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Prince Rupert Journal Aug 14, 1910

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Array New WeUlitttn
Coal
is the best
ROGERS & BUCK
Sole Agents
VOLUME  1
fficmte Mnpttt fomwi
Published Twice a Week
High-Class
Job Printing
In all Lines
PRINCE RUPERT, B.  C,  TUESDAY, AUGUST 16, 1910.
Price, Five Cents
NO.  18
DEVELOPING   BRISK   COMMERCIAL   CENTRE
i|H$HfH$H$H§H$Hgt4H$HfHfH$M$Hgi<^
STARTING WORK ON QUARANTINE
First of Buildings to Serve Shipping Interests Will Be Commenced
at Once on Digby Island—Superintendent's Launch
Now Under Construction.
There arrived in the city on' Sunday evening by the Prince George
Dr. Montizambert, director general of
public health for the Dominion, and
Dr. A. T. Watt, the superintendent of
the Williams Head quarantine station at the entrance to Victoria.
These officials of the Dominion
government are here in connection
with the establishment of the quarantine station at this point. Some
time ago the site for the station was
selected on Digby Island and the
land necessary for the establishment
was acquired from the company and
other rights granted by the province.
The site, according to Dr. Montizambert, is a model one. It is convenient to the wireless station and
in a sheltered spot. There are 66
acres set aside for the needs of the
station which will be sufficent to fill
all the purposes.
In an interview with a Journal
representative, Dr. Montizambert
said that the plans for the first section of the station were now under
consideration. Work on It would begin just as soon as the plans were
approved of. Asked what the character of the buildings would be the
Director General said that there
would be provision made at the first
for the Inspection of freight vessels
calling here as that trade would be
the one to develop at the start. There
would be hospital accominodalion for
any sailors who might be suffering
from a contagious disease In connection with the establishment. Just
as soon as the demand arose additions would be made to the building
so that it might serve all the purposes that are usually filled by these
stations. Before the passenger trade
was developed from foreign ports
there would be provision at the station tor that branch of the quarantine work.
Asked what the style of the building would be that was to commence
at  once,  the  doctor  said   that  that
point had not been fully decided upon just yet. The plans were all but
completed, but It had not been settled whether it would be of frame
or of cement. This would be decided
quickly, however, and no delay occasioned to the work starting.
A launch is being built in Victoria
for the use of the station and will
soon be here and be at the disposal
of the medical official in charge. Dr.
Tremayne is In charge of the work
of the department here. Until such
time as the quarantine station is
ready for service the work connected
with the department will be done
from the city here.
The work of construction in connection with the building together
with the launch will represent an expenditure of $25,000, which is but
the beginning in connection with the
institution.
Speaking of the site selected, Dr.
Montizambert said that it was a most
convenient one. There was a sheltered bay which would give ample protection and In it there would be built
a wharf to accommodate the needs of
the station. Situated within about
three miles of the city, the site was
a most convenient one, and yet far
enough away to avoid all danger of
any contagion. The site is also well
situated to command a view of the
entrance of the harbor and thus most
convenient for the shipping interests.
It Is close to Casey Point.
Dr. Montizambert left again on the
Prince George accompanied by Dr.
Watt. The former is making his
regular annual Inspection of all the
stations with which he has to do. Before coming west he Inspected those
on the Atlantic.
The commencement of work on the
quarantine station is but another evidence that the governments recognize In Prince Rupert the great
entreport of the north and at this
port will be centralized the whole of
the business connected with this northern part of the Canadian coast.
RECEPTION TO SIR WILFRID LAURIER
Last evening a general meeting of all the committees having %
in hand the reception to Sir Wilfrid Laurier, was held at the city \
hall.    The various committees reported that everything was well In ^
hand for the end of the week.  The programme arranged is in line *
A
with that already published in these   columns.     Sir   Wilfrid    and *
party will arrive here on the G. T. P. steamer Prince George at two a
o'clock, It is expected, on Saturday.    The steamer will be met at *
the entrance to the harbor by stea mers and  launches and  by  the *
fishing craft from tbe Skeena. These will convoy the Prince George •:•
into the harbor.                                                                                  ' A
On landing the address will be presented by the city and  an- *
other by the French Canadians of  Prince Rupert and a third  by •>
the Indians.    The place where tb Is presentation will be made will *
likely be in fonrt of the general office of the G. T.  P., commonly f
known as Mr. Bacon's house, close  to  the  wharf.    The wharf  will %
be kept clear.           i *
At S.aturday a banquet will be served at the Prince Rupert Inn. )j{
On .Monday morning a trip up the railway will be arranged. In *
the afternoon the public address of Sir Wilfrid will be given either *
In front of the provincial buildings or in front of the general offices *
of the G. T. P., in 'which ease the    private  car   of   Superintendent *
Melian will be used as a platform from which to speak. *
A smoker will be given in the evening in the Empress Theatre. *
On Friday evening there will  be a general  meeting   of    the *
committees when the final reports will be received. *
:.,.:..:..>.:.>:"H«>->**#*<"^">*#**
A BRIGHT OUTLOOK
Dr. Stonliiim Pleased With the Prospects of This City
Dr. Stonham and his wife who
have been guests of Mr. Stonham,
manager of the Bank of B.N.A., left
last night on the Prince George for
Vancouver. Dr. Stonham was very
much interested in Prince Rupert
and its promise for the future and
would like to have spent a longer
time here.
Speaking of the trip up the coast
he says that it has been one of the
most delightful experiences he has
had. He likens it to a trip along the
Norwegian coast and through Scotland joined together.
The outlook lor British Columbia,
he thinks, is a very bright one, and
as compared with other parts of the
empire, he thinks, it must have a
very prosperous future. Referring to
the question of the scarcity of labor
here to meet the needs of railway
construction, Dr. Stonham only wishes he could influence some of the
deserving poor In the Old Land to
come here and engage in the work
and make homes In the land.
SMOKER TO PRES. HAYS
EXPERIMENTAL FRUIT STATIONS
Publicity   Club    Will   Give  Unusual
Entertainment to G. T. P. Party
The Empress theatre has been engaged for next Wednesday evening
week by the Publicity Club, which is
to give a smoker as a kind of informal welcome to President Hays
and his party. There will be no addresses fired at the chief executive
of the G. T. P., or any of its directors. On the contrary, the occasion
is to be one of "high jinks" of the
most informal character. Some of
these will be startling novelties In
the line of entertainment, but the
full programme cannot yet be announced.
Provincial Government  Will Locate Testing Orchards   in Lakelse
and Kitsumkalum Valleys—W. Manson, M.P.P.
Visits the Locations.
The richness of the valleys of the
Skeena are fast coming into prominence and the next few years will see
a large population located upon these
productive lands. An important move
in the direction suggested has been
taken by the provincial government
and two experimental fruit stations
will be opened in these valleys to
serve the ends of those who are contemplating locating on the lands and
also as a means of exploiting the
fruit possibilities of the country. The
Stations will be in the Lakelse and
in the Kitsumkalum valleys.
For a considerable time, W. Man-
son, the representative of this district in (he legislature, has been urging the claims of the district for such
stations, as being essential In view
of the attention which is being attracted to this part of the country.
The visit of Hon. Thomas Taylor
this summer to the locations gave an
excellent opportunity to press the
matter home. While the work does
not come under the department over
which Mr. Taylor presides, there can
be no question that the favorable
opinion which he formed of these districts on his recent visit had also to
do in some measure with the decision
of the Government.
Mr. Manson recently received word
from Victoria that his requests had
been complied with and that experimental stations would be located in
the two valleys named. For the purpose of arriving at the best available
sites in these districts, Mr. Manson
visited the places last week.
Under the arrangements which
the Government lias made it is provided that the government will prepare the ground, supply the trees
and plant them, and the owner on
his part will agree to do all the work
under our instructions, including
spraying and pruning up to an
amount per acre to be agreed upon
between the department and himself,
according to the soil and other conditions.    The plots to  he set aside
will be five acres and the agreement
is to stand for five years, and aftei
five years to be cancelled at the request of either side on giving six
months' notice, the owner, of course,
to have all the product. The orci.ards
are to be available for any government officials at any time to give
demonstrations to the public and tlm
owner must agree to send reports lo
the department of the eondi! on ot
the orchards when required.
On his visit, .Mr. .Manson called
meetings of 'he residents of tin districts affected and discussed with
them the most appropriate sites upon
which to locate these fruit stations.
Choice was made of situations that
were felt to be suitable for the purposes and these are being sent on by
.Mr. .Manson to the department ol
agriculture with a recommendation
that an expert from the department
ben sent north to go over them and
decide at what points the best ends
of tiie industry would be served.
.Mr. .Manson on his recent visit to
the districts was more than ever
Impressed with the imemnse possibilities of tiie valleys. The present
summer lias been a delightful one
and the returns to those who havo
fruit plantations have been very
gratifying. The Lakelse on the south
side of the Skeena and the Kltsum-
liuliini on the other side form a continuous valley which extends on up
and joins the Naas valley so that
there will be a tremendous stretch
of rich land available for agricultural
purposes within very easy reach ot
this city which will Torm its great
market for some time to come.
According to all reports these
lands are exceedingly rich and specially adapted to intensive farming.
Fruits and vegetables are produced
in immense quantities wherever the
land has been brought under cultivation and the outlook for the long
i
(Continued on Page Eight)
ELECTRIC LIGHTING!
City Engineer Reports Upon Temporary
Power Plant for Use of
Citizens.
Question is Now Under Consideration
by the Light Committee of the
Council
On Saturday evening the city engineer reported to the council on the
subject of a temporary electric lighting system for the city. The report
was referred to the light committee
and a report from that body will
probably be received tonight when
the question will be given general
consideration and something definite
may be decided upon.
The report of the engineer on the
subject was as follows: —
In accordance with your instructions I have collected the available
information regarding the installation of an electric light system, and
beg leave to submit it for your consideration.
In view of the fact that there are
water powers available in this vicinity which when developed, can supply power more cheaply than can be
produced otherwise, it is my opinion,
that the system adopted should fulfil the following requirements.
It should light the streets in section 1 between McBride street and
the junction of First and Third avenues in a satisfactory manner, and,
if possible, without unduly increasing
the cost of installation, the business
places and residents in this district.
The system of distribution should
be one that can ultimately be utilized
In the permanent plant to be hereafter adopted. In the plant for the
generation of power, the cost should
be kept as low as possible, recognizing the fact that the plant is only
temporary.
For the proper lighting   of    the
(Continued on Page Eight)
CEMENT BOUGHT FOR COLD STORAGE PLANT
The Canadian Fish nnd Cold Storage Company, one of the most
promising of the enterprises in view for this city, and one fraught
with the greatest promise of development, has made arrangements to
push forward the work of construction with little or no delay. Within
n few days there will be delivered here about 0,000 barrels of cement
to be used in the work of construction at the site nt Seal Cove.
The purchase has been made from the agents of the comp....y who
are shipping to Foley, Welch & Stewart by the big steamer Inverklp,
which is due hero from the Orient towards the end of the month.
When the shipment was made to Foley, Welch & Stewart of a
large consignment of cement, it was found by the agents that there
was room available for a further tonnage, and accordingly this extra
amount was loaded on the steamer.. Arrangements have now been
made for the taking over of the 0,000 or more barrels that will remain
after the other contract is filed.. It will be taken to the new wharf
that has been built for the Cold Storage Company and will be utilized
by that company in the construction of the immense works that are
to be built for the requirements of the company.
A. Collins, the active head of the company here, and one of the
directors of the great concern, has gone to Vancouver for n few days
on business connected with his company. A tug to be operated by gasoline engines is under construction there for the fish company, and will
as soon as it is completed be brought north and put to use in towing
for the concern in connection with the construction work.. Scows of
their own will be brought here and will be utilized in carrying sand and
gravel and other supplies during construction days, and then tinned
over later to the general use of the company in the fish business.
As the works are to be four or five storeys in height of reinforced
concrete, it can readily lie seen that there will be an Immense amount
of raw material used up In the work of building. The purchase of
cement by the thousands of barrels is but an indication of the scale
upon which enterprises In this now city nre to be floated.
FIRST   TENDERS  IN
MAY IN GOOD SHAPE
No Damage  to  Her Structurally—Has
Been Put in Safe Condition
By Crew.
Santa Cruz is Now at Scene And Will
Take Steps to Haul the
Vessel Oil"
Among the arrivals by the C. P. R.
steamer Princess Royal on Saturday
afternoon was Captain Troup, superintendent of the coasting service for
his company, who has been to Juneau and Sentinal Island for the purpose of looking into the condition of
the Princess May and taking steps
to have the steamer released from
her position on the rocks.
Capt. Logan, representing the underwriters, accompanied Capt. Troup
north. Both of the officials were
agreed that they never saw a vessel
pile up like the May did. At low
water Capt. Troup says they have to
use ladders to reach the rents In the
bottom of the steamer. If the vessel
were hauled 'out on Bullen's way at
Esquimalt, said Capt. Troup, to the
Journal, the opportunities for getting
al  it would not be improved.
Capt.  McLeod and  the crew have
worked well and have the vessel well
shored up. They have made their
headquarters on Sentinal Island and
have had timber shipped from Juneau. No time has been wasted and
the patching is quite well done now.
The Santa Cruz, the salving steamer from Seattle, was met by the Princess Royal and reached the scene on
Sunday.
Within about two weeks the May
should be off the rocks. A temporary
way will have to be built along which
the steamer may be hauled to deep
water.   This will take a little time.
While the holes in the sides are
quite large there is nothing in the
structural part of the May Injured,
says Capt. Troup. The repairs will,
therefore, be simply confined to
patching the bottom on the points'
where the rocks punctured her.
The greatest loss to the company,
he says, is the withdrawing of her
from the service at this time when
every vessel is so badly needed.
The ore which was used to brace
the May up Is all intact. It is sacked and will be taken south. There
will be no loss to the cargo.
Speaking of the new vessels building in England, Capt. Troup says the
Princess Adelaide will be on the
coast about Christmas time, and the
Princess May will follow very soon
after.
TO REFUSE PERMIT
Council Acts on Recommendation of City
Engineer in Matter  of Careless Blasting.
Vehicles Must Not Be Left Standing
On the Streets When Not
In Use
There was a considerable amount
of routine business disposed of by the
city council on Saturday night, involving not a few points that had tu
do with questions of policy.
The city solicitors wrote to the
streets committee relative to the position of the city should it undertake to give street lines. This was
read by request to the council. It
was set forth in tills opinion that If
special precautions were not taken
the city would be held responsible
for any mistakes should the city engineer's department give the lines.
Wagons on SI reels
The fire and water committee
recommended that owners of wagons
be requested to keep vehicles off the
street when not In use.
Aid. Barrow suggested that If the
owners of vehicles saw fit to put
platforms off the regular planked
part it might be allowed.
Aid. Pattullo thought that this was
reasonable.
Aid. Mobley said that the object
was to clear the streets of these
vehicles so that they might not be
a menace to anyone walking after
dark and also a hindrance to the fire
department.
The report was adopted and the
solicitors were to be Instructed to
prepare a bylaw.
Accounts to be Paid
The finance committee recommended the payment of accounts to the
amount of $857.50. The report was
adopted.
Blasting Report
Tiie building Inspector reported
upon a blast being set off which re-
stilted in if piece of rock flying Into
Mr. Barker's office and very narrowly escaping doing injury to one of
those in the office. He had found
that there was not sufficient care
taken by R. Peacock who did the I
work. He recommended thai Mr.
Peacock he refused in future any!
permit.
Aid. Pattullo thought that In the |
matter of the blasting the man was!
Many Offers Received to Grade and Plank
in Part of Section One
of City.
Streel  Committee   Has   the   Mutter
Under Consideration — May Report to Council Tonight
On Saturday night the city coun-
citl opened tenders for the close cutting and grading and the planking of
Beach Place, Tenth and Eleventh
streets under the local improvement
plan. The tenders were referred to
the streets committee, after being
read at the council meeting. Aid.
Pattullo remarked upon the number
of tenders received as indicating that
there had been a good deal of publicity given to the call.
The principle of having the city
engineer prepare a tender and submit it so as to safeguard the city In
getting the work done cheap enough
was followed. His tender was $1,300
for planking at G^ cents for planking and r. cents for hand railing, For
grading and close cutting the tender
was $4,000 ai the rale of $2 for rock
work and  60 cents for eartli work.
The other tenders were as follows:
Nell Norman tendered for close
cutting at $5,453.71 on the basis of
$3.50 for excavating rock and $1 for
earth.
S. II. Watson & Company asked
$4,103 for close cutting at $2.40 for
rock and 70 cents for earth. For
planking the roadways the tender
was $1,2.10 nt the rate of G cents
for planking and 2 cents for hand
railing,
B. C. Latrace for the planking
asked $782.45 at the rate of 3%
cents for planking and 2 cents for
railing.
John Swanson tendered for the
grading only for $2,311 at the rate
of $2.25 for rock and $1.00 for earth.
(Continued on  Page Five)
(Continued on Page Five) THE PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Tuesday, August 16, 1910.
BOTHA'S PLATFORM
He Strongly Advocates Close Connection
With the British
Crown.
South African  Unrest Is Apparently
a Thing of the Past—Itoers
Now Loyal
The manifesto of General Botha,
who is leading the party in power in
the new British commonwealth in
South Africa, Is an interesting one
in view of tbe part which he played
but a few years ago in the South
African war. It shows that the feeling of antipathy toward Britisli rule
has to a very large extent vanished
in that country. The text of this
interesting document is as follows:—
"The political union of South
Africa is no longer an ideal, but has,
under the guidance of providence,
became an accomplished fact through
the joint labors and sacrifices of the
white races and of all parts of British South Africa. A work has been
accomplished which it is fervently
hoiied will bring lasting peace and
happiness to this country; but a task
of enormous difficulty and responsibility still lies ahead of the people
and government of South Africa.
"The public- and railway services
of the various colonies absorbed by
the union will have to be co-ordinated, their railway policies will have
to be recast, their financial systems
will have to be assimilated. A fiscal policy will have to be inaugurated
which will lead to the rapid development of the resources of the country.
The closer settlement of the land will
have to be promoted.' A defence
organization will have to be created
worthy of the heroic tradition ol'
South Africa. The expanding educational requirements will have to b(
met, and, above all, a native question of unexampled complexity and
requiring the utmost patience and
the fairest judgment will have to be
dealt, with.
"But behind and beyond these
grave matters lies the greater national problem of welding into one
South African nation the various
peoples who have made this country
their permanent home. In order that
these matters may be dealt with successfully, it is essential to secure the
co-operation of all South Africans of
whatever race, and to eliminate racialism from all political and national question; and it is further essen-
tian that political parties should rest
upon differences of principle on practical questions, and not upon differences of race. I feel certain that a
great majority of South Africans are
in favor of the formation of a political party whose fundamental object
shall be to make union a real and
abiding force in our future development, fully recognizing South Africa
as an integral part of the Empire. It
is with the object of forming such
a party that I appeal to my fellow-
countrymen in whatever part of
South Africa they may live.
"As it is our primary object to
form a Soutii African nation, I suggest that the name of our party shall
be the South African National party,
and  that it shall undertake:
"(a) To use its utmost endeavors
to make a success of union and to
promote the spirit of union throughout Soutii Africa and among all section of its people; and
"(b) la promote a healthy South
African spirit in dealing with our
political and national problems. I
would also suggest that to secure
these objects the party adopt the following principles;
"1. The just and equal treatment
of all parts of the union.
"". Tiie maintenance of the
equality provisions contained in 'he
South African act, and the avoidance
of all causes of estrangement and
misunderstanding between the various sections of the people,
'::. Tiie placing of the native question above party politics and the fair
and sympathetic treatment of the colored races in a broad and liber spirit.
"I. The encouragement of European and the prevention of Asiatic
Immigration into South Africa.
"5. An expanding education policy
to meet the growing requirements
of South Africa.
"0.   The improvement of the conditions of labor, and the securing to
white labor its proper share In the
Industrial and agricultural expansion;
of South Africa.
"7. The establishment for South
Africa, as part of the Empire, of an
adequate system of national defence
which will recognize the obligation
of the citizen to take part In the defence of his country.
"8. Tho efficient organization of
the state departments, with due re
gard to the vested rights of civil
servants.
"9, The development of economic
and railway policy along lines which
will give greater freedom of expansion to Soutii African industries and
commerce.
"10. The fostering of stable conditions in connection with the mining industries of Soutii Africa, so as
to encourage the investment of additional capital therein, and the
vigorous development of the mineral
recources of the country.
"11. The promotion of agricultural expansion and land settlement
by means of improved methods of
production, the diffusion of agricultural knowledge and the opening up
of foreign markets for South African
products.
"These are the projects and principles," added General Botha, "which
I have endeavored to carry out during my period of office in the Trans-
vaals, and which I and my colleagues
desire to carry out to the best of
our ability in the government of
South Africa; and I appeal to all
Soutii Africans to strengthen our
hands by co-operating with us on
these lines."
Side by side with the prime minister's pronouncement may be set the
declaration of the Opposition party
of the new "Unionist party of South
Africa"—recently inaugurated by Dr.
Jameson at Bloemfontein. The objects of that organization are declared to be.
(a) To bring to completion the
union of the South African in accordance with the spirit and intention of the constitution;
(b) To work for the advancement
of every section of the people, for
the promotion of agriculture, commercial and industrial prosperity,
and for the settleemnt of a permanent, contented population;
(c) To build up in South Africa
a strong and united nation, working
out its own domestic problems according to its own needs and aspirations and taking its share in the defence of the Empire in all movements leading to more effective participation by the different portions
of the Empire in its common benefits
and obligations.
 o	
HUDSON 1JAY ROAD
We are officially advised, says the
Railway & Marine World that the
bridge which is to be erected across
the Saskatchewan River at Le Pas,
Saskatchewan River, at Le Pas,
Sask., will be of the through Pratt
truss type, consisting of four fixed
spans of 147 feet each, and one
swing span of 262 feet. It is designed to comply with the Dominion
government specifications for heavy
class loading, and provision is also
made for carrying a highway on cantilever brackets. The abutments and
piers are to be of concrete. The
depth of water In the river at the
point of crossing is about 20 feet
at low water level, with a flood rice
of 20 feet above that level. The river
bottom is of boulders and clay.
An Ottawa dispatch says a contract has been given for the superstructure and that the work will be
completed this year, in order that
work may be started on the railway
in the spring.
Reports reaching Ottawa from the
survey parties in the field state that
a line with a maximum gradient of
0.4 per cent has been located, which
is rather better than It was thought
would be obtained. The new route
is to the- south of- Nelson River,
which will obviate the construction
of a bridge across It. The further
reports also strongly favor the settlement of Port Ne'son as the terminal on Hudson Bay, but this will not
be finally decided upon until after
tbe return of the hydrographlc survey parties. These left Halifax
July 2 on board the steamer Halifax, and on the schooner Chrissle G.
Thomey,.which sailed about a week
previously. The Stanley will pick
the schooner up and tow her to th»
Nelson River, in the vicinity o:
which she will cruise during the
summer, while the Stanley will return to Fort Churchill, and make surveys in the deeper channels.
NEW QUEBEC BRIDGE
A messenger boy was told to deliver a telegram to a certain Chicago
minister on a Sunday morning at the
hour when the preacher was in the
pulpit.
The boy gained entrance to the
vestry door and he was at a loss to
know how to reach the minister, who
was then in the midst of his discourse. He finally succeeded in attracting the attention of one of the
ushers to whom he whispered:
"How long has dat guy been
preachin'?"
"About thirty years," said the usher.
"Well, I guess I'll wait. He must
be nearly done," said the boy.
Minister of Railways Gives Some Facts
Concerning the Work With
Comparisons.
The Strength   of   the   Structure   in
\ arious Features Set Forth by
Hon. Mr. Graham
In speaking at Fort William, Ont.,
recently, Hon. G. P. Graham, Minister of Railways, gave the following
facts as to the new Quebec bridge
as compared with the Forth bridge in
Scotland:—
Total length of cantilevers In Quebec bridge, 2,930 feet; in Forth
bridge, 5,349.5 feet.
Number of channel spans In Quebec bridge, one; In Forth bridge, two.
Length of longest channel span on
Quebec bridge, 1,758 feet; on Forth
bridge, 1,710 feet.
Roadways'on Quebec bridge, two
electric railway tracks, two railway
tracks, two highways, two sidewalks;
on Forth bridge, two railway tracks.
Load per lineal foot Quebec bridge
is designed to carry exclusive of its
own weight, 13,340 pounds; Forth
bridge, 4,480 pounds.
Total weight of Quebec bridge,
72,000 tons; of Forth bridge, 57,000
tons.
Weight per lineal foot for cantilever only in Quebec birdge, 49,150
pounds;  in 21,360 pounds.
Greatest depth of piers below high
water in Quebec bridge 93 feet; in
Forth bridge, 87 feet.
The caisson for the north pier of
the Quebec bridge is 180 by 56 feet
square, and over 60 feet high, requiring approximately 3,000,000 feet of
timber, 90 per cent of which is 12 x
12 inches Southern pine. Nearly 70
tons of bolts are required in its construction.
At the lower depths to which the
caisson will be sunk the men are
working under a pressure of about
four atmospheres. At this depth men
can only work for about two one-
hour shifts in the 24 hours, for
which they receive a full day's pay.
The north pier will be built entirely
new and carried down some 60 feet
below the bed of the river to rock.
For the soutii pier the old foundation
will be utilized and enlarged, but
will not rest on rock, as the present
foundation has been found good.
Work will go no night and day, and
a force of about 2,000 men required.
The caisson for the south pier will be
built this winter and sunk next season. Between 40,000 and 50,000
barrels of cement will be required In
the construction of the north pier
alone, and about 125,000 barrels for
the entire work.
The weight per lineal foot of steel
in the Quebec bridge is 2.30 times
as great as that of the Forth bridge.
The load .for which the Quebec
bridge is designed is 2.98 times as
great as that for which the Forth
bridge was designed.
The Forth bridge has 4.77 pounds
of carbon steel for every pound of
live load it is designed to carry. The
Quebec bridge has 3.90 pounds of
nlckle steel for every pound of live
load it is designed to carry.
The prescribed test load for the
Quebec bridge is 4 1-3 times heavier
than that used for the Forth bridge.
Test pieces of the compression chord
of the old Quebec bridge broke at
26,850 pounds per square inch. Test
pieces of similar chords for the new
bridge broke at 56,800 pounds per
square inch. The new chords are
therefore more than twice as strong
per square Inch as the old ones.
The maximum section of the compression chords of the old bridge was
843 square inches; in the new bridge
the maximum section is 2,037 square
Inches. According to the tests the
old chords would break under a pressure of 22,634,000 pounds, and the
new ones under a pressure of 115,-
701,000 pounds. The new chords
are therefore more than five times as
strong as the old ones, all hough the
live load of the new bridge is only
about, twice as heavy as the live load
of the old bridge.
 o .—
NEW STAMP ISSUE
\      HAYNOR BROS.
1 House Furnishers
Located temporarily, since the Are,    „
in Dunedin Block, corner of Second    jjj
Avenue and  Eighth  Street. m
m
1
■
!   Some snaps in slightly damaged   goods  which   we  want  to  clear
g out before moving into new quarters in Manson Blk., Third Ave.   ■
| FUNERAL  FURNISHERS «
viiEnn«iinnniiwn«n«ii«Hiiiiiiniiii«iiiaHiiiiniiiiiiiin«nii!iiiiinii!iniiii«n«r
ready to print twenty-one million
sheets, or about 5,000 million stamps
per annum."
Although the new contractors will
take over the printing on January 1,
1911, their stamps will, in all probability, not be in the hands of the
public until several months later, as
a large stock Is always kept by the
post office. No Information has yet
been received by the firm as to the
King George stamps.
 o	
NAVAL MUSEUM
The frigate Portsmouth, one of the
last of the old square-rigged participants in the civil war, still afloat,
weighed anchor a few days ago in
New York on her last journey. She
will shortly sail for Seattle, where
she is tcbe transformed into a naval
museum.
The Portsmouth was built at
Portsmouth, N.H., but she was largely manned by state of Washington
men, and the claim of their descendants was given first call by the federal government, although San Francisco also put in a bid for her, because she took possession of California in the name of the United
States.
Her journey today was brief. She
was towed to the New York navy
yard, where her seams will be fresh
calked for her around the horn and
up the Pacific coast.
EFFECT OF MOON ON FISH
Scotch Herring Stastics Show Varying Results nt Different Phases
Five  Thoiisnnd  Million  Will  Re  Issued  Per Annum
Preparations are rapidly being
pushed forward by Messrs. Harrison
& Sons for the execution of their
great contract as printers of the postage stamps for Great Britain and
Ireland. It Is thirty years since the
contract changed hands, and during
that time the volume of the work to
be executed has enormously increased.
"We are renting an entire new
factory and shall be taking on several
hundred additional hands," the secretary of the firm said. "We must be
A recent report of the Scotch fishery board mentioned a curious habil
which, according to fishermen, is associated with fish, the phases of the
moon, It was asserted, have a very
direct connection with the willingness of the fish to be netted.
To' test this theory statistics were
obtained of the catch of herring from
1860 to 1900, with the result that
the biggest catches were found to
have coincided with new moon and
the smallest with full moon. The report suggested that a full moon enables the nets to be seen much more
easily than at the time of new moon
or the crescent phase, or that the
tides, which vary with the lunar
phases, were possible factors In the
matter.
 o	
| Cake Making 1
* *
There Is no such thing as "luck"
in cake-making. Given good ingredients, properly measured and
prepared, the right sort of pan, and
an oven of correct temperature, the
cake will be satisfactory. If it is
coarse-grained, or heavy, or tasteless, there is a blunder somewhere.
To make cake comfortably, one
needs a large earthern bowl to mix
in; an egg beater; a large spoon, preferably a wooden one; a bowl to beat
eggs in; a platter for the whites, if
there are to be many; a teaspoon
for measuring, and a cup for the
same purpose; and a' pan or several
pans to bake the cake in. The bottoms and sides of the pans should be
well greased, but not with butter, as
this makes the contents stick, but
with suet, lard or oil. If one makes
a fruit cake, or any other which requires long baking, the pan should
be lined with paper, well greased.
The usual method for mixing a
cake is to work the batter to a
cream, adding the sugar, then the
beaten yolks, next the flavoring, and
then the flour, alternately with the
milk, until both are used up. Last of
all fold In lightly the whites, after
they have been beaten stiff and dry.
Do not beat these in, and do not beat
the cake hard after they are added.
Put it at once Into the pan and set
in the oven. Close the door gently,
and do not allow any jar In the kitchen while the cake Is baking.
ake must not be put into an oven
which is very hot at first and cools
later. This cooks the outside of the
batter and prevents Its rising as it
should, then, as the heat declines, the
baked crust pressing on the unbaked
Interior makes It fall.
Do not open the oven until you
think the cake has "set," or partly
baked all through, and not then unless you have reason to fear that one
side of the oven is hotter than the
other. Never move the cake until the
crust has formed. When a loaf must
bake for a long time, it is well to
cover It for the first half-hour with
brown paper. When done, the cake
will Bkrlnk slightly from the sides of
the pan; and If a loaf cake, will have
a crack across the top. A clean strow
run into the thickest part will come
out clean and free from dougt.
For Job Printing of all kinds see
the Journal man.
LINDSAY'S CARTAGE ft STORAGE
G. T. P. CARTAGE AGENTS
Office at H. B. Rochester, Centre St.
—o—
LADYSMITH  COAL
is handled by us.   All orders receive
prompt attention.   Phone No   68.
NOTICE
The public of British Columbia and
visitors are cordially invited to meet
the Right Honorable Sir Wilfrid
Laurier, G.C.M.G., P.C., Premier of
Canada, at a public reception to be
tendered by the Premier and Members of the Executive Council of the
Government of British Columbia, in
the Parliament Buildings, Victoria,
on Wednesday, the 17th instant, at
9 p.m.
HENRY ESSON YOUNG,
A15 Provincial Secrtary.
Some Rock
Bottom
Prices
Sec Da For Investment
Rupert City Realty & Information Bureau, Ltd.
PRINCE RUPERT,
B.C.
Diamonds !
Diamonds !!
Diamonds !!!
I have a stock that is unsurpassed in
variety and quality and for ten days
I am offering any in the stock at
prices that will warrant you looking
at them whether you have any intention of purchasing or not.
Don't miss this opportunity of seeing the best values ever offered In
British Columbia.
C. B. WARK
Clarmont Rooms
Sixth Avenue near Fulton Street
Comfortable, Homelike Rooms; Newly Furnished Throughout; Bath
Rooms   with   Hot   and
Cold Water
Rates, $3.00 a Week   and   Upwards
Mrs.   Annie  McGrath,   Proprietoress
The Roland Rooms
Splendid Accommodations
Newly Furnished
Hot  baths;  right down  town;  good
table board all  round
RATES, FIFTY CENTS AND UP
 LADYSMITH	
COAL
H. B. ROCHESTER,  •   Centre Street
Fred Stork
General Hardware
...Complete Line of...
VALVES
Pipe and Pipe Fittings
—THE—
Oliver
Typewriter
—FOR—
Seventeen Cents a Day
Please read the headline over
again. Then its tremendous significance will dawn upon you.
An Oliver Typewriter—the standard visible writer—the most highly
perfected typewriter on the market
—yours for 17 cents a day!
The typewriter whose conquest of
the commercial world Is a matter of
business history—yours for 17 cents
a day!
The typewriter that Is equipped
with scores of such conveniences as
"The Balance Shift"—"The Ruling
Device"—"The Double Release"—
"The Locomotive Base"—"The Automatic Spacer"—"The Automatic Tabulator"—"The Disappearing Indicator"—"The Adjustable Paper Fingers"—"The Scientific Condensed
Keyboard"—all
Yours For 17 Cents a Day
We announced this new Bales plan
recently, just to feel the pulse of the
people. Simply a small cash payment—then 17 cents a day. That
is the plan in a nutshell.
The result has been such a deluge of applications for machines
that we are simply astounded.
The demand conies from people of
all classes, all ages, all occupations.
The majority of inquiries has
come from people of known financial
Btanding who were attracted by the
novelty of the proposition. An impressive demonstration of the immense popularity of the Oliver Typewriter.
A startling confirmation of our belief that the Era of Universal Typewriting is at hand.
A Quarter of a Million People are
Making Money With
Tlje *_
OLIVER
Typewriter
The Standard Visible Writer
The Oliver Typewriter Is a moneymaker, right from the word "go!" So
easy to run that beginners soon get
in the "expert" class. Earn as you
learn. Let the machine pay the 17
cents a day—and all above that la
yours.
Wherever you are, there's work to
oe done and money to be made by
using the Oliver. The business world
Is calling for Oliver operators. There
are not enough to supply the demand.
Their salaries are considerably above
those of many classes of workers.
"An Oliver Typewriter In
Every  Home!"
That is our battle cry today. We
have made the Oliver supreme in
usefulness and absolutely Indispensable In business. Now comes the
conquest of the home.
The simplicity and strength of the
Oliver fit it for family use. It Is becoming an important factor In the
home training of young people. An
educator as well as a money maker.
Our new selling plan puts the
Oliver on the threshold of every
home in America Will you close
the door of your home or office on
this remarkable Oliver opportunity?
Write for further details of our
easy offer and a free copy of the new
Oliver catalogue.    Address:
R. C. BEAN
Prince Rupert Agent
General   Offices:   Oliver   Typewriter
Building, Chicago, 111.
CANCELLATION  OF  RESERVE
NOTICE is hereby given that the
reserve existing on Crown lands In
the vicinity of Babine Lake, and
situate in Cassiar District, notice of
which bearing date June 30th, 1909,
was published In the British Columbia Gazette, dated July 2nd, 1908, is
cancelled.
ROBERT A. RUNWICK,
Deputy Commissioner of Lands.
LandB Department,
Victoria, B. C, June 16th, 1910
(First Insertion July 5.) ■•■"  -   - _. ■■   -.
Tuesday, August 16, 1910.
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
****4>***&%#.!f$.Aii,AAAAAAAA.iA-
* *
* First Canadian Railway    %
♦ *s»
*********cs,*^,4,<,^,<i.j.<<,-,.;..;..^.j,<„j,.;.
What is said to have been the first
railway in Canada was built between
Laprairie and St. Johns, Que., to replace the stage coach in carrying passengers between Montreal and the
waterway which reached to New
York. The charter was obtained in
1832 and it provided for a line of 16
miles. The authoriezd capital of the
company, known as The Champlaln
and St. Lawrence Railway Company,
was £50,000, divided into 1,000
shares of £50 each, a capitalization
of a little over £3,000 a mile. Work
was commenced In April, 1835, and
the line was opened In July, 1836,
horses at first being used to haul
the cars. The first rails were what
were known as "strapralls," strips of
wood covered with a thin plate or
metal, but these were soon replaced
with Iron T-shaped rails.
In writing of this earliest of Canadian railways, the late J. J. Lanning
for some time Assistant General Managed of the G. T. P., said: "The line
was opened for traffic in 1836, being
laid with wooden rails and worked
by horse power during the first year
of its existence." In this latter statement, Mr. Lanning was evidently in
error, for in the Montreal Transcript
of October 27, 1836, appeared the
advertisement of this railway service,
giving the time table and fare, and
it is stated there that the trains
were hauled "by locomtive."
Thoe advertisement in the Montreal Transcript announced that "The
Champlain and St. Lawrence Railroad Company, in connection with
the steamboat Princess Victoria, will
continue to run as follows: Steamer
from Montreal precisely, 9.30 a.m.,
3 p.m. Cars from Laprairie, 10.30
a.m., 4 p.m., by locomotive." Then
followed the time of the return trips
and the times of the Sunday service.
The fare for the return trip on the
same day was 7s 6d; single fare, 5s;
children half price.
This advertisement appeared after
the railway had been in operation
only a few months. In the same issue of the Transcript appeared the
following news paragraph which
shows how early the new line developed freight traffic: "A number
of American speculators have been-
engaged in this city for the last two
weeks In buying up wheat and salt
for the American market. The
steamer Princess Victoria has already brought 35,000 bushels of
wheat and 20,000 bushels of salt to
Laprairie to be taken to St. Johns
via the said road. What does this
portend?"
The political troubles of 1837-38
arested railway expansion and not
much more was done until 1845
when a charter was granted to the
St. Lawrence and Atlantic Railway
Company, authorizing it to build i»
line from the St. Lawrence, opposite
Montreal, to the United States frontier, there to connect with a line running to Portland, Maine. In 1847,
the line from Montreal to Lachine
was opened; in 1850, the line to
Portland was opened as far as Richmond, Que., and a charter wa's granted to build a branch from Richmond
to Levis, opposite Quebec. In 1852,
tne St. Johns-Laprairie line was
briught down to St. Lambert, which
became the general junction point,
and eight years later the southern
terminus of the Victoria Bridge.
These early railways are today parts
of the G. T. P. system.
 o	
STANDARD COINAGE
completed and in the hands of the
printers within a few days.
The silver dollar piece will have an
intrinsic value of seventy-two cents.
This coin will be supplemented by
issues of half dollars, quarters and
dimes. The currency issue has been
assigned to the Imperial Chinese
bank, which will issue tender under
the direction of the central government, which will guarantee it.
The action of treasury officials in
establishing a new currency basis followed much agitation for fiscal reform carried on over the empire.
Strong effort was made to have the
gold standard of coinage adopted.
In rejecting these proposals, it was
contended by the officials that the
radical change from a no-value basis
to a metal never before used in the
nation could hardly be expected to
be a success, but the possibilities of a
later change to the gold standard
might well be considered.
 o	
LOCATION OF THE
FIRE   ALARM   BOXES
No. 1.—Fifth street and Third avenue.
No. 2.-—Sixth street and Third avenue.
No. 3.-—Seventh street and Third
avenue.
No.   4.—Eighth     street    and    Third
avenue.
No. 5.—Junction, of First and Second avenues.
No.  6.—Dominion Hotel.
No.  7.—Eighth street and  Second
avenue.
No. 8.—Seventh street and Second
avenue.
No.   9.—Sixth   street  and  Second
avenue.
No.   10.—Centre  street and  First
avenue.
No.  11.—G. T. P. dock.
No. 12.—Front of the Government
building.
No. 13.—Second street and Second
avenue.
No.  14.—First    avenue   and    Mr.
Bride  street.
No.   15.—Third   avenue   and   McBride street.
No. 16—Fulton Hotel.
 o	
Skeena Land District—District of
fa aojo. V
TAKE NOTICE that Brenton
Brown, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation insurance agent, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands in the vl-
vinity of the Kltwancool or Chean
Weln Valley:—Commencing at a
post planted at the north-east corner and about ten miles distant in
a north-westerly direction from the
north end of Kitwancool Lake,
thence south 80 chains, thence east
80 chains, thence north 80 chains,
thence west 80 chains to point of
commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
BRENTON BROWN.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 1, 1910. Jy8
LAND PURCHASE NOTICES
China Preparing for Its First Issue
On a Permanent Basis
For the first time in its history,
covering hundreds of years, the
Chinese empire is soon to have a
monetary standard. Within the present month the first issue of currency and coin on an established
basis will be ready for circulation.
in the future the traveller or resident In China will he able to use
money whose value will remain the
same from day to day.
Information covering the new
financial order was brought to Seattle by Mr. C. D. Tenney, secretary
of languages In the United States
legation, an arrival from Pekln. He
will spend a month with his son, Dr.
Albert S. Tenney, a Seattle physician.
Mr. Tenney states that the new
fiscal order i« eagerly awaited by
people who have not been able to
tell over night how rich they were.
It is also the most radical step for
progression that has taken place In
China for ages.
The new currency is on the basis
of dollars and cents, superseding the
ratio of taels, Mexican silver valuations and the countless methods of
calculation that have prevailed for
centuries. Coins are now being
minted, and American engravers are
at  work  on   plates  that  should   be
Skeena Land District-—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Reginald
Davey, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation machinist, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands, In the vicinity of
Citwancool or Chean Weln Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-west corner and about 6%
miles distant in a north-westerly direction from the north end of Kitwancool Lake, thence south 80
chains, thence east 80 chains, thence
north 40 chains, thence west 40
chains, thence north 40 chains,
chains, thence west 40 chains to a
point of commencement, and containing 480 acres (more or less).
REGINALD  DAVEY.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Cited  May  30,  1910. Jy8
Coast Land District—District of
Skeena.
TAKE NOTICE that Elijah
Rounds, of Victoria, B.C.,' occupation
Stewart, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted one-half mile north,
and one-half mile east, of Nettle A.
Lairds N. E. corner of application to
purchase, and 300 feet east of Ana-
ham Lake trail, marked E. R.'s
south-west corner, thence 40 chains
east, thence 40 chains north, thence
40 chains west, thence 40 chalnB
south to point of commencement,
and containing 160 acres, more or
less. ELIJAH  ROUNDS.
Vincent M.  Schibner, Agent.
Dated May 25, 1910. jn2^
LAND  PURCHASE  NOTICE
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that John Cherry,
of Victoria, B. C, occupation mattress maker, intends to apply for permission to purchase ihe following described lands In the vicinity of Kltwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-east corner and about 14 miles
distant in. a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence west 80 chains, thence
south 80 chains, thence east 80
chains, thence north 80 chains to
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
JOHN CHERRY.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 3, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
On ^^*i v
TAKE NOTICE that Jessie Stead-
man, of Victoria, B. C, occupation
married woman, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following described lands, in the vicinity of
Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-east corner and about 61/4
miles distant in a north-westerly direction from the north end of Kitwancool Lake, thence soutii 80
chains; thence west 80 chains, thence
north 80 chains, thence east SO
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 640 acres, more or
less. JESSIE STEADMAN.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated May  31,  1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassia
TAKE NOTICE that Bruce Oleler-
shaw, of Victoria, B. C, occupation
jeweller, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of the
Citwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at
he north-west corner and about 7 %
miles distant in a north-westerly direction from the north end of Kitwancool Lake; thence south SO
chains, thence east 40 chains, thence
north 80 chains, thence west 40
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 320 acres, more or
less. BRUCE OLDERSHAW.
James W.  Smith, Agent.
Dated  May  31,  1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Echo Dudgeon, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
assistant dentist, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of the
Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-east corner and about 7 %
miles distant in a north-westerly direction from the north end of Kitwancool Lake, thence south 80
chains, thence north 80 chains,
thence east 80 chains to point of
commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
ECHO DUDGEON,
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated May 31, 1910. Jy8
LAND PURCHASE NOTICES
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that William
Hume Grant, of Stewart, B.C., occupation engineer, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a
post marked W.H.G.'s S.W. Cor., and
planted adjoining Alfred Manson's
corner post, thence 80 chains north,
ilong W. N. Harrison's west line,
thense east 80 chains, thence south
SO chains, thence west 80 chains, following Alfred Manson's north line to
point of commencement, and con-
a in ing 640 acres, more or less.
WILLIAM  HUME GRANT.
Frank R. Strolm, Agent.
Dated July 2, 1910. Jy22
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that The Canadian
Fish and Cold Storage Company, of
Vancouver, B. O., occupation mercantile and manufacturing, intends
to apply for permission to purchase
the following described lands:-—
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-east corner of lot 34, Range 5,
Coast District, thence south 20
chains, thence east 40 chains, thence
north 25 chains more or less to the
shore line, thence following along
the shore line to the point of commencement and containing 90 acres,
more or less.
The Canadian  Fish  & Cold
Storage Company Limited.
J. H. Pillsbury, Agent.
Dated July 14, 1910. Jyl9
Skeena Land District—District of
Onssifir
TAKE NOTICE that William
Simpson, of Lindsay, Ont., occupation hotel-keeper, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of the Kitwancool or Chean Wein
Valley:—Commencing at a post
planted at the south-east corner and
about 7 Vz miles distant in a north
westerly direction from the north
end of Kitwancool Lake, thence
north 80 chains, thence west 80
chains, thence south 80 chains,
thence east 80 chains to point of
commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
WILLIAM SIMPPON.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated  May  31,  1910. Jy8
LAND PURCHASE NOTICES
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Sarah Ward,
of Victoria, B. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. E. corner and about 22 milec distant in a north-weBterly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north 80 chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence south 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or -ess.
SARAH WARD.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 6th, 1010 Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
(' 'ISS 1 ill'
TAKE NOTICE that George Mc-
Bain, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
merchant, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. W. corner and about 26% miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north 80 chains, thence
east 80 chains, thence south 80
chains, thence west 80 chains to
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
GEORGE  McBAIN.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 8th, 1910. ,Ty8
Skeena Land District—District of
Pn CGI 1 V
TAKE NOTICE that Catherine
Welsh, of Vancouve.., li. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands in the vi-
vinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein
Valley:—Commencing at a post
planted at the S. E. corner and about
17 % miles distant in a north-westerly direction from the north end of
Kitwancool Lake, thence north 80
chains, thence west SO chains, thence
south SO chains, thence east 80
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 640 acres, more or
less. CATHERINE   WELSH.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 4, 1910. JyS
LAND PURCHASE NOTICES
LAND PURCHASE NOTICES
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Frederick
Tutt, of Selkirk, Manitoba, occupation merchant, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands In the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. W. corner about 14% miles distant In a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north 4 0 chains, thence
east 40 chains, thence south 40
chains, thence west 40 chains to
point of commencement, and containing 160 acres, more or less.
FREDERICK   TUTT.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 3, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Henry Van
Wyck, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation hotel keeper, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands In the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Weln
Valley:—Commencing at a post
planted at the north-east corner and
about 20 miles distant in a northwesterly direction from the north end
of Kitwancool Lake, thence soutii SO
chains, thence west 80 chains, thence
north SO chains, thence east 80
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 640 acres, more or
less. HENRY  VAN WYCK.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated  June  6th,   1910. JyS
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Minnie Clarke
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Weln Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. \V. corner and about 2S% miles
distant and in a north-westerly direction from the north end of Kitwancool Lake, thence south 40 chains
thence east SO chains, thence north
40 chains, thence west 80 chains to
point of commencement and containing 320  acres,  more or less.
MINNIE  CLARKE.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated  June  Sth,   1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
PfmsiRr
TAKE NOTICE that John Grieve,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
agent, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wien Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. E. corner and about 20 miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north 80 chains, thence
west SO chains, thence south 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to
point of comemncement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
JOHN GRIEVE.
James W, Smith, Agent.
Dated June 6th, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Lelhl Cherry,
of Victoria, B. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Weill Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at tne
S. E. corner and about 21 miles distant in a north-we3terly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north SO chains, thence
west SO chains, thence soutii SO
chains, thence east 80 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 040 acres, more or less.
LE1I1I   CHERRY.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 6th, 1910. JyS
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE mat Alfred E.
Partington, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation broker, intends lo apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of
Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. E. corner and about 15 V2 miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north 8 0 chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence soutii SO
chains, thence east SO chains to the
loint of commencement, and comain-
ng 040 acres, more or less.
ALFRED E. PARKINGTON.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 3, 1910. Jy8
m
JOB PRINTING
LETTER HEADS ENVELOPES
BUSINESS CARDS
VISITING CARDS       STATEMENTS
Prince Rupert Journal
»*
M
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that George Tutt,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation den-
ist, intends to apply for permission
o purchase the following described
ands in the vicinity of the Kitwancool or Chean Weln Valley:-—Commencing at a post planted at the
north-east corner and about 8 %
miles distant In a north-westerly direction from the north end of Kltwancool Lake, thence south 40
chains, thence west 40 chains, thence
north 40 chains, tnence east 40
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 040 acres, more or
less. GEORGE TUTT.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June  1,  1910. ,Ty8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Lome Thompson, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
dentist, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of the
Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:
Commencing at a post planted at the
south-west corner and about 8 V-.
miles distant in a north-westerly direction from the north end of Kitwancool Lake, thence north 80
chains, thence eaBt 40 chains, thence
south 80 chains, thence west 40
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 320 acres, more or
less. LORNE THOMPSON.
James W. Smith, Agent. \
Dated June 1, 1910. Jy8 ]
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
. TAKE NOTICE that Edward Cas-
pell, of Cayley, Alberta, occupation
merchant, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of the
Kltwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. W. corner and distant about 15%
miles in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence south 80 chains, thence
east 80 chains, thence north 80
chains, thence west 80 chains to
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
EDWARD CASPELL.
James W.  Smith, Agent.
Dated June 3, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Samuel John
McDiarmld, of Monarch, Alberta, occupation farmer, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following described lands in the Kitwancool or Chean Weii\ Valley:—Commencing at a post planted at the N.
E. corner and about 4 % miles in a
north-westerly   direction    from    the
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that George Williams, of Winnipeg, Man., occupation
clerk, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool
or Chean Wein Valley:—Commencing at a post planted at the S. W.
corner and about 16 y2 miles distant
in a north-westerly direction from
the north end of Kitwancool Lake,
thence north 4 0 chains, thence
east 40 chains, thence south 40
chains, thence west 40 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 100 acres, more or less.
GEORGE WILLIAMS.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 4, 1910. Jy8
-District of
Skeena Land District-
TAKE NOTICE that John Reid,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
broker, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. W. corner and about 15% miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north 4 0 chains, thence
east 40 chains, thence south 40
chains, thence west 40 chains to the
north   end     of     Kitwancool     Lake,
thence soutii SO chains, thence west point of commencement, and contain-
80   chains,  thence  north   80   chains, I'"B  100  acres,  more  or less.
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Charles Gei-
ger, of Victoria, b. C, occupation
clerk, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands In the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Comemncing at a post planted at the
S. E. corner and about 19 miles distant In a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north 80 chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence south 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
CHARLES GIEGER.
James W.  Smith, Agent.
Dated June 4th, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Sarah Cox,
of Monarch, Alberta, occupation mar-
icd woman, Intends to apply for per-
in ission to purchase the following
described lands in the Kltwancool or
Chean WIeh Valley:—Commencing at
i post planted at the N. W. corner
ind about 4% miles distant In a
north-westerly direction from the
north end of Kltwancool Lake, thence
south 80 chains, thence east 80
chains, thence north 80 chains,
thence west 80 chains to point of
commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
SARAH COX.
James W. Smith, Agent
Dated May 31st, 1910.
Coast Land District—District of
Skeena.
TAKE NOTICE that I, George A.
Poole, of Prince Rupert, occupation
printer, intend to ripply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted on the north-east shore
thence east 80 chains to point of
commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
SAMUEL JOHN McDIARMID.
James VV. Smith, Agent.
Dated May 31st, 1910. Jy8
-District of
Skeena Land District-
Cassii*.
TAKE NOTICE that Thomas Sills,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation machinist, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Weip Valley:—
Commencing at. a post planted at the
N. W. corner and about 26% miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence south SO chains, thence
east 80 chains, thence north 80
chains, thence west 80 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 040 acres, more or less.
THOMAS SILLS.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June Sth, 1910. Jy8
JOHN  REID.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated  June  3,   1910. Jy8
Skeena Land Diacrlct—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that William Wallace,  of Toronto,   Ont.,    occupation
insurance agent, intends lo apply for
permission to purchase tin following
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Grace Cess-
ford, of Victoria, B. C, occupation
married woman, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of
Kitwancool or Chean Weln Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. E. corner and about 23 miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kltwancool
Lake, thence soutii 80 chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence north 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 64 0 acres, more or less.
GRACE CESSFORD.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June Gtb, 1910. Jy&
Skeena Land  District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Henry Hemming, of Victoria, B, C, occupation
hotel keeper, Intends to apply for
Ipermii ion to purchase the following
described '-'nils In the vicinity of Kltwancool   oi    Cliean   Weln   Valley:—
,,   . ,    ,   ,    .,      ... i,     i ,.-,,   Commencing at a post planted at the
iiisi-riii.'d lands in the yM ily ol Kit- N  ,,.  ,.,„„„,. .„„, .,limlt'
wancool   or   Chean   Worn   VaU""'—'
Comencing at a post planted al the
N. E. corner and about 26 % miles
distant in a north-westerly*dlroc: on
from tiie north end of Kltwancool
Lake, thence soutii 80 chains, thenee
west su chains, thence north
chains, thence cast SO chains to the
point of commencement, containing
640 acres,  more  or  less.
WILLIAM  WALLACE.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated  June   Sth,   1910, Jy8
Iv corner and about 21 miles dia-
iiini, in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence south 80 chains, thence
west 80  chains,    thence    north     80
chains, thence east 80 chains to the
J: point of commencement, and contain-
'ing 040 acres, more or less.
IIIOMtY   HEMMING.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 6th, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE      NOTICE      that      Nelson
(iowen,   of   Victoria,   B.   C,   occupation mining engineer, intends to apply  for   permission   to  purchase  the
following described  lands  In  the vi-
Kitwnncool or Chean Weln
Commencing    at    a    poBt
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Annie Gowan,
of  Victoria,   B.   C.  occupation  married woman, intends to apply for permission   to   purchase   the   followingIclnlty
described lands in the vicinity of Kit-1 Valley
wancool   or   Chean   Weln   Valley:—| planted at the N. E. corner and about
Coinmencng at a post planted at the] 19   miles  distant  In  the  north-west-
iine of Smith   Island, distant about JN. W. corner and about 23 miles dls-jerly direction from the north end of
one mile south-east from Lot 38, and
marked "G. A. P.'s North-west Corner Post," thence 20 chains soutii,
thence 80 chains east, thence north
to shore line, thence following shore
line to point of commencement, containing 160 acres, more or less.
GEORGE  ARTHUR  POOLE.
Dated Satrrday, July 2, 1910.
(First Insertion July 5.)
tant   in   a  north-westerly     direction I Kitwancool   Lake    thence   south   80
from   the  north   end   of   Kltwancool j chains, thence west 40 chains, thence
„„ -L-._-  ...  ...   ^    _..-._-     ... west <()
Lake; thence south SO chains, thence
eaBt 80 chains, thence north 80
chains, thence west SO chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 040 acres, more or less.
ANNIE GOWAN.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 7th, 1910. Jy8
north 40 chains, thence
chains, thence north 40 chains,
i hence east 80 chains to point of
commencement, and containing 480
acres, more or less.
NELSON   GOWEN.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 4th, 1910. Jyg
'•-> PRINCE  RUPERT JOURNAL
Tuesday, August  16,  1910.
prince liupcrt journal
Telephone   188
Published twice a week on Tuesdays
and Fridays from the office of publication, Third Avenue near McBride St.
Subscription cute to any point in
Canada, $2.00 a year; io points outside
of Canada, 63.00 a year.
Advertising rate furnished on application.
O. H. NELaON,
Editor.
Tuesday, August 16,  1910.
CITY  INVESTMENTS
That it is wise for a city to look
ahead in the matter of securing sites
for necessary public buildings Is
shown in the case of Vancouver. The
News-Advertiser, referring to the
subject, says:
"It pays pretty well for the city to
acquire and set aside ground for
parks and squares. Following was
the official valuation of these properties reported last year: Powell
street park, $120,000; Harris street
park, $65,000; Fairview park, $35,-
000; Cambie street park, $200,000;
South park, $20,000; English Bay
Park, $245,000; Kitsilano park $74,-
000; Mt. Pleasant part, $20,000;
Grandvlew park, $26,500. It is also
a good plan to look out early for
school sites, as last year's valuation
of land set aside within the city
limits for school purposes was over
a million dollars, which is something
more than the value of the buildings
then occupying those sites."
THE FISHING INDUSTRY
The immense possibilities of this
port as a fishing centre is again
vividly brought to attention by the
following news item in a Vancouver
exchange: —
"In four days 900,000 pounds of
halibut were landed at the New England Fish Company's dock for every
vessel in tho fleet has reported since
Saturday. With the Celestial Empire and Kingfisher disposed of on
Saturday and Sunday, and the Manhattan cleared on Monday, room
was made for the New England,
which came in yesterday with 230,-
000 pounds and the Flamingo which
landed 180,000 pounds. It is very
unusual for the boats to arrive in
such close order."
The lisli here referred to all comes
from the zone of which Prince Rupert is the centre. With the further
development here all this trade will
centre here because of the monetary
saving by the companies engaged in
the business will be such that they
cannot afford to land the fish elsewhere.
 o	
EDITORIAL NOTES
METHODISTS MEET
^Mi^l^Efl^S^^ffl
General Conference of the Church is Being
Held in Victoria at the
Present Time.
Many Serious Questions to lie Considered at tin- Gathering of
Delegates
While residents of Victoria were
discussing learnedly whether or not
alfalfa, the succulent prolific alfalfa,
would grow to advantage or not in
the city, Charles Rodney MacDonald,
a visitor from Arizona, walked out
amid the flowers on Beacon Hill park
and gathered some splendid samples
of the plant growing wild right in
the city.
 o	
UNEXPECTED  FORTUNE
California Blacksmith mid Daughter
Get u Million East
Oscar Hoffman, employed at Truc-
kee, California, as a blacksmith, and
his daughter, Alice, will receive
$1,000,000 each from the estate of
Philip Hoffman, who was a wealthy
tea and coffee merchant in India. He
died recently, leaving an estate worth
$60,000,000, divided between his
three brothers and their children.
Frank Hoffman, the only brother living In the West, and his six children,
one of whom Is Oscar Hoffman of
Truckee, receive $1,000,000 each.
Frank Hoffman lias willed his $1,-
000,000 to his granddaughter, Alice,
who has just returned from St.
Helena, where she saw tho documents in Hie case signed. Tne heirs
will receive their money within six
months, as the papers must he returned to England, where the estate
Is being probated. Other lieirs, the
children of Frank Hoffman, are as
follows: Frank C. Hoffman, of St
Helena; Anna and Katie Hoffman,
of St. Helena, anil Mrs. Elizabeth
Richards, o'f .Manhattan, Nev.
 o	
Maud—1 do wish Tom would
hurry up and propose.
Ethel—But I thought you didn't
like him.
.Maud—I don't. I want to get rid
of him.
 o	
"What you ought to do," said the
physician, "is to take the air in an
automobile or motor boat."
"Can't I stay at home and open a
can of gasoline?"
The eighth session of the General
Conference of the Methodist church
which meets every four yeai'3, is assembled in Victoria, and tht prospects are tbat this meeting of the
great legislative body of the'Methn-
dist church will he one of the most
important and Interesting ever held.
Great issues will be discussed and
the interest that is being taken In
the meetings is very widespread.
A special train left Toronto a week
ago Monday morning and the visitors
made brief calls at places of interest en route, arriving on Saturday
evening.
Three of the great leaders of the
church will be sadly missed. These
are the great Dr. Potts, who passed
away in 1907, Rev. Dr. Withrow, the
man who became so well-known to
all Methodist Sunday school scholars
as the editor of Onward and other
favorite papers; and the greatest of
all missionary secretaries, Rev. Dr.
Sutherland, so well-known and so
well beloved by the Methodists of
British Columbia and of all Canada.
Portraits of Dr. Potts and Dr. Sutherland, by the celebrated Canadian artist, J. W. L. Forester, havs been
hung in the conference church, suitably  draped.
Rev. Dr. Carman, veteran leader
and master of assemblies, is present
to preside over the conference, and
as his eight-year term as general superintendent expires with this conference, speculation is rife as to who
will be his successor. Many are of
the opinion that the strong old man
will be re-elected for another term
by a substantial majority, aj noth
ing short of insistent resignation, or
death, would lead to his rejection
for the high office. He is recognized
as a master among masters in guiding the affairs of a great gathering,
and uring the warm and exciting de-
abtes which will take place during
the sessions the conference will be
safe with him to wield the gavel.
The question whether there shall
be a separate home mission office in
Winnipeg is one which will come up
during the next two weeks before
the Methodist general conference.
The question involved Is that of the
arrangement of the missionary department, some favoring a proposal
to hold a strong man at the head of
the whole missionary work of the
church, with secretaries of the foreign and home departments and
forward movement and other activies
as subordinates.
If there should be a division of the
home field, no doubt one of the present secretaries would be sent to
Winnipeg, but whether such a change
would be considered to be in the best
interests of the work generally is a
question the conference would debate
very seriously before taking any
step.
Another problem coming before
the delegates will be that of the advisability of electing an associate
general superintendent to relieve
Rev. Dr. Carman of some of the burdens now pressing upon him.
The desirability of giving a larger
grant from the superannuation fund
to the widows and children of ministers who are dependent upon It will
be another important question. At
present a man in active service of
the ministry for 23 years has a
permanent claim on the fund and
should he die his widow receives two-
thirds of what he would he paid,
which amounts to about $1,000 per
annum for every year of active service. The proposal now is to put
everybody in n position to enjoy the
benefits of the bund permanently,
and not only those who bad been for
the specified number of years in the
work.
 o •	
BOOKMAKING  I.N  MOW ZEALAND
* ♦J* *•* *I* *J* ♦!♦ *5* *2* *J« »J« »J« 'Z* *.
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THE JOURNAL
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*
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Is the Official Advertising
Medium for the City
of Prince Rupert
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PROGRESS BY SUBSCRIBING
FOR THE PAPER
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The Journal aims at keeping Prince Rupert
and new B.C. ever before the public eye. Send
it to your friends and any whom you wish to
interest in the coming Metropolis of the North.
LAND PURCHASE NOTICES
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Leihi Cherry,
of Victoria, B. C, .occupation married woman, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool   or   Chean   Wein   Valley:	
Commencing at a post planted at tne
S. E. corner and about 21 miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north 80 chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence south 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
LEIHI   CHERRY.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 6th, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
C* Aflftlfi 1*
TAKE NOTICE that John Grieve,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
agent, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described-lands in the vicinity of Kltwancool   or  Chean  Wien   Valley:	
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. E. corner and about 20 miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kltwancool
Lake, thence north 80 chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence south 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to
poiut of eomemncement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
JOHN GRIEVE.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 6th, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE tiiat Alfred E.
Partington, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation broker, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of
Kitwancool or Chean Weill Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. E. corner and about 15 % miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north SO chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence soutii 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 040 acres, more or less.
ALFRED E.  PARKINGTON.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 3, 1910. Jy8
Three years ago parliament legalized bookmakers with unsatisfactory
results. A considerable number of
undesirables arrived from Australia,
and betting on horse races increased.
A strong demand is now being made
to repeal this legislation. The feeling is almost unanimous that the
bookmaker must go. The totallsator
In which the state participates is also
threatened. Parliament will shortly
vote on both issues, and also on the
reduction of the number of race
meetings, which of late years has increased unduly.
Ar"l FV^ FV^ FV1 FV1 FV^ FV^ FV1 FV1 FV^ Wwl FV1FV^ FV^ FV^ FV1 FV^ FV^rV^rV
WATER NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that an
application will be made under Part
V. of the "Water Act, 1909," to obtain a licence in the Skeena Division
of Coast District.
(a) The name, address and occupation of the applicant is The Municipal Corporation of the City of
Prince Rupert, County of Atlin, B.C.
(If for mining purposes) Free
Minti's Certificate No.
(b) The name of the lake, stream
or source (if unnamed, the description is), Clogali Lakes.
(c) The point of diversion, at the
foot of the Lower Lake.
(d) The quantity of water applied
for (in cubic feet per second), 150.
(e) The character of the proposed
works, dam, pipe-line and power
plant.
(f) The premises on which the
water is to be used (describe same),
The Power site at mouth of Clogali
River.
(g) The purposes for which the
water is to be used,  Power.
(h) If for irrigation describe the
land intended to be Irrigated, giving
acreage.
(i) If the water is to be used for
power or mining purposes describe
the place where the water is to be returned to some natural channel, and
the difference in altitude between
point of diversion and point of return: Water will be returned at
mouth of Clogali River, 55 feet.
(j) Area of Crown land intended
to be occupied by the proposed
works.
(k) This notice was posted on the
thirteenth day of August, 1910, and
application will be made to the Commissioner on the fifteenth day of
September, 1910.
(1) Give the names and addresses
of any riparian proprietors or licensees who or whose lands are like'y
to be affected by the proposed works,
either above or below the outlet:
Owners of lots 130, 131, 632, and
972.
(ml The boundaries and'area of
the Municipality are as follows:—
I. The said City of Prince Rupert
shall be bounded as follows: —
Commencing at a post on the shore
of Shawatlan i'assage, in Range 5,
Coast District, of British Columbia,
and being the southeasterly post of
Section 9, Prince Rupert Townsite;
thence along the boundary of Section 9 as follows: Soutii forty-three
degrees forty-seven' minutes (43deg.
47min.) west astronomical, a distance of four hundred anil fifty-one
and seventy-seven hundredths (451.-
77) feet; thence north eighty-three
I degrees thirty-seven minutes (83deg.
:'7i'.iin.( west astronomical, a distance of one thousand live hundred
and seventy-two hundredths (1,500.-
72) feet; thence soutii twenty-seven
degrees twenty-three minutes fifteen
seconds (27deg. 23mln. 16sec.) west
astronomical, a distance of three
thousand four hundred and seventy-
three and seventy-five hundredths
13,473.75) feet; thence south thirty-
five degrees fifty-eight minutes
thirty-four seconds (35deg. 58mln.
34sec.) west astronomica', a distance
of two thousand and fifty-one and
twenty-live hundredths (2,051.25)
feet; thence north sixty-two degrees
sixteen minutes twenty seconds (62
deg. 16min. 20sec) west astronomical, a distance of one thousand one
hundred and twenty-four and eight
hundredths (1,124.08) feet; thence
south forty-seven degrees twelve
minutes ten seconds (47deg. 12min.
lOsec.) west astronomical, a distance
of four thousand eight hundred
(4,800) feet, more or less, to a post
being the north-easterly corner of
Lot 1,194, Range 5, Coast District;
thence along the southerly boundary of Lot 1,994 south fifty-nine degrees forty-two minutes thirty-eight
seconds (59deg. 42min. 38sec) west
astronomical, a distance of three
thousand eight hundred and six and
sixty-eight hundredths (3,806.68)
feet; thence south forty-seven degrees seven minutes five seconds
(47deg. 07min. 05sec.) west astronomical, a distance of two thousand
six hundred and three and seven-
tenths (2,603.7) feet; thence south
seventy-nine degrees forty-one min-
uates forty-three seconds (79deg. 41
mln. 43sec.) west astronomical, a
distance of one thousand three hundred and forty-one and twelve hundredths (1,341.12) feet; thence
south fifty-two degrees forty-six minutes twenty-four seconds (52deg.
46mln. 24sec.) west astronomical, a
distance of two thousand two hundred and forty-seven and ninety-six
hundredths (2,247.96) feet; thence
south sixteen degrees one minute
nineteen seconds (16deg. Olmin. 19
sec).west astronomical, a distance
of three thousand one hundred and
sixty-nine and nin"ty-eight hundredths (3.169.9S) feet; thence
north seventy-nine degrees twenty-
two minutes (79deg. 22min) west
astronomical, a distance of five hundred and thirty and sixty-four hundredths (530.64) feet, more or less,
to a post on the shore of Prince Ru-
per Harbour; thence west astronomical one thousand three hundred and
twenty (1,320) feet; thence north
astronomical a distance of twelve
thousand nine hundred and thirty-
six (12,986) feet; thence north
sixty-one degrees and thirty minutes
(lildeg. 30min) east, a distance of
twenty-three thousand seven hundred
(23,700) feet to a point opposite the
centre point of Shawatlan Passage;
thence along the centre line of Shawm Ian Passage to a point due west
of the point of commencement;
thence due west to the point of com-
mencement; the land area contained
within said boundaries consisting of
nlcoiit two thousand (2,000) acres
and being shown on the registered
plans of Prince Rupert .Townsite,
registered at Prince Rupert Town-
site,  registered at  Prince  Rupert.
(n) Approximately the number of
Inhabitants: Five thousand.
(o) The place of the proposed
reservoir for storing: The Clogali
Lakes.
(p).The means by which it is proposed to store the water: By n dam.
(q) The area or the reservoir site
or sites at each foot in depth above
ihe outlet: Six square miles.
(r) How it is proposed to acquire
the land necessary for the purpose:
By purchase or otherwise.
(s) Approximately the number of
acre feet intended to be impounded,
38,400.
(t) Whether it is proposed to
lower the water In any natural lake
or standing body of water, and if so
then:—
(1) The anticipated extent of the
lowering.
(2) The means proposed to be
adopted to lower and refill.
(3) The nature and character in
detail, of the works proposed to be
constructed to provide for the discharge and penning back of the
water. Dam pipe-line and power
plant.
THE MUNICIPAL CORPORATION
OF THE CITY OF PRINCE
RUPERT.
By Its Agent, F. S. Clements.
A16.
Skeena Land District—District of
(Iftflfliiir
TAKE NOTICE that Thomas Sills,
of Vancouver, B. 0„ occupation machinist, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands In the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. W. corner and about 26% miles
distant In a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence south 80 chains, thence
east 80 chains, thence north 80
chains, thence west 80 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
THOMAS SILLS.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 8th, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land Di&crict—District of
TAKE NOTICE that William Wallace, of Toronto, Ont., occupation
insurance agent, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the follov.ing
dlscribed lands in the vie' tlty of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Comencing at a post planted at the
N. E. corner and about 26i/> miles
distant in a north-westerly dlrecron
from the north end of Kltwancool
Lake, thence south 80 chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence north 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to the
point of commencement, containing
640 acres, more or less.
WILLIAM  WALLACE.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated  June  Sth,  1910. JyS
Skeena Land  District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Samuel John
MrDiiirmld, of Monarch, Alberta, oc-
1'iipation farmer, intends lo apply for
permission to purchase the following described lands in the Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—Commencing at a post planted at the N.
E. corner and about 4H miles In a
north-westerly direction from the
north end of Kitwancool Lake,
thence south 80 chains, thence west
SO chains, thence north 80 chains,
thence east 80 chains to point of
commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
SAMUEL JOHN McDIARMID.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated May 31st, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that George Williams, of Winnipeg, man., occupation
clerk, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands in (lie vicinity of Kitwancool
or Chean Wein Valley:—Commencing at a post planted at the S. W.
corner and about 16H. miles distant
in :i north-westerly direction from
the north end of Kitwancool Lake,
thence north 4 0 chains, thence
east 40 chains, thence south 40
chains, thence west 40 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 160 acres, more or less.
GEORGE WILLIAMS.
James W.  Smith,  Agent.
Dated June 4, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of .
TAKE NOTICE that John Reid,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
broker, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kltwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. W. corner and about 15% miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north 40 chains, thence
east 40 chains, thence south 40
chains, thence west 40 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 160 acres, more or less.
JOHN  REID.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 3,  1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Grace Cess-
ford, of Victoria, B. C, occupation
married woman, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of
Kltwancool or Chean Weln Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. E. corner and about 23 miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence south 80 chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence north 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
GRACE CESSFORD.
James W. Smith, Agent
Dated June 6th, 1910. JyS
Skeena Land District—District, of
TAKE NOTICE that Henry Hemming, of Victoria, B. C, occupation
hotel keeper, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity ot Kitwancool or Chean Weln Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. E. corner and about 21 miles distant, in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence soutii SO chains, thence
west SO chains, thence north 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
HENRY HEMMING.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 6th, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Nelson
Gowen, of Victoria, B. C, occupation mining engineer, intends to apply for permission to purchase tho
following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein
Valley:—Commencing at a post
planted at the N. E. corner and about
19 miles distant in the north-westerly direction from the north end of
Kitwancool Lake thence south 80
chains, thence svest 40 chains, thence
north 40 chains, thence west 40
chains, thence north 40 chains,
thence east 80 chains to point of
commencement, and containing 480
acres, more or less.
NELSON   GOWEN.
Jjmes W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 4th, 1910. JyS i nBa*n«
■■     '.■-: ; .- '
Tuesday, August  16,  1910.
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
C. D. NEWTON
Real Estate
Money to Loan
Notary Public
Exchange Block
Corner 3rd Avenue and 6th Street
P.O. Box 226   Tel. 226
The
Washington Cafe
A PLACE TO EAT
Seats For Ladies
Everything Clean and Tasty
Prices Reasonable
W.  F.  CARPENTER, PROPRIETOR
Second Avenue, near Seventh Street
Hear
the
Truth
There's nothing about a set of
harness that requires such careful
attention, in both leather and .workmanship, as traces and collars, there's
where the strain lies, -there's -where
we excel, though we are just
watchful as to every other detail of
a complete set of harness, be it for
heavy or light work.
B. C. Saddlery Company
Limited
MANUFACTURERS OF SADDLERY
Jobbers of Leather, Harness, Saddles, Whips, Trunks and Valises,
Pads, Blankets, Rugs; Harness Soaps
and Dressings.
566 YATES STREET
VICTORIA, B.C.
Clarmont Rooms
Sixth Avenue near Fulton Street
Comfortable, Homelike Rooms; New
ly Furnished Throughout; Bath
Rooms   with   Hot  and
Cold Water
Rates, $3.00 a Week   and   Upwards
Mrs.   Annie   McGrath,   Proprietoress
Municipal Notice
TENDERS FOR PLANK ROADWAY
AND GRADING
SEALED TENDERS endorsed
"Tender 1," and 'Tender 2," will be
received by the City Clerk until Wednesday noon, August 24th, 1910: —
(1) For the construction of a 16-
foot plank roadway on Hays Cove
avenue, and Eighth avenue.
(2) Grading on Hays Cove avenue
and Eighth avenue. Plans and specifications may be seen, and form of
lender obtained at the office of the
City   Engineer.
The lowest or any tender not
necessarily accepted.
ERNEST A. WOODS,
WM. M. DAVIS, City Clerk.
City Engineer. A16-19
Arrangements have been completed by the South African National
union for a grand tour of Soutii
Africa by English men of business.
The tour is to occupy the whole of
the autumn, beginning on August 27
and ending on November 26.
Last evening upon the arrival of
the Prince George, the provincial and
city police were asked to assist in investigating the loss of a hand
satchel containing about $200 worth
of jewellery belonging to Mrs. Gillis
of Vancouver. The lady could not
recall what she had done with the
satchel and a diligent search failed to
find any trace of it. It is believed
that she may have mislaid it and
that before Vancouver is reached the
satchel will be found.
NEWS OF THE PROVINCE
Items of General Interest From Centres in British Columbia.
Track Foundation
Vancouver.—The B. C. E. R. will
shortly try an experiment with a new
type of permanent track laying,
which, if it proves satisfactory, will
be adopted for all future track laying. The type has been in cogue
in Montreal for some years and gave
good satisfaction. Instead of the
rails being laid on cement foundations six Inches lower than the bottom of the rails as at presentfi a
solid foundation of rock ballast will
be substituted. It Is anticipated that
this will not only be fore expedlous
as regards laying rails, but also do
away with the heavy jarring of cars
experienced more or less where rails
have been laid in the solid concrete.
While the piece of track on which
the experiment will be tried has not
been definitely chosen, the B. C. E.
railway contemplate making a six
months' test on a strip where traffic is the heaviest, enduring definite
deductions for or against its adoption.
Premier   is   Fatigued
Vancouver.—Mr. J. H. Senkler,
acting on behalf of the Liberal entertainment committee in connection
with the visit of Sir Wilfrid Laurier,
has written to Mr. R. P. Pettipiece,
secretary of the Trades and Labor
Council, that Sir Wilfrid will be
pleased to hear what the union folk
have to say on the Asiatic question.
The interview is fixed for August 17
at 10 a.m.
Mr. Senkler admitted this information In a letter to the Trades Council, and adds that it is especially
desirable, in view of the condition of
fatigue that the Premier will be in
by the time he reaches Vancouver,
that the interview be as brief as possible.    Mr. Senkler says:—
"I have a letter from Mr. Pardee,
who is travelling with Sir Wilfrid,
in which he says that Sir Wilfrid's
health is not of the best and that he
is having a very arduous trip and
asking me personally to arrang
that all meetings shall be as shor
as possible."
Squatters' Rights
Vancouver.—The. advice of the
Dominion government offices as to
the squatters now residing on the
naval reserve up the Inlet, which is
under lease to the city, is that they
should be given notice to leave. Accordingly, this is likely to be the action taken by the city. The matter
has been brought to the attention of
the medical health officer In connection with the Isolation hospital site
in the reserve, and he will bring It
up before the health committee.
One of the residents in the reserve claims to have strong
moral, if not legal, rights, and
asks the sum of $800 from the city
as compensation for the improvements he claims to have done to the
property on which he lived.
Too Extravagant
New Westminster—Mr. M. B. Cots-
worth, the city auditor of New Westminster, makes the following announcement at the commencement of
the current instalment of his report.
"The city's dragging liabilities,"
he says, "caused by the over expenditure on current account must be paid
off by monies from taxation, rentals,
and profits from light, water, etc.,
before the city can rightly incur any
further expenditure that can possibly
be avoided, otherwise the city's
credit will become injured."
To meet that necessity, it is the
imperative duty of the council to refrain from incurring any avoidable
extra charges until the improving
financial position enables it to pay
the desired increase. Meanwhile, the
council could make arrangements to
raise sufficient taxes, etc., during,
say, the next two years to pay off
the dragging liabilities along with
current expenditure.
"Such expenditure as the $11,800
included in this year's estimates for
the proposed fifth fire hall in the
northwest should be very carefully
reconsidered by the council with a
view to hold It In abeyance till the
city can afford not only that outlay
but also the extra .yearly expense
of $4,000 it will require, as that
should increase the present heavy
cost of $27,014, which exceeds the
high rate of $2 per year per person,
Including women and children.
Trustees to Meet
Kelowna.—The annual convention
of the British Columbia School
Trustees association is to be held
this year at Kelowna, opening on
September 13. The importance ot
the work of the association is growing, and there are indications that
the attendance this year will be
larger than usual.
To Study Tuberculosis
Kamloops. — Tuberculosis from
many standpoints will be the chief
subject of the British Columbia Medical association's eleventh annual
meeting which will be held at the
Tranquille sanitorium, Kamloops, today and tomorrow.
The meeting will be held in the auditorium of the new sanitorium,
which has not yet been occupied by
patients, and the delegates and their
wives will be accommodated in the
building. It is expected that there
will be a large attendance of physicians from all parts of the province, who will avail themselves of
this oportunity to study the advantages of the institution. Sessions
will be held in the forenoon and evening of each day, the afternoon being devoted to entertainment provided by the committee in charge,
which will include a steamboat excursion on Kamloops lake to Savona
on Tuesday, and an auto trip to Fish
lake on Wednesday.
Mission Steamer
Victoria. — Nearly 300 people
gathered upon the G. T. P. wharf at
Victoria Friday, August 5, to witness the dedication of the Columbia
Coast Mission's new hospital steamer Columbia by Bishop Perrin. The
clergy of the city were well represented, and members of the choirs of
several churches were present. The
oratory of the vessel was first dedicated by his Lordship, who made a
brief address appropriate to the occasion. The massed choirs then assembled on the after deck where, under the direction of Choirmaster
Percy WoIIaston, a service of song
was carried  out.
Following the reading of a lesson
by Archbishop Scriven a short but effective eulogy of the mission work
was delivered by Bishop Perrin, who
paid tribute to the zeal and energy
of Rev. John Antle, through whose
efforts the building of the first
mission steamer was accomplished.
Following the ceremony visitors were
allowed to inspect the steamer and
$109.35 was contributed to the fund
for Its operation in addition to donations of 67 useful articles.
The Columbia will commence at
at once its work of visiting the logging camps of the north, taking spiritual and physical comfort to the men
of these lonely industrial communities very shortly. Capt. Gusheau is
in charge of the steamer with a crew
of four men. Rev. E. R. Nivin, M.A ,
M.D., acting as clergyman and surgeon, has charge of the medical department. Rev. E. C. Owens, of Vancouver, and Rev. Mr. Seeger, of Toronto, came over as guests on the
Columbia.
;. .;. .J..;. .> A a a a .;..;..;. ,;. .;.,;.... ... a .j. * ....;..;..;..;..;. .;..;.,;, A ....;. ,;.....;. .'. ty
Incorporation papers have just
been filed by the Black Diamond Collieries, Limited, who have acquired
coal mining rights to seven sections,
4,480 acres, on the main line of the
Grand Trunk Pacific Railway, about
60 miles west of Edmonton, Alberta,
and a mile from the town of Ent-
wlstle. There are three seams on
the property, one of four feet, one of
five feet, and on of liftcen feet, of a
high grade of lignite coal. The coal
scams of 10 to 12 lot thick are exposed along the bank of the Pembina river for a distance of 10 miles.
The Pembina river passes the property about a mile to the west. The
Sharp & Irvine Company of Spokane,
Wash., who own the controlling stock
in this company, announce that development work will start on the
property at once.
TO REFUSE PERMIT
(Continued from Page One)
getting  off  too  easily.     He  thought
the niiin might well be prosecuted.
It was found that the bylaw was
not registered at the time anc therefore they could not proceed under it.
Aid, Hildltch urged the necessity
of registering these bylaws as (illicitly as possible after tliey were passed,
The city clerk stated that this was
the practice.
Street Steps Refused
The streets committee recommended that H. II. Roe be permitted to
put 11]a retaining wall, but recommended that no sfeps be allowed to
be put on the street as petitioned for.
On adjournment the council decided to sit  again tonight.
GENERAL BOOTH AND HIS WORK
Writing to-the Toronto Glob,? from
London, "J.F.W." says:—
There are not many national
memorials to great movements in
the east end of London. That dreary
stretch of territory that lies east of
Aldgate Pump does not offer temptations to the builder of monuments or
other commemorations. The Mile-
end road, which is really, In parts at
least, a noble thoroughfare, concealing behinf its handsome front many
sad slums, has one distinguished
memorial to a great effort for social
betterment. This is the '"rle's
palace, which owes its origin to the
late Sir Walter Besant. In his novel
"All Sorts and Conditions of Men,"
Besant, who was then collaborating
with James Rice, described a ereat
building in the east end of London, |
conducted by a wealthy young worn- j
an, where poor girls and boys re- j
ceived an education and some sort c
of training for a  higher and  better
I
stood on the memorable evening
forty-live years ago, has been marked
by a stone bearing the inscription
"Here William Booth commenced the
work of the Salvation Army, July,
1S65." The exact site is on a new
garden strip opposite the Mile-end
great assembly.
General Booth is an "old ancient"
man now, yet to one who, like myself, has been privileged to meet and
talk with him on the annievrsary of
f-iery birthday, and on his return
from foreign tours, the years do not
seem to make such impression on
him. He still has the straight, slim
figure of a young man, but his wrinkled face and coronal ot white hair
and flowing white beard tell of 'his
eighty odd years. He is still keen
for work, and In the tiny, plainly
furnished back doom of his very
modest home at lladley Wood in
the northern outskirts of London, he
is writing his autobiography in  the
►J. »J« A A A A A ... A A A A A .J« .J. A ... .
GENERAL B< OTH OF THE SALVATION ARMY
fr^^^'H»>»t*>><•}.;.-;. ■;.*■'...»-. ".•>'■ <M....
life. The reading of this novel so
impressed the daughter of a wealthy
brewer that she forthwith si?: to
work to give reality to the novelist's
dream. The result was the Peoi le's
palace, which still carries on a beneficent work in the east end.
Now the Mile-end road has had
another memorial of a great movement, a plain and simple one; nothing but a stone at Mile-end Waste to
mark the spot where General Booth
preached the first open-air sermon
which determined his future career
and led to the formation of. the Salvation Army. When tVe history of
the world's great reliaious revivals
comes to be written, one of the most
thrilling pages will be that in which
is recorded that awakening of the sad
and distressed east end of London to
the realties of a revival. The spot
where William Booth, the ex-communicated young Methodist preacher,
Interval? between meetings and Sal-
I vatlon Army work in all parts of the
i country.    When  finished, this autobiography will be a memorable work
I filling  up  a.id   rounding out  an  im-
! portant    chapter  in   the social  and
j spiritual history of Britain, and describing tin   beginning and progress
ress   of  what   Besant     called   "The
Great Endeavor." The hook will have
its   world-wide   luturst,   too,   for   In
its late phases  it will deal with  the
rem:   ' able overseas development of
WilHv.il Boolh's great    organization.
On its pu:ely spiritual side the "autobiography" should have a wonderful
fascination ns a study   in    spiritual
growth .end Inheritance  It will show
how  :i  Nottingham  merchant's son,
who  might  have   become    through
sheer  business  ability  a  great  merchant   prince,   abandoned   commerce
and took to street preaching, cutitng
himself at the same time adrift from
the Church of England, in which he
has been brought up. And it will
show his successive changes from
Wesleyanlsm, iwth which he first allied himself, to Congregationalism,
then to the Methodist New Connexion, and finally, a free man, as the
pioneer on the Mile-end Waste of a
movement which its opponents
thought to stifle with sneers at
"Corybantlc Christianity."
The writing of the book is proceeding by fits and starts, for General
Booth in this, as in other matters, Is
autocratic and will allow no interference with his methods. The life of
the Booth family at Hadley Wood ts
ideally simply. Mr. Bramwell Booth,
the general's eldest son and chief of
the staff, lives with his family close
at hand, and every morning before
he leaves for London he visits his
father. Whatever work is in hand at
the moment is put aside while the
two converse on the affairs of the
Salvation Army or on matters of public interest. It is an interesting fact
that every officer of the Salvation
Army, no matter how high his rank
on the staff, is also a common soldier
on the roll book of one of the corps.
Thus General Booth himself is a
soldier of the Barnet corps, and al-
thought he Is unable to attend the
meetings, he "fires his cartridge,"
otherwise pays his subscription into
the branch every week. For this
reason the news brought by li is
grandchildren from the Barnet
iranch always Interests him greatly,
and their visits are responsible for
many a delay in the composition of
the "autobiography." General Booth
is a strict vegetarian, and his needs
in the matter of food are carefully
looked after by a lithe housekeeper,
an olii-linip Salvationist, whom the
general regards with a deep affection. As with all his friends and
visitors, the general enjoys a gentle
joke at the expense of his old housekeeper, and he tells how, after returning from a deeply interesting
visit to the late king and Queen
Alexandra at Buckingham palace, ho
caught himself addressing his little
housekeeper as "Your Majesty." He
keeps up the joke still, much to the
old lady's confusion. But she takes
it ill good part, and her master's
jocularity makes no difference in her
devotion. Every morning when the
summons comes she brings him his
cup of strong tea—stronger than
most people who have a care for their
nerves would care to drink—and
some thin slices of bread and butter.
That Is his frugal breakfast, and for
lunch there is dry toast, with sometimes vegetable broth, followed by a
cup of coffee. Between the two meals
he lies down for a short rest, and
then, with rare exceptions, the day
Is spent in constant work. Sometimes he goes for a short walk in
the neighborhood accompanied by a
faithful dog. The "autobiography"
will cover a period of sixty years of
active work, and the general does not
mind confessing that one of his Inspiration in his task is the portrait,
hanging in his room, of his dead
wife, the "mother" of the Salvation
Army, the courageous woman who,
when the Methodist New Connexion
decided to send William Bootli on
pastoral work, instead of giving him
the revival work for which his heart
longed, echoed his "never" from the
gallery, and so determined his new
start in life.
FIRST TENDERS IN
(Continued from Page One)
Gillingham & Bcatty offered to
plank for $1,401 at 6 2-3 cents for
planking and 1 1-3 cents for railing,
S. p. Mc.Mordie & Company wanted $1,2:10.46 for planking al 5 '-
cents for planking, and 10 cents for
railing. For grading mill close- .lilting, $4,213,211 was asked, at $2.50
for rock  and  $1.20  tor earth.
\V. II. .Mitchell & Company offered to grade and close cul for $8,-
912.60 at tho rate of $2.20 for rock
and 80 cents for earth.
The tenders were referred  to the
streets commit lee  for  report.
Eighth  Avenue Work
Aid. Hildltch suggested that II
was about time to call for tenders
for the work on Eighth avenue,
On ii being replied thai the time
had expired for objections being received, Aid. Hilditch moved that tenders be railed for Hie work, the same
to be advertised for seven days.
Aid. Smith Wished to know from
the city engineer how Hi" work relative to preparing estimates for fenders for Ihe work to Third avenue
was progressing.
The city engineer replied thai
there was still considerable to be
done.     The   department   hail   lead   a
lot of work to do and it would take
probably a whole week to get this report   in  shape  if  the  whole  time  of
his assistant  was given  to it.
Sewer Difficulty
His Worship called attention to
Ihe tie t thai a temporary sewer that
ran from Second avenue to the G.
T. ". grade ami thence to the harbor
was now to be Interfered with. It
had been laid across the G. T. P.
right-of-way cm the understanding
that it could be done until sm-h time
as the company needed to do work
there, Mr. Mehan had given notice
thai blasting was to begin there, and
HIa Worship said this would rain the
sewer. He suggested thai a way
might in- found inn icy connecting
wiili the Bewer being put in Icy Mr.
MeMordie, bul If connection was
made ii would relieve the contractor
from liability.
Aid.  Mobley thoughl  that in \ lew
nt'  il c-  fm ■   thai   iiiere  was  a  good
deal  of  money spenl   by  those con-
en    l in connection with this Bewer
lometl Ing      should    be    done.    He
■ ;:i  Mr. Mi Mordle would nol  lie
onable   and   conditions   might
le- niT.ai. ■    I
Aid. Hildltch moved that the city
engineer look into the matter.
The men ion  carried.
Tux Exemption
Aid.   Hildltch  wanted    to know  If
any answer had been received from
the city solocltor In reply to a question from the s'.reets committer relative to taxing government property,
A reply was given Hint the solicitor was considering this point.
('annuel], Laird & Co., Ltd., Shef-
li'-ld, Eng., rolled recently ;,t its
Grlmesthorpe Steel Works, what is
claimed to lie the largest mild steel
plate ever produced In England. The
ingot uiilized weighed 120 tons, Its
dimensions being 9 feet by 5 feet 10
Inches, by 1s feet 1 inch, and the
charge was obtained from three furnaces. The ingot was stripped the
following day after casting, taken
from tiie easting pit, and within one
hour charged into a horizontal re-
heatlng furnace. The Ingot was slab-
lied down under a 4,000-ton press to
12 feet '.i Inches by 9 feet by 4 0
Inches, reheated and rolled into a
plate 18 feel by 10 feel 9 Inches bj
25 1-8 Inches, the latter operation
occuping 45 minutes. When the
scrap was removed and ihe plate machined ai Cyclops, the approximate
iiiiislied welghl was 0", (ons. Transit between Hie two works was by
road, three heavy traction engines
being required for the purpose.
Subscribe  for The Prince   Rupert
Ii'iirnal now. PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Tuesday, August 16, 1910.
'Fitz" on the Fight      §
Fitz, the prize fighter who has re-
X
*
talned so many friends, has given
his impressions relative to the last
fight between Jeffries and Johnson.
He says: —
Speaking in a cold blooded way, as
a professional prizefighter, I would
say that It was a rotten fight. That
is my critical opinion of the Reno
contest, and when I use the inelegant if fexpressive term "rotten,"
I mean to convey all the critical contempt the word carries.
But speaking personally as Bob
Fitzsimmons, it was the saddest fight
I ever witnessed. I am not a sentimental man. Prizefighting is not a
sentimental business and in it tears
of rage are the only tears we shed,
but honestly I could have wept aloud
when I saw poor, brave old Jeff, the
best one of us all, making pitiful
efforts to get to his feet. It was
a sight to make an iron man sad—
big, fighting Jeff, Jeff whom I have
seen pick up a 220-pound man and
throw him bodily across the room
like an old shoe—to see him down
and out, and Johnson gazing off into
space just as if it did not make any
difference to him.
And Jeff didn't treat men quite
right when I called on him. I left
his training camp without much love
in my heart for Jim. I'm sorry for
It now, because I know that Jeff
wasn't right and he wasn't to blame.
As soon as I saw him step into
the ring the next day I knew there
was something wrong. He stood like
a man who was having a hard time
to keep his feet, yet he showed no
signs of dope. I'm sure he wasn't
doped, he lasted too long. I've been
doped myself and I know how It
goes.
When the fight started I was pulling for him as hard as I could. I saw
that he wasn't quite up to it, but I
thought he would take a brace. I
watched and watched until the sixth
round and then I knew it was all off.
All the time he was fighting I kept
saying to myself, "Tear Into him,
Jeff," "Get into him," "Fight, fight,
fight." I hoped that I could influence
him in some way—they say you can
do this by mental telepathy. My
muscles were pulled as tight as fid-
dlestrings and the sweat stood out
all over me. 1 fought just as hard
as Jeff did; I did my best to help him
beat the black; I wanted to jump
into the ring myself. I thought if
I could only get a smash at the smiling black face I'd kill the smile.
That sounds rather foolish now, but
I was dreadfully in earnest then. It
was no use. Jeff got slower and
slower, he got. stupid. Corbett was
taunting Jack, so that Jack would
forget for a second and let Jeff put
one over, but Jeff did not have sense
enough to know it. He'd just turn
his head around to Corbett and Jack
would smash him. That's how he got
that eye.
It was heart-breaking after the
sixth. Little by little Jeff was going
to pieces and there I was and could
not do a thing or say a word, and
I wanted Jeff to win so bad. I hoped
against hope, I hoped when I knew
there wasn't a chance to win; if I
knew anything about praying I
guess I would have prayed for Jeff.
And all the time I was puzzled; I
could not understand it. It didn't
seem real.    I thought my eyes were
LEANING TOWER OF PIZA
Experts   Fear  That    Calamity
Come to World's Wonder
Will
"Why is the leaning tower of Piza
out of perpendicular?" "Because so
constructed," is the wonted reply,
now, however, an Investigation by a
royal commission of experts has not
only demolished this antique legend,
but, moreover, has revealed the
startling fact that unless immediate
measures are taken to prevent it, the
celebrated companlle, with its glor-
ous eight-tiered structure of marble
colonnades, wherefrom Galileo made
his famous experiments on the law of
gravitation, Is likely to follow the
fate of St. Mark's campanile in
Venice.
"Our explorations," say the experts, "led to the wholly unforeseen
and dlstreslsng discovery that, instead of being founded upon a massive spacious base, as was generally
believed since Grassi, in 1831, and
Rohault de Fleury, in 1859, published their collections of plans, the
actual foundation simply consists of
ring-shaped masonry exactly corresponding in girth to the huge cylindrical mass superimposed thereon. In
fact, the diameter of the inner ring
foundations is seven metres forty
centimetres, which is precisely that
of the space inside the tower. This
discovery, taken together with the
further astonishing fact that the
foundations are merely three metres
( 9 ft. 9 in.) beneath the surface constitutes henceforth incontrovertible
proof that the campanile was originally built perpendicularly , and that
its leaning propensities, which are becoming more and more accentuated
are due to other causes than the intention  of its constructors.
In 1829 it was 4 metres 388 mill-
metres out of vertical line, but during the last eighty years, the commission affirms, the tower leans an additional 5.5 milimetres for every
metre of its fifty-four metres in altitude. The reasons given for this
dangerous state are principally that
the base of the tower has always
been immersed in water, and that a
deep cistern dug seevnty years ago
with the unsuccessful object of draining a basin around the foot of the
tower made matters worse.
The tower had already been considerably weakened by earlier excavation for a basin for measuration
purposes. Later in 1834 the severest
shock of earthquake ever felt at
Piza left the leaning tower some
thirteen centimetres more out of the
straight. Another main source of responsibility is undoubtedly the osceil-
lation from its magnificent peal of
seven bells.
Cardinal Maffi, Archbishop of Piza,
himself an illustrious mathematician,
has straightway offered to co-operate
with the Italian government in every
possible way for the preservation of
this fifth among the seven wonders
of the world. The cardinal has already given orders to suspend the
ringing of the two biggest bells, called the Assumption and the Crucified
Christ, which though fixed on the
non-inclined side of the campanile,
weigh together over 12,000 pounds.
As for the smaller bells they are to
be forthwith beaten simply with the
hammer.
to the jangling tunes of pianos until
the wee small hours. After a particularly active period, Johnnie found
himself financially embarrassed and
after trying every known way of
raising the wind, concluded that the
parental money bags must be appealed to once more in order that the
scion of the House of Hlrsch might
pursue his way along the primrose
path and keep up his end as a "good
fellow." And so he wended his way
to the little telegraph station of the
Canadian Pacific Telegraph company
and taking stock of his earthly monetary possessions, concluded, with the
mathematical aid of the agent, that
two words were about all he could
stand for, considering the enormous
prices then demanded for the English service.
And so he wired his father just
the simple, expressive words, "Destitute. John," then wended his way
up town to proceed on his joyful
way with the aid of some additional
credit secured by the announcement
that he had telegraphed to the "pater." Next morning while Johnnie
was recovering from the eflects of
was recovering from the effects of
the night before and fighting back
the feeling of impending disaster
that usually accompanies the "dark
brown taste," a telegram was handed to him. With feverish hand he
tore the envelope and read, much to
his disgust, the laconic words, "Des-
titue John must work." And to the
credit of John be it said that he did.
I have not heard from him for many
years, but if he should read this little story he will remember these
facts and the days of the long ago
when we all thought life held nothing but the fleeting pleasures of the
moment and before we had made up
our minds that to count in the checkered game of life we must work and
toil  and  suffer.
LAND PURCHASE NOTICES
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Phillip Williams, of Sydney, Nova Scotia, occupation accountant, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein
ley:—Commencing at a post planted
at the S. E. corner and about 16%
miles distant In a north-westerly direction from the north end of Kitwancool Lake, thence north 80
chains, thence west 80 chains, thence
south 80 chains, thence east 80
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 640 acres, more or
less. PHILLIP WILLIAMS.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 4, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
PflRfliiir
TAKE NOTICE that Annie Grieve,
of Victoria, B. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. W. corner, and about 17 % miles
distant In a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence south 40 chains, thence
east 40 chains, thence south 40
chains, thence east 4 0 chains, thence
north 80 chains, thence west 80
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 480 acres, more or
less. ANNIE GRIEVE.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 4,  1910. Jy8
-District of
Skeena Land District
TAKE NOTICE that John Cox, of
Monarch, Alberta, occupation farmer, intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described
lands, situated in the vicinity of Kitwancool   or   Chean  Wein Valley
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that John Henderson, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
agent,  intends to  apply  for  permls-
Come7cing*atT7ost'planterr*at'the sio?, to purchase the following de-
LAND PURCHASE NOTICES
Skeena Land District-—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Pearl Caspell
of Cayley, Alberta, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. E. corner and about 15% miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kltwancool
Lake, thence south 80 chains, thence
west 40 chains, thence north 40
chains, thence west 40 chains, thence
north 40 chains, thence east 80
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 480 acres, more or
less. PEARL CASPELL.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 3, 1910. jy8
Skesna Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Mary Brown,
of Vancouver, B.C., occupation married woman, Intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following described lands In the vicinity ol
the Kitwancool or Chean Weln Valley:—Commencing at a post planted
at. the North-east corner and 'about
ten miles distant in a north-westerly
direction from the north end of the
Kitwancool lake, thence south 80
chains, thence west 40 chains, thence
north 40 chains, thence west 40
chains, thence north 40 chains
thence east 80 chains to point ol
commencement, and containing 480
acres, more or less.
MARY  BROWN.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 1, 1910. Jy8
LAND PURCHASE NOTICES
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Ethel Welsh,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation married woman, IntendB to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands In the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
south-east corner and about 10 miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north 80 chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence south 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to
point of commencement and containing 640 acres, more or less.
ETHEL WELSH.
James W. Smith, Agent
Dated June 1st, 1910. Jy8
C. P. R. PROTESTS
Has  Objection   to  Canadian   North'
em's Route Along Fraser
The commission reports that a
most insidious danger arises from the
underground pprlngs that are undermining the adjacent soil.
The leaning tower of Piza was he-
lying to me;  that   something    wasjgun in 1170, and took nearly a cou
pie of centuries to complete. The
campaniles of St. Mark and Piza were
built or begun in the same century,
viz., the twelfth. The leaning tower
is 179 feet high, and 51 feet 8 inches
In diameter, cylindrical in form, the
exterior entirely built of white marble, and the interior of Verruca stone.
wrong with me.    It was like a bad
dream.
By the tenth I wanted the worst
over. I hated to sec Jeff being made
a spectacle; I hated to see him pitied.
It was just like watching a man
dying hard, fighting for each gasping breath.
I was sick of the whole thing
when Jeff went down In the fourteenth. 1 wanted to shut my eyes.
I didn't want to see his shame. I
had a feeling of horor when I saw
him groveling at Johnson's feet, the
same feeling as when you sec a man
mangled by a street ear. Not once,
nor twice, hut three times did I go
through this, three minutes of the
bltteresl agony 1 ever went through.
I would rather lake a hundred knock
outs myself than see that again.
It was a rotten tight, lint It was
a terrible sight.
 o	
Simeon Easy go, after living sixty
years on a farm, found his quarters
on shipboard somewhat cramped. He
obviated the lack of space, however,
by stowing his trousers and shoes
into a round cupboard in the side of
the vessel on going to bed. At 7
a.m. there was exeftu,.,ent. "Steward,
las' night I put my clothes in that 'ar
cubby-hole, an' they hain't thar
now."
"That ain't a clothes-press; that's
a port-hole, sir."
DESTITl'TK JOHN
Interesting Story of the Early Days
of Mining in Interior of Province
Protesting against the application
of Messrs. Mackenz'e & Mann for the
approval of the Canadian Northern's
survey along the Canadian Pacific's
right-of-way along the banks of the
Fraser and Thompson rivers, the latter company has engaged counsel and
will strive to prevent the board of
railway commissioners from granting
the former corporation's request.
The commission will meet in Vancouver September 5, and an exciting
legal battle Is promised.
In their application, Messrs. Mackenzie & Mann ask for the approval
by the board of the proposed route
of the Canadian Northern for a seven
mile section on the Thompson river
and a ten-mile right-of-way on the
Fraser. The new route lies along
the sloping banks of both streams,
but below the Canadian Pacific right-
of-way. The latter corporation claims
that the building of the new road
will endanger their line as there
is not enough room along the steep
slopes for two roads.
Mr. George A. Mountain, chief
advisory engineer for the board will
examine the stretch of land under
contention.
 o—■ -
north-west corner and about five and
one-quarter miles distant in a northwesterly direction from the north end
of Kitwancool Lake, thence 80
chains south, thence 80 chains east,
thence 80 chains north, thence 80
chains west to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres,
more or less.
JOHN COX.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated  May 30,  1910. Jy5
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that James Alexander McDonald, of Monarch, Alberta, occupation farmer, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands, situated in
the Kitwancool or Cheln Wein Valley:—Commencing at a post planted
at the N. E. corner about five and
one quarter miles distant in a northwesterly direction from the north
end of Kitwancool Lake, thence south
80 chains, thence west SO chains,
thence north 80 chains, thence east
80 chains to point, of commencement,
and containing 640 acres, more or
less.
JAMES ALEXANDER McDONALD
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated May 30, 1910. Jy5
scribed lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. ,W corner and about 25 miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north SO chains, thence
east 40 chains, thence soutii 80
chains, thence west 80 chains to
point of commencement and containing 320 acres, more or less.
JOHN   HENDERSON.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 7th, 1910. Jy8
Over 275,000,000 feet of lumber
was cut on New Brunswick crown
lands last year, and stumpage dues
amount to over $300,000.
LAND PURCHASE NOTICES
Subscribe   for  The   Prince  Rupert
Journal now.
The following narrative of early
days in Nelson Is related in the Los
Angeles   Mining   Journal:
Few of those who passed through
the early stages of the boom in tiie
West Koolenay district of British
Columbia, particularly of those who
were at Nelson in the pioneer days
of its existence, In the early nineties,
will fail to remember Johnnie Hirsch
who, sebscquently became one of the
best known and most proficient mineral surveyors in the country. When
I first knew him, soon after the Hall
mines excitement caused an influx
of all sorts and conditions of men
to Nelson, he was principally engaged in sowing an enormous crop
of wllo oats brought with him from
England and distributed with a pro
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte.
TAKE NOTICE that the Queen
Charlotte Whaling Company Limited,
of Victoria, British Columbia, occupation manufacturers, intend to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:-—Commencing at a post planted about fifteen
chains soutii of a small creek on the
west side of Rose Harbour, Moresby
Island, thence west forty chains,
thence north forty chains, thence
east forty chains, thence southerly
;following tho sinuosities of the foreshore line forty chains, to the point
of commencement.
Queen Charlotte Whaling
Company Limited,
Per Sydney Charles Ruck, Agent
Dated July 14th,  1910.
Rose Harbour, Q.C.I.       . A5
the "other side" a pretty penny. In
those days the pace was certainly
hot and life one continual round of
so-called pleasure, which began well
towards evening and was carried on
LAM)   LEASE   NOTICE
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that The Canadian
Fish & Cold Storage Company Ltd.,
of Vancouver, occupation Mercantile
and Manufacturing, intends to apply
for permission to lease the following described land:—Commencing at
a post planted at high water mark
on the westerly side of Prince Rupert Harbor and distant about 110
chains from the north-east corner of
Lot   443,   thence   west    20     chains,
thence south  20  chains,  thence east
5 chains, more or less to high water
dlgal  hand  that cost his father  on ,m.il','k'  t',enne  f,olI°wlng   along    the
high water mark to the point of com
mencement and containing 20 acres
more or less.
The Canadian  Fish  and  Cold
Storage Company, Limited,
J. H. Pillsbury, Agent.
Dated June 20th, 1910. Jyl2
Coast Land District—District of
Skeena.
TAKE NOTICE that I, Ernestine
A. Roney, of Prince Rupert, occupation married woman, intend to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted on the north
bank of the Skeena River about half
a mile south of Geo. T. Church's preemption, thence west 10 chains,
thence north 40 chains, thence east
to the Skeena River; thence souths
west following the bank of the
Skeena River to the place of beginning, and containing about 80
acres.
ERNESTINE A, RONEY, Locator.
W. A. Roney, Agent.
Dated July 7th, 1910. Jy22
Coast Land District—District of
Skeena.
TAKE NOTICE that I, J. Adolph
Perry, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation
book-keeper, intend to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted on the north bank of the
Skeena River, about a mile west of
Lot 31, thence north 40 chains,
thence east 80 chains to lot 31,
thence south 40 chains to bank of
Skeena River, thence west about 80
chains following north bank of
Skeena River to point of commencement, and containing about 320
acres.
J. ADOLPH PERRY, Locator.
Wm. A. Roney, Agent.
Dated July 16th, 1910. Jy22
Coast Land District—District of
.Skeena.
TAKE NOTICE that I, Mary M.
Roney, of Stillwater, Minnesota, U,
S.A., occupation married woman, intend to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands.
Commencing at. a post planted on the
north bank of the Skeena River at
the south-east corner of Geo. T.
Church's pre-emption, thence north
40 chains, thence east 40 chains,
thence south to the bank of the
Skeena River, thence south-west following the Skeena River to the place
of beginning and containing about
120 acres.
MARY M. ROENY,  Locator.
W.  A.   Roney,  Agent,
Dated July 8th, 1910. Jy22
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Laura Gordon
of Victoria, B. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. E. comer and about 18 miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thenee soutii 40 chains, thence
west 40 chains, thence north 40
chains, thence east 40 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 160 acres, more or less.
LAURA GORDON.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated  June  4,  1910. jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Henry Welsh,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
printer, intends to apply foi permission to purchase the following described lands In the vicinity of Kltwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. E. corner and 11 miles distant
In a north-westerly direction from
the north end of Kltwancool Lake,
thence north 80 chains, thence west
80 chains, thence south 80 chains,
thence east SO chains to point of
commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
HENRY WELSH.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 2, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
0 ft Rflf ft T *
TAKE NOTICE ' that Frederick
Welsh, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation clerk, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described hinds in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-east corner about 11 miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence soutii SO chains, thence
west 4 0 chains, thence north SO
chains, thence east 40 chains to
point of commencement, and containing 320 acres, more or less.
FREDERICK WEJLSH.
James W. Smith, Agent
Dated June 2, 19.10. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Walter Marke
of Toronto, Ont., occupation traveller, Intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool
or Chean Wein Valley:—Commencing at a post planted at the N. B.
corner and about 27% miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence south 80 chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence north 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to the
point of commencement and containing 640 acres, more or less.
WALTER MARKE.
James VV. Smith, Agent
Dated June 8th, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassia,.
TAKE NOTICE that James Welsh,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation machinist, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—.
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. W. corner and about 12 miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the uortk end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence south SO chains, thence
east 20 chains, thence north 80
chains, thence west 20 chains to the
point of commencement and containing  160 acres, more or less.
JAMES  WELSH.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated  June  2,   1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Richard
Howie, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation dentist, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands In the vicinity of
Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. E. corner and about 24% miles
distant In a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence south 80 chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence north 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
RICHARD HOWIE.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dajed June  7th,  1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Violet Gelger,
of Victoria, B. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands In the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. W. corner and about 23% miles
distant In a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence south 80 chains, thence
east 40 chains, thence north 40
chains, thence east 40 chains, thence
north 40 chains, thence west 80
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 480 acres, more or
lesB. VIOLET GEIGER.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated  June 7th,   19!0. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
C"»A Rfliftl*
TAKE NOTICE that Sandford
Burton, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation mining engineer, Intends to
ipply for permission to purchase the
following described lands In the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein
Valley:—Commencing at a post
planted at the N. E. corner and
about 23% miles distant In a northwesterly direction from the north
end of Kitwancool Lake, thence south
80 chains, thence west 80 chains,
thence north 80 chains, thence east
SO chains to point of commencement
and containing 640 acres, more or
less. SANDFORD BURTON.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 7th, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Norman Cle-
land, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation printer, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands In the vicinity of Kltwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Comencing at a post planted at the
S. E. corner and about 26% miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north 80 chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence south 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
NORMAN  CLELAND.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 8th, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassu.
TAKE NOTICE that Marguerette
Burns, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission ,u purchase the
following described lands In the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein
Valley:—Commencing at a post
planted at the N. E. corner and distant about 12 miles in a northwesterly direction from the north
end of Kitwancool Lake; thence
south SO chains, thence west 20
chains, thence north 80 chains
thence east 20 chains to point of
commencement, and containing 160
acres,  more or less.
MARGUERETTE   BURNS.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 2,  1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles F.
Burns, of Moncton, New Brunswick
occupation auditor, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein
Valley:—Commencing at. a post
planted at the south-west corner and
about 12 miles distant In a northwesterly direction from the north
end of Kitwancool Lake: thence
north 80 chains, thence east 80
chains, thence south 80 chains,
thence west SO chains to point of
commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
CHARLES F.  BURNS.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated   June   2,   1910 jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that James Jar-
dine, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
merchant, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean   Weln    Valley:	
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. W. corner and about 13 miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of' Kltwancool
Lake, thence soutii SO chains, thence
east SO chains thence north so
chains, thence west 80 chains to
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
JAMES JARDINE.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 2, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that John McDiar-
mid, of Lucknow, Ont, occupation
farmer, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands In the vicinity of the
Kltwancool or Chean Weln Valley:	
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. W. corner and about 13 miles distant In a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kltwancool
Lake; thence north 80 chains, thence
east 40 chains, thence south 80
chains; thence west 40 chains to
point of commencement, and containing 320 acres.
JOHN  McDIARMID.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 2, 1910. Jy8 ■ ;'■■■■.  '•  '-""."     ''■. ■■ '•        " ."•'■    • ■>■ i
Tuesday, August 16, 1910.
THE   PRINCE   RUPERT   JOURNAL
AN ANNUAL BANQUET
Real  Estate  Hen  Gather at  Premier
Hotel and Hake
Merry.
Local Exchange Members  Dine Together And Give Expression to
Hopes for Future
The first annual banquet given by
the Prince Rupert Real Estate Exchange, which was held In the Premier Hotel on Friday evening, was
a grand success in every way. The
Exchange has been In existence one
year and the results, according to
every one of the forty members who
attended the banquet, were such as
to prompt a continuation of the exchange. Some said that they had regarded the formation of the association with some misgivings. The results had completely won them to
it and they ardently advocated its
continuation.
The banquet was served in first
class style and everything reflected
the utmost credit upon the host and
hostess whose attention to every detail was remarked upon by all.
Kauffman's orchestra was present
and an excellent programme of music
was rendered throughout the evening. After a choice meal had been
served, a toast list of considerable
length was proceeded with, which
owing to the splendid speeches, made
the evening pass all too soon. In
the absence of Major Gibson, the
president of the Exchange, M. M.
Stephens acted as toastmaster. The
direction of affairs proved to be In
good hands, for Mr. Stephens kept
everything going in a manner to
leave nothing to be added.
"The King" was duly honored, followed by a toast to Canada. To Dr.
Mclntyre was assigned the task of
responding and in one of the best
speeches of the evening he performed his duty. He opened by a reference to the real estate business, calling attention to the important part
tnat real estate men had in the progress of any country. Canada was
thirty times as large as the Mother
Land and larger than the United
States. It was often asked what the
future of Canada was to be. When
he saw the Immense number of native born Americans coming here
from the United States he was forced
to the conclusion that the annexation
question was to be reversed. "We
are going to annex the United
States," he said. As the Scotch and
English who peopled Ireland be
came more Irish than the Irish, so il
was found with the Americans who
came to this country—they became
the most ardent Canadians. He was
glad to see the Americans here. This
country was large enough for all. The
friendly feeling between the two
countries was soon to be culminated
by tbe greatest event when the 100
years of peace on the continent was
to be celebrated. There was only one
danger he saw from these people
from the United Stats coming In. It
was that Canadians might learn
some of the bad habits—for instance,
money making. This country, for
variety of resources, for its pure, and
strong institutions, rivalled the
world, he believed. The commercial
idea should not. be the strongest In
the nation. The prospects and contentment of the people should 'be
sought. In closing he made a strong
appeal for the continuation of British   connection.
The chairman on the conclusion
of Dr. Mclntyre's speech said he now
understood why he was defeated at
the municipal election. The speech
of the Doctor had shown him he was
not then in his class.
Replying to the toast of "Our
Province," G. R. Naden remarked on
the fact that a third of the city council were real estate men. This showed that they could not be as bad a
set as was sometimes represented.
The province, while noted for many
things, was famous for its real estate boosters. The quality of its real
estate boosters was a distinctive
feature. This was proved by the fact
that Prince Rupert, only a year old,
had an assessed value of $13,000,-
000. The real estate men were responsible in large measure for this.
Tbe province was without a peer for
its scenery and its climate and judging by the past few months here
there was no part of it that compared with Prince Rupert in point of
climate. The natural resources were
such that there was hardly anything
worth getting that they could not secure. Tributary to Prince Rupert
was a veritable empire. He hoped
the Exchange would result in the
spread of as good fellowship in the
next twelve months as In the past.
Coupled with the toast "Prince
Rupert," were the names of M. P.
McCaffery,   W. AI. Law,   and   Chas.
Halsey. Mr. McGaffery said he would
retire in favor of Mr. Law and received a grave reprimand from the
chairman for his failure to make to
a speech.
Mr. Law went into his experiences
on the Pacific coast covering a period
of 23 years. He had lived from Los
Angeles to Prince Rupert, and he
was well satisfied to stay here. He
recalled some evidences of develop-
mnt In a few years that had taken
place in Seattle, Vancouver, Spokane,
San Francisco, Los Angeles and
other cities. Some of his references
prompted a query as to how old he
was and he was later referred to as
the venerable member of the Exchange. Prince Rupert, however, he
said, was destined to outshine them
all. He recalled the time when
Water street in Vancouver only a
few years ago was paved with plank
as Prince Rupert was today. The
Vancouver Hotel was then in the
country. When every thing was considered they could not be too enthusiastic over Prince Rupert. There
was 900 miles of virgin country to
be opened up by the G. T. P. When
it was considered what that meant
the future of Prince Rupert was Indeed very bright.
Mr. Halsey expressed his great
faith in the city. He never had any
doubts about it, and was satisfied
with the place.
The chairman said when he
thought of the resources of the city
he could not help warming up to the
possibilities of it. They were already eating fruit grown within 100
miles of the city, which spoke volumes  for  the  productiveness  of it.
"The Real Estate Exchange—
Prince Rupert's Salvation," was referred to Mr. Hobbs and Mr. Pattullo. The former in a few words
passed the duty on to Mr. Pattullo.
The later said the exchange was a success from the high plane upon which
it was conducted. It had acted as
a protection to the public. He saw
not reason why it should not continue to be a success. He counselled
all holding together.
To the toast of the ladies, G. C.
Emerson was called upon to respond.
He preferred, however, to leave the
time to Mr. McRae who was on the
list and Mr. Benson who came from
a province noted for its beautiful
women.
Mr. McRae had come to the conclusion after hearing the speeches
that real estate was too low here.
Proceeding to the toast he said that
as men and as a country they were
too prone to forget what they owed
to women. The ladies had a steadying
influence upon men and tended to
counteract the tendency to go down
Mr. Benson agreed with Mr. McRae that they owed a lot to the
ladies and they also owed a lot after
they got the ladles.
P. I. Palmer, responding to the
toast "Prince Rupert Industries,"
said they should offer every inducement to industries to come here.
Mr. Moore's name was also coupled
with this toast and he referred to
the fact that Prince Rupert did not
seem to realize fully enough the vast
possibilities of the fishing trade here.
At the present time the salmon canneries were worth a lot to this city.
The concern with which he was connected would In a few days pay off
—expending to the extent of $250000
to $300,000 in cash to the fishermen. The Indians got a third of this.
These people would spend it in a few
days after they got it. The trade was
well worth going after. Quite a few
Indians owned land in Prince Rupert.
There were others who would purchase.
In the absence of H. M. Leonard,
the toast "Future Prospects" was responded to by Mr. Mortimer, who
spoke in a most optimistic way. He
way In the future and the near future at that, great works here, a
naval station, a dry dock and Industries of various kinds. The outlook was indeed bright.
"Canada's Transcontinental, ' was
fittingly coupled with the name of
D. II. Hays. He said the subject
was too great for him. It was Impossible to say what the opening of
this 3,600 miles of new railroad
would mean. Here they were to some
extent earth bound until the line
came through. No grander work
had ever been conceived and carried
out. Almost unsurmountable difficulties had to be overcome, but the
Ang'o-Saxon race did not know what
it was to fail and so it was accomplished. In the summer of 1913 they
would see the old world linked up
with the new. He advised avoiding
criticisms and turning attention to
doing what could be done to aid In
It. They would have the Grand Old
Man of Canada, Sir Wilfrid Laurier
to whose foresight this system owed
so much and by whose untiring attention it was made possible, here
next week. The next week they would
have  the   heads   of   the   enterprise.
They should all be given a hearty
welcome. The people here were doing
the pioneer work. The polishing
work must come soon. There was
to be un immense flood of visitor?
to the place. It was none too soon
to commence work in preparation for
this. This would include the post
office, the hotel the railway station
and the government wharf. The commencing of these works with the city
work wou'd scare away any croakers.
Prince Rupert must be the Mecca of
a'l who travel over the rails of the
G. T. P.
The toast "Prince Rupert's Foundations" was relegated to J. Y.
Rochester, who said that because of
lack of facilities on the water front
he was handicapped In landing supplies In the waywf sand and gravel.
There was no lack of material. The
raw material was here.
The Press was responded to briefly
by G. R. T. Sawle, William Raymond
and O. H. Nelson.
"The Interior," was announced by
the chairman as a most important
toast and J. C. Christiansen did ample justice to it. He told of the rich
areas in the interior including Lakelse and Kitsumkalum valleys, which
were soon to be subdivided into 10-
acre lots, each of these lots being
sufficient to support a family. These
rich areas In the interior would contribute to the wealth of Prince Rupert.
Mr. Brown and Mr. Angell, after
hearing Mr. Christiansen, were satisfied to leave the subject as he had
presented it.
"Mining," was replied to by S.
Harrison, Mr. Tapley and Mr. Ward,
but the chairman felt that they had
not said enough on the subject and
supp'emented some remarks himself.
To the toast "Civic Improvements," Mr. Alder was asked to
speak on short notice. He said the
city was making marked improvement. He advocated fixing the grades
and doing all the work in such a
permanent way that in future years
it could not be said that they did
not do their work well. Seattle afforded an Instance of not doing the
work permanently in the first place.
It had cost immense sums to do the
work there later on. Everything
should be done commensurate with
the future and let the world see
that they expected big things here.
The toast of "The Host and
Hostess" was honored with a will, af
ter the hearty way in which the com
pany  had  been  entertained.
R. A. White and Norman Soule
made short speeches In this connection.
Before the party dispersed , the
committee in charge was remember
ed, and the chairman who had made
such a decided success in that position was also given the thanks ot
all.
It was suggested by one of the
speakers that the function might
come more frequently than once a
year. This was heartily endorsed by
all.
 o	
THE FROZEN ISLAND
Unusual  Sight  in  Arctic  Regions—
Not Seen Since Fifty Year., Ago
From the captain of the Hamburg-
American liner Oceana, which is at
present on a pleasure cruise around
Iceland, Spitzbergen and the North
Cape, an Interesting telegram has
been received at the company's offices in London.
The captain states that while passing between Spitzbergen and the
North Cape last Sunday the Oceana
sighted the Island of Jan Mayen. This
island had not been seen since Lord
Dufferin saw it while yachting in the
region fifty years ago, and subsequently mentioned it in his hook,
"Letters  from   High   Latitudes,"
The Island was discovered in 2607
by Hudson, who thought he had got
to the North Pole. The reason why it
is so rarely seen is that usually it
is surrounded by the Arctic Ice
pack. Owing, however, to the abnormal weather which has prevailed
In the Arctic regions during the past
month, the ice pack has been broken
up to an exceptional extent. The
Oceana passed within a mle of the
island during the daytime, and the
captain describes it as "a wonderful
sight,  half  rock  and  half  glacier."
The nearest place from which the
captain could wire was Hammerfest,
and he sent his telegram off from
there on Wednesday afternoon.
While he was there he states the
Phoenix, with Prince Henry of Prussia, and Count Zeppelin on board
came into the port. As the object
of the voyage of the Phoenix is to
make preliminary preparations for
Count Zeppelin's Arctic airship expedition , her distinguished passengers were greatly Interested in the
description of the island.
To Save the Birds        %
i* '> »> A •> •> •> ♦;♦ $ »> »> *;. ►> ♦;. >>.;. »;• *>.;. »> ,>.;.»-. ►>.;.
To array fourteen of the world
powers against the butchery of the
birds of the globe for millinery purposes is the object of an international
movement which has been formally
called to the attention of the United
States government. Recommendations for the prohibition of this feather traffic by non-exploit and non-import laws in Great Britain, Germany,
France, Italy, Russia, Norway, Sweden, Belgium, Denmark, Holland, Austria, Bavaria and United States have
just been filed with Secretary of-
State P. C. Knox at Washington by
William Dutcher, president of the
National Association of Audubon societies, who represented the United
States at the recent international
ornithological congress in Berlin,
where they were framed and unanimously endorsed by delegates from
every part of the world.
Though England and several other
foreign nations are already considering this urgent call of the world's
ornithologists, it is expected that the
United States will take the lead in
practical co-operation to save the wild
birds.
For the first time in history the
ornithological authorities in their
international conclave are reported
to have been able to unite upon some
simple course of action that would
check the economic loss of billions of
dollars each year that has been
shown to result from the killing of
the pest-destroying and plague-preventing wild birds of land and water.
By the ornithologists of the nations
it is generally conceded that bird
slaughter and sale for millinery purposes is the chief cause for the
threatened extinction of their valuable bird life, according to Mr.
Dutcher, who devoted his entire energies in Berlin to the paramount question of bird protection.
While rational shooting laws and
acquainting the public with the value
of birds have been advocated by the
congress, its members have made
their principal plea to the world powers for the prohibition of import, export, purchase or sale of the plumes
of wild birds for millinery purposes,
Acting as an "international committee for the protection of birds," a
score of ornithological experts select
ed from the nobility and scientists of
fourteen of the leading nations are
placing before their governments the
proposition of co-operation to break
up the destruction of bird life by the
world-wide tariff In feathers. Though
the people of United States have coma
to extend reasonable protection to
their birds In many states, the destruction of American bird life must
go on as1 long as any foreign country
continues to offer a market for the
sale of the scalps of the birds of the
United States, It is pointed out by
Mr. Dutcher, who with Dr. T. S. Palmer, of the department of agriculture at Washington, represents this
country on the international committee.
"Americans need the help of the
great world powers—as every other
people need our help—to check the
destruction of the birds who work
for our common prosperity and
health," said Mr. Dutcher at the
headquarters of the National Association of Abdubon societies, 141 Broadway, New York City, recently. Owing
to the high prices offered for the
plumes of white herons, birds of paradise, hummingbirds, albatrosses, and
other species in the European markets, these birds have been slaughtered almost to the point of extinction.
On the other hand, thousands of the
valuable lnsectiveous wild birds and
game birds of Europe are shipped
here as cage birds and to make
choice tidbits in our restaurants,
"Only by putting a slop lo the export and Import of birds butchered
for commercial purposes can the nations of the earth hope to retain the
valuable bird resources. It remains
for the American people to take the
first step in tills very vital movement
for the International protection of our
birds."
Municipal Notice
TENDERS FOR STREET GRADING
SEALED TENDERS will be received by the City Clerk until SATURDAY noon, AUGUST 27th, 1910,
for the grading of Second avenue,
between McBride street and Eleventh
street.
Plans and specifications may be
seen and forms of tender obtained at
the office of the City Engineer.
The lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted.
ERNEST A. WOODS,
Wm. Mahlon Davis, City Clerk,
City Engineer. A5-23
CANCELLATION  OF  RESERVE
NOTICE Is hereby given that the
reserve existing on Crown lands In
the vicinity of Babine Lake, situate
In Range 5, Coast District, notice of
which was published In the British
Columbia Gazette, dated December
17, 1908, Is cancelled in so far as
said reserve relates to lotB numbered 1519, 1518, 1517, 1516, 1515,
1510, 1507, 1506, 1506A, 1503 1501,
1502, 1512, 1511, 1505, 1504, 1513,
1514, 1509, 1508, 1530, 1527, 1528,
1529, 1531, 1532, 1533, 1534, 1535,
1537, 1539, 1536, 1538, 1540, 1541,
1544, 1543, 1545, 1546, 1542, 1547,
1548, 1549, 1550, 1520, 1521, 1522,
1523, 1524, 1525, 1526, and 1551.
ROBERT A. RENWICK,
Deputy Commissioner of Lands.
Lands Department,
Victoria, B. C, June 16th, 1910.
(First insertion July 5.)
COAL CLAIMS
Skeena  District—Queen  Charlotte
Islands.
To all to whom it may concern: —
NOTICE is hereby given that I, the
undersigned, intend to apply for a
license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum upon the following lands
situate on Graham Island, one of the
Queen Charlotte Group, in the Province of British Columbia, and more
particularly described as follows, viz:
Commencing at a stake planted one
and a quarter miles west of the
north-east corner of Louis Inlet, and
marked "P. C. Coates' S. E. Corner
Claim No. 1," thence west 80 chains,
thence north 80 chains, thence east
80 chains, thence south 80 chains to
the place of commencement.
Staked June 14th, 1910.
Dated this 28th day of July, 1910.
P. C. COATES,
By his Agent, Wm. Edward Laird,
A9
Atlantic Steamship
 Agency	
Through  tickets and excursion
rates to
England, France, Germany,
and all
Scandinavian Ports.
Call or write for rates to any
part of the world. I am also
agent for all American steamers
to and from Prince Rupert;
Northern Pacific Railway; Alaska Pacific Express.
J. H. ROGERS
General Steamship and Railway
Agent, Prince Rupert, B.C.
Canadian Pacific  R'y
Steamers leave Prince Rupert for Vancouver,
Victoria, Seattle
Princess Beatrice, every Monday at 1 p.m.
Princess May or Princess Royal
every Saturday morning.
Steamers leave Vancouver
Princess Beatrice every Thursday night.
Princess May or Princess Royal
every Saturday night at 11
o'clock.
Union Steamship Co'y
of B.C. Ltd.
COAL CLAIMS
Skeena  District—Queen   Charlotte
Islands.
To all to whom it may concern: —
NOTICE is hereby given that I, the
undersigned intend to apply for a
license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum upon the following lands,
situated on Graham Island, one of
the Queen Charlotte group, in the
Province of British Columbia, and
more particularly described as follows, viz:—Comemncing at a stake
planked at the S. E. corner of P. C.
Coates' Claim No. 1, and marked
"Wm. Penman's S. W. Corner, Claim
No. 1," thence east 80 chains, thence
north 80 chains, thence west 80
chains, thence south, 80 chains to the
place of commencement.
Staked, June 14th, 1910.
Dated this 28th days of July, 1910.
WM.  PENMAN.
By his Agent,  Wm.  Edward  Laird.
A9
The new Steel Passenger Steamer
"Camosun"
PRINCE RUPERT every Sun-    '
day at 9 a.m.  for Vancouver,
arriving Monday afternoon.
For Stewart City on arrival from
Vancouver Friday night.
Northbound,   leaves  Vancouver
Wednesdays at 9 p.m.
Steerage Fare $5.00
The "Camosun" is the only steamer
on the run having- water-tight bulkheads and double bottom, thus ensuring safety of passengers in case of
collission or wreck.
J. H. ROGERS,   Ticket Agent
THE FOREST FIRES
Official of Lumbermen's Association
Says   Damage   Not   Great
The burly farmer strode anxiously
into the post-office.
"Have you got any letter for Mike
Howe?" he asked.
The new postmaster looked him up
and down.
"For who?" he snapped.
"Mike Howe," repeated the farmer.
The postmaster turned aside.
"I don't understand," he returned
stiffly.
"Don't understand!" roared the
applicant. "Can't you understand
plain English? I asked you if you've
got any letter for Mike Howe!"
"Well, I haven't!" snorted the
postmaster. "Neither have I got a
letter for anybody else's cow! Get
out!"
W. A. Anstie of the Lumbermen's
Association, when asked regarding
the extent of the damage to timber
limits of the mountain operators
from  forest  fires,  said:
"I consider it most unfortunate
that so many inaccurate reports
should have recently appeared in the
press to the effect that timber holdings in the Interior have been toally
destroyed, etc. This sort of thing
does the country a whole lot of harm
in the way of causing a feeling of
Insecurity in our timber, and undoubtedly has a tendency to depreciate valuable asets which is unwarranted  by the facts.
"No sane person will wish lo underestimate the lire menace in this
province and I do not for a moment
wain to minimize the danger io life
and property from bush fires, bul th"
fac-t is that this year the fires have
been chiefly confined lo cut over
lands and tracts which were formerly burned.
"Many timber companies have
been put to heavy expense through
being forced to close down their
mills and turn In all hands forest fire
lighting—in some cases only saving the mills, buildings and stocks
by the most strenuous efforts.
"The government and land depart-
men of the C. P. It. have both done
splendid work this season In handling bush fires and it is regrettable
that the clause in our hush fires act
providing that locomotive engines
shall be equipped with efficient spark
arresters, which shall be kept in ord-
der, is not enforced.
"Tbe fact that a large part of the
territory between Kootenay Londing
and Crow's Nest has been on fire at
fairly close Intervals along the line
of railway this su'mer, demonstrates
pretty well from what origin the fires
spring."
HAYNOR   BROS.
FUNERAL   DIRECTORS
and
PROFESSIONAL  EMBALMERS
DR.  W.  B.  CLAYTON
DENTIST
—o—
Office  In    the    Westenhaver   Block,
Over  Orme's   Drug   Store.
Prince Rupert
WM. S. HAi-cL, L. D. S. D. D. S.
:-:    DENTIST   :-:
Crown and Bridge Work a specialty.
All dental operations skillfully
treated. Gas and local anaesthetics
administered for the painless extraction of teeth. Consultation free.
Offices, Helgerson Bk., Prince Rupert
.1. H. PILLSBIRY
CIVIL     ENGINEER
Surveying,   Designs,   Estimates,   etc.
Room   7,   Exchange   Block,
Corner  Third  Ave  and   Sixth   Street
Prince Rupert
G. to. NIOKBRSON & CO.
— o—
CUSTOMS AND MERCHANDISE
•—o—
Brokers, Forwarding Agents,
Storage,  etc.
J,   to.   POTT Kit
ARCHITECT     AND     STRUCTURAL
ENGINEER
Re-lnforced Concrete a Specialty
—o—
Law-Butler Building - Prince Rupert
GRAHAM ISLAND — "The surest
sign of the progress of a town or
district is its newspaper—live, active, hustling." "The Masset Review,"  Masset,  Q.C.I.
The Thompson
: Hardware Co.
-Second Avbndb-
, >   Paints. General Hardware,
Oils, Stoves and Ranges.
♦ ♦»♦♦♦»
♦ » ■»■■
/ .)
THE   PRINCE  RUPERT  JOURNAL
Tuesday, August 16, 1910.
r
MARINE NEWS OF THE COAST
MARINE NOTES
The Humboldt arrived this morning from Skagway at 11.30, carrying her usual list of tourists and a
few local passengers.
The Cottage City and City of Seattle are each expected In this afternoon, the former from Seattle and
the latter from Skagway.
The steamer Hazelton is expected
from Hazelton tomorrow morning
and will leave again for tip the river
as soon as possible, as the Port Simpson will not be in shape to sail for
two or three days.
KESTREL COALING
The fisheries protection cruiser
Kestrel, Capt. Musgrave, reached
port yesterday from the south. She
has been In the Skeena and has arrived for coal. The Kestrel will remain in these waters until after the
visit of Sir Wilfrid Laurier.
PORT SIMPSON HACK
The Hudson's Bay steamer Port
Simpson on her way from the Stickine, where she has been making
several trips up the river, grounded
off Metlahkatla Sunday night on taking the inside passage. She has been
floated and is being repaired at
Foley, Welch & Stewart's slip. She
will leave Saturday for up the
Skeena.
BIGGEST   SHIP   AFLOAT
With Kaiser Wilhelm II's visit to
Herr Ballin, of the Hamburg-American line at Hamburg the other day,
on his way to the Kiel regatta, came
the first published details concerning the new turbine-propelled vessel which the line is'building for its
New York pasenger service. The
Vulvan company, of Stettin, has received the contract, which was originally intended for an English shipbuilding concern, but on account of
hard   times   in   the  Atlantic   service
SHIPPING GLIDE
To Arrive
Wednesday,   Aug.    17.—Prince   Rupert from Vancouver, Victoria and
Seattle.
Venture from Vancouver, Victoria.
Thursday,  Aug.  18.—Prince  Rupert
from Stewart.
Princess Royal from Vancouver.
Friday,    Aug.     19.—Venture     from
Stewart,  Port  Simpson.
Camosun from Vancouver.
Saturday,   Aug.   20.—Prince   Albert
from  Skidegate.
Prince George from  Vancouver.
Sunday,  Aug.   21.—Camosun     from
Stewart.
City of Seattle from Seattle.
Monday,  Aug.    22.—Prince    George
from Stewart.
Humboldt from Seattle.
Cottage  City  from   Skagway.
To Depart
Wednesday, Aug. 17.—Prince Rupi'i't
for   Stewart.
Prince Albert for Skidegate.
Venture for Stewart,  Naas River,
Port Simpson.
Thursday,  Aug.   IS.—Prince  Rupert
for Vancouver, Victoria, Seattle.
Princess Royal for Skagway.
Friday, Aug.  19.—Venture for Vancouver.
Camosun  for  Stewart.
Sunday, Aug. 21.—Camosun for Vancouver.
Prince George for Stewart.
City of Seattle for Skagway.
Prince Albert   for    Masset,    Kin-
eolith, Port Simpson.
Monday, Aug. 22.—Prince George for
Vancouver, Victoria, Seattle.
• Humboldt for Skagway.
Cottage City for Seattle.
two or three years ago, when Herr
Ballin first announced his intention
of building the biggest vessel in the
world, the project was postponed.
Although it has been -known for
some time that something was "doing" nothing definite was published,
and very scanty allusion was made of
the leviatran even in the last annual report of the Hamburg-American line. It was known that the
Stettin firm was commissioned to
build a large steamer, but no one
expected it to turn out anything that
would eclipse the White Star boats.
The new vessel is to be of more
than 40,000 tons gross register, exceeding the register of the Olympic
and the Titanic of the White Star
line. The Cunard company is known
to be contemplating steamers of 40,-
(100 to 50,000 tons, but their plans
are not yet matured. The White Star
boats mentioned, by the way, are too
far ahead now to allow for their enlargement. So that the Hamburg-
American company may now lay
claim to possessiong the biggest vessel in the world.
The Kaiser visited Herr Ballin at
his residence, and there were also
present several distinguished men
connected with German shipping and
shipbuilding, His majesty has approved of Herr Ballin's plans, and
pictures were shown him of the vessel. Some conception of the size of
the liner may be formed from the
following details: —
Its length is to be 879.3 feet;
breadth, 95.2 feet, and depth from
the upper deck, 04 feet. To indicate
the advance which these figures represent, as compared iwth the largest existing ships, the following details relating to the Lusitania and
the Mauretania, may be given:
Length, 762 feet; breadth, S7.8 feet,
and depth, 56.6 feet. The Cunarders
are just under 32,000 tons register.
The new Hamburg-American liner,
as already noted, is officially stated
"over 45,000 tons." Then as to
speed. The Cunarders can do
twenty-live or twenty-six knots. As a
minimum speed of no more than
twenty-two knots is to be assured, it
looks as if no attempt is to be made
to compete with the Cunard in
swiftness. It may be added that, as
the new White Star boats are to have
a working speed of about twenty-one
knots, the German leviathan will
slightly excel them alike in size and
speed.
Personals
E. M. Sandilands, gold commissioner at Jedway, has gone south.
* *    *
James Thomson of Victoria, superintendent of the Hudson's Bay steamship service in the province, is in the
city for a few days on business.
* *    *
B. Tatchell, of the Union Bank
staff returned to the city by the
Prince George after spending five
weeks with friends and relations in
Manitoba.
* *    *
Jack Chisholm returned to the city
by the Prince George. Mrs. Chisholm
has gone as far south as Portland,
Oregon, and will not be back for a
month.
* *    *
J. McKay, of Vancouver, representing Gebhardt, Hanley, McKay &
Company, of Winnipeg, was In the
city last week. He was accompanied
by Mrs. McKay.
»    •     •
Miss Gladys Rogers entertained a
number of friends last evening at the
lesidence of .Mr. .1. Chisholm, where
she has been living with some other
members of the family for two weeks.
*     *     *
Chas. Halsey lefl for Vancouver on
the Princess Royal on Saturday, He
will lie gone for two or three weeks,
during which time he will take in the
Vancouver exhibition,
* »    *
Herbert Carmichael, provincial as-
savi-r, after a vlsll to Atlin, wbere
he examined the mines there, ii-
lias now gone 'en iii Bella Coola
where he will examine other mining
propel ties. The assayer will likely
make a bulletin reporl al an early
date,
IMPURE MEAT
City   Council   Consider   Question   ot
Sale of Bad Food
The subject of impure meat being
sold in the city came before the city
council at Its last sitting and some
discussion followed as to how action
could best be taken to punish the
vendors of such meat. It came up
in connection with Aid. Pattullo's
fuel and food bylaw. Aid. Hilditch
asking if the matter of impure food
could not be dealt with under it.
Aid. Pattullo thought this was provided for in another bylaw, the
health bylaw.
Aid. Hilditch said there was meat
unfit for food being sold.
Aid. Barrow made the suggestion
that the purity of the food very often
Experimental Fruit Stations
(Continued from Page One)
TELEPHONE  IN USE
After being without a telephone system in the city until
this week the installation of
the civic plant and its being
put into commission this week
has been attended with a very
liberal use by citizens. There
have been some very amusing
lapses of memory on the part
of patrons who had become
accustomed to personally deliver all messages. ResITtents
with 'phones In their offices
have from force of habit
found themselves travelling
blocks before remembering
thai   this  was  needless.
The telephone system installed is working remarkably
well.
valley thus formed is one of the best
in the whole province of Britisli Columbia. Parts of the valleys are to
be subdivided this fall and put on the
market. Lots will be about ten acres
in extent and on areas that size there
is said to be no difficulty in a family
being comfortably maintained.
Local News
.
i:. Tolmle, deputy minister oT
mines for the province, arrived on
the Princess Royal on Saturday accompanied by .Mrs. Tolmle. The [
deputy minister left the steamer here
taking Ihe Prince George Sunday
n'sht f-jr Stewau, wher. he hns busi
ness to attend ii in connection with
the  depai" iniiii
Among the arrivals on the Princess Royal on Sal unlay were quite
n number of holiday seekers who had
been on the round trip to Skagway.
Among them were Percy Brown, a
well known real estate dealer of Vic-
was  measured  by  bow  hungry  one
was.
Aid. Smith said he had had meat
none too pure sent to his place. He
thought something might well be
done.
Aid. Pattullo thought it was time
some action was taken. If impure
meat was sent to his house he would
promptly lay an information against
Ihe seller and proceed against lu.n.
Aid, Hilditch thought the iiea.th
officer should taken the action and
thus relieve the man wio got the
torla, who was accompanied by hia j meat fronl tn" trouble.
Wife, A. It. Woll'c'iiili'ti, also a real es- ■ Aid. Pattullo favored individuals
tate dealer of Victoria, and his wife ! taking action. A few prosecutions
were aboard the steamer. i would  right matters.
D. McK. McCorkindale, of Fort
William is in the city on a visit.
* #    *
The Methodist Sunday school Is
holding a picnic   this   afternoon   at
Metlahkatla.
* *    *
Chas. Boscowitz, charged with supplying liquor to an Indian, was fined
$100 in the police court this morning.
* *     *
Dr. Ernest Hall of Victoria, is to
deliver a lecture In the intersts of the
Scott Act campaign here on Sunday
afternoon. The place Is to be announced later.
* *    *
G. T. Williams, convicted of setting the Talbot House on fire, was
taken south by the Camosun on Sunday to enter upon his ten-year term
of Imprisonment. Williams has hopes
it Is said of having his sentenca
shortened by the parole system now
so much In vogue In the country.
* *    *
The dance given by the Young
People's Club at the skating rink on
Friday last was a great success. The
floor was In very fine condition, the
music was all that could he wished
for and everything seemed to lend a
happy feeling to the merrymakers.
A very tasty luncheon was served
by the Fulton Bakery.
* *     *
A  large  party  of  Mystic  Shriners
| from Victoria and  the lower main-
| land  passed   through   the    city    on
■ Saturday on their way from a gath-
j ering in  Dawson.    They report hav-
I ing had a delightful trip throughout
and a most pleasant time In Dawson.
The  banner  that  flew  at  the mast.
head of the Princess Royal when they
arrived here on their way north was
not in evidence on the way back.    It
was left in Dawson.
For Job Printing of all kinds see
the Journal man.
ELECTRIC LIGHTING
(Continued from Page One)
whole of section one, I estimate that
5,000 candle power incandescent
lamps would be required and for the
lighting of the streets alone 500 16-
candle power lamps. The work can
be done most economically by an alternating current.
The only existing power available
for this work is that of the sash and
door factory on Seventh avenue
where the boiler is aproximately 80
horsepower, and the engine 125
horse power.
The proprietor states that 36 horse
power of the boiler Is required for
his plant, and he wo»ld, therefore,
have over 40 horse power to dispose of, and after five p.m. SO horsepower. The 40 horsepower would
operate 500 16 candle power Incandescent lamps sufficient for the street
lighting, or if the whole 80 horsepower was available, 500 or 600 extra lamps could be supplied.
I have estimated  the cost of installation as follows: —
Generator  60  K..W.  with  ex-
citor switch board if 2,000
New poles and repair line
from power station, tot corner of Sixth street and lane
between Second and Third
avenues        417
Engineering and erection  . . .    1,000
Total   $3,417
64.11S feel of No. 4x6 wire. $2,088
Poles and cross arms   •.       530
Transformers        200
Insulator, lamp fittings, etc. . 74S
Engineering and erection. . . .    2,000
Total $5,666
Total cost. . $8,983
In the event of the additional 40
horsepower being available from 500
to 600 16-candle power lamps might
be installed for such private consumers as are resident in the districts
between Eighth street and Third
street without any extra cost for high
tension lines.
I have also considered the installation of a steam plant at the foot of
McBride street of sufficient capacity
to provide 5,000 16 candle power
lamps for section one. The cost of
this installation would be $30,000
of which one-half would be expended  for the steam generating plant.
A proposal for a gas producer
plant to operate a 75 K.W. A.C. generator has been submitted. The cost
of this plant for the generation of
electricity is submitted at $11,840.
To this would have to be added cost
of pole lines and distribution, $1,000
making a total of $21,000,
This proposition would provide, I
am of the opinion, the first and
cheapest system, would be best, and
it could be installed in about six
weeks from arrival of plant in the
city. WM. MAHLON DAVIS,
City Engineer.
Aid. Pattullo wanted to know
what the estimated cost to the consumer would be.
No definite answer could be given
until the cost of power was obtained.
Col. Davis in reply to the mayor
said that he had not obtained prices
for use from the sash and door factory. About half the cost of installing the plant would be for steam
plant were that system installed.
The engineer said that he did not
doubt that some one in the city
would be willing to supply the power
on a business basis, the city to collect rates and look after distribution.
Such a contract would have to extend
over about ten years, however, he
thought.
Aid. Pattullo moved to refer this
report to the light committee with
a recommendation that the cost of
lighting the city be estimated.
The engineer said that he had calculated upon a temporary system for
two years which was none too long
to allow for a careful consideration
of the best place to go to for water
power.
Aid. Hildltch said that he.thought
that if a permanent supply could
have been got quickly this expense
might be done away with. If they
could get the permanent supply before a year from winter ho thought It
might be well to install a plant for
only 3,000 lights to light section one
for  this  winter.
Don't Forget
We have the stock and when you
want to select a Diamond Ring, a
Wedding Present, It is no trouble for
you to find something that will suit
you. Our stock Is composed of the
best goods that the factories produce
and we guarantee everything sold
here.
Bring us your Watch and Jewelry
repairing if you want it properly
done.
C. B. WARK
"WHERE  QUALITY IS KING."
GEO. D. TITE
Furniture Dealer
3rd. Avenue
Prince Rupert
An inspection of. our stock
of House Furnishings will
convince you. For quality and
economy you will leave us a
satisfied customer.
Dining Room Furniture, Sideboards,
Builds, Dlnlnf Tables, lilt.
ind 8It. Extension
Dlnlnf Room Chain, Uunriered Oik with
Luther Seats, Golden or Early Enjllih
finish. Prices ringing from
Just Received a
Handsome Line of
Iron Beds, Springs and
Mattresses, all sizes
WINDOW BLINDS
Manufactured here to lit any
window  uii  to 10  feet wide.
Tapestry and Lace Curtains,
Poles and Trimmings
Special orders for Upholstering
of any kind.
$22.50 to $50
Wicker Chairs and Rockers
GEO. D. TITE,
3rd Ave.
:
SHERWIN & WILLIAMS
PAINTS
COVER THE EARTH.
WE   ARE   SOLE   AGENTS
CARLOAD JUST ARRIVED
Ready Nixed Paints,
Paints Ground in Oil,
Paints Ground in Japan,
Varnishes, Shellac, etc.
Water Stains
and
Decotlnt
IN ALL COLORS
Prince Rupert Hardware & Supply
Company, Ltd.  thos. dunn, m*.
The Westholme
Lumber Company, Ld.
We carry the largest stock of
Building Supplies in the North.
Quotations given on short notice in all lines.
Rough and Dressed Lumber
Shingles and Lath
Mouldings and Cases
Doors and Windows
We handle Plaster and Lime at reasonable prices
Get our'quotntions for all£classes*Of buildings.
FIRST AVENUE
OFFICE AND
WAREHOUSES
Grand Trunk Pacific  Steamships
For VANCOUVER, VICTORIA, SEATTLE.
Connecting   with   Eastbound   Trains
"Prince Rupert" sails every Thursday, 8.30 p.m.
"Prince  George"  sails  every Monday 8.30 p.m.
FOR STEWART:
"Prince Rupert" sails Wednesdays 8 p.m.
"Prince George"  sails  Sundays at 8 p.m.
Steamer for Masset, Kincollth.Naas   Bay  and   Port  Simpson,   Sundays, I p.m.
For Skidegate,  Queen Charlotte City,   and   other   Moresby Island
points, Wednesday, 1 p.m., returning via Queen Charlotte City.
Tickets, reservations and information   from
A'E. McMASTER
Freight and  Passenger Agent, G. T. P. Wharf.

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