Jas. M.. . . Lot 121, NW 1-4 Section 29, Range 5, Coast	
Burton, David    Lots 19 & 20, D of 25, Simpson. Map  401   	
Bradon, Hannah   PL Section 32, Range 5, 30 acres	
Bradon, Hannah   Lot 5, D of 5, Simpson. Map 401  .	
B. C. Canning Co Lot 6, Range 5, Coast; 15 acres	
Brewer, M. J Lot 1150, Range 5, Coast; 94 acres	
Baker,   Mrs.   N Lot 6, being part Lot 9, Block 15. Map 413   	
Barnard, G. H Part Lot 96, U.D.  1-6.    Map 783.  50 2-3 acres	
Bartlett, Geo Block 125, Skeena City. Map 811a	
Baird, Jas. Gordon Lots 1 & 2, Block 14, Simpson.   Map 765  	
_,anchard, John F Lot 21; SD of Pt. Lot 5, of Pt. Sec. 11, Tp. 1, Range 5, Coast. Map 784. ..
Baker, Adelaide H Lot  4,  Block  6,  Simpson..   Map  412   	
Beaulino, Mrs. Nellie Sheppard  . . . Lot  1,  Block   7,   Simpson.     Map   412   	
Boochine,  C.  O Lot 16, A of l;Lots 9-10, D of 17. Map 401	
Brown, Mrs. Mina Lots 2, 3, 4, B of 1, Simpson.   Map 401  	
Lots 13 & 14, 19 & 20, B of 1, Simpson.  Map 401	
Lots 1 to 4, 17 to 19, a of 20, Simpson.   Map 401	
Lots 11 & 12, C of 20, Simpson.   Map 401   	
Lots 7 to 10, 15 to 17, D of 20, Simpson. Map 401	
Bergstrand, Florence    Lot 4> B of 3, Simpson. Map 401..	
Benson, Dr. L. E L°ts 1, 2, 3, 6, 7, 8„ D of 4, Simpson. Map 401	
Lots 2 to 5, D of 33, Simpson. Map  401   	
Braden, W. H. and J Lot 10, C of 10, Simpson. Map 401	
Biggs  Geo. B Lots 11 & 12   C of 22, Simpson. Map 401   	
Bridge,  Wm L°ts 4 & 17, C of 37, Simpson. Map  401   	
Bannerman, A. McL Lots 13 &14, Block 2, Stewart. Map 818  	
Brown, Irene Lot 20, Block 2, Stewart. Map 818	
Bruce, Mrs. Marion O Lot 22, Block 11, Stewart. Map 818	
Barrow, Francis J Lots 9 & 10, Block 12, Stewart. Map 818   	
Bennett, H. C Lot 11, Block 13, Stewart. Map 818a  	
Lot 3, Block 16, Stewart. Map 818a	
Bevan, R. G Lots 21 & 22, Block 13, Stewart. Map 818a	
Brown, W. A Lot 24, Block 15, Stewart. Map 818a	
Lot 10, Block 22, Stewart. Map 818a	
Britton, G. R. H Lot 21, Block 16, Stewart. Map 818a. . . .■	
Black, Fredk Lot 22, Block 20, Stewart. Map 818a	
Bianco, Victor Lot 23, Block 21, Stewart. Map 818a	
Barnes, H. T Lot 9, Block 23, Stewart. Map 818a	
Babbington, Hume Lot 15, Block 4, Stewart. Map 905	
Lot 10, Block 13, Stewart. Map 905	
Bevans & Gore   Lots 19 & 20, Block 6, Stewart. Map 905   	
Barlow, W. J Lot 379, SW 1-4, Queen Charlotte Islands;   160  acres   	
Clifford, C. W. D Lot 312, Range 4, Coast, undivided 1-4;   Lot  88,  Range  5,   Coast,
166.60 acres; S 1-2 Lot 90, Kitamaat;   Lots 15-20, Map 783; Lots 9-14
Block 3; Lots 22-27, Map 10; Lots   9-14, Block 5; Lots 1-6, Map 13;
Lots   1-14,  Block  7,  Lots  16-21,   Map 13;  Lots 8-13, Block 6;  Lots
'"•>■-,.■,                                      23-28, Map 14; Lots 1-10, Block 15; Lots 1-10, Block 18; Lots 1-11,
'•*«■», -* Block 20; Blocks A.B.O. Map 783	
Lot 1, Block 2, Kitselas. Map 875	
Crippen, Lionel   Lot 2285, Range 5, Coast District; 20 acres	
Church, Kate Douglas s i"2 Lot 4, Block 16, Essington. Map 537   	
Cameron, Louise W N 1-2 Lot 4, Block 16, Essington. Map 537	
Chancey, Paul R Lot 12, B'ock  6, Essington.  Map 765   	
Clifford, Lawson Lot 58, S.D. of Part Lot 5, E 1-2 Section 11. Map 784	
Caldwell, Mrs. Hattie Lot 9, Block A;  Part Section 21, Aange 5, Township 1. Map 443	
Christie, Henry Austin Lot 6, Block B; Part Section 21, Range  5, Township  1.  Map 443	
Cooper, David Havelock  . . 286 Lots, being part Lot 130, Range 5. Map 856;  balance Lot 130,
Range 5, Coast; 235 3-4 acres	
Cohveil, Geo. O Lots 9 & 10, B of 14, Simpson. Map 401   	
Crowder,  Jno Lot 16, A of 20, Simpson. Map 401	
Cnambers, W. H Lots 9 & 10, B of 25, Simpson. Map 401   	
Crosby, Haliburton C Lot 12, C of 37   Simpson. Map 401	
Calkins, Mrs. Christine Lots 15 & 16, Block 17, Stewart; Map  818a   	
Lot  19, Block  22,  Stewart.  Map  818a   	
Cameron, Agnes Deans Lots 8 & 9, Block 20, Stewart. Map 818a   	
Clarke, W. H Lot 12, Block  2, Stewart. Map 905	
Cave-Brown-Cave, E Lots 21 & 22, Block 6, Stewart. Map  905   	
Cuppage, Edith M Lot 8, Block 8, Stewart. Map 905	
Cunningham, Jno Part Lot 63, Group 1, Cassiar; 78 acres	
Cadwell, Mrs. E Lot 9, Block A. Map 443	
De Buff, Henry Lot 33, Township 1, Range 3  (Pt. NE.  1-4)  except 30 acres	
Dagland, Olaf M N 1-2 of SW. 1-4 of NE 1-4 Sec. 6, tp. 1, Range 3;  146 acres	
Dinner, James   Lots 7 & 13, Block 73. Map 781a	
Davey, Robert N Blocks 129 &  92, Skeena City. Map 811a   	
Dibble,  Clarence E Lot 8, A of 18, Simpson. Map 401	
Delage, Lepold Lots,   11,   12  &   13,  A  of  20,  Simpson.    Map   401    	
Dibble, Chas Lots 8 & 9, C of 26;  Lots 7-9, B of 42. Map 401  	
Dalton, F. and Fowler, Walter Lots 19 & 20, C of 36, Simpson. Map  401   	
Dugdale   D. E Lot 8, D of 41, Simpson. Map 401 '	
Demille,  Wm Lot 11, Block 15, Stewart. Map 818a   	
Dunn, J. H Lot 16, Block 22, Stewart. Map 818a   	
Dolby, Dr Lots 15 &  16, Block 6, Stewart. Map  905   	
Ellison,  Wm Lot 327, Range 4, Coast;  80 acres	
Erickson, J. A Block 29, Skeena City. Map 811a	
Elliott, G. W Lot  1, B of 19, Simpson.   Map 401	
Erickson, A. J Lots 9 &  10, D of 24, Simpson. Map 401   	
Eliot, Victor A. G Lot 21, Block 8, Stewi rt. Map 818	
Elliott, J.  G Lots 13 & 14, Block 9, Stewart. Map  818   	
England, D. D Lot 4, Block 20;  Lot 15, Block 23.  Ma   818a   	
Evitt,  C. V Lot  7,  Block   23;   Lot  9,  Block  12.  Maps 818a and 905	
Elliott, August F Lot 169, Queen Charlotte Islands;  174 acres  	
Evans,  Eleanor    Lot 12, Illock 13, Queen Charlotte. Map 934	
Ewen,  Estate of Alex Lot  49, Add.  1,  Essington.  Map 537   	
Flcwin, John    Section 16, Township  1, Range 5, Coast;  25 acres  	
Flewin, Eliza T Lots 7 & 8, Block 4. Map 413	
Flcwin    Helen    Lots 1 & 2. Block 4. Map 413	
Findlay, .las. and J.  D.  Mann Lot 100, Range5, undivided 1-4 interest	
Fowkes, (1. T Lot 324n, Range 2;  162 acres	
Flcwin, Walter and George Rudge . . Lot 189, Range 5;  75 acres	
Frizzell, Mrs. G. J Lots 42 &  104, Essington. Map 537	
Frizzell, Sarah J Lot 49, Esslngton.  Map  537   	
Foil, The estate of James F Lot 2, E 1-2 of SW 1-4 Section 11, Township 1, Range 5.    Map 784  . . . .
Lot 3, Part W 1-2 of SW 1-4, Section   14, Township 1, Range 5. Map 784.
Lot 4   E 1-2 of NE. 1-4 Section IB, Townshlpl,  Range  5.   Map  784	
Lot 6   E 1-2 of NE 1-4 Section 21, Township 1, Range 5. Map 784   	
Lot 5, Part SW 1-4 Section 22, Township  1, Range 5,  Map  784	
Finn, Mary Ann    Lots 7, 8, 10, Block .., Section 21, Township 1, Range 5. Map 443	
Lot  9,   Block   B,   Section   21    Township 1, Range 5. Map 443  	
Lots 2, 10, Block C, Section 21   Townshp 1, Range 5. Map 443	
France, Walter    Lot 5, B of 17, Simpson. Map 401  	
Falrson,  E.  J Lots 11 & 12, C of 19, Simpson. Map  401   	
Fletcher, Geo. P Lot 20, A of 22, Simpson. Map 401  	
Fuller,   H Lots 4, 14, 15, 16, 21, Block 1, Stewart.    Map  818   	
Futcher, A. C Lot 7, Block 1, Stewart. Map 818	
Floyer,  E.   W Lot 8, Block 11, Stewart. Map 81«	
Foster, A. G Lot 7, Block 20, Stewart. Map 818a	
Flllpovloh, S. M Lot 20, Block 17, Lot 9, Block 22, Stewart.  Map 818a	
Falkner, Jas Lot 2, Block 24, Stewart.  Map 818a	
Lot 13, Block 14; Lot 14, Block 26, Queen Charloote, Map  934    '.'.
Fltzherbert, Cecil H Lots 1, 5, 16, Block 2; Lots 10, 12, Block 3, Stewart. Map 90o	
Fox, C Lot 7, Block 6, Stewart. Map 905 	
Fraser, Henry   Lot 10, Block 7, Stewart. Map 905	
Fox,  Jno.  B Lot. 8, Block 26, Queen Charlotte. Map  934	
Glendhlll,   S Part Section 27, SW 1-4 Township 6, Range 3; 160 acres	
Grand Trunk Lumber Co Lot 53, Range 5, Coast;  10 acres	
urayson, J. G  Lot 4, B of 18, Simpson.   Map 401	
Galloway,  E Lot 21, Block 17;  Lot 10, Block 20.  Mai) 818a ......'.
Garlck,  Arso    Lot. 3, Block 24, Stewart.  Map 818a	
George, Gustave Lot 4, Block 24, Stewart.  Map 818a       '
Goldsmith, A. and Capt. Buckman. .Lot 9, Block 7, Stewart.    Map 905 	
(Continued on Page Seven)
1.35 $
3.60
1.20
1.50
4.20
1.20
.90
24.00
1.20
.90
11.20
2.70
4.80
1.20
.60
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2.70
1.95
2.75
6.90
3.15
3.00
.45
2.70
14.95
1.35
.60
.60
1.20
1.50
3.30
98.35
6.40
2.40
3.60
1.20
.60
.25
.40
115.85
.90
.90
2.70
.30
3.60
2.70
1.35
3.00
1.50
24.80
12]60
1.80
36.00
5.40
.45
1.35
2.70
1.20
.90
.165
1.05
2.70
12.80
1.80
3.60
1.20
1.20
1.20
2.25
2.40
34.80
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20.00
19.40
9.00
36.00
17.00
90.60
1.80
.60
.90
1.30
3.75
.75
1.65
1.35
2.25
2.85
5.40
1.20
1.20
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16.20
26.50
.45
2.25
1.35
1.35
1.20
5.80
2.10
9.80
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.3.90
.70
.60
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3.10
11.10
1.80
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2.10
1.40
.30
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.10
.20
.05
.05
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.03
3.60
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1.20
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1.10
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5.05
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11 00 :
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
2.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
2.00
2.00
1.00
2.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
.70
1.50
.30
.25
1.35
3.15
1.05
1.20
2.55
1.95
18.40
1.65
5.95
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.46
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.05
.05
.05
6.95
.06
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.45
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3.70
L60
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4.30
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1.15
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.06
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2.10
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1.55
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1.90
1.15
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4.30
1.00
2.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
2.00
1.00
2.00
2.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
2.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
2.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
1.00
1.00
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o
4.60
8.05
2.30
2.60
5.25
2.95
1.95
8.15
3.35
11.60
1.48
29.60
3.30
1.95
13.85
4.00
10.45
3.20
2.25
2.90
7.35
20.20
6.85
8.10
1.50
6.35
22.40
2.45
1.65
1.65
2.30
2.60
4.60
1.95
.10
1.00
3.05
1.60
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1.00
2.60
1.35
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1.00
2.45
1.35
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1.00
2.45
1.05
.05
1.00
2.10
1.35
.10
1.60
.10
1.00
4.05
2.70
.15
1.00
3.85
32.00
1.90
2.00
36.90
2.00
106.30
2.00
8.80
1.00
3.60
1.00
5.05
1.00
2.25
1.00
1.65
1.00
1.30
1.00
1.45
124.80
1.95
2.80
5.65
1.65
4.80
3.85
2.45
4.20
2.60
30.50
1.25
15.10
4.00
41.30
7.05
1.50
3.85
7.20
2.30
2.00
2.75
2.10
3.85
15.95
2.95
5.10
3.55
2.25
2.25
3.40
3.55
38.00
1.95
3.70
2.10
20.95
2.75
23.90
22.55
11.55
41.30
19.0C
4.50       10.85     2.00      107.95
.76
.10
1.00
2.90
.05
1.00
1.65
.05
1.00
1.95
.30
1.00
3.35
.25
1.00
5.00
.05
1.00
1.80
.10
1.00
2.75
.20
1.00
2.45
.15
1.00
3.40
.15
1.00
4.00
.35
1.00
6.75
.06
1.00
2.25
.05
1.00
2.25
.05
1.00
1.95
2.05
2.00
20.25
4.70
2.00
36.20
.05
1.00
1.95
.15
1.00
3.70
.10
1.00
2.45
.10
1.00
2.45
.05
l."0
2.25
The"St»y S&tbfaciory'IUnfi*
Good, Sound Reasons for
MONARCH Economy
Monarch Ranges are built so that they can
never have "air leaks"—
For around every opening Into the body there
Is a   Malleable   Iron frame to which the
steel Is riveted.
No putty Is needed In such Joints.   They are
air tight when new and stay air tight
if these other ranges were built In this way
they might be economical too.
Investigate this matter of rivet construction
versus stove bolts and stove putty.    It's
important to every one using or buying
a range.
SOLD AND GUARANTEED BY THE
Kaien Hardware Co.
Telephone 3 Third Avenue
FOR SALE
Lot 66, Blk. 34, Sec. 1, $6,000; 1-3 cash, bal. 6 and 12 months.
Lots 33 and 34, Blk 6, Sec. 1,   $4,000; half cash.
FOR RENT
STORES, OFFICES AND DWELLINGS
FIRE INSURANCE In old English, Canadian and American
companies, at tariff rates. Policies good as collateral at All Banks,
and all written In our own office. PLATE GLASS, ACCIDENT
and MARINE INSURANCE
M.M. Stephens & Co. Ld.
REAL ESTATE
Phone 222
LOANS       INSURANCE
Office: Third Avenue
INVESTMENTS
P. O. Box 275
BIB B SB:E SB BB'B B B B B;B BE B B BB E BIB B
HOTEL
ENAMELWARE
Q]
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Hi
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Hi
BB EiE BE B BE B BB BB EiEiEIE,BE BiEiB BBS
HAVE JUST RECEIVED A SMALL SHIPMENT OF HOTEL
ENAMELWARE ESPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR USE IN
HOTELS, RESTAURANTS AND CAMPS. WE GUARANTEE
THEM TO LAST TWICE AS LONG AS ORDINARY ENAMEL
WARE.
A CALL IS SOLIeCITED
Prince Rupert Hardware & Supply
Company, Ltd.
THE BIG
FURNITURE STORE
—WE SELL-
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tf-r-'B-KWWKHStWmiK'^'m^
F. W. HART,
HART BLOCK
Kiel 11 ra ejeeil Avenue nnd uth Street,
Queen  Charlotte Islands  Land  District—DlBtrlct of Skeena
TAKE NOTICE that Margaret A.
Merrill, of Chicago, Illinois, occupation housewife, intends to apply for
permission to prospect for coal and
petroleum over the following described area:—Commencing at a post
planted on the west shore of Kundis
Island, Massett Inlet, five miles
south of the most northerly point of
said Kundls Island; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south
80 chains, to point of commencement; containing 640 acres, more or
less.
MARGARET A. MERRILL.
Orland P. Merrill, Agent.
Dated August 28, 1911.
Queen  Charlotte  Islands  Land  District—District of Skeena
TAKE NOTICE that Almee Merrill, of Massett, B. C, occupation
housewife, intends to apply for pen-
mission to prospect for coal and petroleum over the following described
area:—Commencing at a post planted
on the west shore of Kundls Island,
Massett Inlet, five miles south of the
most northerly point of said Kundls
iBland; thence east 80 chainB; thence
south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence north 80 chains, to
point of commencement; containing
640 acres, more or less.
AIMEE MERRILL.
Orland P. Merrill, Agent.
Dated August 28, 1911. Mtov-Mtm -• ■■•
Friday, October 27 ,1911.
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
OLD ST. ANDREWS
Scottish University Celebrates its Founding Five Centuries
Ago.
Interesting History  Connected  With
This Educational
Institution
The oldest of the Scottish universities recently celebrated the anniversary of its foundation five hundred years ago. To Its loving sons,
and to all who have had part or lot
In Its work, this small university has
had a charm and fascination which
they have delighted to confess.
"Here," writes one of them to the
London Times, "on our foam-fringed
promontory, withdrawn In some
measure from the hurry of today,
and looked down upon by those many
centuried towers, breathing the very
atmosphere of antiquity, and hearing
for ever that roar of ocean which
whoso hears must think on what
shall be and what has been." It
has had its poets, and fill, from
George Buchanan to Andrew Lang,
have turned to it with kindly words.
The quiet of which Principal Shalrp
speaks in the words which we have
quoted is of the present. Somehow,
for reasons which have not been
fully explained the town and university have had more than their
share of stirring history. Thither
have come at one time or other many
of those whom the world has not forgotten. The Bruce, the Black Douglas, Queen Mary, Chastelard, Darn-
ley, Buchanan, have left memories
of themselves. The town has is record of turmoil and gruesome crimes
and martrydoms heroically endured;
and over its early history hangs a
cloud of mystery and romance which
the explorer is tempted to penetrate,
only to find himself lost In a maze
of conflicting legends.
The university came Into existence at a time when all over Europe
there was a deep-seated belief that
such institutions were needed as the
pioneers of culture, the nurseries of
true doctrine, and a mainstay against
heresy. St. .Andrew's is coeval with
several universities of France and
Germany formed with like purpose.
Its founder was one of those cosmopolitan ecclesiastics, fortunately then
common, who did much of the secular work of their time. Faithful
churchmen, they had a wide outlook
and many interests; they were able
men of affairs, had lived in several
lands, knew colloquially more than
one tongue, and had often been entrusted with the conduct of important state business. Many of them
were lovers of music. Generally
they were great builders of bridges,
churches, and fanes of learning.
They loved pomp and splendor;
they rose above many of the local
prejudices of their countrymen; and,
while remorseless in their dealings
with heretics, as became men who
might sit along with or do the work
of inquisitloners, they were proud to
be the patrons of learning and science as then understood. Not, probably, a stateman of the rare attainments and noble attractive character
of Bishop Elphinstone, who a little
later founded Aberdeen University,
Bishop Wardlaw was among the wise
and enlightened of his generation.
He saw the needs of his countrymen
and met them in practical fashion.
There were special reasons why a
Scottish university should be founded about 1411. The Scottish students had by that time ceased to
-frequent Oxford and Cambridge.
They had been accustomed to go to
Paris. But the strife aB to the Papacy had made that Impossible. The
Scottish people, and with them
Bishop Wardlaw, defied the decree
of the Council of Pisa, which deposed
Benedict XIII; they continued to
obey him, the Council notwithstanding, and Benedict had laid the University of Paris under condemnation.
But, apart from this circumstance,
there Is evidence that there was a
thirst for learning, a desire to transplant to Scottish soil the culture
which was to be found in Paris and
Orleans and other seats of learning
to students from Scotland resorted.
The university had small beginnings and meagre endowments.
There was not a succession of pious
donors who made easy every expansion of instruction. Listening to
modern founders of universities, one
might suppose that the only thing
needful or essential was money; science requires capital just as much
as does cotton or hardware. There
was not much money or capital available for the foundation of St. Andrew's, or some other of the universities which were created about the
same time. But there was abundant
zeal, unshaken belief that the world
could be made better and brighter
and less savage by the diffusion of
learning; that knowledge might be,
loved for Its own salts; tbsl 't !iad
only to be set before re;; to be
Bought after with eageri-esp. Mo
stately buildings were e.ecteti by the
patrons of this seat of learning.
Bishop Kennedy, to whom, next to
Bishop Wardlaw, the university owes
most, gave his money to the erection
of a beautiful church; "the secular
buildings of the college"—it is characteristic of the alms of the founders—"were of inferior workmanship
and formed a small and rather
gloomy quadrangle." Perhaps in
reasons of enforced economy originated the curious practice found In
Scottish universities of one of the
"Regents" taking the entire instruction In all subjects of men of tbe
same year throughout their four
years' curriculum. Yet with little
means, cut off as It might seem from
stimulating intercourse with the
world, the university did admirable
work. It graduates have been distinguished In many kinds of activity.
Its professors Include men remembered in literature and science. It
Is only just that we should turn for
a moment to the memory of those
whoh five hundred years ago lit in
a dark place that light which has
burned brightly ever since.
For Neat Job Printing
see the Journal Man
Tel. 138
THE   DUCHESS   OF  CONNAUGHT
Some  of  the   Characteritics   of   the
Wife of the New Governor
General
There are very few women in Canada who are not anxous to learn
something about the lady who has
just come to preside over Rideau
Hall, and her daughter. Such a curiosity, innocent as it is, is not likely
to be gratified as far as the Duchess of Connaught is concerned. It
is very difficult to learn much concerning Her Royal Highness. She is
the daughter of Prince Frederick
Charles of PrusBia and though her
pictures give no hint of her age, the
records say she was born in 1861.
She is known to be a devoted mother
and her daughter is authority for
saying she is the shyest of women.
This may have given rise to the impression, common In the case of women of humbler rank, that she Is reserved. If first impressions count
for anything, however, we may hope
that there will be nothing of hauteur
and this royal lady in her intercourse
with Canadians. She, as well as her
husband, won the hearts of the people on board ship on their outward
voyage and when she landed in Quebec the plainly dressed lady chatted
brightly to the visitors.
The Princess Patricia on the other
hand, is a charming girl with p'enty
of wit and originality and a love
of freedom and an Independence that
are likely to make her very popular
with the young people of Ottawa.
She has a sunny disposition and loves
an outdoor life. She rides well and
plays an excellent game of golf. It
is easy to foresee that the winter
sports of the capital will be a delight
to the fun loving young lady. The
princess will find in Canadian scenes
subjects worthy of her brush, for she
is said to possess real artistic ability.
Sh,- speaks many languages and has
travelled nearly ail over the world.
At present she is with her sister, the
beloved crown princess of Sweden.
As a young girl the princess is said
to have been the heroine of many
escapades little suited to the etiquette and ceremony of the court.
Now, if we may judge by hints given
in various publications, she is a beautiful young lady who likes to think
and choose for herself and who has
many accomplishments and charms.
Princess Patricia had a very wholesome influence over society at the
capital.
What the Insurgents Seek
That the object of the Chinese
revolution is first of all (and alomst
entirely) to secure representative
government, is the explanation given
by Chui King, one of the leaders of
the Chinese Reform Association.
Chui King was seen by the News-
Advertiser, when nhe stated that the
refusal to grant constitutional government is the whole source of the
trouble.
If satisfactory assurance by the
Chinese government be given that
the strong desires of the Chinese
people on this point will be conceded he considers there is very little double but that the revolution
will come to an early end, the people having then obtained what they
are chiefly striving for. Such a result may be brought about at the
opening of the Chinese parliament,
which is to take place on Friday
next, when doings of an interesting
character  are  looked  for.
The only thing the people or fighting for, said Chui King, is the matter of politics, and the great object
of the revolution is undeniably to
impress upon the government the
seriousness of the general demands,
and the extent the people may. go
to if the demands are not admitted.
In this respect two matters come to
the front, and these two matters are
the chief causes of the revolution.
The first cause of complaint is
with regard to the railroads. Some
years ago, by an edict, the government promised that the Su Chong
Railroad should be run In the way
the people wanted. Nothing, however, has been done, and the people
have gone from a state of Impatience
to a condtlon of revolution by reason
of the neglect of the government!! to
carry out the promises It made. At
present the government Is trying to
get the railroad back from the people after having negelected to run
It as promised.
The second cause of tbe trouble
Is that the government has taken up
loans from foreign countries to build
railroads, which loans had not been
agreed to by Parliament, nor has
information been given as to where
the money was coming from, or for
what purpose it was to be used.
It Is expected that the proceedings
at this opening of Parliament will
be of the liveliest character, and It
is possible that, should the government by that time have come to the
conclusion that the demands of tbe
people, backed as they have been, by
force, are such that they must be
acceded to, arrangements will be
made which will render a continuance of the fighting improbable. The
revolution, so far, has been with tire
more specific object of frightening
the government.
The chief leader of the revolutionaries is Li Yuen Hung, a man
of middle age, and formerly a general in the Imperial army. Should the
uprising end successfull, and a republic be proclaimed, it is not unlikely that Li Yuen Hung may be its
first president. On the side of the
government, General Yeung Chung is
in chief command. To compose the
differences of the two parties the
government is anxious that Yuen
Shai Hei, who is a man of great
attainments and looked up to by all
the people, should be appointed as
the governor of the two provinces
where the uprising started.
Chui King has no doubt that most
of the Chinese people are in favor
of a great change in the political
constiution of the country. In his
opinion, the Chinese would like to
see the Manchus out of China, but
he thinks there are few who would
wish to take steps to drive them out,
the time for such action not yet being ripe. Even, however, if China
proposed to attempt to do so, Chui
King does notn think that any European power, or even Japan, would
be likely to interfere.
If the Chinse government gives
way over the matters of the railroad
and the foreign loans, the people,
said Chui King, would then feel more
settled and at ease, and would be
more Inclined to quietly take up and
discuss the matter of constitutional
government.
The movement or the Republic
Society was originated eight years
ago by Dr. Sun Yat San, who was
In Vancouver during the present
year, and who Is now in tbe United
States. Its objects were to get the
Mniie-bus out of China, and establish
a republican government. Its operation have been aggressive, In which
respect It differed greatly from the
Chee Kong Tong (Masonic Society),
which was established 200 years ago,
with the same objects. This latter
society, although large, has, it Is
said, made little or no progress during Its long existence In the "awakening of China." It is considered Uy
many of the thinking Chinese that
the Republican Society may have
gone too fast, and that matters are
far from ready for the overthrow of
the Chinese government.
This Is not the first time Chui
King has visited Vancouver. He was
here some eight years ago. He leaves
In the course of a few days for the
United States. All around Chinatown the people are absorbed in the
revolt, and all buleltins put up by
the Chinese newspapers referring to
the progress of events In the Celestial Empire have a great, crowd
around them all day long.
Sale of Mineral Claims for Unpaid Taxes in the Prince Rupert Assessment District, Province of British Columbia.
THE   LIST   ABOVE-MENTIONED
Name of Claim.
Name of Onwer.
Lot  No.
Unpaid   Cost  and
Taxes.  Expenses.
Hange 5, Const.
Four  Ace.
Golconda     Hickey, P. et al.
.Hickey, P. et al 165
. 167
McKInley     Hickey, P. et al 168
Laurier    Hickey, P. et al 169
La   Tosca Siiiglelmrt, The est.ite of S.  A 153
Ptarmigan Singlehurst, The estate of S. A 154
Range 3, ("oust.
. Clrristensen,  Hague  B 179
Sulphur    	
Hange 4, Coast,
Henrietta    Worsfold, Cuthert C. et al 109
Margaret     Worsfold, Cuthert C. et al 110
P26.00
25.00
23.50
26.00
13.00
13.00
13.00
12.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
Total.
$28.00
27.00
25.50
28.00
15.00
15.00
15.00
19.50 2.00 21.50
17.00 2.00 19.00
Queen  Cliurlotte  Islands
Bluebell     McMillan,
Copper   Queen McMillan,
Modoc   McMillan,
Reco    McMillan,
Onray    McMillan,
Emma   McMillan,
John S  80
John S  7V
John S  83
John S  &2
John S  84
John S  85
3.75
.25
2.00
11.75
2.00
13.75
7.25
2.00
9.25
10.25
2.00
12.25
12.00
2.00
14.00
13.00
2.00
15.00
Dated at Prince Rupert, B.  C, this 9th day of October, A.D. 1911.
A.   CUTHBERT,
Assessor and Collector Prince Rupert Assessment District.
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE
NOTICE is hereby given that the
reserve existing over Crown lands on
the Morrice River, Range 5, Coast
District, notice of which bearing date
of May 5th, 1910, was published in
the Br'tish Columbia Gazette of May
5th, 1910, is cancelled in so far as
it relates to the lands surveyed as
Lots 3881, 3882, 3883, 3884, 3885,
3886, 3887, 3888, 3889, 3890, 3891,
3892, 3893, 3894, 3895, 3896, 3897,
3898, 3899, 3900, 3901, 3902, 3903,
3904, 3905, 3906, 3907, 3908,, 3909,
and 3910.
ROBERT A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Department of Lands, Victoria, B. C.
September 12, 1911. s22-d22
LIQUOR ACT, 1010
(Section 42)
NOTICE is hereby given that, on
the first day of December next, application will be made to the Superintendent of Provincial Police for renewal of the hotel licence to sell
liquor by retail in the hotel known
as the Big Canyon Hotel, situate at
Kitselas, in the Province of British
Columbia.
J.   W.   PATERSON,
Applicant.
Dated October 6, 1911. olO
Skeena   Land    District—District   of
Queen  Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Eliza Sutherland, of Blair, Nebraska, U. S. A.,
occupation housewife, intends to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about 2 %
miles north and 5 % miles west from
the northwest corner of Lot 992;
thence east 60 chains; thence north
80 chains; thence west 60 chains;
tlience south 80 chains, to point commencement; containing 480 acres.
ELIZA SUTHERLAND.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated August 25, 1911. s22
Skeena   Land    District—District   of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Aimee Merrill, of Masset, B. C, occupation
housewife, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 2% miles north
and 5% miles west from the northwest corner of Lot 992; thence east
60 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 60 chains; thence north
80 chains, to point of commencement;  containing 480 acres.
AIMEE MERRILL.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated August 25, 1911. s22
Skeena   Land   District — District  of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that I, George M.
Wilson, of Mountair, New Mexico, occupation farmer, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the follow
ing described lands:—Commencing
at a post planted at the northwest
corner of Lot 698; thence south 70
chains, more or less, to Hell's Gate
Slough; thence westerly along slough
following edge of island around to
point of commencement; containing
220 acres, more or less.
GEORGE M. WILSON.
A. Wilson, Agent.
Dated August 25,  1911. 9-26
Skeeua Land  District—District
of Coast, Range 6
TAKE NOTICE that Thomas Stewart, of Prince Rupert, occupation
accountant, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at s
post planted 40 chains soutli from
tho southwest corner of Lot 1733;
thence west 40 chains; thence south
■10 chains; thence east 40 chains;
thence north 40 chains to point of
commencement; containing 160 acres
more or less.
THOMAS STEWART.
John  Klrkaldy,  Agent
Dated September 22, 1911.      s26
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that I, Mitchell
Albert, of Prince Rupert, occupation
manager, Intend to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted on the east shore of the
Exchumsik River, and being about
two miles northerly from the mouth
of the said Exchumsik River, and
which post is about forty chains
north from a stake planted on the
Exchumsik River and known as
"E9"; thence north 40 chains;
thence east 80 chains; tlience south
80 chains; thence west 40 drains;
Ihence north 40 chains; tbence west
40 cliains to the place of commencement; containing 480 acres, more
or less. MITCHELL ALBERT.
John R. Beatty, Agent.
Dated  October  1,  1911. o!7
Form of Notice (Section 47)
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that George A. Mc-
Nicholl, of the City of Prince Rupert, railway superintendent by occupation, intends to apply for permission to lease the following described
land:—Commencing at a post planted about three hundred (300) yards
west of Mile Post 80, on the line of
the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway
track from Prince Rupert; tbence
north eighty (80) chains; thence
west forty (40) chains; thence south
eighty (80) chains; thence east forty
.40) chains to place of commencement and containing three hundred
and twenty (320) acres, and which
land was located by me on the 26th
day of August, A. D. 1911.
GEORGE A. McNICHOLL.
Philip T. Chesley, Agent.
Dated August 29, 1911. s5
Form of Notice (Section 47)
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that Philip T.
Chesley of the City of Prince Rupert,
occupation prospector intends to apply for permission to lease the following described land, bounded as
follows:—-Commencing at a post
planted on the south bank of the
Shamos River (sometimes called the
Shames River) about three-quarters
of a mi'e west from the Grand Trunk
Pacific Railway and on the sou.n
bank of the said river; thence north
eighty (80) chains; tlience west
forty (40) chains; thei.ee south
eighty (80) chains; thenco ea-t forty
(40) chains to point of commencement, and containing three hundred
and twenty (320) acres more or less,
and which land was located by mo
on the 25th August, A. D. 1911.
PHILIP T.  CHESLEY.
Dated August 28, 1911.
Form of Notice  (Section 34)
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that Philip T.
Chesley, of the City of Prince Rupert, B. C, occupation prospector,
intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described
land:—Commencing at a post planted
about half-way between Mile Post
77 and Mile Post 78 on the main line
of the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway
trom Prince Rupert, and about fifty
(50) feet west off the Eaid right-of-
way of the said railway; thence
soutli eighty (80) chains; thence
west forty (40) chains; thence north
eighty (80) chains; thence east forty
(40) chains to point of commencement, and containing th ee hundred
and twenty (320) acres more or less
and which land was located by me on
the 26th day of August, A. D. 1911.
PHILIP  T.   CHESLEY.
Dated   August  28,   1911.
Form of Notice  (Section 34)
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that Edward Chesley, of the City of Prince Rupert,
B. C, occupation trainman, Intends
to apply for permission to purchase
the following described land:—Commencing at a post planted about halt
way between Mile Post 77 and Mile
Post 78 on the Main Line of the
Grand Trunk Pacific Railway from
Prince Rupert and about fifty (50)
feet west of the right-of-way of the
said Railway; thence north eighty
(80) chains; thence west forty (40)
chains; thence south eighty (80)
chains; thence east forty (40) chains,
to the point of commencement; and
containing three hundred and twenty
(320) acres more or less and which
land was located by me on the 26th
day of August, A. D. 1911.
EDWARD CHESLEY.
Dated August 28, 1911. s5
Form of Notice (Section 47)
Skeena   Land    District—District    of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that John A. Kirkpatrick, of the City of Prince Rupert, dry goods merchant by occupation, intends to apply for permission
to lease the following described land,
bounded as follows:-—Commencing
at a post planted about three hundred (300) yards west of Alile Post
79 on the line of the Grand Trunk
Pacific Railway track from Prince
Rupert; thence north eighty (80
chains; thence west forty (40)
chains; thence south eighty (80
chains; thence east forty (40)
chains to place of commencement,
and containing three hundred and
twenty (320) acres more or less, and
which land was located by me on th«
26th day of August A.D. 1911.
JOHN A.  KIRKPATRICK.
Philip T. Chesley  Agent.
Dated August 29, 1911. s5
Form of Notice (Section 47)
Skeena    Land    District—District    of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that Alexander
Faulds, of the City of Vancouver,
B. C, occupation mining engineer,
intends to apply for permission to
lease the following land, bounded as
lease the following described
land, bounded as follows: —
Commencing at a post planted
on the south bank of the
Sliiiinos    River     (sometimes    called
shames River) about three-quarters
of a mile west from the Cirrrnd Trunk
Pacific   Railroad   and   nn   tbe  south
hank   of   said   river;    tlience   soutli
eighty (80) chains; thence wesl forty
(40)   ciiniiis;   thence   north   eighty
(SO)  chains; thence cast forty (40)
• hains to the point or commencement,
und   containing   three  bundled   and
twenty (820) acres more or less, nnd
Which land wns located by me on the
26th day or August. A. D,  1911.
ALEXANDER FAULDS.
Philip T. Chesley, Agent.
Dated August  25,  1811,
Form of Notice (Section 47)
Skeena    Land    District--District    of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that George W.
Kerr, of the City of Prince Rupert,
occupation butcher, intends to apply
for permission to lease the following described land:—Commencing at
a post planted about throe hundred
(300) yards west of Mile Post 79
on the line of the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway track from Prince Rupert; thence south eighty (80)
chains; thence west forty (40)
chains; thence nortli eighty (80)
chains; tbence east forty (40) chains
to the place of commencement, and
containing three hundred and twenty (320) acres more or less, and
which land was located by me on
the 20th day of August Inst. A. D.
1811.
GEO.   W.   KERR.
Daled August 28,  1911. s5
-
il PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Friday, October 27 ,1911.
-prince -Kupert journal
Telephone  138
Published twice a week on Tuesdays and Fridays from the office of
publication, Third Avenue, near
McBride Street.
Subscription rate to any point In
Canada, $2.00 a year; to points outside of Canada, J3.00 a year.
Advertising rates furnished on
application.
0. H. NELSON,
Editor.
Friday, October 27 ,1911.
ADVERTISING  RATES
The News, with characteristic
Ignorance of the facts connected with
the subject, attempts to create the
Impression Hurt tbe Journal charged
double rates tor the city advertising,
This is false and if the News knew
where II was at it would know that
the rates charged were those mutually agreed upon by the News, the
Empire and the Journal at the beginning of the year when dealing
with the council.
It Is all very well for the News
to flippantly charge citizens with
misconduct and to attribute to them
actions unbecoming to anyone who
has a desire, which is surely not to
be condemned, to maintain a reputation of dealing fairly with all. There
has in certain quarters in the city
been far too much of that and while
we personally are satisfied enough
to allow the News or anyone else
to work Injury to themselves by any
personal attacks upon us, there have
been others in this city who have
been unjustly criticised and who do
not possess the means whereby these
mischievous charges may be met.
When the News says that the opposition of the proprietor of the
Journal to commission government is
a tribute to commission government
we can only say, adopting a similar
crude and childish style, that the
opposition of the News to any course
we pursue is not uncomplimentary
to us.
NOT   ALL   SENTIMENT
pert and as such should be welcomed.
Vancouver, as has been referred
to many times in these columns, is
alive to the possibility of this north
country and that city will take active
steps to secure connection from Fort
George to Vancouver as soon as possible. It is realized in Vancouver
that to secure this trade before
Prince Rupert gets its feel well under it and business established will
mean millions for the southern port.
No doubt the connection sought will
eventually be given. It is important
that every effort should be exerted
to give Prince Rupert connection
with the districts referred to as soon
as possible. The connection with Hie
south will follow later.
Every day brings more prominently forward the fact that the part
nf British Columbia to be opened by
the G. T. p. is Inflntely richer In
minerals and in farms lands than the
more southern part now openedup.
Prospectors and mining mon are all
turning their steps this way now.
Within the next two years the main
mining camps of British Columbia
will be In the north. Every mining
man from the south will bear out
this statement. Following the opening up of the mining camps will
come the development of the farming districts. The advent of the
railway materially assists in this
work. Prince Rupert is the natural
point for all this and residents of
the city will oppose any movement
to divert the trade away from here
until this place is in a position to
meet all legitimate competition. The
day is not very far distant when
Prince Rupert will be In a position
to fear no competitors.
THE PREMIER'S MISSION
ANOTHER FEEDER
Prince Rupert Will Have a New Railway
to Assist in Hauling Freight
to Port
,ine  Through  Peace  River  Country
Is to Be Built to Fort George
at Once
The immense possibilities of
Prince Rupert as a seaport and an
outlet for trade from the richest part
of the provinces of British Columbia
and Alberta is further brought Into
prominence in an announcement that
.1. Ii. McArthur, millionaire railway
contractor of Winnipeg, and several
associates, have acquired a charter
for a railway extension from Edmonton to Fort George. This announcement was made in Vancouver a few
days ago by J. L. Cote, member for
Athabasca in the Alberta legislature.
The proposed line will traverse the
richest portion of the the Peace River district entering British Columbia via the Pine Rivere Pass, north
of the Yellowhead Pass, and opening
up a vast region in the northern por-
over one thousand miles long and
will take the shape of two sides of
triangle whose apex will be at
PaBS,  which   has  a  low
Natural   gas   is  abundant  at \ *»«<HS«#*-KHSi^^
and there are a thou- *	
feet, ^^^
many places,
sand square miles of asphalt country.
In many places the rivers cut the
asphalt beds, which have in this way
been proved to a depth of at least
200 feet. I sent samples to New
York experts, who pronounced it
first class and predicted that it
would yet be used for commercial
purposes. A government report estimated the deposits of asphalt in my
district to amount to thousands of
millions of tons."
SNOW IS MELTING
Continued iie-m of Past Summer Has
Had Effect Upon the Alps
The groat and
u.e past bu mnier
effect even upon
continued heat of
has had a visible
the highest iiioun-
One of the biggest delusions connected   with  the  recent  election   in
Canada is the claim made by all Liberal  papers and by too many Conservative papers, that Imperial sentiment  predominated   over  commercial considerations, says the Hedley
Gazette.    No such thing.    It is true
that the Imperial element In the situation   did   sway  many  electors,  and
who is there who is sordid enough
to  blame  any  Canadian  who  voted
■on those lines?   But to say that any
elector who voted on those lines was
placing bis national sentiment before
his   commercial   interests  is  to  talk
arrant humbug.    Weak as the advocates of reciprocity were on the score
of   national   sentiment,    they   were
weaker a hundred times when they
attempted  to put forward economic
grounds   for  support   of  reciprocity.
There were Liberals by the thousand
who  recognized  the  shallowness of
Liberal  argument  when  asking support   for  the   measure   on  economic
grounds and voted against It on that
feature alone, and it is safe to say
that there were as many more whose
judgment   told   them    that   Canada
would  get  the worst  of  the bargain
commercially,  but  nevertheless they
would   vote  their  parly   rather  than
see   it   defeated.     In   England   they
have   the  same  foolish   notion  that
Canada threw away a commercial opportunity in bed devotion to Imperial
ties when the truth of the matter is
that Canadians are able to recognize
when they have a snap and patriotic
enough to their own pockets to want
to kee;i it for themselves.   The market   gardeners  and   fruit  growers  of
Ontario,  in  whose ranks were hundreds of strong Liberals, voted to a
man   against  reciprocity  and  did  so
alinirst  wholly on commercial  lines.
The  farmers of Ontario generally,
went strongly against reciprocity and
did so largely because it paid them,
Anyone who would  have have told
Onlario   farmers   twenty-five   years
ago   thai   after   1 our.   the  Canadian
west would begin to absorb annually
ten million dollars worth of Ontario-
bred horses, would have been laughed
at;   but  nevertheless  it  is so  today,
and    three    months    of    reciprocity
would give almost all of that trade
to   the   horse   breeders    of    Dakota,
Idaho and  Montana.
Premier   McBride   is   leaving   for
Ottawa in the course of the next few
weeks for the purpose of conferring
with the Hon. R. L. Borden on the
requirements  of this province  from
the federal standpoint, says the Colonist.      Britisii    Columbia    has    no
sturdier champion and  the  visit  to
the  east  of  the  premier  is  certain
to be followed by good results.    We
may look for an early adjustment of
the differences between the two governments which for years past have
existed  as  stumbling  blocks  in   the
path of prosperity.   It is certain that
during his stay  at  Ottawa  Mr.   McBride will take up other matters the
question of the Indian title to  land
in  British  Columbia and it is  to be
hoped   that   in   this   vexed   question
some   amicable   understanding   will
be reached, satisfactory not only to
the Dominion and provincial authorities, but to the Indians themselves.
Another question  which  will  doubtless  be  considered   will  be  that  of
immigration.    Heretofore this prov-
inve  has had  only too great  reason
to   complain   that,  it   has   not   been
given   sufficient,   prominence   in   the
scheme   of   advertising   carried   out
from Ottawa.    This it is now hoped
will be rectified.    To date, the government of the province has not seen
its way clear to establish an  immigration  department  of Its own, and
we   think   that   it   showed   excellent
judgment In not doing so.   The question of immigration is just at present more one for the federal authorities, though doubtless the time will
coiiie      when      British      Columbia,
through tlie policy which she adopted
with   regard   to  transportation   matters, will be able to embark on some
scheme which will aid in settling up
the  country   more   rapidly.     In   the
meantime any arrangement with the
government at Ottawa, whereby the
latter  could  work   in   harmony  with
the powers over James Bay,  cannot
fall to mean prosperity for the province.
PEACE  RIVER   TRADE
The announcement is made that
.1. D. McArthur Is behind a railway
building project from Edmonton to
Fort George by way of the Peace
River Pass. The proposition when
carried out will be a means of tapping the rich Peace River country
in both British Columbia and Alberta. When completed the road
should be an important feeder for
tire G. T. P. mainline lo Prince Ru-
INSPECTOn OF LEGAL OFFICES
Upon the recommendation of Attorney General Bowser, the appointment bus been made by the provln-
i-iiiial governmenl of Henry C. Hnii-
nlngton of Victoria as Inspector of
legal offices for British Columbia,
lhe duties of which office Mr. Ilair-
ington will assume on the first of
November. The position is one
brought into existence a little more
than a year ago, its first incumbent
being J. P. McLeod, who upon the
resignation of H. A. MacLean, K. C,
also became deputy attorney general
and has since borne the official responsibilities attaching to both of-
f'ces. Mr. Hannington, It is understood, will devote his time and attention exclusively to his public position, and it Is hoped that through
his activities such reforms will
speedily be brought about—more particularly in the land registry offices
—as will fully satisfy a., public e-riti-
cisni in respect thereto. One of Mr.
Hannlngton's first objects In his new
position will be the reorganization
of  the  land  registry  offices.
a
Pine   River
altitude.
An exploratory survey party is
now going over the route to secure
data preliminary to undertaking the
location work. It is expected that
the line will be completed and in
operation within four years as, it is
understood, arrangements for financing the proposition have already
been commenced.
Important Line
This road, when completed, will
connect with the Grand Trunk Pacific at Fort George, providing a link
in a through route from here to the
Peace River district and tending to
secure for this port, with its great
advantages as an ocean port, a big
share of the potential business with
that vast northern region.
Mr. Cote is more familiar with the
resources of the Mackenzie River
basin than with those of British Columbia and is confident that the proposed line will open up the richest
regions on this continent. He stated
that the past season had witnessed
a remarkable trek of settlers into the
Peace River district, which in itself
does not belong in his own electoral
division. On his way out last spring
from Lesser Slave Lake to Athabasca
Landing, where he resides, he passed
no less than 400 teams with settlers
and their stock bound for the Peace
River prairies. The flow northward
continued with little abatement all
summer.
Potentialities of North
"Canadians generally do not realize that the country north of Edmonton has agricultural areas large
enough to provide homes for millions
of people," said he. "The wheat
growing limit will extend as far as
Great Slave Lake, the most northerly point reached by the buffalo in
its annual migration. This means a
series of prosperous settlements 600
miles north of Edmonton and possibly beyond. Competing against all
sections of Alberta, samples of fall
wheat grown at Athabasca Landing,
100 miles beyond Edmonton, won the
first award at this year's fair at Edmonton. The Hudson's Bay Company is abandoning its traditional
conservative policy and is now advertising that It will be prepared next
year to sell round trip tickets from
Edmonton to the mouth of the Mackenzie River, nearly three thousand
miles north, on the Arctic Ocean.
The same company has several flour
mills in operation In the Peace River districl, where pioneer settlements
enjoy good success in ralstnng wheat,
barley and oats, and in cattle and
horse ranching.
Mecca of Railways
"The Canadian Northern Railway
will have Its branch line extended
Hiis year as far as Saskatchewan
Landing and other roads are preparing to invade those northern regions. Railway communication
will stimulate the influx of settlers
and lead to the development of the
rich mineral resources known to exist In the mountains. I have seen
splendid samples of copper and silver-lead ores that were brought in
from points east of Lesser Slave
Lake. Outside of the waterways and
lakes, which are the main highways
of travel, thousands of square miles
of country have not yet been explored.
"In the Fort McMurray district,
three different companies are boring
for oil, of which there is said by
experts to be good indications. One
well  has attained a depth  of  1,200
tains In Switzerland, France and
Italy. Guides and Alpinists reports
that ice centuries old and probably
never before seen by man is now exposed to view and is being penetrated
and melted by the sun's heat for the
first time in Alpine history. Small
glaciers have disappeared and large
ones have shrunk.
This phenomenon is specially noticeable in the Alps of Savoy, Valols
and parts of the Bernese Oberland
while the level of the summit of
Mount Blanc is lowered several
yards. In the rock mountains, such
as the Matterhorn and the Aiguilles
of Mont Blanc, the melting of the
old ice between the fissures and crevasses is causing dangerous avalanches of stone and boulders.
The rivers fed by glaciers are very
high, but the others are at unusually
low  level.
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We shall be pleased to quote you on all your requirements
for Paints, Oils, Varnishes, Window Glass
and Supplies for the
building trade.
The Staneland Co. Ltd
836-840 Fort Street, VICTORIA, B.C.
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The Britisii Columbia Company
LIMITED.
AUTHORIZED CAPITAL $100,000.::  PAID UP CAPITA! 941,500
DIRECTORS:—Reginald C. Brown, President; J. C. Maclure, Vlces-
Presldent; H. E. Marks, Managing Director; Capt. E. Nash, William
McNalr, R. A. Bevan, and F. C.   Williams, Secretary.      :-:      :-:
INTEREST 4 PER CENT. DEPOSITS
This Company acts ai Executors,  Administrators, Transferees and
Secretaries to Public Companies.    Commercial, Industrial and other
business propositions underwritten.    Issues  made  on  the
London and New York Stock Exohanges.
TIMBER, COAL, LANDS, and
COMPANY ORGANIZATION
Head Office for Canada, 203, 208, 210, 215 Carter-Cotton Building,
VANCOUVER, B.C.
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The Most Popular
SCOTCH
WHISKEY
in the World
Sole Agents for British Columbia
CLARKE BROS.
Nclntyre Block,       3rd Ave.
Phone 39
P.O. BOX 319
Royal Bank of Canada
HEAD OFFICE: MONTREAL ESTABLISHED  1869
Surplus        $7,200,000
Capital         $6,200,000
Total Assets $100,000,000
Savings   Bank   Department—$1 Will Open an Account
Branches Throughout Canada and  Banking Connections With All
Parts of the United States
Agents Throughout tlie World
H. P. WILSON, Manager Prince Rupert Branch
4 Per Cent 4
On a Checking Account
is what our depositors receive.    Start saving today by opening an account with us.
$1.00 is enough to begin with
The Continental Trust Company, Limited
Second Avenue, Prince Rupert, B.C.
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WOBKINGMAN'S HOME
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Rooms 50 Cents
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FIRST AVE. AND SEVENTH ST.
J. Goodman, Proprietor
High-Class....
Grocery
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Goods for the Table to Suit the Most
Fastidious Housewife
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MERRYFIELD'S !
CASH GROCERY
I
I I
Friday, October 27 ,1911.
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
**************************
MARINE NEWS   !
**************************
AOCTDENT TO BEATRICE
Officers of the Princess, on arrival
south, stated that the vessel went
ashore on Noble Island In a driving
rain. Mate W. Hines was on the
bridge, with the watchman at the
wheel. The Beatrice was steaming
ahout fourteen knots, with the compass pointing southeast by south. The
night was terribly dark and nothing
was discernible ahead. The mate instructed the man at the wheel to
keep her a few points east of her
course and drop the • clutch. It is
understood that this order was disregarded, owing to the alleged deafness of the man at the wheel, who
failed to catch the orders given by
the mate. The vessel Immediately
altered her course and swung around
northeast by north and a few minutes
later struck the rocks.
ALASKAN WHALERS
With a capital stock of $3,000,000,
subscribed by European and American capitalists, the latter residing in
the east, the United States Whaling
Company has been incorporated and
has let a contract for the constrc-
tlon of three modern steam whalers
to the Moran Company of Seattle.
The new vessels will be built after
designs prepared at the Victoria shipyard, and will be ready for service
In Alaskan waters within six months.
Balfour, Guthrie & Co. are agents
for the United States Whaling Company, and Alexander Baillie, resident
partner of the British concern, said
that headquarters for the whaling
corporation would be maintained in
Seattle.
Two of the new whalers will be
nlnetyi-flve feet long and one will
be 117 feet in length. All will be
built of steel, will have a speed of
approximately eleven knots an hour
and will be equipped with all modern apparatus for whaling in the
waters of the north.
While no figures were given out,
It is said the cost of the three new
whalers, which will be patterned after the Paterson and Moran, lately
launched at the Moran yards, will be
slightly In excess of $200,000.
P. Borgen of Norway is president
of the United States Whaling Company and Captain Eiuar Abrahamson,
also of Norway, is general manager.
AbrahamsoD Is a veteran master of
whaling vessels.
FOB PAPER  MILL
Remodelled at a cost of some $10,-
000 the Dodwell liner Fulton
has increased her capacity to 900
tons. The principal reason for her
remodelling Is to permit her carrying theh increasing exports of the
Powell River Paper Company to Seattle. Captain E. V. Kriiger, a familiar figure in Sound shipping, who,
as master of the Sound freighter
Samson, rendered invaluable aid in
floating the steamship Kitsap, Is in
command. From « well decked
steam schooner, the Fulton has been
changed to a raised deck vessel, and
ports have been cut in her sides. A
freight elevator was recently installed in the vessel to assist in raising freight to the level of the dock.
The Fulton was only recently put
on this route between Tacoma, Seattle, Victoria and Vancouver, having been brought up from San Fran-
cisoo for the purpose. Hitherto she
has not made Powell River a port
of call.
TRADE OF PACIFIC
Leaders of the shipping trade of
Australia are awakening to the necessity of asserting themselves In
the Pacific. During the past ten
years foreign shipping trade has
grown enormously as the result of
the subsidies paid by European governments. This trade has been
taken away from the Commonwealth,
and shipowners here bnvc become
alarmed at the losses they have suffered. Strong representations arc
now being made to tbe federal government to remove the disabilities
under which local shipping nt present labors. It Is thought that with
fair opportunities the Australian
owners could regain their lost preeminence.
The rapid spread of the Japanese
over the isllands of the Pacific Is
also causing apprehension in the
minds of those Australian who hope
to see the Commonwealth play her
part In the Pacific Ocean. It is asserted that there are now 25,000
fighting men in Honolulu, while
thousands are flowing into New Caledonia, ostensibly to work In the
mines. The Importance of securing
trade In the Pacific has also made
itself felt in New Zealand, where
much more active steps have been
taken than In tbe Commonwealth.
In connection with this question,
pressure Is being brought to bear on
the FUher administration to liaste-n
the establishment of reciprocity with
Canada and at the same time to improve the mail service between the
two countries. A proposal has already been made to the postmaster
by the Oceanic company to carry the
mails in thirty days from Sydney to
London. The company states that it
intends to resume its service with
San Francisco and it wishes to secure
a subsidy for carrying the mails. The
fact that a considerable saving of
time would be effected by sending
the mails via San Francisco is weigh-
with the government, but no action
will be taken until the whole proposal is thoroughly gone Into.
<  o	
LACROSSE CHANGE
According to rumors now going
the rounds in lacrosse circles in the
east there is a movement on foot to
freeze out four of the teams in the
National Lacrosse Union, engineered,
it is believed, on account of the
weakness of the Montreal Shamrocks, the Ottawa Capitals and the
Cornwall club and the strength and
financial backing of the Torontos.
The movement to drop Cornwall and
Ottawa is not new, but the proposition to drop the Shamrocks and Torontos comes as a big surprise.
The proposal now is to form a
"big four" lacrosse league, with the
Teeumsehs and a new team at Rosedale on the Toronto end, and the
Nationals and Montreal on the Montreal end.
Ever since the Toronto Street
Railway Company took over the
franchise of the Toronto club in the
N. L. U. there has been a feeling
among the other clubs that the railway officials will reach the limit in
lacrosse salaries in an effort to gather together the best players in the
game, thus weakening the other clubs
which cannot afford to pay big prices.
Already the Toronto club his signed
several players from other N. L. U.
clubs for next year's team, while it
is reported on good authority that
Johnny Howard will come east again
and that he will be accompanied by
one of the New Westminster club's
best home players. Howard, it is
said, will manage the Toronto club.
The local club is also negotiating for
a couple of Vancouver players. The
officials of the Scarboro Beach club
are determined to land the best and
are particularly anxious to bring the
Minto Cup east next year.
PUGILISTIC AMBITION
The one abltion in the life of Matt
Wells, the English lightweight champion, Is to win the world's title from
Ad Wolgast, and it is largely because
he wants to earn enough money so
that he can insure his mother a trust
fund of at least $2ii a week as long
as she lives.
Matt was born in London and will
be twenty-six years old the fourteenth
of next December. Hrowever, regarding this point, he and his mother
are forever arguing. „ Matt says he
is only twenty-four years old now,
while his mother declares he is
twelve months older than that, and
as be believes his mother is in a
better position than himself to know
his right age he takes her word
for it.
There were twelve in Matt's family, but two of them have passed beyond. Six of the survivors are girls
and they have all married well-to-do
business men in England. Two of bis
brothers are married, while the other
is content to emulate Matt anil remain single as long as their mother
is alive.
Nobody would ever think that Mrs.
Wells is sixty-eight years old, writes
a New York expert, as she Is just aa
lively as a cricket and takes long
walks, swims anil oilier outdoor enjoyment with nil the ardor of a niur-li
younger person. Mrs. Wells (jliln'l
like 11 when Malt first took up the
pugilistic game, bul lis long as lee
was determined lo make his living
out of It she made the best of It, Her
only worry Is that be might get hurt,
and after every one of bis battles
she Insists on his going straight to
her to see whether be is marked.
Mrs. Wells dreads the oughts of
Matt being seriously injured In bis
fights and she has always cautioned
him to be lenient witih his opponents
and It Is for this reason probably
that he Is content with just outpointing an adversary.
Once during the four that Matt
was an amateur on tne other side he
beat a fellow up so badly that it made
him timid for a long time in the
ring, and every since he has always
lets up on his opponent when he
showed signs of grogglness. In all
his twenty-five battles as a professional, Matty has never really knocked an opponent sense-ess.
It was because of his great love
for bis mother and his lonelieness
when she Is not at bis side that
prompted Wells to cable her to come
{0m
Double Weekly Service
S.S. PRINCE RUPERT & S.S. PRINCE GEORGE
Sail for Vancouver, Victoria and Seattle
Mondays and Fridays at 8 a.m.
S.S. PRINCE JOHN for Port Simpson, Naas and Stewart, Wednesdays, 1 P. M.    For Masset and Naden Harbor, Thursdays, 12
P. M. For Skidegate, Rose Harbor, etc., Saturday, 1 P. M.
RAILWAY SERVICE TO COPPER    RIVER,    mixed     trains from
Prince  Rupert Mondays,  Wednesday and Saturdays,  1  P. M.;
returning Tuesdays, Thursdays and Sundays, 4 P. M.
THE GRAND TRUNK RAILWAY  SYSTEM,   connecting   with
trains from the Pacific Coast, operates a frequent and convenient
service of luxurious trains over Its DOUBLE TRACK route between
Chicago, Toronto, Montreal, Quebec,   Halifax,     Portland,     Boston,
New York and Philadelphia.
Atlantic Steamship bookings arranged via all lines
Full information and tickets obtained from the office of
A. E. McMASTER
Freight and Pasenger Agent, G. T. P. Wharl.
to America when he had only been
here a week himself. She came to
New York toward the last of May
and he hired a nice furnished apartment in Brooklyn for her. Later in
the summer, when he was training
at Rye Beach, he had her down there
with him, and he declares that the
water, air and sunshine added five
years to her life.
Any day Matt Is not able to go
over the bridge to see her, and there
are such days because of fights and
theatrical dates, he always writes to
her. She would worry herself sick if
he did not do it.
If you ask Mrs. Wells what she
prizes most on earth, she will tell
you that outside of the love for her
children, it is the gold medal studded with diamonds which Matt won
after a special bout when an amateur
In England.
TRANSCONTINENTAL   CHAIRMAN
It. C. Leonard of St. Catherines Hus
Been Named for the Post
The Borden government has made
a beginning with its appointments.
The premier announces that It had
been decided to repliace S. N. Parent
as chairman of the National Transcontinental Railway commission
with R. E. Leonard of St. Catherines,
Out. Mr. Parent was a lawyer politician out of a job. Under him the
estimates of the line have been enormously exceeded and there has been
a series of over classification scandals. R. E. Leonard is an engineer,
a practial railway man. and a wealthy
man who takes the post from a desire
to render public services. He is a
graduate of the Royal Military College and for some years was in railway construction work, being employed on the C. P. R. and the New
York Central. He lias a high reputation among engineers. Of late he
has made exceedingly successful investments in the mining districts of
WATEH  NOTICE
THE AIN RIVER DEVELOPMENT
CO., LTD. of Prince Rupert, a Corporation, gives notice thai it intends,
on the 27th day of November next,
at eleven o'clock in the forenoon, to
apply to the Water Commissioner at
his office at Prince Rupert for a
licence to take and use 700 cubic feet
of water per second from Ain River,
a tributary of Masset Inlet, to be
diverted at a point 2 \\ miles above
the outlet  inlo Masset Inlet.
The water will be used at on near
the mouth of Ain River for generating power for sale purposes.
It intends to apply at the same
time for pennission to store 75,000
acre-feet of the said water In a reservoir at I-in-tsua Lake.
The copy of such parts of the Memorandum of Association as authorize
the proposed application anil works
are: —
(J) The construction or operation
of works for the supply or utilisation
of water under the "Water Act,
1909,"
Ik) To apply for ami obtain, under the provisions Of the "Water
Act, 1909,' or lo purchase or otherwise acquire, water records, or water
licences.
(o) io construction operate and
maintain electric works, power-
works, generating plant, and such
other conveniences as may be necessary for generating electricity.
(p) Producing power In any manner and of any kind.
(s) For rendering water and water-power available for use, application anil distribution by erecting
dams, Increasing the head of water In
any existing body of water, or extending the area thereof, diverting the
waters of any stream, pond or lake
Into any other channel or channels,
laying or erecting any line of flume,
pipe or wire, constructing any raceway, reservoir, aqueduct, weir, wheel,
building or other erection or work
which may be required in connection
with the improvement and use of the
said water and water-power, or by
altering, renewing, extending, improving, repairing, or maintaining
any such works or any part thereof.
THE   AIN   RIVER   DEVELOPMENT
CO.,  LTD.
Ry  George  S.   Mayer,  Agent.
Dated Or-lober 1, 1911. olO
New Ontario, among other things,
being the principal owner of the Con-
iagas mine. He also has smelting
interests at Thorold, Ontario. Mr.
Leonard's means are such as to make
the $10,000 a year which the position
carries a matter of indifference. His
attitude is understood to bs that hav.
ing once acquired sufficient wealth,
he Is anxious to do some public service. It is purely a case of the office seeking the man. Hon. Frank
Cockrane, who conducted the negotiations on behalf of the government, found the public service aspect
pt the offer, the argument that prevailed.
Mr. Non - Resident
Write us regarding the value of your
Prince Rupert property.    We will be
pleased   to  keep   you   posted   as   to
conditions here.
0. Ml. HELGERSON, LTD.
REAL ESTATE AND RENTALS
Offices:  Helgerson Block
 LADYSMITH	
COAL
ROCHESTER & MONROE, Phone 115
*J* *>*i**I* *> *!• •!* *J* "I* *J- *i* ♦*■* *+* *1* ** *I* *i* *** "t"i* ♦♦'fr *■*'**
3*
I Customs Broker
f   STORAGE
*
*
* Forwarding,   Distributing   and
% Shipping   Agent
*
* Special attention given to stor-
•:>   age of  Household   Goods  and
% Baggage
*     DOUGLAS
SUTHERLAND
First   Ave.   Near   McBride   St.
P. O. Box 907 Phone 202
LINDSAY'S CARTAGE & STORAGE
G. T. P. CARTAGE AGENTS
Office at H. B. Rochester, Centre SL
LADYSMITH  COAL
Is handled by us.   All orders receive
prompt attention.   Phone No  68.
Skeena    Land    District—District    eef
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE Ural Gwendolen E.
Burrowes of Prince Rupert, li. ('.,
married woman, intends to apply (or
permission to purchase the following
described land:—Commencing at a
posl plan toil about one mile wesl of
post marked L, 1448, northwest
comer; thence south no chains;
tbence east 40 chains; thence north
so chains; thence west 40 chains, to
point of commencement; containing
320 acres, more or less. Said land
is situated between T.L. 42913 and
A.P. 11679.
GWENDOLEN E. BURROWES.
Gilbert   Burrowes,  Agenl.
Dated October 11,  1911. 0-24
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World's Greatest
Highway
Let us plan your
Trip East
OR TO
Europe
We like to answer enquires.
Agent  for  all   Atlantic  lines.
Call on or write:
J.  G.  McNAB,
General  Agent.
fjow ls the Time
To arrange for that trip EAST or to
the OLD COUNTRY
THE GREAT NORTHERN RAILWAY
Oilers the Rest Service
First    and    Second    Class    Sleepers,
Observation   Cars   and   Dining   Cars
by  their  celebrated
ORIENTAL  LIMITED
Atlantic  Ocean  tickets  by  all  lines
from  New York  or  Montreal
ROGERS STEAMSHIP OFFICE
Phone 110 Second Ave
Skeena   Land   District — District   of
Coast
TAKE NOTICE that Hugh A.
Qourlay, of Vancouver, oe-e-u pation
bookkeeper, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commenciirt, at a
post planted about 10 chains distant
and in a northly direction from the
northwest corner of Lot 3"iJ, anH on
the southwesterly end of an island;
thence following tbe sourlreasterly
shore to the northeast end of island;
thence following the northwest shore
of said island to the polnr of commencement; containing fifty m-res,
more or less.
HUGH A. (iOURLAY.
Mancell Clark,  Agent.
Dated Oct.  12, 1911. o-20
Skeena    Land    District—District    of
Coast,  Hange  .">
TAKE NOTICE that 1, Anton Sal-
berg, laborer, or Prince Rupert, intend to apply for permission to purchase tire following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted em ihe
west   side   of   Lakelse   Lake; forty
(40)   chains   north   and   aboul   two
12)   chains  e-rrsi   of  A.P   18787,  and
jtwrr miles south of Lot 17::::;  Hi.-Here
outh   40   rhains;   thence   west   80
chains;     thence    north    40    ■•lirilns;
tlience  east   40   chains,   to   point  of
rommencement;      containing      :!20
ic-res, more or less.
ANTON  SALBERG.
Fred E. Cowell, Agent,
Dated Sept. IS, 1911. o-20
Free Employment
Office
For all kinds of help. Cooks, waiters, dishwashers, hotel porters, all
kinds of laborers or mechanics, cal)
up 178 or call at the
FREE EMPLOYMENT OFFICE
GRAND HOTEL
Headquarters for Cooks and Walters
ROGERS & BLACK
Wholesale Dealers In
BUILDING  MATERIAL,     CEMENT,
LIME,   HAIR-FIBRE PLASTER
COKE, BLACKSMITH COAL,
COMMON BRICK, PRESSED BRICK
SHINGLES AND LATH
NEW   WELLINGTON   COAL
All   orders   promptly   filled—see   ub
for prices.
PHONE 110 PHONE 110
Skeena   Land    District—District    of
Coast,  Hange fe
TAKE NOTJuE that I, Hans lte.s-
tad, laborer, of Prince Rupert, intend to apply for permission to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post
planted on the east side of Williams
Creek, which Hows into l.akeise
Lake, about one (1) mile from Kitamaat Branch right-of-way In a
southerly direction, and (i.e. i5)
chains from the creek bunk: thence
south 40 chains; thence east 40
chains; tbence north 4e> chains;
thence west 40 cliains, to point of
commencement; containing 160
lcres, more or less.
HANS RU8TAD.
Fred E.  Cowell.  Agent.
Dated  Sept.  15, 1911, o-20
Skeena    Land    District—District    of
Coast,  Range fe
TAKE NOTICE that 1, Lars Anderson, of Prince Rupert, occupation
laborer, Intend to apply fur permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted on the east sid« e>r Williams Creek, a tributary of l.akeise
Lake, one and one-half (1 1-2 r miles
in a southerly direction from the Kitamaat Branch right-of-way and ten
(10) chains from the creek bank;
thence south 4 0 chains; thence east
40 chains; tbence north 4<> chains;
thence west 4 0 chains, to point ot
commencement; containing 160
ae-res, more or less
LaRS  ANDERSON.
Fred E. Cowell,  Agent.
Dated  Sept.   16,  1911, er-20
The Thompson
:: Hardware Co. :
—Second Avkxue—
|    Paints. General Hardware,    • >
Oils, Stoves and Ranges.
E.  L.  FISHER
Funeral   Director *  Embalmer
CHARGES   REASONABLE
THIRD AVE. PHONE  866
OPEN DAY AND NIGHT
J. L. PARKER
MINING ENGINK.-'i;
Prince Rupert, B. C.
Open for Confutation and  Mine
Examination
Temporary Address: —
Prince Rupert Inn
FREDERICK PETERS, It. C.
ee I Barrister, Solicitor and Notary Public
THE WESTHOLME LUMBER CO.
LIMITED
We handle all kinds of
Building Supplies
First Art-nut- Telephone 186
Office in
EXCHANGE  BLOCK
WM. S. HAr.L, L. D. S. U.  11. a
:-:    DENTIST   :•:
New Knox Hotel
ARTAUD & BESNER
Proprietors
The New Knox Hotel Is run on the
European  plan.      Flrst-clas Bervlce.
i All the latest modern Improvements
THE  BAR keeps   only    the    beBl
brands of liquors and cigarB.
THE CAFE la open from 6.30 a.m
to 8 p.m. Excellent cuisine; flrst-
clasB service.
Board, $1 a Dny — Beds, 50c and up
FlrBt Aventee*   Prince Rupert
Crown and  Bridge Work -r  iirerialty.
All dental operations iklllfuHy
itreated.    Gas  and  local  anaesthetics
administered for tbe painless ex-
Itraction of teeth. Consultation free.
[Offices, Helgerson Bk„ Prince Itupert
NIOKERSON-ROEK1G COMPANY
—o—
CUSTOMS AND MERCHANDISE
—-o—
Brokers. Forwarding Agents,
Storage, etc.
Skeena    Land    District—District    of
Queen  Charlotte   Islands
TAKE NOTICE that .lens Hansen,
of Masset, B, C, occupation farmer,
intends to apply for permission lo
purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at ii post planted at. the southwest corner of Timber-
Limit No. 80901; thence north, following the line of said timber limit,
80 chains; tlience west about 30
chains to Coal Claim No. 3582;
tlience soutli to the shore line; tbence
following the shore line In a northeasterly direction to the point of commencement; containing 800 aires,
more or less.
JENS HANSEN.
Dated Oct. 16, 1911. 0-24
Skeena   Land   District — District  of
Coast, Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that William H.
Hargrave, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation banker, Intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted on the west shore of
Lakelse Lake, and about one and one-
half miles distant in a southerly
direction from the southwest corner
of Lot 3982, Skeena Land District,
District of Coast, Range 5; thence
40 chains west; thence 8>e chains
south, more or less, to the shore of
Lakelse Lake; thence following the
shore of said lake to point of commencement; containing 160 acreB,
more or leBB.
WILLIAM  H.   HARGRAVE.
Dated  August   1.2,   1911.
J,   VV.   POTTER
I ARCHITECT     AND     STRUCTURAL
ENGINEER
Re-lnforced Concrete a Specialty
—o—
'Law-Butler Building - Prince- Hnpert
! II.Gordon Munro   W.Nicholson I.nlley
MUNRO & LAILEY
ARCHITECTS
PRINCE RUPERT, B, r*.
P. O.  BOX   14 PRINCE  It (PERT
HAYNOH  DUOS.
S-UNBRAL  DIRECTORS
and
PROFESSIONAL   E.MIIAI MERS
lilt. W. B. CLAYTON
DENTIST
—o—
Office In   the   Westenhaver   Mock.
Over  Oime's  Drug   Stun
Prince Rupert ■—' V '' ';ji ■""■—■
■ '■■ - ■-    .'    .
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Friday, October 27 ,1911.
1). IL YOUNG HAS CONTRACTED FOR THE PURCHASE OF
TWO BLOCKS OF SHARES OF
100,000 SHARES EACH, AND
THEY ARE BEING SOLD BY
A. E. KEALEY, FISCAL
AGENT, FOB THE PUR.
CHASER.
Consulting Engineers, Vancouver, B.C.
NORTHERN ANTHRACITE COLLIERIES LIMITED
==============^^ HAS   BEEN   INCORPOEATED   WITH   THE   FOLLOWING   OFFICERS : ' '   .    ' '     '  '
T. S. Gore, President, Victoria, B.C. A. S. Innes, Victoria, B.C.
J. C. Keith, Vice-President, Vancouver, B.C.
Arthur E. Hepburn 1
Christian F. J. Galloway   J
F. H. Hepburn, Secretary, 317-317 Winch Building
Kenah & Nesbit, Auditors
$85.00 Profit
IN SLY MONTHS ON AN INVESTMENT OF $15.00 IS
GOOD ENOUGH FOR ANYONE
33,000   SHAKES   HAVE   BEEN
ALREADY   SUBSCRIBED   FOR
The Diamond Drill leaves here for Queen Charlotte
Tomorrow, Saturday, October 28 [ Buy now before it is too late ~)
Read this offer over carefully. Be
sure that it Is right, then don't wait.
The owners take a chance with you.
They put up the coal lands and you
put up the money to prove the coal,
one-half of the stock for you, and
one-half for them. This is one of
the fairest and best offers ever made
to the public under ironclad conditions. A business proposition from
start to finish, there is nothing on
the market like it. Leases and Crown
grants to over 3,500 acres of the best
coal lands on Queen Charlotte Islands
are being conveyed free from all encumbrances to the Northern Anthracite Collieries, Ltd., capital stock
1,500,000 shares, par value of $1.00
each; one-half of this stock for the
treasury and one-half for the owners
of the land. The first 100,000 of
these shares of par value of $1.00
each, non-assessable and fully paid
up, are to be sold at 15c, 5c with
application, 5c in 30 days and 5c in
60 days. The proceeds from this
block of stock will be used proving
these coal lands with a Diamond
Drill under special contract, and in
charge of competent management. It
is expected that the proceeds from
this first block of stock will be sufficient to put down at least three or
more boreholes of 1,000 feet each.
This will undoubtedly cut one or two
seams of splendid coal—then see
your stock jump. Satisfactory tenders have been accepted and a contract let to the Diamond Drill Contracting Company of Spokane, Wash.,
for the boring and drilling operations. As an emergency, and to be
absolutely on the safe side, a further
block of 100,000 shares of treasury
stock will be offered at 25c per share/
5c on application and 5c per month
until paid, as soon as the first block
has all been subscribed.
Now, use your own judgment, but
consider carefully what your chances
are of making $85.00 on an investment of $15.00 in six months, or
$1,000 on an investment of $150.60,
for as sure as the sun rises and sets
this stock will go to $1.00 at least as
soon as the drill cuts through the
seams of splendid coal that are surely
there, according to all experts' reports of the highest obtainable authority, who have reported on the Queen
Charlotte Islands coal measures as
follows: T. R. Marshall, F.C.S., 1902;
Dr.     George    M.     Dawson,    D. S.,
A.R.A.R.S.M., F.G.S., 1878; H. E.
Parrish, John J. Langdale, 1867;
James Deans, 1872; James Parkinson, 1888; R. W. Ellis, 1906; T. B.
Cory, of the State of Washington,
U. S. A., and our own expert, C. F. J.
Galloway, B.S.C., who is among the
best authorities In B. C.
These reports cover first the Wilson-Robinson coal fields, three miles
north of this coal land; second, the
Old Cowgate coal fields, almost adjoining on the west; third, the Alfred
Bay coal fields on the south; and
fourth, the company's own coal, all
of which are positive evidence that
this is one of the best coal fields on
the Queen Charlotte Islands. Situate on Graham Island, Bearskin Bay,
one of the best harbors In the north,
at the gateway of transportation to
all points of the world, and at the
very doors of Queen Charlotte City;
in fact, a portion of this coal underlies the townsite. No railroads to
build—just load the coal from the
mines to the boats. These are facts
that defy contradiction, and within
five days the Diamond Drill will be
on the ground and In operation. This
is the only way anyone can tell how
many millions of tons of coal there
is in the property.
All applications will be filed in
order received, and only 100,000 will
be sold at 15c.
Hoy many times in your life have
you had a chance like this? A square
deal for once at least In a stock
proposition, with almost a certainty
of the stock being worth $1.00 before
you have made your third payment
at 15c. Do not hesitate. Send in
your application today.
For further information call or
write to the head office of the company, 506 Pacific Building, where the
report of C. F. J. Galloway, B.S.C.,
on this coal land can be seen. His
report is all that could be asked,
practically saying that the coal is
there beyond a doubt, with sufficient
evidence in sight to warrant drilling
and development work at once.
Paragraph From Mr. Galloways
Report
"The easiest seam to prove will be
the Cowgitz, as its horizon is known.
I should, therefore, recommend you
to put down a borehole near the eastern end of your easternmost section.
At the point marked C on the map
the position of this seam should be
passed through at a depth of about
500 feet, the Camp Anthracite seam
being probably passed through In the
same hole, if it occurs at all in this
locality."
All promoters' stock is to be pooled
until $200,000 has been raised for
the purpose of developing the mine.
In conclusion, you will have the
satisfaction of knowing that your
money is all golnng into proving the
coal Is there, not Into the promoters'
pockets nor to pay for a dead horse
of any kind, as the coal leases and
titles are all paid for and clear of
all encumbrances and will always be
a valuable asset. Fill out the application form for any number of
shares you want and address your
application to H. F. McRae & Co.,
Second Street, Prince Rupert, who
are the authorized agents to receive
applications and receipt for same.
All cheques or money orders should
be made out to them. You are requested to make any enquiries not
answered in this advertisement,
wliich will rece'.ve a prompt answer.
The solicitors for all concerned are
Burns & Walkem, 415 Winch Building, Vancouver, B. C.
Capital $1,500,000-1,500,000 Shares of $1.00 Each
ARNOLD E, KEALEY
Fiscal Agent, Registered office, 506 Pacific
Bldg., 743 Hastings St. West, Vancouver,
B.C. H. J. Heal, 125 Pemberton Block,
Victoria, B.C., or H. F. McRae & Co., Second
Avenue, Prince Rupert.
APPLICATION   FOR   SHARES.
To Arnold E. Kealey, Fiscal Agent.
Vancouver, B. C.
I hereby request you to obtain f
shares in the NORTHERN ANTHRA
par value of $1.00 each at the net p
now hand to you the sum of $	
ments of five cents on each share n
pay as follows: Five cents on each s
five cents on each share in sixty d
hereof; Deing payment in full, and I
shares or any less number of share
same; and I hereby authorize you t
allotted to me.
This application is made by me s
shares being subscribed  for and pu
or me	
CITE COLLIERIES LIMITED, of the
rice to be of  15c per share, and  I
. . . -. ,  being the first pay-
ow applied for; balance I agree to
hare in thirty days from date hereof;
ays from date hereof; being payment
hereby agree to accept the said
s allotted to me, and also pay for
o register me the holder of the shares
ubject   to   fifty   thousand
rchased.
(50,000)
Skeena   Land   District — District  of
Coast, Range v.
TAKE NOTICE that Alice Munro,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted on the west shore of
Lakelse Lake and about one and one-
half miles distant in a southwesterly direction from the southwest
corner of Lot 3982, Skeena Land
District, District of Coast, Range 5;
thence west 40 chains; tlience north
40 chains; thence east 60 chains,
more or less to the shore of Lakelse
Lake; thence following the shore of
said lake to point of commencement;
containing 200 acres, more or less.
ALICE MUNRO.
Dated  August 12, 1911.
WATER  NOTICE
I, Henry Newton Boss, of Victoria,
B. C, occupation broker, give notice
that on the fourteenth day of November, 1911, I intend to apply to
the Water Commissioner at his office
in Prince Rupert, B. C, for a licence
to take and use three cubic feet of
water per second from the Lakelse
Hot Springs situated on the east side
of Lakelse Lake in the Coast District,
Range Five. The water is to be taken
directly from the said springs and
is to be used on Lot 684 for industrial purposes.
0l3-nl4       HENRY NEWTON BOSS.
Skeena   Land   Dlstrict--District   of
Queen  Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
saddler, Intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a licence
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
at the northwest corner of C. L.
4471, Graham Island; thence south
80 chains; tbence west 80 chains;
thence nortli 80 cliains; tlience east
80 chains, to place of commencement.
AUSTIN  M.   BROWN.
Dated August 20, 1911. s-27
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Queen  Charlotte
TAKE NO PICE that thirty days
from date, 1, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadd'er, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a licence
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
at the northwest corner of C. L.
4469, Graham Island; thence south
80 chains; thence west 80 cliains;
thence north 80 chains; thence east
80 chains, to place of commencement.
AUSTIN M.  BROWN.
Dated August 20, 1911. s-27
Corner Eighth and Fraser Street.
Clinton Rooms
Newly remodelled and furnished.
Board and lodging. Home cooking
a  specialty.     Mrs.   Anderson,   Prop
Rooms, $3 Per Week
Skeena    Land    District—District   of
Queen   Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadd'er, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a licence
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing- at post planted
at the southwest corner of C. L.
4472, Graham Island; thence north
80 chains, to place of commence-
thence south 80 chains; thence east
80 hcalns, to place of commencement.
AUSTIN  M.  BROWN.
Dated August 20, 1911. s-27
NOTICE.
A book Is kept In the City Clerk's
Office in which to enter the names
and addresses, etc. of citizens of
Prince Rupert desiring employment
on City work. All desiring employment should register at once.
ERNEST A. WOODS,
City Clerk.
WATER  NOTICE
TAKE NOTICE that I, Charles M.
Wilson, of Prince Rupert, B. C, occupation broker, give notice that on
the 25th day of October, 1911, I
Intend to apply to the Water Commissioner at his office In Prince Rupert, for a licence to take and use
3 cubic feet of water per second
from hot springs on the border of
Lake Lakelse in the Skeena Land
Division of Coast District. The water is to be taken directly from the
springs and is to be used for sanitarium purposes on the following described land:—Commencing at a post
planted at the northeast corner of
Lot 684; thence west 30 chains, more
or less, to the east line of Pete De-
boers suveyed pre-emption; thence
north 40 chains, more or less, along
said  Deboer  east  line;   thence west
4 0 chains, more or less to the shore
ol Lake Lakelse; thence following
the lake shore north 20 chains;
tlience east 70 cliains; thence south
70 chains, more or less, to place of
beginning.
CHARLES M. WILSON.
Dated September 25, 1911.
The Journal (twice a week), only
$2.00 a year.
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that I, Martin Peterson, of Towner, North Dakota, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted on the east bank of Williams
Creek, a tributary of Lakelse Lake,
forty (40) chains In a southerly direction from John N. Kuhl's initial
post; thence west 40 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 40
chains; thence south 80 cliains, to
point of commencement.
MARTIN   PETERSON.
Fred E. Cowell, Agent.
Dated Sept.  15,  1911. o-20
Skeena   Land    District—District   of
Queen  Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Theone
Gange, of Lindsay, California, occupation housewife, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about 8 miles
east and 14 miles south of the southeast corner of Indian Reserve No. 11,
Graham Island; thence north 80
chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thenco west 80
chains to point of commencement;
containing 640 acres.
THEONE  GANGE.
A.' S. Christie, Agent.
Dated September 13, 1911.      olO
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Queen  Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
saddler, intend lo apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a licence
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
at the southwest corner of C. L.
4475, Graham Island; thence north
80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east
80 chains to place of commencement.
AUSTIN M.  BROWN.
Dated August 20, 1911. s-27
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen  Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
saddler, Intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a licence
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
at the southwest corner of C. L. 4470,
Graham Island; thence north 80
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains, to place of commencement.
AUSTIN  M.  BROWN.
Dated August 20, 1911. s-27
Skeena Land District-—District of
Queen   Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
saddler, Intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a licence
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
at the southwest corner of C. L.
4473, Graham Is'and; thence north
80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east
80 chains, to place of commencement.
AUSTIN M. BROWN.
Dated August 20, 1911. s-27
Slreena Land District—District of
Queen  Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
saddler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a licence
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
at the northwest corner of C. L.
4476, Graham Island; thence south
o0 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence east
80 chains, to place of commencement.
AUSTIN M. BROWN.
Dated August 20, 1911. s-27
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Miner Converse, of Peabody, Kansas, occupation farmer, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 8 miles east and
14 miles south of the southeast corner of Indian Reserve No. 11, Gra- ' V,
ham Island; thence south 80 chains;
tnence west 80 chains; thence north
80 chains; thence east 80 chains to
point of commencement; containing
640 acres.       MINER CONVERSE.
A. S. Christie, Agent.
Dated September 13, 1911.       olO
Skeena   Land    District—District   ot
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NO'lICE that Oscar M.
Brown, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation salesman. Intends to apply for
permission to purchase tne following
described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 8 miles east and
14 miles south of the southeast corner of Indian Reserve No. 11, Graham Island; tlience south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence north
80 chains; thence west 80 chains to
point of commencement; containing
640 acres.       OSCAR M. BROWN.      '
Dated September 13, 1911,      olO
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Queen   Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
saddler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a licence
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acreB of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
at the northwest corner of C. L.
4474, Graham Island; thence south
80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence east
80 chains, to place of commencement.
AUSTIN M.  BROWN.
Dated August 20, 1911. s-27 Friday, October 27 ,1911.
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Sale of Lands for Unpaid Delinquent Taxes in the Prince Rupert Assessment District, Province
of British Columbia.
(Continued From Page Two)
Delinquent Taxes
Name of Person Assessed.
Short Description of Property.
►■I
p
£ r*e
£-n'
» 5 a
Goldsworthy, F. T Lot 8, Block 12, Stewart. Map 905        1.
Gore, T. S. and Silas S. Ramsay Lot 29, Queen Charlotte Islands;   46 acres          9.
Grand Trunk Pacific Railway Co Part Lot 608, Range 5, Coast; 17.60 acres	
Part Lot 694, Range 5, Coast;  43.90 acres         22.
Heptonstall, Louis Lot 1006, Range 5, Coast; 176 acres      35.
Hunter, The Honorable Gordon,
Chief Justice   Lot 186, Range 5, Coast;  168 acres      33.
Hayes, D. H Lot 2275, Range 5, Coast;  497.23 acres    102.
Herring, Mrs. R Lot 1, Block 14, Esslngton. Map 537        3.
Henderson, M. A Lot 103, Skeena City. Map 811a	
Holmes, Ada   Lot 8, Block 13, Simpson. Map 412        1.
Hulett, Mrs. Elizabeth   Lot 8, B of 13, Simpson. Map 401	
Hart, J. W Lot 1-2, B of 17, Simpson. Map 401        3.
Harrison, C. A Lots 1 & 2, D of 18, Simpson. Map 401           3.
Hardy, Sarah Isabel   Lot 6, Block A; Lots 2, 6, 11, Block B;  Lots 7, 19, Block C;  Lots
2, 5, 8, 10, Block D; Lots 1 to 10, & 12, Block E; Lots 1-9 and 11,
Block F (All Map 443)           9.
Hlbbard, George J Lots 9, 10, B of 22, Simpson. Map 401   	
Hockstra, Frank   Lots 6, 7, 8, A of 43, Simpson. Map 401           4.
Hanson, G. E Lot 7, C of 44, Simpson. Map 401	
Hamilton, Alex, and Wm. A. B Lot 20, Block 1, Stewart. Map 818	
Hamilton, R. J Lot 20, Block 13, Stewart. Map 818a  .       1.
Hartley, J Lots 6 & 7, Block 16, Stewart. Map    818a           1.
Henderson, J. and A. C Lot 2, Block 8, Stewart. Map 905        1.
Harris,  H.  J Lots 3 & 4, Block 8, Stewart. Map 905           2.
Haswell, J Lot 23, Block 8, Stewart. Map 905	
Home, Amedee Plercy Lots 13 & 14, Block 13, Stewart. Map 905           3,
Harrison, Chas Lot 234, Queens Charlotte Is: 32.90 acres        6.
Haynes, the Estate of G. W Sec. 31, Tp. 6 part NW 1-4, Q. C. Islands, 5-24 interest	
Sec. 6, Tp. 7, SW. 1-4, Q. C. Islands, 5-24 interest   ;.. .
Sec. 1, Tp. 8, E 1-2 SE 1-4, Q. C. Islands, 5-24 Interest  	
Sec. 36, Tp. 9, E 1-2 NE 1-4 Q. G; 5-24 interest      19.
Henwig, H. H Lot 9, Block 24, Queen Charlotte. Map 934   	
Hickey, Pat   Part Lot 9; E 1-2 12 acres, Range 5   	
Heptonstall, L. N Lot 2, Block 17, Add. 1, Esoington. Map 537	
Holmes, C. A Lot 7, Block 13. Map 412	
Imhoff, Henry Lot 1, Block  12, Essington.  Map 537           7,
Johnstone, Wm. J Lot 543, Range 4, Coast; 60 acres        7.
Johnson, H. D Part Lot 9, Range 5, Coast; 1 acre        8,
John, B. H U.D. 2-149 interest Lot 99, Range 5;  5 acres        12,
Johnson, Albert E Lot 980, Range 5, Coast; 160 acres        1.
Jones, E. K. L. and Roy Tifflo Lot 2, Block 4, Kitselas. Map 875        1.
Johnson, Ruth E Lot 4, C of 2, Simpson. Map 401	
Johnson, Ralph Merrill Lot 5, A of 7. Map 401          1.
Johnson   Wm Lot 4, Block 6, Esslngton. Map 537        1,
Johnson, Jennie Lot 5, C of 2, Simpson. Map 401 	
James,  Mrs.  W Lot 12, D of 20, Simpson. Map 401	
Keith, James C Lot 131, Range 5, Coast; 80 acres     32.
Kerr, A. T Lot 973, Range 5, Coast; 160 acres      56.
Knight, Reginald Arthur Lots 7 & 8, Block B. Map 443        1,
Kendrick, Miss Esta Lot 5, B of 14, Simpson. Map 401         1.
35
20
80
20
60
40
00
DO
80
60
90
60
45
60
05
45
75
65
50
20
40
90
30
40
00
00
20
80
20
45
60
20
90
20
00
20
60
60
80
70
.20
00
.80
.90
20
.80
30
20
00
1.40
.60
2.60
3.35
7.70
.60
3.10
.45
1.45
4.25
1.40
4.20
.75
1.05
.75
.76
.46
1.20
2.70
.45
2.76
1.00
5.50
4.90
4.00
.76
1.40
1.50
13.40
Kelly, Wm. A Lots 1 & 2, C of 23, Simpson. Map 401
Kutchka, Carl   Lot 8, B of 26, Simpson. Map 401	
Kutchka, T. and J Lots 6&7, B of 26, Simpson. Map 401           3.
Kirk, The estate of Louis Lot 4  D of 26, Simpson. Map 401        1.
Knight, C. W Lot 18, Block 2, Stewart. Map 818	
Klrkham, H. O Lots 5 & 6, Block 12, Stewart. Map 818           1.
Lome, C. A Part Lot 9, Range 5; 1 acre         4,
Longton   Joseph    Lot 2078, Range 6; 85.8 acres       17.
Lallaemonde, C.  F Lot 2, Block 17, Essington. Map 537           6,
Leiser, Simon and Max Lots 11, 12 & 13, Block 62. Map 781a           3,
Larson, Louise K Block 70, Skeena City. Maps 794 and 811    '        1.
Logan, M. S Block 127, Skeena City. Map 811a        2
Loden, Anette   Lots 2-5, Block 11, Simpson. Map 412           7
Leask, John et al   Lots 1-10, C of 3, Simpson. Map 401           6.
Loder, A.K. & H.H. & E.B. Butler. .Lots 6 & 7, C of 18, Simpson. Map 401           1
Lagourge, Chas. . . Lots 11-12, B of 22, Simpson. Map 401   	
Lord, Mrs. Josephine   Lots 11-12, A of 36, Simpson. Map *-l           1
Lunn, Wm. A Lots 9 & 10, B of 43, Simpson. Map 401           1
Lamb, Chas.  M Lots 19 & 20, Block 21, Stewart. Map 818a        3
Laycock, Mrs. Bessie Lot 7, Block 7, Stewart. Map 905        1.
Lander,   M Lots 17 & 18 Block 26, Q. C. City Map  934         12.
Lombard    Ada    Lots 1 to 11, Block 12. Map 412 	
Lots 13 to 24, Block 11. Map 412	
Lot 6, Block 18, Map 412	
Lucas, F. G. T Lots  1-31, Block  1, Copper  City.  Map  933   	
Lots 1-27, Block  2, Copper City.  Map  933   	
Lots  1-4,  Block  4,  Copper  City.  Map  933   	
Lots 6-12 & 15-27, Block 4. Map 933
Lots 1-18 and 4-27, Block 5. Map 93
Lots 1-27, Block 7. Map 933	
Lots 1-27, Block 8. Map 93„	
. Lots 1-31, Block 9. Map 933  	
Lots  1-14 & 16-31, Block 11.  Map 933 ...
Lots 1-31, Block 10, Map 933	
Lots 1-31, Block 14. Map 933   	
Lots 1-31, Block 15. Map 933   	
Lots 1-31, Block 16. Map  933   	
Lots 1-29, Block 17. Map 933  	
.    Lots 1-31, Block 19. Map 933  	
Lots 1-31, Block 20. Map 933   	
Lots 1-31, Block 21. Map 933	
Lots  1-3-, Block 22.  Map 933   ....
Lots 1-31, Block 24. Map 933   	
Balance Lot 312, Range 5, Coast;  10 acres
Balance Lot 315, Range 5, Coast; LLacres        55.00
McEwen, Walter   Lot 12e Block 14. Map 820a  . . e' V  .90
McDaniel, Mathew G Lot 1, Block 13. Map 783           6.30
McPhatter., Capt. Mather & J. R.
Patton     538 Lots In S. D. 641, Range 6. Map 850       120.10
McLeod, Margaret Lots  3,  4,  5,  B  of  7,  Simpson.  Map  401           3.00
McKinley, Mrs. Margaret Lot 6, A of 15, Simpson. Map 401        1.95
McKay,  Harriett    Lot 2, Block 1, Stewart. Map 818    .75
McKay, Harriett   Lot 8> Block 1, Stewart. Map 818 75
McDonell, R. J Lots 1 & 2, Block 11, Stewart. Map818           6.60
♦ McFarlane, W. R Lots 19 & 20, Block 12   Stewart. Map  818           2.25
McMartln   T   A       Lot  22,  Block  17,  Stewart.  Map  818a           1.20
McLauchlin, T. A Lots 2, 21 & 22, Block 3, Stewart. Map  905           3.30
McPhee, A. D Lots 15, 16, 17, Block 3, Stewart. Map  905   	
Lot 11, Block 12, Stewart. Map 905        5.40
McCaffery, M. P Lot 16, Block 4, Stewart. Map 905          1.35
McKinnon, Wm. J Lots 2, 3 & 4, Block 6, Stewart. Map  905           3.60
McMillan.  Major    Lots 20 & 21, Block 13, Stewart. Map  905           3.00
..ecKenzle, J.R. and J. J. Shields . . .Lots in & 15a, Q. C. IslandB;  333 acres        70.00
Mcintosh, David Lot 232, Q. C. Islands;  640 acres      128.00
KicPball and Pollard Lot 11, Block D. Map 443 45
McKay, Kay Lois 1, 2, 6 & 7, C of 5. Map 401
Lots 1-10, B of 9. Map 401
Lots 1-10, A of 48. Map 401
Lots 1-6, 8-10, C of 48. Map 401
Lots 3, 7, 8, D of 48. Map 401
Lots 1-20, D of 22. Map 401       16.80
Morrison, J. R Lot  33,  Range  3,  Coast District;   80 acres          9.60
Magneson, Theo. H 1_3 interest Lot 471, Range 5, Coast District        10.40
Magneson, Theo. H. & W. Murray. . . 1-6 interest, Lot 471, Range 5, Coast District          3.00
Magneson, Otto   I"3 interest, Lot 471, Range 5, Coast District        10.40
Moron, John C Blocks 119 & 19, Skeena City Map 7b4           3.60
May, The estate of David B Lots 6, 7, 8, B of 2; Lots 3, 6, 7, C of 2;  Lots 4-10, D of 2;   Lots
1-10, D of 7; Lots 4-7, B of 14; Lot 11, B of 19; Lots 1 & 20, C of
19; Lots 1 & 2, D of 19;  Lots 1-2, D of 21; Lots 7 & 8, C of 22; Lot
4, A of 24; Lots 4-10, B of 24; all Simpson. Map 401      27.45      26.85
Moy, Ed. C Lot 6, C of 27, Simpson. Map 401 45
Moore, Arthur E Lot 6, C of 29, Simpson. Map 401        1.80
May, James    Lots 4 & 5, A of 34, Simpson. Map 401     .90 .90
Myers,  Alice    Lot 5, B of 36, Simpson. Map 401        1.30
Murray, Archbd Lots 19 &     20, D of 36, Simpson. Map  401    -        1.80        1.40
Moorhouse, J. W Lot 9, C of 48, Simpson. Map 401 45
Mearns, W. H Lot 13, Block 1, Stewart. Map 818        1.05
Munro, A. K Lots 8 & 9, Block2; Lot 4, Block 6;  Stewart. Map 818        2.56
Mongomery, Ethel N Lot 23, Block 8, Stewart; Map 818        1.50
Martin, Miss E Lot 6, Block, 15, Stewart. Map 818a 75
Miller, Percy M Lot 20, Block 24, Stewart. Map 818a        1.20
Mott, A Lot 11, Block 20, Stewart. Map 905        1.06
Moore, L. B Lots 10, 11 & 12, Block 26, Q. C. City. Map 934        2.10
Mathers,  Jno Lot 163, Queen Charlotte Islands;  106 acres        21.00
Miller,  J.  R Lots 1-10, C of 43. Map 401            3.00
Noot, Bertha    1-2 of Lot 8, Range 2, Coast District      10.00
Neil,  Wm.  Mayne    Block 1, Section 8, Range 5, Coast  District;   26 acres          6.40
Newberry, Annie Gertrude Lots  975 & 976, Range 5, Coast District;   198 acres        83.20
Nicols, J.  D Lot 1725, Range 5   Coast District;  320 acres         51.20
(Continued on  Page  Eight)
2.40
1.30
.10
.55
1.35
3.15
2.00
6.15
.65
.06
.35
.06
.95
.85
1.50
.05
.60
.06
.05
.10
.10
.05
.15
.05
.20
.35
1.20
.05
.10
.35
.15
1.20
.45
.70
1.45
.10
.10
.10
.26
.15
.06
.05
1.90
4.30
.10
.20
1.05
.05
.70
.20
.06
.06
.25
1.55
.55
.40
.15
.30
1.06
.95
.75
.10
.25
.30
.20
.06
.70
6.10
.05
.75
7.75
.60
.50
.05
.05
.45
.15
.06
.20
.25
.10
.20
.20
4.20
7.68
.05
1.00
.85
.95
.20
.95
.30
5.10
.05
.20
.10
.20
.35
.05
.05
.15
.10
.05
.05
.05
.15
1.25
.20
.60
.55
5.90
3.05
1.00
2.00.
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
2.00
2.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
2.00
2.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
2.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.50    1.00
2.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
2.00
2.00
1.00
1.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
1.00
2.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
2.00
1.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.45
11.75
26.15
40.35
37.60
110.55
4.55
1.95
4.55
2.25
8.45
8.80
19.65
2.25
8.75
1.95
1.80
2.75
2.60
2.25
3.55
1.95
4.50
8.75
23.00
1.95
2.65
5.60
2.55
13.60
9.65
10.70
15.46
3.90
2.15
2.75
3.65
3.10
1.80
1.45
35.90
62.20
3.50
3.00
8.95
1.95
8.05
3.40
1.96
2.25
5.25
20.75
8.15
5.00
2.95
4.00
14.75
12.85
7.55
2.75
3.85
4.60
4.50
2.25
13.70
15.00
Omineca    Land    District — Hazelton
Division
TAKE NOTICE that I, R. D. Rori-
B C, intend to apply to Chief
son, Financial Agent of Vancouver,
Commissioner of Lands for a licence
to prospect for coal and petroleum
over the following described lands: —
Commencing at a post planted about
one mile north of Fiddler Creek near
G. T. P. Ry. survey hub 6705;
thence south 80 chains; thence west
80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence eait 80 chains, to place of
commencement; containing 64ft
acres, more or leBS.
D. R. RORISON. N.E.C.
Per T. E. Muir, Agent.
Staked October 4, 1911. 017
Omineca    Land   District — Hazelton
Division
TAKE NOTICE that I, R. D. Rori
son, Financial Agent of Vancouver.
B. C, intend to apply to Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a licence
to prospect for coal and petroleum
over the following described lands: —
Commencing at a post planted about
one mile north of Fiddler Creek near
G. T. P. Ry. survey hub 6705; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains, to place of
commencement; containing 640
acres, more or less.
R. D. RORISON. S.W.C.
Per T. E. Muir, Agent.
Staked  October 4, 1911. ol7
Omineca    Land   District — Hazelton
Division
TAKE NOTICE that I, R. D. Rori-
son, Financial Agent of Vancouver,
B. C, Intend to apply to Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a licence
to prospect for coal and petroleum
over the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted about
one mile north of Fiddler Creek near
G. T. P. Ry. survey hub 6705;
thence north 80 chains; thence west
80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains, to place of
commencement; containing 640
acres, more or less.
R. D. RORISON, S.E.C.
Per T. E. Muir, Agent.
Staked October 4   1911. ol7
63.10
1.95
8.05
137.85
7.00
4.75
1.80
1.80
8.05
3.40
2.25
4.50
6.65
2.45
4.80
4.20
76.20
137.118
1.50
18.80
13.45
13.35
5.20
13.35
4.90
61.40
1.50
3.00
2.90
2.50
4.55
1.50
2.10
3.70
2.60
1.80
2.25
2.10
3.25
2 4.25
4.20
12.60
8.95
91.10
56.25
Omineca    Land    District — Hazelton
Division
TAKE NOTICE that I, R. D. Rori-
son, Financial Agent of Vancouver,
B. C, intend to apply to Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a licence
to prospect for coal and petroleum
over the following described lands: —
Commencing at a post planted on the
west bank of Porcupine Creek about
one mile northwest from G. T. P.
Ry. survey hub 6855; thence north
80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east
80 chains to place of commencement; containing 640 acres, more
or less.
R.  D.  RORISON.   S.E.C.
Per T. E. Muir, Agent.
Staked September 18, 1911.      ol7
Omineca    Land   District -- Hazelton
Division
■iauE NOTICE that 1, R. D. Rori-
son, Financial Agent of Vancouver,
B. C, intend to apply to Cuief
Commissioner i t Lauds for a licence
to prospect for coal and petroleum
over the following described lauds: —
Commencing at a post planted on the
west bank of Porcupine Creek about
one mile northwest from G. T. P.
lty. survey hub 6855; thence north
80 chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; tbence west
80 chains to p'ace of commencement; .
containing 640 acres, more or less.
R. D. RORISON. S.W.C.
Per T. E. Muir, Agent.
Staked September 18, 1911.     ol7
Omineca    Land    District — Hazelton
Division
TAKE NOTICE that I, R. D. Rori-
son, Financial Agent of Vancouver,
B. C, intend to apply to Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a licence
to prospect for coal and petroleum
over the following described lands: —
Commencing at a post planted about
one mile north of Fiddler Creek
near G. T. P. Ry; survey hub 6705;
thence south 80 chains; thence east
80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains, to place of
commencement; containing 640
acres, more or less.
R.  D.  RORISON. N.W.C.
Per T. E. Muir, Agent.
Staked October 4, 1911. ol7
Omineca   Land   District — Hazelton
Division
TAKE NOTICE that I R. D. Rorl-
son, Financial Agent of Vanco ver,
B. C, intend to apply to Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a licence
to prospect Tor coal and petroleum
over the following described lands: —
Commencing at a post planted on the
west bank of Porcupine Creek about
one mile northwest from G. T. P.
Ry. survey bub 6S5D; thence south
80 ehains; thence west. 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence east
80 ch-iiLs to place of commencement;
containing 640 acres, more or less.
R.  D.  RORISON. N.E.C.
Per T. E. Muir, Agent.
Staked September 18, 1911.      ol7
Omineca    Land    District — Hazelton
Division
TAKE NOTICE that I, R. D. Rori-
Bon, Financial Agent of Vancouver,
v. C, intend to apply to Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a licence
to prospect for coal nnd petroleum
over the following des e-ibed lands: —
Commencing at a post planted on
the west bank of Porcupine Creek
about one mile north- =st from the
G. T. P. Ry. survej hub tr$55;
thence south 80 chains; thence east
80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thene e west 80 chains to place of
comiu receuient; containing 640
acres, more or ''-ss.
R. W. RORISON. N.W.C.
Per T. E. M' .r, Agent.
Staked Si ptember 18, 1911      ol7
Omineca    Land    District — Hazelton
Division
TAKE NOTICE that I, R. D. Rori-
son, Financial Agent of Vancouver.
B. C., intend to apply to Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a licence
to prospect for coal and petroleum
over the following described Iands:—
Commencing at a post planted on
north bank of Lome Creek about
one mile west of G. T. P. Ry. survey hub 6788; thence north 80
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80
chaieis, to place of commencement,
containing 640 acres, more or less.
R. D. RORISON. S.E.C.
Per T. E. Muir, Agent.
Staked September 19, 1911.      ol7
Omineca vLand    District — Hazelton
Division
TAKE NOTICE that I, R. D. Rori-
son, Financial Agent of Vancouver,
B. C, Intend to apply to Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a licence
to prospect for coal and petroleum
over the following described lands: —
Commencing at a post planted on the
north bank of Lome Creek about
one mile west of G. T. P. Ry. survey
hub 6788; thence north 80 cliains;
tbence east 80 chains; tlience south
80 chains; thence west 80 chains to
place of commencement; containing
640 acres, more or less.
H.  D.  RORISON.  S.W.C.
Per T. E. Muir, Agent.
Staked  October  19,  1911. o17
Omineca Land District ~ Hazelton
Division
TAKE NOTICE Hint 1, It. I). Rorl-
son, Financial Agent erf Vancouver,
II. C, Intend to apply to Chief
Commissioner of LandB for a lii-e-ne-e.-
ier prospeel  for coal and petroleum
over the following described lands:   -
Commencing at a inert planted on the
north bank of Lome deck about one
le wesl of (I. T. I'. Hy. survey
hub 678S; lliene-e soutli 80 cliains;
tbence west 80 Chains; thence north
80  chains;   thence east   SO  chnlns to
place of commencement;  containing
640  acres,  nrore or  less.
R.   D.   RORISON.   N.E.C.
Per T. E. Muir, Agent.
Staked September 19. 1911.      ol7
Omineca Land District — Hazelton
Division
TAKE NOTICE that I R. D. Rorl-
son, Financial Agent of Vancouver,
B. C, Intend to apply to Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a licence
to prospect for coal and petroleum
over the following described lands: —
Commencing at a post planted on
north bank of Lome Creek about one
mile west of G. T. P. Ry, survey
bub 6788; thence south 80 drains;
thence east 80 chains; thence north
0 cliains; thence west 80 drains to
place of commencement; containing
640 acres, more or less.
R.  II.  RORISON.  N.W.C.
Per T. E. Muir, Agent
Staked September 19   1911,      ol7
Omineca    Uind    District — Hazelton
Division
TAKE NOTICE that I. R. D. Rori-
son, Financial Agent of Vancouver,
B. C, intend to apply to Chief
Coinmisi-ioner of Lands for a licence
to prospect for coal and petrerleum
over the following described lands:—•
Comme-mcing at a post planted about
one-eighth of a mile south, and one-
eight of a mile west, from the G.T.P.
Ry. tunte' above mouth of Porcupine Creek; thence nortli 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south
80 chain*-; thei.e-e east 80 chains to
place of ;pm-<encement; containing
640 acres, more or less.
R.   D.   RORISON.  S.E.C.
Per T. E. Muir, Agent.
Staked  .-optember  20,  1911.     o!7
Omineca    '.and    District — Hazel.on
Division
TAKE VOI ICE that R. D. Hori-
son, Financial ,-ge or Vancouver,
B. C, intend lo apply to Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a licence
to prospect for coal and petroleum
over the following described land*-: —
Commencing at n post planted about
one-elgb h of a mile south, and one-
eighth of a mile west, from the
G. T. P, I!;., tunnel above mouth of
Porcupine Creek; thence north 80
chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
south 80 Chains; tbence west 80
cliains to place of commencement;
containing 6 10 n.-res more or less.
R. D. RORISON. S.W.C.
Per T. B. Muir, Agon-
Staked   >eptember  20,   1911. ol7
Omineca    Land    Districl -- Hazelton
Division
TAKE NOTICE thai  1. R. I). Rorl-
son, Financial Agent of Vancouver,
II.     C,     Ilele'llrl     111    apply     to     Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a licence
io prospeel for e-oal and petroleum
over the following described Ir nils:
Commencing al » i>eest planted aboul
one-eighth e,r a i ule south, and one
eighth ol a eirllc west, from the t;. T.
P. Ry. tunnel above mouth of Porcupine Creek; " rue south 80
drains; thei u west 80 chains;
tlience nore.. 80 chains; tbence east
80 chains i - place <rf commencement; co. taining 04o acres, more or
less.
Per T. E. Muir, Agent.
R,  Ii.  RORISON. N.E.C.
Staked September 20, 1911.    o17
Omineca Land District — Hazelton
Division
TAKE NOTICE that I, R. D. Itori-
son, Financial Agenl of Vancouver,
B, C, Intend to apply to Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a licence
to prospect for coal and petroleum
e: described lands: —
post planted about
ulle south, and one-
west, fnrm the O. T.
Ry. tunnel above mouth erf Porcupine Creek; tbence south SO chains;
thence enst 80 chains; thence north
80 chains; tlience west SO chains lo
place of commencement;  containing
C40   acres,   more'  or  less.
R. 1).   RORISON, N.W.C.
I it T. 10. Muir, Agent.
Staked September 20, 1911.     ol7
over the follow
Commencing at
one-eighth of a
eighth of a m
I PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Friday, October 27 ,1911.
START ON BRIDGE
i
Cetisson for Structure Over Skeena Has
Been Put in Place by
Contractors
8t»rt   Made ill  (Jetting  the  Crossing
.War- Hazelton Bendy for
Traffic
The first cassion for the big railway hrldge across the Skeena River
some sixteen miles below Hazelton
was laune-hed today with success,
says ihe- Omineca Herald of last Saturday. To get the huge framework
together was the work of many men
for several weeks. The thing Is 80
feel long by 40 feet wide and its
weight is several hundred tons, including a half million feet of timber, besides the oakum, steel bolts
and other material. The first cassion
was Iniili on the south side of the
river anil lauched In the same manner as a ship and then towed to the
norlh hank, wliere it was sunk,. As
soon as i his Is accomplished three
shifts "I forty men each will be put
to work building the cement work,
while another big gang will be employed on the construction of the
caisson  for the south side.
The shore work on the north side
is practically completed. That is, the
first pier and the abutments are finished, orr the south side one pier is
ready inrrl the excavation is completed fin- the abutment and Is is
being filled. Men are now excavating for the second and last pier on
the south side.
Splendid progress has been made
this fall and the greatest difficulties
have been overcome. The future will
be mostly straight work and above
water, which will enable the contract ors to make better progress.-
Duriug ihe entire winter between two
and three hundred men will be constantly employed and it will be a
race with the contractors on the
grade and tunnels to get the bridge
ready for the steel work by the time
the rails are laid from Newton to
Skeena Crossing, when the bridge
steel   will  be broughtup  by  train.
 o	
Municipal  Engineer
The e-iiy council is holding a special meeting this afternoon at 6
O'clock for the purpose of receiving
a reporl from the engineer upon a
new appolnttee for the special work
Oi taking charge of the waterworks
Installation to be now undertaken.
There were many applications received last night but it was thought
best to postpone action until the city
engineer had gone through them and
reported upon the qualifications.
PROGRESS ON LINE
Vernon W. Smith Tells of Conditions as
He Found Them Along
Way
Sale of Lands for Unpaid Delinquent Taxes in the Prince Rupert Assessment District, Province
of British Columbia.
(Continued From Page Seven)
Contractors on G. T. P. Are Making
Rapid Advances in the Work
of Construction
Vernor W. Smith, head of Foley,
Welch & Stewart, on arrival in Hazelton, before leaving for New Hazelton, where he will resume his duties in the new offices, stated that
the Prince Rupert staff was already
settled and that the Sealey offices
were packing up today and would
be In New Hazelton on Monday. Thus
the entire office staff would be consolidated at the one point and business would be transacted with greater convenience than heretofore.
The grade for the big side tracks
at New Hazelton are now about completed, and Mr. Smith stated that
as soon as the tracks can be laid
up to that town freight would be
hauled up and unloaded there. It
will be the first of January when
the rails reach the Skeena Crossing
have between two and four hundred
teams hauling supplies from the
bridge through lo the Bulkley Summit, and the headquarters for this
immense army will be New Hazelton.
As for the tunnel at Kitselas, Mr.
Smith said it would be completed by
November 20, and then track laying
would be rushed. Everything is
ready and no delays will be caused
once they get through McDo-ugall s
tunnel.
During this fall and winter there
will be a great deal of business transacted at New Hazelton. It will be
a fine town and next spring there
will be a great influx of population,
according to Mr. Smith.
Delinquent Taxes
Name of Person  Assessed.
Short Description of Property.
1-3
on o
ts
Nelson,   L.   P Block 106, Skeena City. Map 811a 90
North Yakima Produce Co Lots 9 & 10, D of 23. Map 401 90
Nixon,- S Lot 23, Block 9, Stewart. Map 818  1.65
Newcombe, C. P. H Lot 23, Block 3;   Lot  19, Block  13. Map 905    2.70
O'Keefe, Ellen Lots 8, 9 & 10, C of 2, Simpson. Map 401     1.80
O'Keefe, Mary   Lots 1, 2 & 3, D of 2, Simpson. Map 401     1.80
O'Neill W. J Lots 1 &  2,  Block  3   kitselas.  Map    875     2.10
Ogden, Jessie F Lot 5, C of 17, Simpson. Map 401    2.25
O'Reilly, Martin Lots 17 & 18   Block 4; Lot 14, Block 7. Map 905    4.05
Pcacblne, C. A Lots 1  &  2, A of  18;  Lot 19, C  of  1.  Map  401     4.05
Port Simpson Land & Impmt. Co.  . .1145 Lots in Simpson, map 765         Lot 10, C of 7, Simpson Map 401  . . 51(1.50
Paton, Dr. J. R. et al   476 Lots—S.D. Lot 642, R. 5. Map 864     228.50
Prolaz,   Pierre    Lot 11, B of 1, Simpson, Map 401       1.36
Pollard, A.  H Lot 185, Range 5, Coast;  181.72 acres  22.60
Pollard, A. H. et al Lot  99,  Range  5,  Coast;   12-149  interest     ~.°*°()
METHODISTS AND UNION
How  the   Dcmnomination  Feels  Toward the Question of Fusion
of  Churches
Thanksgiving Banquet
On Monday evening in the Methodist Church the Ladies' Aid of that
denomination will give their annual
banquet, to which the public are cordially invited. The banquet will be
served al 6:4 5 in the evening and
following that a toast list with mu-
Bic will fo'low. The ladles of the
church make this an event of great
interest and the co-operation of all
c'lizens Is asked by them to make
this year's banquet in keeping with
theese. erf either years.
 o •	
COUNTRY  VERSUS  CITY
Southern    States    Show    Movement
<>f  Population to  Urban
Centrps
Ii appears that Maryland, where
the population of Baltimore city
alone constituted more than 43 per
cent of ihe total population, was the
only southern slate In which the population was divided about equally between eity and country. Tlie per
oenl e,f ii,,. urban population in tbe
south was only 22.6 anil, in addition
lee Maryland, only five stnt-s had a
proportion of urban  population for
tha whole see-lion. Those States
are- Louisiana, with 80 per rent or
its population urban; Florida, with
29.1 per eent; Kentucky, with 24.2
Pe,- cent; Texas, with 24,1 per cent,
and  Virginia, with 23.1 per cent.
In 1910 there wire forty-one cities
in iIn- senith having a population of
25,000 or more. The Increase In
those e-ltles In ten years bad been at
the rate of 34.4 per cent. But the
Increase In the urban population of
the south had been 87.'i  per cent.
Between 1900 and 1910 tbe urban population of the south increased
from 4 508,385 to 6,206,598, a gain
ol 1.698,218, equal to 37.7 per cent,
nnd ihe Increase In urban population In the rest of the country was
from 27,079.157 to 36,410,785, a
gain of 9.337,628, equal lo 34.4 per
cent.
Although the smith's Increase
from immigration is much less rapid
than that of the rest of the country,
In the end ils white population will
be the more homogeneous and dcsii-
ab'e lor that very reason.
The completed tabulation of the
vote in the Canadian Methodist Annual Conferences, composed of equal
numbers of ministers and laymen, on
the basis of union with the Presbyterian and Congregational Churches,
shows that 1,579 ministers and laymen voted in favor of union and 270
against it.    The figures are:
For Against
Toronto   241  46
London   190   44
Hamilton   149 27
Bay  of  Quinte     167 15
New     Brunswick     and
Prince Edward Island 111 54
Nova Scotia  84 14
Newfoundland    4 0 21
Manitoba     129 16
Saskatchewan     120 9
Alberta      124
Britisii  Columbia   .... 84 12
Totals     1,579     270
f
 o	
Fred Peters, K. C, city solicitor,
went south this morning on business for the city. He will be gone
only a few days.
* i* *
W. Slbbald, who has the contract
for the provincial lockup on the
Naas has returned from the south.
He will leave shortly to begin the
construction  of  the  building.
# *     t
Twin children were born a few
days ago to Mr. and Mrs. James .labour of Ihis city, but while one was
born at the home of tho mother, the
other was born in the hospital, over
a mile distant. Although the case
was a critical one, lhe children and
the mother are all doing well under
the care of  Dr.   McNeill,  who  was
In  charge.
 O	
LOCOMOTIVES I'Oli LINE
Pacific  Pulp & Power Co Lot 199, Range  5, Coast;  114  acres.
Peterson, B Lot 2, Block 12   essington. Map 537	
Pearse, A Lot   3,   Block     1,   Essington.   Map   537   	
Parent,   H.   J Lots  1-11,  Block  2,  Cloyah  Park   (Map 646a); Lots 6-10, Block 13;
Lots 23-31, Block 14;  Lots 34-44, Block 14; Lots 1-11, Block 15—all
Map 820a  	
Porter, Jas. Lawrence Block 90, Skeena City. Maps 794 & 811   	
Pouarges, Armond D Lots 75 & 76; S.D. Lot 5; E 1-2 Section 11. Map 784	
Pederson,   Jno Lots 1 & 2, Block 10, Stewart. Map  818   	
Pennoek, W. H Lot 18, Block 12, Stewart. Map 818	
Percival, Spenser Lot 9   Block  13, Stewart. Map 818a	
Prince  Rupert Agencies   Lot 14, Block 17, Stewart. Map 818a	
Lot  11,  Block  S,  Stewart.  Map  905	
Potts, Arthur G. H Lot 9, Block  21, Stewart. Map 818a	
Pericli,   Mlknglo    Lot 8, Block 3, Stewart. Map  905	
Palano, Pete Lot 15, Block 24, Stewart. Map 818a	
Payne, F Lot  13,  Block  6,  Stewart.  Map  905	
Palmer,  C Lot 16, Block 8. Stewart. Map 905	
Powers,  Robert P Lot 10, Block 24, Queen Charlotte City.  Map 934   	
Port Simpson Townsite Company, . .Unsold Lots—Simpson Townsite. Map  401   	
Perry Bernard J Lot 989, Group 1, Cassiar; 380 acres	
Quirk, John    Lot 3, B of 17, Simpson. Map 401
22.80
1.20
(i.00
10.20
1.80
2.25
1.35
1.05
.00
2.70
1.20
1.20
1.20
1.20
.00
,1)0
60.80
.45
Queen Charlotte Oil & Packing Co.. . Lots 2, 3 & 4, Q. C. Islands; 330 1-2  acres         4S.00
(Do)       (Simon Leiser & Co.). .Lot 20, Q. C. Islands; 5 acres	
Robson,   James    Part of Section 6, Township 10, Range 3;  319 acres
Richardson,  Henry    Lots 17 & 18, B of 1;  Lot 13, C of  20.  Map  401   .
Reid,  E.  Baynes    Lot  8, part of Lot 3,  Block 62.  Map 781a
Reed, A.  S	
Large Order .lusi Received From the
Grand Trunk Pacific
Company
The Canadian Locomotive Company has nnnounced the completion
of a contract with the G. T. P. for
twenty-five of their large type locomotives. With the preBent capacity
of seventy-five locomotives a year,
this means a relatively very large
order, and even with the enlarged
ship It will keep the plant operating
for at least two months. The cost
of the engine produced by the company runs from $14,000 to $24,000,
and as the twenty-five ordered by
the C. T. P. are the largest type,
the price will probably range close
to the greater figure.
The school trustees are meeting
this afternoon In the police courtroom,
         6.00
       38.20
         1.20
 30
. . .Lot 94, U.D.  3-16 interest. Map 783       51.60
Reid, W.  C Block 93, Skeeua City. Map 811a           2.70
Rudge, Geo ' Lot 5, Block 4;  Lot 6   Block 5. Map  875            2.70
Radcliffe, Jackson Lots 5 & 6, D of 20, Simpson. Map 401            1.80
Rees, Wm Lots 1-10, A  of 27;  Lots 1-10, A of 28; Lots 4, 5, 6, D of 30; Lots
1-10, B of 31; Lots 1-10, D of 31; Lots 1-10; A of 2; Lots 2, 3, 6-10
C of 4; 1-10, D of 6; 1-10, A of 8; Lots 1-10, C of 8; Lots 3-10, D of
8;  Lots 1-10, D of 9;   Lots 1-10,  D of 10. AU Map 401       102.60
Rhodes, Emma M Lots 6, 7 &  8, B of 17;  Lots 6,  7 & 8,    A of 6;  Lots 3, 4, 5, C of
16; Lots 6, 7, 8, A of 17; Lot 9, D of 16; Lots 1-10, D of 44. All
Map   401    	
Rhodes, Miss Norma Lots 1 & 2, B of 8; Lots 1 & 2, D of 8. Map 401  	
Robins, S. A Lot 15, Block 2, Stewart. Map 818  	
Rae, Robert Lots 15 & 16, Block 20, Stewart. Ma	
..ankin,  Sidney    Lot 21, Block 25, Stewart. Map 818a •	
Rainer, J. L Lots 13 & 14, Block  4, Stewart. Map  905   	
Reardon,   Patrick    Lot 1, Block  25,  Q.  C.  City.  Map  934   	
Sim, James D Lot 49, Range 11, Coast;  Ilo acres	
Sanstead, Jolloff P Part Section 14; 1-2 SE 1-4; Township 4, Range 3;  80 acres       10.20
Stoesiger,  Earl   H S 1-2 of SE 1-4 Sec. 12; N 1-2 of NE 1-4 Sec. 1, Tp., 8, R. 3	
Skeena Land Co. Limited Lot 370;  Range 5, Coast;  256 acres	
Sloan & company, J. J Lot 17, Block 2, Essington. Map 537	
Steele, Jas. L. & Jno. Dinner Lot 22, part SW  cor.  Lot 83,  Range 5. Map 781  	
Smith, J. P Lot 26, Simpson Map 457a; 5 acres	
Steffen,   Clara    Lot 2, Block 10. Map 765	
Sheridan, R. P Lot 2, Block 5, Simpson. Map 412  	
Schooling, Mrs. Eva   Lot 6, Block 10, Simpson. Map 412	
Lot 9, Block 11, Simpson. Mali 412	
Skinner, E. B Lot 7, Block 11, Simpson. Map 412	
Simon, H. and H. Cohl Lots 11 &  12, A of 1, Simpson.  Map  401   	
Sanders, E. B Lot 1, B of 14, Simpson. Map 401	
Sanders, Mrs. Marie Arvilla Lot 2, B of 14, Simpson. Map 401	
Sawyer, Mrs. Isabella Lot 14, A of 19, Simpson. Map 401	
Scott, Kate Lots 9, 10 & 11, A of 20; Lots 19 &  20, B of 20. Map 401   	
Shields,  Jno Lot 3, C of 23, Simpson. Map 401  	
Shumway, Jno Lots 6 & 7, D of 24, Simpson. Map 401   	
Swanson,  Chas.  A Lot 9, D of 41, Simpson. Map 401  	
Schaup, Aug Lots 9-10, D of 48, Simpson. Map 401   	
Smith, W. R Lot 19, Block 1; Lot 15, Block 9;  Lots id & 20, Block 6. Map 818. .
Sargison, — Lots 8, 9, 10 & 11, Block 4, Stewart.  Map 818  	
Sherborg,  Oliver    Lot 20, Block 8, Stewart. Map 818	
Smith, J. G Lot 3, Block 9, Stewart. Map 818	
Stewart,  J.   W Lots 14 & 19, Block 10, Stewart. Map  818   	
Stewart, Geo Lot 18, Block 11, Stewart. Map 818	
Spain, F. S Lot 20, Block 22, Stewart. Map 818a	
Sanders, Aubrey T Lot 3, Block 3, Stewart. Map 905   	
Stewart,   R.   M Lots 22, 23 & 24, Block 4, Stewart.  Map 905  	
Scott, Henry J Lot 7, Block 8, Stewart. Map 905	
Savage, Hattie   Lot 21, Block 8, Stewart. Map 905	
Stevens,  Ed. C Lot 159, Moresby Island;   158.62  acres       24 00
Strathy,   E.   K Lot 159a, Moresby Island;  28.15  acres    	
Spike, W. D. C Lot 6, Block 11. Map 412  	
Skinner, A. E Lot 4, B of 36. Map 401  	
Tompson, Annie E Lot 974, Range ee, Coast;  5 acres  	
Thome, J. A. & Jas. L. Bethuren . . . Lot 4, Block 4, Kitselas. Map 875  	
Turley, Emma   Lot 10, B of 17, Simpson. Map 401	
Treen, J. F Lot 2, C of 17, Simpson. Map 401	
Turpel,   Wm Lots 12 & 13, A of 21, Simpson.  Map 401	
Thomas,   August    Lot 72, Skeena City. Map 794  	
Taylor, Samuel B Lot 9, C of 35; Lot 10, C of 41. Map  401   	
Terry,  W Lot 3, Block 1, Stewart. Map 818	
Tomortvlch,  Mike    Lot  15,  Block  21,  Stewart.  Map  818a   	
Thompson, B. C Lot 23, Block 22;  Lot 23, Block 22.  Map 818a  	
i ownley, Cora   Lots  9  &  10,  D of  25, Simpson.  Map  401   	
Vangunyon, Henri De Lot 15, B of 23, Simpson. Map 401 ,	
Vuosln, D. & Slevan Czarovich  .... Lot 9, Block 3, Stewart. Map 905	
Wooten,   E Lot 124, Range 2, Coast; 20 acres	
Wright,  Hamiet D Lot 102a,  1-6 of N 30 of S;   60 acres;  R. 5   	
Weeks, S. C Lot 1745, Range 5, Coast;  160 acres	
West-ley, Chas.   et al Lot 3, Block 3, Essington. Map 537	
Wells,  Joshua    Lot 1, Block 16, Esslngton. Map 537	
Wilkinson, J. T Lot 8, Range 5, Frac. Sec. 32. Map 457a   	
Walker, Alfred Ogilvie Lot 128, Skeena City. Map 811a  	
Warren, Jno Lot 5, Block 10. Map 766  	
West, Jeremiah    Lot 30, Block 35. Map 784	
Whitfield,  T.  G 13-20 Int. Frnc. Sec. 15, Tp. 1, R.  5
11-20 Int. Frac. Sec. 15, Tp. 1, R. 5
U.D.  Int.   Pt.   W   1-2   SW   1-4   of  NW 1-4 Sec.  15   	
Wiiili-,  Enoch  L Lots 9 £- 10, B of 2;  Lots 4 & 5, C of 29
Lot 4, D of 29. Map 401  	
Wilson, G.  1 Lot 5, A of 15, Simpson, Map 401	
Winterer, Miss Louise Lots 6-10, C of 6;  Lots 1-5, C of 28. Map 401  	
Wagner, Jno Lots 3 & 4, C of 17, Simpson. Map 401   	
Westerner Company    Lots 8, 9, & 10. B of 31, Simpson. Map  401   	
Weeks,  Hannah   Lots 1, 2, .", 0, C of 37; Lots 18-20, C of 37. Map 401	
Williams, H. A Lot 4, Block 2,; Lot 16, Block 4; Lots   20   &   21,   Block   4;   Stewart.
Map 818   	
Williams,  Mary    Lot 19, Block  2;   Lots 16  &  17,  Block 15;  Lot 13, Block 20, Stewart.   Maps 818 & 818a	
Williams, G. o  et al Lots 2 & 3,  Bloc*  6, Stewart;   Map 818   	
Williams, G. S Lot 13, Block 13, Stewart. Map 818a	
Williams,   Miss  A Lot 22, Block  6, Stewart. Map 818	
Woodcroft, Alfred   Lot  5, Block 10, Stewart, Map 818	
Wilson,  C Lot 23, Block 10, Stewart. Map 818	
Wetzell, O Lot    3, Block 17, Stewart. Map 818	
Ward,  Hubert    Lot    7, Block 22, Stewart. Map 818a
Lots 3, 4, 7, 8, 9, 10, ulock 4. Map 905   	
Warton, R. I. B. & W. E. Fisher Lot  21-24,  Block   2,  Stewart.   Map  905   	
Wood,  Wentworth F Lot 732, Group 1, Cassiar;  82 acres	
24.40
2.50
1.45
;i.'io
470.00
i.05
3.45
2.05
105.00
1.40
.05
.40
.10
.15
.15
.15
.20
.110
.25
.80
124.30
20.55
.25
1.35
3.45
1.35
.05
1.35
1.10
.15
.50
.10
.05
.05
.15
.10
.10
.10
.10
.05
.05
11.00
3.05
.05
2.90
.35
2.30
.05
.05
7.20
.30
.30
.35
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
1.00
1.00
2.0o
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
2.00
2.00
1.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
1.00
1.00
2.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
5.95
1.05     2.00
1.95
4.80
2.75
3.85
2.95
2.95
2.30
5.30
5.30
8.95
1111.50
250.05
3.65
25.95
34.25
26.15
2.25
11.80
19.35
2.90
5.85
2.45
2.10
1.65
3.85
2.30
2.30
2.30
2.30
1.95
1.95
178.00
66.45
1.60
52.90
8.35
42.50
2.25
1.35
60.80
4.00
4.00
4.55
80.40       21.15     2.00      206.15
7.95
.45
1.00
9.40
3.90
.40
1.00
6.30
.90
.05
1.00
1.95
2.10
.15
1.00
3.25
1.20
.10
1.00
2.30
3.15
.20
1.00
4.35
.90
.05
1.00
1.95
2.40
.15
2.00
4.55
10.20
1.05
2.00
13.25
1.80
.20
2.00
4.00
51.20
4.60
2.00
67.80
6.60
.55
1.00
8.15
6.00
.36"
i.00
7.36
8.90
1.95
1.00
11.85
3.60
3.25
.80
1.00
8.65
1.80
1.40
.35
1.00
4.55
3.85
2.35
.40
1.00
6.65
3.60
2.75
.75
1.00
8.10
.90
.05
1.00
1.95
1.80
1.40
.35
1.00
4.65
1.80
1.40
.35
1.00
4.55
1.80
1.40
.35
1.00
4.55
3.60
2.95
.55
1.00
8.10
.90
.75
.10
1.00
2.75
5.70
3.65
1.50
1.00
11.85
.45
1.05
.15
1.00
2.65
.60
.05
1.00
1.65
3.35
.25
1.00
4.60
6.00
.35
1.00
7.35
1.50
.10
1.00
2.60
.60
.05
1.00
1.65
2.40
.15
1.00
3.66
.60
.05
1.00
1.65
1.20
.10
1.00
2.30
.90
.05
1.00
1.95
3.90
.25
1.00
5.15
1.50
.10
1.00
1.60
.90
.05
1.00
1.95
24.00
1.45
2.00
27.46
1.80
.10
2.00
3.90
i.66
.10
1.00
2.10
.50
.05
1.00
1.55
5.00
.30
2.00
7.30
.60
.06
1.00
1.65
.90
i.05
.15
1.00
3.15
.90
.05
1.00
1.96
1.20
.05
1.00
2.25
1.80
1.15
1.00
3.95
2.25
1.75
.50
1.00
5.45
.75
.05
1.00
1.80
1.35
.10
1.00
3.45
3.00
.90
1.00
4.?"
.90
.05
1.00
1.00
45
.45
.05
1.00
1.95
.90
.05
1.00
1.95
1.85
.20
2.00
4.05
20.0(1
3.60
2.00
25.60
1.80
.10
2.00
3.90
7.20
7.55
1.30
1.00
17.05
.45
.45
.10
1.00
2.00
4.00
.35
2.00
6.35
2.70
.30
1.00
4.00
1.20
i.20
.15
1.00
3.55
1.80
.10
1.00
2.90
34.30
5.H5
4.05
1.10
1.00
12.00
2.40
1.(15
. -Ve
1.00
5.00
3.30
3.30
.40
1.00
M.0O
.(ill
.60
.10
1.00
2.30
1.35
1.35
.20
1.00
3.90
2.10
.10
1.00
3.20
3.90
....
.25
1.00
5.15
5.66
.25
1.00
6.80
2.10
.15
1.00
3.25
1.50
.10
1.00
2.60
1.50
.10
1.00
2.60
.60
.05
1.00
1.65
3.60
.30
1.00
4.90
.75
.05
1.00
1.80
7.35
.45
1.00
8.80
4.65
.30
1.00
5.95
6.40
.40
1.00
7.80
Indoor   Baseball
At. the skating rink last night the
Phillies defeated the Giants at Indoor
baseball by a score of 34 to 23. The
match  was exciting at times.
STEEL   BRIDGE
VANCOUVER—The C. P. R. has
awarded to Messrs. Waddell & Harrington, civil engineers of Kansas
City, a contract for designing and
superintending   the   construction   of
ten steel bridges along the route between Cisco and Kamloops. Their
total cost will abount to about,
$1,000,000. There will be two crossings of the Fraser, seven of the
main Thompson River and one of
the North Thompson River. The Fra
ser will be bridged just above the
C. P. R. bridge at Cisco and also at
a point a short distance below Lytton. Most of these bridges will be
supported on concrete pierB, but several of them may be arch or cantilever affairs.
MHHMMm -

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