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Prince Rupert Journal Sep 19, 1911

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 Ptinct Unpttt
^ Lesislat/ve S^
M/
High Class
Job Printing
in all Lines
VOLUME  II.
Published   Twice  a  Week.
PRINCE   RUPERT,   B.   C.  TUESDAY. SEPTEMBER 19, 1911.
Price. Five Cents.
NO.
TEMPLEMAN GOES
Cabinet Minister for British Columbia
Will go Down to Defeat ■
in Victoria.
Campaign of Abuse Has ltceu Started
by the Liberals of the
Capital
(Special to The Journal)
. .Victoria, Sept. 19.—The local campaign has become intense and the
rival candidates are exerting every
effort to line up their respective supporters. From the Conservative
standpoint, there have been two notable features of the content here. The
first Is the number of defections
from the Liberal ranks, and the second is the wholly unanticipated number of workers who have come forward to help in he securing of a
record majority for G. H. Barnard.
From the Conservative standpoint
the situation is excellent. The Liberals have gone back to their old
methods of abuse and slander which
always precedes defeat for them.
With the Conservative organization
never stronger, with their ranks being recruited daily by former staunch
Liberals, who fail to see eye to ej-e
with Sir Wilfrid Laurier on the reciprocity question, and with the possibility of commercial union with the
United States eventually tending towards political union, this ultra-loyal
constituency may be depended to
give a lead to the rest of the prov-
inve on what attitude British Columbia will take on a trade pact
which may lead to a weakening of
Britisii  connection.
Local issues dominate the scene
here every whit as much as reciprocity. The action of the Dominion
government in permitting a violation
of the Alien Labor Act; the question
of the necessity of building the warships for the Pacific portion of the
navy on the Pacific Coast; the policy
of Mr. Templeman in the matter of
Chinese Immigration, and Ottawa s
neglect in providing for the defenses
of Esquimalt, are all playing their
part against the chances of the Liberal candidate.
To offset all these cries the Liberals are working tooth and nail to
show that reciprocity will reduce the
cost of living, but against this there
is the fact that Victoria is in an unprecedented flourishing condition,
wages are high, every branch of business is prosperous and the great
bulk of the people, with the exception of those who set party above
policy, are unwilling to experiment
with anything wliich might upset the
present good times. Present indications are that the Britisii Columbia
cabinet minister will go down to defeat by a very substantial majority.
PROSPECTS   GOOD
Dr. Clayton Reports That Bella Coola
and Other Coast Points Will
Return Clements.
Decided Interest Taken in the Cain-
paign Against Reciprocity
Pact
Dr. Clayton addressed meetings in
the interests of H. S. Clements, the
Conservative    candidate,    at    Bella
t
Coola, Swanson Bay, Ocean Falls and
other points along the coast, returning to the city yesterday. He was
accompanied by Lionel Crippen during his trip, while Dr. Quinlan also
assisted In the campaign there.
The speeches delivered by Dr.
Clayton are reported to have been
excellent, and were very much appreciated by the settlers. At Bella
Coola, where Mr. Carlson presided,
Mr. Brynildson, president of the Liberal Association, moved a vote of
thanks to Dr. Clayton, which was
carried unanimously.
At the meeting at Hagensborg
there was a large attendance, many
driving from Bella Coola to be present. Mr. Brynildson, who drove thirteen miles to be present, again moved
a vote of thanks.
The districts along the coast are
reported to be very strongly in favor
of Mr. Clements.
 , o	
Miss McTavish, matron of the
Prince Rupert General Hospital, returned to the city much Improved in
nealth.
IS CORNERED AT KITSUMKALUM
J. S. Cowper who in his own Estimation Overshadows the Liberal Candidate Himself Shows
That he has no Power to Convince the Electorate of the Comox-Atlin Riding-
Misrepresentation Used to Bolster up Failing Cause.
RICH  BELLA   COOLA
A wild horseback ride on the
Queen Charlotte Islands, a hurried
voyage by water to Prince Rupert
and record breaking trip by train to
Kitsumkalum brought J. S. Cowper
of this city to a Liberal meeting
where, with a flourish of trumpets
before the event, he prophesied he
would "corner" H. S. Clements and
with "sledge hammer answers" would
obliterate the Conservative candidate. The two met at Mr. Cowper's
meeting, and so ably did Mr. Cowper,
who is wont to describe himself in
such modest terms, aquit himself before the coming member for Comox-
Atlin, that the audience passed a
resolution at the close of the meeting condemning reciprocity as being
against the best interests of Canada
and endorsing Mr. Clements. And
so tlie large bubble that drifted about
Queen Charlotte, across the Hecate
Straits and up the Skeena suddenly
burst. ,
The News has only a few more
days left to glorify the editor, the
self-styled orator without an equal
who has wrung commendation from
Samuel  Gompers  and  who  will  live
In the history of the west as Its greatest orator.
The preliminary announcements in
connection with tbe meeting at Kltsumkalum were in common with the
methods adopted by the Liberal
organ in the campaign-—nothing if
not misleading in their verbiage. It
was made to appear that Mr. Clements was to be confronted at his
(Mr. Clements') own meeting at
Kltsumkalum.
What happened was that there was
a Ross meeting called in Kitsumkalum, and Mr. Clements telegraphed
asking leave to meet Mr. Cowper at
that meeting. He received a message
in reply, saying: "Your desire to meet
Cowper accepted. He will meet you
at Kltsumkalum tonight."
There was no particular romance
about this such as was attempted to
be made out by the Liberal press.
The meeting was held and Mr. Cowper acquitted himself in his usual
manner. He failed by his parables
to convince the hard-headed ranchers
of the Skeena Valley that there w-as
anything in reciprocity for them and*
for the country as a whole.    They
therefore decided in favor of Mr. Clements and the Conservative party.
.Mr. Cowper returned to Prince
Rupert in a very ordinary way on
Sunday without any trumpets.
The Conservative candidate, accompanied by William Manson, returned to the city on Sunday's train,
after a most encouraging tour of the
interior which took them as far as
Aldermere. At every point, Mr. Clements was assured of success at the
polls on Thursday. The residents
of the district realize it js time for
a change at Ottawa and showed un-
mistakeably that they were antagonistic to the reciprocity idea with all
its evils.
The Liberal meeting at Kitsumkalum on Saturday night was characteristic of the gatherings held
e'sewhere. J. S. Cowper and G. Angers, two of the most brilliant speakers in the Liberal ranks in Canada—
this must be so, for they say so themselves—appeared to advocate the
cause of Mr. Ross. Breathing out
all kinds of dire calamities upon Mr.
Clements when he would be met and
confronted  hy  Mr.  Cowper  with  the
extracts from a speech in the House
of Commons, the modest editor-orator in his speech never alluded to
this feature at all, leaving that to be
dealt with by Mr. Ross, the bean
artist at meetings when Mr. Clements
is not present.
Mr. Clements, however, in his
speech following Mr. Cowper did not
allow this to pass. He made his position clear on that point without its
j being contradicted by the opponents.
, He contradicted the construction at-
j tempted to be put upon his speech by
reading sentences here and there and
denied that he was then an advocate
of reciprocity. The reading of Ills
speech in its entirety would show
this.
Mr. Clements was followed by Mr.
Anger, while Mr. Manson followed,
with -Mr. Cowper concluding the
speech making. Following the presentation by the speakers of both
sides the resolution above referred
to was carried without dissent. The
resolution endorsed Mr. Clements as
candidate for Lhe riding and expressed disapproval of the scheme of reci-
procity.
ARE IN DESPERATION
Crooked Species  of  Ballot Box  Nade
in Edmonton for the
Election.
Conservative Candidate Exhibits One
of Them—Boxes Sent to
Outlying Points
Dramatically exhibiting to the
gaze of five thousand .people assembled in the Thistle Rink , a ballot
box so designed as to permit of tampering with ballots, and stating that
this ingeniously designed ballot box
was a replica of thirty which have
been sent to outlying points of the
constituency to which the Conservative scrutineers cannot penetrate,
Major Griesbach, the Conservative
candidate for Edmonton district,
treated to a sensation those present.
The box, designed upon the exact
plan of the boxes used by the government in Ontario in the days of
its degeneracy, by a simple piece of
wire which is passed through the
circular rim of the lid, might be
opened without in any way impairing the seal. Major Griesback declared tnat of the 225 boxes which
have been made for this constituency,
195 are honestly made, but the remaining 30, which were sent this
week to the outlying points, may be
opened and closed by the presiding
officers at the elections (Oliver appointees) without bearing any sign
of tampering.
Major Griesbach declared that the
people who had made all the ballot
boxes were willing to take oath that
they bad made thirty after the model
of the box which was exhibited.
***************
PRACTICAL   EFFECTS
* "If reciprocity carries we will *
* find it to our advantage to take •
* our business south of the line," *
* said R. J. McGraw, superintend- *
* ent of the Western Canada Flour *
* Mills  Co.  In  Vancouver.    This *
* company will construct a $400,- *
* 00 plant, consisting of elevator, *
* warehouses, etc., in Vancouver, *
* employing sixty men,  and  cap- *
* able of producing one thousand *
* barrels daily.    If the pact goes *
* Into effect the plant will go to *
* Seattle or Tacoma, and so much *
* more wheat will go to the United *
* States instead of to Vancouver. *
* Sixty   fewer   men   will   be  em- *
* ployed   in   this   city,   says  the *
* News-Advertiser. •
Miss Manning, the new teacher in
the public school, will reach the city
on Wednesday.
H. S. CLEMENTS WELL RECEIVED
Last evening H. S. Clements, the
Conservative candidate in Comox-Atlin, met the electorate in Port Essing-
ton and discussed with them the
questions of the day. As usual at
all his meetings, Mr. Clements made
a splendid impression. His course
throughout was gentlemanly and
considerate to his opponents. It was
therefore but natural that he should
make many friends- at the meeting
and on Thursday be will have a good
majority in the cannery town.
The meeting was presided over by
Mr. Morrison, a pioneer of this district who formerly lived at Hazelton
but who is now a resident of Port
Essington. He is a lifelong Conservative and an uncompromising opponent of reciprocity. He advised all
present to vote for Mr. Clements on
Thursday. Many ladies were present at the gathering.
Mr. Clements was in excellent form
in spite of the trying campaign he
has been through. Ever since the
nominating convention in Nanaimo
the Conservative candidate has been
steadily on tour, covering the greater
part of the immense constituency.
Everywhere he Has gone he has received a most cordial reception and
on Thursday it is safe to say he will
be returned as the head of the poll
as the member for the riding.
He spoke for about sn hour and
a half at Essington last night, dealing generally with the reciprocity
question from the standpoint of the
Canadian national life. In his criticisms he was exceedingly fair, as he
always is, hut showed that this country had all to lose and nothing to
gain by the pact. He has no objei'-
tion to the Americans coming in here
with their money and investing in
the country. He thought the United
States should not object if Canada
now answered them as they bad said
to the' Canadians twenty-five years
ago when reciprocity was sought by
Canada, and when, owing to the conditions then existing, it would have
been a temporary relief. The United
States then said to Canadians "if
you want to share in our prosperity
you must come over here and live in
the United States." Canadians could
return that answer today and tell the
people of the United States that our
raw resources were open to their factories only upon the condition that
the factories moved over to Canada
and invested on this side, building
up   this   country.
FISHERY METHODS
Evidence as to How the Dominion Government Makes Provision for
its Favorites.
Henry   Doyle  of   Mill   Bay   Tells   in
Police Court How  the  Regulations Are Enforced
(Continued on Page Eight)
Conservative Rally!
The closing meeting of the campaign
will be held in
Melntyre Hall
Wednesday Evening, Sept. 20
H. S. CLEMENTS
the Conservative Candidate
CEO H. COWAN
of Vancouver
WM. MANSON, M.P.P.
Will Address the Meeting
Gray's Orchestra will furnish music
While the main part of the evi
dence was taken last Friday in the
charge against John Donnelly for
having fished in a weekly close season contrary to the Dominion regulations, there yet remains some
further evidence to be heard before
the case is decided by J. II. McMullIn, stipendiary magistrate. The ac-
cused was in the employ of Henry
Doyle of Mill Bay, near Naas Harbor, and Mr, Doyle was an important
witness. There are several other
Counts io be disposed of also. ,
Tiie evidence of Fishery Inspector
Williams and other officials was thai
there had been a violation of the
regulations.
Mr. Doyle did not appear to deny
the facts but he made a statement
in evidence that went to show that
there was decided partiality shown
iii conjunction with the fishing rules.
He said that an officer had admitted
knowing the laws were openly violated. He told of his having a few
years before purchased from R. P.
Rithet & Co. rights in Smiths' Inlet
to fish. Certain waters were afterwards pronounced a fresh water body
by inspector Sword and as a result
fishing was prohibited in them.
Doyle did not in his evidence deny
that the waters were fresh, but held
they were, as he had drunk water
from the lake.
But Robert Kelly had been given
seining rights In the same Smith's
Inlet when the Inspection passed
from Mr. Sword to Mr. Williams. Mr.
Kelly had been given a special licence
to seine which enabled him to fish
within the 200 yards limit of the
mouth of the stream flowing from
the lakls lake. Had the lake not
been pronounced salt water this
would have been Impossible.
Incidentally, it was brought out
In the evidence that an Indian had
been fined for taking fisli within
200 yards of the mouth of a stream.
Inspector Williams, during the
hearing of the evidence, took strong
objection to what he thought Mr.
Doyle had said as to his making
bounds. He contended that e\Ir.
Doyle stated was not true nnd knew
it to be so.
Later Mr. Williams found out his
mistake and openly apologized for
what  he said.
The case comes up again on Saturday, when It may be adjourned until
Monday. VV, 10. Fisher appears for
the defendani and L. W. Patmore tor
the prosecution.
Valley South of Prince Rupert Able to
Provide Vegetables and Fruit
for City.
I»r. Clayton  Is  Highly  Pleased  With
Hie Promise of This
Section
Dr. Clayton has just returned from
i trip to Bella Coola, and is enthusiastic over the opportunities that that
rich valley has to offer in an agricultural way.
Dr. Clayton's views interest from
many points of view, particulary considering the arguments that have
been used by the supporters of reciprocity to the effect that not enough
vegetables and fruit can be grown
in the country adjacent to Prince Rupert to supply the demand, thus rendering it imperative that our consumers be supplied from the United
States. Now, as a matter of fact, the
leople of Prince Rupert have for
some time been eating Bella Coola
potatoes. Possibly they have been
marketed as Ashcrofts or some other
high quality potato with a reputation, but the fact remains, large
quantities of potatoes have been shipped from Bella Coola to Prince Rupert.
Within the past year, and during
Dr. Clayton's trip through the valley,
not only has he been convinced, by
the large area of land under cultivation, that every fresh vegetable and
such fruits as plums, apples, strawberries and many others too numerous to mention that are ever likely
to be consumed in Prince Rupert
ean be supplied by these neighbors
in the Bella Coola Valley. True, the
shipping facilities from this inland
point have been somewhat of a handi-
enp, but the Farmers' Association of
the valley will shortly overcome this
obstacle by e-o-operating and establishing a branch in Prince Rupert,
tnus ensuring a constant supply of
fresh fruit and vegetables, and also
poultry and eggs, guaranteed the
equal of, if not superior to, any of
the American importations. About
sixty farmers have acreas of from
five lo fifty acres under cultivation,
some, more.
Dr. Clayton, who was me'l there,
particularly expressed admiration at
ihe extent and quality of development
at the ranch of Samuel Grant. Cucumbers, cabbages, potatoes, carrots,
turnips, beets, beans, vegetable marrow, squash, onions, cauliflower, ete-..
are to be seen growing in huge' quantities, Of sizes and quality much .superior to anything those In Prince
Rupert are accustomed to, and from
ihe remarks of the doctor as to the
way fresh cream and home made preserves disappeared from the table,
the above is no exaggeration.
One splendidly equipped farm is
that of Mr. Jacobson, almost adjoining .Mr. Orant's ranch, with a splendid dwelling house, large barn and
stables, all properly bulli and painted enough to remind one more of a
successful farmer from Ontario or
.Manitoba. There sweetpeas were
growing over eight feet in height.
Many oilier farms or ranches were
Inspected during tlie twenty-five mile
drive from Bella Coola up the valley
to Canoe Crossing, but ll would be
nn Injustice to pass over the Nord-
skow ranch, al Hagensborg, without
special mention. Here Mrs. Nord-
skow, with her five accomplished
daughters, manage a thoroughly up-
to-date, fruit, dairy, vegetable and
poultry farm. A large field of outs,
Willi a second crop this year almost
ripe, was enough He make, the eyes
eif any Canadian glad. For genuine
hospitality, one rarely meets with
their equal. In referring to ihe accomplishments of the daughters as
vocalists and musicians, their repe-
tolre was distinctly high class, espe-
eiaiiy the performance of Miss Ruth
anil Miss Annie WoodskOW on the
organ.
Farmer Fossbnck, who conducted
the doctor's party up to Canoe Crossing, was a genial guide, and much
ihanks, he says, is due to him for
information supplied regarding the
progress since the settling up of the
valley. Any lover of picturesque
scenery will be amp'y repaid by a
trip Up the Bella Coola Valley. Within n few hours' launch ride from the
valley down Ilurke Channel there is
a splendid hot spring, with house and
bath erected. This is much patronized by the seJtlers In. the district.
If you want to spend a holiday go
up the valley of the Bella Coola River and if you do not wax enthusiastic
you are nol human, says the doctor.
\ PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Tuesday, September 19, 1911.
THE HUB OF THE HAZELTON DISTRICT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
ON THE MAIN LINE OF THE GRAND TRUNK PACIFIC
REGISTERED TOWNSITE
THE PROSPERITY OF EVERY GREAT CITY IS DUE TO ITS GEOGRAPHICAL LOCATION
The most important Townsite! The most talked of Townsite along the line of the GRAND TRUNK PACIFIC RAILWAY
NOTICE
New Hazelton Townsite Section 1
Now being offered for sale Is Not a
Grand Trunk Pacific Promotion
Townsite. NIOW HAZELTON Town-
site was selected by the experts of
a syndicate of successful men as the
geographical location for a big city.
They bought the land, realizing the
wonderful resources of the Hazelton
District, the Mines, the Distributing
Centre for liundr.'ds of miles, and
many other reasor s.
We ask you to investigate in your
own way all of the statements in this
advertisement. Should you join us
by buying lots you will know that
your Investment is guarded by every
means known to human foresight,
and the judgment of a body of successful  men  known  to 3*ou  all.
Your profits should eclipse the
story of Edmonton, Calgary, Regina,
Moose Jaw or Prince Rupert.
Don't be classed among the failures who will say, "I wish I had
known." Don't stand idly by and
see your neighbors reap tbe profits
on Real Instate while you reap
nothing but your salary. Put your
savings to work in that sure coining
City—NEW* HAZELTON.
NEW   HAZIOLTON   is   out  of   the
damp belt, and many people who
spend the whole year in the district
say the winters are not severe—
plenty of sunshine and dry air.
Taken from Official Bulletin, B.C.,
No. 22, Page 23: —
"On the Upper Skeena, about a
distance of Tell miles, there are large
tracts of land on both sides of the
river, which, as far as soil and climatic conditions are concerned, I
would consider ideal for successful
growing of fruit as well as for other
brandies of agriculture. Potatoes,
and all garden produce, grow to perfection."
HAVE VOL' CONFIDENCE OF
MERCHANTS ON THE GROUND?
Many Lots already purchased by
(he keenest business men of Hazelton (Old Town). Vou can safely
follow the* judgment eel such men.
NEW HAZELTON should he the
centre of a busy population of thousands within a year. Why not? During the past year there was an average of over I wo new towns created
In the Canadian West every week.
We are all here to share in this
mosl wonderful prosperity.. We offer
you an opportunity to participate In
the progress of the best town for
invest ment on tlie line of tlie Grand
Trunk   Pacific.
MOW HAZELTON Railroads Open
Xew Country.
Railroads have been the great
feature In the growth of Western
Canada.
NEW HAZELTON, located on the
Grand    Trunk    Pacific    Railroad    is
attracting tlie attention of the whole
world, as all important towns do on
the main line of the Grand Trunk
Pacific Railroad.
Stores are going up. Newspaper
plant now moving on the Townsite.
Two or three General Merchandise
Stores, Drug Store! Bank, Restaurants, and in fact many lines of trade
are now arranging to open in NEW
HAZELTON, Section One. Activity is
in that part of the Townsite known
as  Section  One.
The story of NEW HAZELTON is
well known to the public. It is a
iownsite being offered to the public
by successful business men. There is
positively no Railroad Company or
Townsite Promoter financially interested in the hind. Tne owners have
undertaken to make NEW HAZEL-
TON a city of importance in British
Columbia. NEW HAZELTON promises to be the most profitable city
to the Grand Trunk Pacific along its
main lines.
Offices of Foley, Welch & Stewart,
contractors building the Grand Trunk
Pacific Railroad, will be located in
NEW HAZELTON. The Chief Clerk,
Paymaster and Purchasing Agent are
preparing to, anil will, build homes
in NEW HAZELTON, Section One.
NEW* HAZELTON, the hub of the
Hazelton District, will be the natural
headquarters for what promises to
be the most active and sensational
new city in tlie fastest growing part
of the world today on account of
the wonderful Lead, and Zinc Mines,
the Groundhog Mountain Coal Fields,
the Vast Agricultural Country tributary to the coming principal city in
British Columbia on the Grand Trunk
Pacific Railroad.
The Grand Trunk Pacific Railroad
is now running regular trains over
100 miles out of Prince Rupert. The
G. T. P. Officials, and also the
G. T. P. Contractors, say that the
Railroad should be running to Mile
164 this winter, and will reach NEW
HAZELTON next summer. Grading
is now under way as far along the
line as 30 miles east of NEW HAZELTON. The grading is about finished from Prince Rupert to NEW
HAZELTON. Many mines are getting ready to ship ore. Some of the
mines being developed are:—Silver
Cup, American Boy, Silver Standard,
Sunrise and Sunset, Lead King, Erie
Babine.     Most  of  the  ore  in   NEW
INVESTMENTS
Made in towns with the
RIGHT KIND OF COUNTRY
RIGHT KIND OF RESOURCES
RIGHT KIND OF PEOPLE
will surely be big paying
investments. This is the
kind  of town you  find  at
New Hazelton, B.C.
HAZELTON mines is high grade
Silver-Lead, similar to ore in the
Siocan District in East Kootenay,
B. C, aud similar to some ores found
at Leadville, Col.
Buy Lots
TERMS ARE EASY'
Look them over again, and think
of this money making investment.
OUT OF CITV INVESTORS
Can reserve one or more Lots by
wire or letter. State price of Lots
and number required, and we will
make the best available reservation
for you.
Remember NEW HAZELTON is
not a gift Townsite and when you
buy a lot In it you are investing your
money on the business .judgment of
the most successful men in British
Columbin.
NEW HAZELTON Townsite had over
a Quarter of a Million Dollars Invested by a few Business Men before
the Lots were offered for sale. NEW
HAZIOLTON is a Business Man's
Townsite. All the G. T. P. and Local
History was carefully considered.
The Engineer's Reports as to grades,
opportunities for Side Tracks necessary to handle the thousands of
freight cars were examined. Then
they invested in NEW HAZELTON.
They paid in Cash for NEW HAZEL
TON   and   nearby   Lands   over   Two
Hundred and Fifty Thousand Dollars.
That is a wonderful sonnet written
by John J. Ingalls on the subject of
Opportunity, but tbe real fact is.
Opportunity does not knock once on
each man's door. Opportunity plays
a continual anvil on every man's portals—but, of course, if be is knocking nt tbe time he will not bear
Opportunity when she knocks.
Clipping from Omineca Herald,
Saturday, September 9, 1911:—
JUST  ONE  NEW  HAZELTON
THE  SPOKANE OF CANADA
All Interests Combine to Roost the
New Town—Campaign Has Start,
ell—Natural Resources Guarantee a liig Population—Contractors' Headquarters.
The New Hazelton campaign has
started. For the next few months
the very best efforts of some of the
greatest advertising men and real
estate firms in British Columbia will
be devoted to Boosting New Hazelton. The different interests have
combined to make this town one of
the foremost in the province. A careful study has been made by experts
and they are all agreed that there
cannot be too much boosting. The
natural resources are here and they
are now being developed in a way
heretofore unknown. Everything is
now on the move. Mining has this
week had a stimulation that was not
dreamed of. .During the two previous
weeks several big deals were put
through which meant the bringing in
of mining men known the world
over. Agriculture has been very successful this year and the farmers
have had bigger crops than ever.
They are all getting on their feet
and buying machinery as fast as it
can   be   brought   into   the  country.
This week Charles S. Meek, president of Standard Securities, Ltd.,
Vancouver was In town and completed   arrangements   with   the  sur-
PRICES:
BUSINESS LOTS
33x120 (according to location)
Terms one-third cash, balance 1 and 2 years, at 6 per   cent.
$350 to $500 per lot
Prices on Residence lots . _ JblUU   lO   IbOUU
Terms $10 cash; 810 per month; No interest; or one-third cash; balance 1 and 2 years at 6 percent.
Make Cheques, Drafts, Money or Express Orders payable to Northern Interior Land Company, Ltd.
veyors to lay out his company's
property. This work has already
been started and it will be finished
in another ten days.
It is on the Northern Interior
Land Co.'s property that so many
of the old Hazelton- business men
have purchased lots and are prepared
to build, many this fall. It is from
this point that the business section
will start and grow, and where high
values will prevail.
There    will    be    the    one    town
instead of several as might have
been. This means a great deal; in
fact, many hundreds of dollars to
the people of the old town, who have
been wondering where the town
would be. From now on New
Hazelton will be introduced to the
world in a manner that no other
town   can   equal
The gentlemen associated in the
horning of this New Townsite they
now call NEW HAZELTON, paid out
in actual cash before a lot was sold
Over a Quarter of a Million Dollars.
NEW HAZELTON
Where the Grand Trunk Pacific
Railroad has Sixty Acres of right-of-
way and track grounds.
NEW HAZELTON is reported by
Engineers to be the only available
spot In the Skeena or Bulkley Valleys
for many miles each way where it
would be possible to have Railroad
Yards large enough to handle the
Hazelton District's business.
NIOW HAZELTON affords a .long,
nearly level stretch of land suitable
for Immense Yards, which will be
required to handle the thousands of
cars of ore and coal that will be
shipped from the mines in the
Hazelton District.
TheG.T.P.
Capital of Grand Trunk Railway
and the Grand Trunk Railway Systems, $447,808,082,
Over 50,000 Stockholders, G. T.
and G. T. P. Millions of people boost
for Grand Trunk Pacific Townsites.
Maximum grade of G. T. P. is 21
feet to the mile, one-fifth of any
other Trancontinental Railroad in
Canada or the United Slates.
.MOW HAZIOLTON Is the Town
that everybody Is talking about, and
there are no two opinions as to its
opportunities for investments. The
reason is obvious.
NEW HAZELTON Is Situated near
the junction of the Skeena and
Bulkley Valleys.
The Northern Interior Land Co.
Ltd., paid cash for and own (Section One) NEW HAZELTON TOWN.
SITE and guarantee to deliver to
purchasers of lots an Indefeasible
Title upon receipt of final payment.
ADDRESS ALL CORRESPONDENCE TO
NORTHERN INTERIOR LAND CO., Ltd.
Prince Rupert, B.C., P. 0. Box 1515
PRINCE RUPERT OFFICE FOR SALE OF LOTS
JEREMIAH H. KUGLER. LTD.
2nd Avenue Between 5th and 6th Streets Tuesday, September 19, 1911.
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
TBE HALIBUT AND RECIPROCITY
Dear Sir:—In a few days ihe electors will be called upon to vote on the
reciprocity pact, the most important question Canada has faced in years.
As the resources of this northern country and the methods of development
are so little known, a few articles on the fish industry may be acceptable
to the electors. There are many facts connected with the halibut, the
salmon and the whaling business which the public does not know and some
of them may surprise you.
To properly grasp the many phases of the catching and marketing of
the halibut one must first realize that all the fish on the coast of Britisii
Columbia does not belong to Canada. The halibut may be found in what
we claim to be Canadians waters but until such time as our national treaties
recognize them as Canadian waters, the fish caught there by United Stater,
boats must be considered as American fish. In discussing the tariff we
must recognize both Canadian fish and United States fish.
For years the United States fish companies, headed by the New England
Fish Company, have been in control of the halibut industry. Al' these
companies have freezing and shipping plants on the Washington or Alaska
coast harbours, and the greatest of them, the New England Fish Company,
has one in Seattle, one in Kechikan and one in Vancouver. The fish are
caught on the banks of Hecate Straits with bait lines and trawlers, taken
to the freezing plants and from there distributed to the American market.
The New England Fish Company, which is recognized as the best organized
corporation in America, have their own marts all over the United States
and they are unafraid of any competition.
This company operates in Canada under the name of the Canadian Fish
Company, which is all that is left of a Canadian Company which they put
out of business. Their Canadian steamers, the Celestial Empire and the
F'ainingo take Canadian fish to the Vancouver plant, where it is frozen
and shipped to Canadian cities. Tbe same company has three American
bottoms, the Manhattan, the King Fisher and the New England, which take
American fish to Vancouver, where under a special bonding privilege',
secured through the influence of the C. P. R., it is shipped in refrigerator
cars*to the Eastern United States markets. This company has been able
by their magnitude and organization to ship that American fish back into
Canada, pay the cent a pound duty and undersell Canadian companies in
their own market.    Here is the way they are able to do it:
All fresh halibut is shipped in carload lots to Boston. There bulk Is
broken and carloads of mixed fish, composed of Pacific salmon and halibut,
and Atlantic bluefish, mackerel, butterfish, South Carolina shad and many
other varieties of warm water fish not procurable in Canada, are made up
and shipped into Canadian cities. As the western Canadian companies are
only able to ship salmon and halibut, which Canadian cities cannot take
in carload lots, the New England Company can pay the duty, undersell
them and still make money. That has been the experience of numerous
Canadian companies wliich went in and out ot business or were absorbed
by the New England company. This state of affairs was a few years ago
recognized by the Dominion Government, and it was decided to subsidize
Canadian companies by granting a freight rebate on1 all fresh fish shipped
by them to Canadian points. When this was passed the B. C. Packers, a
Canadian company with headquarters in Vancouver, went into the halibut
fishing business and are now operating the steamer Roman for the Canadian market. Their freezing plant is located in New Westminster. There
is also a smaller plant at Claxton, on the Skeena, putting up frozen and
cured fish, most of which goes to the Britisii market.
Such is the condition of the halibut Industry to-day. it is practically
controlled by the big American companies, with the Canadian companies
being subsidized to give them some chance of competing on an even footing.
If reciprocity goes into effect and the duty comes off halibut what will
happen to the Canadian companies? If they need a freight rebate from the
Government now what will they need with reciprocity? The United States
companies will swamp them.
Prince Rupert has been congratulating herself that all the fish companies will move to Prince Rupert as soon as the transcontinental is open.
It is a false hope. The companies now operating have millions invested
in plants just below the.border or in Alaska and they will not discard those
plants and build new ones in a foreign country on the prospects of a reciprocity agreement which may be terminated at any time. They have these
plants already; their markets are profitably organized; and they will not
be tempted to move for the mere benefit of some advantage in transportation. The question of rapid transportation effects only the fresh fish—the
frozen fish is kept, in the plants for weeks and months. Reciprocity will
simply give to our competitors a freer Canadian market in which to dispose
United States fish, or possibly Canadian fish which they will buy from
the smaller concerns who are unable to compete against them. Canadians
cannot hope to enter the United States market and sell at a profit against
such odds as the New England Fish Company, which is really a combination
of fish dealers who distribute their own fish to the consumer. New England
Fish Company shareholders, who are the fish dealers in all the distributing
points in the United States, are not likely to buy from a rival company.
What Canada wants and what Prince Rupert wants is a Canadian
market for Canadian fish. We must not be content with the belief that
our market consists of only eight million people. To-morrow we will have
eighty millibn, and these are the people who are going to buy Canadian
fish from Prince Rupert plants. There is at the present time sufficient
Canadian market for a large halibut plant in Rupert, and the Britisii
market is always open when we have a surplus.
If we figure on stealing the trade of some other city to build up Prince
Rupert we are deceiving ourselves and are going to be disappointed. The
history of every new railroad has been that they have not taken the
trade of the rival road but have created a new trade. This is what we are
going to do in Rupert, providing reciprocity does not kill our chances
before we get under way.
Some prominent Liberals of Rupert must have the same Idea In an
immature state, for rumor has it that certain of them, Including some of
the executive, have the promise of the herring licence in Prince Rupert
harbour. If these men were really wise they would be trying to hold the
big future market of Canada for Canadians, instead of boosting for a pact
that Is giving our markets away..
Canada cannot hope to play the game of free trade in fish with the
United States, for Uncle Sam can deal himself a black-jack every time.
G.  R. T. SAWLE.
Skeena Land  District—District of
Queen Charlotte
"'ARE NOTICE that thirty clays
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince iiupert, B. O, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 040 acres of land on
Graham Island described as- follows;—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the northeast corner
of C.L. 4471; thence east SO chains;
thence south SO chains; thence west
SO chums; thence north SO chains,
to place of commencement.
AUSTIN  M. BROWN.
Dated July 17, 1911.
The Graham Island Oil Fields, Limited.
CAPITAL   STOCK,   $1,000,000.00
We are offering for sale a very limited amount of shares of stock
25 CENTS PER SHARE;  PAR VALUE, $1.00
These shares  are going quickly, and will soon be off the market
The Mack Realty & Insurance Co.
SELLING AGENTS
S'teena Land  district—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply io the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the southeast corner of C.L. 4472; thence west 80
chains; "thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence south
SO chains to place of commencement.
AUSTIN M.  BROWN.
Dated July  17,  1911.       	
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the southeast corner of C.L. 4472; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence soutli
80 cliains to place of commencement.
AUSTIN M.  BROWN.
Dated July  17, 1911.	
Skeena Land  District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. O, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the northeast corner
of C.L. 4471; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east
SO chains; thence north 80 chains to
l.lace of commencement.
AUSTIN  M.  BROWN.
Dated July 17, 1911.
Skeena Land  District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the south corner of
C.L. 4410; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south
SO cliains; tlience east 80 chains, to
place of commencement.
AUSTIN  M.  BROWN.
Dated July  17,  1911.
Skeena Land  District—District  of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing' at post planted
one mile east of the south corner of
C.L.4475; thence north 80 chains;
thence east SO chains; thence south
SO chains; thence west 80 chains to
place of commencement.
AUSTIN M.  BRO..N.
Dated July  17,  1911.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE   NOTICE   that   thirty   days!
from  date,   I,  Austin   M.   Brown,  ofi
Prince Rupert,  B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief j
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect  for coal and  petroleum
on and under' 640 acres of land on
Graham    Island    described    as    foi-1
lows:—Commencing at post planted j
one mile north of the northeast corner   of   C.L.   4477;   thence   west  80
cliains;    thence   south    80    chains;
thence east 80 chains;  thence north
80 chains, to njace of commencement,
AUSTIN  M.  BROWN.
Dated Julv  17,  1911.
Skeena Land  District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE   NOTICE   that,   thirty   days
rrom  date,  I,  Austin  M.  Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to tl t Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and  petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham   Island    described    as   foi-!
lows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the northeast corner i
of C.L. 4474;  thence east 80 chains; !
thence south SO chains;  tbence west
SO chains; tbence north 80 chains, to
place of commencement.
' AUSTIN M.  BROWN.
Dated July  17, 1911.	
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Henry Edenshaw, of
;.'asset, B. C, occupation storekeeper, intend to apply to the Chief Commissioner of Lands for a license to
prospect for coal and petroleum on
and under 640 acres of land on Graham Island described as follows: —
Commencing at a post planted on the
west shore of \i est River, one mile
easterly from the moutli of said river; thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence north 80
chains; tlience west 80 cliains to the
place of commencement.
HENRY EDENSHAW.
Dated July 17,  1911.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Henry Edenshaw, of
Masset, B. C, by occupation storekeeper, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 64 0 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:
—Commencing at a post planted on
the west shore of the West River,
about one mile easterly from the
mouth of said river; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south
80 chains, to place of commencement.
HENRY EDENSHAW.
Dated July 17,  1911.
Skeena    Land    District—District    of
Queen  Charlotte  Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Charles Lamb
of  Blair,   Nebraska,   U.   S.  a.,  occupation farmer, intends to apply for
j i ermission to purchase the following
described  lands:—Commencing  at  a
'post planted about 4 miles west and
4   1-2  miles north  from  the south-
e west corner of Lot 99i; thence south
j SO  chains;   thence  west  80   chains;
'tbence north 80 chains;   i-ience east
I 80 chains to point of commencement;
eontaining 640 acres.
CHARLES LAMB.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated July  10    i911. A-15
j Skeena    Land    District—District    of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE  NOTICE that   llatlie  Sutherland of  Blair,  Nebraska,  V.  S.  A.,
occupation    housewife     intends    to
apply for permission to purchase the
following    described    lands:—Commencing at a I'ost  planted  about  5
miles   west   and   2   1-L'   miles   north
from   the   southwest   corner   of   Lot
991;  thence west 60 chains;  thence
'north    Mi    chains;    thence   east    60
chains;   thence south  su  chains,  to
point  of commencement;  containing
ibout 4S0 acres.
HAl'TIE SUTHERLAND.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated July 16    1911. A-15
Skeena Land  District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows*—Commencing at post planted
at the southeast corner of C.L. 4477; j
thence east 80 chains; thence north
80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains, to place of
commencement.
AUSTIN M.  BROWN.
Dated July  17, 1911.	
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Coast—Range  V.
TAKE NOTICE that Edward H.
Port, of Prince Rupert, B. C, occupation farmer, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following described lands:— Commencing
at a post planted in the South West
Corner, on the shore line of Lake
Lakelse; thence 20 chains East, to
South West Corner of Lot 684;
tlience 30 cliains North, following
along the West line of Lot 684 to
post; thence South, following along
the shore line of said Lake to point
of commencement, containing about
4C acres.
EDWARD H.  PORT,
By C.  N.  Pring, Agent.
Dated June 26,  1911. 6-26
6-26
Skeena   Land    District—District    of
Queen  Charlotte  Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Abram Sutherland of Blair, Nebraska, U. S. A.,
occupation insurance agent, intends
to apply for permission to purchase
the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted about
5 miles west and 2 1-2 miles north
from the southwest corner of Lot
991; thence east 80 chains; tlience
north SO cnains; thence west 80
chains; thence soutli SO chains, to
point of commencement; containing
640 acres.
ABRAM SUTHERLAND.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated July 16,  1911. A-15
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. O, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
at the southeast corner of C.L.4478;
tlience north 80 chains; .uence east
80 chains; i.eence south SO chains;
[thence west 80 chains, to place of
commencement.
AUSTIN M.  BROWN.
Dated July 17,  1911.	
Queen Charlotte Land District—District of Skeena
TAKE NOTICE that S. Barclay-
Martin, Jr., of New' Westminster,
occupation engineer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted at the
northeast corner of ungazetted lot
1428, said lot being T.L. 39979;
thence north and following the
, westerly shore of Massett Inlet SO
chains; thence west 20 chains;
I thence south 80 chains; thence east
40 chains, more or less, to the point
of commencement, and containing
240  acres,  more  or  less.
S.  BARCLAY MARTIN, Jr.
Dated  July  21,  1911. S-8
Skeena   Land   district—District   of
Queen  Charlotte  Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Miriam Hal-
ler of Blair, Nebraska, U. S. A., occupation housewife, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted abort 5 miles
west and 1 1-2 miles north from
the southwest corner of Lot 991;
thence east SO chains; thence north
80 cnains; thence west 80 chains;
tlience south 80 chains, to point of
commencement; containing 640
acres.
MIRIAM   HAULER.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated July  16.  1911. A-15
Skeena Land  District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. O, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the southeast corner of C.L. 4470; thence east SO
chains; thence north SO chains;
thence west SO chains,; thence south
80 chains, to place of commencement.
AUSTIN M.  BROWN.
Dated July 17, 1911.
Skeena Land  District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE   NOTICE   that   thirty   days
from  date,   I,  Austin   M.   Brown,  of
Prince.Rupert,  B.  C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on (
I Graham    Island    described    as    foi-;
lows:—Commencing at post  planted!
at the southeast corner of C.L. 4467;
thence north SO chains;  thence east;
SO chains;   tlience south  SO chains;'
ihence west  80  chains,  to  place  of'
commencement.
AUSTIN*  M.   BROWN.
Dated July 17, 1911.	
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, b. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the northeast corner
of C.L. 4469; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east
80 chains; thence north 80 chains,
to place  of  commencement.
AUSTIN M.  BROWN.
Dated July 17, 1911.
Skeena Land  District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, Intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the northeast corner
of C.L. 4469; thence east 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence west
80 chains; thence north 80 chains to
place of commencement.
AUSTIN M.  BROWN.
Dated July 17, 1911.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. O, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the southeast corner
of C.L. 447.e; thence west 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence east
80 cnains; the:.ce south 80 chrins,
to place of commencement.
AUSTIN  M.  BROWN.
Dated July 17, 1911.     '
Skeena Land  District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE   NOTICE   that   thirty   days
from  date,   I,  Austin  M.   Brown,  of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief j
Commissioner of Lands for a license!
to prospect for coal and petroleum j
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham    Island    described    as    follows:—Commencing at post planted
at the southeast corner of C.L. 4465;
thence north 80 chains;  thence east
SO chains;   thence south SO chains;
thence west  80  chains,  to place of
commencement.    ,
AUSTIN M.  BROWN.
Dated July 16, 1911. 	
Skeena   Land   District — District   of
Queen   Charlotte   Islands
TAKE   NOTICE   that   W.   G.   Mc-j
Morris of the City of Vancouver in !
the   Province   of   British   Columbia, j
occupation, broker,  intends to apply i
for permission  to purchase the foi- j
lowing described  lands: — Commencing at a posl  planted  on an  Island
in  Skidegate  Inlet  about  500  yards j
east from the mouth of Slate Chuck !
Creek, separated from the mainland
of    Graham    Island    at    high    tide;
thence  soulh   tliree   chains;   thence!
east ten chains;  thence north three |
chains;   thence   west   ten   cliains   to
point, of  commencement,  containing
two acres, more or less.
W. G. MCMORRIS,
Dated   July   29,   1911.       Locator.
Skeena Land  District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Henry Edenshaw, of|
Masset, B. O, by occupation store-1
keeper, intend to apply to the Chief,
Commissioner of Lands for a license'
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under u<0 acres of land on j
Graham Island described as follows:.
Commencing at a post planted on the:
bank of west River, about one mile'
easterly from the mouth of said river; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80 j
cliains; thence ne-th 80 chains, to
place of commencement.
HENRY EDENSHAW.
Dated July 17, 1911.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Henry Edenshaw, ofi
Masset, B. C, by occupation store-1
keeper, intend to apply to the Chief!
Commissioner of Lands for a llcensej
to prospect for coal and petroleum on j
and under 640 acres of land on Gra-|
ham Island described as follows: —,
Commencing at a post, planted on thej
west shore of West Liver, about one j
mile easterly from the mouth of said,
river; thence nortli SO chains; thence!
west 80 chnlns; thence south 80
1'hains; thence east SO chains, to
place of commencement'.
HENRY EDENSHAW.      I
Dated July 17, 1911.
Skeonn Land District—District of
of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that James G.
Crombie, of Prince Rupert, occupation auditor, intends to apply for
permission to purchase tbe following
described lands:— Commencing at a
post planted at the northwest corner, 55 chains east and 20 chains
south from northeast corner of Lot
1116 (Horry Survey), Coast Dist.,
range 5; thence 20 chains east;
thence 25 chains, more or less,
south to Angus McLeod Pre-emption; thence 20 chains west; thence,
25 chains, more or less, north, to
post of commencement, containing]
50 acres, more or less.
JAMES  G.   CROMBIE.
Fred  Bohk-n, Agent.
Dated June 14,  1911.               6-23 ;
 |
Skeena    Land    District—District    of
Coast—Range  V.
TAKE  NOTICE   that     I,    Joseph \
Pastl,  of  Watson,  Sask.,  occupation
farmer,  intend  io apply  for permission  to purchase the    following de-j
scribed lands:— Commencing    at   a,
post planted about    30 c, alns In a[
northerly direction  from  tbe    N.  E. j
corner of Lot No.  2662 or T. L. No. \
32598 at Lakelse Lake; thence northj
20 chains;  thence east    40    chains;
thence south  20 chains along shore!
of  Lakelse  Lake;   thence  west    40
chains to point  of    commencement, i
containing  120  acres,  more  or  less.
JOSEPH PASTL.
George Hlr, Agent.
Dated  May  6,  1911. 6-2
Prince
Rupert   Private
Agency
Detective
Skeena    Land    District—District    of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that James Mullin
of Murdo, South Dakota, occupation
farmer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following de-
Bcribed lands;—Commencing at a
post planted about I 1-2 miles west
and 1 1-2 miles north from the southwest corner of Lot 991; tnence east
40 chains; thence soutli SO chains;
Ihence west 40 cliains; thence north
SO chains, to point of commencement; containing 320 acres.
JAMES  MULLIN.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated July  16    1911. A-15
Skeena    Land    District—District    of
Queen  Charlotte  Islands
TAKE NOTICE thai Belle Lamb
of Blair, Nebraska, occupation housewife, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post plained about 4 miles west and
I 1-2 miles north from the southwest corner of Lol 991; thence north
80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south SO chains; Ihence east
80 chains, to polnl of commencement;  containing 640 acn s.
BELLE  LAMB.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated  July  16,  1911. A-15
Skeena    Land    District—District    of
Coast—Range  V.
TAKE NOTICE that I, Charles
Percy Hickman, of Naas Harbour,
occupation constable, intend to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:— Commencing at a post planted on the
east shore of Naas Bay, about two
miles in an easterly direction from
Lot 3, marked C. P. H., S. W. corner; thence east 20 chains; tlience
north 40 chains to the shore; thence
along the shore line to the place of
commencement, containing 40 acres,
more or less.
CHARLES PRECY  HICKMAN.
Dated June 7,  1911, 6-30
Skeena  Land  District—District
of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that Victor H.
Reynolds, of Hull, Massachusetts, occupation chauffeur, Intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described land:—Commencing at a post planted nt high water
mark on tho northerly Bide of the
entrance to a small unnamed cove on
the west coast of Pitt Island, about
one-quarter mile south of the entrance to Kltkatla summer village;
thence east forty chains; thence
Bouth twenty chains; thence west
forty chains; thence north ten
chains more or less to high water
mark; thence following along high
water mark around the head of the
cove back to the commencement, nnd
containing sixty (60) aires more or
less.
VICTOR H.  REYNOLDS.
J. H. Plllsbury, Agent.
Dated Feb. 18th, 1911.
N. McDonnlil,  Manager
All kinds of legitimate detective work
handled   for  companies  and  Individuals.     Business  strictly  confidential
P. O. Box HI):l — Phone 210
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prompt attention.   Phone No   68. PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Tuesday   September 19, 1911.
I>
prince IRupett journal
Telephone  138
Published twice a week on Tuesdays and Fridays from the office of
publication, Third Avenue, near
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Subscription rate to any point in
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Editor.
CLOSING RALLY
Tomorrow night the electors of Prince Rupert will be given an
opportunity to hear George H. Cowan, who represented Vancouver
in tbe House of Commons last parliament. Mr. Cowan is exceedingly well informed and should be beard by all who can secure
a place in Melntyre Hall.
H.   S.  Clements,   the  next  member   for   Comox-Atlin,
be heard in his closing address for the campaign.
will   also
Tuesday   September 19,  1911.
EXCELLENT CANDIDATE
As the political campaign draws to
a e'lose the Conservative parly In
Comox-Atlin are' more and more
gratified   at   the   magnificent   tight
which Mr. Clements has put up
throughout the riding. He is spending the last days of tlie campaign in
Prince Rupert alter a strenuous
contest owing to the immense distances to be covered.
With every assurance that he will
be elected, however, Mr, Clements is
finishing the e'ontest with the same
spirit  he  showed  on  the  start.
When he goes to Ottawa as a supporter of Mr. Borden, who seems
now assured of victory at the polls,
Comox-Atlin will be ably .represented. All friends of good government
should lend their every effort to give
Mr. Clements a good round majority.
William .Manson, the member for Skeeua in the legislature, will
also address the meeting, which will be a grand closing rally to
a most vigorous campaign.
*. * -:
t    AMONG THE POLITICIANS
* * * * * ** * * * * * * * * * * * * * ** * * * *
Rig Things In Canada
at
DISCREDITED TACTICS
The tactics employed by the Liberal organ in the city in the present
campaign have been despicable. The
adoption of such a line of action,
where misrepresentation is employed
continuously in connection with politics, is happily becoming less frequent. It has been left to the local
organ of the Liberal party to revive
a style of political battle that has
for the most part been relegated to
oblivion long ago. Public opinion
frowns down the taking of such liberties with common sense and the
vast majority, while realizing that
every legitimate advantage must be
taken of an opponent during a political contest, demands that nothing
shall -be done that is manifestly unfair.
In the present campaign tlie News
seems to have proceeded upon the
principle that anything is fair in
politics and has stooped to tactics
that have reflected anything but
credit upon thai paper. The day
of reckoning is coming, however,
and the party that allows such
methods need not complain if it reaps
the whirlwind.
a
PERSONAL  APPEAL
Sir Wilfrid Laurier and his supporters have now forgotten everything else in tlie campaign but the
catching of votes by any appeal possible. In consequence, the leader of
the. Liberal party is appealing on his
own persona'ity very largely—all
that is left on which to appeal.
It Is his "white plume" and his
years of service that are being made
to play the mosl Important part in
this tight. As an evidence of this
there stands the fact that Sir Wilfrid is himself contesting three seats,
hoping thereby to win where one of
less importance in the party could
not hope to do so. Such a course
is also an acknowledgment that many
of his main supporters, members of
Ills government, are going down to
defeat and in the hope that lie may
save himself in power he is providing
for the bye-elections.
There is now little question that
the government is doomed. Sir Wil-
friel will go down to defeat and be
succeeded by R L. Borden at the
bead of a strong Conservative government.
EDITORIAL NOTES
.1.
rider
I, Cowper is apparently a better
than   he  Is a political  speaker.
Professor Odium of Vancouver
a meeting recently held, said:
"This is the day of big things in
Canada. The day of great changes;
lhe day of mighty progress. Canada
has an era of prosperity unsurpassed
in the history of western ations, and,
I think, in the history of the world;
and having that it is worth looking
into the causes."
Proceeding, the speaker said he
was going to refer to the opinion of
the greatest man on the continent at
tlie latter part of the last century—
Bismarck. There was a time, he
said, when old Prussia was a free
trade county, but when it passed into
tiie new form it was decided to build
up a new system of trade and eco
nomics. Bismarck, said the speaker,
referred to the country being a dumping ground for other nations' articles
and contended that that was obstructing progress, and that a measure of
protection was necessary for the upbuilding of the country's trade.
That, the speaker contended, was
the basis of the whole matter. Quoting from an American publication,
he read an article in which it was
averred that reciprocity would stop
tne lead of 'American capital to Canada. Ho instanced the millions of
American capital that had been put
into Canadian industries of recent
years, and contended that it was this
that the Americans hoped to stop
through reciprocity. By getting
Canada's raw material, the United
States would be able to keep their
capital home and spend it in building
up industries there. He also quoted
President Taft as stating that the
Tnited States would sell more agricultural products to Canada than
Canada would sell to the United
States.
He proceeded to ouch on another
phase of the question, by referring
to the favored nation treaty. He
pointed out that in entering into the
reciprocity pact with the United
States, Canada would have to give
ihe same treatment to tlie twelve
other nations that came in under the
favored nations treaty.
The keenest competitor against
Canada in the markets of the world,
he reminded his audience, is the
United States, which is competing
against Canada in the ratio of ten
to one, so of course, she got the
advantage. It.was like a tug of 1war,
with ten men on the one side and
only one on the other, and, of course,
the ten men pull the one.
"Therefore," he continued, "we
are putting ourselves, if we adopt the
reciprocity pact, In the position of
dealing with men who stand in. the
ratio of ten to one with us, and with
this great difference, that they are
after our country and our raw products, and we are not after their raw
products, because we don't want
them."
"The treaty is, heads 1 win, tails
you lose.' lie remarked, amid
laughter.
Ih. contended that protection had
bulll up the prosperity of Canada,
and that reciprocity would cause
Canada's trade to be diverted to the
south Instead of going east and west
over our own lines of railroads. "Are
yon ready for that?" he asked. "Is
that the thing you are wanting?"
lie concluded by saying:  "We are
****************** **********
Ferguson's
willing to he friends with tlie United
States,  but we want to  handle  our
own business in our own way."
Laurier Hurts  Laurier
Among the influences Sir  Wilfrid
Laurier as an advocate of reciprocity
has to combat are those of his own
speeches from  1899 onward to practically the present year. Before 1S96
he,  with  other  Liberal  leaders,  was
an advocate of reciprocity with  the
United  Statis, even if it was to be
unrestricted and to apply to all the
products   of   the  two  countries.     In
1S96 he came into power at Ottawa
and  almost  immediately  took  steps
to  secure  what  he  had  long  advo-,
cated.     Reciprocity was  among  the ! *
matters  discussed  at  his  suggestion
hy the Joint High Commission which
met  under  the  presidency  of  Lord
Herscbell in the autumn of 1898.   In
his efforts to obtain what he thought
would be a boon, Sir Wilfrid Laurier
with    Sir   Richard    Cartwright,    Sir
Louis Davis and Mr. John Charlton,
twice   journeyed   to   Washington,   in
November, 1898, and January, 1899.
There was a feeling of real relief in
the country when, after many months
of negotiations and adjournments, it
was intimated that the whole thing
was off.    The people of Canada had
thought much after the defeat of the
unrestricted reciprocity movement in
1891, and their thinking made them
them   feel,   that,   situated    as    their
country was, they would be best off,
nationally     and     industrially,     by
plouging their own furrow.    Liberals
as  well  as  Conservatives  joined   In
this.    It is doubtful if ever the failure of a government effort in Canada
caused so little regret or so general
satisfaction as that of the ministers
of  1S98-9  to get what they  desired
in the matter of trade agreement at
Washington.    So plain was the situation  and  so evident  the satisfaction
that things were to remain as they
were thai Sir Wilfrid Laurier himself
fell  in  with  the current  of  opinion,
in many places and on many occasions  he  put  himself on  record   In
favor of what was for a Liberal leader  a   new   dispensation.     He  was   a
Canada for the Canadians man, and
a believer in Britisii rather than United  States  trade  connections.     Here
is a quotation from a speech he made
as  leader  of  the government  in  the
House   of   Commons,   on   eVlarch   21,
1899:
"If we know the hearts and minds
of our people at present, I think 1
am not making too wide a statement
when I say that the general feeling
in Canada today is not in favor of
reciprocity. There was a time when
Canadians, beginning with the honorable gentleman himself, would
have given many things to obtain
the American market; there was a
time not long ago when the market
of the great cities of the Union was
the only market we had for any of
our products. But, thank heavens!
those days are past and over now.
We are not dependent upon the American market as we were at one
time."
SCOTCH
WHISKEY
in the World
*
Sole Agents for British Columbia
CLARKE BROS.
Nclntyre Block,       3rd Ave.
Phone 39
P.O. BOX 319
K************* **** **** ***.* *
Then lie went to show that Canada needed no outside nation's favor
and could stand alone. It was his
declaration of Independence of the
country with which he had long desired to be associated, in a trade way
ut least. This country was pleased,
and there is little doubt thnt the
attitude he thus took helped him In
the subsequent parliamentary election. He evidently perceived that liu
was on the right national track, for
he kept in it. He was still following
it and calling attention to the fact
in 1907. when speaking before the
Canadian Club at Ottawa, in the pres-
'ence of Mr. Bryce, the Britisii minister at Washington, he was thus reported:
"I have seen, and you have all
seen, in an American newspaper published in New York just a few days
ago, that we are yearning for reciprocity with the United States. Now
1 tell you that the editor of that
paper is about twenty-five years behind the times. At that time we
would have given our right arm for
such a thing, but it is now a thing of
the past. We have in 1907 a changed
condition of things. We are turning our holies towards the old Motherland. We have introduced the doctrine and the policy of a preference
to Great Britain and towards all the
Britisii Empire, and this is the policy
by which we stand at the present
time. Not for my part that I do
not value the American trade, not
for my part that I do not value all
we would have to gain if our rela-
tionsn were on a better footing, but
this is a matter on which we shall
have no more pilgrimages to Washington, and this is simply the message 1 have to convey to your guest
guest tonight."
That also met the approval of the
Canadian people, and, like the previously quoted utterance, undoubtedly helped him In the parliamentary
election of the following year.
The British Columbia Company
LIMITED.
AUTHORIZED CAPITAL $100,000.::  PAID UP CAPITAL $41,500
DIRECTORS:—Reginald C. Brown, President; J. C. Maclure, Vice-
President; H. E. Marks, Managin g Director; Capt. E. Nash, William
McNair, R. A. Bevan, and F. C.   Williams, Secretary.      :-:      :-:
INTEREST 4 PER CENT. DEPOSITS
This Company acts as Executors, Administrators, Transferees and
Secretaries to Public Companies.   Commercial, Industrial and other
business propositions underwritten.    Issues made on  the
London and New Tork Stock Exchanges.
TIMBER, COAL, LANDS, and
COMPANY ORGANIZATION
Head Office for Canada, 203, 208, 210, 215 Carter-Cotton Building,
VANCOUVER, B.C.
The Staneland Co. Ltd
•IS THE-
Paint Supply House
of British Columbia
ALL GOODS ARE GUARANTEED
WRITE FOR PRICES AND SAMPLES
The Staneland Co. Ltd
836-840 Fort Street, VICTORIA, B.C.
Replenish
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EVERYTHING CLEAN AND FRESH
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S MERRYFIELD'S
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L—..»—..„„.„.
'I
i
i
i
i
When, in 1911, Sir Wilfrid Laurier finds that opinion is going contrary to his views on reciprocity, the
cause, in part at least, is due to his
own work. If for ten years be sought
to join in and lead and profit by
tbe sentiment that was making Canada commercially independent and
self-reliant he must expect to lose
when, without warning end wlthout-
renson given, lie reverses his attitude anil seeks support for a policy
he publicly deprecated and the majority of his fellow-countrymen bad
come to regard as dangerous as well
as unnecessary to their national,
commercial and Industrial well-being.
Sir Wilfrid Laurier could not have
been sincere when be spoke as quoted above and ns he spoke on many
other occasions, and so be sincere
now in advocating tlie first step towards the obliteration, so far ns
trade is concerned, of the boundary
between Canada and the United
Stntes. In this campaign lhe Laurier of lhe pasl hurts the Laurier of
today.
2nd Avenue
Prince  Rupert,
B.C.
Real
Estate
INVESTMENTS
Real
Estate
List Your
Properties
with
Uncle Jerry
JEREMIAH H. KUGLER
He Sells Buildings He Sells Contracts
He has Houses to Rent
He Buys Lots He Builds Homes
He Buys Leases He Loans Money
He Has Farms for Sale
He Sells Houses He Rents Stores
SUM
JEREMIAH H. KUGLER
Special Bargains in
KITSELAS LANDS
FRANCOIS LAKE LANDS
LAKELSE LANDS
HAZELTON   DISTRICT   LANDS
SAND,   GRAVEL   AND   MARBLE   DEPOSITS
BULKLEY VALLEY LANDS
KISPIOX VALLEY LANDS
PORCHER  ISLAND  LANDS
KITSUMKALUM   LANDS Tuesday, September 19, 1911.
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
**************************
!   MARINE NEWS   I
* *
* *
**************************
CANCELS LICENCE
The certificate of Albert A. Sears,
master and part owner of the wrecked steamer Iroquois, is cancelled, the
certificate of Mate John Isbister Is
suspended for six months and the
certificate of Engineer William
Thomson is suspended for nine
months according to the findings of
the court of marine enquiry handed
down in the admiralty court.
With respect to the captain, the
finding says that the harsh comments on his conduct after reaching
shore were not justified by the evidence. Yet, he failed to perform his
duty in regard to rescue work and in
regard to the stowage of the cargo,
and also failed in his abality as a
seaman and a master.
With respect to Jihn Isbister, the
court finds he was incompetent, and
recommends that at the expiration
of the six months' suspension of his
certificate he should be required to
satisfy the examiner of masters .^nd
mates of a sufficient knowledge of
stowing cargo. The court says that
the period of suspension would have
been extended had it not been for the
work done by isbister in saving life
after the wreck.
With respect to William Thompson, the finding says he left the
engine room while the engines were
iu motion before circumstances warranted his doing so.
The wreck is held to have occurred
through negligence In the stowing of
cargo. The drop window sashes are
condemned and the lifeboats are held
to have been improperly inspected.
Inspector Kinglioni is blamed for
not having insisted on alterations to
the boats.
NEW  MISSION  IIOAT
The new steamer to be built for
Methodist Coast' Mission will have a
length of 85 feet, a beam of 17 feet,
and a draught of 7 feet. The engines
will be equipped for oil burning, and
.will cost $10,0000. She will have
five staterooms in addition to the
usual galley and crew's quarters. At
least one of the staterooms will be
equipped as a hospital ward. Like
the Homespun, she will be schooner
rigged, and will carry canvas for use
in the more open waters of the northern coast. Her frame will be of oak,
and her deck houses of hardwood.
Her bows will sheer forward instead
of following clipper lines. She will
be constructed at Vancouver, and
will be ready for work by December 1. The commander of the new
vessel will be Captain H. Oliver, now
of the Homespun, and he will be succeeded on the present boat by Capt.
H. J. Woodward, at present acting
chief engineer on the Homespun.
PACKERS' ESTIMATE
Total Pack Nearly as Large as Last
Year—Sockeycs  Show   Rig
Dropping Off
• * Now that the canning season for
1911 is practically over, packers are
engaged in figuring out what the
total pack for Britisii Columbia will
be. Some of the Fraser River men
estimate that it will amount close on
to 750,000 cases and that the season
in comparison to last year will not
be as unsuccessful as it was first
.. thought. In 1910 the canneries of
this province put UP 762,201 esses
of salmon, but the sockeye catch was
far larger than  this  season.
The sockeyes, which are the most
valuable of the salmon tribe, have
been scarce this year and the total
catch amounts to but 365,000 cases,
in comparison to 566,000 cases last
season. One hundred nnd thirty-five
thousand cases ,were put up on the
Fraser Inst year, but this season the
canneries packed but 60,000. The
spring, humpbacks and cohoes will
more than equal the output of the
sockeye.
Allowing n pack of 750,000 cases
of all kinds of salmon, for the year
1911, the output Ihis year will be
in excess of that of 1907, the year In
the four-cycle period of salmon runs
which corresponds with the present
season. In 1907 the total of all kinds
of salmon packed was 547,459 cases,
which gives a balance of 200,000
cases in favor of this year.
The estimated pack of sockeyes in
Britisii Columbia this year is as follows: Skeena River, 120,000 cases;
Fraser River, 60,000 cases; Naas,
32,000; Low Inlet, 13,000'; Namu,
5,000; River's Inlet, 87,0000; Smith
Inlet, IS,000; Alert Bay, 4,000;
Knight Inlet, 1,500; Quathiaski
Cove, 1,500; Alberni, 7,000; Clay-
oljuot, 6,000; Work Island, 2,000.
Total, 365,000 cases
The present week, it is asserted*,
will witness the end of the packing
season on tiie Fraser River. Last
week a number of the canneries on
the Fraser shut down and those
plants   which  are  still  running  are
making preparations to close. The
river Is reported to be full of humpbacks but the quality of the fish Is
not, it is asserted, by any means first
class. The packing of cohoes is now-
proceeding in the north.
 o	
FIRST    PULP    .MILL
Swanson liny Plant Is New in Operation—Ilritish  Columbia's  Great
Advantages  for Pupcrniaking
"British Columbia, the last resort
of the papermaker," Is the enthusiastic description of James Wood, the
general manager of Swanson Bay
Forests, Wood, Pulp and Lumber
Mills, Ltd., In Vancouver.
The Swanson Bay concern is the
first of its kind to operate a pulp
mill in this province, and it was only
a few days ago that the first "cook"
of the pulp mill went through the
digester, marking almost a mile post
in British Columbia's industrial history.
Mr. Wood came to this province
from the Old Country about eighteen
months ago and since then he has
made many and expensive alterations
in the plant. The early pioneers of
the undertaking went along with
more good will than system and when
Mr. Wood was placed in the position
of general mapager it was with the
understanding that he should put the
mills in working shape, and this he
has accomplished, for the plant Is
now complete and Is reported to represent the last word in paper pulp
manufacture,
"Owing to the great size of timber on the Pacific Coast," says Mr.
Wood, "the ordinary pulp mill practice had to be varied and the company had to put in a band mill and
auxiliary saw mill machinery in order
to break down the big logs into such
size as would come within the compass of a pulp mill to handle. The
saw mill is working in full blast now,
breaking down logs for the pulp mill
and the pulp mill is in full working
order and the first cook went
through the digester just a few days
ago. The whole establishment is in
first class mechanical order and a
full clew of 200 men s working in-
e'essantly. The old stock of lumber
and pulp is now being entirely disposed of and the company has orders
for 1,500 tons of pulp for the American market and has already disposed
of one-half of its high grade lumber
output. The plant at present Is capable of a 30-ton daily production,
but will be enlarged before very long.
"Given time and patience and capital there is no doubt but that British
Columbia with its immense resources
of spruce forests is the last resort
of the papermaker, and provided the
government of British Columbia will
paternally encourage the pulp and
paper industry, those who are yet
living will see a development in the
paper trada so great as to be appalling. We have the raw material,
we can command the expert's skill.
What we lack is capital, and it will
be a thousand pities if the capital
which is required to develop such an
Industry shall have to come from
any other B.Mrltish pockets."
 o	
LEAVE FOR OLD LAND
The proposed torn* of a Calgary
team through Great Britain this season seems assured. The team will
leave Calgary for the Old Country on
the 23rd of the month. Several British Columbia players will be on the
team. In addition to Melville and
Dyke of, the Vancouvers, who went
through to Calgary earlier in the
summer, Andy McLean, ArnOld of
the Celtics and Billy MeOulre of Victoria are wanted.    All expenses are
Dent Gloves
We have secured, direct
from tlie manufacturer, the
selling agency for this very
superior line of Gloves, thus
saving the jobber's profit, and
can sell them very much
cheaper than they are ordinarily sold for. A portion of
our stock has just arrived, Including Men's Tan Dressed and
Mocha Undressed Kids, both
lined and unllned.
Cadet Tan and - Mochas,
Suede and Full Dress In men's
sizes, as well as a complete
line of Wool Lined and Wool
Gloves and Mitts for winter
use. Remember, we buy these
direct and sell them for
less than they are ordinarily
sold for.
SLOAN & CO.
Sixth  St. Alder ISIk
PRINCE   RUPERT
LABOR -MAN'S VIEW
William Davidson, ex-M.P.P.
for Siocan, now organizer for
the Western Federation of Miners is in the city. Mr. Davidson
was elected for Siocan to the
legislature a few years ago as
a labor candidate.
Speaking of reciprocity, he
says he cares little about it one
way or the otlier. The cry of
cheaper supplies, even if it resulted from reciprocity, Is not
any great boon to be sought.
As a representative of labor, he
says cheap supplies is nothing
to be sought. With that goes
lower wages, and the working
man is better off on high wages
and high living as a general
thing. He is able to get more
out of the wages paid.
guaranteed the players, but there
will be no salary. McLean and Arnold have signified their Intention of
going along with the team, but
whether McGuire will travel is uncertain. The Calgary team has been
assured of matches with quite a number of first-league teams in both
England and Scotland, and the tour
should be a great success.
Miss Unwin of the city hall staff
will be given a two weeks' holiday.
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S.S. PRINCE JOHN for Port Simpson, Nans and Stewart, Wcdnes-
days, 1 P. M.    For Masset and Naden Harbor, Thursdays, 12
P. M. For Skidegate, Hose Harbor, etc., Saturday, 1 P. M.
RAILWAY SERVICE TO COPPER    RIVER,    mixed    trains from
Prince  Rupert  Mondays,  Wednesday and  Saturdays,  1  P. M.;
returning Tuesdays, Thursdays and Sundays, 4 P. M.
THE GRAND TRUNK RAILWAY  SYSTEM,   connecting   with
trains from the Pacific Coast, operates a frequent and convenient
service of luxurious trains over its DOUBLE TRACK route between
Chicago, Toronto, Montreal, Quebec,   Halifax,     Portland,     Boston,
New York and Philadelphia.
Atlantic Steamship bookings arranged via all lines
Full information and tickets obtained from the office of
a. e. Monaster
Freight and Pasenger Agent, G. T.  P.  Wharf.
The Thompson
Hardware Co.
—Second Avenue—
Paints. General Hardware,    • >
Oils, Stoves and Ranges.
THE WESTHOLME LUMBER GO.
LIMITED
We handle all kinds of
Building Supplies
First Avenue Telephone 180
YOU ARE SURE OP
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The Canadian Fairbanks Co., Ltd.
101-107 WATER 8TREET      .
Local Agent—F. M. DAVIS      -
VANCOUVER, B. C.
- PRINCE RUPERT
**************************************************i
GROUND
V
■*>
I   Floor Space For Rent
| IN THE
I    HART BUILDING
I Corner of Second Avenue and Sixth Street
V
J»
t   The Best Business Corner in
Prince Rupert
I Jermiah H. Kugler, Ltd.
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Q
^^
The
World's Greatest
Highway
Let us plan your
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast, Range 5.
TAKE NOTICE that T. H. Hughes,
of Lakelse Valley, occupation farmer,
intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted at the southeast corner of Lot
4128; thence 40 chains north; thence
40 chains east; thenc-3 40 chains
soutli; tlience 40 chains west to point
of commencement, and containing
ICO acres, more or less.
TOM HUGH HUGHES.
Dated June 5,  1911.
Skeena   Land   District—District
of Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that Thomas Stewart, of Prince Rupert, occupation
accountant, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted 40 chains north from
the southwest corner of Lot 1733;
tlience west 40 chains; thence south
40 chains; thence east 40 chains;
thence nortli 40 chains to point of
commencement.
THOMAS  STEWART.
John  Kirkaldy, Agent
Dated July 7, 1911.
WATER  NOTICE
Trip East
NOTICE is hereby given that an
application will be made under Part
V of the "Water Act, 1909," to obtain a licence in the Queen Charlotte
Islands Division of Skeena District.
(a) The name, address and occupation of the applicant—Orland P.
Merrill; Massett, Graham Island,
B. C.j prospector.
(If for mining purposes) Free Miner's Certificate No	
(b) The name of the lake,
stream or source (if unnamed, the
description is)—Ain Lake and Ain
River.
(c) The point of diversion—At
or near Ain Lake.
(d) The quantity of water ap-
f.lieei for (in cubic feet per second)
—700.
(e) Tlie^ character of the proposed
works -Ham, flume, pipe line and
power plant,
(i) The- ;:':' OS on v. ii li I o
water is to be used (<U .-.•..'.,.• s_ t
—Near mouth of Ain River.
(g)    The purposes  for  '..'..: -h  I
water  is  to     be     used—Geijc ■*■•'.
power.
(h)    If for irrigation, de.-- ■■ "
land to be irrigated,  giving acre. ;.•
OR TO
Europe
We like to answer enquires,
Agent  for nil  Atlantic lines.
Call on or write:
.1. Q. McNAB,
General  Agent.
Excursions!
Let us tell you all about the cheap
ROUND TRIP EXCURSIONS
to all Towns and Cities In Eastern
Canada  and  United  States
Via
The Great Northern
Choice of Return  Route
Tickets to tlie Old Country by all
Lines. Take any Steamer from
Prince Rupert.
ROGERS STEAMSHIP AGENCY
Phone 110 Second Ave
Prince Rupert, B.C.
Free Employment
Office
(I) If the water is to be used for
power or for mining purposes, describe the place where the water is
to be returned to some natural channel, and the difference in altitude
between point of diversion and point
of return—Near mouth of Ain River
about 150 feet below point of diversion.
(j) Area of Crown land intended
to be occupied by the proposed
works— About 10 acres.
(k) This notice was posted on
tlie tenth day of June, 1911, and application will be made to the Commissioner on the fourth day of September, 1911.
(I) Give the names and addresses
of any riparian proprietors or li-
censees who or whose lands are
likely to be affected by the proposed
works, either above or below the
outlet—None.
(Signature)  ORLAND P.  MERRILL,
(P.  O.  Address)   Masset,  B.   C.
George S. Mayer, Agent,
(P. O.  Address)   Masset, B.  C.
Note—One cubic foot per second
Is equivalent to 35.71 miner's inches.
For all kinds of help. Cooks, waiters, dishwashers, hotel porters, all
kinds of laborers or mochanlcs, call
up 178 or cnll at  Ihe
FREE EMPLOYMENT OFFICE
GRAND HOTEL
Headquarters for Cooks and Walters
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that I, John If.
Rochester, of Prince Rupert, occupation broker, intend to apply f*r permission to lease the following de-
scribed land:— Commencing at a
post planted on the northerly end of
an island in (he Skeena River about
Mile 45 on Ihe Grand Trunk Pacific
Railway; thence north 1000 feet
more or less to low water mark;
ihence westerly along tlie low water
mark 1000 feet more or less;
tlience southerly 10no feet more or
less; thence easterly 10 00 feet to
the place of commencement.
.7. Y. ROCHESTER.
Dated May 30, 1911. C-2
ROGERS & BLACK
Wholesale Dealers In
BUILDING  MATERIAL,    CEMENT.
LIME,   HAIR-FIBRE PLASTER
COKE, BLACKSMITH COAL,
COMMON BRICK, PRESSED BRICK
.SHINGLES AND LATH
NEW   WELLINGTON   COAL
All   orders   promptly   filled—see   u>
for prices.
PHONE 1111 PHONE 11(1
Skeena    I,anel    District—District    of
Coast—Range V,
TAKE NOTICE that T. M. Turner,
of LaKelse Valley, occupation farmer, Intends to apply for permission
tee purchase the following described
lands: — Commencing at n post
planted em the Omineca & Hazelton
right nf way anil adjoining the N, E.
corner nf l.eet. 518; thence west 17
chains tee corner of Lot 3990; thence
north 20 ehains; thence following
rlghl eif way to peeint of commencement.
T. M. TURNER,
John Kirkaldy, Agent.
Dated   Mile  June.  1911. 7-4
Skeena    Land     Notice—District    of
Coast—Range V
TAKE   NOTICE   that   Daniel   W.
Beaton, of Prince Rupert, B. C., oc-
I'upation carpenter, Intends to apply
for  permission  to  purchase tlie following  described   lands:—Commencing at a post planted about five miles
up   the   Exchumslk   River   from   Its
;  ee itie, .inel on Its sonth bank; thence
asl    40   chains;    thence    north    40
lialns;    thence    west    40    chains;
thence south  40 chains  to place of
immencement.
DANIEL   W.   BEATON.
Dated June 14,  1911, Ml
i«M
,L PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Tuesday, September 19, 1911.
1
Among the Politicians
llOIIeees    to    Sil'tOIl
The conclusions drawn by the
citizens of St. John, N. B., after hearing Laurier and the one-time first
minister are that Mr. Sifton had it
on the premier at every stage of the
game. There was great contrast between the two meeting. On Monday night there gathered a'l the
dredging rafters and their supporters and employees. On Tuesday evening, without any preparation save
the appointment of a volunteer corps
of ushers a great mass meeting was
held in the Queens rink by theh opponents of reciprocity, and Hon. Mr.
Sifton was heard in an exceptionable
good address. The effect was good.
He discussed the reciprocity pact
the moderation and calm deliberation
of a business man, not as a Tory
partisan, but, as he himself said,
as one citizen talking to another.
And he made an impresion. He completely showed that Sir Wilfrid on
Monday evening was ignorant of his
subject ar else did not tell the people
the truth. The natural result of
such an impression is that the independent man, who hears Lutli sides
of the question, pondered In his mind
until he reaches a conclusion Heat
the premier had a motive in concealing his knowledge and that he wanted to dupe the people into supporting the reciprocity pact in order that
lie might ride into power on that
rail, and save a government already
discredited for its wholesale corruption. While Sir Wilfrid Laurier
probably failed to turn a vote it is
safe to say that scores will leave
their party as a result of Mr. Sifton's
address.
The Fundamental Issue
(From Victoria Colonist)
You may or may not be impressed
by the argument that the closer trade
relations that will be engendered by
a reciprocity agreement with the
United States will weaken your connection with the Empire. You may
or may not believe that under the
specific agreement now before the
electorate the cost of living will be
reduced. You may or may not assent
to the proposition that competition
from the United States will injuriously affect certain Canadian industries. You may or may not fear that
the rapid exploitation of its natural
resources, which reciprocity is expected to bring about, will be hurtful to tlie country. But no matter
what your opinion may be upon these
points, you cannot hope to prove
that the commercial Independence of
Canada can be maintained after tbe
Canadian people have assented to
the policy, which is submitted to
them for their approval by the Laurier  ministry.
Our position on this question is
not only that the agreementn negotiated by Messrs. Fielding and Paterson Is in itself objectionable, but
that the principle involved in tlie
regulation of the Canadian tariff by
any agreement with the government
at Washington is indefensible. We
are told from time to time that the
Conservatives in former times favored reciprocity. I'ndoubtedly they
did so, and undoubtedly their course
was justified by the conditions that
then existed. We see no reason to
attempt to conceal or explain away
what is a part of the history of Canada. But during the last twenty
years conditions have changed. To
enter into a reciprocity agreement
with the United States in 1911 is a
very different thing from what such
a course would have been In 1891.
Not only has Canada changed since
the time when Sir John A. Macdonald last appealed to the people, but
the United States has changed. Canada has changed for the better; the
United States has changed for the
worse. We are not now referring to
the latter country In respect lo its
wealth and importance as a nation.
In this particular it has advanced
with gigantic strides. We have in
mind the commercial and financial
unrest which mars the present and
beclouds the future of that country,
the great combines which control Its
industrial prosperity, tlie selfish Interests which control Its legislation.
These things were almost non-existent in 1891. We are also referring
to the spirit of national arrogance
wliich has grown up during the pa»t
two decades, a spirit which will render any true spirit of reciprocity between the two countries impossible.
Is there any man who believes for
a moment that, once we have entered
into a trade agreement of any kind
whatever with the United States, the
interests in that country, wliich will
profit thereby, will not seek In future to control Canadian fiscal legislation? If any man does so believe
he must be credulous in the extreme.
A nation sue'h as Canada is cannot
hope to remain fiscally Independent
of a nation like tlie' United States,
with which It is co-termlnus for three
thousand miles, and with which it
will steadily become more closely
bound by any trade agreement that
can be nnegotiated. We took this
objection to the reciprocity nengoti-
ations when they were inaugurated.
We repeated it at times during the
progress of the negotiations. We
raised it again when the nature of
tlie agreement was announced.
Our position has been that Canada
ought to retain absolutely in her own
hands the regulation of her own
trade, unci while we concede that this
right is nominally reserved by the
reciprocity agreement, it is not and
cannot be preserved to us. A man
In the swift cunrrent above Niagara
Falls may be free to swim as he will,
but he will be carried over the cataract just the same as if he were tied
hand  and  foot.
Sir .leilen a. Macdonald
(From  the News-Advertiser)
"Mr. Senkler only repeats the
words of his leader when he says
that if Sir John A. Macdonald were
alive he would support reciprocity.
If Sir John A. Macdonald were alive
he would say to Sir Wilfrid Laurier,
Sir Richard Cartwright, Ah*. Patterson, Mr. Fielding, Mr. Fisher and the
rest the same thing that he said to
the same persons in 1891: 'For myself, my course is clear. A British
subject I will die; with my latest
breath will I oppose the veiled treason which attempts by sordid and
mercentary proffers to lure our people from their allegiance.'
"As yet no announcement has been
made by Hon, William Templeman,
British Columbia's sole representative in the Dominion cabinet, that he
'will tour the province during the
present campaign. He has shown no
disposition to give an account of his
stewardship lo the electors of Comox-Atlin. And it is said that wild
horses could not drag him to Fernie,
although he is minister of mines and
the miners of the Crow's Nest have
manythings which they would like
to hear him explain.
British Yiew
(From Standard of Empire)
The Standard of Empire, in its
issue of August 18, says: "Before
these lines can reach Canadian readers, the federal election campaign
will be In full swing in the Dominion. The whole Empire is the audience of the speakers and leaders in
this campaign, to an extent which
has probably never before been
known. It is illustrative of Canada's
great progress of late years, of her
undoubted attainment of full British
nationhood, that her general election
should have the first rate prominence
which it eiuite clearly has, as an
Imperial topic and event. Our. readers have already had the opportunity
of considering tlie manifesto of the
Canadian prime minister. This week
we give details of a later pronouncement: tlie elector address of the
leader of the Opposition, the Hon.
ft, L. Borden. With the domestic
and party aspect of the working programmes of the two political parlies
we are, of course, not concerned.
That is stctly Canada's business; and,
in any case, the Standard of Empire
lias nothing to do with party politics.
"But, politics aside, it would be
folly to deny that the main issue of
Canada's election is a matter of supreme interest and importance to the
whole Britisii people and Empire;
and necessarily, therfore, to this journal. The issue is Canadian-United
States reciprocity. Of this the leader of the Opposition says that 'with
a firm heart' his party takes the
stand that tlie people, and not any
one section of them, must pronounce
the verdict, since the verdict 'must
determine the future destiny of this
Dominion and this Empire.' It
would scarcely be possible to use
stronger words. But upon the whole
we think them fully justified by the
facts. The supporters of reciprocity,
in the United States at all events,
are quite as emphatic as its opponents elsewhere in insisting upon the
vital, far-reaching and permanent importance of the present decision, for
or against. From the president
downward, United States leaders
have agreed in speaking of this 'last
chance,' 'only chance,' 'parting of
the ways,' and the like; all phrases
arguing recognition, first of the
urgen desirability, for the States, of
the. pact, and, secondly, of the fact
that revocation or revision of that
decision need hardly be reckoned
among practical contingencies. All
these arguments, however, well they
may have served supporters of the
measure In the Republic, point chiefly, so far as British North America
is concerned, to the serious need for
caution and deliberation. The United
States has recorded their decision.
Nobody cand oubt their keen desire
for the fullest form of reciprocity.
For Canadians, two other aspects of
the question are of much greater Importance than the desires of their
shrewd southern neighbors; namely,
the destiny of the free British nation
of Canada, and the interests of that
world-wide empire of which It is the
premier dominion. Those are the
points upon which—apart from party
feeling or lesser matters—we sincerely truth the Canadian people will
concentrate their grave and impartial attention, as a patriotic and
practical nation, during the next few
weeks. Their fellow subjects in
every quarter of the Empire will follow the process with most anxious
and sympathetic interest; and, be it
said, with the fullest confidence in
trie Canadian people."
J. L. PARKER
MINING ENGINEER
Prince Rupert, B, C.
Open for Consultation and Mine
Examination
Temporary Address:—
Prince Rupert Inn
Th«"Stay Sarrsfattory'Hrenjee
Good, Sound Reasons for
MONARCH Economy
Monarch Ranges are built so that they can
never have "air leaks"—
„For around every opening into the body there
is a   Malleable   Iron frame to which the
steel is riveted.
No putty is needed in such joints.    They are
air tight when new and stay air tight.
If these other ranges were built in this way
they might be economical too.
Investigate this matter of rivet construction
versus stove  bolts and stove  putty.     It's
important  to  every  one  using  or  buying
a range.
SOLD AND GUARANTEED BY TBE
Kaien Hardware Co.
Telephone 3
Third Avenue
FREDERICK PETERS, K. C.
Barrister, Solicitor and Notary Public
Office in
EXCHANGE BLOCK
WM. S. HA1.L, L. D. S. D. D. S.
:-:    DENTIST   :-:
Crown and Bridge Work a specialty
All dental operations skillfully
treated. Gas and local anaesthetict
administered for the painless extraction of teeth. Consultation free
Offices, Helgerson Bk., Prince Rupen
NICKERSON-ROERIG COMPANY
—e—
CUSTOMS AND MERCHANDISE
—-o—
Brokers, Forwarding Agents,
Storage, etc.
Skeena  Land   uistrict — District   of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Burton Vivian
Brewer, of Vancouver, occupation
clerk, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about two miles north
from the nore".*.east corner of Lot
993; thence west 80 chai»s; thence
south 80 chains; thence east
chains; thence north 80 chains, to
point of commencement; containing
640 acres.
BURTON VIVIAN BREWER.
George S. Mayer, Agent
Dated July 31,  1911.
Skeena  Land   District — District  of
Queen    ..nrlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Edgar J.
Young, of Vancouver B. C, occupation painter, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted two and one-half miles
north of the northeast corner of Lot
993; thence west 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; containing  640  ncres.
EDGAR J. YOUNG.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated July 31, 1911.
Skeena   Land   District — District  of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Margaret
Merrill, of Chicago, Illinois, U.S.A.,
occupation housewife, intends to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about tliree
miles west, and one-half mile north
from the southwest corner of Lot
991; thence west 40 chains; thence
south 60 chains; thence east 40
chains; thence nortli 60 chains, to
point of commencement; containing
240 acres, more or less.
MARGARET MERRILL.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated August 7, 1911.
Skeena   Land   District — District   of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Arthur W.
Nelson, of Chicago, Illinois, U.S.A.,
occupation clerk, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 3 miles west and
one-half mile north from the southwest corner of Lot 991; thence east
SO chains; thence south 60 chains;
thence west SO chains; thence north
60 chains, to point of commencement; containing 480 acres, more or
less. ARTHUR W. NELSON.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated August I, 1911.
FOR SALE
Lot 56, Blk. 34, Sec. 1, ?5,000; 1-3 cash, bal. 6 and 12 months.
Lots 33 an* 34, Blk 5, Sec. 1,    $4,000;  half cash.
FOR RENT
STORES, OFFICES AND DWELLINGS
FIRE INSURANCE in old English, Canadian and American
companies, at tariff rates. Policies good as collateral at All Banks,
and all written in our own office. PLATE GLASS, ACCIDENT
and MARINE INSURANCE
M.M. Stephens & Co. Ld.
REAL ESTATE
Phone 222
LOANS        INSURANCE
Office: Third Avenue
INVESTMENTS
P. O. Box 275
3@000[5]00@@[§0000@0000|d]|d][d](1
HOTEL
ENAMELWARE
HAVE JUST RECEIVED A SMALL SHIPMENT OF HOTEL
ENAMELWARE ESPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR USE IN
HOTELS, RESTAURANTS AND CAMPS. WE GUARANTEE
THEM TO LAST TWICE AS LONG AS ORDINARY ENAMEL
WARE.
A CALL IS SOLICITED
Prince Rupert Hardware & Supply
Company, Ltd.
THIRD AVENUE PHONE 120
3EilDra.graii]iarara
J.   W.  POTTER
ARCHITECT     AND     STRUCTURAL
ENGINEER
Re-inforced Concrete a Specialty
—o—
Law-Butler Building - Prince Rupert
1-1. Gordon Munro    W. Nicholson Lailey
MUNRO & LAILEY
ARCHITECTS
PRINCE RUPERT, B. C.
P. O. BOX 14 PRINCE RUPERT
HAYNOR   BROS.
FUNERAL   DIRECTORS
and
PROFESSIONAL   EMBALMERS
DR.  W.  B.  CLAYTON
DENTIST
Office  In    the    Westenhaver   Block
Over Orme's Drug   Store.
Prince Rupert
Skeena   Land   District — District  of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Harry Martin, of Vancouver, B. O, occupation
artist, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted two and one-half miles
north of the northeast corner of Lot
993; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains, to
the point of commencement; containing 640 acres, more or less.
HARRY MARTIN.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated July 31, 1911.
Skeena   Land   uistrict — District  of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Allan Orr, of
Masset, B. C, occupation carpenter,
intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described
lands:-—Commencing at a post planted three and one-half miles north
and one mile west from the northwest corner of Lot 992; thence west
SO chains; thenc* north 80 chains;
tbence east 80 chains; thence south
80 chains, to point of commencement; containing 640 acres.*
ALLAN ORR.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated July 31, 1911.
Skeena   Land   District — Dislrict   of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Frank Gray,
of Blair, Nebrasaka, U.S.A., occupation farmer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 2 miles west and
"'.. mile north from the southwest
corner of Lot 991; thence east SO
chains; thence north SO chains;
thence west SO chains; thence south
80 chains, to point of commencement; containing 040 acres.
FRANK   GRAY.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated July  29,  1911.
Skeena   Land   District — District   of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Wirt A.
Stevens, of Chicago, Illirtois, U.S.A.,
occupation civil engineer, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about two
miles west and one and one-half
miles nortli from the southwest corner of Lot 991; thence east 80
chains; thence north SO ehains;
thence wesl SO chains; thence south
80 chains, to point of commencement;  containing 640  acres.
WIRT A.  STEVENS.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated July  29, 1911.
Skeena   Land   District — District  of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Christina Orr,
of Masset, B. C, occupation housewife, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted about four miles west and three
and ojie-half miles nortli from the
northwest corner of Lot 992; tlience
west 80 chains; thence north 80
chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains, to point of commencement; containing 640 acres.
CHRISTINA ORR.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated August 7, 1911.
Skeena   Land   District — District  of
Coast, Range v.
TAKE NOTICE that Alice Munro,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described iands:—Commencing at a
post planted on the west shore of
Lakelse Lake and about one and one-
half miles distant in a southwesterly direction from the southwest
corner of Lot 3982, Skeena Land
District, District of Coast, Range 5;
thence west 40 chains; thence north
40 chains; thence east 60 chains,
more or less to the shore of Lakelse
Lake; thence following the shore of
said lake to point of commencement;
containing 200 acres, more or less.
ALICE MUNRO.
Dated  August  12,  1911.
Skeena   Land   District — District   of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Norman
Hurst, of Vancouver, B. O, occupation clerk, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about three and one-
half miles north and one mile west
from the northwest corner of Lot
992; thence east SO chains; thence
north SO chains; thence west 80
chains thence south SO chains, to
point of commencement; containing
640 acres. NORMAN HURST.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated July 31, 1911.
Skeena   Land   District — District  of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that C. Verne
Brewer, of Vancouver, occupation
clerk, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted tliree and one-half miles
nortj and one mile west from the
northwest corner of Lot 992; thence
east SO' chains; thence south 81
chains; tlience west SO chains; thence
nortli SO chains, to point of commencement; containing 640 acres.
C. VERNE BREWER.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Datedo July 31, 1911.
Skeena   Land   District — District   of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that John Henry,
of Vancouver, occupation contractor,
intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted two and one-half miles north of
the northwest corner of Lot 992;
thence west SO chains; thence south
40 chains; thence east 80 chains;
Ihence north 40 chains, to point of
commencement; containing 320 acres.
JOHN HENRY.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated July 81,  1911.
Skeena   Land   District — District   of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that William Robert Little, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation mason, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about two and one-half
miles north from the northwest corner of Lot 992; thence east 80
chains; thence south 40 chains;
tlience west SO chains; thence north
40 chains, to point of commencement;   containing  320  acres.
WILLIAM ROBERT LITTLE.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated July 81, 1911.
Skeena   Land   District — District   of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Fred Jackson,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation painter, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted about two miles north from the
northeast corner of Lot 993; thence
west SO chains thence north 40
chains; thence east SO chains; thence
south 40 chains, to point of commencement; containing 320 acres
FRED JACKSON.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated July  31,  1911.
Skeena  Land   District — District  of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Ellen Ives, of
Masset, B. C, occupation housewife,
Intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described-
lands:—Commencing at a post planted about four miles west and three
and one-half miles north from the
northwest corner of Lot 992; thence
east 80 chains; thence north 80
chnlns; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains, to point of commencement; containing 640 acres.
ELLEN IVES.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated August 7, 1911.
Skeena  Land   District — District  of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE thnt Joseph C.
Merrill, of Chicago, Illinois, U.S.A.,
occupation retired, Intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing nt a post planted about four and
one-half miles west and one-half mile
north from the southwest corner of
Lot 991; thence north 20 chains;
thence west 60 chains, more or less,
to the Ain River; thence following
shore of river in a southerly and
easterly direction to point of commencement; containing 120 acres,
more or less.
JOSEPH  C.   MERRILL.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated August 2. 1911.
Skeena   Land   District — District   of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Stanley Hol-
brook, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation clerk, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lauds:—Commencing at a
post planted about two miles north
from the northeast corner of Lot
993; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 40 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south 40 chains, to
point of commencement; containing
320 acres.
STANLEY HOLBROOK.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated July 31, 1911.
Skeena   Land   District — District   of
Queen Charlotte IslandB
TAKE NOTICE that Patrick O'Connor, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
foreman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about two miles north
from the northeast corner of Lot
993; thence east SO chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence west 80
cliains; thence north 80 chains, to
point of commencement; containing
640    acres.
PATRICK O'CONNOR.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated July 31, 1911.
Skeena Land District — District of
Coast, Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that William H.
Hargrave, of Vancouver, B. O, occupation banker, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted on the west shore of
Lakelse Lake, and about one and one-
half miles distant in a southerly
direction from the southwest corner
of Lot 3982, Skeena Land District,
District of Coast, Range 5; thence
40 chains west; thence 8o chains
south, more or less, to the shore of
Lakelse Lake; thence following the
shore of said lake to point of commencement; containing 160 acres,
more or less.
WILLIAM H.  HARGRAVE.
Dated  August .12,  1911. Tuesday, September 19, 1911.
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
*****************************************************
1 ROOSEVELT ON ARBITRATION !
■!> *
* *
*****************************************************
Former President Roosevelt deals side body.    Critics in the Senate, in
with the arbitration treaties recently
presented to the Serate in an editorial article appearing in the Outlook.    He said in part:
"It is one of our prime duties as
a nation to seek peace. It is an even
higher duty to seek righteousness.
It is also our duty not to Indulge
in shams, not make believe we are
getting peace by some patent contrivance which sensible people
ought to know cannot work in practice, and which, if we sought to make
It work, might cause irretrievable
harm. I sincerely believe in the
principle so far as practicable, but
I believe that the effort to apply it
where it is not practicable cannot
do good and may do serious harm.
"I think that theh great majority
of the persons who advocate any and
every treaty which is called a treaty
for peace or for arbitration, will be
less often drawn into, a position that
tends to humiliate their country if
they would take the trouble to formulate clearly and defintely just
what it is that they desire.
"Of course, there are persons
wholly indifferent to the nation's
honor and interest, who In consequence cannot be reached by an appeal to national honor and interest,
' and there are other persons whose
in grained personal timidty is such
that they are more afraid of war
than of any dishonor, personal or
national.
"We, the American people, believe,
and ought to believe, in righteousness
first, and in peace as the handmaid
of righteousness. We abhor brutality
and wrong-doing whether exhibited
by nations or by individuals. We
hold that the same law of righteousness should obtain between nation
and nation as between man and man.
I, for one, would rathehr cut off my
right hand than see the United States
* adopt the attitude either of cringing
before the great and powerful nations
who wish to wrong us,, or bullying
small and weak nations, who have
done us no wrong.
"The American people desire to do
justice and to act with frand generosity towards all the other nations
of mankind; but I err greatly In my
judgment of my countrymen if they
are willing to submit to wrong and
Injustice. Again and again in the
past they have shown, and rightly
shown, that when the choice lay between righteousness and peace they
chose righteousness. Just exactly as
they also chose righteousness when
the choice lay between righteousness
and war."
Mr. Roosevelt cites the Revolutionary War, the Civil War and the
Spanish-American War as instances
in which "we put righteousness above
peace."
He also cites the existing treaties
between the United States, Great
Britain and France,' as better than
the proposed treaties because they
make no false pretences, and exclude
questions affecting our vital interests, independence or honr. He continues:
"The proposed arbitration treaty is
defective, in the first p'ace, because
it is not straightforward. . It sets
forth that "all-justicable" matters
should be arbitrated. The language
both of the opponents and the defenders of the treaty shows that even
among our own people, and before a
case for applying the treaty has
arisen, there Is hopeless confusion as
to what 'justiciable' means. Such
being the case, it can be imagined
how useless would be the effort to
defend "justicable' when a serious
conflict had actually arisen and blood
was up and passion high. The word
ing of the treaty is so loose, it so
larks expllcitness. ns to allow one
set of its advocates to announce that
it binds us to arbitrate anything we
did not wish to. Now, no moral
movement is permanently helped by
hypocrisy. Does the proposal in the
treaties if entered Into with various
nations bind us to arbitrate the Monroe Doctrine, the Piatt amendment
with Cuba, the payment of state
bonds to European bondholders, the
question whether various European
countries are entitled to the same
concessions that Canada is to receive
under the reciprocity agreement, the
right of other foreign nations to interfere in Panama, our own right to
exclude any immigrants whom we
choose to exclude?
"If these questions arose, I am
sure our representatives would privately or publicly inform foreign
powers (and indeed would have to
inform foreign powers) that the
American people would not abide by
any agreement to arbitrate them, in
which case the only proper course to
following is that followed by the
Senate committee, and to say In honest fashion that there were certain
questions which this nation will not
arbitrate at the dictation of any out-
ent generation effectively work for
and secure the peace of rightoui-
ness."
 o	
SEEKING PROPERTIES
this matter, talk ss if it had usurped
a 'right'; in reality the Senate merely performed a duty.
"Most of those who are willing to
think know perfectly well that this
course would not ss a matter of fact
keep an agreement to arbitrate when
questions of vital hour and interest,
even though It were so unwise as to
make it; and it is a wicked thing to
put us in the position of promising
what will not and cannot be performed. In such a matter the Indulgence of false pretense in the
present would with an absolute certainty be followed bythe breaking off
of faith in the future.
"Tlie fatally objectionable feature
of lhe proposed treaty Is the clause
providing that the joint commission
which may be composed exclusively
of 'nationals' of the two countries,
but which also may be composed exclusively of foreigners, may, by
unanimous vote or by a vote of all
but one of its members, determine
that any government question might
be arbitrated, it is difficult to characterize this provision truthfully
without seeming to be offensive.
Merely to speak of It as silly comes
far short as saying what should be
said. It is arguable that in certain
cases neither of the two component
parts of the treaty-making power, the
president or the Senate, should delegate to the other for certain purposes the power of exclusive action.
"But, no sound argument can be
made for permitting both the president and Senate to delegate to outsiders, possibly to foreigners, the exercise of a fundamental and vital
power. The details of carrying into
effect a great and far-reaching policy
can appropriately be delegated, but
the elected servants of the people
betray their interests if they shirk
the duty of themselves deciding what
that policy should be.
"It would be quite proper to delegate to the joint high commission
many subordinate functions, but the
high, the supreme function of deciding whether a question of such vital
importance to the country that it is
or is not arbitrable, cannot with propriety be delegated to any outsider
by either the president or the Senate. They are elected to perform exactly the vital duties implied in such
decision. If a president, after consulting with his constitutional advisors, the Senate, could not make
up his own mind about such a vital
question and had to have it made
up for him by outsiders—possibly
foreigners and certainly not rspon-
sible to the people—it will be proof
positive that he was not fit to hold
the exhalted position to wh|h he had
been elected. A president unfit to
make such a decision himself and
willing to have somebody else make
it for him, would also be unfit to
perform any of the really important
duties of the presidency.
"We, the people of the United
States, cannot and will not surrender
to outsiders the power to determine
whether or not we are fit to decide
for themselves what are our vital
needs, and what is more, the policies
proper for meeting these needs. In
other words, Uncle Sam does not intend to wrong anyone, but neither
does he Intend to bind himself if his
pocket is picked, his house burglarized or his face slapped, to arbitrate
with the wrongdoers, and so long as
he does not intend so bind himself,
it would be offensive hypocrisy for
him to say that lie will so bind himself.
"It is out duty, so far as now possible, so far as human nature in the
present day will permit, to fry to
provide peaceful substitutes for war
as a metn 'd for the settlement of international disputes. But progress in
this direction is merely hindered by
the folloy that believes In putting
peace above righteousness, while It
Is of course even worse to pretend to
so believe. The greatest service this
nation can render to righteousness is
to behave with scrupulous justice to
other nations and yet to keep ready
to hold its own if necessary.
"Our usefulness to humanity rests
in our combining power with high
purpose. Power undirected by high
purpose spells calamity and high purpose by itself is utterly useless if the
power to put it Into effect is lacking.
It is the history of our country that
peace advocates who treat peace as
more than righteousness will never
and never have been of service to
manklqd. The true lovers of peace,
the men who have really helped onward the movement for peace, have
been those who followed, even
though far off, the footsteps of
Washington and Lincoln, and stood
for rlghteousnes as the supreme end
of national life. Only by acting on
these principles, only by following In
the footsteps of these great Amer
cans of the past, can we of the pres-
Investors  Are  Anxious  to  Invest  in
the Mining Areas in
the  Interior
At Hazelton there is evidence that
experienced mining men are getting
possession of properties there, apparently being satisfied that the
opening up of the country by transportation facilities will be followed
by a decided movement in that part
of the province.
P. J. Jennings of Portland, Ore.,
representing United States capital, is
taking an active step in this move.
The Silver Cup, which is held locally
and which has been giving such a
good account of Itself, 'is sought by
Mr, Jennings, it is reported.
Ever since Manager Falls struck
the ore In the third tunnel on Silver
Cup the ore has boon widening out
and improving all the time. He now
has two feet of very high grade ore
in the tunnel and the work is proving very profitable. The company
has decided to drive the fourth tunnel at once; in fact, it has already
started at a point some distance farther down the hillside. When the
ore is struck in this tunnel, as it
surely will be, Silver Cup will then
be in a position to ship steadily.
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE.
NOTICE is hereby given that the
reserve of a parcel of land situated
on Graham Island, notice of which
appeared in the British Columbia
Gazette on the 25th of February,
1909, being dated 23rd February,
1909, is cancelled to permit of the
lands being acquired by pre-emption
only and for no other purpose
ROBT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Department of Lands,
Victoria, B. C„ April 5th, 1911.
4-14—7-5
Form of Notice  (Section 34)
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that Edward Chesley, of the City of Prince Rupert,
B. C, occupation trainman, intends
to apply for permission to purchase
the following described land:—Commencing at a post planted about half
way between Mile Post 77 and Mile
Post 78 on the Main Line of the
Grand Trunk Pacific Railway from
Prince Rupert and about fifty (50)
feet west of the right-of-way of the
said Railway; thence north eighty
(80) chains; thence west forty (40)
chains; thence south eighty (80)
chains; thence east forty (40) chains,
to the point of commencement; and
containing three hundred and twenty
(320) acres more or less and which
land was located by me on the 26th
day of August, A. D. 1911.
EDWARD  CHESLEY.
Dated August 28, 1911. s5
Hazelton  Land  District—District of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that John Gabriel,
of Aldermere, B. C, Prospector, intends to apply for a'licence to prospect for coal and petroleum over the
following described l.-nds:—Commencing at a post planted five miles
east and one mile south from the
mouth of Kitnayakwa River; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence north SO chains;
thence west SO chains, to point of
commencement.
JOHN GABRIEL   Locator.
Dated July 10,  1911.
Form of Notice (Section 47)
Skeena   Land    District—Disti ict   of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that George W.
Kerr, of tlie City of Prince Rupert,
occupation butcher, Intends to apply
for permission to lease the following described land:—Commencing at
a post planted about three hundred
(300) yards west of Mile Post 79
on the line of the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway track from Prince Rupert; thence south eighty (80)
chains; thence west forty (40)
cliains; thence north eighty (80)
chains; thence east forty (40) chains
to the place of commencement, and
containing three hundred and twenty (320) 'acres more or less, and
which land was located by me on
the 26th day of August inst. A. D.
1911.
GEO.   W.   KERR.
Dated August 28, 1911. s5
Hazelton  Land  District—District of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that Vivian
O'Brien of Copper City B.C., prospector,
Intends to apply for a licence to
prospect for coal and petroleum over
the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted four
miles east and four miles north from
the mouth of Kitnayakwa River;
thence south 80 chains; thence east
SO chains; tlience north SO chains;
thence west 80 chains, to point of
commencement,
VIVIAN O'BRIEN, Locator.
Dated July. 10, 1911. si
PURLIC HIGHWAYS
Province of British Columbia
NOTICE is hereby given that all
Public Highways in unorganized Districts, and all Main Trunk Roads in
organized Districts are sixty-six feet
wide, and have a width of thirty-
three feet on each side of the mean
straight centre line of the travelled
road. THOMAS TAYLOR,
Minister of Public Works.
Department of Public Works, Victoria. B. C, July 7, 1911.    jyl8-ol8
Form of Notice (Section 47)
Skeena   Land    District—District   of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that George A, Mc-
Nlcholl, of the City of Prince Rupert, railway superintendent by occupation, intends to apply for permission to lease the following described
land:—Commencing at a post planted aboHt three hundred (300) yards
west of Mile Post SO, on the line of
the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway-
track from Prince Rupert; thence
north eighty (80) chains; thence
west forty (40) chains; thence south
eighty (80) chains; thence east forty
(40) chains to place of commencement and containing tliree hundred
and twenty (320) acres, and which
land was located by me on the 26 th
day of August, A. D. 1911.
GEORGE A. McNICHOLL.
Philip T. Chesley, Agent.
Dated August 29, 1911. s5
Hazelton   Land   District—District  of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that John Gabriel,
of Aldermere, B. C, Prospector, intends to apply for a licence to prospect for coal and petroleum over the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted four miles
east and four miles north from the
mouth of Kitnayakwa River; tlience
west 80 chains; thence south 80
chains; tlience east SO chains; thence
north 80 chains, to point of commencement.
JOHN GABRIEL, Locator.
Dated July  10,  1911.
Hazelton   Land   District—District  of
Coast. Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that John Gabriel,
of Aldermere, B. C'., Prospector, intends to apply for a licence to prospect for coal and petroleum over the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted 4 miles
east and 2 miles north from the
moutli of Kitnayakwa River; thence
soutli 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; tlience north SO chains;
tlience east 80 chains, to point of
commencement.
JOHN GABRIEL, Locator.
Dated July  9,  1911. sl
Hazelton   Land   District—District  of
Coast, Range o
TAKE NOTICE that John Gabriel,
of Aldermere, B. C, Prospector, intends to apply for a lieence to prospect for coal and petroleum over the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted ■* miles
east and 2 miles nortli from the
mouth of Kitnayakwa River, thence
soutli 80 chains; thence east -v0
chains; thence north SO chains,
thence west 80 chains, to point of
commencement.
JOHN GABRIEL, Locator.
Dated  July  9,   1911 sl
Hazelton   Land   District—District  of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that. Vivian
O'Brien of Copper City B.C. .prospector,
intends to apply for a licence to
prospect for coal and petroleum over
the following described lands: —
Commencing at a post planted tliree
miles east and three miles north
from the mouth of Kitnayakwa River; thence south SO cliains; thence
west 80 chains; tlience north 80
chains; tlience east 80 chains, to
point of commencement.
•     VIVIAN O'BRIEN, Locator.
Dated July 9, 1911. sl
Hazelton   Land   District—District   of
Coast. Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that Vivian
O'Brien nf Copper City B.C., prospector,
intends to apply for a licence to
prospect for coal and petroleum over
the following described lands: —
Commencing at a post, planted 4
miles east and 2 miles north from
the mouth of Kitnayawka River;
tlience north SO chains; thence west
80 chains; tlience soutli 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains, to point of
commencement,
VIVIAN O'BRIEN, Locator.
Dated July  9,  1911. sl
Hazelton   Land   District—District   of
Const, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that Vivian
O'Brien of CopperClty B.C., prospector,
intends to apply for a licence to
prospect for coal and petroleum over
the following described lands:—•
Commencing at a post planted 4
miles east and 2 miles north from
the mouth of Kitnayakwa River;
thence north 80 chains; tlience east
80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains, to point of
commencement.
VIVIAN O'BRIEN, Locator.
Dated   July   9,   1911. sl
NOTICE.
In the matter of an application for
the issue of a duplicate of the Certificate of Title for an undivided
one-half of Lot 883, Group I,
Cassiar District:
Notice is. hereby given that it is
my intention to Issue at the expiration of one month after the first
publication hereof a duplicate of the
Certificate of Title to the above
mentioned land in the name of William Jordan Larkworthy, which Certificate is dated the 30th day of September, 1910, and numbered 326R.
WILLIaM  E.   BURRITT,
Di   rict Registrar.
Land Registry Office,
Prince Rupert, B. C,
May 26, 1911. J23
NOTICE
In the matter of an application for
the  issue   of   a   duplicate  of  the
Certificate  of Title  for  Lot  361,
Range 5, Coast District:
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
it  Is  my  intention  to  issue  at  the
expiration  of  one  month   after  the
first publication  hereof a  duplicate
of the Certificate for the above described lands In the names of Truman S. Baxter and Albert D. Durham,
which  Certificate  of  Title  is  dated
25th   November,    1909,   and   numbered 44 1.
WILLIAM  E.   BURRITT,
District  Registrar.
Land  Registry  Office,  Prince  Rupert, B. C, August 14, 1911. aio-slo
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE.
Notice is hereby given the the
reserve existing by reason of the
notice published in the British Columbia Gazette of the 27th December, 1907, over lands on Graham Island, formerly covered by Timber
Licences Nos. Nos. 37055, 37056 and
37057, which expired on the 6th day
of November, 1909, and tbe lands
embraced within Timber Licence No.
37059, which expired on the 25th
day of January, 1909, Is cancelled,
and that the said lands will be open
for pre-emption only under the provisions of Section 7 of the "Land
Act" after midnight on June 16th,
1911.
ROBERT  A.  RENWICK.
Deputy  Minister  of Lands.
Lands Department,
Victoria, B. C,
9th March, 1911.
Form of Notice (Section 47)
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that John A. Kirkpatrick, of the City of Prince Rupert, dry goods merchant by occupation, intends to apply for permission
to lease the following described land,
bounded as follows:—Commencing
at a post planted about three hundred (300) yards west of Mile Post
79 on the line of the Grand Trunk
Pacific Railway track from Prince
Rupert; thence north eighty (SO
chains; thence west forty (40)
chains; thence south eighty (80
chains; tlience east forty (40)
chains to place of commencement,
and containing three hundred and
twenty (320) acres more or less, and
which land was located by me on the
26th day of August A.D. 1911.
JOHN A. KIRKPATRICK.
Philip T. Chesley   Agent.
Dated August 29, 1911. s5
Form of Notice (Section 47)
Skeena   Land    District—District   of
Coast, Range u
TAKE NOTICE that Alexander
Faulds, of the City of Vancouver,
B. C, occupation mining engineer,
intends to apply for permission to
lease the following land, bounded as
lease the following described
land, bounded as follows: —
Commencing at a post planted
on the south bank of the
Shamos River (sometimes called
Shames River) about three-quarters
of a mile west from the Grand Trunk
Pacific Railroad and on the soutli
bank of said river; thence south
eighty (80) cliains; thence west forty
(40) chains; thence north eighty
(SO) chains; thence east forty (40)
chains to the point of commencement,
and containing three hundred and
twenty (320) acres more or less, and
which land was located by me on the
25th day of August, A.D. 1911.
V ALEXANDER   FAULDS.
Philip T. Chesley, Agent.
Dated August 25, 1911.
Hazelton Land District—District of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that John Gabriel,
of Aldermere, B. C, Prospector, intends to apply for a licence to prospect for coal and petroleum over the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted tliree miles
east and three miles north from the
mouth of Kitnayakwa River; thence
north SO cliains; thence west 80
chains; tlience south 80 chains
thence east 80 chains, to point of
commencement.
' JOHN GABRIEL, Locator
Dated July 9, 1911. sl
Hazelton  Land  District—District of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that John Gabriel,
of Aldermere, B. C, Prospector, in
tends to apply for a licence to prospect for coal and petroleum over the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted 3 miles
east and one mile north from the
mouth of Kitnayakwa River; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80
cliains; thence south SO chains
thence east SO cliains, to point of
commencement.
JOHN GABRIEL, Locator.
Dated July  9,  1911. sl
Hazelton Land District—District of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that Vivian
O'Brien of Copper City B.C., prospector,
intends to apply for a licence to
prospect for coal and petroleum over
the following described lands: —
Commencing at a post planted three
miles east from the mouth of Kitnayakwa River; thence north SO
chains; thence west SO chains;
thence south 80 cliains; thence east
80 chains, to point of commencement.
VIVIAN O'BRIEN, Locator.
Dated July 9, 1911, sl
Hazelton  Land   District—District' ot
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that John Gabriel,
of Aldermere, B. C, Prospector, intends to apply for a licence to prospect for coal and petroleum over the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted 4 miles
east and one mile north from the
mouth of Kitnayakwa River, thence
south 80 chains; tlience west 80
cliains; thence north SO chains;
thence east 80 chains, to point of
commencement.
JOHN GABRIEL, Locator.
Dated  July  10,  1911. sl
Hazelton  Land   District—District  of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that Vivian
O'Brien of Copper City B.C., prospector,
intends to apply for a licence to
prospect for coal and petroleum over
the following described lands:—-
Commencing at a post planted 1
miles east and one mile north from
the mouth of Kitnayakwa River!
tlience south 80 chains; tlience east
SO chains; thence north SO chains;
tlience west 80 chains, to point of
commencement.
VIVIAN O'BRIEN, Locator.
Dated July 10, 1911. sl
Hazelton   Land   District—District of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that Vivian
O'Brien of Copper City B.C., prospector,
Intends to apply for a licence to
prospect for coal and petroleum over
the following described lands: —
Commencing at a post planted five
miles east ami two miles nortli from
the mouth of Kitnayakwa River;
thence south SO cliains; tlience east
80 chains; tlience nortli SO chains;
thence west 80 chains, to point of
commencement.
VIVIAN O'BRIEN, Locator.
Dated July 9, 1911. sl
Hazelton   Land   District—District  of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that John Gabriel,
I of Aldermere,  B.  C,  Prospector, Intends to apply for a licence to prospect for coal and petroleum over the
following    described     lauds:—Commencing at a post planted three miles
jeast from the mouth of Kitnayakwa
River;    thence   soutli' so    ehains;
i thence west So chains;  thence nortli
| SO chains; thence east 80 chains,, to
j point of commencement.
JOHN GABRIEL, Locator,
Dated July 9, 1911,
Hazelton  l.aml  District—District of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE      NOTICE      that       Vivian
O'Brien of CopperClty B.C.,prospector,
Intends to apply tor a licence to
prospect for coal and petroleum over
the    following   described    lands:—
Commencing at a post planted four
miles east and one mile south from
tlie mouth of Kitnayakwa River;
thence south 80 chains; thenco west
SO chains; thence north So chains;
thence east 80 cliains, to point of
commencement.
VIVIAN O'BRIEN, Locator.
Dated July  9, 1911. sl
Hazelton   Land   District—District   of
Coast, Range o
TAKE NOTICE that John Gabriel,
of Aldermere, B. C, Prospector, intends to apply for a licence to prospect for coal and petroleum over the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted 4 miles
east from the mouth of Kitnayawka
River; thence soutli 80 cliains;
thence east 80 chains; thence north
SO chains; thence west SO chains, to
the point of commencement.
JOHN GABRIEL, Locator.
Dated   July   10,   1911. sl
Hazelton   Land  District—District  of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that John Gabriel,
of Aldermere, B. C, Prospector, Intends to apply for a licence to prospect for coal and petroleum over the
following described lands:—Com-
nieneing nt a post planted five miles
east and two miles north from the
mouth of Kitnayakwa River; theneee
nortli 80 chains; thence east SO
chains; thence south SO chains;
thence west 80 chains, to point of
commencement.
JOHN GABRIEL, Locator.
Dated July 9, 1911, sl
Hazelton   Land   District—District   of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE      NOTICE       that       Vivian
O'Brien of CopperClty B.C., prospector,
Intends to apply for a licence to
prospect for coal and petroleum over
tho following described lands: —
Commencing at a post planted four
miles east from the mouth of Kltna-
|yakwa River; tbence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence north
80 chains; Ihence easl 80 chains, to
ipoint of commencement.
VIVIAN O'BRIEN, Locator.*
Dated July 10, 1911.
j Hazelton   Land   District—District   of
Const, Range 5
TAKE      NOTICE      that      Vivian
O'Brien of Copper City B.C., prospector,
I intends   to   apply   for   a   lieence   to
prospect for coal and petroleum over
the    following    described    lands: —
'commencing at a post planted  five
j miles east from the mouth of Kitua-
lyakwn River; thence east 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains;  theue'e west
80  chains;  thence  north  80  chains,
to point, of commencement.
VIVIAN O'BRIEN, Locator.
Dated July 10, 1911. sl
Hazelton Land District—District of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that John Gabriel,
of Aldermere, B. ('., Prospector, intends to apply for a licence to prospect for coal and petroleum over the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted four miles
east and one mile south from the
mouth of Kitnayakwa River; thence
east 80 chains; tlience south SO
drains; thence we st 80 drains;
thence north So chains, to point of
commencement,
JOHN GABRIEL, Locator.
Dated July 9, 1911. sl
Hazelton   Land   District—District  of
Coast, Range 6
TAKE NOTICE that John Gabriel,
of Aldermere,  II.  C,  Prospector,  Intends to apply for a lieence to pros-
pe-e-i  for coal and petroleum over the
' following    described    lands;—Commencing at a  post   planted  .*!   miles
east from the mouth  of Kitnayakwa
River;    thence    north    sn   ciraius:
thence east 80 chains;   thence south
Sn chains; thence west Sn drains, to
i.iiint of commencement.
JOHN GABRIEL. Locator.
Dated July  10, 1911. sl PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Tuesday, September 19, 1911.
CARRUTHERS STAND
Well Known Investor Here Says he Must
Break With the Liberal
Party.
He Puis Up Wager That Laurier Will
Be Defeated in the Coming
Election
James Carruthers, the grain dealer of Montreal, who is so well known
in Prince Rupert, Is out and out
against reciprocity. Mr. Carruthers
has been very closely identified with
the life of this city, having invested
very deeply in various enterprises
during the early days of the city. He
has been a very frequent visitor to
the west, coming out at difefrent
times us the guest of the officials of
the G. T. P.
Mr. Carruthers has been a Liberal
in politics, but reciprocity has led to
his breaking with that party and
coming out openly In opposition.
He now says: "This is the time
when men should get away from the
party and say 'yes' or 'no.' This
question is too big to be settled
along party lines. For one, I am
strongly against  reciprocity."
"They got the wrong end of the
stick," laughingly said James Carruthers in discussing the story published in Montreal by the Liberal
organ to the effect that while Mr.
Carruthers opposed reciprocity, he
had placed $1,500 that Sir Wilfrid
Laurier would be returned to power.
"All wrong," said Mr. Carruthers,
who added: "Now, here is what I
will wager, $500 that Laurier will
not have 30 of a majority, $500 that
he will not have 20 of a majority,
and $500 that he will be beaten. The
loser's money to be donated to three
Montreal hospitals."
At the last election Mr. Carruthers
won a handsome wager on the Liberal victory from the late Robert
reieighen, the latter contributing a
goodly sum to charities as the result
of the Liberal return.
IX QUEBEC
The Montreal Star has the following item, which may be of
interest in British Columbia,
where Air. Bethune is well
known:
".Mr. J. T. Bethune, formerly
Liberal organizer in British Columbia, who is in business in
this city and fighting the government on reciprocity all along
the line, accompanied Mr. C. H. s
Cahan to Hull, returning yesterday morning. What struck
Mr. Bethune was the absolute
loss of prestige amongst the
French-Canadians sustained by
Sir Wilfrid Laurier during the
past year. He says there were
seven or eight thousand people
at the Hull meeting, and both
Mr. Bourassa and Mr. Cahan
received a very warm welcome.
When, for instance, the speakers
would mention the name of Sir
John .Macdonald, or other past
leaders, the cheers of the meeting would be deafening, but the
name of Laurier evoked little
applause."
IHE SALMON INDUSTRY AND THE GOVERNMENT
MISREPRESENTATION
C. P. R. Officials Explain the  Alleged
Sign in Seattle on Reciprocity.
Company's Agent Is Against
and  Never Authorized
Words   Used
Iu' Pact
(he
Liberal papers, including (lie local
one, have been making a great deal
out of an alleged endorsation of reciprocity by the C. P. R. offices in
Seattle,  playing up  the words:
"Reciprocity will increase Canadian lands 100 per- cent."
The following explains the matter
and contradicts the story:
r From tire Winnipeg Telegram,
Friday evening, September 8, 1911.)
FAKE SCHEME TO BOOST
RECIPROCITY PACT
Seattle Clerk's Little Lark Paraded
as an Argument in Favor of
the Agreement
There appeared in yesterday's
evening edition of the Free Press,
a reproduction of a photograph in
onen of the windows of the C. P. R.
office in Seattle. The photograph,
it is explained, was taken from the
sidewalk in front of the window, and
on It were the words: "Reciprocity
will increase Canadian lands 100 per
cent."
The name of Louis Williams, general agent of the Canadian Pacific
Railway lands, was used in connection with this production. It appears
that the photograph referred to was
first used by the Calgary Albertan,
the Liberal organ in Southern Alberta. It has been passed on to other
Liberal papers in the west with the
object of conveying the Impression
that the C. P. R. agent In Seattle believed an increase of farm values in
Canada would follow the ratification
of the reciprocity agreement.
The newspapers publishing this
photograph have discreetly suppressed the letter which Mr. Williams, the
C. P. R. agent in Seattle, addressed
to the Calgary Albertan as soon as
the matter was brought to his attention. Here is the letter.
i.ditor   Morning   .iioi'llaii,   Calgary,
Alta.
dear Sir—Your reproduction of
sign in O. 1*. R. land office in Seattle
is misleading in the extreme. This
'sign was not authorized hy the
C.P.R., nor by me, nor ley anyone in
authority in the office, but was put
up by a clerk dining m.V absence and
Immediately removed on my return, i
As  a   large   land-holder  and - grain- '
grower in Alberta, I believe Canada
is better without reciprocity, and thus
lieer untrammelled by foreign trickery and wish as a subscriber to your
paper that you he lair and give this
the same publicity you gave the reproduction and the misleading statements.      Yours for justice, *
LOUIS WILLIAMS.
Seattle, Sept. 2,  1011.
The  Free   Press,  like   its  Calgary
contemporary,  refrained  from  printing Mr. Williams' letter.
 o •
POLLS CLOSE AT B
The polls orr Thursday close at 5
in (he afternoon.
 o .
Pole Contract
The contract  for  supplying  poles
to   the   city   has   been   awarded   to
Frank Engler and others.
 o •
To Enlarge Plant
The council has endorsed the report
of the electrical expert with respect
to the purchase of additional equipment for the power house. A Ridge-
way engine will he bought at $14,-
580.
 o	
Selling Without Licence
The police raided the quarters of
J. Gentile on Comix Avenue Sunday
evening and succeeded in carrying
off a large amount of material that
was convincing, in court as to its being a place for selling liquor. Before Stipendiary Magistrate McMullIn the accused was fined $300 or
six months' Imprisonment.
 o	
Wedded Saturday
On Saturday the marriage of Mr.
Fred Wesch and Miss Rosa Heuden-
se-hild was solemnized by Rev. W. H,
.McLeod at the home of the bride,
Sixth Avenue and Fraser Street. The
bride was attended by her sister, Miss
Sophie Heudenschild, while Mr. T.
BaMinger acted as best' man. Both
are well known among the young
people of the city. They will reside
on Seventh Avenue.
New Teacher
The school board met on Friday
afternoon to consider applications for
the new teacher that is required.
There were not many applications received but the decision of the board
was in favor of Miss Manning, who
wrote from Vancouver. She is a
graduate in arts from Acadia University, N. S., having taken the degree this year. She comes highly
recommended by the staff of her col
lege and will enter upon her duties
at once.
 o	
A  NEW  CITY HALL
Plans Accepted  for  a   Three Storey
Building on Fulton
Street.
Work Will Proceed At Once on the
Bidding, Which Will Supply
Present Needs
The city council last night passed
upon the plans ror a new city hall
to be erected on Fulton Street on the
site now being cleared. The plans
as prepared by J. W. Potter were
accepted. The building will be three
storeys high, fronting on Fulton
Street. Offices for all the city hall
staff will be provided, as well as for
the city police and  city lockup.
There will be a good sized council
chamber on the top floor.
The complete plan will now be
prepared and work will go forward
at once.
Though many residents of Prince Rupert have lived here long enough
to establish a home and secure a vote, the majority of them know very
little of the practical side of the salmon industry. However, it is general
knowledge that the canneries are licenced jointly by the Dominion and the
Provincial Governments; the fishing boats are limited and licenced; the
seasons regulated and the waters restricted under the regulations made
by the officers of the Dominion Government. The actual fishing is done
by Japanese and Indians, but principally the former, in crews of two to
each boat. These fishermen use the gear of the canneries and get ten
cents a fish for sockeyes, forty cents a fish for spring salmon and one cent
a fish for hump-backs. This latter price has sometimes been half a cent
higher. Kloochmen (Indian girls and women) do the cleaning and filling,
the latter being piece work. A few canneries use machinery for part of
this operation. The balance of the work is done by machinery and Chinamen, with a few white men as machinists anil overseers. All the Chinese
and Indian labor inside the cannery is paid by the China-boss who contracts to put up the season's pack at a price per case. The help, apart
from the filling, which is piece work, is all employed at a lump sum for
the season. Usually, the product of the cannery is sold before it is packed.
Vancouver brokers buy it and ship most of it from Vancouver to Liverpool,
the world's clearing house for salmon.
The sockeye salmon of the Britisii Columbia coast, which is only rivalled
by the Chinook salmon of the Columbia River, has an unassailable market.
No tariff between Canada and the the United States can affect it. it is
sold all over the world and the supply is never sufficient for the demand.
But these northern rivers produce a second grade salmon In the humpback and the dog salmon, for which there is a growing demand. The
advocates of reciprocity claim the market for this class of fish is in the
negro states of the nation to the south of us. They say the removal of the
duty would give the cannery about $1.25 a case more for the hump-backs,
and a larger pack would be put up. Even if this were true, who would
get the benefits? The hump-back and the dog salmon run at the tail end
of tho sockeye season. They are caught without extra material or labor
and the Japs get one cent each for them. Excepting the few piece work
laborers in the cannery no extra wages are paid for packing humps; therefore, any benefit would go to the owner of the cannery. As this is the
only advantage reciprocity claims for the cannery industry, there would
be only one while man in this north country benefitted, because there is
only one cannery proprietor making his home in Prince Rupert.
But I want to go back and challenge the statement that reciprocity
will in any way affect the price of the cheaper grades of salmon, and to
do this 1 will tell you more about the hump-back. The canned hump-back
has a romance attached to him. One time when the sockeye run was poor
a cannery in desperation filled up its cans with humps. On the cans was
pasted an elaborate guarantee that the contents would not turn red in
the can. Thus vouched for the goods were successfully worked off in the
southern states, and to the surprise of the cannerymen there grew up a
demand for this cheap fish.
Enterprising brokers thought that if the humps were good enough
for negroes, they were good enough for foreigners, and tlie product was
tried out on the immigrants of the Middle States. Finding that none of
them complained of ptomaine poisoning, the goods were exploited in New-
York, and they eventually reached England. Now there is an increasing
demand for humps and his running mate, the dog salmon, and the price
for this pink salmon is jumping, too. In fact, the demand has grown so
rapidly that the British market will take all Canada can produce. Today
the price in Canada is the same as it is in the United States, and twice as
high as it was two years ago. The demand is far in excess of the supply,
even though this has been a very big year for humps.
Now let us look into the harmful effects of reciprocity. If the duty
fs taken off it will permit United States brokers coming into Canada and
buying the Canadian pack for shipment to England. In that event the
salmon will be taken to Seattle for trans-shipment Instead of going
to Vancouver as it does now—or to Prince Rupert as it will when we are
prepared to handle it. It means that the United States brokers will put
their own labels on the Canadian fish and our products will loose their
identity. Beyond question, at least a part of our Skeena and Naas salmon
will he diverted to United States channels.
If the tariff on salmon is maintained Canadians will market their own
product and make a reputation for their own fish. With sockeye salmon
selling at $10.50 a case and humps at $4.50 a case, which is just double
the price of a few years ago, the salmon industry is evidently not hard up
for a market.
A STUPID POLICY
Brrt a greater evil than reciprocity is the Dominion Government's policy
on the salmon industry. The kindest words that can be said about that
policy is that it is stupid, so stupid that politicians and favorites have
encouraged it until they have secured a cinch hold on the industry nnd
created a monoply tighter than Standard Oil or the beef trust.
Owing to the unlimited market for salmon the salmon trust has no fear
of anyone cutting prices; but they do fear that some one else may get some
of the fish. .Evidence of this fact is apparent in the action of the Dominion Fisheries Department, which has taken away twenty boat licences
from each of the only two Independent canneries on the Skeemrf and the
Naas. The story, though intensely interesting, is too lengthy.to be told
here, but an officer of the Dominion department, after making an investigation, admitted that a grave injustice had been done. Liberals may tell you
that the Dominion department offered to remedy this glaring partiality,
but that the Provincial Fisheries Department, who are jointly interested
in the licences, refused to consent; but the fact cannot be overlooked lhat
the injustice was done by a Dominion officer and that the Liberal politicians in the salmon trust are the chief beneficiaries.
But that is not where you are mostly interested. The point that affects
Prince Rupert is that the salmon trust has the industry sewed up so
tightly that you cannot go out and catch a sockeye salmon under penalty
of law, nor buy one unless some one has stolen It. Prince Rupert has
boasted of her fisheries, advertised them the world over, yet the only
salmon you can honestly procure in this city are the culls of the canneries.
Though millions of them are running the waters of our harbours and rivers,
Prince Rupert, as a city, does not know what first class salmon It. The
salmon you buy is mostly bought from the canneries—a second class article
for which the fish markets pay a first class price. The reason is that
under the plea of protecting the fish, the Dominion Government refuses to
grant any more licences, and as all existing licences are given to the
canneries, they have a monoply of the fish. It means that A WHITE MAN
CANNOT GET A LICENCE TO NET SALMON. The only licence In the
district not held by a cannery is the privilege of fishing in Shawatlans
Passage, which is passed around among the familes of the Metlakatla
Indians—a sort of tribal heirloom which gives a very limited and irregular
supply to the local market. By their policy of thus playing Into the hands
of the salmon trust the Dominion Government has built a Chinese and
Japanese wall between you and your fish, and they guard It with an armed
force of Federal inspectors.
That is the way the Dominion Government Is looking after your interests. That Is the condition of affairs in the salmon industry you are
asked to perpetuate by retaining this government and their fishery policy.
Is it not enough to raise your protest and bring indigation to the most
placid?
If you ever get a chance to buy a sockeye or a steel-head salmon, nnd
place It on your table, try to digest along with the very edible product, the
fact that it had to be stolen or procured Illegally before it was sold to you.
G. R. T.  SAWLE.
CLEMENTS WELL RECEIVED
(Continued From  Page One)
Mr. Clements, in concluding, stated that if elected, as he felt sure he
would be, he wanted the residents to
feel that he was at their service. He
was appealing to the Liberals as well
as to the Conservatives to declare in
the interests of Canada from a Canadian standpoint.
A number of questions were asked
the candidate at the conclusion of
the meeting. Several In the audience wanted to know how he stood
on the question of Oriental labor
and whether he thought Japanese
should be given fishing licences in
stead of white men.
Mr. Clements said he would be ab
solutely frank. He believed this
should be a white man's country and
he was against the introduction of
Orientals.
In reply to further questions, he
said he believed the fishery trouble
would not be settled here until British Columbia did as Ontario had
dpne—secured the control of its
fisheries other than the deep sea fisheries. The fisheries of the province
were under a boss who used them for
his own advantage. This was Bob
Kelly of Vancouver. The Dominion
government was handling these fisheries in anything but a satisfactory
way. He believed iu retaining everything possible for the use of the
white men of the country.
The meeting closed with the singing of "God Save the King," and
rousing cheers for Mr. Clements and
for Mr.  R.  L.  Borden.
WATER  NOTICE
Miss Shot of the hospital staff has
been obliged to take a few weeks'
holiday  owing to  111  health.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
l   FOR RENT   t
* *
* Store     building     on     Second  •■:•
* Avenue    at    Seventh    Street.  *
* Low   Rent. *
I JEREMIAH H. KUGLER, LTD. I
.;-.;. * * * * * * * *,;
j. * * * * * *... * *»;. * *.
********
I, Andrew Christian Skjelbred, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, occupation
farmer, give notice that on the 24th
day of September, I intend to apply
to the Water Commissioner at his
office in Prince Rupert, for a licence
to take and use 3 cubic feet of water
per second from hot springs on the
border of Lake Lakelse in the Skeena
Land Division of Coast District. The
water is to be taken directly from
the springs and is to be used on Lot
8279, for sanitarium purposes.
Dated August 24, 1911
AND.   CHRISTIAN  SKJELBRED.
9-6 Prince Rupert, B. C.
Skeena  Land  District—District of
Cassiar
TAKE NOTICE that Marion Mc-
Diarmid, of London, Ontario, occupation nurse, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described land:—Situated on the
Kitwancool River; commencing at a
post planted at the northwest corner and about 5 1-4 miles distant in
a northwesterly direction from the
north end of Kitwancool Lake;
thence south SO chains; thence east
80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains to point of
commencement, and adjoining Lot
1S78 to the north; and containing
G40 acres, more or less.
MARION   McDIARMID.
Daniel McDonald, Agent.
Dated July 24   1911. A-15
Form of Notice (Section 47)
Skeena    Land    District—District    of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that Philip T.
Chesley of the City of Prince Rupert,
occupation prospector intends to apply for permission to lease the following described land, bounded as
follows:—Commencing at a post
planted on the south bank of the
Shamos River (sometimes called the
Shames River) about three-quarters
of a mi'e west from the Grand Trunk
Pacific Railway and on the south
bank of the said river; thence north
eighty (80) chains; thence west
forty (40) chains; thence south
eighty (SO) chains; thence eur-t forty
(40) chains to point of commencement, and containing three hundred
and twenty (320) acres more or less,
and which land was located by me
on the 25th August, A. D. 1911. .
PHILIP T.  CHESLEY.
Dated August 28, 1911.
i »44 »;* .j« ijt «*« <•*< »j»»jt ij* »j« ij. »jt <$* »;•»;«♦]
I 75 x 100 Feet
|    ASK     For Lease on Third
| UNCLE     Avenue at Ninth
| JERRY Street
| JEREMIAH H. KUGLER, LTD.
■J* ••* **•** *»♦ "I" *** ♦!* -*•* ,»* *!*■ "I* •*!* "J* *I* •*••■ *I* **•* ♦»* •I* »I* •»*• 'I* 'J* ->J» »5
v v •** v v v v v v v v *? v v v *»* v v v *•* •*■* 'I* •J* •J* *»* **■
I STORAGE!
'.*• *
* *
* Household Goods and Baggage *
* given careful attention. *
£   Forwarding,   Distributing   and *
* Shipping Agents X
I TRANSFERERS f
* Prince     Rupert     Warehousing %
* and   Forwarding   Co. X.
* First  Ave.,  near  McBride  St. *
$ DOUGLAS SUTHERLAND,      *
% Manager. *
* P. O. Box 007        '  Phone 202 *
.;. .;.
.;..;«* ** * * * * * * * * * * * .*.** * * * * * * *
Defection in  Montreal
The defection of J. N. Greenshields, K. C, of Montreal, one of
the most influential leaders and managers In Quebec province, is a seriouB
blow. "I have been a Liberal all
my life, and still am," says Mr.
Greenshields,  "but 1  am  opposed  to
the reciprocity proposal, and intend
to fight it all I can."
 o	
Rebate  on  Taxes
The council has decided to extend
the time during which a rebate on
taxes will be made up to November
16 Instead of November 1.
GRAND HOTEL
WORKINGMAN'S HOME
25c
Rooms 50 Cents
Spring Beds, Clean
White Sheets
Best in Town for the Money
FIRST AVE. AND SEVENTH ST.
J. Goodman, Proprietor
Form of Notice  (Section  34)
Skeena    Land    District—District    of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that Philip T.
Chesley, of the City of Prince Rupert, B. C, occupation prospector,
intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described
land:—Commencing at a post planted
about half-way between Mile Post
77 and' Mile Post 7S on the main line
of the Grand Trunk Pacific Railvay
from Prince Rupert, and about fifty
(50) feet west off the said right-of-
way of the said railway; thence
south eighty (80) chains; thence
west forty (40) chains; thence north
eighty (80) cliains; thence east forty
(40) chains to point of commencement, and containing th ee hundred
and twenty (320) acres more or less
and which land was located by me on
the 20th day of August, A. D. 1911.
PHILIP   T.   CHESLEY.
Dated   August  28,  1911.
Tt)  WATER  TAKERS
On account of scarcity of water
the supply will be cut off between
the hours of 9 p. m. and 5 a. m.
during the dry weather.
WM.   MAHLON   DAVIS,
tf Supt. of Water Works.
NOTICE h- hereby given that on
the eleventh (11th) day of October
next application will be made to the
Superintendent of Provincial Police
for the grant of a licence for the sale
of liquor by retail in and upon the
premises known as The Copper City
Hotel, situated at Copper River,
Skeena District, upon the land described as Lot A, Block 312, Copper
City, Skeena District, B. C.
Dated September 11, 19il.        s-6
HARVEY CREECH,
Applicant.
LAND   FOR   SALE
Corner Eighth and Fraser Streets
Clinton Rooms
Newly    remodelled   and    furnished.
Board   and   lodging.   Home cooking
a  specialty.    Mrs.  Anderson,  Prop.
Rooms, $3 Per Week '
New Knox Hotel
ARTAUD & BESNER
Proprietors
The New Knox Hotel Is run on the
European plan. Flrst-clss service.
All the latest modern improvements
THE BAR keeps only the besf
brands of liquors and cigars.
THE CAFE is open from 6.30 a.m.
to 8 p.m. Excellent cuisine; first-
class service.
Board, $1 a Day — Beds, 50c and nn
First Avenue'   Prince Rupert
TAKE NOTICE that I will receive
tenders for the parcel of land known
as Lot 1105, Range 5, Coast District,
Province of British Columbia. This
is one of the choicest pieces of land
lying along the Skeena River and
contains about 155 acres. The land
Is Crown granted. Terms cash. Tenders must be in before the 5th day
of October, 1911. The highest or
nny tender not necessarily accepted.
For further particulars apply to the
undersigned.
D.   G.   STEWART,
Assignee of H. C. Breckenrldge.
Box  225,  Prince Rupert,        s-15
NOTICE.
A book is kept In the City Clerk's
Office in which to enter the names
and addresses, etc. of citizens ot
Prince Rupert desiring employment
on City work. All desiring employment should register at once.
ERNEST A. WOODS,
City Clerk.
 LADYSMITH	
COAL
ROCHESTER & MONROE, Phone 116

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