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Prince Rupert Journal Apr 28, 1911

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VOLUME 1
Published Twice a Week.
PRINCE RUPERT, B. C, FRIDAY, APRIL 28,  1911.
Price,  Five Cento.
No.   91.
ISLANDS AWAKENING
Active Year on the Queen Charlottes is
Indicated by Early Movement There.
C. Gillinglinin Laments tlie Waste of
Fodder Through Absence
of Stock
C Gillingham, road engineer for
the Queen Charlotte Islands, is in
the city for a few days. He reports
that the islands look forwaro to a
very busy season. Already there are
abundant evidences of the coming
activity. The spring is opening up
with a steady influx of people, and
various enterprises are preparing
for active operations.
The day he left Rose Harbor in
the south, eight whales had been
taken and the whaling company are
sure to find the southern station one
of the best on the coast. The station at Naden Harbor is likewise expected to be important, the Queen
Charlotte stations being probably
the best in the chain established in
the Pacific coast.
The mining interests are active
early and there promises to be an
excellent season's work done in the
mines. The Morgan group near
Lockport, will spend $5,000 at once,
it is announced, in preparatory development work at the properties.
Other mining ventures are spending
similar amounts or larger sums in
testing what the claims are like, so
that there is promise of a very active
mining season.
An early start is being made on
the roads. Mr. Gilllngham is enthusiastic over the islands as a farming
centre and says there is a luxuriant
growth of grass already on vast
areas. This is going to waste for
want of cattle to put upon it.
TO PROTECT GAME
Regulations  Put  Into  Effect  by the
Government in This
Respect
Elk anil Mountain Sheep to Continue
Off List of Animals to
Be Shot
A close season has been declared
by the Lieutenant-Governor in
Council, for mountain sheep and for
wapiti or elk. There can be no elk
shot for a year on the mainland of
the province. The close season for
mountain sheep is confined to Yale,
Simulkalum and Okanagan districts,
and covers two years' time.
The animals have been protected
for some time as specified. The
season is to be continued in the interests of the game.
The proclamation made by the
provincial secretary with respect to
this reads as follows:
"On the recommendation of the
Honourable the Attorney-General,
and under the provisions of the said
Act, His Honour, the Lieutenant-
Governor in Conucil, doth declare as
follows:
"That there shall be a close season for a period of two years for
mountain sheep In the Yale, Simil-
kameen and Okanagan electoral districts.
"And it is further declared that
there shall be a close season for a
period of one year for wapiti or elk
throughout the mainland of the
province.
Another proclamation in the Interests of game preservation Is the
bringing into effect of the statute
against the use of automatic shotguns.
The statute was passed in 1909,
but is only now daclared In force.
The section reads as follows:
"It shall be unlawful for any person to use an automatic shotgun in
the pursuit of game in this province. The penalty for offending
against the provisions of this section shall be not less than fifty dollars or more than two hundred and
fifty dollars for each offence. This
section shall not come into force
until proclaimed by the Lieutenant-
Governor In Conucil."
The Lieutenant-Governor In Council has been pleased to declare, by
an order In council, the first day of
September, one thousand nine hundred and eleven, as the day on
which the section shall come into
force.
WATER SUPPLY FOR PRACTICALLY ALL TIME
Engineer Thomson of Seattle Says There is Water Enough at Shawatlans to Serve the City of
Prince Rupert Until it has a Million of Population-Consulting Expert Will
Likely Touch Upon the Power Side of the Proposition Also
in the Report he will Present to the Council.
As a result of his investigations
so far, Mr. Thomson, Seattle's chief
engineer, is very favorably impressed with Prince Rupert and her
prospective water supply. He came
here to report on the water supply
but so enthusiastic has he become in
studying the engineering questions
that present themselves here that it
would appear to be difficult supply
for him to decide where he will stop.
He seems prone to turn in and assist the city and Colonel Davis at
every turn in the propositions. In
an interview with The Journal he
admitted yesterday that the questions the city has to face are stupendous but he is pleased -to see the citizens facing them in the way they
are.
As to the water supply, he pointed
ou that basing the consumption for
domestic purposes on the ratio used
by St. Paul, which was higher than
many cities, there was available
enough water for a population' of
one million people here. This, he
pointed out meant that when the
supply was tapped the water question was solved for practically all
time for the city. When Prince Rupert's population went beyond the
million mark he felt it would be
easy to get additional water supplies.
Of the water he speaks in the
highest terms. It is pure and can
be kept free from all contamination
if no settlement is allowed about the
lakes.
In the city of $eattle which boasts
of its water supply, he points out
that now, with a population of a
quarter of a million it has been
found necessary to add to the water.
To show how advantageously situated Prince Rupert is, Mr. Thomson points out that he is figuring
upon a reservoir site for Seattle
that will be quite as far from the
city as the source of supply is here.
It is reported that Mr. Thomson
is likely to make a report upon the
power question as it is affected by
the Woodworth Lake proposition.
He is reported to be very favorably
impressed with this aspect and it is
expected will be able to promisg a
very considerable power plant at
quite   a  small  cost  to  the  city.     If
so, his engagement will be a double
advantage to the city at this time
when the subject of power is being
brought up by the Tsimpsean company. Mr. Thomson, it is reported,
believes he can give the city a very
cheap power supply without interfering with the water.
In speaking of the muskeg here,
Mr. Thomson points out that with
the cutting through of streets, sewers, etc., the muskeg will become
dry and become in reality peat. The
citizens will have to take precautions to guard against fire getting
started in it, then.
Mr. Thomson will probably leave
in a few days for SeattJe, taking the
data he has and send his report
back  at  an   early  date.
TO OPEN UP NORTH
Experts Will Look Into Possibilities of
the Skeena and Naas
Valleys.
Will   .Test  the   Growing of   .Sugar
Beets in These Sections
of the Province
The visit that the expert agriculturists and horticulturists are to
make to the Skeena River Valley in
a few days should be attended with
excel'ent results as far as getting
exact information as to the possibilities of the district along the lines indicated. The experts, E. A. Will,
who comes from Ontario, and E. W.
White, a Britisii Columbian, will be
here next week, it is expected, to
enter upon a thorough examination
of the lands of the north.
E. A. Wier is an expert agriculturist and horticulturists from Ontario, and E. W. White, a son of
Rev. Silva White of New Westminster. They have been specially commissioned by the provincial department of agriculture to proceed to
northern Britisii Columbia, via the
valleys of the Naas and Skeena rivers, and especially investigate the
agricultural and horticultural. possibilities of that great region. They
will thoroughly explore the entire
coast and adjacent northern territory, travelling on horseback and by
canoe, and making daily memoranda of the areas explored, the character of the soil, the maximum, average and lowest temperature, frost
conditions, precipitation, extent and
character of timber, approximate
cost of clearing, etc., etc., mailing
these memoranda, back to the department at Victoria at every opportunity, in the same manner that similar reports will be made in fin
ture by all provincial surveys engaged in the field.
Both Mr. Wier and Mr. White are
spoken of as exceptionally capable
men, with thorough, practical
knowledge of agriculture and all Its
related industries. They intend going in by way of Hazelton, to spend
the entire season in the nortli country and to complete an agricultural
survey of the whole of northern
British Columbia in so far as possible. From the data which they will
collect during the season a full and
completely informative report will
be made with respect to the producing capabilities of the several districts; at the same time, these two
expert representatives of the department will hold conferences with the
farmers and settlers at every opportunity, advising them as to what
crops or fruits their lands are most
suited for, and the methods to be
adopted for the securing of the Ijest
possible results.
This specialized survey work constitutes a new feature and a most
important one of the activities of the
department of agriculture. Many
quiries have, during recent months,
been received from, and hundreds of
new colonists  are now going    into
(Continued on Page Five.)
DEADLOCK REACHED ON
RECIPROCITY DEBATE
Both Sides to the Debate Declare That They Will Not
Give Way But Will Fight to the Bitter End Without any Truce-Determined Contest Now
Faces House of Commons.
(Special to The Journal)
OTTAWA, April 28.—The fight
of the Conservative opposition
against the reciprocity agreement
took a new turn yesterday and as a
result not. a speech on the subject
was heard in parliament. The Conservatives blocked the government's
attempt to bring up the question by
forcing a discussion upon the
charges made against a French
member.
With   both  the  parties  in  a  posi-
-en from w'eich the leaders declare
they  will  not    retreat, a d?ad-lock
has been established which may last
for weeks.
The announcement by R. L. Borden that his party would make no
trguce, was followed by a caucus of
the government supporters yesterday at which the determination was
expressed to push the fight aggressively.
BOAT NUMBERING
New Rules to be Enforced by the Provincial Government With Respect
to Salmon Fisheries.
Rules   to   Be   Observed    by   Those
Using Boats in the Fishing
Grounds
The provincial government has
made regulations as to the number
ing'of boats engaged in the salmon
fisheries. The new rules are as follows:
"1. All boats used in the taking
of salmon, as provided under the
provisions of the Salmon Fishery
Regulations, shall bear numbers
corresponding with those of the licence under which they are operated, and each boat shall have its
number and the initials of its owner
painted on both sides of the stern
in   white   on   a   black   ground,   the
COMMITTED FOR TRIAL
(Special to The Journal) *
VICTORIA,:   April   28.—Cap- *
tain A. A. Sears will stand trial *
at the next assizes on a charge *
of unlawfully killing and slay- •
ing John  Brydson,  one  of  the *
passengers    drowned    on    the *
steamer    Iroquois    when     she *
sank  off  Sidney,  near  here,  a *
few  weeks  ago. *
numbers and initials to be not less
than six inches in height.
"2. Any person who shall fall to
comply with the provisions of the
foregoing regulations shall be guilty
of an offence against the foregoing
regulation and the "British Columbia Fisheries Act, 1901," and
amending Acts."
IN ACTIVE DEMAND
Lots in Ellison and its Addition Meet
With Steady Sale This
Spring.
Increased Interest in the Interior Is
Shown  by Active Sale
of Lots
J. H. Kugler, with the energy
characteristic of him, is at the present time devoting a good deal of attention to the sale of town lots in
Ellison and the Rogers' Addition.
This site, which in the minds of
those best informed, is sure to be
an important point In the opening
up of the rich Hazelton district.
Situated right on the Skeena, it is
easily reached b steamer and is also
situated right on the line of the
Grand   Trunk   Pacific   Railway.
The Grand Trunk Pacific is
jointly interested in the site, which
is a guarantee that It is to be one of
the distributing points in the interior.
The promoters of the townsite
are well satisfied that they have the
stare of all others and will be rewarded by seeing a most active season there. The season will open up
In the Hazelton district at once so
that no time is to be wasted by
those who want to take advantage
of the boom days during construction. Tlie result of this anxiety is
seen In the demand which is manifest at tne office of Mr. Kugler.
"Is There a Personal Devil?" or
"The Problem of Evil," will be the
subject of Rev. W. H. McLeod's sermon at tlie Baptist Church, Sunday
evening. Service commences at
7:30 p. in. Regular morning service at 11 a. m. Bible School and
Brotherhood Baraca Bible Class at
2:30 p. m. You are cordially invited to attend these services.
Church situated at Sixth and Fruzer
streets.
THE INDIAN LANDS
Question of Vast Rights Claimed in Province is Put Before Sir
Wilfrid.
Prime Minister Encourages Idea of
an Appeal Being Made to
the Courts
HOSPITAL   BUSINESS
A New Set of Bylaws Will be Framed
to Meet Altered Needs of
Institution.
Secretary    Cnthbert    Has    Resigned
from  Position—Fire  Escapes
Discussed
(Special to The Journal)
OTTAWA, April 28.—Sir Wilfrid
Laurier, a few days ago, received
a delegation representing "The
Friends of the Indians of British
Columbia,' who pressed for a submission of the land question In the
north to the courts, objecting to tho
reply given by Hon. Richard McBride, who refused them a petition
of right.
Sir- Wilfrid expressed regret that
Mr. McBride had not agreed to refer
the matter in dispute to the courts.
He pointed out that, they might
have to take it into court without
tlie consent of the government of
Britisii Columbia in order to settle
the matter.
With Rev. A. E. O'Meara, who
has been actively engaged in the
mission on behalf of the Indians,
were Rev. Canon Tucker, Rev.
Charles Deprose and H. Cassells,
K. C, of Toronto.
IN POLICE COURT
Charge of Keeping "Opium Joint" Is
Not Concluded in  Magistrate's Court
In the police court today Gussey
Hamilton, charged with keeping a
disorderly house, a place where
opium was used, was brought before
the magistrate. The case for the
prosecution was presented when an
adjournment was taken until Monday when the defence will be offered.
The evidence went to show that
when the police raided the place,
two were using opium, at least, had
the pipe and all the other necessary
articles between them and were in
a dazed condition. The keeper, (he
accused, was in the room.
A. Manson, who appeared for the
defence, endeavored to establish the
tact that the pipe, etc., did not belong to the house, but to the woman
next door, Mae Adams, who was a
witness and denied possession. The
defence also attempted to show that
a police officer had attempted to
screen the latter woman in connection with the case.
This was denied absolutely by
Constable  McArthur.
The new quarters occupied by
J. H. Rogers, the steamship agent,
and J. H. Kugler, the enterprising
real estate dealer, are among the
most comfortable In tlie city. Both
firms have moved into their new
quarters on Second avenue, looking
down Centre street. They are both
furnished in excellent style and afford excellent opportunities for publicity.
The hospital board met on
Wednesday afternoon in the office
of P. I. Palmer. A letter of resignation from A. Cuthbert, secretary
of the board was read. Mr. Cuthbert in his letter took exception to
some remarks that had been made
at a previous meeting with respect
to furnishing reports. He contended that he had given all the reports
required under the bylaws.
After some discussion it was decided not to accept Mr. Cntlibert'3
resignation at the meeting, but to
refer it to the executive committee,
who will recommend a successor
from among the members of the association.
On the report of C. V. Bennett,
who had been appointed to look into
the bylaws as they now stand, it
was decided to have a new set of
bylaws drafted to be brought before
a special meeting of tlie association
to be called for the purpose, A committee, consisting of C. V. Bennett,
chairman, P. I. Palmer and O. H.
Nelson was appointed to prepare
new  bylaws  and  report.
The new bylaws will provide for
the appointment of a managing secretary such as is now employed, and
which it is doubtful can be properly
appointed under the present bylaws.
Several other changes will be introduced so as to make the machinery
of the board run rather more
smoothly, the changes being based
on the experience of the board since
the institution opened and the exact
needs are known.
J. G. Scott brought up the question of laundry. He said he understood that some of it went to the
Chinese laundry. It was, he understood, from some of the employees
at the hospital. He did not think
this condition should exist. Only
white laundries should be patronized.
It was pointed out that the hoard
bad not power to dictate as to where
employees should send their laundry. It was felt that the board
could use its influence along the line
indicated and accordingly, on motion of J. G. Scott and O. H. Nelson,
a motion was passed that the board
recommend that the staff of the hospital should patronize white laundries rather than Chinese.
A report was maae by H. H.
Clarke for the committee having in
hand the consideration of a water
tank for the hospital to provide
against shortage during lack of wa-
er. He reporteo in favor of a red
wood tank.
After discussion it was decided to
give further time to the committee
to go more fully  Into the question.
The subject of fire escapes for the
nstitulion formed the basis for a
report from J. G. Scott, who presented to the board a choice of escapes to meet the needs,
It was decided to empower the
committee to proceed with the work
of  installation.
The board adjourned tei meet next
Wednesday  at  the  hospital.
EIRE LOSS
Branch    Store   Of    Stalker  &   Wells
Destroyed  During  the  Night
Tlie rirm of Stalker & Wells met
with an unfortunate loss early this
morning when their new branch
store opened a little over a week
ago, near Hays Cove, was destroyed
by fire. The fire broke out some
time after midnight. Mr. Wells,
who was In charge and who had
rooms in the building, was awak-
ened only to find the place full of
smoke, lie notified the fire department and a quick response was
made. The distance from headquarters, however, rendered it, impossible to reach the place until the
building and sto'-k were practically
destroyed.
 o	
Captain S. Johnson, who has
e-harge of Ihe Foley, Welch & Stewart fleet, has gone up the river to
superintend (lie dispatching of the
steamers on  their  first  trip. PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Friday, April 28, 1911.
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| Prospecting in British Columbia f
•:•   *
.> *
* What "Financial World" of London Has to Say About This Province.       *
* *
*****************************************************
An interviewer recently asked Mr.
E. J. Chamberlin, the general manager of the Grand Trunk Pacific
Railway, whether any programme of
development was contemplated with
regard to Vancouver Island by his
company, says the Financial World.
"No," he replied, "we have no development plans for Vancouver Island. Why should wo go into that
is'and, whose great wealth of resource is now approximately understood, which wolud mean paying a
substantial price for any of its re-
zh ,66bahead cmfw ycm fcm
sources we might seek to acquire,
when we have such a virgin field as
the Queen Charlotte Island so much
nearer pur terminus, and every bit
as rich in variety of natural resources as even Vancouver Island?
While the Canadian Pacific and Canadian Northern are developing
Vancouver Island we shall devote
ourselves in all probability to the
Queen   Charlottes."
In a recent article in the Financial World we dealt with the exceptional openings which British Columbia offers to the British capitalist, and with the particular attractions of the group of Islands above
referred to by Mr. Chamberlin.
The completion of the Grand Trunk
Pacific line from Moncton, New
Brunswick, to Prince Rupert, brings
the Queen Charlotte Islands into direct touch with Canada's markets,
and removes the one obstacle which
has hitherto hindered the development of a richly mineralized and
densely timbered region. A Financial World representative has recently had the pleasure of a lengthy
and interesting interview with Mr.
J. G. Johnston, of the Western Steel
Corporation, of Vancouver. Although well-known as one of the
oldest pioneers and explorers in
British Columbia, Mr. Johnston is
still a young man. Active and wiry,
with keenly observant eyes he is an
excellent type of colonist, and
knows the Province intimately from
one end to the other.    He confirmed
in every particular what has already been said on the subject in
the Financial World, and was able
to supplement it by many details
from his close personal knowledge
of the country. On the subject of
timber he is an enthusiast, and he
pointed out that British Columbia
undoubtedly possesses a greater
quantity of timber than any other
part of North America. The minister of finance, in his recent budget,
statement, announced that the total
amount of lumber cut in 1910
amounted to 1,040,000,000 feet,
valued at $17,160,000, an increase of
Jie.lOO.OOO as compared with 1909.
It is believed that the rapidly growing demand for timber will increase
the value of this commodity by 50
per cent in the near future, and Mr.
Johnston emphasized the exceptional opportunities thus offered to investors in moderately capitalized
and carefully managed lumber and
sawmill companies. Mr. Johnston,
among his many other activities,
played a prominent part in the location of the extensive coal deposits
now being developed on Graham Island, which are likely to be of the
greatest importance to the commerce of the north.
The remarkable speed with which
the industries of this prosperous
province are being succesfully matured is due in no snioll degree to
the Premier, the Hon. Richard McBride. His clear, statesmanlike
grasp of the political situation, his
remarkable businesslike foresight,
and his vigorous yet charming personality, make a brilliant combination which is proving of incalculable
benefit to Britisii Columbia. He is
proud of his province, and great and
varied though his responsibilities
are, he is always ready to grant an
interview to anyone having suggestions to make in the interests of the
country. He is a quick and unerring judge of men and affairs dominating the politics and finance of
the province. Britisii Columbia
should rapidly come to the front.
OF INTEREST TO FARMERS
Bulletins   to   Be   Issued   from   New
Dominion  Institution  for the
Benefit of Farmers
WILL WRECK PARTY
Premier Roblin's Views of the Way in
Which Reciprocity Movement
Will Act.
He   Sees    Defeat   for   the   Liberals
Even If the Arrangement Is
Put in  Effect
Hon. R. P. Roblin, Premier of
Manitoba, speaking on the reciprocity question to an interviewer in Toronto,  said:
"There are a good many who believe that if it ever goes into operation It will be such a disappointment, such a costly experiment to
the poor unfortunates who have
been misled and deceived, that the
defeat of the Laurier Government
will be so easy that here will hardly
be a contest at al". That view of
the case Is held, I may say, by men
who believe that the Laurier government should be overthrown on
its general administration, but who
are satisfied that with the reciprocity pact in effect the overthrow
would be assured,
would be assured. My own opinion," Mr. Roblin continued, "is that
reciprocity will divide Canada into
an east and west, it will produce a
condition of things that will destroy
the work that has been prosecuted
toward binding tlie scattered provinces together in inter-provincial
trade ever since confederation."
After pointing out that reciprocity
would mean the certain wrecking of
mixed farming in Manitoba, where
this business Is just beginning to
fee-  developed,  Mr.  Roblin  went on:
"I make the statement that reciprocity will not only not benefit the
people of Manitoba, btu that it will
work most serious injury and financial loss, with more certainty and
conviction than any statement I
have ever made on any other public
question. I cannot undertake even
to estimate—it Is too serious to do
so—its final effect upon confederation and upon our relations with the
Motherland."
 o —
Small Johnny—Papa, would you
be glad if I saved a dollar for you?
Papa—Certainly, my son.
Small Johnny—Well, I saved It
for you, all right. You said If I
brought a first-class report from my
teacher this week you would give
me a dollar—and I didn't bring it!
**************************
I     The New Coiffure      I
* *
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Without doubt, fashion has now
veered to the more modified coiffure. The hair is frequently parted
and waved, to be draw down at the
sides of the face, partially conceal
ing the ears, and knotted at the
back in a style not unlike the Psyche knot. Again, the hair will be
parted but drawn up at the back and
sides, with a loose cluster of curls or
puffs on the top of the head, well
toward the back. Still another and
more extreme method is that which
shows the hair done in flat bands,
with bang on the forehead, and
sometimes with ringlets depending
from beneath the bandeaux at the
bask.
Does this mean the passing of the
pad and of extra hair goods? the
merchant will ask. Not necessarily. The second variety of coiffure
one popularized by Miss Billie
Burke, and firmly rooted in the
favor of American women generally,
demands not only a devided pad,
but it also requires extra curls,
puffs or ringlets in the case of a woman who has no great supply of
hair of her own.
The first style of coiffure would
also call for the divided pad in some
cases, and even for an artificial
Psyche knot. On the other hand,
the last name would dispense with
all padding, but would require the
bang, and perhaps several bandeaux of hair as well as the tiny
ringlets.
On the other band, the flatness
of the now head-dressing will undoubtedly presage the return to
favor of the ornamental combs, of
late rather neglected. Barrettes
should be as popular an ever, with
an increased demand for the high
style feature in back combs especially, including the jig-sawed, the
rhlnestone set and the metallic
mounted numbers.
In the last named several beautiful styles have recently appeared.
The wide gold band is prettily
chased and engraved, and both
shell and white goods are used for
tha comb, the latter being a high
novelty which should appeal to the
lady of blonde tresses.
After an umbrella has been In use
for a short time, put a drop of oil
in the centre of the top about once
a month. This prevents the ribs
from rusting.
Under the direction of the new
superintendent, Mr. P. H. Moore,
the Dominion Government experimental farm at Agassiz is being converted into a model stock farm.
Heretofore fruit growing has been
the principal work carried on. Under the new superintendent it is the
intention of the government to
establish a model home dairy. Cattle and horse breeding will also be
engaged in, and the results will be
announced in a series of bulletins
for the benefit of the farmers of
Britisii Columbia. The new policy
to be adopted at Agassiz was decided upon in view of the rapid settlement of the province and the
need for giving farmers the results
of dairying and stock breeding experiments.
Instead of engaging mostly in
fruit growing at Agassiz the government experts concluded ft would be
better to adopt general farm work
there, and establish fruit growing
stations in various sections, including the dry belt, owing to the variety of climates existing In different parts of the province. While
these alterations are being made it
is not intended that fruit culture
shall be neglected. A model dairy
stable and a model home dairy will
soon be realities at Agassiz. A contract for the buildings will be
awarded shortly. Fifty head of
grade Holsteins will be purchased,
and the herd will be gradually
worked up to a pure-bred type;
similar experiments will be made
with various breeds of horses. The
farm is already the home of one of
the best flocks of Dorset sheep in
the province.
The Dominion Government has
just selected the site of a large experimental fruit station at Salmon
Arm, on the line of the Canadian
Pacific Railway, and located in the
dry belt. This new farm will carry
on work similar to that now being
conducted at the Harper ' ranch
near Kamloops. The Dominion
Government has already secured a
large tract in the dry belt in the
Wndermere district, about fifty
miles south of Golden, and will establish a similar experimental fruit
station there, as well as another in
the Okanagan district. Negotiations for the land required for the
last mentioned farm are now in
progress.
 o	
Mr. Slimson—Willie, didn't you
go to the trunkmaker's yesterday
and tell him to send around that
trunk I ordered?
Willie—Yes, pa.
Mr. Slimson—Well, here is the
trunk, but no strap.
Willie—Yes, pa; but I told him I
thought you hadn't better have any
strap.
Skeena   |Land    District—District    of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that William H.
Hargrave, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation banker, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lanas:—Commencing at a post planted on the west
shore of Lakelse Lake, and about
1% miles distant and in a southwesterly direction from the S. W.
corner of Lot 3982, Skeena Land
District, District of Coast, Range V;
thence west 40 chains; thence south
80 chains, more or less, to the shore
of Lakelse Lake; thence following
the shore of said lake to point of
commencement, containing 160
acres more or less.
WILLIAM H. HARGRAVE.
Mancell Clark, Agent.
Dated  20th March, 1911.
New Knox Hotel
ARTAUD & BESNER
Proprietors
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlote Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Wirt A. Stevens, of Chicago, 111., U. S. A., occupation civil engineer, intends to
apply for permission to purchase
the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on
the shore of Masset Inlet about one
mile northeast of the mouth of the
Ain River; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 40 chains more or less
to the eastern boundary of T. L.
35413; thence south along the
boundary of T. L. 35413 and
T. L. 35414, a distance of 80 chains;
thence east 40 chains, more or less,
to point of commencement, containing  320  acres more or less.
WIRT   A.   STEVENS.
G. S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated Feb.  24th,  1911.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that James Mul-
lin, of Murdo, So. Dakota, U. S. A.,
occupation farmer, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands: —■ Commencing at a post planted on the
shore of Masset Inlet, about one
mile northeast of the mouth of the
Ain River; thence west 40 chains,
more or less, to the eastern boundary of T. L. 85414; thence south
60 chains, more or less to the shore
of Masset Inlet; thence northeasterly along the shore to point of
commencement, containing 60 acres
more or less.
JAMES   MULLIN.
G. S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated Feb.  24th,  1911.
For Sale
155% Acres good land, on South
Bank of Skeena River, 85 miles East
of Prince Rupert by G. T. P. Ry.,
with buildings erected thereon, containing dwelling, store and post
office.
P. McLACHLAN.
Box 324.
For Sale
160 Acres Alberta land for sale
at $15.00 per acre, or Exchange for
Prince Rupert property; fenced; 40
acres broken; small house; 2 miles
from P. O., being southwest quarter
section 6, township 53, range 9.
P.  McLACHLAN,
P. O. Box 324     Prince Rupert, B. C.
Wanted
A live, active Real Estate Partner,
with some capital, to take half-
Interest in company handling Real
Estate, Insurance and Manufacturing Agencies. Party to take full
charge of office in Prince Rupert, as
I am soon to leave for the Interior
for the summer. Apply to
G. W. ARNOTT
Drawer 1539 Prince Rupert
Skeena Land  District—District
of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that Victor H.
Reynolds, of Hull, Massachusetts, occupation chauffeur, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described land:—Commencing at a post planted at high water
mark on the northerly side of the
entrance to a small unnamed cove on
the west coast of Pitt Island, about
one-quarter mile south of the entrance to Kitkatla summer village;
thence east forty chains; thence
south twenty chains; thence west
forty chains; thence north ten
chains more or lees to high water
mark; thence following along high
water mark around the head of the
cove back to the commencement, and
containing sixty (60) acres more or
VICTOR H. REYNOLDS.
J. H. Plllsbury, Agent.
Dated Feb. 18th, 1911.
The Thompson
Hardware Co.
—Second Avenue—
Paints. General Hardware,
Oils, Stoves and Ranges.
Prince  Rupert  Private   Detective
  Agency 	
N. McDonald, Manager
All kinds of legitimate detective work
handled for companies and individuals.    Business strictly confidential.
P. O. Box 803 — Phone 210
NOTICE.
Tenders will be received by the
undersigned up to the 22nd day of
April, 1911, at 5 p. m., for the purchase of Block 27, Subdivision of
Lot No. 541, Group 1, New Westminster District, situated in the City
of Vancouver, and being the site of
the old Provincial Court House.
Each tender must be enclosed in a
registered letter and must be addressed to the under Igned, and
plalnlv marked " 'ender for old
Van www Court House Site," and
must be accompanied by an accepted
cheque for ten per cent of the first
payment of the purchase money.
Payment for the property will be
accepted in instalments of one-
quarter of the purchase money.
The first of such instalments to be
paid within thirty days after the acceptance of the tender, and the other
three annually thereafter, with interest at the rate of 6 % per annum.
In the event of the person whose
tender is accepted failing to complete the first instalment within
thirty days of the notice of such acceptance the sale to him will be
cancelled and his ten per cent deposit forfeited. The cheques of unsuccessful tenderers will be returned. The highest or any tender
will not necessarily be accepted. No
commissions of any kind will be allowed.
WM. R. ROSS.
Minister of Lands.
Department of Lands,
Victoria,  B.    C.
March  7th,  1911.
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE.
WM. S. HALL, L. D. S. D. D. S.
:-: DENTIST :-:
Crown and Bridge Work a specialty.
All dental operations skillfully
treated. Gas and local anaesthetics
administered for the painless extraction of teeth. Consultation fraa.
Offices, Helgerson 3k., Prlace Rupert
The New Knox Hotel is run on tbe
European plan. First-clas service.
All the latest modern improvements.
THE BAR keeps only the best
brands of liquors and cigars.
THE CAFE is open from 6.30 a.m.
to 8 p.m. Excellent cuisine; first-
class service.
Board, $1 a Day — Beds, 50c and np
First Avenue.  Prince Rupert
GRAND HOTEL
WORKlNGMAN'S HOME
25c
Rooms 50 Cents
Spring Beds, Clean
White Sheets
Best in Town for tho Money
FIRST AVE. AND SEVENTH ST.
J. Goodman, Proprietor
THE WESTHOLME LUMBER GO.
LIMITED
We handle all kinds of
Building Supplies
First Arenne
Telephone 180
Corner Eighth and Fraser Streets
Clinton Rooms
Newly   remodelled   and   furnished.
Board   and   lodging.   Home cooking
a  specialty.     Mrs.  Anderson,  Prop.
Rooms, 93 Per Week
Skeena Land District—District
of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that P. C. Pills-
bury, of Boston, Mass., occupation
civil engineer, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—beginning at a
post planted at high water mark on
the northerly end of Pitt Island, on
Ogden Channel, and about 2 miles
southwesterly from Swede Pt; thence
east 60 chains thence south 40
chains; thence west 50 chains more
or less to high water mark;.thence
following along the high water mark
back to the point of commencement,
and containing 240 acres more or
less.
F. C. PILLSBURY,
J. H. Plllsbury, Agent
Dated Fob. 19, 1911.
Prince Rupert Land District—
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that P. McLachlan,
of Prince Rupert, occupation broker,
intends to apply for permission to
lease the following described land:
—Commencing at a post planted
one-third of a mile northerly from
head of Alice Arm, on Its Easterly
Side; thence 40 chains northerly;
thence 40 chains easterly; thence 40
chains southerly; thence 40 chains
westerly to place of commencement.
PETER  McLACHLAN.
Thos. L. Fay, Agent.
Dated 2nd Feb.,  1911.
Skeena   Land   | District—District   of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that Alice Munro,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
married woman, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted on the west
shore of Lakelse Lake, and about
1% miles distant and in a southwesterly direction from the S. W.
corner of Lot 3982, Skeena Land
District, District of Coast, Range V;
thence west 40 chains; thence north
40 chains; thence east 60 chains,
more or less, to the shore of Lakelse
Lake; thence following shore of
said lake to point of commencement,
containing 200 acres, more or less.
ALICE MUNRO.
Mancell Clark, Agent.
Dated  20th  March,  1911.
GRAHAM ISLAND — "The surest
sign of the progress of a town or
I district is its newspaper—live, ac-
' tive, hustling." "The Masset Review," Masset, Q.C.I
NICKERSON-ROERIG COMPANY
CUSTOMS AND MERCHANDISE
Brokers, Forwarding Agents,
Storage, etc.
3. W. POTTER
ARCHITECT    AND    STRUCTURAL
ENGINEER
Re-inf orced Concrete a Specialty
—o—
Law-Butler Building - Prince Rupert
HAVNOR  BROS.
FUNERAL  DIRECTORS
and
PROFESSIONAL  EMBALMERS
Notice is hereby given the the
reserve existing by reason of the
notice published in the British Columbia Gazette of the 27th December, 1907, over lands on Graham Island, formerly covered by Timber
Licences Nos. Nos. 3705-5, 37056 and
37057, which expired on the 6th day
of November, 1909, and the lands
embraced within Timber Licence No.
37059, which expired on the 25th
day of January, 1909, is cancelled,
and that the said lands will be open
for pre-emption only under the provisions of Section 7 of the "Land
Act" after midnight on June 16th,
1911.
ROBERT A.  RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Lands Department,
Victoria, B. C,
9th March, 1911.
DR.  W.  B.  CLAYTON
DENTIST
—o—
Office  in    the    Westenhaver  Block.
Over Orme's Drug   Store.
Prince Rupert
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE, that I, Minnie
Meredith, of Victoria, B. C, occupation a married woman, Intend to
apply for permission to purchase the
following desoribed lands:—Commencing at a post planted about 40
chains distant and in a South direction from the Southeast corner of
Lot 1733; thence, east 40 chains;
thence south 40 chains; thence west
40 chains; thence north 40 chains
to point of commencement, containing 160 acres more or less.
MINNIE   MEREDITH.
John Klrkaldy,
Agent.
Dated  February  20th,  1911.
Skeena Land  District—District
of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that Joseph Edward Merryfield, of Prince Rupert,
occupation merchant, intends to apply for permission to lease the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about 10 chains
north from the northeast corner of
Lot 33; thence west 1500 feet to
shore of Smith's Island; thence following shore in a southerly direction
1200 feet; thence east to shore of
De Horsey Island;  thence following
" ore in a northerly direction to
point of commencement.
JOSEPH  EDWARD  MERRYFIELD.
E. Spro, Agent.
Dated April 4, 1911. 4-7
NOTICE
TENDERS for the Installation at
the Prince Rupert School of twelve
(12) Red Cross Sanitary Closets,
furnished by the Government, will
be received by the undersigned up to
noon on Wednesday, March 22nd,
1911, for transmission to the Public
Works Department. The successful
tenderer will be called upon to furnish a bond in two sureties in a
sum equal to 50 per cent of the contract price. Specifications can be
seen at the Government. Agent's Office, Prince Rupert. The lowest or
any tender not necessarily accepted.
J. H. McMULLIN,
Government Agent.
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast
TAKE NOTICE that F. T. Saunders, of Vancouver, occupation master
mariner, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands:— Commencing at a
post planted about 6 miles northwest of Love Inlet on the north
east shore of Pitt Island; thence
south 20 chains; thence west 40
chains; thence north to shore;
thence following shore In a southeasterly direction to point of commencement , containing 80 acres
more or less.
FRANK TAUNTON SAUNDERS,
Locator.
W, Hamilton, Agent.
Staked 17th, Feb., 1911.
Skeena Land District—Dlstrlet of
Queen  Charlotte Island.
TAKE NOTICE that Robert Fraser Ogllvle, of Vancouver, occupation banker, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the folowing
described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 2 miles west of
the southwest corner of A. P. 12-
037; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains to
point of commencement, containing
640 acres.
ROBERT FRASER OGILVIE.
Arthur Robertson,  Agent.
Dated Dec. 9, 1910.
NOTICE.
A book is kept in the City Clerk's
Office in which to enter the names
and addresses, etc. of citizens of
Prince Rupert desiring employment
on City work. All desiring employment should register at once.
ERNEST A. WOODS,
City Clerk.
For Neat Job Printing
see the Journal Man
Tel. 138
i Friday, April 28, 1911.
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
&tftlffllffltffl[ffltffltffltftl
ElftWWWWWtfflWk
I GRAND TRUNK PACIFIC 1
TOWNSITE
M
ELLISON
The only Main Line Town-
site in British Columbia in
which the Grand Trunk
Pacific Railway Company
has announced its joint
ownership.
ELLISON
w
i i
S.EE THE OFFICIAL MAP.—The
first glance will show you that
ELLISON is located at the junction
of the Skeena River and the Bulk-
ley Valley. The Grand Trunk
Pacific has announced that they are
joint owners in the townsite of Ellison. Now, my dear reader, you must
remember that up to date the Grand
Trunk Pacific has not announced
that it has any interest in any other
main line towsite in Britisii Columbia. Does that start you thinking?
 o ■
STUDY THE MAP and you will
find Ellison is where the railway tracks leave navigation. That
fact is a very important one for conservative investors to think over.
What is known as the Hazelton district covers a territory many miles
in extent in every direction radiating from the townsite of Ellison.
.Mining machinery, ore shipments,
smelters, reduction plants and all
sorts of mining operations starting
up in this rich mineral region, must
necessarily have a metropolis, a
HUB, a headquarters. If any sane,
conservative man can figure out any
other spot except Ellison for the hub
of the great commerce of this district, his plan should be very inter
esting to the Grand Trunk Pacific
officials. It does seem as though
these officials, after several years of
investigation and engineering,
would know just what they were doing when they put their official
stamp  on Ellison.
 o	
STUDY THAT MAP.—I desire to
say to all parties who are talking townsites in the vicinity of Skeena River and the Bulkley Valley
that there will no doubt be several
small towns, just the same as one
always finds in a mining district.
There will be towns in the vicinity
of Ellison along branch railways,
probably towns at the ends of branch
lines made to serve the mines and
the collieries, but it will be history
repeating itself in regard to the
building up of every metropolis.
Ellison has every natural advantage,
has every earmark of being the future mercantile and financial center of the Skeena River mining dislrict and the entrance to the Bulk-
ley Valley.
STUDY THAT MAP and you will
find that all of the mining
towns and railroad towns around
there just beginning to    be    talked
about will only be feeders to the
city and port of ELLISON. The
Grand Trunk Pacific has put its
official stamp on Ellison. Do you
believe the company will do as much
for townsites owned by individuals
as it will for one in which its stock-
holders are joint owners? If you
do, don't buy any lots in Ellison. If
you desire to make a permanent investment, or merely to make a little
quick money, you must decide for
yourself right now. Do you propose
to follow the individual townsite
promoters or the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway Company.
 o ■	
STUDY THAT MAP.—If you desire to put your money into a
real estate promoter's townsite you
will have many, many opportunities
this summer, The average promoter
is full of hurrah and red fire. He
must enthuse investors of the mail
order class with his wares. ELLISON is in the Missouri class. Therefore, I am not telling any fairy
tales about it. I am making statements that can be readily verified.
 o	
STUDY      THAT      MAP.—If     you
want to join that great army of
investors-at-long-range,     then     you
should put your money into promoters' townsites. If you want a perfectly safe and sound investment,
certain to bring you large profits,
then put your money where the
Grand Trunk Pacific, after years of
careful investigation, have put their
money.
 o —
STUDY THAT MAP.—It is not
likely the Grand Trunk Pacific
will have any other townsite in British Columbia for sale this year. The
officials of the company state that
the company is not interested in any
townsite in the Hazelton district
with  the exception  of ELLISON.
ELLISON is on the bank of the
Skeena at its confluence with
the Bulkley. You may change railway surveys; you may change the
location of towns along the line of
road, but you cannot change the
geography of the country through
which the railway passes. The head
of navigation necessarily means an
important townsite. Ellison will
not only be at the head of navigation but the center of a mining district wonderful in its resources that
is   now   being  opened   up,   and   for
which Ellison will be the shipping
point both by rail and water. The
fact that trains may change engines
up or down the line or in the suburbs of the town of Ellison does not
amount to shucks in building up a
town when sue-li places are compared with a town located wliere
rails and navigation meet.
STUDY THAT MAP.—You will
find on the official plan of Ellison that a large part of the town-
site has been reserved for future
sales, the same as the company has
done with certain sections of Prince
Rupert townsite. There are, therefore, at this time, comparatively
few lots on the market. You must
hurry if you want one.
 o	
STUDY THAT MAP.—ROGERS'
ADDITION to Ellison, only a
small parcel of land, lies within
eight blocks of the site of the railway station. Lots in this are heing
offered. 1 am advising my clients
to buy Rogers Addition lots at $150
for inside lots and *^60 for corners.
Terms—10 per cent discount for
cash, or 10 per cent down and the
balance on easy terms;  no interest.
ft
LOTS IN ELLISON TOWNSITE AND ROGERS ADDITION FOR SALE
PRINCE RUPERT
British Columbia
^WWWWWWWW!
JEREMIAH H. KUGLER
Offices-2nd Avenue
Facing Grand Trunk Terminal
wwwwwRawwi^
GERMANY'S RULERS
Correction  of Some  Misconceptions is
Hade by British Writer in
Chronicle.
There   Are   Wide  Powers   Given   to
the Representatives of the
People in That Country
A writer in the London Daily
Chronicle, Charles Lowe, throws an
interesting flood of light on the system of government in Germany. The
description of the powers of the local governments and the freedom of
the reichstag, or people's parliament, shows how safely the affairs
of a vast military empire may be
conducted on the home rule theory.
The article is as follows:
Many people regard the German
Empire as a great autocracy, and
the Kaiser as the very personification of an autocrat. Nothing, however, is further from the truth. The
German Empire is today the most
convincing proof of the triumph of
Federalism.—Mr.  John  Redmond.
The above quotation from an article contributed to a contemporary
by the leader of the Irish party, calls
attention to a fact not generally
known, that Germany is par excellence the country of home rule in
Europe—her local or Individual
state parliaments corresponding to
the various state legislatures In the
American Union. But whereas with
us it is proposed, by the advocates
of home rule, to decentralize legislation by the creation of separata
parliaments, subject to their venerable mother at Westminster, Germany has attained to her present
autonomous position by something
like the reverse process. That is to
say, all the home rule diets, or local
state assemblies in Germany did not
proceed from, but preceded, the
reichstag, or imperial parliament.
They were In existence before the
creation of the empire in 1871, and
all they did was to surrender some
of their lawmaking powers to the
legislature of the reich. The residue
of these powers they retained, and
continue to exercise in as full and
independent a manner as ever—sub
ject, of course, to the usual "Imperial guarantees."
The Confederation
Prussia, Bavaria, Saxony, Wur-
temberg, Baden, and all the other
minor sovereignties in Germany,
form in their totality the confederation called the German Empire;
each has its landtag, diet, or separate state assembly, generally consisting of two chambers, with the
king, grand duke, duke, or prince as
the third effective factor in the legislature; and each of these bi-cameral diets is entitled to legislate on
lacol matters as before, minus the
affairs that were, by common consent in 1871, handed over to the
care of the reichstag, or imperial
parliament, representing the whole
German people.
Even the Reichsland, Alsace-Lorraine, is now at last to be endowed
with a two-chamber sort. of legislature for local self-government, under the Statthalter, or viceroy, and
promises fair to reconcile the people to their conquered, or rather reconquered lot, as nothing else has
ever done. It is also, let me say,
that, though Bavaria, for example,
enjoys some very special privileges
in the field of autonomy, neither
here nor in any state, so far as I
know, lias there ever been seen any
sign of tlie least centrifugal tendency or disposition to dislocate and
disrupt tlte imperiol edifice which
had the mighty Bismarck for its
builder. This Is an edifice in which
the most keen-eyed critic will search
In vain for the very slightest rent
or crack—all the German princes
and people being welded indivisibly
together by their heart-whole devotion to the ideas of "Kaiser and
Reich."
State  Legislatures
It is, I believe, generally known
how the various state legislatures
are constiuted—most of them bicameral landtags or diets with the
local crown placed effectively, hut
by no means arbitrarily over them.
And now let us see what is the nature of the federal or imperial legislature itself. This may be said to
sist of only two factors, with no
crown or veto power over them at
all. "But what, then, about the
emperor?" I think I hear my astonished readers ask. My reply is
that  the    emperor,    as     executive
president of the German Union, has
no veto power whatever over measures which have been passed by the
imperial legislature, which is a
purely  bi-cameral   one.
These two chambers, constituting
the German legislature, represent
the German people on one hand,
and the sovereign princes of Germany on the other. The former is
called the reichstag, or national assembly, returnable on the basis of
universal or manhood suffrage,
while the other is the Bundesrath,
or federal council, composed of personal representatives of tho confederate sovereigns, and presided over
by the imperial chancellor, whose
appointment lies with the kaiser.
Each of these chambers—one the
people's house, the other the princes'
house—has co-ordinate and co-equal
powers. The assent of both is necessary to the passing of a law, and
a bill would be blocked by the negation of either.
Distribution  of Power
The reichstag has 397 members,
and the federal council 58—or, at
least, that is the number of its votes.
Of these 17 only belong to the King
of Prussia, whose monarchy is about
two-thirds of tho whole of Germany,
while the rest are distributed
among the other states in proportion to their size and Importance.
It will thus be seen that Prussia
might easily be outvoted in what
may be called the upper chamber or
princes' house • of Germany, Tlie
combined "noes" of Saxony and the
southern states would, In themselves
suffice to counteract the "ayes" of
Prussia, and as a matter of fact It
has repeatedly happened that the
king thereof has thus been outvoted
by his sovereign confederates. The
location of the supreme court of the
empire at Leipzig, instead of at Berlin, was a case in point. But, please,
will my gentle readers try and get
it. into their heads that the kaiser,
as executive chief of the German
union, has no power of veto over a
measure which has once—as in the
case, for example, of the supreme
court—been approved by thq two
chambers of the legislature; and
that then, as German emperor, he
has no choice, but to promulgate a
law which, as King of Prussia, he
may have previously opposed In the
princes'  house.    It  is true  that  In
this upper house the influence of
the King of Prussia is paramount;
nevertheless such is the theory and
practice as I have endeavored to explain, the main thing to remember
being that the emperor has no veto
power over measures passed by the
two' chambers representing tlie
princes and people of the Fatherland.
The  Reichstag
Moreover, it is a great mistake to
suppose, as so many Englishmen
seem to do, that the reichstag, or
people's house, returnable by manhood suffrage, is a new law-assenting and registering body, and that
it has no will or power of its own.
I can assure them that this is a gross
mistake, and that the Williemstrasse
is ankle-deep in the bones and dust
of bills which the people's chamber
has thrown out. The reichstag's
power of the purse is absolute as
that of the house of commons. Not
a single man or mule, for example,
can be added to the German army
without the consent of, that is to
say. the voting of their cost, by the
German people. The veto power of
the reichstag is just as absolute as
that of the Bundesdrath, and nothing can be done in the way of positive legislation without tlie assent of
both, They thus represent a pretty
even balance of forces. What mutters it that tbe initiative of legislation lies with (lie federal council,
and that therefore private bills are
rarely heard of, if the reichstag enjoys the absolute right of rejecting
those measures?
Party System
The one tiling the reichstag, or
the people's house, cannot do is by
a party majority against the government to turn it out of power, and
for the simple reason that, though
Germany may be said to have a parliamentary regime, it is not yet
"blessed" or otherwise, with the
party or see-saw system of rule.
Besides, there is no such thing at
Berlin as an imperial cabinet. The
only imperial minister worth considering is the chancellor, the rest
of the "ministry," so to speak, being
formed by the members of the federal council. There is a Prussian
ministry, but not an Imperial one,
so that an application of the party
system to the German government
Itself would, at the utmost, result In
a change of chancellor. But, as a
matter of fact ,the German people,
as a whole, are not very much en
amored of party government, preferring to trust to the wisdom of their
monarch and the patriotism of their
ministers. What, said Prince Dulow,
who may be credited with knowing
his countrymen as well as anyone?
"No one in Germany desires personal regime; but on the other hand
the vast majority of the German
people is most emphatically against
a party regime." And why? Because the Germans, being a sensible
people, know full well that they
must strike the golden mean between civil liberty and military security, and that as long as their
country, as Moltke phrased it, "remains in tlie position of a besieged
fortress," it would be folly of them
to entrust the destinies of their
country—depending as they do on
the strength and efficiency of their
forces by land and sea—to tlie polit-l
icai caprices of rival factions.
When Englishmen talk of "constitutional government" they mean
government by party, whereas the
meaning attached to the phrase by
the German is a governmenl according to a written constitution, which
they certainly enjoy,
They are the must reconciled to
its omission of any reference to party governmenl since it gives them,
as I said before, absolute control of
the nation's purse, as well as absolute power to reject any and every|
measure thai may meet with their
disapproval. Hundreds of such
measures have' been thrown out beyond recall, while, on the other
hand, the government lias absolutely
no means Of dragooning tlie reichstag to its will. True, the kaiser,
with tlie assent of his fellow-sovereigns in tlie Union, may, on the advice of the chancellor, dissolve parliament, and thus send il packing,
on the understanding "bien enten-
elii," that another must soon take
place. But so may our own king
on the advice of his premier. Dissolutions of the reichstag have always taken the form practically of a
plebiscite, referendum or direct appeal on some particular Issue—army
bill, or tin. like—from the party
rent representatives of the people to
the people themselves, anil I cannot
recall a single case In which the pop
ular  reply   to  such  an   appeal   was
not in favor of tlie government.
That is because the German people, as a whole, firmly believe in the
hondesty, the honor, the enlightenment, tlie public spirit and patriotism of their government, and the belief is anilely justified of acts. For
there Is no government in Europe
that is more slngle-mindedly devoted to the highest interests of tlie
nation than that of Germany, whose
greatest source of strength is its consistency and continuity, and its happy non-dependence, on the ever-
varyig spirit of party.
NURSERY   STOCK
The   Principal    Regulations   Govern*
ing Importation Thereof
The attention of all persons who
Inend to import nursery stock into
Canada is called to the regulations
of "The  Distructlve  Insect  lend   Pest
Act," which may be obtained em application to the Department of Agriculture,   Ottawa.
In particular they should note the
following regulation governing the
conditions under which nursery
stock may lee- admitted;
"6. All persona importing nursery stink iiii■ > Canada shall givs
notice tu the Minister of Agriculture
within five days of dispatching the
order for the- B&me, lend tiie-y shall
again notify tbe minister on the arrival eel' the. shipment  in Canada."
"Notice shall also be given to the
Minister by all transportation companies, Custom House brokers and
other persona importing or bringing
nursery stock into Canada, Immediately such a consignment is received
by them. Such notice shall Includo
the name of the consignor and the
consignee, the points of origin and
destination, the name of the company carrying the nursery stock, ae
we1' as tlie nature, quality and origin of same.
"6. European nursery stock, and
such other Imported vegitatlon or
vegatable matter as the Minister
may determine, entering Canada
may be allowed to proceed and
shall be Inspected at the point of
destination, but must not bo unpacked except In the presence of an
inspector." PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Friday, April 28, 1911.
prince lupert journal
Telephone  138
Published twice a week on Tuesdays and Fridays from the office of
publication, Third Avenue, near
McBride Street.
Subscription rate to any point in
Canada, $2.00 a year; to points out-
side of Canada, $3.00 a year.
Advertising rates furnished on
application.
O. H. NELSON,
Editor.
Friday, April 28, 1911.
MISCHIEVOUS  AGITATORS
It is to be hoped that Sir Wilfrid
Laurier is incorrectly reported when
he is credited with using language
that can be interpreted as encouraging the Indians of northern Britisii
Columbia to expect that the claims
put up by "The Friends of the Indians of British Columbia" will receive his support in pressing for a
submission of a case to the courts
for decision. The encouragement
which tlie reports state has been
given by Sir Wilfrid to these Indians
shou'd never be held out. No one
wants to deprive the Indians of this
province or any other province of
every right that belongs to them.
We would favor going far beyond
treaty rights with them and the
majority of citizens would back up
such a course.
The Indians have never been
harshly treated in this country. The
native tribes of northern British
Columbia are a credit to the Indian
race in every respect. They are intelligent, and to a very considerable
extent industrious. There has never
been any attempt on the part of the
province of British Columbia to take
away any rights that belonged to
these Indians. If there ever were
such an attempt made we would be
the first to demand on the part of
the Indians the fullest protection by
the Dominion whose wards the Indians are. But no such attempt is
oeing made. The Indians, or rather
their "friends" ask au appeal to the
courts to decide the point as to
whether the Indians have not rights
io all the land in certain parts of
the north and ask for the granting
of a petition of rights to the natives
to submit such a claim to the courts.
On first thought this might appear to be an easy request to grant
and let the courts decide. There
are, however, two serious objections
to it, however that will readily appeal to all who have followed the
history of negotiations with the Indians on this coast.
The first objection is that an uncertainty would be introduced into
the land question in the north. It
may be perfectly evident how the
case would end, but there would be
for some time a cloud upon the
land titles.
On the other hand, Indians pre
Indians. While many are very advanced in the ways of the dominant
white race, yet the vast majority
of the tribesmen remain Indians in
their method of looking at matters
of law and constitutional order.
The case of Joe Capilano, the old
chief on the Fraser, affords an instance. Capilano, a few years ago,
together with some other Indians,
conceived the idea that there wero
grievances. It was decided that
Capilano should go back to Ottawa
and see the "Big Chief," Sir Wilfrid,
about the matters In dispute. He
went, and, returning, became a positive nuisance in the community until
his death a few years later, lie assuredly misinterpreted a simple
audience Which Sir Wilfrid gave him
and at which lie was given a courteous hearing. He refused after his
return to treat with Indian agents
or any other officials, He conceived
the idea that, in any ditficuty he
had, lie had been told to appeal
direct to Sir Wilfrid.
The premier of Canada is too
wise a statesman, we concede, to
have  Intentionally  given  tbe   Indian
ohlef bucIi an assurance,    Capilano,
nowever, cherished this thought and
became a disturber to a far greater
degree than ever before. His time
was spent In agitation and trouble-
making, to the disadvantage of his
kindred and tlie white settlers.
The Indian must be dealt with
with ulscretlon, with kindness and
with firmness combined. When Sir
Wilfrid was here last summer the
Indians approached him in person
on these land questions. The premier then acted with discretion. He
told the Indians to always look to
the agents of the department as their
friends and to be franK in bringing
tl.elr troubles before the agents,
feeling assured that the fullest justice would always be given them.
They were not encouraged hy the
"Big Chief" to make trouble and
the advice was well received.
We feel satisfied that if Sir Wil
frid would but consult Hon. William
Templeman in the matter he would
be better guided than by listening
too strongly to the words of the
"friends." If the prime minister is
correctly reported as being prepared
to force the question into court in
spite of the provincial government's
decision and on the fanciful claims
of the "friends," we feel that he is
but very poorly advised.
•> * •>»>.;*»>>>*;. * ** ***** **** ***** *
* *
* News of the Province      %
* J
**************************
SUBURBAN ROAD
VICTORIA— Work, preliminary
to the actual construction of the
Saanlch extension of the B. C. Electric Railway, has been commenced.
Two camps between Victoria and
Stelly's crossing, a point twelve
miles out, have been established,
and a number of men, working from
these are clearing the right of way
for the suburban car line. The
force at work will be increased to
two hundred men within the next
few  days.
REWARD FOR BRAVERY
SIDNEY—To recognize the bravery of the Indians Cowichan Bob,
Cowichan William Jack and Doughnut Charlie, who performed the
major part of the rescue work in
connection with the wreck of the
Iroquois on the morning of April 10,
the residents of Sidney have arranged a committee to take the matter up in the district and with the
proper authorities. Captain Eddie,
examiner of masters and mates, at
Vancouver, who held the first sitting of the preliminary enquiry into
the cause of the wreck, at Sidney,
there notified Cowichan William for
the three Indians, that their bravery
would be communicated to the head
of his department and that he would
urge that proper recognition of the
acts be given.
A NEW  HOSPITAL
NELSON—The directors of the
Kootenay Lake General Hospital Association have decided to erect a
new building at a cost of approximately $60,000 to replace the present inadequate and inconvenient
structure. This decision arose out
of the report presented by a special
committee appointed at the annual
meeting to look into the question of
putting up a new building or making additions nad improvements to
the present structure. The latter
course was considered impracticable
and the directors decided to inaugurate a campaign to raise from $30,-
000 to $35,000 immediately, the
provincial government having given
an understanding to put up dollar
for dollar for all money raised by
the association.
EXTREME  PENALTY
NEW WESTMINSTER — Charlie
Sato, a Japanese, who for some time
has been keeping a bawdy house on
Quebec street, received the highest
sentence that the law permits, at the
hands of Magistrate Edmonds in the
police court—$100 and costs or six
months' in jail with hard labor.
Sato pleaded guilty to the charge.
.Mr. G. E. Martin, city prosecutor
asking that the highest penalty be
imposed, grilled the prisoner unmercifully. "This man—I should
have said this creature—has pleaded
guilty," he said. "Fortunately,
such charges as this are not frequent ,for 1 cannot imagine a man
—for he is still a man—keeping
such a place. I think that it is time
to recognize that such a man should
be dealt with as severely as the law
allows." Magistrate Edmonds stated that he fully agreed with Mr.
Martin, The fine was the highest
the law permitted, hilt were It In his
power he would cheerfully give
more.
NO   BIDS  IN
VANCOUVER—Although Saturday, the 22nd instant, was tlie day
allowed for the receipt of tenders for
the purchase of the site of the old
court house, at the union of Cambie,
Hastings and Hamilton streets, Vancouver, it Is the astonishing fact that
not one offer for the property—unquestionably the most valuable in
the business section of the Terminal
City—reached the government. The
city of Vancouver has long looked
upon this particular property with
covetous eyes, as an ideal location
for the new city hall It Is proposed
to erect in the near future. Capitalists also have on various occasions
approached the government with a
view to purchase, and It Is understood that one provincial millionaire
has a standing offer with the minis
ter of lands at a price running into
seven figures. Whether the standing
offer will be accepted or what further move will now be made toward
a disposition of the property will
probably remain in abeyance until
the return to the capital of Hon. Mr.
Ross, who is now in Ottawa on public business. Meanwhile it is understood that no time will be lost
by the provincial authorities in laying out the grounds of the new
court house in a manner that will
make it one of the most delightful
and artistic features of the mainland
metropolis. Plans for the beautifying of the grounds have been obtained from one of the foremost
landscape architects of the dominion, and action thereupon will shortly be taken.
 o	
IMPORTING   RED   DEEIt
NEW WESTMINSTER—It is the
intention of the provincial government to fence off between 20 and 30
acres of the park at Coquitlani Provincial Mental Hospital for a deer
park. About 15 head of red deer
are to be brought out from England
this summer from Walham Court,
Sussex, for breeding purposes, and
these will be placed on the Asylum
Farm at Coqultlom. Mr. Bryan Williams, provincial game warden, has
paid a visit to the farm at Coquit-
lam to select a suitable deer park,
but so far he has made no selection.
SCHOOL BOARD'S POWERS
NELSON—At a conference showing clearly that the finance, committees of the city council and the
school board were irreconcilable on
the question of the current year's
school estimates to a difference of
nearly $8,000, the two committees
agreed to disagree and on friendly
basis decided on a mutual reference
to the supreme court of the province. For the school board the
board's finance committee had full
power to conclude this arrangement,
but the civic finance committee
could only recommend such a course
of action to the council. This recommendation was made, and was
unanimously adopted by the council,
Mayor Selous pointing out that the
action taken was friendly and. mutual. It is understood that the
school board will bring a mandamus
action at the May sitting of the su-
prme court to compel the city coun-
cial to grant the estimates, and that
the city council will co-operate by
facilitating the submission of the
Whole question to the court.
WANTED
WANTED—An assistant in the furniture business. Apply to J. F.
MacDonald, Second avenue.
BOARD WANTED
Gentleman desires board and room
in private family; $10 to $15 per
week. State conveniences. Address
R. A. M., "Journal."
Skeena    Land    District—District   of
Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that I, Roy,
Chrisman, of Port Essington, B. C..
occupation prospector, intend to apply for permission to lease the following described land:—Commencing at a post planted about five
miles distant and in a southwesterly
direction from the point at the entrance to Captain Cove, Petrel
Channel, and on the northeast side
of McCauley Island; thence west 20
chains; thence south 40 chains,
thence east about 20 chains to shore
of Petrel Channel; thence northerly
along shore line of Petrel Channel
to point of commencement and containing eighty acres more or less.
ROY CHRISMAN.
Dated April 11, 1911. 4-25
Skeena    Land   District—District   of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that W. H. Ferguson, of Prince Rupert, B. C, occupation civil engineer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about one
mile southerly, following the sinuosities of the shore line from the
southwest comer of Lot 104, Range
V; tlience 20 chains west; thence 20
chains south; thence 20 chains west,
thence 20 chains south; tlience 20
cliains west; thence about 40 chains
south; thence along shore northerly
to point of commencement.
W. H. FERGUSON.
G. Hansen, Agent.
Dated April 22nd, 1911. 4-25
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that W. H. Ferguson of Prince Rupert, B. C, occupation civil engineer, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about ono mile
southerly following the sinuosities
of the shore line from the southwest
corner of Lot 104, Range V;, thence
20 chains west; thence 20 chains
south; thence 20 cliains went; thence
20 chains south; thence 20 chains
west; thence about 40 chains south;
thence along shore northerly to
point of commencement.
W. H. FERGUSON.
G. Hansen, Agent.
Dated April 22nd, 1911. 4-25
The British Columbia Company
LIMITED.
AUTHORIZED CAPITAL $100,000.::  PAH) UP CAPITAL $41,500
DIRECTORS:—Reginald C. Brown, President; J. C. Maclure, Vice-
President; H. E. Marks, Managin g Director; Capt. E. Nash, William
McNair, R. A. Bevan, and F. C.  Williams, Secretary.      :-:      :-:
INTEREST 4 PER CENT. DEPOSITS
This Company acts as Executors, Administrators, Transferees and
Secretaries to Public Companies.   Commercial, Industrial and other
business propositions underwritten.    Issues made on  the    .
London and New York Stock Exchanges.
TIMBER, COAL, LANDS, and
COMPANY ORGANIZATION
Head Office for Canada, 203, 208, 210, 215 Carter-Cotton Building,
VANCOUVER, B.C.
DURESCO
The King of Water Paints
FIRST IN THE FIELD:
FOREMOST EVER SINGE
■SOLE AGENTS IN WESTERN CANADA:
The Staneland Co. Ltd
836-840 Fort Street, VICTORIA, B.C.
mm
New Twin Screw Steamer
Prince George
Replenish
the
Pantry
L.»—...—..
»..J
High-Class....
Grocery
Stock
to choose from
EVERYTHING CLEAN AND FRESH
Goods for the Table to Suit tbe Most
Fastidious  Housewife
! MERRYFIELD'
i
i
L.
CASH GROCERY
I
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'-"I
si
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For Vancouver, Victoria and Seattle
Mondays at 8 a. m.
S. S. "PRINCE GEORGE" sails tor Stewart, Sundays,  8:00  a.  m.
Vancouver,  Victoria,   Seattle, Mondays, 8:00 a. m.
S. S. "PRINCE ALBERT" for Port Simpson,   Naas    iviver   Points,
Massett,  Naden Htrbor, every Wednesday, 1:00 p. m.
and for '
Refuge Bay, Skidegate, Queen Charlotte City, Lockeport, Pa-
coti, Jedway, Ikeda Bay, Rose Harbor and return    via Queen
Charlotte City, e/evy Saturday,  1:00 p. m.
THE GRAND TRUNK RAj- .VAY SYSTEM, connecting with
trains from the Pacific Coast, operates a frequent and convenient
service of luxurious trains over its DOUBLE TRACK route between
Chicago, Toronto, Montreal, Quebec, Halifax, Portland, Boston,
New York and Philadelphia.
Information and tickets obtainable from the office hereunder
mentioned. Trans-Atlantic steamship bookings by all lines arranged
A. E. McMASTER
Freight and Pasenger Agent, G. T. P. Wharf.
Free Employment
Office
For all kinds of help. Cooks, waiters, dishwashere, hotel porters, all
kinds of laborers or mechanics, call
up 178 or call at the
FREE EMPLOYMENT OFFICE
GRAND HOTEL
Headquarters for Cooks and Waiters
ROGERS & BLACK
Wholesale Dealers in
BUILDING MATERIAL,    CEMENT,
LIME,  HAIR-FIBRE PLASTER
COKE, BLACKSMITH COAL,
COMMON BRICK, PRESSED BRICK
SHINGLES AND LATH
NEW  WELLINGTON  COAL
All  orders  promptly  filled—see   us
for prices.
PHONE 110 PHONE 116
ROGERS STEAMSHIP AGENCY
Through tickets to all points In the
United States and Canada by
The Northern Pacific Railway
The finest train across the continent.
Connecting at NEW YORK, BOSTON
PORTLAND and HALIFAX with ATLANTIC STEAMERS for all points in
ENGLAND, SCOTLAND, GERMANY,
FRANCE, ITALY, NORWAY and
SWEDEN, by WHITE STAR, RED
STAR, AMERICAN - DOMINION,
WHITE STAR DOMINION, CUNARD
FkENCH LINE, NORTH GERMAN
LLOYD, HAMBURG AMERICAN and
CANADIAN NORTHERN Steamships.
For all information write me, or
call at office:
J. H. ROGERS
General Railway & Steamship Agent
Prince Rupert, B.C.
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAW GO.
B. C. Const S. S. Service
§
FAMOUS
Princess  Line
^^
Princess
May
FOR
Vancouver, Victoria,
AND
Seattle
MONDAY, MAY 1, at 6 p.m.
J. G. McNAB,
General Agent.
The Roland Rooms
Splendid Accommodations
Newly Furnished
Hot baths;  right down town;  good
table board all round
RATES, FIFTY CENTS AND UP
LINDSAY'S CARTAGE ft STORAGE
G. T. P. CARTAGE AGENTS
Office at H. B. Rochester, Centre St
LADYSMITH COAL
is handled by us. All orders receive
prompt attention.  Phone No. 68.
* »&»>.> * ** * * *** * ** * * * * * * * * * * a
*
*
*
*
I Remember
j That we  *
| Import
I Our Wines
+ direct from Europe;  and that
ej.
* no house in Prince Rupert can
$ equal  them  for  quality.    No
* better can be bought anywhere
* in tbe Province.    We make a
J specialty  of
Family Trade
and guarantee satisfaction
* We  also   carry  r   complete *
* stock nf other *
* *
Liquors
Try a glass of
Cascade
Beer
f       The best local beer on the
t   market.
! CLARKE BROS.
* Christiansen & Brandt Bid.
* Telephone 30       Third Avenue
eV«"W*+******************4
.*-. Friday, April 28, 1911.
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
**************************
|   Shipping Report   !
* By Dominion Wlrehn. %
**************************
April 28—8 a. m.
Skidegate—Clear; calm; sea
smooth.
Ikeda—Clear; calm; barometer
30.11;  temperature 48; sea smooth.
Triangle—Overcast; wind west,
11 miles; barometer 29.57; temperature 37.
Estevan—Clear; calm; barometer
29.78;  temperature 45; sea smooth.
Pachena—Cloudy; calm; barometer 29.45; temperature 50; sea
smooth; two-masted schooner east-
bound at 8 a. m.
Tatoosh—Cloudy; wind west 6
miles;! barometer 30.22; temperature 45; sea smooth; In, steamer
Wasp at 6:50 p. m.; in, steamer
Northwestern at 7:15 p. m.; out,
steamer  Hulplnwand at 4:15  a.  m.
Point Grey—Clear; calm; misty
seaward; barometer 30.15; temperature 50.
Cape Lazo—Clear; wind northwest;
barometer 30.10; temperature 50;
sea smooth; Princess Mary left Comox at 8 a. m.
RIVER NAVIGATION
Active work is in progress on
the Skeena getting railway supplies
and general merchandise up the
river. A large number of commer
cial travellers are making their way
up to catch the first trade for the
season.
The Inlander will leave tomorrow,
expecting to run right through to
Hazelton.
The Hudson's Bay Company's
steamers are alongside the govern
ment wharf fitting up finally before
starting into service.
Foley, Welch and Stewart's boats
are all in commission carrying
freight.
session of sufficient information and
kowledge of the ground to itelli-
gently advise settlers in these particulars. This deficiency of knowledge it is intended to immediately
correct.
Messrs. Wier and White are also
taking with them a quantity ot sugar beet seed, and extensive experiments will be conducted with a view
to testing the suitability of the
northern district for this particular
crop and the related industry of sugar-making.
The provincial horticulturist, Mr.
R. M. Winslow, is also expected in
Prince Rupert next week, bringing
with him upwards of six hundred
fruit trees which have been ordered
for experimental planting by the settlers of the Lakelse and Kltsumka-
lum Valleys. Information is required by the settlers as to which
varieties are most suited for successful growth in the districts in which
they will be planted, and Mr. Wins-
low will personally initiate experiments In this connection and at the
same time address a series of meetings for the practical Instruction of
the colonists in the most practical
methods for the successful utilization of their holdings.
 o	
INSURANCE       SUPERINTENDENT
Colonel  Gunther,  of    Toronto,  Has
Been Appointed to Office
in Province
ON HUNTING TRIP
To hunt the big game of Alaska,
which many enthusiastic hunters of
the south have searched the wilderness depths of that northern land,
the Seattle yacht La Viajera, which
has been lying in Victoria harbor
is now on her long cruise.
One of the finest yachts, the La
Viajera, is owned by H. K. Owens,
J. D. Sword, mining engineer, and
A. H. Ridsdale, prominent business
men of Tacoma, who, in company
with Mr. Dodds, are making the trip
to the north. The vessel has been
in this port, taking on stores and
ammunition, and the latter they expect to distribute widely throughout
the Alaskan country.
It will be a day of woe for the
great elk, the grizzly bear and other
species which make the northern
domain their home. The sportsmen
expect to be gone about six months
and on their return trip believe that
they will have some excellent specimens of the big game of Alaska.
They have on board the vessel every
kind of firearms and ammunition
necessary for securing big bags. The
air will be full of lead whizzing m
various directions, pursuing the
feet quadrupeds of the north.
The La Viajera is a schooner-
rigged yacht and is equipped with
auxiliary power, so that in a calm
she Is able to proceed on her set
course. Many of those in this city
who remember the great ocean
yacht race from Honolulu In 1907,
will recall the fact that the La Viajera, which was built at Dockton,
Wash., was among those entered in
the race, but as she did not finish
in time was not among the competitors. She is 74 feet over all; 17.C
feet in, breadth; 9.6 feet in depth,
and has a tonnage of 35 tons.
With all her sails set she has
spread from her masts 3,400 square
feet of canvas and with a fair breeze
can hit a fast clip. She Is built
upon beautiful lines and her well
finished deck of Douglas fir has
caught the eyes of many spectators
who have visited her. In case of
calms her 25-horsepower gasoline
engine Is used and she is an ideal
boat for the cruise which she Ins
just started on.
In connection with the trip to the
north It is the Intention of Mr.
Sword to conduct a prospecting tour
of Alaskan shores. The La Viajera
is equipped with a complete assay
ing outfit and is credited with be
ing the only vessel on the coast that
has one.
 o	
TO OPEN UP THE NORTH
(Continued From Page One.)
that territory, who will, similarly,
be anxious to know for what crops
their lands are best suited and the
beBt methods to be adopted for their
successful development. Up to date
the department has not been In pos-
The provincial. government has
appointed Colonel Gunther, of To
ronto, to be superintendent of insurance for British Columbia, effective from July 1. Colonel Gunther
has been for many years inspector
of the Norwich Union Assurance
Company.
The duties of Colonel Gunther
may be stated in a few words, although they will be quite important,
and will require not only the whole
of his time, but also probably that
of two or three assistants. His office was created by the insurance
legislation passed last session, the
salary being left to be fixed subsequently by order-in-council. His department will be under the direct
control of the attorney general.
Under the insurance act any company desiring to do a fire Insurance
business in Britisii Columbia, must
deposit $20,000 with the provincial treasurer to protect the public
in payment of losses, and must also
pay a license fee of ?250. When
these things have been done the superintendent will examine into the
company's standing, ad if he is satisfied o this point the company will
be allowed to do business In the
province. He is empowered to examine into any fire insurance company's affairs at any time, not only
in British Columbia, but at the head
office, wherever it may be located.
Of course tne company need not permit such examination unless it sees
fit, but a refusal would mean the
immediate cancellation of the license.
In case of fire occurring under
suspicious circumstances, it will be
his duty to make a complete investigation. For this purpose he is empowered to use the resources of the
province, subject to the approval of
the attorney general, and is given
what are practically Judicial powers
in the way of summoning and examining witnesses. Great difficulty
has hitherto been found in investigating fires of this kind, so much
so that the attorney-general informed the legislature last session
that the existing method of investigation was so cumbersome as to be
of very little use. The new superintendent is expected to change all
that, and to give insurance companies a security against fraud, which
they have not hitherto enjoyed.
The expenses of the office will
be defrayed by a tax of two per
cent on the receipts of all old line
fire insurance companies doing business in the province. This means,
of course, their receipts of business
done in the province. Mutual companies are not included. They do
not pay the two per cent tax, and
they are not required to secure approval before commencing business.
They may, however, secure his services in case they have any fire which
they think should be investigated.
 o '	
ALIEN IMMIGRATION
Dominion Government Will Suspend
Regulations to Allow Railroad
Contractors to Get Labor
The Dominion immigration regulations, providing that aliens entering Canada must come direct from
the countries of their birth or naturalization will be partially suspended, until September 30, next,
for the purpose of affording railroad
contractors opportunity to secure
sufficient men for the vast amount
of railway construction projected
for the present season. The precise
regulation acted is Privy Council order, No. 920. It was on July 14,
1910, suspended for three months
as the contractors were unable to secure sufficient labor. In connection with the suspension of the order, it is added, however, that the
applicants for admission must pro
duce evidence to show that they are
going to railway construction jobs.
Laborers from the south of Europe
will not be allowed to enter Canada,
the change applying only to those
from northern Europe. Orientals
are not affected.
$****&***********************************************
AMONG THE MINES
e$e^,^*4.4.4e4e»>4t<t«5,^,^4,^,^,^,^,^,i{.4,e|.4,4e,5,4,eJ,4,^,eS.^4t4.4ieJ.^.4.^..5,4e^^,4.^,^.^.^,^,^.^,^.^.^,
THE GOLDEN POTLATCH RED CLIFF'S PLANS
Seattle   Is   to   Celebrate   the   Klondike's Gold  Discovery
On July 17, 1897, the steamer
Portland arrived in Seattle from
Alaska, bringing a ton of virgin
gold from the rich new fields of the
Klondike and starting the great gold
rush which gave the first impetus to
Seattle's growth and prosperity. On
July 17, 1911, Seattle will inaugurate an annual carnival to celebrate
the gift of gold, the celebration to
be called the "Golden Potlatch, '97,"
and to consist of a week of pageantry and merrymaking in which the
whole city will take part. The name
and general nature of the festival
were decided upon by a committee
of leading citizens, and the details
of the big carnival are in the hands
of several, committees, while the
whole city is subscribing funds for
the event by purchasing official buttons.
The name "Golden Potlatch, '97"
is derived from the old Chinook
word, potlatch, which meant to give,
or, as a noun, a festival of giving.
The Seattle carnival might have
been termed a festival in commemoration of the gift of gold in 1897,
but the short Indian word being
used to express this idea. The celebration will further be known as "A
Hot Time in a Cool Place," a
catchy reference to the summer climate of Puget Sound.
Seattle's big festival will be widely advertised throughout the east
and south, as an extra attraction to
summer tourists and the railroads
will assist in calling the nation's attention to this unique celebration of
an event which marked the beginning of the present prosperity of the
northwest. Water pageants and
fetes, street parades, electrical displays and carnival features of every
sort will be prominent In the week's
celebration.
Move     Is     Made   to   Install  Water
Power for Promising' Stewart Property
If a trio of predictions made by
General Manager A. Erskine Smith,
of the Red Cliff Mining Company,
eventuate on June 1, shareholders in
this well-known property will have
cause for rejoicing, says the Portland Canal Miner. Just previous to
his departure for the south, Mr
Smith stated that by June 1 the 300-
fott upraise wolud reach the upper
workings; that the harnessing of
Lydden creek for the company's
power system would be generating
electrical energy to drive the plant
and that the first unit of a 500-ton
ore bunker would be in commission
ready to load the product of the
mine on to the cars of the Canadian
North Eastern Railway. Mr. Smith
is nothing if not optimistic, and his
success In driving the long 1,400
foot bore on schedule time is augury
that what lie announced above will
come to pass, if human energy and
resourcefulness are not checked by
any contretemps. The upraise is
proceeding to its goal at the rate of
25 feet a week; the Installation of
the water power plant has already
started and the ground is being pre
parpd for the laying of the pipe
line. Timbers are being hauled to
the site of the ore bunkers, and as
the railway management will rush
the laying of steel for the balance of
the nine miles to the Red Cliff mine
the sanguine expectations of the
general manager as outlined should
be fulfilled.
 o	
The Boss—Mr. Stubpen, when
you came this morning I detected
a trace of liquor about your person.
The Bookkeeper—That's fine, sir!
Fine! That shows how much better
your cold Is, sir.
Provincial Elections Act.
Skeena Electoral District.
TAKE NOTICE that I have received objections In writing to the retention of the following names on
the Register of Voters for the Skeena Electoral District on the grounds stated below.
And take notice that at a Court of Revision to be held on the 1st day of May, 1911, at the Court
House, Prince Rupert, at 10 o'clock In the forenoon, I shall hear and determine to said objections, and unless such named persons or some other Provincial Voter on their behalf satisfies me that such objections
are not well founded, I shall strike such names off said Register:
J. H. McMULLIN,
ReglBtrar of Voters.
Dated  this  5th   day  of April, 1911.
Tlie following persons are reported absent from the District:
No.
63
274
335
407
421
451
464
530
540
553
724
745
798
882
1097
1098
1207
1260
1263
1627
1917
1928
2047
2067
2102
2481
NAME
BADHAM, FRANK	
BYRNE, PATSY JENSON	
CATT, JAMES	
CONNOR, CHARLES F	
COREY, THOMAS	
CRAIG, WM. ALEX	
CROUCHER, ERNEST	
DENOON, GEORGE 	
DICKSON, RYAN	
DOCKERY, GARLAND D	
FOX, HERBERT S	
FRY, REGINALD G	
GLADMAN, GORDON G	
HAMMOND, FRED. ERNEST .
KEELEY, MARTIN FRED	
KEELEY, NEIL A	
LAYCOCK, EDWARD P	
LOYAL, WALDEMAR  	
LUCAS, FREDK. TRAVERS   . .
McINNES, ANGUS   	
PEPIN, GEORGE   	
PETHICK, GEO.  HAROLD. . . .
ROSS, ROBT. STEWART	
RYAN, ARTHUR E	
SCRIMGEOUR, JOHN   MURRY
WHITCOMB,  JAMES   	
PLACE
Prince Rupert.
Port Essington
Prince Rupert.
Prince Rupert.
Prince Rupert.
Prince Rupert.
Prince Rupert.
Prince Rupert.
Prince Rupert.
Borden, B. C.
Prince Rupert.
Prince Rupert.
Prlnc.) Rupert.
Prince Rupert.
Prlnc-. Rupert.
Prince Rupert.
Lakelse, B. C.
Prince Rupert.
Prince Rupert.
Prince Rupert.
Prince Rupert.
Prince Rupert.
Prince Rupert.
Prince Rupert.
Prince, Rupert.
Prince Rupert.
The following persons are reported deceased:
No.
795
829
1232
1515
1137
NAME | PLACE
 1 ■
GILROY, CHAS. HENRY  I  Prince Rupert.
GRANT, ROY F     Prince Rupert.
LEWIS, THOMAS   I  Prince Rupert.
MURPHY, FRANK   |  Prince Rupert.
KEVITT, OSCAR V I  Sloan, B. C.
BACK  FROM  SCOTLAND
Angus  Stewart   Had  Pleasant  Trip,
Bnt Is Glad to Get
Back
Angus Stewart returned last evening from a three months' trip to his
old home in Scotland and from a
visit in various parts of Europe.
Mrs. Stewart, who acconipanied him,
remained in Vancouver for a few
days and will return to Prince Rupert at an early date.
Mr. Stewart, who completed all
his contracts before leaving had no
worries on his mind and so enjoyed
to the fullest his visit in the old
land. He found Prince Rupert a
topic of interest everywhere and the
prospects are exceedingly bright, he
feels, for the city.
While pleased to spend a holiday
in his old home he is satisfied to return to British Columbia, which
must remain his home.
 o •
The Salvation Army had a very
successful concert in the citadel last
night.
PERSONALS
C. C. Perry, Indian agent at Met-
lakatia,   lias  gone   south   for   a   few
days.     Mrs.   Perry,   who  is  visiting
in Nanaimo, will return with him.
•    »    »
Mrs. J. Y. Rochester will receive
for the first time in her new home
2919 Alder street, says the News-
Advertiser. Mrs. Rupert Buchanan,
who is in Vancouver on a visit, will
receive with her mother.
 o	
INVITED TO REMAIN
The district meeting of the Methodist Church for Port Simpson district will be held in this city next
week.
Willie Manson, son of the mayor,
has been removed from the hospital
to his home. He is recovering rapidly and expects to soon be about
again.
At a meeting of the quarterly official board of the Methodist Church
held a few days ago, Rev. Charles R.
Sing was Invited to remain as pastor for the next year if in the discretion of the stationing committee
of the conference this is felt to be
in  the interests of the church.
Mr. Sing, who came here about a
year ago from the .Manitoba conference, has thrown himself very
heartily into the work on this coast
and is very popular not only with
his own congregation but with the
citizens generally. He has taken a
very deep interest in the proposition
for a permanent church here and
the quarterly official board desires
to have him remain. The invitation
extended is a very cordial one and
will, It is expected be acted upon by
the stationing committee of the
Britisii Columbia conference, which
meets early next month In Vancouver.
TIDES AT PRINCE RUPERT, APRIL, 1911
MUNICIPAL   NOTICE
Tenders will be received by the
undersigned, for the Collection aud
Disposal of Garbage and Nightsoil,
and for the supply of Garbage and
Nightsoil Cans. Tenders must be
on form to be obtained from the
City Clerk and to close at 5 p. ni.,
May 1st 1911. Each tender must
be accompanied by a certified cheque
for ?100.
Full particulars at City Clerk's office.
The lowest or any tender not necessarily  accepted.
ERNEST A. WOODS,  .
City Clerk.
4-25-28
NOTICE  OF   DISSOLUTION
HIGH WATER
DATE   AND  DAY       | Tlmo|" Ht | Time|~HT
LOW  WATER
Time..   lit   Time]  lit
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
Saturday  .   .
Sunday  .   .
Monday.   .   .
Tuesday.   .
Wednesduy.
Thursday .
Friday.    .   .
Saturday  .   .
Sunday.   .   .
Monday   .   .
Tuesday.   .
Wednesday.
Thursday.   .
Friday.    .   .
Saturday.  .
Sunday.
Monday .  .
Tuesday.   .
Wednesday  .
Thursday .
Friday  .   .
Saturday .
Sunday.   .   .
Monday.   .
Tuesday   .   .
Wednesday ,
Thursday .
Friday.    .   .
Saturday  .
Sunday.   .   .
19[21.8jl4:
62(21.8,15:
29|21.5|16:
14|20.8;17:
10|19.7 18:
19 18,5 20;
17.9|21
18.1:22
18.9)23
27(19.7]. .
03120.0112
3'i|20.7jl2
08|21.1'13:
38 21.4J14
08 21.3 14
51120
36)19,
28)18.
28|17
42116.
Ill 1(1,
37|16.
40J17.
24 19,
.. ...
15)20,
56)20.
83 20,
8:40
2  ..
0|| 0
8|| 1
9) 3
1 4
•II 5
21.0)15
20.5il6
19.7|16
18.7)17
17.6118
16.6)20
16.2J21
16.6)22
17.6|22
18.6)23
19.6). .
07J20.6I12
41|21.6,13
16|22.3!13
52122.7(14
3)
•>'
5.
6j|  8
711  9
69 18
34119
34120,
16120
59l20,
44120
2.4|20
22!    2.6;21
11 3.0122
08j 4.0:23
, ■ ... . j 12
13)10.0113
•III I 11.1! 11
lOj 9.9)16
8.3)16
6.6117
5.1 j IS
::.!» is
.",.1 in
2.820
2.9)20
3.421
4.2J21
5.2122
6.2J22
. .1... ,|12
10|11.3|13
46|11.3|14
12)10.4)15
16| 8.8)16
7.0)17
5.1|17
3.5)18
2.2
1.4
1.1
:47
:27
:12
:00
:16
:32
:55
:04
:58
:45
:24
:59
:31
:02
:33
:04
:36
:12
:57
:08
:17
:35
:40
:81
:14
:53
:.'il
:08
:46
:26)
4.6
5.7
7.2
8.8
5.1
5.8
5.7
5.1
4.5
4.2
4.1
4.4
4.9
5.6
6.4
7.3
8.5
9.5
10.6
7.0
7.5
7.3
6.8
6.9
6.2
4.7
4.4
4.5
6.0
5.8
The Time used is Pacific Standard, for the 120th Meridian west. It
Is counted from 0 to 24 hours, from midnight to midnight.
The Height Is in feet and tenths of a foot, above the Low Water datum
adopted for the' Chart. The Harbor datum, as established by the Grand
Trunk  Pacific   Railway,   Is   one  foot lower.
TAKE NOTICE that the partnership heretofore existing between
Joseph E. Merryfield, Prince Rupert, B. C, and Joseph E. McEwen,
of Kitselas, B. C, has this day been
dissolved by mutual consent, and
that Joseph E. Merryfield will carry on the grocery business heretofore
carried on by tlie firm at Prince Rupert, B. C, under the name of "J. B.
Merryfield," and will collect all
debts due to and pay all debts owing
by the said firm, and that Joseph E.
McEwen will carry on the business
of the partnership heretofore conducted at Kitselas, B. C, under the
firm name of "Merryfield & McEwen," and will collect all debts due to
and pay all debts owing by the said
firm at Kitselas, B. C.
Dated   at   Prince  Rupert,  B.  C,
this 21st day of April, A. I). 1911.
.1. 0. MERRYFIELD,
.1.   K.   MelCWEN.
Witness:
M,  M.  STEPHENS, 5-12
If you mint (lie lioncy
That comet  from  the  hive
Take up the phone and
Call one, double five.
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast Range  5.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles
James Gilllngham, of Prince Rupert,
occupation contractor, Intends te
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner of Lot 992 and
marked C. J. Gillingham's N. E.
Corner Application for Purchase; I,
C. J. Gilllngham, Intend to apply
for permission to purchase 320 acres
of land bounded as follows:—Commencing at this post; thence 80
chains south; tbence 40 chains west;
thence 80 chains north; thence 40
chains east to place of commonce-
mont.
C.iARLES JAMES GILI INGIIAK
Robeirt Osborn Jennings, Agent.
Dated January 5, 1911.
The Journal (twice a week), only
?2.00 a year. PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Friday, April 28, 1911.
I.;. *;. * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *J..»«.;. * * »J..;, *.;..;. * * * * * * * * .j, ,♦.,;. .j. ,J«.;. »J. * *
* *
I New Anecdote About King George I
* *
*****************************************************,
One bank holiday some few years
ago the King, Queen Mary and their
little daughter, Princess Mary, were
motoring in the neighborhood of
Windsor, when they came upon the
scene of a strange accident. A party
of holiday folk had hired a landau
to enjoy a drive in the country, and
all had gone well until within a
short distance of Windsor Park.
Then by some mischance the horse
had caught one of its hind legs in
the front of the carriage with such
force that it seemed inextricable.
The occupants had scrambled out
in terrified haste, fearful lest the
poor animal's frantic efforts to free
itself should capsize tlie vehicle. Its
wild plunges were fruitless, and it
fell to the ground exhausted, Its foot
still imprisoned. The driver and
his fares exchanged exclamations of
dismay, and eyed the smart motor
car bearing down upon them with
cynical uncertainty as to the View
jts 5GG'upai« 7n"U] ,ak« «f this predicament of coniinoniilili'c bank holiday makers, With the courage of
desntllr, however, the driver held up
his hand as a signal of distress, apparently determined to believe that
human hearts might be found even
under tlie disguise of aristocratic
motorists.
The car slowed down; its dignified owner stepping out. Approaching the disconsolate looking driver
with a cheery manner that promised
much, he said, sympathetically:
"You have a nasty accident, I see."
"You're right, sir," replied the man,
shaking his head dismally, but with
a gleam of hope creeping into his
eyes at the kindly tone. "It beats
me to know how we are to right
things. The noble stranger cast a
comprehensive glance over the scene
—the prostrate horse, the damaged
carriage, the disappointed pleasure
seekers standing helplessly around.
Then he spoke in a brisk, businesslike tone that put courage into all.
"If you will just follow my directions," he said, "we will try and extricate this poor creature," and
turning to his chauffeur he bade
him bring the tools belonging to the
car.
Off went the motorist's long coat,
and with 'a sailor's ready wit and
skill our Sailor Prince set to work,
while his wife and little daughter
left the car and joined the small
crowd which had gathered to watch
with them the results of his efforts.
The tools, however, were found
inadequate to the task; something
stronger was needed. What was to
be done? The difficulty was met in
a wa ywhich made the bystanders
wonder who the stranger could be,
for, calling a man, he directed him
to go to the park lodge and there
make known his requirements. Evidently he must be well known at the
palace to venture on such a step as
that!
The necessary tools were brought
and the frightened horse was set
free; but it lay panting and trembling, exhausted almost to death. In
vain, willing, but ignorant, hands
sought to raise it; the poor creature
was powerless to respond. At this
fresh crisis the noble carpenter assumed another role—that of veterinary surgeon. "Water!" he commanded promptly; "bring me a pail
of water" and when it was brought
it was from his compassionate hand
the refreshing stream was poured
upon the fainting animal's head, the
result being that in a very short
time it revived and was able to
struggle to its feet.
Meanwhile the driver stood sadly
contemplating tlie half-wrecked carriage, for the horse's hoof had been
literally cut out of the woodwork.
What sort of a reception could he
expect from his employer at the livery stables?
Just then a guardsman came in
sight crying along the road. Ilo
glanced with indifferent curiosity at
the little crowd gathered around the
scene of the late disaster, until his
eye fell upon the motor car. Then
his expression suddenly changed to
one of vivid interest. Leaping from
his machine lie looked searchlngly
around and caught sight of the motorist just as he turned towards
him. He saluted with a promptitude and reverence that made the
bystanders stare in greater astonishment than ever. The Royal Guardsman received some command, and,
saluting again with profound respect, remounted his bicycle nad
rode off in haste towards Windsor.
His errand was not discovered till
later. But the mystery of the motorist's identity was cleared up before the guardsman was out of sight.
The stranger having completed
his self-imposed task, once more
donned the long grey coat, and, going up to the coachman as he stood
a little aloof, his amazement struggling with the thanks he found himself powerless to utter, the prince
held out his hand, saying with a
genial smile:
"Accept a little present from the
Prince and Princess of Wales."
Then, before the recipient could
finally recover from his bewilderment, the prince had stepped into
his car, where his wife and daughter were already seated and had
glided off. The bystanders, however, had taken in the situation, and
they cheered wildly, again and
again, congratulating themselves on
their good fortune which had made
this bank holiday a red letter day to
them for the rest of their lives.
But more good fortune was In
store for the coachman, for when he
arrived at the livery stables, he was
surprised to find his master on the
lookout for him; but supposing that
already his mishap had become
I known through wayside tattlers, ho
approached with a dismal apprehension of liiiiiending fate, which even
the remembrance of a prince's kindness and generosity could not dissipate. For if, as seemed practically
certain, he should receive his dismissal, even the prince's gift would
not go far towards alleviating the
consequences.
It was at this moment that ho
discovered what had been the errand
on which the prince had sent the
Royal    Guardsman. Incidentally,
also, he discovered something of the
depths of that kingly heart. Not
content with rendering "first aid"
to man and beast on the spot, the
prince had bethought him of the
coachman's future. With the foresight of a naval commander he had
sent word to his employer that he
had been in no way to blame for the
unfortunate accident, and that his
character as a driver was not thereby impugned.
This certificate from the Prince
of Wales naturally reversed his position in the eyes of his master, and
no doubt he was regarded in the
light of a hero. The injury to the
carriage, too, was overlooked in the
happy realization that the life of the
four-legegd hero had been saved by
royal skill and kindness.
It is fitting that his charming
story of our present gracious King
should be revived at this juncture,
for it assures us that the lustre of
the imperial crown which has since
descended to him, will remain undiminished, since he has proved himself so staunch an upholder of the
noble tradition of his throned man-
arch better than his crown.—Cactus,
in The Ladies' Field.
 o	
RELIGIOUS EDUCATION
Mi
, linlfour Gives His Views on tlie
Future with Respect to Training in Schools
Mr. Balfour was the principal
speaker at a meeting held at the
Mansion House, London, to commemorate the approaching centenary of the National Society.
When the society began its labors
in the great work of education, Mr.
Balfour said, they were, if not the
only agency, undoubtedly the greatest agency working in that cause.
Those who founded and carried on
the work of the society in 1811, and
subsequently thought, as we think
now, that it was folly to divide education into secular and religious
education as if they two quite separate things. To think that these
things can be divided is to misunderstand the true way In which the
molding of character is to be carried out.
"Gradually the state began to see
that education could not be left entirely to private enterprises, to philanthropy or to the action of
the churches," continued Mr. Balfour. "Then came the real difficulty of the situation, because in
this country we have long since
abandoned tho idea that It Is the
business of the community to see
that its citizens are all brought up
in the religious belief held by the
community as a whole. That way
of looking at things is, of course,
wholly alien to modern modes of
thought, and the state finds itself in
a difficulty not easy to deal with.
"There are people who believe
that the difficulty might be comfortably settled if the state looked after
secular education and left religious
education to the parents. But if
you make education compulsory,
you cannot say to the parents: 'We
will look after your children as regards reading, writing and arithmetic, but you must look after their
religion.'
"To do this would be to use a
vain   formula.    The  idea  that  you
can meet the religious needs of the
country by setting parliament to
work to compose what is called a
non-dogmatic theology is really the
wildest of dreams. I look forward
to the time when it will be found
possible to give in our public elementary schools that religions
teaching to every child which the
parents of that child desire. This
is the only solution which seems to
me perfectly consistent with our
ideas of parental responsibility and
with the fundamental doctrine that
it is a misfortune for any child to
be brought up without any knowledge of religion whatever."
—: o	
A cynical old bachelor who firmly
believes that all women have something to say on all subjects, recently
asked a female friend:
"Well, madam, what do you hold
on this question of female suffrage?"
To which the lady responded,
calmly:
"Sir, I hold my tongue."
—THE—
PUBLIC JN'QTJCE
Tenders will be received by thu
undersigned up to Thursday, June
1st, 1911, at five o'clock in the afternoon for the purchase of Lot 541,
Range 5, Coast District, situated in
the vicinity of the City of Prince Rupert and containing 19.7 acres.
An upset price of one hundred
dollars per acre has been fixed upon
the lands embraced in said lot.
Each tender must be enclosed in
an envelope securely sealed and
marked "Tender for Lot 541, Range
5, Coast District," and must be accompanied by an accepted cheque
for twenty-five per cent of the
amount set out in such tender.
Payment for the lot will be accepted in instalments, one-quarter
cash and the balance in three equal
annual payments with interest on
deferred payments at the rate of six
per cent per annum.
The cheques of all unsuccessful
tenderers will be returned to them.
The highest or any tender will
not necessarily be accepted.
Field Notes of the survey of the
said Lot 541, Range 5, Coast District, may be seen at the office of
the undersigned.
No commissions of any kind will
he allowed.
J. H. McMULLEN,
Government Agent.
Government Agent's Office,
Prince  Rupert,  B.   C,
April 27th, 1911. 6-1
IN THE COUNTY COURT OF ATLIN,
Holden  at Prince Rupert.
In the Matter of Lazar Milovich, Deceased,
and
In  the Matter  of the  "Official Administrators' Act."
Dated   13th   day   of  April,   A.   D.
1911.
Upon reading the affidavits of
Micho Luke Kosich, Mike Wusovich,
Nike Gurvich, John Hugh McMullen,
C. V. Bennett and a further affidavit of J. H. McMullen, it is ordered,
that John Hugh McMullin, Official
Administrator for part of the County
Court District of Atlin, embraced
within the Skeena and Queen Charlotte Islands Mining Division,
shall be Administrator of all
and singular the estate and effects
of Lazar Milosevich, deceased, Intestate, and that this Order is published in the Prince Rupert "Journal" for two issues.
(Signed)      F. McB. YOUNG,
5-2 Judge.
LAND   ACT
I, John Kirkaldy, of Lakelse Valley, by occupation a farmer, do solemnly declare:—
1. I, John Kirkaldy intend to
apply for permission to purchase six
hundred and forty acres of unoccupied and unreserved Crown lands
(not being part of an Indian Settle-
mot), situate in the vicinity of Lakelse Valley.
2. I, on the 11th day of April,
1911, did locate the said land by
planting at the N. E. corner thereof
a post at least four inches square
and standing not less (ban four feet
above tlie surface of the ground.
3. The said post is about 120
chains distant, and in a southerly
direction from Herman Lake.
4. I, on the same day did inscribe
on the said post the name John Kirkaldy, and  the letters N.  E.  corner.
5. I, on the same day, did affix
Io the said post a notice with iho
lo,lowing words written thereon: —
Sixty days from date I intend to apply to the Commissioner of LanJs
lor permission to purchase the following described lands: Commencing at this post; thence west 80
chains; thence south SO chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence north
80 chains, containing 640 acres more
or less.
6. The purpose for which the
land  is required is agriculture.
7. That I am not disqualified to
make this application by the provisions of sub-section (11) of section
34 of the "Land Act."
And I make this solemn declaration, conscientiously believing it to
be true, and knowing that, it is of
the same force and effect as if made
under oath and by virtue of the
"Canada Evidence Act."
JOHN KIRKALDY,
Signature   of   Declarant.
Declared and signed by John Klrkaldy, on the 18th day of April,
A. D. 1911 before me at Kitsumka-
lum.
E. EBY,
(Notarial Seal) N. P.
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LAND  PURCHASE  NOTICE.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE tl at J. E. Anderson, of Masset, B. C, occupation farmer, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
iands:—Commencing at a post planted on the shore of Masset Inlet,
about two miles west of the S. W.
corner of T. L. 40787, thence north
80 chains; thence west 40 chains;
thence south 80 chains more or less
to the shore of Masset Inlet; thence
easterly along the shore back to the
place of commencement, containing
320 acres, more or less.
J. K. ANDERSON.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 25, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Frank NelBon,
of Chicago, 111., U. S. A., occupation
clerk, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about one mile north of
N. W. corner of Application to Purchase 6953; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence north
80 chains; thence east 80 chains, containing 640 acres.
FRANK NELSON.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 25, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Fred. A. De
Lisle, of Masset, B. O, occupation
farmer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 40 chains south
and 120 chains east of the S. E. corner of Lot 35; thence north 80
chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains, containing 640 acreB.
FRED.  A.  DE  LISLE.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 25, 1910.
Skeena Land District-—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that George Stanley Mayer, of Masset, B. C occupation farmer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted on the east shore of
Tsu Skundale Lake; thence east 80
chains; thence south 40 chains, more
or less, to the north boundary of
T. L. 35413; thence west and south
along the boundaries of T. L. 35413,
to the shore of the Ain River; thence
northerly along the shore, back to
the place of commencement, containing 500 acres, more or less.
GEORGE STANLEY MAYER.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 28, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Robert Cross,
of Masset, B. C, occupation farmer,
Intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted on the east shore of Tsu Skundale
Lake; thence east SO chains; thence
north 80 chains, to or near to the
S. E. corner of Lot 35; thence west
40 chains, more or less; thence
south 40 chains, more or less; thence
west 40 chains more or less, following the southern boundaries of Lot
35; thence south to the shore; tlience
southerly along the shore back to the
place of commencement, containing
500 acres, more or less.
ROBERT  CROSS.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov.  28, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Christina Orr,
of Masset, B. C, occupation married,
Intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing i.t a post planted about 40 chains south and 3 miles
east of the N. E. corner of Lot 35;
thence south 40 chains; thence west
80 chains; thence north 40 chains;
thence east 80 chains, containing 320
acres.
CHRISTINA ORR.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 25, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Clara Orr, of
Masset, B C., occupation spinster,
intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted about 40 chains south and 80
chains east of the N. E. corner of
Lot 35; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence north
80 chains; thence east 80 chains, containing 640 acres.
CLARA ORR.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 25, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Wesley Singer, of Masset, B. C, occupation farmer, Intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a poBt planted about 4 miles north of the N. W.
corner of T. L. 40859; thence south
80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence north 80 chalnB; thence east
80 chains, containing 640 acres.
WESLEY SINGER.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 27, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that A. Walter De
Lisle, of Masset, B. C, occupation
farmer, intends to apply for permis
slonu to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 40 chains south
and 120 chains east of the S. E. corner of Lot 35; thence south 80
chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence east
80 chains, containing 640 acres.
A. WALTER DH LISLE.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 26, 1910.
LAND PURCHASE  NOTICE.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Alice Millard,
of Masset, B. C, occupation married
woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:— Commencing at a
post planted about 80 chains east
and 120 chains north of the N. E.
corner of Lot 35; thence north 80
chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains, containing 640 acres.
ALICE MILLARD.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 25, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Merton A.
Merrill, of Masset, B. C, occupation
prospector, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted at the S. W. corner of
T. L. 40787; thence north 80 chains;
tlience west 80 chains; thence south
80 chains, more or less, to the shore
of Masset Inlet; thence easterly along
the shore back to the place of commencement, containing 640 acres,
more or less.
MERTON A. MERRILL.        ,
Dated Nov. 25, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Carl NelSofl,
of Chicago, III., U. S. A., occupation
draughtsman, Intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 80 chains east
and 120 chains north of N. E. corner of Lot 35; thence south 80
chains; thence eaBt 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence west
80 chains, containing 640 acres.
CARL NELSON.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated, Nov. 26, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Arthur W.
Nelson, of Chicago, 111., U. S. A., occupation clerk, Intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing
at a post planted about 4% miles
north of the S. E. corner of T. L„
40859; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence south
80 chains; thence west 80 chnlns,
containing 640 acres.
ARTHUR W. NELSON.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 27, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Allan Orr, of
Massett, B. C, occupation carpenter,
intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted on the shore of Masset Inlet two
miles west of the S. W. corner of T.
L. 40787; thence north 80 chains;
thence east SO chains; thence south
SO chains, more or less, to the shore
of Masset Inlet; thence westerly
along the shore back to the place of
commencement, containing 640 acres,
more or less.
ALLAN   ORR.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 25, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Flora Orr, of
Masset, B. 0„ occupation spinster, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:
—Commencing at a post planted
about 40 chains south and 80 chains
east of the N. E. corner of Lot 35;
thence north 80 chains; thence west
80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains, containing 640
acres.
FLORA  ORR.
M. A.  Merrill, Agent.
Dated November 25, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Arthur Ives,
Sr., of Masset, B. C, occupation hotel
keeper, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:— Commencing at a
post planted about 40 chains south
and 120 chains east of the S. E.
corner of Lot 35; thence south 80
chains; thence east 80 ' chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence west
SO chains, containing 640 acres.
ARTHUR IVES, Sr.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 25, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Lynn Sutherland, of El Paso, Texas, U. S. A., occupation auditor, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:-—Commencing at a
post planted about 40 chains'' south
and 120 chains east of the S. E. corner of Lot 35; thence north 80
chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains, containing 640 acres.
LYNN SUTHERLAND.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 25, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Orland P.
Merrill, of Chicago, III., U. S. A., occupation coal operator,, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about 80
chains east and 40 chains south of
the N. E. corner of Lot 35; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains, containing 640
acres.
ORLAND P. MERRILL.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 25, 1910.
MISS HENNY WENNERSlJiN
SWEDISH SPECIALIST
Electric, * acial and Scalp treatment;
Scientific Massage treatment for
rheumatism, nervousness and poor
circulation. Manicuring also Chiropody work.
ROOM NO. 4, EXCHANGE BLOCK
-,' Friday, April 28, 1911.
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
IN SOUTHERN ICE
Member of Captain Scott's Expedition
Writes on Conditions as
They Are.
Opt. Amundsen's Fram Is Met by
the Terra Nova in Southern Seas
Lieut. Pennell, a member of Capt.
Scott's Antarctic expedition, writing from the Terra Nova, states:
"The Terra Nova, on proceeding
eastward from McMurdo Sound, surveyed the Great Ice Barrier as far
aB the point where it Is crossed by
the 170th meridian of west longitude. Up to this point it appears to
have changed little since the expedition of 1902. A gale from the
southeast now forced us to head for
Cape Colbeck, which was reached on
February 2, and here further progress to the east was stopped by
heavy pack ice. A high ice cliff pre-
. vented the eastern party landing in
the vicinity of Cape Colbeck itself,
so we retturned along the Barrier
edge, searching for a landing place.
No practical spot was found until
we reached the Bay of Whales, In
longitude 164 west. Here we made
the discovery that the shore line of
Balloon Bight has broken away entirely, merging that indention Into
the Bay of Whales.
"In this bay, which we reached on
February 4, we found the Fram, the
vessel of the Amundsen Antarctic
expedition, which is going into winter quarters here. With her were
eight men, accompanied by 116
Greenland dogs, and furnished with
a full equipment for a journey to
the Pole. The Fram is proceeding
to Buenos Ayres, returning the following season to re-embark Captain
Amundsen.
"Stores were landed and a hut
erected two miles from the ship, and
the Terra Nova afterwards left again
for McMurdo Sound. We found, in
the Discovery hut, a message to the
effect that the depot-laying party
were all well.
"Proceeding north once more we
encountered a southerly gale off
Cape Adare, and were blown over a
hundred miles to the north. We
made land to the east of Smith's Inlet, and followed the coast for a distance of two miles to Robertson's
Bay. Landing here, however, was
Impossible, owing to the precipitous
and heavily glaciated coast, and the
eastern (? western) party is wintering at Cape Adare.
"The Terra Nova next proceeded
on an exploring cruise to the east of
Cape North, with the object of investigating the pack in the Balleny
Islands vicinity. No pack was
found immediately south of the islands. When in latitude 69.40, we
encountered strong winds, which
lasted until February 22, when a
mountainous land, hitherto unknown, was discovered at about
€9.50 S., 1G3.2' E. We were hampered greatly by cloudy and foggy
weather, and forced away from land
by heavy pu k-ic-, and the coast line
was found again on February 25, in
69.20 S., 159 E.
"We were unable to approach
nearer than about twelve miles, for
we were caught in an exceptionally
heavy pack, from which we were
fortunately released the next day by
the wind shifting. We followed the
coast line northwestward for thirty
miles, but the pack never let us approach it within ten miles. The
coast is hilly and rugged, and Is
scarred with numerous glaciers. The
higher land was mostly obscured
from our vision by low clouds which
hung about it the whole time.
"The Terra Nova was prevented
getting further west than 68.30 S.;
158.15 E., and, being forced eastwards, skirted tho pack until in
the vicinity of the BalleneyB once
more. Frequently the ship was
stopped entirely by the pack, once
for three days, but she cleared it
finally on March 8, in 64.28 S.,
161.39 E. Many interesting soundings were taken, and the biologist
obtained excellent trawls at a depth
of 200 fathoms."
My husband amuses me," says the
hostess, "by the excuses he has for
being detained down town of evenings. Sometimes I can almost hear
his brain working out an excuse as
he tiptoes up the stairs."
"My husband," says the caller, "is
different. He is a very systematic
man, you know, and some time ago
he wrote out a list of various excuses and numbered them. Now,
when he comes in he just calls up
the stairs, 'Number four',' or
'Number twenty,' or whatever the
number may be."
IMPERSONATION CASE
Paris  Has  Had  a  Lot of Laughing
Over a Peculiarly Interesting   Career
A bewildering case of impersonation has kept Paris laughing all the
week, while It has plunged in consternation the old French aristocracy, whose proverbial exclusive-
ness Is held up to general ridicule.
The affair finds a historical parallel
in the notorious case of the English
butcher, Arthur Orton, who passed
as Sir Roger Tichborne.
Marquis Paul de Rquefeuille, one
of Paris' most popular Boclety men,
a member of several smart clubs,
and lionized in the best society for
the charm of his appearance and
manners, and who married the
Comtesse de la Bourmene, has been
identified by the secret police as
Paul Reiss, alias Gallett, alias Tisse-
band, son of a wine seller, and wanted by the police here and In other
countries for swindling and bigamy.
The name Rouquefeuille, assumed
by the adventurer, belongs to a rich
and ancient family.
The false marquis has had adventures all over the world. Born in
1855, he began his career in 1875,
when he left Paris for Buenos Ayres
in company with a wealthy coffee
planter. There he became bankrupt
and returned to Paris with a great
deal of money, which he spent in a
few months. He then managed to
obtain funds on false promises and
travelled in Italy, India and China.
Nothing more was learned of him
until he appeared in Algeria as a
novice in the Trappists monastery,
which he left In 1885 to become the
editor of Le Verite, which conducted
a campaign against anti-Semitism.
At that time he became a friend of
the real Marquis de Roquefeuille,
then a lieutenant in a regiment of
hussars stationed at Algiers.
The marquis died shortly after,
and Reiss appropriated all his papers. Armed with these family documents, he travelled some years in
Italy and Spain. No one knows
how he lived.
In 1907 he reappeared in Paris, a
reserved, good looking, middle aged
man, and, thanks to his assumed title of Marquis de Roquefeuille,
moved in the best circles. While on
a trip to Italy in 1909 he met the
widow Comtesse de Bourmene, a
wealthy widow and a most popular
Paris hostess. So well he played
his part that they were married at
Paris. Charles de Muoy and Joseph
Blondel, general attorney to the
high court of justice, acted as witnesses to the wedding ceremony.
The elderly bride and her husband,
twenty years her junior, lived happily, dividing their time between
their country house in Touraine,
their Paris mansion, a house at
Brussels, and a villa at Cannes.
They entertained royally, and Invitations to their receptions, where
everybody who counted in diplomat-
is, political and social circles were
to be found, were eagerly sought
for.
Their great popularity, was, however, the cause of the pseudo marquis' undoing. In December last a
glowing report, of one of their receptions in the society papers attracted the attention of a member of
the Roquefeuille family, who called
on the false noble and asked him
for an exp.anation. 'Ihe one he received did not satisfy him, and, in
order to clear up the mystery, he
placed the matter in the hands of
the secret police, with the result
that a warrant was issued for the
arrest of the person, known as the
Marquis  de Roquefeuille.
The   adventurer,     however,     got
wind of the danger, because neither
he nor his wife could be found.
They quit Paris, leaving no address.
A sentence of five years passed on
him during one of his many absences from Paris awaits the false
nobleman, who will have to answer
to a charge of bigamy, as it has been
ascertained that he has a wife and
three children living at Algiers.
Although a bigamist, Reiss does not
appear as such legally, having contracted both marriages under assumed  names.
Fish that is to be fried should be
ordered to be sent early, as It cooks
much better if previously rolled
some time In a clean cloth to Insure
perfect dryness.
Hamblin's Bakery
Just Re-opened
Sale    counter    in    MERRYFIELD'S
STORE, Third Ave. and Fifth St.
Family trade catered to.  Will supply restaurants and steamerB.
Cakes and Confectionery of all
kinds
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Local Agent—F. M. DAVIS
VANCOUVER, B. O.
- PRINCE RUPERT
The Best
Publicity |$2.00
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a Year
THE JOURNAL
Is the best Advertising
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The Journal aims at keeping Prince Rupert
and new B.C. ever before the public eye. Send
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COAL MINES ACr
Skeena   Land    District—District   of
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Commencing at post planted 6 %
miles N. E. of the mouth of the
White River and the junction of the
Naas, marked Chas. J. Gillingham's
S. E. Corner; thence 80 chains
North; thence 80 chains West;
thence 80 chains South; thence 80
chains East to point of commencement and containing 640 acres more
or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles  M.  Huff, Agent.
Dated March 4, 1911. 4-18
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Cassiar.
TAK.J NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Comencing at a post planted 7 miles
N. E. of the mouth of the White
River and the junction of the Naas,
marked Chas. J. Gillingham's S. E.
Corner; thence 80 chains North;
thence 80 chains West; tlience 80
chains South; thence 80 chains East
to point of commencement and containing 640 acres more or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles M. Huff, Agent.
Dated March 5th,  1911. 4-18
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Commencing at a post planted 7 Vi
miles N. E. of the mouth of the
White River and the junction of the
Naas and marked Chas. J. Gillingham's S. E. Corner; thence 80
chains North; thence 80 chains
West; thence 80 chains South;
thence 80 chains East to point of
commencement and containing 640
acres more or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles M.  Huff, Agent.
Dated March 5th, 1911. 4-18
thence SO chains North; tlience 80
chains West; thence 80 chains
Soutli; thence> 80 chains East to
point of commencement and containing 640 acres more or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles M.  Huff, Agent
Dated March 4th, 1911. 4-18
Skeena   Land    District—District    of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land:—
Commencing at u post planted about
8 miles N. E. of the mouth of White
River and the junction of the Naaa
River, marked Chas. J. Gillingham's
S. E. Corner; thence 80 chains
North; tlience 80 chains West;
thence 80 chains South; thence 80
cliains East to point nf commencement and containing 640 acres more
or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles M. Huff, Agent.
Dated March 6th, 1911. 4-18
Skeena I.and District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land; —
Commencing at a post planted about
8 miles N. E. of the mouth of White
River and the junction of the Naaa
River, marked Chas. J. Gillingham's
S. E. Corner; tlience 80 chains
North; thence 80 chains West;
thence 80 chains South; thence 80
chains East to point of commencement and containing 640 acres mou
or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles M.  Huff, Agent-
Dated March 6th, 1911. 4-18
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
Occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Commencing at a post planted 7 Vz
miles N. E. of the mouth of the
White River and the junction of the
Naas, marked Chas. J. Gillingham's
S. E. Corner; thence 80 chains
North; thence 80 chains West;
thence 80 chains South; thence 80
chains East to point of commencement and containing 640 acres more
or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles M. Huff, Agent.
Dated March 5th,  1911. 4-18
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. O,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for a
license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Commencing at a post planted about
8 miles N. E. of the mouth of the
White River and the junction of the
Xaas, marked Chas. J. Gillingham's
S. E. Corner; thence 80 chains
North; thence 80 chains West;
thenCe 80 chains South; thence 80
chains East to point of commencement and containing 640 acres more
or 1 g s s.
CHARLES   J.   GILLINGHAM.  '>
Charles M. Huff, Agent.
Dated March  6th, 1911. 4-18
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, Intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Commencing at a post planted 6 %
miles N. E. of the mouth of the
White River and the junction of the
Naas, and marked Chas. J. Gillingham's S. E. Corner; thence 80
chains Nortn; thence 80 cliains
West; thence 80 chains South;
thence 80 chains East to point of
commencement and containing 640
acres more or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles M.  Huff, Agent.
Dated March 4th, 1911. 4-18
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prini'e Rupert,B. O,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Commencing at a post planted about
8 miles N. E. of the mouth of White
River and tlie junction of the Naas
River, marked Charles .1. Gillingham's S. E. Corner; thence 80
chains North; thence 80 chains
West; thence 80 chains South;
thence 80 chains East to point of
commencement and containing 640
acres more or less.
CHARLES .1.  GILLINGHAM.
Charles IM.  Huff, Agent.
Dated March 5th, 1911. 4-18
Skeena   Land   District—Distrle!    of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gilllngham, of Prince Rupert, H. ('.,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land:—
Commencing at a post planted 6 %
miles N. E. of the mouth of White
River and tha junction of the Naas,
marked Chas. J. Gillingham's S. E.
Corner; thence 80 chains Nortli;
thence 80 cliains West; thence 80
chains South; tlience 80 chains East
to point of commencement and containing 640 acres more or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles  M.  Huff, Agent.
Dated  March  ith,  1911. 4-18
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingliam, of Prince Rupert, B, C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for a
license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 64 0 acres of land: —
Commencing at a post planted about
8 miles N. E. of the mouth of the
White River and the junction of the
Naas, marked Chas. J. Gillingham's
S. E. Corner; thence 80 chains
North; thence 80 chains West;
thence 80 chains South; thence 80
chains East to point of commencement and containing 610 acres more
or less.
CHARLES   J.   GILLINGHAM.
Charles M. Huff, Agent.
Dated  March  6th,  1911. 4-18
WATER NOTICE.
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. O,
occupation contractor, Intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Commencing at a post planted six
miles N. E. of the mouth of White
River and the junction of the Naas
River on Canyon Creek, marked
Chas. J. Gillingham's S. E. Corner;
NOTICE is hereby given that an
application will be made under Part
V. of the "Water Act, 1909," to obtain a licence in the Queen Charlotte Islands Division of Skeena District.
(a) The name, address and occupation of the applicant—Merton A.
Merrill, Masset, Q. C. I., B. C,
Prospector.
(If for mining purposes) Free
Miner's Certificate No	
(b) The name of the lake,
stream, or source (If unnamed, the
description is)—I-in-tsua Lake, Tsu-
Skundale Lake and Ain River.
(c) The point of diversion—At >r
near the outlet of Tsu-Skundale
Lake Into Ain River.
(d) The quantity of water applied for (In cubic feet per second)
—1,000.
(e) The character of the proposed works—Power Plant, Dam,
Flumes, etc.
(f) The premises on which the
water Is to be used (describe same)
—At or near the mouth of the Ain
River.
(g) The purposes for which the
water Is to bo used—Generating
power.
(li) If for Irrigation, describe
iho land Intended lo be Irrigated,
giving acreage	
(I) If the water Is to bo used for
power or mining purposes, describe
thee place where the water is to be
returned to Bomn natural channel,
nnd tho difference.. In altitude bo-
tween point of diversion and point
of return—At or near tho mouth of
the Ain River, ahout 100 feet below
point of diversion.
(j) Area of Crown land Intended to be occupied by the proposed
works—10 acres more or less.
(k) This notice was posted on
the 28th day of November, 1910,
and application will be made to the
Commissioner on the 1st day of
June,  1911.
(1) Give the names nnd addresses of any riparian proprietors or
licensees who or whose lands are
likely to be affected by the proposed works, cither above or below
the outlet--Don't know of any.
(Signature)
MERTON  A.   MERRILL,
(P.  O.   Address)   Masset,   B.  C.
NOTE.—One cubic loot per second is equivalent to 35.71 miner's
Inches.
Job Printing  of all  kinds  neatly
executed at tbe Journal Office. I
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Friday, April 28, 1911.
SPORTS
BOXERS'   DECLINE
In the unceasing evolution of time
as applied to the activity of athletes the career of a fighter is not
of long duration as a rule. The
training and physical exertion of
long contests are a great drain on
the endurance, while they are able
to stand it for a reasonable number
of years, fighters cannot last as long
in their profession as actors or
other persons not subjected to the
same hard  strain.
The average career of a pugilist
is about seven years—that is, the
active fighting career. Many stall
around the small towns for a much
greater length of time, boxing with
rising youngsters or old vets, for
150 and $100 purses. You may play
It hard that when a young pug gets
to this stage he is "gone."
A large number of glove players
have tided over the seven years, and
some have passed beyond the ten-
year mark, but these are indeed exceptions. Abe Attell has been in the
ring nearly fourteen years, but he
Is acknowledged the cleverest ring
general that ever crushed resin
under his feet. And, besides, Abe
has not been forced to labor over-
industriously. His head has done
most of his fighting since he boxed
George Dixon.
A list of the fighters who have
seen their best days and who may
quit the big clubs before 1911 is
over would probably comprise the
following: Boer Unholz, Dave
Deshler, Matty Baldwin, Biz Mac-
kay, Al Delmonl, Willie Lewis, Dixie
Kid, Mike Twin) Sullivan, Al Ku-
biak, Battling Nelson, Dick Nelson,
Jimmy Welsh and Danny Webster.
There are a few more who might
also be mentioned, but they are not
bo very well known outside of their
native hamlets.
Boer Unholz was knocked out recently by Jack Redmond, a demon
fighter, who couldn't destroy a
helpless cripple with his fists. Redmond hit Unholz twice in the stomach and the Boer lay on the floor
and groaned weakly. Unho'z has
been in the fistic game nearly eight
years.
Dave Deshler is a veteran who
will never go any higher than he is
at present. He's still a good tough
bay, but he has passed the stage
where he can get big money. Biz
Mackay of Ohio has been on the
down grade for three years, and is
now nearing the bottom. He gave
Al' Delmont a fight in New York
some weeks ago, but Delmont is not
what he once was. Danny Webster
of California once looked like the
best good bantam in the world, and
later was good fighting around 119
and 120 pounds, and, although now
he can't be classed as a has-been,
he's beyond redemption as a first-
rater.
Al Kubiak was touted as a heavyweight champion when he cracked
out of the lumber camps of Michigan a few years ago, but his fighting has never won him any gold
medals. All ne Is now is a trial
horse, although he can put up a
good  thir-rate  exhibition.
Tel. 187
2nd Avenue & McBride*
Fancy Groceries
Family Groceries
Fresh Groceries
Green Vegetables
Fresh Fruits
Special Attention Given to Family Trade.
You Will Find Our Prices RIGHT.
STALKER & WELLS
2ii Auric & Mride
fe
2
way. Experience is tlie only essential lacking, but before long a few
good trial horses will be engaged
and Stuckey can test the worth of
his blows and endurance against
these.
The most phenomenal feature of
the "hope" is in his height, which
measures no less than 6 feet 9
inches, five inches taller than the
fast rising Carl Morris, of Sapulpa,
Okla., and a half foot in length
greater than the title holder, Jack
Johnson. His reach is about the
same as the dusky title holder, being 81% inches, while Morris boasts
a span of 84 inches. His weight
when in good condition due to training is just  236  pounds.
Stuckey has a chest expansion of
o % inches, measuring 39 inches deflated and 45% inches inflated, being 42% inches at normal. Prom
shoulder to shoulder is a length of
52% inches, while the neck measures 16%  and the waist 37 inches.
ROLLER WANTS TITLE
Dr. Roller, the Seattle grappler, Is
anxious to prove he is the champion
light heavyweight wrestler of America, and an effort is being made to
match him with the Greek champion, Demetral, who recently made
a good showing against Frank
Gotch.
LACROSSE
THE WHITE HOPE
On a farm not far from Jacksonville, Fla., there Is in training the
"hope of the while man's hopes."
The youth who some day in the near
future counts on getting a trial for
the highest honors In pugilism is
Ostard W. Stuckey, 20 years of age,
and a veritable giant, probably as
big a man as ever stepped into the
ring to don the padded mits.
Stuckey's debut into the ranks of
top-notch puglism is still remote.
He is still training earnestly at the
present time on the Florida ostrich
farm, and if size and weight count
for anything his climb Into tlie
championship class Is practically
halffinished before the start.
Measurements of the lad this
state will contribute to Ihe cause of
winning back the crown now gracing the dome of Jack Johnson, when
compared to other big men of the
ring, appeal as fabulous.
Carl Morris, who is even bigger
than the black man whom he hopes
to trim some day, appears small beside this young giant. His titular
hopes do end with his size, however,
for his ability to take punishment
and also administer it in copious
quantities is the talk of the fighting
fraternity of these parts. Constant
training has improved him wonderfully in the finer points of the game,
and still more time under the able
tutors is counted upon to turn out
a finished boxer.
Hacking will be plentiful for the
aspiring youth. William milliard
has him in charge at the present
time, and predicts a whirlwind career for the lad once he gets under
Tlie all-star aggregation promised
by Con Jones for the Vancouver Lacrosse Club to battle for the world's
supremacy in Canada's national
game is nearing completion.
The latest acquisition to the club's
firing line is Harry Hyland of the
Montreal Shamrocks. Con . Jones
states that the clever home and favorite of the Irishmen in the metropolis, had decided to come
through the Rockies to assist Vancouver in its determined effort to
wrest the championship of lacrosse
from the Royal City.
Who now remains to assist in
placing Vancouver on the highest
pedestal of lacrosse in the Dominion? Speculation is rife as to one
or possibly two places remaining to
be filled, but when the gong sounds
for the initial game in the league
series it is safe to predict that the
team fielded by Con Jones will provide a constellation in the firmament of lacrosse the like of which
has never been handed together before in the history of the sport.
Con makes no secret of his determination. The die has been cast
and it will be a fight to the last
ditch. No quarter will be asked or
given. The Mlnto Cup is the stake,
witli Vancouver tlie challenging
combination. The stars have already
given notice of their intention to
turn out on demand, which means
that within the next week or so
there will be a ga'axy of talent at
practice on the local lacrosse field
which will more resemble a national
co in hi nation than anything else.
The decks are being cleared for
action. Like a trainer getting his
horse fit for a big race, Mr. Jones
has supervised the collection of men
who, upon their reputation, stand
high In the realm of lacrosse today.
The fact that Hyland has consented
to come will undoubtedly be received as a severe blow in eastern
Canada.
Harry Hyland is an athlete of
note In Montreal and the east. He
Is a youngster who haB proved a
veritable marvel on both the lacrosse field and also on the Ice
where hockey has been played.    For
—A—
New One
Here is tlie newest two-
button sack wiili long,
smart, lapels. It is essentially n dressy young man's
style. The coat is beautifully modelled and perfectly draped. The shoulders and sleeve head are
cleverly tailored by experts,
the skirt hugs tlie hips and
tlie trousers are designed
specially to suit tlie young
man. Let ns show you
this style.
L
SLOAN & CO.
SIXTH STREET
ALDER BLOCK
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE.
NOTICE is hereby given that the
reserve of a parcel of land situated
on Graham Island, notice of which
appeared in the British Columbia
Gazette on the 25th of February,
1909, being dated 23rd February,
1909, is cancelled to permit of the
lands being acquired by pre-emption
only and for no other purpose
ROBT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Department of Lands,
Victoria, B. C, April 5th, 1911.
4-14—7-5
RESERVE
NOTICE is hereby given that all
vacant Crown lands not already under reserve, situated within the
boundaries of the Land Recording
Districts of Cariboo and Lillooet,
and the Kamloops Division of Yale
Land Recording District, are reserved from any alienation under
the "Land Act" except by pre-emption.
ROBT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy  Minister  of Lands.
Department of Lands,
Victoria, B. C, April 3rd, 1911.
4-14—lm
010 0|0!0I0 0 0 £3 010 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0,00 0i0,0
SHERWIN & WILLIAMS
-PAINTS-
COVER THE EARTH.
WE   ARE   SOLE   AGENTS
CARLOAD JUST ARRIVED
Ready Nixed Paints,
Paints Ground in Oil,
Paints Ground in Japan,
Varnishes, Shellac, etc.
Water Stains
and
Decotint
IN ALL COLORS
Prince Rupert Hardware & Supply
Company, Ltd.  thos. dunn, m*.
SKEENA DISTRICT.
WHARF, PRINCE RUPERT.
In the Matter of Chapter 115, "Navigable  Waters Protection Act,"
R. S. C, 190o.
NOTICE is hereby given that
drawings and description of the site
of a proposed wharf at Prince Rupert, B. C, have been deposited
with the Minister of Public Works,
Ottawa, and duplicates thereof with
the Registrar of Deeds at Prince
Rupert, B. C, and that thirty days
after date the Honourable the Minister of Public Works and the Government of British Columbia will
apply to the Governor-General In
Council for approval thereof.
J. E. GRIFFITH,
Public Works Engineer.
Department of Public Works,
Victoria, B. C, 5th April, 1911.
4-14—lm
TRUST COMPANIES.
EVERY COMPANY receiving deposits of money or carrying on business in the Province of British Columbia as a Trust Company, as defined in the "Trust Companies Regulation Act, 1911," is requested to
furnish particulars as to the corporate name of the company, and the
name and address of its managing
director to the Inspector of Trust
Companies, Victoria, in order to receive a supply of forms to be used
in making the return as provided in
section 4 of said Act.
W. U.  RUNNALS,
Inspector of Trust Companies.
4-18—lm
a couple of years lie has performed
va'iant deeds for the Montreal
Shamrocks and is considered by the
Sons of Erin back east one of the
greatest stick handlers of this generation. Under the supervision of
Alderman McConnell and a few of
the sporting giants of Montreal, he
has been practically looked upon as
the favorite of all. The result is
that he has blossomed into one of
the stars upon which eastern Canada has a'ways cast the eye or pride.
And now he says good-bye to
Montreal. He is coming to Vancouver and hopes to be instrumental
in helping the Pacific Coast city's
team to be proclaimed world's champions. Hyland figured on the Wanderers' famous septette which
marked "paid" against the redoubtable Ottawa hockey team in 1910.
NOTICE.
PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given
that, under the authority contained
in section 131 of the "Land Act," a
regulation has been approved by the
Lieutenant-Governor in Council fixing the minimum sale prices of first
and second-class lands at $10 and $5
per acre, respectively.
This regulation further provides
that the prices fixed therein shall
apply to all lands with respect to
which the application to purchase is
given favourable consideration after
this date, notwithstanding the date
of such application or any delay that
may have occurred In the consideration of the same.
Further notice is hereby given
that all persons who have pending
applications to purchase lands under
the provisions of sections 34 or 36
of the "Land Act" and who are not
willing to complete such purchases
under the prices fixed by the aforesaid regulation shall be at liberty to
withdraw such applications and receive a refund of the moneys deposited on account of such applications.
WILLIAM R. ROSS,
Minister of Lands.
Department of Lands,
Victoria, B. C, April 3rd, 1911.
4-11—6-11.
M.M. Stephens & Co. Ld.
offer the following bargains in real estate subject to   prior   sale
or change In price:
SECTION 1
Lots 3 and 4, Block 5, Terms $4,500.00
Lots 33  and 34, Block 5, Terms $3,750.00
Lots 18 and 19, Block 7, Each $1,500.00
Lots 33 and 34, Block 29, Terms $1,250.00
SECTION 5
Lots 5 and 6, Block 37, Terms $1,800.00
Lot  7,  Block  32       $700.00
Lots 43  and  44, Block  27,  each    $000.00
SECTION 6
Lots 19 and 20, Block 4,  %-cash, each $1,080.00
Lots  10 and  11, Block 21, Terms $3,000.00
Lot  11,  Block  22       $850.00
Lots 8 and 9, Block 26,   %  cash $2,500.00
Lot 20, Block 27, % cash   $000.00
Lots 1 and 2, Block 29,  %   cash $2,025,00
SECTION 7
Lots 27 and 28, Block 5, % cash $000.00
Lots 21 and 22, Block 10, Each   $450.00
Lots 11 and 12, Block 21, % cash,  each $450.00
Lot  15,  Block  39    $500.00
Lot 16, Block 35,  % cash   $000.00
Lots 35 and 36, Block 50, each $250.00
SECTION 8
Lots 28 to 31, Block 15, each , $225.00
Lots, stores, offices and dwellings for sale and lease in ail parts
of tlie City.    Insurance  of all kinds.
PHONE 222 p. o. BOX 275
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS
STEWART SCHOOL.
SEALED TENDERS, superscribed
"Tender for Stewart School," will
be received by the Honourable the
Minister of Public Works up to noon
of Monday, the 1st day of May,
1911, for the erection and completion of a two-room frame school
with basement, etc., at Stewart,
B. C, in the Skeena Electoral District.
Plans, specifications, contract,
and forms of tender may be seen on
and after the 7th day of April, 1911,
at the offices of J. H. Smith, Esq.,
Secretary to the School Board, Stew-
are, B. C; the Government Agent,
Prince Rupert; and the Department
of Public Works, Victoria.
Each proposal must be accompanied by an accepted bank cheque or
certificate of deposit on a chartered
You Can Avoid This
by sending your Clothes to the
PIONEER STEAM LAUNDRV
There are Many
Reasons Why
IT  IS  TO  VOUR  INTEREST
We do first-class work and
are careful with your Garments. We can do your work
and return It within 48 hours
if necessary. We call for your
Liaundry and return it to you.
Should anything be lost or misplaced we will make it satisfactory.
When your Laundry goes to the Chinks there are many drawbacks. When you send It to us your money helps pay WHITE
LABOR.
PIONEER STEAM LAUNDRY
FOR   SALE
BLOCK
SECTION ONE
LOTS BLOCK
19 ..
11    1-2-3-4-5-6
11 9-10
12    22
13 21-22
18    1-2
SECTION FIVE
9    22-23
18 22-23
LOTS
 8-4
1» 16-16
20 19.20
34 36-37-38
3<    42
27    9.10
27 42-43
SECTION SIX
'8 7-8-9-10
W     ^       FiFM^DXI    Tne A»<"itic Realte and Improvement
VV.    \J.    MJM^IVOKSIM     Company Ltd.        -        P.O. Box BI
bank of Canada, made payable to
the Honourable the Minister of Public Works, for the sum of $250
which shall be forfeited If the party
tendering decline to enter Into contract when called upon to do so, or
if he fail to complete the work contracted for. The cheques or certificates of deposit of unsuccessful tenderers will be returned to them
upon the execution of the contract.
Tenders will not be considered
unless made out on the forms supplied, signed with the actual signa
ture of the tenderer, and    enclosed
in the- envelopes furnished.
The lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted.
J. B. GRIFFITH,
Public Works Engineer.
Department of Public Works,
Victoria, B. C, 3rd April, 1911.
4-14—5-2
The Journal (twice a week), only
$2.00 a year.
T

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