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Prince Rupert Journal Jun 9, 1911

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 1 ■■'
CegislS ~ASs
New Wtllingron
Coal
is the best
ROGERS & BUCK
Sole Agents
Prince Unptvt Journal
JU/V|l5l9n
High Class
Job Printini
^ToniA.afe
I'tins*'
VOLUME 1
Published Twice a Week.
PRINCE RUPERT, B. 0., FRIDaY, JUNE  9,  1911.
Price,   Five   Cents.
No.  ltd.
G.T.P. UNFOLDS ITS PLANS FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF WORKS HERE
BUILD LARGEST DOCKS
ON PACIFIC COAST
Company Will Begin Construction at Once Upon the
Commodious Accommodation for Shipping at
Hays Cove—Immense Shops Will be Built
and Then in Turn Used to Provide
Material for the Floating
Docks.
The negotiations between the city
council and the Grand Trunk Pacific
have been concluded and the officials
of the company have left again for
the east. The visit of Charles M.
Hays and his party resulted in an
agreement being reached which only
requires the assent of the property
owners to become effective. The
agreement has long been hoped for
and the citizens with very few exceptions express themselves as highly
pleased that there has been a settlement of this question of taxation and
will accordingly do all in their power
to see that the necessary bylaw carries. The agreement is based upon
the one arrived at in March between
the council and Mr. Tate, the solicitor of the company when he was on
a visit here for the purpose.
With the negotiations went the unfolding by the company of its plans
for development in the city. The
company agrees to begin work at
once upon these in the event of the
agreement being entered into. The
projects which the Grand Trunk Pacific has in view are far more extensive than had been expected. In the
matter of the dry dock alone there
has been a much more elaborate
scheme evolved by the company than
it had in view at the commencement
of the undertaking.
The negotiations were conducted
in a most commendable manner
throughout and with the greatest expedition.
Amicable Conference
Mr. Hays and party arrived here by
the Prince Rupert on Wednesday afternoon. At once the council and the
officials of the company went Into
conference in the police court room
and sat practically continuously until
10 o'clock at night when a basis of
settlement had been reached.
It then remained for the solicitors
on each side to complete the formal
agreements which occupied most of
Thursday. D'Arcy Tate for the company, and Fred Peters, K. C, for
the city performed this duty and
on both sides the most watchful care
was taken to avoid anything that
would lead to future difficulty. The
agreement is short and explicit.
Taxation Fixed
The company agrees to pay ?15,-
000 taxation a year upon its property used for railway purposes in the
city. This is to continue for ten
years from the present date, there
being due now $30,000 to cover last
year and this year. As soon as any
land is alienated in any way it becomes taxable. The copany's leases
of land carries with it the usual condition that the lessee is to pay all
taxes.
On the land held by the Grand
Trunk Pacific Development Company
which is open to sale, etc., the ordinary rates of taxation will apply
and the company pay as a private Individual would.
The company also agrees to pay its
share of local improvement taxation
on all its railway lands abutting upon
the streets to be improved, which
means a great deal in Section One.
Waterfront for City
The city Is to be given 100 feet of
waterfront by the company and in
conjunction with this the Provincial
Government adds another 100 feet
adjoining it. This is at the point
where the waterfront block on which
the present company wharf is situated and the government block near
the entrance of the harbor meet and
Is In the vicinity of Eleventh street.
The city receives this without any
restrictions.
The city is to receive a large number of parcels of land throughout the
city, aggregating a total assessed
valuation of $172,270. This Is giv n
in fee simple and the city may thus
dispose of It as It sees fit.
Another class of property is to be
given under a lease of 999 years.
This includes the cemetery and park
properties. The reason for this being given under lease at a nominal
figure is mainly owing to a legal aspect of the case. The company makes
restrictions that, hese lands shall be
held for these definite purposes. Under lease this is enforceable. If given outright it would not be so. Included in this is the Fairview cemetery site containing about 60 acres,
Acropolis Hill, the land at Laurier
Square, Hays Creek Park, a parcel
on Second avenue west of the junction at Lynch's, suitable for a school
site, the squares at the corner of
McBride and Sixth avenue, the circular portion at Seal Cove Circle, the
parklike portions of Prince Rupert
boulevard and many other breathing
spaces which will become very valuable as the city grows. The assessed
value of these at present is $368,000.
Change of Policy
The railway company has found It
necessary to take back the section of
the reserve property on Second avenue between Third and Sixth streets
from the Development company. Its
plans for the station yard are not
complete enough yet to allow them
to say how much of this land will not
be required. This, therefore, also
goes in as railway land In the meantime. If any part is alienated later
and becomes a part of the Development company's property it will be
taxable again.
In return for the loss which the
city suffers here in taxation the company has turned over in fee simple
several parcels of land In the central
part of the city which may be realized upon if the city so desires. This
includes the reserved strips between
Third avenue and Fourth street from
the yard reserve near Cameron Cove
TAXATION AGREEMENT
........i.m.
* Tltl'E  HILLS  FOUND
* (Special to The Journal)
* VICTORIA,       June    9.—The
* grand jury    on    Thursday    re -
* turned a true bill against Milo
* Vuckovitch, charged with shoot-
* ing at Constable Phillipson with
* intent to murder.      True    bills
* were   also   found   against   Dan
* Babich  and  Juras Vujovic    on
* charges arising out of the Prince
* Rupert    strike.       Their    trials
* started today.
to Fulton street, and the reserves beyond that point skirting the Acropolis
Hill park, etc. The assessed value of
these is $152,000.
Drydock   Scheme
On the other side the company
agrees to start work at once upon its
permanent works here. These are
on an elaborate scale, far greater
than were originally intended. When
completed there will be terminal
works in this city that will be the
envy of every other city on the coast.
Foremost in these is the construction of the dry dock which will start
at once. W. J. Donnelly, an eminent
engineer of New York, is in charge
in a consulting capacity, the plans
having been prepared by him. Originally it was the intention of the
company to put In a dock that would
cost about a million and a quarter.
The work has grown on their hands,
however, and now the cost is put
at not less than $2,000,000. The
location of the works is Hays Cove
near the mouth of Hays Creek.
Accessory Buildings
It is proposed to proceed at once
with the construction of the necessary wood working, boiler and other
shops.    These will be of the    most
MEMORANDUM OF AGREEMENT made in quadruplicate this 8th day
of June, in the year of Our Lord, one thousand nine hundred and
eleven,
BETWEEN
THE MUNICIPALITY OF THE CITY OF PRINCE RUPERT (hereinafter railed the "City," of the first part),
THE GRAND TRUNK PACIFIC RAILWAY COMPANY (hereinafter called
the "Railway  Company," of the second part),
THE GRAND TRUNK PACIFIC DEVELOPMENT    COMPANY,   LIMITED,
(hereinafter  called the  "Townsite Company," of the third part),
anil
HIS MA.JESTY THE KING, In his right of his Province of British  Columbia,   herein   represented   and acting by  the Honorable William
K. Ross, Minister    of    Lands   of   the   said    Province    (hereinafter
referred to as "The Province," of the fourth part).
WHEREAS, differences have niiscn regarding the taxation by the
City of the hinds belonging to the Railway Company situated within the
limits of the City of Prince Rupert, and certain other matters as hereinafter appearing, and this agreement is made for the purpose of settling
such differences.
AND, WHEREAS, the Townsite Company is the owner of an undivided three-quarters interest and the Province of an undivided one-
quarter interest in the lands referred to In paragraphs one (1), four (4)
and five (5) hereof, and are severally interested in securing an adjust-
ment of the said difference, and as part of such adjustment have severally agreed to transfer and lease such lands as hereinafter provided:
NOW, THEREFORE, THIS AGREEMENT WITNESSETH, that in
consideration of the covenants and agreements on the part of the several
parties herein contained, the pai-ties hereto have agreed with each other
as follows: »
1. The Townsite Company will, with the concurrence of the Province, as testified by the Province joining in this agreement and the conveyance to be made hereunder, convey to the City in fee simple all
those certain parcels of lands indicated on the plan hereto annexed as
numbers three (3), eleven (11), thirteen (13), fourteen (1-1), eighteen
(18), twenty (20), twenty-two (22), twenty-three (23), twenty-nine
(29), thirty-eight (88), forty (40), forty-one (41), fifty-six (50), fifty-
eight (58), fifty-nine (50) and sixty-two (02).
2. The Railway Company will convey to the City in fee simple the
westerly one hundred (100) feet of Waterfront Block E, as shown on
plan in pink on attached plan, on condition that the said waterfront shall
not unless upon the consent of the Company given under its Corporate
Seal be used  for other than strictly municipal purposes.
3. The Province will convey to the City in fee simple the easterly
one hundred (100) feet of Waterfront lilork D, as shown in pink on the
attached plan, on condition that the said waterfront shall not unless
upon the consent of the Province be used for other thai', strictly municipal purposes.
4. The Townsite Company will, with the concurrence of the Province ns aforesaid, grant to the City a lease lor the term of nine hundred
and ninety-nine (000) years of the several parcels of land indicated
on tlie plan hereto annexed as numbers five (5), fifteen (15), seventeen (17), twenty-one (21), twenty-four (24), twenty-five (25), twenty-
six (20), twenty-seven (27), thirty-one (31), thirty-two (32), thirty-
three (33), thirty-four (34), thirty-file (35), thirty-seven (37), thirty-
nine (30), forty-two (42), forty-three (43), forty-four (44), forty-
five (45), forty-six (40), forty-seven (47), forty-eight (48), forty-nine
(49), fifty (50), fifty-one (51), fifty-two (52), fifty-three (53), fifty-
five (55), sixty (00) and sixty-one (01). The snid lease to be at a nominal rental of one dollar ($1.00) per annum and upon the following conditions, that is to say:
(a) The lease is not to he assigned or sublet without leave of the
Townsite Company  and  tbe Province;
(b) The lands are not to be used lor any other than park, boulevard, or other purposes having for their object the beautifying of the
City, without the consent of the Townsite Company and the Province;
(c) No buildings or structures other than statues or monuments
are to be erected upon the snid parcels or any of them without the like
consent.
5. The Townsite Company will, with the concurrence of the Province testified ns aforesaid, grant to the City a lease for the term of
nine hundred and ninety-nine (909) years of the several parcels of land
indicated on the plan hereto annexed as numbers two (2), four (4), six
(fl), seven (7), eight (8), nine (9), ten (10), twelve (12), sixteen
(10), twenty-eight (28), thirty-six (30) and fifty-four (54). The said
lease to be nt a nominal rental of one dollar ($1.00) per annum, and
not to be assigned or sublet without leave of the Townsite Company and
the Province, except as hereinafter provided  with  respect  to Parcel  2,—
(a) Parcel two (2)—This land shall be used for cemetery purposes
only, anil shall he laid out mid developed accordingly, maintaining a
parkiike effect throughout. It is understood that the City may assign or
sublet individual plots in this urea to persons desiring to use the same
for burial purposes without obtaining the leave hereinbefore provided;
(b) Parcel four (4)—This hind shall he used only for the establishment of u reservoir and waterworks connected therewith; the election of buildings of a public character and possessing architectural merit;
nnd in other respects for general park purposes;
(c) Parcels six (fl), seven (7), eight (8), nine (0) and ten (10)
—These lands shall be used only for tlie purpose of public buildings,
having a grouped effect architecturally with parkiike surroundings;
(d) Parcel twelve (12)—This land shall be used only for public
park purposes or for tlie erection of school, college, seminary or other
public buildings;
(e) Parcel sixteen (10)—This land shall be used ns n public recreation ground and for the erection of public buildings of real architectural
merit, the entire development to be such as shall produce a parkiike effect. In addition to the above, It shall be lawful for the City to construct and innintuiii upon this parcel one or more reservoirs in connection with the City waterworks system, making for this purpose the necessary connections therewith upon the said  parrel;
(f) Parcel twenty-eight (28)—This land shall be used for ii general
public park and is to he developed to that end. Without in any way
lessening the duty of the City to preserve the parkiike features of this
parrel, it is understood that for n distance of one thousand (1,000) feet
to the north of n rond connecting McBride Street and the Prince Ruperl
Boulevard, the natural  park like features of the hind are to he retained;
(g) Parcel thirty-six (86)—This land shall only be used for buildings of a public character possessing real architectural merit, the grounds
surrounding same to be suitably graded and planted;
(b)     Parcel  fifty-four   (54)—This land shall only be used for public
(Continued on Page Eight)
COUNCIL AND COMPANY
REACH A SETTLEMENT
Citizens Have Now But to Pass Upon it and the Railway
Will Enter Upon Its Projects for the Providing of Great Shops Here—President Hays and Party Leave
After Inspection of
Line.
permanent character, built of reinforced concrete. There will be 2,000
horsepower provided to run them and
one building alone will be 90 feet by
140 feet.
As these are completed the machinery will be installed and work
started upon the floating docks and
the pontoons connected with them.
The steel for the docks will be
brought in only partially prepared. It
will be taken care of in the shops
here and the actual installation
made. About 2,000 tons of steel will
be used in this work. The timber
for the pontoons will aggregate four
million feet. It will be landed here
and worked up in the wood shops
which are constructed. Thus it will
be seen that steady work is to be
found for mechanics in the city from
the very start. The buildings will
call for a good force of men, while
the completion of these will be immediately followed by skilled work In
the way of equipping the docks
proper.
Elaborate  Plans
According to the plans which the
company has now prepared, the reserve beyond Cameron Bay extending
to Hays Creek will be cleared. Mr.
Chamberlin, the general manager of
the company, speaking with The
Journal representative last evening,
said that work would have to begin
on that undertaking very shortly.
Cameron Bay and the mouth of Hays
Creek will be filled in. From the
end of the government waterfront
section, which is all to be built on
at once, the company will continue a
line of wharfage extending all the
way to Hays Creek.
On the land side there will be long
lines of parallel trackage for the
coaches of the company. About 20
lines of road will parallel the main
line at that point. Closer to the hill
the necessary shops and  works will
CONDEMNS RECIPROCITY
(Special to The Journal)
VICTORIA, June 9.—The
hoard of directors of the British Columbia Fruit Growers
Association at a meting at Kamloops passed a resolution condemning the proposed reciprocity agreement between Canada
and the United States as being
detrimental to the fruit industry of  Britisii Columbia.
e built. U]i Hays Creek, near Ninth
avenue continued will be the round
house for the repairing of the locomotives of the line with the necessary shops in connection. On the
west side of the mouth of Hays Creek
the dry docks will he located.
Handle  Any   Vessel
These are to be constructed on the
most Improved plans. In order to
accommodate all classes of business
offering here, the dock will be In sections. It will he available as three
docks for small vessels or two sections may be brought together to accommodate a moderately sized vessel with the third section available
for small craft. Then when occasion
arises the three sections are convertible jointly Into a dock 68 0 feet long
and 130 feet wide over all. The result is that when all sections are
brought together the dock is the
most commodious oil the Pacific
coast and capable of handling any
vessel on this coast. The Minnesota
could be taken care of in il.
Ship Building Works
Under the plans prepared whereby
the dock is capable nf alteration to
suit different sizes of vessels its usefulness is very materially enhanced.
In addition  to the ship yards the
dock and the large buildings for
shops there, is on the eastern side
of Hays Creek accommodation provided for a covered shed under
which may be constructed wooden
ships up to a length of about 250
feet.
The addition of this part of the
equipment, together with all the nee.
essary machinery for carrying on the
work of building is ominous. It indicates that the company Is not going to provide for repair work alone.
It is making provision for the building of vessels that will ply out of
Prince Rupert to the various ports
tributary to it. Hays Creek is to
become, not the scene of a repair
dock alone, but it is to be the home
of a constructive enterprise, namely,
a ship building yard. The effect
which this will have upon the industrial life of the city is great. Prince
Rupert is going to require a vast
number of vessels varying in size
from the fishing schooners of which
there must be a large fleet, to vessels
engaged in carrying freight and passengers along the coast. These will
all be capable of construction here
and Prince Rupert will reap the benefits.
Hotel Site Sought
The company will also proceed
with its station at an early date and
within two years the work is to begin on the palatial hotel planned for
the city. Just at present the hotel
building is being held in the background, because the officials of the
compan yare not fully decided upon
the best site. Mr. Hays asked the
council during the conference to suggest the site and he expresses his
willingness to receive suggestions
from any source as he has a desire to
settle upon it and proceed with the
work. The point in rear of the residence of General Superintendent
Mehan, overlooking the harbor, has
been recognized as the best available
location, but the president does not.
want to make any mistake.
Early this morning before the
Prince Ruperl left, at s oVloe-k, he
was out with his brother, David II.
Hays, covering the city in an effort
to locate what he felt would he the
best site. With the question of the
right location settled, work will begin at once upon the hotel building.
The site to he chosen must command
a good, unobstructed view of the harbor; it must be convenient to the
company's wharf and railway station; it must be within easy reach of
the business section and it must be
free from objectionable smoke, etc.
Went  up |lie Line
Yesterday was spent by President
nays, E. J. Chamberlin and the' other
officials in a tour over the line of
the railway. They proceeded by a
special train lo the end of the Steel
and there tramped along ihe right of
way to I hi' big tunnel, under the
guidance of General Superintendent
Mehan.
Mr. Hays and Mr. Chamberlin wpre
well pleased with the progress being
made. Mr. Chamberlin says lliere
are none more anxious than the railway officials to see the work completed.
Tin' tunnel, Mr. Chamberlin
thinks, will he completed In time this
summer to allow the track to be completed lo the Hazelton brielge. With
that work finished during the winter
the road will be quickly laid next
spring to Aldermere.
To Complete  Road
The chief engineer Is now calling
for bids on thee remaining Bectlon of
the road to couple up Aldermere and
Tele Jaune Cache. This portion, Mr.
Hays says, will not be- ns difficult as
that on the Skeena and by using the
waterways faster time will be made.
Speaking of the roadbed, Mr. Hays
says he found  it  in splendid shape,
(Continued on  Page Four) PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Friday, June 9,  1911.
SANGUINE  OF  VICTORY
G.   H.   Barnard,  on  Retrn   from  Ottawa Tells of Conditions in
Political  Field
With the Conservative party never
better organized, never more enthusiastic and with such a rallying
cry as the necessity of saving the
country from reciprocity, Mr. G. H.
Barnard, M. P., who has just returned to Victoria from Ottawa, considers that at the forthcoming Do-
niining election Mr. Borden will be
returned to power with a handsome
majority. "The party," he says, has
never been In more excellent trim to
fight a campaign. It is absolutely
united in its opposition to reciprocity; while on this question the ranks
of the Liberal party have been split.
The most notable among the defections are Messrs. Sifton, Harris and
German. When the campaign is in
progress these three men will be
found on platforms denouncing the
reciprocity pact.
"The possibilities are that a redistribution bill will be brought
down early in September, dissolution
taking place as soon as it has been
put through. At present supply has
been voted up to the first of September, and a general election is
hardly probable before some time
late in October. During the present
recess the Conervatlve party is going
to carry on a strenuous campaign
throughout the country, edducating
the people on what reciprocity really
means. Mr. Borden has arranged a
tour which will carry him through
the northwest territories.
His campaign will be a whirlwind
one, as I understand that he has arranged to address two meetings
every day. He will go as far north
as Edmonton, covering the territory-
served by the Grand Trunk Pacific
lines, and will return eastward over
the Canadian Pacific system. In
Ontario, an energetic campaign will
also be carried on. Already that
province is overwhelmingly against
reciprocity. We have had excellent
reports of the strides which Conservatism is making in Nova Scotia
and Prince Edward Island, and I
believe that the coming election will
record several important gains in
the province of Quebec.
Increased Representation
"Conservatives are eagerly looking forward to redistribution. In
British Columbia it is likely that the
reprsentation will be fourteen members, or double what we have at
present. At all events it is certain
to be increased to eleven members.
The other provinces in the west will
have larely increased representation,
so that it will be possible, as it has
not been during the last two Dominion elections to ascertain what really
is the political opinion of the majority of the voting population of the
country.
"From the standpoint of the Conservative party, the feature of the
session which recently came to a
conclusion al. Ottawa was the tact of
Mr. Borden in forcing Sir Wilfrid
Laurier to represent the Dominion
at the coronation, after Sir Wilfrid
had said that he would not go. Mr.
Borden's attitude in this matter exhibited masterly act.
"There is a question of very vital
importance, not only to Victoria, but
to the pjrovlnce at large. That is
the question of having the warships
for the new Canadian navy built
either at Esquimalt or at some point
on the coast. I fear that Ihis matter
Is going to be dealt with somewhat
on tlie Hiinie lines as the disposition
of (lie fleet The government,
through Sir Wilfrid Laurier himself,
has practically admitted that the Pa-
cific coast is far more in need ot
protection than the Atlantic coast,
being inure liable tee attack. Yet, in
spite of this opinion we' find that the
majority of the ships are to be sta-
tioned 'in the Atlantic,
"1 personally do not see any
chance of any of the vessels for the:
new navy being constructed on the
Pae iflc coast. Indeed 1 am afraid
that in order to reconcile Canadian-
French opinion to the Idea of a navy
at all, ilea tall the vessels will probably he built at some point in Quebec. Yes, I know what the opinion
in Britisii Columbia will be if such
a policy is adopted; but then the
Dominion government's policy and a
sense of national fairness in the distribution of public moneys are not
necessarily synonymous."
Mr. Barnard will be in Victoria
until about the middle of July. Before leaving the east he said that
the weather there was very hot, so
much so as to be uncomfortable;
coming west in die prairies he expe-
rlenced cold weather, while on
reaching Victoria he found the conditions ideal. He was accompanied
to the city by Mrs. G. H Barnard,
whose many friends will be glad to
hear that she shows great improvement after her recent sever illness.
If you want the honey
That comes from the hive
Take up the phone and
Call one, double five.
Skeena    Land    District—District  of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that Freadrlck
Madden, of Seattle, Wash., occupation laborer, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described land:—Commencing at a
post planted about two hundred feet
east of mile 77 on the south side of
G. T. P. Right-of-way; thence west
40 chains following the said Right-
of-way; thence south to bank of
Skeena River; thence east following
the sinuosities of said river until
due south of said post; thence north
to point of commencement, containing 130 acres, more or less.
FREADRICK MADDEN.
Thos. L. Fay, Agent.
Dated April 27, 1911.
5-16
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that John Kirkaldy, of Lakelse Valley, occupation
farmer, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 120 chains south
from the south end of Herman
Lake; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains.
JOHN  KIRKALDY.
Dated April 11, 1911. 5-5
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that I, V. W.
Smith, of Prince Rupert, occupation
contractor, intend to apply for permission to lease the following described foreshore:—Commencing at
a post planted ahout 2 miles in a
southerly direction from Port Simpson; thence northerly along high
water mark 25 chains and containing all foreshore hetweeii high and
low water mark.
V. W.  SMITH,
Locator.
Staked 31st May, 1911. 6-6
Skeena  |Land   District—District   of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that William H.
Hargrave, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation banker, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lanas:—Commencing at a post .planted on the west
shore of Lakelse Lake, and about
1 Vz miles distant and in a southwesterly direction from the S. W.
corner of Lot 3982, Skeena Land
District, District of Coast, Range V;
thence west 40 chains; thence south
80 chains, more or less, to the Bhore
of Lakelse Lake; thence following
the shore of said lake to point of
commencement, containing 160
acres more or less.
WILLIAM H. HARGRAVE.
Mancell Clark, Agent.
Dated  20th  March,  1911.
Skeena Land District-—District of
Queen  Charlote IslandB.
TAKE NOTICE that Wirt A. Stevens, of Chicago, 111., U. S. A., occupation civil engineer, Intends to
apply for permission to purchase
the following described lands: —
Commencing at a post planted on
the shore of Masset Inlet about one
mile northeast of the mouth of the
Ain River; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 40 chains more or less
to the eastern boundary of T. L.
35413; thence south along the
boundary of T. L. 85413 and
T. L. 35414, a distance of 80 chains;
thence east 40 chains, more or less,
to point of commencement, containing  320  acres more or less.
•WIRT   A.   STEVENS.
G. S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated Feb. 24th, 1911.
For Sale
155% Acres good land, on South
Bank of Skeena River, 85 miles East
of Prince Rupert by G. T. P. Ry.,
with buildings erected thereon, containing dwelling, store and post
office.
P. McLACHLAN.
Box 324.
For Sale
160 Acres Alberta land for sale
at J15.00 per acre, or Exchange for
Prince Rupert property; fenced; 40
acres broken; small house; 2 miles
from P. O., being southwest Quarter
section 6, township 53, range 9.
P.  McLACHLAN,
P. O. Box 324     Prince Rupert, B. C.
Wanted
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast Range 5.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles
James Gillingham, of Prince Rupert,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner of Lot 992 and
marked C. J. Gillingham's N. E.
Corner Application for Purchase; I,
C. J. Gilllngham, intend to apply
for permission to purchase 320 acres
of land bounded as follows:—-Commencing at this post; thence 80
chains south; thence 40 chains west;
thence 80 chains north; thence 40
chains east to place of commencement.
C.iARLES JAMES GIU INGHAJI
Robeirt Osborn Jennings, Agent.
Dated  January 5, 1911.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that James Mul-
Iin, of Murdo, So. Dakota, U. S. A.,
occupation farmer, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands: — Commencing at a post planted on the
shore of Masset Inlet, about one
mile northeast of the mouth of the
Ain River; thence west 40 chains,
more or less, to the eastern boundary of T. L. 35414; thence south
60 chains, more or less to the shore
of Masset Inlet; thence northeasterly along the shore to point of
commencement, containing 60 acres
more or less.
JAMES   MULLIN.
G. S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated Feb.  24th,  1911.
NOTICE   OF   DISSOLUTION
TAKE NOTICE that the partnership heretofore existing between
Joseph E. Merryfield, Prince Rupert, B. C, and Joseph E. McEwen,
of Kitselas, B. O, has this day been
dissolved by mutual consent, and
that Joseph E. Merryfield will carry on the grocery business heretofore
carried on by the firm at Prince Rupert, B. O, under the name of "J. E.
Merryfield," and will collect all
debts due to and pay all debts owing
by the said firm, and that Joseph E.
McEwen will carry on the business
of the partnership heretofore conducted at Kitselas, B. C, under the
firm name of "Merryfield & McEwen," and will collect all debts due to
and pay all debts owing by the said
firm at Kitselas, B. C.
Dated   at   Prince   Rupert,   B.   C,
this 21st day of April, A. D. 1911.
J.  E.  MERRYFIELD,
J.   E.   McEWEX.
Witness:
M.   M.   STEPHENS. 5-12
Skeena    Land    District—District    of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that Annie Kirkaldy, of Melville, Sask., occupation
married woman, intends to apply for
l irmlssion to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted 120 cnains southwesterly from Herman Lake; thence west
X0 chnins; thence south SO chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence north
SO chains, containing G40 acres more
or less.
ANN'IE  KIRKALDY.
John Kirkaldy, Agent.
Dated May 13, 1911. 5-19
Skeena Land  District—District
of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that Victor H.
.Reynolds, of Hull, Massachusetts, occupation chauffeur, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described land:—Commencing at a post planted at high water
mark on the northerly side of the
entrance to a small unnamed cove on
the west coast of Pitt Island, about
one-quarter mile south of the entrance to KItkatIa summer village;
thence east forty chains; thence
south twenty cliains; thence west
forty chains; thence north ten
chains more or less to high water
mark; thence following along high
water mark around the head of the
cove back to the commencement, and
containing sixty  (60) acres more or
VICTOR H. REYNOLDS.
J. H. Plllsbury, Agent.
Dated Feb. 18th, 1911.
A live, active Real Estate Partner,
with some capital, to take half-
Interest in company handling Real
Estate, Insurance and Manufacturing Agencies. Party to take full
charge of office In Prince Rupert, as
I am soon to leave for the Interior
for the summer. Apply to
G. W. ARNOTT
Drawer 1539 Prince Rupert
The Thompson
! Hardware Co.
—Second Avenue—
Paints. General Hardware,
Oils, Stoves and Ranges.
New Knox Hotel
ARTAUD &BESNER
Proprietors
The New Knox Hotel Is run on the
European plan. First-clas service.
All the latest modern Improvements.
THE BAR keeps only the best
brands of liquors and cigars.
THE CAFE is open from 6.30 a.m.
to 8 p.m.    Excellent cuisine;  first-
class service.
Board, $1 a Day — Beds, 50c and np
First Avenue.  Prince Rupert
GRAND HOTEL
WORKINGMAN'S HOME
Spring Beds, Clean O C «
White Sheets   -    -    £OC
Rooms 50 Cents
Best In Town for the Money
FIRST AVE. AND SEVENTH ST.
J. Goodman, Proprietor
THE WESTHOLME LUMBER GO.
LIMITED
We handle all kinds of
Building Supplies
First Avenue Telephone 180
Skeena Land Districl—District
of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that F. C. Plllsbury, of Boston, Mass., occupation
civil engineer, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—beginning at a
post planted at high water mark on
the northerly end of Pitt Island, on
Ogden Channel, and ahout 2 miles
southwesterly from Swede Pt; thence
east 60 chains theuce south 40
chains; thence west 50 chains more
or less to high water mark; thence
following along the high water mark
back to the point of commencement,
and containing 240 acres more or
less.
F. C. PILLSBURY,
J. H. Plllshr.ry, Agent
Dated Feb. 19, 1911.
Prince  Rupert   Private   Detective
  Agency 	
N. McDonald, Manager
All kinds of legitimate detective work
handled for companies and Individuals.    Business strictly confidential.
P. O. Box 803 — Phone 210
WM. S. HAL.L, L. D. S. D. D. S.
;-:   DENTIST   :-:
Crown and Bridge Work a specialty.
All dental operations skillfully
treated. Gas and local anaesthetics
administered tor the painless extraction of teeth. Consultation free.
Offices, Helgerson 3k., Prince Rupert
NICKERSON-ROERIG COMPANY
CUSTOMS AND MERCHANDISE
—o—
Brokers, Forwarding Agents,
Storage,  etc.
Skeena   Land    District—District   of
Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that George
Rudge, of Port Simpson, occupation
marble worker, Intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 2 miles In a
southerly direction from meuth of
Union Bay and on south side of Bay;
thence south 20 chains; thence west
20 chains; thence north 20 chains to
shore; thence following shore in an
easterly direction to point of commencement, containing 40 acres
more or less.
GEORGE RUDGE.
Lionel Rudge, Agent.
Staked 11th May, 1911. 5-23
The Journal (twice a week), only
J2.00 a year.
Prince Rupert Land District—
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that P. McLachlan,
of Prince Rupert, occupation broker,
intends to apply for permission to
lease the following described land:
—Commencing at a post planted
one-third of a mile northerly from
head of Alice Arm, on its Easterly
Side; thence 40 cliains northerly;
thence 40 chains easterly; thence 40
chains southerly; tlience 40 chains
westerly to place of commencement.
PETER   McLACHLAN.
Thos. L. Fay, Agent.
Dated 2nd Feb.,  1911.
Skeena    Land   [District—District    of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that Alice Munro,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
married woman, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described landB:—Commencing at a post planted on the west
shore of Lakelse Lake, and about
\Vi miles distant and in a southwesterly direction from the S. W.
corner of Lot 3982, Skeena Land
District, District of Coast, Range V;
thence west 40 cliains; thence north
40 chains; thence east 60 chains,
more or less, to the shore of Lakelse
Lake; thence following shore of
said lake to point of commencement,
containing 200 acres, more or less.
ALICE MUNRO.
Mancell Clark, Agent.
Dated 20th  March,  1911.
GRAHAM ISLAND — "The surest
sign of the progress of a town or
district is Its newspaper—live, active, hustling." "The Masset Re-
vler," Masset, Q.O.1
J. W.  POTTER
ARCHITECT    AND     STRUCTURAL
ENGINEER    .
Re-inf orced Concrete a Specialty
—o-—
Law-Butler Building - Prince Rupert
Corner Eighth and Fraser Streets
Clinton Rooms
Newly   remodelled   and   furnished.
Board   and   lodging.   Home cooking
a  specialty.    Mrs.  Anderson,  Prop.
Rooms, $3 Per Week
—THE—
Oliver
Typewriter
—FOR—
Seventeen Cents a Day
Please, read the headline over
again. Then Its tremendous significance will dawn upon you.
An Oliver Typewriter—the standard visible writer—the most highly
perfected typewriter on the market
—yours for 17 cents a day!
The typewriter whose conquest of
the commercial world Is a matter of
business history—yours for 17 cent*
a day I
The typewriter that is equipped
with scores of such conveniences as
"The Balance Shift"—"The Rutins
Device"—"The Double Release"—
"The Locomotive Base"—"The Automatic Spacer"—"The Automatic Tabulator"—"The Disappearing Indicator"—"The Adjustable Paper Fingers"—"The Scientific Condensed
Keyboard"—all
Yours For 17 Cents a Day
The Roland Rooms
Splendid Accommodations
Newly Furnished
Hot baths;  r.ght down town;  good
table board all round
RATES, FIFTY CENTS AND UP
LINDSAY'S CARTAGE &ST0RAGE
G. T. P. CARTAGE AGENTS
Office at H. B. Rochester, Centre St
LADYSMITH COAL
Is handled by us.  All orders receive
prompt attention.  Phone No. 68.
HAYNOR   BROS.
FUNERAL   DIRECTORS
and
PROFESSIONAL   EMBALMERS
DR.  W.  B.  CLAYTON
DENTIST
—o—
Office  at    the    Westenhaver   Block
Ovet Orme's  Drug   Store.
Prince Rupert
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast—Range;. V.
TAKE NOTICE, that I, Minnie
Meredith, of Victoria, B. C, occupation a married woman, intend to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing pt. a post planted about 40
chains distant and in a South direction from the Southeast corner of
Lot 1733; thence east 40 chains;
thence south 40 chains; tlience west
40 chains; thence north 40 chains
to point of commencement, containing 160 acres more or less.
MINNIE  MEREDITH,
John Kirkaldy,
Agent.
Dated February  20th,  1911.
Skeena Land  District—Dislrict
of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that Joseph Edward Merryfield, of Prince Rupert,
occupation merchant, intends to apply for permission to lease the following described lan^s:—Commencing at a post planted about 10 chains
nortn from the northern corner of
Lot 33; thence west 1500 feet to
shore of Smith's Island; thence following shore in a southerly direction
1200 feet; thence east to shore of
De Horsey Island; thence following
shore in a northerly direction to
point of commencement.
JOSEPH EDWARD MERRYFIELD.
E. Spro, Agent.
Dated April 4, 1911. 4-7
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that I, Roy,
Chrisman, of Port Esslngton, B. C,
occupation prospector, intend to apply for permission to lease the following described land:—Commencing at a post planted about five
miles distant and in a southwesterly
direction from the point at the entrance to Captain Cove, Petrel
Channel, and on the northeast side
of McCauley Island; thence west 20
chains; thence south 40 chains,
thence east about 20 chains to shore
of Petrel Channel; thence northerly
along shore line of Petrel Channel
to point of commencement and containing eighty acres more or leBS.
ROY CHRISMAN.
Dated April 11, 1911. 4-25
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that W. H. Ferguson, of Prince Rupert, B. C, occupation civil engineer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about one
mile southerly, following the sinuosities of the shore line from the
southwest corner of Lot 104, Range
V; theuce 20 chains west; tlience 20
cliains south; thence 20 chains west,
thence 20 chains south; thence 20
cliains west; thence about 40 chains
south; thence along shore northerly
to point of commencement.
W. H. FERGUSON.
G. Hansen, Agent.
Dated April 22nd, 1911. 4-25
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast
TAKE NOTICE .that F. T. Saunders, of Vancouver, occupation master
mariner, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands:— Commencing at a
post planted about 6 miles northwest of Love Inlet on the north
east shore of Pitt Island; thence
south 20 chains; thence west 40
chains; thence north to shore;
thence following shore In a southeasterly direction to point of commencement , containing 80 acres
more or less.
FRANK TAUNTON SAUNDERS,
Locator.
W, Hamilton, Agent.
Staked 17th, Feb., 1911.
We announced this new saleB plan
recently, just to feel the pulse of the
people. Simply a small cash payment—then 17 cents a day. That
is the plan In a nutshell.
The result has been such a deluge of applications for machines
that we are simply astounded.
The demand comes from people of
all classes, all ages, all occupations.
The majority of inquiries has
come from people of known financial
standing who were attracted by the
novelty of the proposition. An impressive demonstration of the immense popularity of the Oliver Typewriter.
A startling confirmation of our belief that the Era of Universal Typewriting Is at hand.
A Quarter of a Million People are
Making Money With
Tlje.
Skeena Land District—District »f
Queen Charlotte Island.
TAKE NOTICE that Robert Fraser Ogllvle, of Vancouver, occupation banker, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the folowlng
described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 2 miles west of
the southwest corner of A. P. 12-
037; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 ehains to
point of commencement, containing
640 acres.
ROBERT FRASER OGILVIE.
Arthur  Robertson,  Agent. I
Dated Dec. 9, 1910.
OLIVER
Typewriter
The Standard  Visible  Writer
The Oliver Typewriter Is a moneymaker, right from the word "go!" So
easy to run that beginners soon get
in the "expert" class. Earn as you
learn. Let the machine pay the 17
cents a day—and all above that Is
yours.
Wherever you are, there's work to
be done and money to be made by
using the Oliver. The business world
is calling for Oliver operators. There
are not enough to supply the demand.
Their salaries are considerably above
those of many classes of workers.
"An Oliver Typewriter in
Every  Home!"
That is our battle cry today. We
have made the Oliver supreme In
usefulness and absolutely Indispensable In business. Now comes the
conquest of the home.
The simplicity and strength of the
Oliver fit it for family use. It is becoming an important factor In the
home training of young people. An
educator as well as a money maker.
Our new selling plan puts the
Oliver on the threshold of every
home in America. Will you close
the door of your home or office on
this remarkable Oliver opportunity!
Write for further details of our
easy offer and a free copy of the new
Oliver catalogue.    Address:
R. C. BEAN
Prince Rupert Agent
General   Offices:   Oliver   Typewriter
Building, Chicago, 111.
NOTICE.
A book is kept in the City Clerk's
Office in which to enter the names
and addresses, etc. of citizens of
Prince Rupert desiring employment
on City work. All desiring employment should register ac once.
BRNEST A. WOODS,
City Clerk.
■ft
'! .•:
Friday, June  9,  1911.
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
^Iffllffllffltffllffltffllffltffl!
iwt^i^wiftiwwc'a^
I GRAND TRUNK PACIFIC I
TOWNSITE
w
ELLISON
The o- ly Main Line Town-
site in British Columbia in
which the Grand Trunk
Pacific Railway Company
has announced its joint
ownership.
ELLISON
SEE THE OFFICIAL MAP.—The
first glance will show you that
ELLISON is located at the junction
of the Skeena River and the Bulk-
ley Valley. The Grand Trunk
Pacific has announced that they are
joint owners in the townsite of Ellison. Now, my dear reader, you must
remember that up to date the Grand
Trunk Pacific has not announced
that it has any interest in any other
main line towsite in British Columbia.    Does that start you thinking?
STUDY THE MAP and you will
find Ellison Is where the railway tracks leave navigation. That
fact is a very important one for conservative investors to think over.
What is known as the Hazelton district covers a territory many miles
in extent in every direction radiating from the townsite of Ellison.
Mining machinery, ore shipments,
smelters, reduction plants and all
sorts of mining operations starting
up in this rich mineral region, must
necessarily have a metropolis, a
HUB, a headquarters. If any sane,
conservative man can figure out any
other spot except Ellison for the hub
ef the great commerce of this district, his plan should be very Inter
esting to the Grand Trunk Pacific
officials. It does seem as though
these officials, after several years of
Investigation and engineering,
would know just what they were doing when they put their official
stamp on Ellison.
 o	
STUDY THAT MAP.—I desire to
say to all parties who are talking townsites in the vicinity oi Skeena River and the Bulkley Valley
that there will no doubt be several
small towns, just the same as one
always finds in a mining district.
There will be towns in the vicinity
of Ellison along branch railways,
probably towns at the ends of branch
lines made to serve the mines and
the collieries, but it will be history
repeating itself in regard to the
building up of every metropolis.
Ellison has every natural advantage,
has every earmark of being the future mercantile and financial center of the Skeena River mining district and the entrance to the Bulk-
ley Valley.
--.      .— o	
STUDY THAT MAP and you will
find that all of the mining
towns and railroad towns around
there just beginning to    be    talked
about will only be feeders to the
city and port of ELLISON. The
Gmnd Trunk Pacific has put its
official stamp on Ellison. Do you
believe the company will do as much
for townsites owned by individuals
as it will for one in which its stockholders are joint owners? If you
do, don't buy any lots in Ellison. If
you desire to make a permanent investment, or merely to make a little
quick money, you must decide for
yourself right now. Do you propose
to follow the individual townsite
promoters or ihe Grand Trunk Pacific Railway Company.
■—■ —o	
STUDY THAT MAP.—If you desire to put your money Into a
real estate promoter's townsite you
will have many, many opportunities
this summer. The average promoter
is full of hurrah and red fire. He
must enthuse investors of the mail
order class with h''j wares. ELLISON is in the Missouri class. Therefore, I am not telling any fairy
tales about it. I am making statements that can be readily verified.
 ! o	
STUDY      THAT      MAP.—If      you
want to join that great army of
investors-at-long-range,     then     yoi'
should put your money Into promoters' townsites. If you want a perfectly safe and sound Investment,
certain to bring you large profits,
then put your money where the
Grand Trunk Pacific, after years of
careful investigation, have put their
money.
STUDY THAT MAP.—It is not
likely the Grand Trunk Pacific
will have any other townsite in British Columbia for sale this year. The
officials of the company state that
the company is not interested in any
townsite in the Hazelton district
with  the exception of ELLISON.
ELLISON Is on the bank of the
Skeena at its confluence with
the Bulkley. "Sou may change railway surveys; you may change the
location of towns along the line of
road, but you cannot change the
geography of the country through
which the railway passes. The head
of navigation necessarily means an
important townsite. Ellison will
not only be at the head of navigation but the center of a mining district wonderful in its resources that
is   now   being   opened   up,   and   for
LOTS IN ELLISON TOWNSITE AND ROGERS ADDITION FOR SALE
which Ellison will be the shipping
point both by rail and water. The
fact that trains may change engines
up or down the line or in the suburbs of the town of Ellison does not
amount to shucks in building up a
town when such places are compared with a town located where
rails and navigation meet.
STUDY THAT MAP.—You will
find on the official plan of Ellison that a large part of the town-
site has been reserved for future
sales, the same as the company has
done with certain sections of Prince
Rupert townsite. There are, therefore, at this time, comparatively
few lots on the market. You must
hurry if you want one.
 o	
STUDY THAT MAP.—ROGERS'
ADDITION to Ellison, only a
small parcel of land, lies within
eight blocks of the site of the railway station. Lots in this are being
offered. I am advising my clients
to buy Rogers Addition lots at $150
for Inside lots and ,.^i0 for corners.
Terms—10 per cent discount for
cash, or 10 per cent down and the
balance on easy terms;  no interest.
PRINCE RUPERT
British Columbia
JEREMIAH H   KUGLER
Offices—2nd Avenue
Facing Grand Trunk Terminal
w
tffl
^WWWWWWWW!
IWWWWWWWWI^
*>
**************************
* *
% Naude Adams as a *
| Public Influence %
*************************
How is a phenomenon like Maude
Adams to be explained? Even those
who love her hesitate to claim for
her a dramatic genius of the first
order, like that of Bernhardt or
Duse. And if she lacks genius, she
does not atone for it with any world-
enslaving beauty. She is a little,
home-like woman, with gentle, intimate graces, a fanciful, elfin
humor, retiring, shy and unworldly,
yet at thirty-eight she finds herself
the most conspicuous figure upon
the English-speaking stage the most
notable woman in a nation of a hundred millions of people, writes David
Gray in Hampton's Magazine for
June.
Few living men have a fame so
widespread; probably none a personal influence so vital or far-reaching. Each year she plays to half
a million people. She cares little
for money, yet she earns, probably
twice the salary of the president of
the United States, and her gross
earning power for her manager, capitalized at five per cent, is in the
neighborhood of ten millions of dollars.
Successful as she Is In New York,
her Importance is even greater
throughout the smaller, less distracted cities, and no geographical
areas appear to limit her popularity.
South, west, north and east her
playhouses are equally crowded. She
seems in fact, to be the embodiment
of something national, to speak for
her time and countrymen with a peculiar authority.
To comprehend the meaning of
such a life and its activities we are
forced to search history for analogies, and that search shows us that
life seems to use such persons as Instruments to further spiritual progress and civilization. In fact the
agencies of our evolution have been
in large measure the artists and heroes. The hero with his faculty for
original thought and action shows
the new and higher possibilities of
conduct. The artist celebrates them
and at length the world lives them.
So the world has grown better from
the eminently strong and eminently
sweet persons that have lived in it
and from those who have interpreted them.
\l the outset, Maude Adams must
be accepted somewhat as a force of
this kind, as an evolution-working
personality, luminous with sweetness and light, even more than as
an artist; as a public influence even
more than as an actress. For her
fame is beyond her artistic achievement, large and real as that unquestionably is. .T..he. main current of
her force Is ethical rather than
aesthetic. Her appeal is fundamental to character. ' he inspires conduct rather than intellectual interest. In a curious manner she combines both the evolution-working hero and artist in one person, reaching
her highest moments as an actress
when slie Is expressing herself. If
we take any other view of her we
come upon  many stumbling blocks.
CRITICISES LAURIER
London Times in Open Letter Tnkes
the Premier of Canada to
Task for His Attitude
In an open letter to Sir Wilfrid
Laurier the Sunday Times said in
part: "Empire is your greatest
theme and you preserve it In a fine
syrup of beautiful words. In 1896
you deliberately turned your back
upon the United States thereby gaining a position In which you have
since been so picturesque an ornament. You have become at once an
Imperialist and a Nationalist. When
you saw Canada become symmetrical
and strong, manufacture balancing
agriculture, a tariff wall enabling
her to offer resistance to the suck
and pull of her great neighbor, your
reward for so intelligently realizing
the policy of others was to be called
an Imperial statesman. You rested
your support on British-Canadians
and at the same time contrived to
retain the support of Quebec provin-
cialists by resisting Canadian sentiment favorable to helping the Imperial navy. Successfully for several
years you have played, the part of
Mr. Facing Both Ways. If you are
sapping Imperial interests you are
also undermining Canadian Nationalism."
FOR   SALE
SECTION ONE
BLOCK LOTS BLOCK
19 . .
11    1-2-3-4-5-0
11 9-10
12    21
13 21-22
18    1-1
i,OTS
 3-4
19 16-16
20  . 19-20
34 36-37-38
34   . .." 42
27    9-10
27    ...42-43
SECTION FIVE
9    22-23
18 i .22-23
W. S. BENSON
SECTION SIX
'3 7-8-9-10
The Atlantic Realty und Improvement
Company Ltd.        -        P.O. Box 51
TRANSPORTATION   NEEDS
Hazelton     and     Vicinity     Requires
Shipping Facilities to Assist
Business
and the mines. In view of all these
things he is prepared to wait a little.
 o	
PLEASED WITH PROSPECTS
James Cronin, the eminent mining
man, is not one who confines his attention to that one branch of business, lie prides himself upon being
a fanner as well and has located
upon northern British Columbia as
the best field for operations in that
line as well as In the mining enterprises. Mr. Cronin has a farm in
the Bulkley Valley and on the last
trip up the river took in additional]
horses and equipment. He has returned, however, and this moraine j
left for his home in Spokane.
Mr. Cronin says there is nothing
wrong with the Hazelton countrj
either from the standpoint of mining or farming. The trouble is all
confined to the lack of transportation facilities that now exist. If
there were the means for getting the
necessary material into the country
at the present time there would be I
marked activity In both fields of en-'
terprise.
With the lack of accommodation
in the carrying trade it is impossible
to get sufficient material In the lines
required to meet the demands. In
grass seed there Is not the supply.
The same applies to potatoes for
seed. Then there. Is a difficulty In
the getting into the country of the
necessary machinery for    the    farm
Old   Country   Investor   Is   Delighted
with the Way G. T. P, Ie- Opening up tlie Territory
Mr. G. Clifford Dixon of the fl m
or Dixon Brothers, stockbrokers,
Glasgow, arrived after completing a
journey over the lines pf the Grand
Trunk Pacific to Edmlnton has
reached the coast. Mr, Dixon's firm
is largely interested in Grand Trunk
Pacific securities, and he is at present the only member of a Glasgow
Bti ."King house to have person-
lily bee. me acquainted with he de-
wlopment of the company In western Canada, In which his firm and
I heir clients are already interested to
the extent of something over *2,-
000,000.
Mr. Dixon is highly appreciate
of the great prospects of the Gram
Trunk Pacific, and was agreeably
surprised, considering the fact that
the Prince Rupert terminus is necessarily not yet within a year at least
of Its connection with the remainder
of the completed road, to find that
thi.- connection between Winnipeg
a.ul Edmonton was in BUCh full
swing,'the trains being full, both In
regard to freight and passengers.
The object of Mr. Dixon's trip is
In make his firm thoroughly acquainted with tbe    progress of    the
Skeena    Land    District—District    of
Coast—Range  V.
TAKE NOTICE that I, Joseph
Pastl, of Watson, Sask., occupation
farmer, intend to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:— Commencing at a
post planted about 30 c.alns in a
northerly direction from the N. E.
corner of Lot No. 2662 or T. L. No.
3259S at Lakelse Lake; thence north
20 chains; thence east 40 cliains;
thence south 20 chains along shore
of Lakelse Lake; thence west 40
chains to point of commencement,
containing 120 acres, more or less.
JOSEPH PASTL.
George Hir, Agent.
Dated  May  6,  1911. 6-2
of
Skeena    Land    District—District
Coast—Range  V.
TAKE NOTICE that I, John V.
Rochester, of Prince Rupert, occupation broker, intend to apply for per-
nr'ssion to lease the following de-
i ribed land:— Commencing at a
i eist planted on the northerly end of
an island In the Skeena River about
Mile 45 on the Grand Trunk Pacifie:
Railway; thence north luOO feet
more or less to low water mark;
thence westerly along the low water
mark 1000 feet more or less;
thence southerly 1000 feet more or
less: thence easterly 1000 feet to
the place of commencement.
.1. Y. ROCHESTER.
Dated May 30, 1911. 0-2
Skeenn Land District — District of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that Prince Rape" Sn-id Ai Gravel Company, Ltd.,
of ".luce- Rupert, occupation Industrial Company, Intends to apply for
penn.sslon to lease the following described land:-- Commencing at a
post planted at the Witness post on
the southerly boundary of Lot 4124;
thence southerly following ihe sinuosities of the shore line 60 chains
more or less to southerly end of the
Island; thence easterly 10 chains
more ir less to low water mark;
thence northerly 60 chains more or
If -s along low water mark; tlience
westerly 10 chains mom or esc to
he point of commencement,
PRINCE   etl'Pr.RT  SAND &
GRAVEL Co., LTD.
Per J. Y. Rochester, Agt.
Dated May 30, 1911, 6-21
Hamblin's Bakery
Just Re-opened
Sale    counter    in    MERRYFIELD'S
STORE, Third Ave. and Fifth St.
Family trade catered to.  Will supply restaurants and steamers.
Cakes and  Confectionery of all
kinds
Free Employment
Office
For all kinds of help. Cooks, waiters, dishwashers, hotel porters, all
kinds of laborers or mechanics, call
up 178 or call at the
FREE EMPLOYMENT OFFICE
GRAND HOTEL
Headquarters for Cooks and Walters
ROGERS & BLACK
Wholesale Dealers in
BUILDING   .MATERIAL,     CEMENT,
LIME,  HAJR-FD3RB PLASTER
COKE, BLACKSMITH COAL,
COMMON BRICK, PRESSED BRICK
SHINGLES AND LATH
NEW   WELLINGTON   COAL
All    erders   promptly   filled—see   us
for prlcos.
PHONE 11(1 PHONE  116
company and to get a personal idea
of the vast opportunities opening
with the completion of its extended
line
The war department has refused to
n cepl General Diaz's resignation as
a major-general, granting him In-
Rtead an  Indefinite leave of absence.
NOTICE
'CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF
    PRINCE RUPERT   	
Notice is hereby given that a sitting of the Court of Revision for the
Corporation of the City of Prince
Rupert, B. O, will be held In the
City Hall, Prince Rupert, B. C, on
Monday, June 5th, 1911, at 10
o'clock a. m. for the purpose of haer-
log complaints against the Assessments as made for the year 1911.
Any person desiring to make complaint against the said Assessments
must give notice In writing, stating
cause of complaint to the Assessor,
at least ten days previous to the sitting of the said Court.
Dated at Prince Rupert, B. C,
May 1st, 1911.
J. c. Mclennan,
5-9-30 Assessor.' PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Friday, June 9,  1911.
prince Bupcrt journal
Telephone  138
Published twice a week on Tuesdays and Fridays from the office of
publication, Third Avenue, near
McBride Street.
Subscription rate to any point in
Canada, $2.00 a year; to points outside of Canada, $3.00 a year.
Advertising rates furnished on
application.
O. H. NELSON,
Editor.
Friday,  June  9,   1911.
THE G. T.  P. AGREEMENT
An agreement has been reached
with the Grand Trunk Pacific with
respect to the taxation of Its railway
property in the city which will appeal to all as an eminently fair one
to both sides concerned. Its ratification by the ratepayers will result in
marked benefits to this city at once
The agreement, which appears on
another page speaks for itself. It
will appeal to anyone as a good bar
gain. The fact that the company be
comes responsible for the local im
provement taxes on its railway prop
erty solves a knotty question affecting the improvements in Section One
of the city.
Apart altogether from the revenue
aspect the settlement is of vital im
portance to the city at this time
while it is awaiting the completion
of the railway. It removes all cause
for any ill will between the city and
the company. The settlement is
reached in an amicable way and the
company interested in the advancement of this city just as the citizens
are, will co-operate to bring the best
results. There can be no question
that such a settlement will have its
effect upon the money markets whore
the city must soon go in order to
secure the funds to carry on the undertakings which it has. in view and
those now under way. There can be
no suspicion on the part of the financiers that there is any friction between the city on the one hand and
the company on the other.
The undertakings which the company has in view and which will
start at once are of such a character
that it is almost impossible to estimate their effects upon the investing public. Ship repairing and ship
building operations require very-
large forces of men. It is work involving a very heavy expenditure.
Vessels valued at hundreds of thousands of dollars cannot be allowed to
remain idle in the repairing docks
any longer than is absolutely necessary. It is essential, therefore, that
hundreds of men must be put to
work to get the repairs necessary
completed with as little loss of time
as possible. Therefore as in other
places where similar works have been
installed there must be a very heavy
payroll.
The method which the company
will pursue of erecting the necessary
buildings for the works and then in
turn using these in the construction
of the docks will add materially to
tlfe outlay in tlie city. It will mean
that there will lee a continuous expenditure at the works from now until the actual installation of the dock
in order.
Another feature of this is not to be
overlooked. This is that the work
under way ley the company will have
a marked effect upon all who visit
the' place en- ihose who look into the
question of investments here. It will
be found that the railway company
has under course of installation
works that would do credit to a place
many times the size of Prince Rupert. This in itself gives a feeding
of stability from tlte standpoint of
i le.- investor that cannot in- overestimated.
There lias been a general approval
.•I tin- settlement by the citizens and
;i readiness shown to endorse it nt
the opportunity being given tee do so.
ENGINEER'S CRITIC
SEARS  ACQUITTED
A criticism has been passed upon
the city engineer from a source
which is somewhat strange to understand at this particular time. The
engineer's department is now under
investigation with Aid. Newton as
chairman. Judging from the tone of
the criticism which the Empire passes
upon the engineer it will scarcely
seem possible to have a very impartial decision from the chairman of
the committee of investigation. We
cannot help feeling that a criticism
such as was dealt out to the engineer
should hardly be expected from the
source from which it emanated just
at this time.
Chuncil and Company
Reach a Settlement
(Continued fronTPage One)
especially in view of the fact that all
of it had not been ballasted. There
is a considerable local trade originating along it and this will develop
quickly, he thinks. There is a lot of
tlmHer that will give profitable employment to small sawmills and,
judging rrom what he saw of the
land, there are large areas of good
Harming land available for settlement.
Mr. Hays was pleased with the
progress the city was making. He
noticed a very marked improvement
since his last visit and remarked
upon the fact that he city was going
to be a beautiful one.
Council  Approves
Last evening after the arrangements had been prepared, the city
council met and passed upon them in
detail. After consideration, on motion of Aid. Hilditch and Aid. Morrissey, they were unanimously passed
and ordered to be signed and tbe
seal attached.
A motion was introduced by Aid.
Smith that the city council write the
minister of railways withdrawing
the protest against the approval of
the plans of the company for Mile 0
westerly. This was interpreted as
the objections filed against the closing of Cameron Bay and Hays Cove.
It was explained that In accordance
with the gigantic scheme of works
there, the company found it necessary to do this.
Some opposition arose as to the
form of the letter, for fear it would
prejudice the city in case the company might try to close Seal Cove.
It was explained that this was not
I'ontemplated and the city would
have to be a party to any such work.
The city solicitor, Mr. Peters, was
perfectly satisfied and the matter
passed.
.Mr. Hays signed the agreements
on behalf of the company and they
now only await the signatures of the
Provincial authorities and the seal of
the company, the mayor signing here
and attaching the city seal.
FOUR—GTP
Captain of  Iroquois  is  Declared Not
Guilty of Manslaughter
at Trial.
Jury Only Take Five Minutes to De-
ride the Point on tlie
Evidence
(Special to The Journal)
VICTORIA, June 9.—Following
addresses from counsel for both sides
and a general summing up of the
evidence by Mr. Justice Murphy In
the assize court yesterday afternoon,
the jury took five minutes to declare
Captain Albert A. Sears, late master
of the steamer Iroquois, which sank
off Sidney April 10, with a large loss
of life, not guilty of the crime of
manslaughter as charged b> the
crown.
The judge's charge was in favor of
the accused.
 o	
To Attend Grand Lodge
C. V. Bennett will represent the
local lodge I. O. O. F. at the grand
lodge at Cranbrook on June 14. The
nominations for the local lodge will
take place on Tuesday evening.
NEW CONSTITUTION
Hospital Association Adopts Changes
Suggested In  Bylaws
Till
NEW  POST OFFICE
The settlemenl of the Grand Trunk
Pacific taxation question at this time
is important in the matter of the new
federal building for which the funds
have been voted by the Dominion
Parliament and expenditure upon
which we are assured awaits only the
settlement of tills question so as to
allow the final disposition to be made
of the site. The Dominion Government have in view n substantial
building that will do credit to the
city. yWork will begin on it as soon
as the site is filially granted and
this is to follow the settlement of the
taxation question. This is something
that will be of great benefit to the
city- being another assurance that
the- future of it is safe. A force
of men upon the massive buildings
which the Dominion will provide
could nol fail to impress those seeking a field  for  Investment.
Engineers to Confer
Mayor Manson at last evening's
council meeting made a request from
Air. Hays for permission to use the
old dams on Morse Creek for the
purpose of supplementing the water
supply of the city. Mr. Hays said he
had no objections whatever, but advised that it be gone into with Chief
Engineer Kelliher, who would be
given power to act when he came.
G.  T.  P. Appeals
The court of revision is sitting
today, hearing appeals against the
Grand Trunk Pacific lands. President Hays and Mr. Tate gave assurances to the council last evening that
they had instructed Mr. Patmore,
their solicitor not to unduly press
the cases. All they sought was to see
that the assessments were fair. The
court today laid over the consideration of railway lands and those involved in the transfer to the city
under the agreement, until after the
bylaw has been voted upon. The
other assessments are found to be
fair and sustained. David Hays and
Mr. Patmore are watching the proceedings on behalf of the company.
*************************
i Remember
1 That we
Import
I Our Wines
* direct from Europe; and that
* no house In Prince Rupert can
* equal  them   for  quality.     No
* better can be bought anywhere
*
* in the Province.    We make a
*
* specialty  of
Family Trade
and guarantee satisfaction *
*
*
* *
i *
? *
t We  also  carry  a  complete *
* stock of other                             *
\t the call of the directors of the
hospital, an extraordinary . general
meeting of the members was held
lust Tuesday evening in the police
court rooms. The object of the meeting was to pass a new set of bylaws
which defines more fully than the
old ones, the various duties pertaining to the different offices. Under
the new bylaws a managing secretary, who may be placed under
bonds is possible. He has very wide
duties in keeping with the office
filled by the association secretary at
present. Mc will combine all the
duties of the secretary and assistant
secretary, thus simplifying the work.
The powers of the directors are
somewhat exended.
('. V. Bennett, the chairman' of
the special committee having the
matter in hand, read the new consti-
iiilion, explaining in what respects
ii  differed from tlie old.
It was provided that Ihe present
board continue in office until the
end of the present term. The number provided for the new board is
the same as at present serve, nine
Of this number five are elected at
the annual meeting, two are ramed
by the lieutenant governor in council and two by the city council. The
board as elected select their own officers.
 o	
Sergeant-Major Wheeler, secretary and range officer of the Kettle
River Valley Rifle Association, has
received an interesting letter from
Lady Audrey Buller, wife of the late
General Sir Reelvers Buller, in
willed she enclosed a £5 note as an
annual subscription to the association for a prize to be put up every
year to perpetuate the memory of
the late General Buller. Wheeler
served under Buller in Egypt, Zulu-
land, the Soudan and South Africa.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that George Stanley Mayer, of Masset, B. C, occupation farmer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted on the east shore of
Tsu Skundale Lake; thence east 80
chains; thence south 40 chains, more
or less, to the north boundary of
T. L. 35413; thence west and south
along the boundaries of T. L. 35413,
to the shore of the Ain River; thence
northerly along the shore, back to
the place of commencement, containing 500 acres, more or less.
GEORGE STANLEY MAYER.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 28, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Robert Cross,
of Masset, B. C, occupation farmer,
intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted on the east shore of Tsu Skundale
Lake; thence east 80 chains; thence
nerth SO chains, to or near to the
S. E. corner of Lot 35; thence west
40 chains, more or less; thence
south 40 chains, more or less; thence
west 40 chains more or less, following the southern boundaries of Lot
35; thence south to the shore; tlience
southerly along the shore back to the
place of commencement, containing
500 acres, more or less.
ROBERT  CROSS.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov.  28, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Christina Orr,
ot Masset, B. O, occupation married,
intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described
lauds: —Commencing at a post planted about 40 chains south and 3 miles
east of the N. E. corner of Lot 35;
thence south 40 chains; thence west
80 chains; thence north 40 cnains;
thence east SO chains, containing 320
ucres.
CHRISTINA ORR.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 25, 1910.
Skeent. Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOT ICE that Clara Orr, of
Masset, B C., occupation spinster,
Intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted about 40 chains south and 80
chains east of the N. E. corner of
Lot 35; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence north
80 chains; thence east 80 chains, con.
talnlng 640 acres.
CLARA ORR.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 25, 1910.
Liquors
Try a glass of
Cascade
Beer
g       The best local  beer on  the *
%   market. *
CLARKE BROS.
Christiansen & Brandt Bid.
* Telephone 80       Third Avenue *
I *
* *
* *
*
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Wesley Singer, of Masset, B. O, occupation farmer, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing ai a post planted about 4 miles north of the N. W.
corner of T. L. 40859; thence south
80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence east
80 chains, containing 640 acres.
WESLEY SINGER.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 27, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that A. Walter De
Lisle, of Masset, B. O, occupation
farmer, Intends to apply for permls-
slonu to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 40 chains south
and 120 chains east of the S. E. corner of Lot 35; thence south 80
chains; thence west 80 chains;
tbence north 80 chains; thence east
80 chains, containing 640 acres.
A. WALTER DE LISLE.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 25, 1910.
The British Columbia Company
LIMITED.
AUTHORIZED CAPITA! $100,000.::  PAID UP CAPITA! $41,500
DIRECTORS:—Reginald C. Brown, President; J. C. Maclure, Vice-
President; H. E. Marks, Managln g Director; Capt. B. Nash, William
McNalr, R. A. Bevan, and F. C.  Williams, Secretary.      :-:      :-:
INTEREST 4 PER CENT. DEPOSITS
This Company acts as Executors,  Administrators, Transferees and
Secretaries to Public Companies.   Commercial, Industrial and other
business propositions underwritten.    Issues made  on  the
London and New York Stock Exchanges.
TIMBER, COAL, LANDS, and
COMPANY ORGANIZATION
Head Office for Canada, 203, 208, 210, 215 Carter-Cotton Buililin",
VANCOUVER, B.C.
61 Floor Varnish
Made
Especially
for Floors
Will not crack nor peel off.
Water will not turn It white.
Sold only in sealed cans.
Ask for sample panel.
If your dealer does not stock It write
The Staneland Co. Ltd
836-840 Fort Street, VICTORIA, B.C. S
"—"1
Replenish
the
Pantry
L«
.»»—...J
I  High-Class....
Grocery
Stock
to choose from
EVERYTHING CLEAN AND FRESH
Goods for the Table to Suit the Most
Fastidious  Housewife
! MERRYFIELD'S !
i
i
CASH GROCERY      i
TIDES AT PRINCE iRUPERT, JUNE, 1911
HIGH WATER
LOW WATER
DATE   AND   DAY
Timo| Ht | Time| Ht || Time| Ht | Time| Ht
1
Thursday.    .    .    .
3:58
20.9
17:24
18.5'
10:44
2.6
23:00
S.S
2
Friday	
4:58
19.5
18:27
18.0
11:40
4.0
3
Saturday  .   .   .   .
6:08
18.0
19:30
17.8j
0:10
9.2
12:41
5.3
4
Sunday	
7:24
16.9
20:30
17.91
1:25
9.1
13:40
6.4
E
Monday	
8:40
16.4
21:24
18.2
2:40
8.4
14:50
7.2
6
Tuesday   ....
9:50
16.4
22:11
18.7
I  3:48
7.2
15:48
7.7
7
Wednesday  .   .   .
10:49
16.8
22:62
19.3
4:44
6.0
16:35
7.9
8
Thursday.    .    .    .
11:38
17.2
23:28
19.8
5:29
5.0
17:17
8.1
9
Friday	
12:22
17.5
6:09
4.1
17:56
8.3
10
Saturday  ....
0:02
20.2
13:01
17.8
6:46
3.5
18:34
8.4
11
Sunday	
0:35
20.5
13:39
17.9
7:20
3.1
19:11
8.5
12
Monday	
1:09
20.7
14:10
18.0
7:53
2.9
19:47
8.6
13
1:44
20.7
14:53
18.0
8:26
3.0
20:23
8.7
14
Wednesday  .   .   .
2:20
20.5
15:31
17.9
9:00
3.2
21:00
8.8
IB
Thursday ....
2:58
20.1
16:10
17.7
9:36
3.7
21:40
8.9
16
19.5
16:ol
17.5
10:15
4.3
22:25
9.0
17
oaturday   ....
4:23
18.6
17:36
17.3
10:58
4.9
23:18
9.1
18
5:15
17.7
16.9
18:26
19:20
17.3
17.6
11:48
0:22
5.7
8.9
1?
12:43
6.4
20
Tuesday	
7:33
16.4
20:16
18.1
1:32
8.2
13:43
6.9
21
Wednesday   .   .   .
8:49
16.4
21:13
19.0
2:42
7.1
14:46
7.1
22
Thursday ....
10:02
16.9
22:07
20.1
3:49
5.5
15:48
7.1
23
Friday.    ....
11:06
17.7
22:5es
21.3
4:48
3.9
16:46
7.0
24
Saturday   ....
12:01
18.5
23:46
22.3
5:40
2.2
17:39
6.8
25
Sunday	
12:52
19.3
6:30
1.0
18:30
6.5
26
0:33
23.0
13:41
19.8
7-: 19
0.2
19:20
6.4
27
1:21
23.2
14:29
20.1
8:07
—.2
20:10
6.5
28
Wednesday   .   .   .
2:19
23.0
15:17
20.1
8:54
0.1
21:01
6.7
29
Thursday  ....
3:00
22.2
16:06
19.9
9:40
0.9
21:54
7.0
30
Friday	
21.1
10:56
19.5
[10:27
2.1
22:49
7.3
The Time used Is Pacific Standard, for the 120th Meridian west. It
is counted from 0 to 24 hours, from midnight to midnight.
The Height Is in feet and tenths of a foot, above the Low Water datum
adopted for the Chart. The Harbor datum, as established by the Grand
Trunk  Pacific  Railway,   Is  one  foot lower.
;. * ** * * ** .;..;..;..;. * ** * * ********
storage!
Household Goods and Baggage, *
given careful attention. %
Forwarding,   Distributing   and *
Shipping Agents |
TRANSFERERS     *
Prince    Rupert     Warehousing *
and   Forwarding   Co. £
First Ave.,  near   McBride  St. t
*
DOUGLAS SUTHERLAND,    |
Manager. *
P. O. Box 007
*************************
•hone 202 *
NOTICE.
In the matter of an application for
the issue of a duplicate of the Certificate of Title for an undivided
one-half of Lot 883, Group I,
Cassiar District:
Notice Is hereby given that It is
my intention to issue at the expiration of one month after the first
publication hereof a duplicate of the
Certificate of Title to the above
mentioned land in the name of William Jordan Larkworthy, which Certificate is dated the 30th day of September, 1910, and numbered 326R
WILLIaM  E.   BURRITT,
Dhtrict Registrar.
Land Registry Office,
Prince Rupert, B. C,
May 26,  1911. J23 .
Friday, June  9,  1911.
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
HOW RECIPROCITY ,
WILL AFFECT CANADA
George H. Cowan Delivers Strong Speech on the Sucject
in Frederickton, N.B.-He Goes Into the Evil
Results That Would Follow the Course
Approved by the Liberal
Government
Speaking in Frederickton, N. B.
George H. Cowan, M. P., of Van
couver, delivered a speech against
the government's policy relative to
reciprocity, which has been very
favorably commented upon In the
east.    In part, Mr. Cowan said:
To gather up with the least waste
that comes from the field, the forest, the mine, and the sea, and to
work these up into the finished
product ready for use, enjoyment
and consumption by its own people
—that is the economical aim and
object of every nation. In that great
aim Canada is as well equipped by
Nature as her big competitor to the
south. Our natural resources are as
great as theirs and much further
from the point of exhaustion; as
great, too, is the skill and energy of
our citizens. Indeed, In the race
for wealth we would be as far ahead
as they are today if we had started
as soon. But we did not start as
soon; we are a younger country.
That is one of our accidental handicaps.
United States Policy
Early in their history, and before
we had the men or the money, they
had begun to develop industries that
worked up into the finished product
within their own country, their own
raw material, and gave to their own
people employment, not only in the
rough and poorly paid work of producing the raw material, but also in
the skilled and  highly paid work of
converting it into the finished product, and they  hud  begun    to    give
their farmers that greatest    of    all
boons, a home market at their very
doors.    They did all this by a tariff
which  by  keeping  out  the  goods of
other   countries,   gave     their     own
home market to  their  home  industries to work up and    manufacture
similar goods out of their own raw
materials.    So  that    today    without
this treaty, and in spite of us, they
are  gathering our  raw  material  as
well as their own, into their country
there, during its manufacture to support American labor, American merchants and American industries, and
from there to be shipped over American railways, operated  by well paid
American   employees,   back  to   Canada, the country from which it never
should  have  gone.     To  such  an  extent  are  they  doing  this,  that  last
year they sold back to us of these
goods     $223,501,809     worth,   while
they bought from us, and that, chiefly in raw material,  little over one-
half   that   amount,   or   $113,150,778
worth.    Indeed, during the last ten
years they have sold us sixteen hundred million dollars' worth, while we
have  sold  them  only  one-half  that
amount.
Our True Policy
To cheek this torrent and not to
increase it, to make these goods at
home and not to buy them from the
States—that should be our aim. That
is the aim and is every day becoming the effect of our present fiscal
policy. That policy gives diversified
employment to labor and capital in
industries engaged in working up
our own raw material within our
own boundaries, and thus creates a
large home market for the products
of our farms. It does this by a duty
on articles that it pays us to manufacture at home, and In this way it
lias induced 200 American manufacturing companies to come into Canada and invest $226,000,000 of
American capital in vast plants on
Canadian soil, employing Canadian
workmen and supporting Canadian
farmers and merchants, while they
manufacture the very goods that
hitherto we have been buying from
the United States.
Treaty Reverses Fiscal Policy
To ratify the proposed treaty
would be to reverse our present fiscal policy and return to the primitive ways of 57 years ago. What,
then, is this thing which our two
mothers in Israel journeyed to
Washington to get, and which President Taft presented to them? What
are these new goods which these two
members of the faith have chosen
for their followers, and about which
there Is war in the gates of the Liberals today? It is, they tell us, in
the main essentials a renewal of the
old reciprocity treaty of 1854.
Tariff Inequality
Like that old treaty, it puts nat
ural products, such as the products
of the farm and the forest, on the
free list; while it leaves the duty on
all products not covered by the
treaty about twice as high when entering the United States as when entering Canada. At this time the
American tariff averaged 24 per
cent, while the Canadian averaged
lO'/i per cent; at the present time
the American tariff averages 43 per
cent, while the Canadian average is
24 per cent. So that while both
treaties put natural products on the
same footing of freedom from duty
between the two countries, they
leave all products not covered by the
treaty, on this unequal footing that
the Canadian article in order to get
into the American market has a tariff wall to jump about twice as high
as that which the American article
has to jump to get into the Canadian
Under the old our experience was
market.
Its Effect Under Old
What was the effect of    this inequality under the old treaty? What
would be its effect under the new?
that while all    Canadian    products,
except natural products, were walled
out of  the  American  market  by  a
high prohibitive tariff, the American
products came flooding into Canada
over a low tariff wall like a full unchecked torrent  from the mountain
side.      The    cars   and    boats    that
brought these    manufactured    products from  the United States to Canada returned laden with the natural
product of  Canada,  not to be  consumed in the United States but to be
shipped over American railways and
American canals to American ports,
and thence in American bottoms to
the  markets  of  the  world.     Under
the    old    treaty,    therefore,     Canada    became    a    greater    consumer
of  American     manufactured   ^;oods,
while  the railways of    the   United
States became greater carriers of the
natural products    of    Canada.    The;
manufacturing  industries    and    the
carrying business of    Canada were,
under  the  old   treaty,  handed  over
for exploitation to the United States.
Its  Effect Under New
So it will be under the new.   That
perfect     balance     and     equilibrium
which    we    have    established,    and
which ought to be preserved amongst
the three great  industrial  elements
of agriculture, commerce and manufacture,  will   again  be  injured  and
destroyed.    Under the new treaty, as
under the old, commerce and manufacture in  order  to evade the high
American tariff, will be encouraged
to migrate from the Canadian to the
American side of the line.
Shingles and Furniture Examples
For example,  the    new    arrangement lets American    shingles    into
Canada free, but imposes a tariff of
30  cents per thousand on Canadian
shingles     going     into     the     United
States.    To evade    this    tariff the
shingle mills  of    British  Columbia,
for Instance, will he transferred  to
the south side of the line, there to
support American labor and American  merchants, and from there    to
ship their shingles    over    American
railways hack to Canadian points for
purchase and consumption.
Again, Ihe new arrangement provides for the free interchange between the two countries of logs and
rough lumber, that go Into the manufacture of furniture, but leaves the
American tariff on furniture at 35
per cent and the Canadian at 30 per
cent, just enough difference to induce the Canadian furniture factory
to locate on tlie American side of the
line in order to get into the big market free of duty, and into the small
over the lower Canadian tariff wall.
The only chance that arrangement
gives the Canadian workmen at
Canadian timber wealth, Is the
rough and poorly paid work of felling the trees in the forest and on
the mountain side and booming them
in the water, or hauling them to the
freight yards for transportation to
the United States.
The finishing business of manufacturing these logs Into shingles
and furniture, and the business of
carrying the shingles and furniture
to the market—those things which
require the greatest amount of
labor at the greatest wage—are all
to be done In the United States.
Surely this is a game of "heads I
but for the Canadian a policy of
selling the hide for a dime, and buying back the tail for a dollar."
And the shingle business, and the
furniture business are only examples
chosen from all the industries.   They
are specimen bricks of    the    whole
structure.     The  whole  tendency   of
this obnoxious treaty is not only to
shift from    Canada to    the    United
States    the manufacturing    business
and the carrying trade of    Canada,
but also to confine the employment
of labor in Canada to the muscular,
mill-horse grind of merely producing
the natural  products and    the raw
material  that  are on the  free  list.
Governor Foss and H. M. Whitney,
both of Boston, are therefore right
when they tell their own people, that
the treaty will tend to divert    the
carrying  trade  of    Canada    to  the
United states, to locate the elevators
for storing and  handling   Canadian
grain on the south side of the line,
and  to transfer  the  home ports  of
Canadian  steamers from    Montreal,
Halifax and  St.  John,    to    Boston,
New York and Portland.
Equilibrium of Industrial Forces
As I have said, we have in Canada
the right relation of the three great
industrial     forces    of    agriculture,
commerce and manufacture, the one
to the other.    Our fiscal policy contains no tribute from any one class
to any other class; on the contrary,
It has improved the condition of the
farmer and the workingman, and so
induces a condition of general prosperity,  In    which    the  farmer,  the
workingman  and  every  citizen  gets
his full    and    fair share.    There is
proof   of   this.     Mr.   Coats,   of   the
Labor Gazette,  has  made  an  excellent  report  on  wholesale  prices  in
Canada,  which  the government  has
published as an official    document.
From   it we  learn  that  during  the
last  20 years the  things the  Canadian  farmer  has  produced  for sale
and has sold has gone up in price 37
per cent, while the things he has had
to  buy  have  gone  up  only  14   per
cent in price.    The same is true of
the    workingman.      Indeed,    it    is
scarcely too much to say that a fixed
amount of almost any kind of farm
produce, or a fixed amount of almost
any  kind  of labor, will  purchase in
Canada today almost one and one-half
times as much  manufactured  goods
as it would have purchased 20 or 25
years ago.    So that the condition of
both  the  farmer  and  the    working-
man  in  Canada  is  steadily  improving.
Labor
Two causes have operated to improve  labor  conditions  in    Canada.
One is labor unions, and the other is
protection.    Protection has increased
the number and variety of industries
in Canada;    and where there is the
greatest  number  of  different  kinds
of industry there labor is the most
abundantly employed and best paid.
I  am  not  a believer  in  low  wages
and cheap labor, such as we had under the old treaty of 1854, such as
we will have under the new.    Under
that old treaty wages were so    low
that they crushed  the energy,    the
spirit   and   the   heart   out     of     the
workmen,    I do not want to see a
return to these conditions in Canada.
I  believe  that  our  first duty  is  to
multiply,   and   not  to   diminish   the
number and variety of our manufacturing  and   our  railway  and   other
activities,  so  as  to  give  our workmen   steady   employment   at   a   fail-
wage.     The  commodity  the  laborer
has  to  sell  is  his  labor,     and     the
greater the variety of industries employing   labor   the   greater   the   demand for the commodity he has to
sell.     That  demand  should  be  constant, because labor is the most perishable of    all commodities.    Unlike
every other citizen, he who    cannot
sell his morning's labor before noon
can  never sell it;   it is gone.    The
wage  rate  is  the  best  gang"   of  a
nation's prosperity.
When wages are high the profits
of capital are high and the country
is prosperous, it is the reduction of
these that makes bad times. An Irish
Immigrant was heard to say that he
colud buy as much for a shilling in
Ireland as he could for a dollar in
this country. "Why did you not stay
there?" he was asked. "Because I
could not get the shilling.'.'   And, by
tect our labor market, and    protect
our carrying trade.
We cannot.    In 1860 the government of the old province of Canada,
seeing the  necessity    of    this,     increased the  duty    on    cotton    and
woolen  goods,  on  boots and shoes,
and leather goods, and a variety of
other  articles   which   Canada   could
manufacture  at  home    and    which
they wished  to see manufactured at
home, and with the revenue they got
from this tariff they began to build
railways  and   canals.     At  once  the
cry went up from    the    Americans
that this wa a hardship to the manufacturing business and the carrying
business  of  the  United  States,   that
although  it was  not a  violation  of
the terms of the treaty, it was a perversion of its spirit, and    in     1866
they abrogated the treaty.   Will they
do it again?     Of course  they  will.
Indeed,  this  time  they  have  taken
the precaution to make it an express
term of the  treaty that we  cannot
move our tariff up or down, either
on the natural products which    are
free or  on  many  of  the  more  important  manufactured   products,  on
which by the treaty the rate is fixed.
Power of Government Paralyzed
So, on almost everything that we
manufacture  or  produce  in  Canada
the hand that raises or lowers the
Canadian  tariff  is to  be paralyzed
and remain paralyzed as long as the
treaty    endures.      No matter    how
much  we  may  need  more  revenue,
no matter how much we may want to
protect our home market or  foster
and develop new industries, or give
labor new   and   better  employment,
we cannot do it.    To do it would be
to bring about the abrogation of the
treaty.
The Tariff the Only Power
Remember, the government of
Canada, the government of any
country, has first the duty to maintain public order, but it has also the
right to oversee the industrial development of the country It may
encourage and develop an industry
by giving it a bounty on its output
or its export. But the great instrument, and practically the only instrument by which the government can
develop the industries and home
market of Canada, is the tariff. The
tariff, the customs duty, with the
power to raise and lower It at will
as the needs of the country demand,
is the instrument, the high tower,
the fenced way, with which our industries and our home market are
compassed round about as with a
shield, when they need protection
and defence, and when we are free
from treaty tangles. That instrument, Messrs. Fielding and Paterson,
out of the great heap of their too
ripe wisdom, have decided to hang
up to rust upon the wall, and to
President Taft they have pledged
their word, and they say our honor,
that the instrument shall rust upon
the wall as long as this treaty is in
force.
Honor
Honor? When we ask the government to consult the people before
passing this treaty, Mr. Fielding an-,
swers that he and Mr. Paterson have
pledged our national honor to the
United States to pass it without consulting the people. To keep that
pledge of honor with the United
States, Sir Wilfrid must break his
own pledge of honor to the people of
Canada, his pledge not to revise or
tamper with the tariff' until that
commission had reported.
"What is honor? A word. What
is that word honor? Air. .A trim
reckoning. What hath it? He that
died o' Wednesday. Doth he feel
it? No. Then I'll none of it; honor
is a mere escutcheon—and so ends
my catechism."
New Treaty Worse Than Old
So that, bad as the old treaty was
tor the manufacturing business and
the labor interests of Canada, this
new treaty is infinitely worse. As
they would say in the west, il has
tlie old treaty on the pan and roasted
to a fairy whisper. Under these circumstances, President Taft's expressed   desire   for
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upon the American market, and the
American transportation systems,
that it was thought that without
these she must either come into the
union or go into bankruptcy. She
did neither. Although Canada had
put the neck of her manufacturer
and of her workmen in the Yankee
halter, as it is proposed to do again,
with the rope in the hands of Uncle
Sam, and although Uncle Sam
twitched the rope when he thought
it would hurt the most, still Canada
survives.
After abrogation we had many
long and lean years of blighted production and paralyzed trade. We
had .however, an annual and plentiful crop of blue ruinists and secessionists, and commercial unionists,
and continental free traders, and
reciprocity agitators, the last rump
and remnant of which you will find
on Parliament Hill today behind this
reciprocity pact.
Fathers of Confederation
But, besides this weedy crop, the
perilous situation in Canada brought,
forth men equal to the peril,
statesmen of stout heart, men such
as Sir John Macdonald, Hon. Geo.
Brown, your own Sir Leonard Til-
ley, Sir Chas. Tupper, and the other
fathers of Confederation and pioneers of Confederated Canada. Into
better men, leaders and followers,
Almighty never infused the breath of
life. Liberals some, Conservatives
others, patriots all, men all of them,
who loved their country, who believed in her, who honored her and
who worked for her.
Their Policy
What did they do, and aim at doing for Canada?    They labored, and
we have entered into the    fruit    of
their  labors.    Their spell  of  toil  is
accomplished, and ours is now    the
task of carrying on their work.. They
dug the foundation of Canada.  What
was that foundation, and is reciprocity a fitting superstructure for us to
raise upon it?    What was their aim,
what     their    all-embracing    policy?
What,     but     Canadian     nationality
j within  the    Empire,    Canadian    resources     for Canadian  development,
Canadian   and     Brilish     capital   for
Canadian   industry,   Canadian   workmen for Canadian production, Canadian routes for Canadian trade.
To that end they first addressed
themselves to the task of uniting the
four old provinces into one confederation, a task which they accomplished in 1S67. . Ilul their object
was not to make a united and therefore stronger effort for a new reciprocity treaty, as Mr Fielding says.
In 1869 they purchased the great
Northwest, the largest and most
profitable real estate deal the world
ever saw. Then in 1870 they brought
Manitoba Into the union, In 1871
British Columbia, and In 1x711 they
rounded off Confederal ion by bringing in Prince Edward Island. To
strengthen that union, and to gel
back the carrying trade which had
been diverted to the United states
by the old treaty, they undertook and
carried oul the- herculean task of
building the Intercolonial and the
more Intimate | Canadian  Pacific Railways    and    of
Excursions!
Let us tell you all about the cheap
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the way, the condition of Canada un-  the sanctity of the  law  of
and cordial relationship with Canada | °xtending and Improving the canals
establishes him a continental repu- of Canada. Ami then to ge't back
tation as a humorist. Willi as much I the Industries and the markets
sincerity might a burglar enlarge on I which reciprocity had taken from us,
win, tails you lose" for the American  industries
der the old treaty, with only the
cruder forms of industry active,
was not unlike the condition of Ireland Do the workmen of New Brnus-
wick want to return to that condition? Wages were never so low as
they were under the old treaty from
1S54 to 1866; they were never so
high  as they are today.
Abrogation, li' Relief Is Sought
But, it may be said, that If at any
time after this treaty goes into operation we find that its tendency is
to wipe out the manufacturing business and carrying business of Canada, and to reduce Canadian labor
to a state of pauperism, then we can
by  means of the tariff  protect  the
property.
'As for those who, like Mr. Fielding,
profess to  believe  that  Mr.  Taft  Is
making this treaty a labor of love
on behalf of Canada—well, theirs is
that   credulity   which   although   the
strength of the child, is the weakness
of the full-grown  man,  or else it  is
the innocence of the sheep exposing
the fallacies of vegetarianism, as it
itself is being led to slaughter.
After Abrogation, What?
After  the  abrogation   of   the  old
treaty on the 17th  of March,  1866, little or none at all  with the other
what happened—what was expected j Provinces.    Under the National Pol-
to happen?     By its abrogation    the icy the trade between the provinces
American  . ation   hoped  tei    put    an
end  to Canada's separate' existence.
to stimulate new Industries, to give
employment io capital and labor, to
hring production and manufacture,
producer and consumer together In
our home markets, and by a variety
of employment to create a demand
for labor, those great leaders inaugurated the National Policy in 1S7S.
Effects of Their Policy
Under the old treaty Canada had
been a house divided against itself,
each province had traded with the
State or  States south   of  it, and   but]
|ing, or next to nothing, it has grown
and outstripped the whole of the foreign  trade of Canada    Then, as distinguished   from   this  interprovincial
trade,   is   that   other   branch   of   the
home market, the trade between city
and   country.     This   and   the   interprovincial trade together    afford    a
market for more than 80 per cent of
Canada's total production.    And that
yearly     production   of Canada     has
gone  into amazing  figures away  beyond   the  billion   mark;   until  today
it  is greater per head of the population  than  that of any  other nation
in the world.    These enormous products find a ready, a safe and a sure
market, at good prices—no less than
80 per cent of them within our own
borders at  the door of the prodni-or
or within rail reacb of the producer
in   a   home  market   Independent   of
hostile legislation from without, anil
by  far  the greater  part   of  the     re-
maining  211  per cent   in   that   great
marl  of ihe world, the British market, when- legislation leeisiilc to Canada  is  unthinkable.  .  The-  prices  in
these markets for these products .'in;
such as make the average Canadian
tizen  a   wealthier  man  today  than
the- average citizen of any other nation,  ami  make the  bank  savings of
Canada the large--:  per head of the
population  <>i' any    nation    in    the
known world    The.    Interchange    of
these products has filled 111 >- pulsating arteries of commerce in Canada
with  the. rich  blood  of frelghl  and
passenger traffic, until    today    our
transport system by land and water
Is the most extensive and    supports
tlie largest number of well-paid employees of any country of our papulation in  the world.
Why Reverse the Knglne?
Just now when we are speeding up
the shining vails of prosperity and
success, as no oilier nation is, why
should we he.' even asked to reverse
the engine and return down the
grade we have climbed down tee that
old morass of fifty years ago. to the
Canada had to become    during    the
quagmire    of    reciprocity?       Why
should we be asked to return to that
the Interprovincial trade, has leaped oW d,ita8tofn, makeshlfl of 1854, to
from  the trifling sum of $2,000,0001 r(Jturn |il(|. a dQg ,„ h|< vnmi,?
that   are   suffering,   pro-  twelve years of treaty so dependent   $400,000,000  a  year.
per  year  to  the gigantic amount   of
From   noth-
(Continued   on   Pago   Six) PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Friday, June 9, 1911-
How Reciprocity Will Affect Canada
i Continued from Page Five)
Changed Conditions
How absurd and fatal to the future of Canada it is to ignore the
fact that the conditions of today are
entirely different from those of fifty-
seven years ago. This is not 1854;
this is 1911, and things have
changed. In those old days there was
no union of the provinces as now,
and therefore no united effort and
strength, as now, to devlop a home
market, or find a foreign market;
there was no great centre-of trade
and no sure top price British market
as now. On the contrary, the old
provinces shortly before that In
1846 had lost their advantage and
preference in the British market by
the repeal of the corn laws, and bad
lost too the best part of their home
market, because that same repeal
had driven more than half of their
merchants and manufacturers into
bankruptcy. There they were as unlike the Canada of today as anything
could be—a few scattered communities of farmers, fishermen, lumbermen and mining men, spread out
in thin settlements along the American boundary, with their own market
glutted with American goods dumped
in at slaughter prices with an exhausted exchequer and a crippled
credit—are those the conditions of
Canada today? Are they not the reverse of the conditions of today?
Since those old days distance has
been annihilated and not the United
States alone, but the whole world is
our market; we have multiplied by
science and art the production of the
land; we have extended our strength
by making the water power of our
streams do the work of thousands;
we have traversed this northern half
Of the continent by railroads, and
the surrounding sea and our inland
waters by steam; we have transmitted our thoughts over a continent by
wire and by wireless.
How absurd then under these
changed conditions is this talk of
reciprocity as the historic policy of
Canada.
The Farmer
Even to the farmer the old treaty
was not an unmixed blessing. While
it added to his market in the United
States, it injured his legitimate market—his home market—by injuring
the manufacturing and the carrying
business of Canada. The prices he
got for his products in the United
States he got not because of the
treaty, but in spite of the treaty,
especially during the later years of
the treaty. During those years a
civil war was raging in the United
States, farm production there was a
a standstill and they had to have our
farm produce at war prices—tariff
or no tariff.
Merits of Home Market
Even if the United States under
reciprocity did afford to our farmers
a better price for their produce, still
it would not be as good a market as
our own home market. The home
market is always better than any
foreign country can give; it is beyond the reach of a hostile legislation; it reduces to a minimum the
cost of transportation; the profits
arising from it always accrue to citizens of Canada—like Mercy, It is
twice blest; it blesseth him that
gives and him that takes; in it there
can be no balance of trade against
Canada, and therefore no gold withdrawn from Canada to meet that balance. Would it not then be to let
in at the spigot and out at the bung
—to seek an uncertain market in the
United States at the expense of a
sure market at home?
Potatoes
On the 28th of February last in
the House of Commons, the Hon. Mr.
Fisher used these rather remarkable
words: "Now, I want to say a word
about potatoes. In twelve years of
high duties the United States accepted from Canada $11,000,000 worth
of potatoes more than they sent into
Canada." His statement Is a little
over twenty times too big. To be
true, It has to be reduced to less than
one-twentieth of its present size. If
the rest of Mr. Fisher were also reduced to less than one-twentieth of
his present size, the Lilliputians
whom Gulliver met in his travels
would be giants In comparison. The
true figures were brought down on
the 29th of March and they show
that dinin gthose years the United
States sent to us $1,419,651 worth
of potatoes, and we sent to them
$1,958,886, or only $539,235 more
than they sent to us. So much for
the big words of little men.
American Market a Plmntnsmngorln
So far then we find that the Canadian price has been higher than the
American, and so It will be to the
end, "so flows the stream, and shall
forever flow." And thus we see that
this phantasmagoria of an American
market for Canadian farm produce
becomes, upon closer scrutiny, a suc
cession of dissolving views. And all
the while we are chasing this phantom of better prices, we are compelling the farmer to pay duty on everything he buys, and to our Canadian
market we are giving free access to
the farm produce not only of the
United States but of 650,000,000
people besides. To attempt to find
a market in a country that has a surplus of everything we produce for
export Is to seek a market for coal
at Sydney. But the crowning act of
folly is to expose our farmers without let or hindrance to the clog and
glut of the surplus farm produce of
all but four of the great nations of
the earth.
Favored Nations
With twelve nations outside the
United States and the British Empire, Canada has treaties which contain what is known as the favored
nation clause. Most of these nations
are large exporters of farm products
and by virtue of that clause Canada
has to let that product come into the
Canadian market free. The moment
she enters into this treaty with the
United States, by virtue of the treaty
itself the produce of the British Empire will also be let into the Canadian market free, and by virtue of
our treaty with France, certain
French products wil lalso enjoy freedom in our markets. So that with
the exception of Germany, Italy,
Belgium and The Netherlands, all
the big exporting nations of the
world with their population of 650,-
000,000 will be left free to flood our
market with their produce, when
overproduction In their own country
makes it pay them. In the middle
of March last 750 carcasses of Australian lambs were landed in St.
John, and after paying our duty of
three cents per pound the undersold
our Canadian lamb by one cent per
pound, there and in Montreal and
Toronto.
Duration Uncertain
And then there is the uncertainty
as to how long this treaty if ratified
is to remain in force. The written
documents say that it is intended It
shall remain in force for a considerable period, but no one seems to
know, and no one has yet ventured
to say just how long a period a considerable period is. Under these circumstances no large factory would
establish itself on the Canadian side
in the hope of catering to the 100,-
000,000 people of both countries, because of the chance that 90 per cent
of that market might be cut off at
any time by the termination of the
treaty. And for the same reason, no
farmer or producer of raw material
in Canada would venture extensive
changes in his mode of production.
Opening Wedge of Separation
But why multiply objections to
this blunder ? Not one single valid
arg.iment can be adduced in support
of ;his atrocious crime against the
vested rights of citizens, the constitutional rights of provinces and the
manifest duty and destiny of Canada
as a part of the British Empire. By
what right and on what principle can
two men, without the mandate or
knowledge or consent, and against
the wish of the people, in secret conclave with a foreign power, barter
away, without the authority of law,
the protection, and, therefore, the income, property and individual rights
of one set of men, such as the men
engaged in the fruit industry in British Columbia, in order to gain a
trade opening for another set of men
engaged in some other industry, and
that, too, without giving the injured
men a hearing?
What right have these two men to
drive an opening wedge into the trade
between the provinces, and to force
each to trade, not with the other
provinces, but with the state or
states to the south of it, in violation
of the commercial object of Confederation, which was interprovincial
trade, and to the dislocation and disruption of the lines of trade we have
been developing for forty years, and
to drive us back to where we were
forty years ago? By no right and on
no principle of justice are these
things done.
Pin-ling of Ways a Mesmerism
This parting of the ways is just
the mesmerism of Mr. Taft over Mr.
Fielding and Sir Wilfrid Laurier. In
years gone by, sometimes as continental free traders, sometimes as secessionists, again as independence aspiring to "sever the ripe fruit from
the parent tree," always as men helpless to develop a home market, these
same two gentlemen have always
gazed with longing eyes across the
boundary on what looked to them
fresh spots. Little wonder is it,
therefore, that they are listening
now to the song of the charmer, to
the siren song of the annexationist
across the line, to the crafty, Tafty
song of reciprocity, to the song of
brotherly love—but of a brother's
birthright. Do you want heir mess
of pottage?
Twentieth Century Ours
Under the present fiscal policy the
Quality
iWW/>
vs.
Imitation
The difference between a red thing and an imitation of it is illustrated by the difference between
"Budweiser" Beer and beers that seek to resemble
Budweiser
The nearest to the original that imitators ever came was in
the counterfeiting of our label. But they have never produced a beer that in any way equals "Budweiser," nor can
they ever.
Budweiser it bottled only {with corks
or crown capt) at the
Anheuser-Busch Brewery
St Louis, Mo.
The North British Columbia
Liquor Co., Limited
Distributors        Prince Rupert, B.C.
20 th century belongs to Canada. Do
you want to give it to the United
States? The Briton's motto has ever
been, "What we have we'll hold."
Do you want Canada to revise that
motto to make it read, "What we
had, we sold"?
British Connection
Do you want to stay the flow of
trade and staunch the flow of affection to the Motherland?
1 know the sneer that question
gets for answer from reciprocity advocates. Sir Wilfrid calls it waving
the British flag, and Mr. Fielding
calls it the big Imperial drum. I
have heard their jeers, but I am
nothing daunted. Tell me, you men
of New Brunswick, with what resentment they would have been heard by
that band of pilgrim loyalists who
more than a century ago sacrificed
their New England  homes to plant
(Continued on Page Seven)
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE.
Notice is hereby given the the
reserve existing by reason of the
notice published in the British Columbia Gazette of the 27th December, 1907, over lands on Graham Island, formerly covered by Timber
Licences Nos. Nos. 37055, 37056 and
37057, which expired on the 6th day
of November, 1909, and the lands
embraced within Timber Licence No.
37059, which expired on the 25th
day of January, 1909, is cancelled,
and that the said lands will be open
for pre-emption only under the provisions of Section 7 of the "Land
Act" after midnight on June 16th,
1911.
ROBERT A.  RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Lands Department,
Victoria, B. C,
9th March, 1911.
NOTICE
PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given
that, under the authority contained
in section 131 of the "Land Act," a
regulation was approved by the Lieutenant-Governor In Council fixing
the minimum sale prices of first and
second-class lands at $10 and $5
per acre respectively.
This regulation further provided
that the prices fixed therein should
apply to all lands with respect to
which the applications to purchase
were given favourable consideration
after the date of said regulation,
namely, April 3, 1911.
Further notice is now given that
by virtue of a regulation approved by
the Lieutenant-Governor In Council
on the 10th of May, 1911, that the
regulation dated 3rd April, 1911, be
held not to apply to applications to
purohase vacant Crown lands which
were received by the Assistant Commissioners of Lands on or before the
said April 3rd, 1911, and with respect to which the required deposit
of fifty cents per acre had been received by said Comniossioners on or
before the said April 3rd, 1911.
ROBT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Department of Lands,
Victoria, B. C, 16th of May, 1911.
5-23—lmo
PURLIC NOTICE
Tenders will be received by the
undersigned up to Thursday, June
1st, 1911, at five o'clock In the afternoon for the purchase of Lot 541,
Range 5, Coast District, situated in
the vicinity of the City of Prince Rupert and containing 19.7 acres.
An upset price of one hundred
dollars per acre has been fixed upon
the lands embraced in said lot.        i
Each tender must be enclosed in
an envelope securely sealed and
marked "Tender for Lot 541, Range
5, Coast District," and must be accompanied by an accepted cheque
for twenty-five per cent of the
amount set out in such tender.
Payment for the lot will be accepted in instalments, one-quarter
cash and the balance in three equal
annual payments with Interest on
deferred payments at the rate of six
per cent per annum.
" The cheques of all unsuccessful
tenderers will be returned to them.
The highest or any tender will
not necessarily be accepted.
Field Notes of the survey of the
said Lot 541, Range 5, Coast District, may be seen at the office of
the undersigned.
No commissions of any kind will
be allowed.
J. H. MCMULLEN,
Government Agent.
Government Agent's Office,
Prince Rupert, B.  C,
April 27th, 1911. 6-1
NOTICE.
In the matter of an application for
the issue of a duplicate of the Certificate of Title for Part (N. 25
Acres) of the S. E. part of Section
16, Township 1, Range 5, Coast District:
Notice is hereby given that it Is
my intention to Issue at the expiration of one month after the first
publication hereof a duplicate of the
Certificate of Title to the above
mentioned lands in the name of
John Flewin, which Certificate was
issued on the 21st day of November,
1906, and is numbered 284.
WILLIAM E. BURRITT,
Dist. Regr.
Land  Registry Office,
Prince Rupert, B. C,
May  6th,   1911. 5-9-6-2
PUBLIC SERVICE ACT.
The qualifying examinations for
Third-class Clerks, Junior Clerks,
and Stenographers will be held at
the following places, commencing on
Monday the 3rd July next:—Armstrong, Chllllwack, Cumberland,
Golden, Grand Forks, Kamloops,
Kaslo, Kelowna, Ladysmith, Nanaimo, Nelson, New Westminster, North
Vancouver, Peachland, Revelstoke,
Rossland, Salmon Arm, Summer-
land, Vancouver, Vernon and Victoria.
Candidates must be British subjects between the ages of 21 and
30, if for Third-class Clerks; and
between 16 and 21, If for Junior
Clerks or Stenographers.
Applications will not be accepted
if received later than the 15th June
next.
Further Information, together
with application forms, may be obtained from the undersigned.
P. WALKER,
Registrar, Public Service.
Victoria, B. C, 27th April, 1911.
4-27—6-15.
SKEENA DISTRICT.
WHARF, PRINCE RUPERT.
In the Matter of Chapter 115, "Navigable Waters Protection Act,"
R. S. C, 190o.
NOTICE is hereby given that
drawings and description of the site
of a proposed wharf at Prince Rupert, B. C, have been deposited
with the Minister of Public Works,
Ottawa, and duplicates thereof with
the Registrar of Deeds at Prince
Rupert, B. C, and that thirty days
after date the Honourable the Minister of Public Works and the Government of British Columbia will
apply to the Governor-General la
Council for approval thereof.
J. E. GRIFFITH,
Public Works Engineer.
Department of Public Works,
Victoria, B. O, 5th April, 1911.
4-14—lm
FERRY,   SKEENA   RIVER.
Mission Point below mouth Bulkley
River.
SEALED APPLICATIONS for a
charter to operate a ferry over the
Skeena River at Mission Point below
mouth Bulkley River will be received
by the Hon. the Minister of Public
Works up to noon of Tuesday, the
30th day of May,.  1911.
Applicants must state the kind
and size of vessel it is proposed to
use, the method of operating, and
the tolls which it is proposed to levy
for the carriage of passengers,
horses, vehicles, cattle, etc.
J. E. GRIFFITH,
Public Works Engineer.
Department of Public Works,
Victoria, B. C, 9th May, 1911.
5-30
TRUST  COMPANIES.
EVERY COMPANY receiving deposits of money or carrying on business in the Province of British Columbia as a Trust Company, as defined in the "Trust Companies Regulation Act, 1911," Is requested to
furnish particulars as to the corporate name of the company, and the
name and address of its managing
director to the Inspector of Trust
Companies, Victoria, in order to receive a supply of forms to be used
In making the return as provided In
section 4 of said Act.
W. U. RUNNALS,
Inspector of Trust Companies.
4-18—lm
RESERVE
NOTICE is hereby given that all
vacant Crown lands not already under reserve, situated within the
boundaries of tbe Land Recording
Districts of Cariboo and Lillooet,
and the Kamloops Division of Yale
Land Recording District, are reserved from any alienation under
the "Land Act" except by pre-emption.
ROBT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Department of Lands,
Victoria, B. C, April 3rd, 1911.
4-14—lm
NOTICE  TO  CONTRACTORS
Police Station, Naas River.
SEALED TENDERS, superscribed
"Tender for Police Station, Naas
River," will be receiv.d by the Hon.
the Minister of Public Works up to
noon of Alonday, the 5th day of
June, 1911, for the erection and
completion of a timber-framed police
statioD at Naas River, in the Skeena
Electoral District.
Plans, specifications, contract, and
forms of tender may be seen on and
after the 16th day of May, 1911, at
the offices of the Government Agent,
Prince Rupert; C. P. Hickman, Esq.,
Provincial Constable, Naas Harbour;
and the Department of Public
Works, Victoria.
Each proposal must be accompanied by an accepted bank cheque or
certificate of deposit on a chartered
bank of Canada, made payable to the
Hon. the Minister of Public Works,
for the sum of $150, which shall be
forfeited if the party tendering decline to enter into contract when
called upon to do so, or if he fail
to complete the work contracted for.
The cheques or certificates of deposit
of unsuccessful tenderers will be returned to them upon the execution
of the contract.
Tenders will not be considered unless made out on the forms supplied,
signed with the actual signature of
the tenderer, and enclosed In the envelopes furnished.
The lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted.
J.  E.  GRIFFITH,
Public Works Engineer.
Public Works Department,
Victoria, B. C, 10th May, 1911.
6-5
NOTICE.
PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given
that, under the authority contained
in section 131 of the "Land Act," a
regulation has been approved by the
Lieutenant-Governor In Council fixing the minimum sale prices of first
and second-class lands at $10 and $5
per acre, respectively.
This regulation further provides
that the prices fixed therein shall
apply to all lands with respect to
which the application to purchase Is
given favourable consideration after
this date, notwithstanding the date
of such application or any delay that
may have occurred In the consideration of the same.
Further notice Is hereby given
that all persons who have pending
applications to purchase lands under
the provisions of sections 34 or 36
of the "Land Act" and who are not
willing to complete such purchases
under the prices fixed by the aforesaid regulation shall be at liberty to
withdraw such applications and receive a refund of the moneys deposited on account of such applications.
WILLIAM R. ROSS,
Minister of Lands.
Department of LandB,
Victoria, B. C, April 3rd, 1911.
4-11—6-11.
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE.
NOTICE is hereby given that the
reserve of a parcel of land situated
on Graham Island, notice of which
appeared in the British Columbia
Gazette on the 25 th of February,
1909, being dated 23rd February,
1909, is cancelled to permit ot the
lands being acquired by pre-emption
only and for no other purpose
ROBT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Department of Lands,
Victoria, B. C, April 5th, 1911.
-14—7-5 Friday, June  9,  1911.
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
How Reciprocity Will Affect Canada
(Continued From Page Six)
the British standard on the hills of
New Brunswick? Their bodies lie
beneath the soil they left you, but
the place is still fragrant with their
memory, and their loyal spirit is still
the inspiring genius of the land. Tell
me, then, whether that love of British connection with which we all imbibed with our mother's milk, is dying out in eastern Canada. The people of New Brunswick enjoy this
unique distinction over the other
older provinces, that their loyalty
never was in question. Liberals and
Conservatives alike—the rank and
file of the electorate of New Brunswick, have always been reputed loyal
to Britain and to Britain's flag. That
very fact It Is that Induces us sons
of eastern Canada when we come
amongst you to open our mind and
heart to you as to the national effect
of this treaty on provinces west of
the Great Lakes. We have gone out
from amongst you, gone out to the
west, gone out and learned something of the conditions in which we
have lived, and with which we have
been surrounded. And we cannot
help observing that we are but the
few amongst the many in the west.
The many, if measured by the standard of Canadian citizenship as we
learned It in our boyhood in the east,
are as yet without some of our Ideals
and aspirations. They have come
from countries to which but recently
they owed allegiance, countries
which still hold their pride and
claim their affections. Busied with
their new pursuits, as yet they have
not learned nor had the opportunity
of learning to feel that love for Canada and that pride in our great fortune to have inherited. We of your
own breed and get in those western
provinces feel that we are there as
a leaven to leaven the lump; we are
to do our share towards inspiring in
the many a patriotism and a love of
country as yet unfelt. It is but natural that things Canadian should be
strange to them, that they for example should object to the singing of
Canadian songs in their schools, natural and therefore not easy to eradicate. It will be doubly hard, if by
this treaty, and by the economic
forces it will call Into being our
prairie settlers from the south are
compelled still to trade with the
south, and are denied even a chance
of becoming Canadianized. Is that
a matter of indifference to eastern
Canada? Without jurisdiction in the
matter of education it is only
through such agencies as trade and
commerce that the Dominion can
fashion the national traits and characters of the people.
Burden of Responsibility
Has eastern Canada becmoe indifferent to this? By this treaty you
are going to increase the heavy burden of responsibility already on the
Canadian born citizen of the west,
until he sinks under the weary load.
He Is willing to buy his food products, and his manufactured goods In
the east, because the policy that
compels him to do so is also the
guarantee of the peaceful progress
and growth of Canadian nationality
in the west. This pact reverses that,
and the reversal is proposed by the
strong party in the pact as a distinct
step towards the definite end of political union. Can we hear that proposal and take the commercial benefits of the treaty without accepting
that proposal also? I think not. It
Is the east that should now feel what
the fiscal and political independence
of Canada really Is and what Its loss
would really mean, and It is upon the
east that the responsibility rests today. Already it would seem that in
high places In the east there are men
obcessed with a strong pro-American
and, perhaps, a stronger anti-British
feeling. The latter feeling was in
evidence last session in the naval debate when it denied Great Britain
all voice in our naval autonomy; the
former feelin gis in evidence this session in the reciprocity debate, and
gives the United States all voice In
our fiscal autonomy. These are the
gentlemen who fly in a rage and say
that it is an insult to their intelligence when the British flag is mentioned. But, thank God, the British
flag still appeals with irresistible
force to many and, I hope, the majority of Canadians born beneath Its
ample folds, still speaks to them of
the glories of the storied and historic past, still points to the duties of
the present, and the hopes of the future—Inspiring them as they gaze
upon its proud blazonry with the ambition that Canada will march down
through the centuries as the foremost nation in that great family of
British nations which together stand,
as a mighty power, for the spread of
Christianity, the advance of civilization, and the peace of the world.
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COAL MINES ACT
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Csssifir
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gilllngham, of Prince Rupert, B. O,
occupation contractor, U-tends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Commencing at post planted 6%
miles N. E. of the mouth of the
White River and the junction of the
Naas, marked Chas. J. Gillingham's
S. E. Corner; thence 80 chains
North; thence 80 chains West;
thence 80 chains South; thence 80
chains East to point of commencement and containing 640 acres more
or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles M. Huff, Agent.
Dated March 4, 1911. 4-18
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
TAK^l NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Comenclng at a post planted 7 miles
N. E. of the mouth of the White
River and the junction of the Naas,
marked Chas. J. Gillingham's S. E.
Corner; thence 80 chains North;
thence 80 chains West; thence 80
chains South; thence 80 chains East
to point of commencement and containing 640 acres more or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles M. Huff, Agent.
Dated March 5 th, 1911. 4-18
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
pnMl AT*
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gilllngham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land:—
Commencing at a post planted 7%
miles N. E. of the mouth of the
White River and the junction of the
Naas and marked Chas. J. Gillingham's S. E. Corner; thence 80
chains North; thence 80 chains
West; thence 80 chains South;
thence 80 chains East to point of
commencement and containing 640
acres more or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles M. Huff, Agent.
Dated March 5th, 1911. 4-18
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
\ Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Commencing at a post planted 7%
miles N. E. of the mouth of the
White River and the junction of the
Naas, marked Chas. J. Gillingham's
S. E. Corner; thence 80 chains
North; thence 80 chains West;
thence 80 chains South; thence 80
chains East to point of commencement and containing 640 acres more
or lsss
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles M.  Huff, Agent.
Dated March  5th,  1911. 4-18
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
pn qq j o i»
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Commencing at a post planted 6 >,±
miles N. E. of the mouth of the
White River and the junction of the
Naas, and marked Chas. J. Gillingham's S. E. Corner; thence 80
chains Nortn; thence 80 cnains
West; thence 80 chains South;
thence 80 chains East to point of
commencement and containing 640
acres more or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles M.  Huff,  Agent.
Dated March 4th, 1911. 4-18
Skeena   Land   District—District-   of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Commencing at a post planted about
8 miles N. E. of the mouth of White
River and the junction of the Naas
River, marked Charles J. Gillingham's S. E. Corner; thence SO
chains North; thence SO chains
West; thence SO chains South;
thence SO chains East to point of
commencement and containing 040
acres more or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles M.  Huff, Agent.
Dated March 5th, 1911, 4-1S
thence 80 chains North; thence 80
chains West; thence 80 chains
South; thence 80 chains East to
point of commencement and containing 640 acres more or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles M. Huff, Agent
Dated March 4th, 1911. 4-18
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, Intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Cemmencing at a post planted about
8 miles N. E. of the mouth of White
River and the junction of the Naas
River, marked Chas. J. Gillingham's
S. E. Corner; thence 80 chains
North; thence 80 chains West;
thence 80 chains South; thence 80
chains East to point of commencement and containing 640; acres more
or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles M. Huff, Agent.
Dated March 6th, 1911. 4-18
Skeena   Land   District-—District   of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. O,
occupation contractor, Intends to
apply to the MiniBter of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land:—
Commencing at a post planted about
8 miles N. E. of thj mouth of White
River and the junction of the Naas
River, marked Chas. J. Gillingham's
S. E. Corner; thence 80 chains
North; thence 80 chains West;
thence 80 chains South; thence 80
chains East io point of commencement and containing 640 acres mo: 3
or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles M. Huff, Agent.
Dated March 6th, 1911. 4-18
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gilllngham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for a
license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Commencing at a post planted about
miles N. E. of the mouth of the
White River and the junction of the
Naas, marked Chas. J. Gillingham's
S. E. Corner; thence 80 chains
North; thence 80 chains West;
thence 80 chains South; thence 80
chains East to point of commencement and containing 640 acres more
or less.
CHARLES   J.   GILLINGHAM.
Charles M. Huff, Agent.
Dated March  6th,  1911. 4-18
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE thi.t Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for a
license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Commencing at a post planted about
S miles N. E. of the mouth of the
White River and the junction of the
Naas, marked Chas. J. Gillingham's
S. E. Corner; thence 80 chains
North; thence 80 chains West;
thence 80 chains South; thence 80
chains East to point of commencement and containing 64 0 acres more
01' less
CHARLES   J.   GILLINGHAM.
Charles M. Huff, Agent.
Dated  March  6th,  1911. 4-18
NOTICE
APPLICATION    FOR    LIQUOR
LICENCE.
I, Edward James Maynard, of the
City of Prince Rupert, In the Province of British Columbia, Liquor
Dealer, hereby apply to the Board of
Licence Commissioners for the said
City of Prince Rupert for a Bottle
licence to sell intoxicating liquors
under the provisions of the Statutes
in that behalf and the by-laws of the
City of Prince Rupert, and any
amendments thereto, for the premises known and described as Lot 29,
Block 11 Section 5, to commence on
the  15th  day of June,   1911.
And I hereby agree that In case
a licence is granted pursuant to this
application that no Asiatic shall be
employed, or be permitted to be
upon said premises, other than in
the capacity of a guest or customer,
nor shall Asiatics be employed off
said premises to do any work to be
used in or in any way connected
with said premises, and I hereby
agree that I shall accept said licence
subject to this agreement, and that
any breach of this agreement shall
render me liable to all the penalties
provided for in Section 19 of the
Prince Rupert Liquor Licence Bylaw,  1910.
My postoffice address Is Prince
i.upert, B. C.
The name and address of the owner of the premises proposed to be
licenced Is C. D. Rand, Vancouver,
B. C.
Dated at Prince Rupert this  4th
day of May, 1911.
6-16 E. J. MAYNARD.
Skeena    Land    Dislrict—District    of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles .1.
Gilllngham, of Prince Rupert, P. C,
occupation contractor, Intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land:--
Commencing at a post planted 6%
miles N. E. of the mouth of White
River and tha junction of the Naas,
marked Chas. J. Gillingham's S. E.
Corner; thence 80 chains Nortli;
thence 80 chains West; thence SO
chains South; thence 80 chains East
to point of commencement and containing 640 acres more or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles M.   Huff,  Agent.
Dated  March  ith, 1911. 4-18
Skeena    Land    District—District    of
Cassiar.
TAKE     NOTICE  that   Charles  J.
Gilllngham, of Prince Rupert, B. C.,:
occupation    contractor,    intends    to.
apply to  the  Minister  of   Lands  for]
a license to prospect   for  Coal and I
Petroleum over 640 acres of land:—j
Commencing at a post planted    six
miles X.  E.  of the mouth  of  White j
River and  the junction  of  the  Naas
River  on   Canyon     Creek,     marked:
Chas.  J.  Gillingham's S.  E.  Corner;
WATER NOTICE.
NOTICE is hereby given that an
application will be made under Part
V. of the "Water Act, la09," to obtain a licence in the Queen Charlotte Islands Division of Skeena^Dls-
trict.
(a) The name, address and occupation of the applicant—Merton A.
Merrill, Masset, Q. C. I., B. C,
Prospector.
(If for mining purposes) Free
Miner's  Certificate  No	
(b) The name of the lake,
stream, or source (if unnamed, the
description is)—I-in-tsua Lake, Tsu-
Skundale Lake and Ain River.
(c) The point of diversion—At r
near the outlet of Tsu-Skundale
Lake Into Ain River.
(d) The quantity of water applied for (In cubic feet per second)
1,000.
(e) The character of the proposed works—Power Plant, Dam,
Flumes, etc.
(f) The premises on which the
water is to be used  (describe same)
At or near the mouth of the Ain
River.
(g) The purposes for which the
water Ii to be used—Generating
power.
(h) if fur Irrigation, describe
ihe land Intended te) he irrigated,
giving acreage	
(I) If the water Is to he used for
power or mining purposes, describe
tin place where Ihe water Is to he
returned tei some, natural channel,
and the difference in altitude between point of diversion and point
of return Al or near the mouth of
the Ain River, about 100 feet below
point of diversion.
(j) Area of Crown land Intended to be occupied by the proposed
works—10 acres more or less.
(k) This notice was posted on
the 28th day of November, 1910,
and application will be made to the
Commissioner on the 1st day of
June,  1911.
tl) Give the names and addresses of any riparian proprietors or
licensees who or whoso lands are
likely to be affected by the proposed works, either above or below
the outlet—Don't know of any.
(Signature)
MERTON   A.   MERRILL,
(P.  O.  Address)   Massee,  B.  C.
NOTE.—One   cubic   eoot   per   second   is equivalent  to  ,15.71     miner's
Inches.
NOTICE
APPLICATION    FOR    LIQUOR
LICENCE.
I, J. Arthur Smith, of the City
of Prince Rupert, in the Province of
British Columbia, Contractor, hereby
apply to the Board of Licence Commissioners for tbe said City of
Prince Rupert for a Bottle licence to
sell intoxicating liquors under the
provisions of the Statutes In that behalf and the by-laws of the City of
Prince Rupert, and any amendments
thereto, for the premises known and
described as Lot 2, Block 34, Section
1 to commence on the lbth dav of
June, 1911.
And I hereby agree that in case a
licence is granted pursuant to this
application that no Asiatic shall be
employed, or be permitted to be
upon said premises, other than in
the capacity of a guest or customer,
nor shall Asiatics be employed off
said premises to do any work to be
used in or in any way connected
with said premises, and I hereby
agree that I shall accept said licence
subject to this agreement, and that
any breach of this agreement shall
render me liable to all the penalties
provided for in Section 19 of tha
Prince Rupert Liquor Licence Bylaw,  1910.
My postoffice address is Prince
Rupert, B. C.
The name and address of the owner of the premises proposed to be
licenced is J. Arthur Smith, Prince
Rupert, B. C.
Dated at  Prince Rupert, this 4th
day ot May, 1911.
6-16 J. ARTHUR SMITH.
APPLICATION FOR LlQl OR
LICENSE
TAKE NOTICE .that 1, Austin M.
Brown, of the City of i-rince Rupert,
B. C, Retail Merchant, intend to apply to the Board of License Commissioners for the ;aid City of Prince
Rupert at their first meeting held
after thirty days fr -m th > first publication of this notice, for a bottle
license to sell intoxicating liquors by
retail under the provisions of the
Statutes in that behalf and the Bylaws of the City of Prince Rupert
and any amendments thereto, for my
store premises situated on Lot forty
(40) in Block seven (7) of Section
one (1) Prince Rupert and being on
Second Avenue in the said City of
Prince Rupert.
And I hereby agree that in case a
license is granted pursuant to this
application that no Asiatic shall be
employed or be permitted to be upon
said premises other th. n in the capacity of a guest or customer nor
shall Asiatics be employed off said
premises to do any work to be used
in or in any way connected with said
premises and 1 hereby agree that I
shall accept said license subjee't to
Ihis Agreement and that any breacjl
nf this Agreement shall render me
liable to th.- penalties provided,for
in the Prince Rupert Liquor License
By-law.
My postoffice address is Second
Avenue, Prince Rupert, ll. C.
I am ih" owner nf the premises
proposed  hi be licensed.
Dated ai Prince nuperl nl« I lib
■ lay eef May.  nil.
AUSTIN M.  BROWN.
NOTICE.
TAKE NOTICE that I, J. E. (Ill-
more, intend to apply at the next
sitting of the Board of License Commissioners to be held on the 14th
(lay of June, next, for a transfer of
the license Issued to me for the Premier Hotel, situate on the G. T. P.
Reserve in the City of Prince Rupert, to Fred W. Hemming, of Prince
Rupert, B. C.
6-13 J.   E.   GILMORE.
Job  Printing  of  all  kinds  neatly |
executed at the Journal Office.
NOTICE
A general meeting of the Prince
Rupert General Hospital Association
will be held In the Police Court
Room, on Tuesday, June 6th, 1911,
at 8 p. m.
Business:-—To revise the Bylaws of the association.
A. CUTHBERT,
5-30—6-6 Secretary. PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Friday, June  9,  1911.
Goods Must Be Moved
•••
•••
Building to be Remodelled
PREMISES WILL BE TRANSFORMED INTO HANDSOME ARCADE, MIKING A MECCA FOR SHOPPERS
WE WILL BE BACK AT THE SAME OLD STAND
! SALE STILL ON-BARGAINS TO BE HAD
REDUCTIONS—To avoid moving much of our Big Stock it will be sold at Big Reductions.
HEADQUARTERS FOR THOSE THINGS YOU NEED FOR YOUR HOME SUCH AS FURNITURE, CUTLERY, LINOLEUM, GRASS
CHAIRS, REED AND RATTAN GOODS.     BEST LINES OF UPHOLSTERED COUCHES, ARM CHAIRS, PARLOR SUITES, ETC.
Fourteen   different   styles  at
prices to suit all, from
which to select your
Raby Carriages
The Big
Furniture Store
Again we remind you of the story of the Early Bird
F. W. HART
■»■»♦♦♦♦♦»»♦♦♦■♦
In Tumblers we have twenty-
one different kinds direct
from the factory
in Fittsburg
Corner Sixth Street & Second Avenue
Phone 62
The Big
Furniture Store
BIG FIRM IS CONING
Balfour Guthrie & Co., the World Renowned Shippers are to Invade
Prince Rupert.
TAXATION AGREEMENT
Pacific  toast  Representative  of  the
Company Visited City and
Feels Time Is Ripe
Mr. Alexander Baillie, the Pacific
coast representative of Balfour,
Guthrie & Co., 'lee- world-wide shipping firm, paid Prince Rupert a visit
this week. He came as the guest of
Charles M. Hays, the president of the
Grand Trunk Pacific, for the purpose
of looking into the situation from
the standpoint of opening a branch
in this city.
Mr. Baillie was astonished at conditions as he found them here. He
had been prejudicially affected by inspired reports in the south, in which
an attempt was made to belittle the
city in every way. The opinion Mr.
Baillie formed on his first visit completely dispels all these preconceived
notions. He was astonished at the
facilities which were possessed here
in a shipping line and at the progress
made.
The territory over which Mr. Bail-
lie exercises control for his company,
he being a shareholder in it, covers
San Francisco, Portland, Tacoma, Seattle and Vancouver. They are heavily interested in the handling of
grain and lumber, chartering vessels
and making shipments to all parts
of the globe. There is not a port in
the world where the name of the
firm is not known.
Speaking to a representative of
The Journal, Mr. Baillie expressed
the opinion that the time was very
near when his company would require to be represented here. He
looks to Prince Rupert to become a
great wheat shipping point when the
road is completed and of necessity
his firm will be here.
A visit to the government dock
where the reinforced concrete piles
were being put in place, was a point
nf intense interest to this shipping
man. He had never seen such work
before and this perhaps more than
anything else he saw in the place
convinced him of the fact that this
was destined to be a great port.
"The time Is very near," he said
"when We must get in here."
The company acts as agents for
the Harrinian line of steamers from
European ports to San Francisco,
Seattle and Vancouver. This line
has just recently been put on the
route to Vancou er and a monthly
freight service Is provided by It. Mr.
Baillie feels that the time Is not very
far distant when Prince Rupert must
be added to the ports of call. Even
at the present time he Is prepared,
as freight offers in sufficient quantity, to have this made a port of call.
He came to Prince Rupert feeling
that there was a great future for it.
He left it feeling that its business
life was really starting and that It
would require industrial concerns to
be alive to keep up with the demands
which are now being felt here.
Captain Gibson, of the stevedoring
company operating in Seattle, Victoria and Vancouver, was a visitor to
the <it yby the Prince Itupert. He
was accompanied by his daughter.
(Continued from Page One)
buildings of architectural merit, provided, however, that the City may
construct and maintain a reservoir thereon. In the development of this
parcel,  the general  parklike features shall he adhered to.
Pending tlie development of any of the said parcels as in this clause
provided, the City shall not do or permit anytliing to be done which
will detract from the existing natural parklike features.
0. The conveyances pi-ovidcd for in the preceding clauses shall be
executed by the parties hereto of the first, third and fourth parts, nnd
shall contain apt clauses embodying the conditions hereinbefore set
forth, so as to ensure that the lands mentioned in clauses four (-1) and
five (5) hereof shall be used only for the purposes defined in this agreement.
7. The Railway Company will, at the request of'the City, grant such
easements over its property within tbe city limits as may be necessary for
sewers, water mains, gas mains, electric light- wires, telegraph wires, telephone wires, or other similar civic utilities, subject always to the approval of the Railway Company's engineer, whose opinion in nil cases
must be treated as final, without prejudice to the right, if any, which the
City may by law possess to expropriate an easement for any of the abov'e
purposes,
8. The Railway Company will, within n period of eight months from
the date of the ratification of this agreement hy the Legislature, commence the erection of its works within the city limits, consisting of permanent station, roundhouse, engine works, machine shops and other
structures and accessories incidental to the establishment nt Prince Rupert of the Pacific Terminus of tlie Railway Company, and complete
tlie some with all reasonable dispatch, retaining within the City the payrolls in connection with such works, so fur as it may be feasible to
do so.
0. The Townsite Company will, within a period of two years from
the date of the ratification of this agreement by the Legislature, commence the erection of a first-class hotel of modern design and appointments,  and  prosecute  the construction thereof with due diligence.
10. The Railway Company will commence the construction of a dry
dock at Prince Rupert in conformity with the agreement respecting tlie
same between the Railway Company and the Government of the Dominion of Canada.
11. The Railway Company will pay to tho City annually on or before ftie 1st day of November in each year for and din ng the period in
the succeeding clause mentioned, by way of taxation, a total fixed sum
of Fifteen Thousand Dollars ($15,000), in respect of all its property, real
or personal, within the City Units; provided, however, that the said sum
shall not include local improvement taxes, which may be imposed by
the City for the improvement of public streets upon which the Railway
Company's land abuts in Sections One (1), Six (0), Seven (7) and Eight
(8), and which streets or portions of streets may be enumerated as follows:
Water Street
Eleventh Street
First Avenue,  opposite blocks 13 and 14
First Avenue and Second Avenue from Eighth to Second Street
Fourth Avenue, opposite blocks 6 and 7, in Section Six
Overlook Streel, opposite 'Mock 4
Seal Cove Circle, opposite Mock  7
Kelliher Street, opposite Mocks 2?i and 30
All in Section Seven;
Kelliher Street, opposite Mock 12
Morse Loop, opposite Blocks 14, 1:1 and 41
Eleventh Avenue, opposite Mock :ll
Edward Avenue, opposite Muck 1
All in Section Bight
Provided, however, thai the Railway Company's share of such local
improvement   taxes,   shall   not  exceed one-half of the total.
112. The City agrees with the Railway Company to accept the said
sum of Fifteen Thousand Dollars ($18,000) per annum, together with the
said local improvement tuxes mentioned in Clause 11 hereof, ill lieu of
all municipal taxes, rates and assessments of every kind whatsoever to
be levied by the City aguiust the Railway Company nnd upon or in respect
of the lauds of the Railway Company, and all buildings, structures or
other improvements thereon or therein, und all the personal property of
the Company within the City limits, for a period of ten (10) years from
the 1st day of January, 1011.
13. The City will accept the sum of Fifteen Thousand Dollars
($15,000) in full of nil tuxes due by the Railway Company to the City
for the year 1010.
14. It is understood by and between the parties hereto that this
agreement shall not become operative or binding unless and until the
same shall have been approved by the ratepayers of tbe City and ratified
by the Legislature of the Province of llritish Columbia; the parties hereto severally agreeing to co-operate In taking all steps and doing all
things necessary to obtain such ratification at the next session of the
said Legislature.
15. This agreement shall extend to and he binding upon the successors and assigns of the parties hereto respectively.
IX WITNESS WHEREOF, etc.
 LADYSMITH	
COAL
ROCHESTER & MONROE, Phone 115
r
>
For Neat Job Printing
see the Journal Man
Tel. 138
v
J
NOTICE
Tenders are invited for the repair
of the wharf at Metlakatla, B. C.
The sum of fifteen hundred dollars
being available for expenditure on
this wharf, bidders should carefully
examine the ground and state in de
tail the extent of repairs he will undertake for that amount. All piles
must be power driven. Tenders will
be received at the Indian Office,
Metlakatla, B. C, up to June 30th,
1911, and should be accompanied
with a certified bank cheque for one
hundred dollars, the amount to be
forfeited in the event of a withdrawal of tender. No tender received
will necessarily be accepted.
CHARLES CLIFTON PERRY,
Indian Agent.
Metlakatla, B. C, June 5, 1911.
6-5—6-9
NOTICE TO MARINERS
The buoys and beacons placed in
Hecate Strait for hydrographic surveying purposes have no reference to
navigation.
P.  C.  MUSGRAVE,
Officer Commanding,
C. G. S. Lillooet.
6-6&13
MINISTER ON VISIT
Hon.
W.  Templeman   is   Touring
Touring His Constituency at
at Present Time.
He Addressed the Liberal Association
on Wednesday Evening, Leaving
Next  Morning for up River
Hon. W. Templeman, minister of
inland revenue In the Dominion Government, reached the city on
Wednesday, accompanied by his private secretary, B. C. Nicholas. The
minister, who is on a visit to his constituency, looks in the best of health.
He was met on his arrival by A. J.
Morris, president of the Liberal Association, and G. R. Naden. In the
evening he addressed a gathering of
the Liberal Association and the next
morning left by train for up-river
points.
 o	
Pasesnger Traffic
D'Arcy Tate solicitor for the
Grand Trunk Pacific, received a message while here that the application
for leave to operate a passenger and
general service on the first 100 miles
of the line out of here would be decided upon at a sitting of the railway
commission to be held in Winnipeg
on June 15.
EEEEEEEBEBEBBEEEE       BEE
SHERWIN &WILLIAMS
H>AINTS=
COVER THE EARTH.
WE   ARE   SOLE   AGENTS
CARLOAD JUST ARRIVED
Ready Nixed Paints,
Paints Ground in Oil,
Paints Ground in Japan,
Varnishes, Shellac, etc.
Water Stains
and
Decotint
IN ALT. COLORS
Prince Rupert Hardware & Supply
Company, Ltd.  tups, dunn, m*.
EESEEEBBEEEEBEEEEEEEEEBEEB
You Can Avoid This
by sending your Clothes to the
PIONEER STEAM LAUNDRY
There are Many
Reasons Why
IT   IS   TO  YOUR  INTEREST
We do first-class work and
■are careful with your Garments. We can do your work
and return It within 48 hours
if necessary. We call for your
laundry and return It to you.
Should anything be lost or misplaced we will make it satisfactory.
When your Laundry goes to the Chinks there are many drawbacks. When you send It to us your money helps pay WHITE
LABOR.
PIONEER STEAM LAUNDRY
We Require Listings of Inside Business Property
Also Residence Property at Right Prices
M.M. Stephens & Co. Ld.
Real Estate, Insurance and Investments,
Notaries, Nines, Timber
Box 275
PHONE 222
PRINCE RUPERT, B.C.
OFFICE THIRD  AVE,
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Frank Nelson,
of Chicago, III., U. S. A., occupation
clerk, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about one mile north of
N, W. corner of Application to Purchase 6953; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence north
80 chains; thence east 80 chains, containing 640 acres.
FRANK NELSON.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 25, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Fred. A. De
Lisle, of Masset, B. C, occupation
farmer, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 40 ohains south
and 120 chains east of the S. E. corner of Lot 35; thence north 80
chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains, containing 640 acres.
FRED. A.  DE LISLE.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 26, 1910.

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