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Prince Rupert Journal Aug 5, 1910

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 New Wellington
Coal
is the best
ROGERS & BUCK
Sole Agents
Ptinu Unpttt ftmtml
High-Clans
Job Printing
In all Lines
VOLUME  1
Published Twice a Week
PRINCE RUPERT, B. C, FRIDAY, AUGUST 5, 1910.
Price, Five Cents
NO.   li
PLEADS INSANITY
Defence of G. T. Williams is That of
Being Irresponsible for
Acts.
Case is Adjourned Until Mental Condition of Accused is Passed
Upon
G. T. Williams, cnarged with the
crime of arson, will be thoroughly
examined medically before the case
proceeds farther with a view to ascertaining whether he.is responsible
or not for his actions. This was decided late yesterday afternoon after
the evidence for the crown had been
submitted and nearly all the evidence
for the defence had gone in. The
evidence had been very similar to
that submitted at the time of the
preliminary hearing with the exception that L. W. Patmore, counsel for
the defense, revealed in his cross examination throughout that the plea
of Insanity was to be put forward.
Calling Dr. McNeill last evening as
a witness for the defense, the opinion
was given by him that Williams
might be Irresponsible. He had examined him that day about 1 o'clock
and had questioned accused. He had
told the doctor that a bolt had fallen
on his head a few years before and
rendered him unconscious. He had
been in a hospital for some time
after it and was warned when he left
to take care that he did not become
excited and to take plenty of sleep.
Dr. McNeill said he had no doubt
the injuries he received had had
some effect on his nerves. Asked by
the judge if In his opinion the accused had been rendered unable to
distinguish between right and wrong,
Dr. McNeill said he did not feel like
answering that deiinitely. In answer
to a further question lie said that in
view of the symptoms and the history
of the case such a condition might
have been produced on the accused.
On cross examination by W. E.
Fisher, representing the crown, Dr.
McNeill said that from his examination he would be ready to prepare
papers asking for Williams admission
to the asylum. It would be up to
the superintendent of tbe asylum
then to say whetner he should be admitted.
His Honor thereupon said that in
view of what Dr. McNeill had said,
there was no need to proceed farther
with the case until the man had been
passed upon medically. A man who
is crazy, said the judge, cannot be
tried for a crime because of the principle of law that he is not In a position to Instruct his counsel.
The judge also added that he did
not see why this evidence was not
introduced long before It was.        '
Mr. Patmore alluded to the fact
that he was showing by other evidence that the man was crazy as he
had left a wide track In all he did"
upon which his crime could be traced
and which indicated the act of a crazy
man.
His Honor said he must admit he
was not impressed very much with
the evidence so far as showing that
the accused did not realize the difference between right and wiong. He
had shown a cunning that made him
believe he knew what was wrong and
had taken steps to cover things up.
He might be Insane, but be criminally responsible for his acts. That was
a point that had been decided again
and again in the courts.
The judge, thereupon; adjourned
the case until there should be an opportunity given to have an examination made by a second medical man
with a view to ascertaining whether
the man was a fit subject for an asylum. The judge added that it was
either the asylum or jail for him. He
could not be allowed at large.
When tho case opened before
Judge Young yesterday morning evidence practically the same as at the
preliminary hearing was submitted.
In the cross examination of J. H.
Hoffa, who had straightened the Talbot House up after the fire, Mr. Patmore brought out evidence to show
that Williams acted very peculiarly
and also the fact that the hose was
found under the mattret* where Williams slept.
Later this point was cleared up by
the calling of Mrs. Hoffa, who had
assisted about the place and admitted
that she had put the hose there because she did not know where else
to put It.
G. R. Naden, who had the insurance on the Talbot House, said he
hajl reduced the insurance since the
fire from $8,000 to $5,000.
(Continued on Page Eight)
A GRAND RECEPTION
Sir Wilfrid Laurier Will be Welcomed
to Prince Rupert by all
Citizens.
Arrangements   Are   Well   Advanced
For the Public Welcome to be
Given Premier
There was a general meeting last
evening of those composing the committees charged with the reception tr.
be tendered Sir Willi id Lati'-ie- and
nis party when plan., were fount to
be well advanced in all lines.
Aid. Pattullo presided with Alex.
Manson, the energetic secretary, also
in his place. The attendance was
good and enthusiasm marked all the
proceedings.
The subject of finances was the
only one about which there was any
uncertainty and the finance committee was authorized to get to work
at once on that part of the undertaking. A subscription list was circulated at the meeting, and $380
raised among those present. The reports of various committees showed
that to carry out the arrangements
as forecasted would require $2,200.
The decorations will cost $1,700 as
planned; the music $150; the address
and presentation $200; and the preparation for the open air meeting
$150.
In connection with the programme
there was a sum of $400 for bunting
and flags. This, it was explained by
the chairman, Mr. Law, included
good flags and bunting that could
be taken care of and used again. It
would be an asset to the city to be
used in  time to come.
Aid. Pattullo, Mayor Stork, and
Aid. Mobley, who were present, approved of this move, and it was decided to authorize the purchase ol
this part.
The members of the council present agreed that in view of the permanent character of these decorations they would be agreeable to support a grant of $500 from the city
council towards the entertainment.
It the money is available, the general scheme of decoration will be carried out which includes banking Centre street with evergreens from the
wharf to Second avenue, the erection
of a log arch at Second street and
the stringing of electric lights along
the route.
The music committee are securing
a band for the Saturday of his arrival and an orchestra for the banquet in the evening.
The banquet is to be self-supott-
ing, there being a charge of $10 a
plate for those who attend.
The open air meeting is to be In
ffont of the provincial government
offices, the use of the grounds being
secured. By planking the open
spaces accommodation can be found
for between 3,000 and 4,000 people,
ihe ladies will have seats on the
lawn of the government buildings.
There are yet some details to be
worked out, but in a general way the
scheme of reception is well in hand.
It was proposed last night that an
effort be made to have all the water
craft available In the harbor meet
the Prince George as she enters the
harbor, and give a greeting in this
way to the Premier. A committee
has been appointed to carry out the
scheme.
On arrival an address will be presented lo him. This Is in the hands
of Morte Craig, and will be unique.
It will be on a moose skin of burnt
work. A portfolio done In leather
of the wild flower of the district will
also be presented  to  him.
in the evening the Danquet will
be glv"n in the Prince Rupert Inn,
seats being placed for 176 people
On Monday the G. T. P. will take
Sir Wilfrid over'a part of the lino if
he wishes to go. Foley, Welch &
Stewart will also place a river steamer at his disposal.
In the afternoon the open air meeting will be held in front of the government buildings.
 o	
The Glee Club held a dance  last
evening in Prudhomme's hall.
*    *    *
Patrons of the skating rink will
be glad to know that an excellent
orchestra has been engaged to play
during the skating.
* * $
Special evangelistic services are being held all this week and next In
the Baptist church, Sixth street, by
the Rev. J. W. Litch. Tonight he
will speak on "The Blackest Crime
in Prince Rupert."   All are welcome.
"PRINCESS  MAY" LOST  IN NORTHERN  WATERS
(Special to The Journal)
Victoria, Aug. 6.—A despatch has
been received here to the effect that
the C. P. R. steamer Princess May
has struck in Lynn Canal some distance out of Skagway. The reports
indicate that she will be a complete
wreck. No loss of life attended the
stranding  of the  steamer.
The Princess May has been on the
Skagway run tor many years, being
probably the most popular steamer
that the C. P.—R. has had in the
northern trade.
Purchased about eight years ago
by the company, she was remodelled
specially for that trade and has been
kept on it almost continuously ever
since. When purchase by the C. P. R.
the Princess May was a new steamer
engaged In the coasting trade on the
China coast under the name of the
Hating. She was brought across the
Pacific to Victoria and there remodelled by the B. C. Ma.rine Railway company for the northern trade. The
vessel was a splendid sea "boat and
preferred by all who travelled north
by the C. P. R.  as the steamer by
which to make the route on account
of| her steadiness and comfortable
quarters.
She was under the command of
Capt. McLeod, a popular and safe
skipper, with Chief Engineer McGrath in charge of the engine rooms,
another of the most tried officers of
the company.
With only meagre news of the disaster it is believed that in the fogs
which have been prevalent of late In
northern waters the May must have
struck a rock and come to grief.
A CITY HALL SITE
G.T.P. Suggest That it be Located on
Reserve—Council Agreeable
to Proposal.
Scheme of Grouping Public (Buildings
Is In  Mew  Near  Point
Suggested
It looks as though the city hall
would be located on the G.T.P. reserve at the corner of Second avenue
and Sixth street. A letter has been
received from the land commissioner
of the company, G. U. Ryley, who
suggests that as the site, and the
mayor has been authorized by the
city council to communicate with Mr.
Ryley  further  in  the  matter.
The council, when the subject* Of
a city hall came up, had written to
the officials of the company relative
to a site where the fire hall is located.
The reply of Mr. Ryley received by
His Worship is to the effect that the
company would prefer to see the city
hall placed on the reserve at the corner referred to.
The council was not long in making up its mind In the matter at
Wednesday evening's meeting, when
the letter of the land commissioner
was read. It was presumed that the'
company intended to make a grant
of the site and the council were ready
to accept on these generous terms.
His Worship will communicate with
the commissioner on the matter.
If this proposition is carried out
there will be located on opposite
corners of the intruding part of the
reserve of the company, public buildings! On one will be the city hall
and on the other the federal buildings, combining the post office and
the custom house.
If this arrangement is adhered to
it will necessitate, it is felt, the erection of a city hall in keeping with
the general scheme of architecture at
that point. The company's station
and hotel, the federal building, the
buildings of the local government
and the city hall will all be located
within a short distance of one another. As some of these are to be
built on quite an elaborate scale It
will be necesary to have them all conform to the general scheme of the
company at that point.
In this way all the public buildings will be well grouped convient to
one another and within easy reach
of every part of what will be the business section  of the  city.
 o	
The Skeena District Agricultural &
Industrial Association will meet tonight to discuss plans for the fair.
* ♦    *
On and after September 1 we sill
for CASH ONLY. Watch our ad. foi
specials.    J. E. Merryfield.
* *     *
The G. T. P. is not the only line
in northern British Columbia that is
requiring labor at the present time.
Sol Cameron, who has the contract
for D. D. Mann's short line at Stewart, has arrived in the city and is
seeking about 250 more men for his
WILL CARRY MAILS
G.T.P.
Will Serve Prince Rupert Free
of Cost to Department.
Officials   Fail   to Reach Sntisfactorj
Arrangement With Government
For the Work
THE CITY'S FIRST MONEY BYLAW
Voting Will Take Place on Monday When Property Owners Have Opportunity to Say Whether They Favor
Taking Over the Telephone System by the City-
Polling at City Hall.
It is good news that the G. T. P.
offices are able to make this week
that mails will reach the city by their
fast steamers pending a settlement of
the difficulties between the company
and the Dominion government in the
matter of the rates to be paid for
carrying the mails regularly. An
agreement has not been reached between the two parties to it, but the
G. T. P. feel that the city of Prince
Rupert should no longer suffer and
accordingly will carry the mails,
charging nothing for so doing, and
not prejudicing the claim for the
renumeration which the company
asks.
Next week the Prince Rupert will
not make the run so that there will
be no mall on Wednesday. The
Prince George will bring a mall Sunday and following next week there
will be a regular twice a week mail'
brought by the steamer.
LEVELLING   STREETS
Tenders Called for and Contracts Should
Soon be Awarded for
Work.
Aid. Mclntyre Wants to Know Why
Second  Avenue  is  Scene of
First Labor
Personals
On .Monday the citizens of Prince
Rupert will have an opportunity of
recording their votes In favor of the
taking over by the municipality of
the telephone system in the city. On
the strength that the bylaw will be
carried the council has made arrangements to take it over. Citizens who
wish to see the telephone owned municipally should not neglect to vote.
If they do they may find when It is
too late that the bylaw has beou qe-
feated and the opportunity has passed to secure it.
There is a general Impression that
if the bylaw is defeated It will be
due to the lethargy of the property-
owners only. The sentiment In the
city, it is felt, is decidedly in favor
of taking over the telephone. All
who favor such a move should make
It a point to record their votes at the
city hall on Monday.
The poll wil) open at 9 a.m. in the
morning and remain open until 7 In
the evening. The clerk, E. A. Woods,
will act as returning officer. The
bylaw Is for the borrowing of $4 0,-
000 to be expended in the purchase
and equipment of the city telephone
system, the debentures to be extended over twenty years.
Those entitled to vote upon the
bylaw are the registered property-
owners only. The list employed in
tiie election is the property-owners
upon the list last used for the election of mayor of the city. Bona fide
property owners who are British subjects of 21 years of age can have
their names added in the prescribed
manner.
.1. H. Pillshtiry is laid up with a
sprained ankle
*     *     *
Mr. Rosevear, auditor of die G,
I'. P. and subsidiary companies, lefl
by the  Prince  Rupert   for the south.
Air. F. C. Clarke, of Vancouver,
spent a couple of days In the city
and left for his home lust night mi
the Prince Rupert.
*    *    *
■I. II. Bacon unci Mrs. Bacon arrived in the city by tin- Prince Rupert
mi her lasl trip. They will make their
home here In the spacious residence
erected by Mr. Bacon mi Fourth avenue.
R. it. Barle, of Battleford, Snsk.,
is imying a visit to Prince Rupert for
the purpose of studying the situation
here. He is quite taken with the city
anil advises putting the streets In
good shape at as early a date as I'
can be done.
The city lias purchased a Cary safe
from G. W. Morrow, who had one for
sale following the going out of business in the meat line.
*     *     *
On Wednesday evening's meeting
ul' tin- city council a resolution was
passed Instructing the mayor to procure a city accountant.
An early start Is to be made on the
street work In section one. The members of the council all seem to be
agreed that no time is to be lost. Accordingly the advertising is being
done and there should be but little
time elapse naw before tenders are
awarded and the work commenced on
Second avenue.
Aid. Mclntyre said his understanding was that work was to be done on
the whole of section one. He could
not see why one part of the section,
Second avenue, should be selected as
a place where work would be done
and other portions left untouched.
His Worship said work must start
somewhere. Second avenue has
permanent sewers and water pipes
on the street. The work was going
forward by the engineers on the other
parts also, and as soon as sewers and
water pipes were laid it would be proceeded with.
Aid. Mclntyre said this argument
was all right if it were not true that
there were water pipes and sewers
paralleling those on Second avenue
on Third avenue.
Aid. Lynch said there were protests from Third avenue respecting
the grades. The work was delayed
to see if any changes would be made
in this matter of grades.
Aid. Mobley moved that the bond
for the carrying out the work deposited by the tenderers should be
ten per cent of the amount of the
contract instead of $2,000 as was at
first suggested. This latter sum
would shut out. many small contractors.
Aid. Lynch said the engineer left
this lo the discretion of the council. The bond representing 2 i/j, per
cent was suggested.
Then the question of the city being
able to proceed with the work until
the engineer was ready with a comprehensive estimate of the whole
work came up for discussion. Some
of the aldermen felt that as the whole
of section one was specified as a local
improvement district it would be impossible to advertise one part of the
work, that on Second avenue, until
all was ready.
; Aid. Naden did not think that according to the act they could separate
one part of the work from the whole
of it. He was anxious to see the
work go on if there was any way out
of it.
His Worship said the thing would
certainly be held tip if all were to
sit down and suggest technicalities.
He favored taking a chance. He did
not think there would be any protests.
Aid. Barrow thought the matter
could be overcome.
Aid. Smith was agreeable to taking
a chance. He thought the engineer
could get plans ready in four days
to cover the work In .sufficient shape
to comply with the laws.
Aid. Pattullo said lie was agreeable
to taking a chance as well as any one
provided It did not render the work
invalid, if there was to lie a change
of fifteen feet in the level of pari c,r
tin- work it would make a dcc-icic-d
change in the cost.
After further debate, ' M Pattullo
moved to ;nh<-i tlse the work for the
whole of section one, and call for
tenders for the work on Second avenue.
Aid. Mclntyre moved thai the ad-
vertlsemenl be Inserted In all the city
papers.
Aid.  Pi Ih. suggested thai when
the city had called for tenders for
publishing the advertisements anil
jthe contracl had been awarded to one
of the papers it was hardly the right
thing to transfer these advertisements now. The columns of the
paper that had obtained the contract
I'm- advertising was looked to now
as .the source, for finding these and
lie did not think It was for the council to change it now.
Aid. Mclntyre said it was import- •
ant that the greatest publicity should
be given to this. This was a thing
of more than ordinary Interest. He
would like to see It advertised not
only In all the local papers, but outside the city. It was a great thing
Hint     there      was      $1,000,000    now
1
(Continued  on   Page  Five) THE PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Friday, August 5, 1910
WHERE MONEY GOES
Financial Situation at Present as Viewed
by the London Economist.
India and Ceylon  12,784,300
South   Africa     2,406,100
Canada     26,518,200
Australasia  7,130,800
Dther British possessions 10,767,200
British Capital Finds Its Way to All
Parts of the World in Various
Channels
The London Economist says: As
the result of general peace, growing
prosperity, confidence and other
favorable conditions, London's new
capital creations have broken all
previous records In point of amount.
For the first quarter of the year the
applications totalled £99,355,000,
and in the second quarter, although
the period began with a four per cent
bank rate, the total was £88,721,400,
an apparent decline but a real Increase, for government issue of $21,-
000,000 exchequer bonds in the first
quarter can hardly be counted as new-
money. In the second quarter the
requirements under nearly im-iji
head exceeded those of the preceding
three months, and th total of £188,-
000,000 for the half-year Is far above
any previous record, although for
the greater part of the time the bank
rate was over three per cent. In
fact, this vast total for the six months
has only been once, In 1908, exceeded
by the capital application for a whole
year. The following table shows the
figures for each quarter in each of
the past three years:
1907
First  quarter    £49,428,600
Second  quarter      40,304,600
Third   quarter       15,631,400
Fourth   quarter       18,265,400
Total    £59,
Foreign countries—
Russia     2
Austria-Hungary     4
Bulgaria     3
Denmark     1,
Norway   	
France    	
Turkey     1
Germany and possessions
Dutch East Indies  4
United States    36
Brazil  10
Argentine     7
Chill     3
Mexico  3
Cuba     1
Philippine Islands   	
Other S. American Rep.. 1
Other  foreign countries. 1
666,600
655,700
.058,000
.603,600
089,000
50,000
220,000
,328,200
736,000
,302,900
,414,600
,808,400
,838,400
,208.700
,655,600
,916,200
50,000
,035,000
,552,500
NEWS OF THE PROVINCE
Items of General Interest From Centres in British Columbia.
Total     £84,522,800
Total    £123,630,000
1908
First  quarter    £45,287,900
Second   quarter       64,385,600
Third   quarter       31,541,800
Fourth   quarter       50,988,400
Total    £192,203,700
1909
First  quarter    £64,238,400
Second   quarter       56,835,200
Third quarter    27,694,400
Fourth  quarter      33,588,800
Total    £182,356,800
1910
First  quarter    £99,355,600
Second   quarter       88,721,400
Total    £183,077,000
The year 1910 is, therefore, bound
to be a conspicuous landmark in the
history of capital applications,
though doubtless there will be some
natural falling off from these marvellous figures In the second half
of the year.
The heavy bond issues of the
American railways have swollen the
total under foreign railways, which
otherwise would have been well below normal. The rubber companies,
which have been springing up like
mushrooms, are mostly quite small,
but they have been so numerous that
their total capital amounted to £16,-
500,000. In the first half of 1909 the
rubebr applications were less than a
million, and the boom Is solely responsible for this increase. The oil
boom, a sturdy parasite, accounts for
over £8,500,000.
The destination of British capital
at the present time provokes a lively
interest among financiers on account
of the controversy about "exports of
capital," which we examined in a
series of articles last winter. Below
we give our usual table, the applications being classified according to
the part of the world where the
money   will  be  employed.
First Half Year, 1910
United  Kingdom—
Total    CLI,887,600
British possessions—
Total half year . . . .£188.522,800
Even if we leave out of account the
Issue of exchequer bonds, the amount
of British capital retained in England exceeded the amount sent to any
other country or colony excepting
only Canada and the United States,
where there are special reasons for
the large sums raised. Canada is
still a large borrower. Rubber companies absorb part of the ten millions odd taken by Brazil. Two
points stand out prominently in the
foreign capital figures. Firstly, there
is the enormous amount which has
gone to finance America, mainly in
the form of railroad bonds. In the
corresponding half of 1909, the
United States took only two millions,
and from this it has risen to thirty-
six millions, a huge sum, which (with
other large amounts taken in short-
term notes) will, it is to be hoped,
prove adequate to the emergency.
The second point is the reduction in
borrowing by those countries which
have acquired reputations as absorbers of capital. Russia has been content with less than two and three-
quarter millions; none of which was
required by the imperial government.
The Argentine government raised no
fresh loans, and the total capital sent
to Argentina was under eight, millions, against over thirteen millions
in the first half of 1909.
Japan has maintained her policy
of economy and raised no fresh loans.
The bulk of the increase in capital
sent abroad will be employed In the
construction of railways and the development of agriculture or industry,
ihe world, therefore, in general, and
the British empire in particular, may
be congratulated on the fact that its
savings for the half-year, so far as
they are represented !»• its greatest
capital- market, have not gone to
finance destructive wars, but rather
to establish and enlarge reproductive
undertakings.
 o	
In Russia one letter in every ten
passing through the post is opened by
the authorities as a matter of course.
Indeed, the postal authorities of
every country have experts who have
raised letter opening to a fine art.
Some kinds of paper can be steamed
open without leaving any traces, and
this simple operation Is finished by
reburnishlng the flap with a boned
instrument. In the case of a seal a
matrix is taken by means of new
bread before breaking the wax. When
other methods fail the envelope is
placed between pieces of wood with
edge projecting one-twentieth of an
inch. The edge of the envelope Is
first flattened, then roughtened and
finally slit open. Later a hair line of
strong white gum is applied and the
edges united under pressure.
 —o	
Love is certainly a contagious
disease. It always makes me sick
to see a young couple In love.
To Rebuild Church
Nanaimo.—Preliminary steps have
been taken toward rebuilding the
Catholic church and St. Ann's convent, which two buildings were destroyed by fire several weeks ago, Involving a loss of over $20,000 with
only $3,000 Insurance. The adherents and friends of the Catholic
church in Nanaimo have taken the
matter up with the assistance of
friends In Victoria and other cities
and have decided to rebuild as soon
as funds are available. With the object of securing funds for this purpose canvassers are now at work in
the city soliciting subscriptions and
are meeting with a very favorable reception. It has not yet. been decided
just what the plans will be for the
new structure, but it is expected the
new buildings will follow something
along the lines of those burned down
Trouble Over Chief
Nelson.—Mayor Selous at a recent
meeting of the council read a document which was in part as follows: —
Gentlemen: I now veto and return
to you for reconsideration the following resolution: "That D. Guthrie be
requested to withdraw his resignation
and that the city endeavor to retain
the services of him as chief of the
fire department." On the 11th of
April last in returning a somewhat
similar resolution to you, I told you
of Chief Guthrie's lapses in the past
and that I had lost confidence In him
as a fire chief on this account. On
Monday, the 4th of July, he sent in
his resignation rather than face an
investigation. I maintain that the
chief of the Nelson fire department
must be absolutely reliable and fit
for duty at all times, and It is our
sworn duty to see than any fire chief
that we may have fulfills this condition.
Aid. McDonald defied the mayor to
get a more reliable man than Guthrie.
In this matter the mayor was opposed to 85 per cent of the people of
Nelson.
Mayor Selous said that in bringing
down this veto he had done what he
considered to be his duty.
Aid. Rutherford sugegsted that the
matter be left for a week, when the
applications should be in. He thought
the chief should put in his application
if he wished to be considered.
In answer to a remark by Aid. McDonald, his worship said he still
claimed, as he claimed before, that
the persons who signed the petlton
of 300 names to retain Chief Guthrie
had not known the full circumstances, that out of kindness as little
has been said about the matter as
possible.
Aid. Wells, speaking as a man who
had a large amount of property at
stake- in case of fire, said he- bettered
he was willing to take what some
he was willing to taek what some
people believed was a chance, on
Guthrie. As for Guthrie putting in
an application, if it came before a
full council It would be turned down
and he would be foolish to put it In.
A motion to sustain the mayor's
veto was lost on the following vote:
For, Aldermen Rutherford, Carrie;
against, Aldermen Wells, Mackenzie,
McDonald.
The clerk was instructed to send
to Chief Guthrie the original letter,
asking him to reconsider his resignation.
eclipse anything ever held on this
coast, both in number and class.
Work on the exhibition grounds Is
still going on at a rapid rate, and the
buildings will all be finished before
the opening day. The Industrial hall
is already completed, and this morning the exhibitors are busy erecting
shelves for their exhibits.
The machinery hall is finished all
but for the painting and this will be
started at once. The hall will be
painted white with cream trimmings,
the same as the Industrial hall. The
work of grading the grounds will
be started this week and every pebble on the Inclosure will be removed
so that the grounds will be In excellent shape when the gates are
opened on August 20.
Great Exhibition
Vancouver.-—At least 2,000 entries
were received at the Vancouver ex-
hitlon association's office Monday
morning, principally dog and poultry
entries, and the association is confident   that   these   two    shows     will
Fires Hinder Mining
Greenwood.—The Jewell mine is
handicapped at starting on account
of destruction by fire of their power
line, which will be repaired as quickly as possible and the opening up
proceeded with.
HAYNOR BROS.
House Furnishers.
Located temporarily, since the fire,
in Diuiediu Block, corner of Second
  Avenue and  Eighth  Street.
I   Some snaps in slightly damaged  goods  which  we  want  to  clear
B out before moving Into new quarters In Manson Blk., Third Ave.
!
FUNERAL FURNISHERS
■iiiiii«iiiiiii
New Lake Steamer
Vernon.—The new C. P. R| steamer Kaleden has made her first trip
between Pentlcton and Okanagan
Falls July 27, carrying 35 passengers. She Is a fine boat, and will
be a great convenience to the residents of the lower Okanagan.
Forest Fires
Nelson.—Forest tires are still
alive and raging throughout this district. So far fire wardens have answered all calls for assistance, but
the demands are increasing. New
fires are breaking out in all directions and fire wardens complain of
the difficulty of coping with the
alarming conditions.
Hall's Siding fire has extended to
the Silver Mine, near Nelson, burned
a number of mine buildings and is
spreading rapidly. Bad fires are reported at many points and if rain
does not follow soon the situation
will again be serious.
Demand For Fish
Vancouver.—A ready market Is
found In Seattle for the large supplies of British Columbia smelt,
port. Most of the smelt are being
which are being shipped to that
caught In the neighborhood of Vancouver, the Canadian Fisheries,
Limited, handling the greater portion
of the catch.
Though the supplies shipped to
Seattle recently have been very
heavy, the market prl&« for various
reasons has fluctuated only to a
slight extent. Onere ason given for
this Is that the St. Paul, Milwaukee
& Pnget Sound and the Oregon &
Washington lines are making special
efforts to place the Canadian smelt
in the interior centres.
It fs said by men experienced in
the movement of fish supplies at the
Sound port that these railroads have
issued instructions to their express
agents all along their routes to use
every effort to encourage the sale of
smelt and other fish In the territory
allotted to them. The railroad
agents are safd to have been so successful in carrying out instructions
that an unusually brisk demand has
beeen created, though local market
prices have remained the same as If
the British Columbia smelt had never
entered into competition with those
caught at Utalcdy, Coupeville, Johnson's Point and Olympla.
Grand Trunk Pacific Steamships
for VANCOUVER, VICTORIA, SEATTLE.
Connecting   with   Eastbound   Trains
"Prince Rupert" sails every Thursday, 8.30 p.m.
"Prince  George"   sails  every Monday 8.30 p.m.   .
FOR STEWART:
"Prince Rupert" sails Wednesdays 8 p.m.
"Prince George"  sails  Sundaye at 8 p.m.
Steamer for Masset, Kincolltli.N'aas   Bay  and   Port  Simpson,  Sundays, I p.m.
For Skldegate,  Queen Charlotte City,   and   other   Moresby Island
points, Wednesday, 1 p.m., returning via Queen Charlotte City.
Tickets, reservations and Information    from
A. E. McMASTER
Freight and  Passenger Agent, G. T. P. Wharf.
9 A
D. D. MANN'S POSITION
*
* *
.,. ************** 999999*99999999999999 ****** •:• *•:•***•;•**•:•*
At the banquet tendered him In
Stewart a few days ago, D. D. Mann
made a speech that may be taken as
explaining his attitude towards the
northern country which he has Invaded.    He said:—
Mr. Chairman and Citizens of Stewart.—I wish to thank you for the enthusiastic way In which you have received the toast, and I also wish to>
say that I am very glad to be your
guest tonight.
While this is not much to say in
appreciation of the first banquet in
the town of Stewart, I hope you will
receive it in the way the preacher
visiting a mining camp did his first
cocktail. He said he did not care
very much for the cherry, but he
did appreciate the spirit In which It
was offered.
Everything seems to be moving
rapidly here, and as labor is scarce,
there Is a great deal evpected from
the men who do the work. I met a
man on the hills the other day who
was chopping wood at the camp, and
asked him how he was getting aloug.
"Oh," said he, "the boss Is very unreasonable. Why he first asked me
to chop a tree down, and then asked
men to chop it up again."
This townslte of Stewart, at the
head of the Portland Canal, is In my
opinion, one of the finest situated for
a city that I have ever seen. The fact
that Portland Canal, as the chairman stated, Is at the head of naviga»
tion, means, if history repeats itself,
that this will be one of the greatest
commercial ports In the world. Take
large cities like London and Liverpool, for instance, on the other side,
and Montreal In Eastern Canada, all
are at the head of navigation, and
this being the most northerly port in
"It's hard for a man to get along
without a woman." "There's only
one thing harder." "What?" "To
get  along with  one."
promise to make great shipping properties in the near future.
Whether the railroad that I am
building will go through the Bear
river pass or cot, I am not prepared
to say. A man should be very careful in making statements that he cannot carry out. I will say this much,
however, that reports In regard to
the Pass are very favorable, and next
month I intend to send out a corps
of engineers to Investigate the Pass,
and I hope to be able to build
through it and on east to connect
with all the great railway lines that
reach the Atlantic Coast, also north
to the Yukon and Alaska.
We must realize that great interest is being taken in this country by
many nations of the earth, and it is
important that when capitalists come
to Stewart to invest that they get a
sqnare deal, and that there will be
none of the trickery that has often
been perpetrated in new mining
camps. It will be the duty of every
businessman who has the interest of
the place at heart to give to any Investor the best advice and Information he can in regard to mining property. With regard to real estate, an
Investor can see for himself, to a
certain extent.
I have spent the last thirty years
of my life in pushing back the fringe
of civilization west and north,
(cheers.) During that time I have
been a pioneer In nearly every sense
of the word. When I reached Winnipeg on Christmas, 1879, It was in
advance of railway construction.
With my own hands I prepared the
railroad ties which carried the first
locomotive over the Canadian Pacific
railway Into that city. Now I have
come to the Pacific Coast to help you
pioneers push the fringe of clvlllza-
British Columbia should be the dis-.|tton eastward, and I assure you that
we hope to do it.
I can only add, gentlemen, In conclusion, that I am proud to be your
guest tonight.
tnbuting point for the whole northern frontier.
I have been asked very often why
I am building this railway. It is because we have an ocean port at one
end of it and a mining country at the
other. There is an ideal transportation proposition. In addition to that,
over In the Naas river valley, I am
informed, Is a good farming country with an abundant supply of coal
which we hope to reach with this railway in the near future.
Since arriving In your town I have [ cream sauce made as follows: One
been up In the hills and have seen'cupful of milk (or half milk and half
some very promising mining pros-! water), sugar, bit of butter, a little
pects, and I have also seen mines'vanilla. Thicken with tablespoon-
faii'ly    well    developed    and which   j ful of corn starch.    Serve hot.
Rice Pudding II.—Put one scant
cupful of rice into rice cooker. Cover
with one pint of water, cook until
water is absorbed, remove to pudding
dish, add a pinch of salt, sugar to
taste, a dash of vanilla or cinnamon,
and a few bits of butter. Put In
oven  and 1 bake.     Serve  warm  with
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•   -        *   *   •   *...   •   • V »   »* ..' *.* ... ... *.' ... .1, * «, » <T» . . . . ....... ... ..,%»..*. .*«**« ...
Comer 2nd Avenue and 6th Street Corne^2nf[ Avenue and 6th Street Corner 2nd Avenue and 6th Street Corner 2nd Avenue and 6th Street     !
We Are Busy Arranging Our 5c and 10c Tables
Wo have sold thu bulk of some patterns of Dinner Sets find wo we almost f«'ivin<? the res) away.       .lust selliiitr un ar-tir-le fm- V «,. in„ fi,„+ ,       i ^ HH
.-, ui^u, iui ou 01 iijc mat may be worth as much as 40c or 50c
 IF YOU ARE SHORT OF ANYTHING IN THIS UNE IT WILL PAY YOU TO STOCK UP— —
Bric-a-Brac
';{. This is where we shine.    There are Figures of many kinds, Vases,
* in variety, I r edlscent Glass Trays,  Cups  Mugs,    all   of   which   we  are
9 marking down.
L
REMEMBER
WE  Ann
COMPLETE   HOUSE   FURNISHERS
7fg
Glassware
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
We are cutting these on some lines  we don't Intend to carry and
some broken sets.
There are WATER SETS and GOBLETS, and about 26 kinds of TUMBLERS.      We carry so many and sell them so cheap that you can't help but buy when you see them *
WE ARE CUTTING THE CUT GLASS DEPARTMENT.   WE OFFER CUT GLASS AT CUT PRICES f
|   Opposite the Theatre    THE BIG FURNITURE STORE    Opposite the Theatre J
;.wwww*wwwww**wwwwwww*wwwwwwww ' * Friday, August 5, 1910
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
****** ww***w*<K>* ♦*♦*•:•*••
* *
+     Hints for the Home     %
Fresh meat should never be al
lowed to remain In paper. It ab-
Borbs the juices.
Calico shrinks In the washing.
When making it up, allow one Inch
in the yard for this.
Never rinse lace In blue water,
It entirely spoils the color. Many
people rinse it finally in skim milk,
to give it the exact shade.
Store soap for a month before
using. Cutit into pieces and pile
up In a dry place so that the air
can get to it.
A joint of meat may be kept
sweet for many dayes lo wrapped In
vinegar and hung in the air.
In case of fire a wet silk handkerchief tied over the nose and mouth
is a complete security against suffocation from smoke.
Ink stains on a white silk blouse
can be removed. Make a paste of
salt and lemon-juice and lay it on
the stains, and they will soon disappear.
Cotton dresses and petticoats
and other starched goods should
not. be put away till next year with
the starch in thein. Wash them
and rough dry them, and then they
will not rot.
'of  granulated  sugar  In   t>   .mum  of
Jabots Hints.—Dissolve a pinch
of granulated sugar in a basin of
water and wring the articles out in
it. Roll them in a cloth and let them
lie for half an hour. When ironed
they will look like new.
An Inexpensive disinfectant for a
sick room can be made as follows:
Put some ground coffee in a saucer
and In the middle place a small
piece of camphor gum. Light the gum
with a match. As the gum allows the
coffee to burn with It the smell is
most refreshing and healthful.
To keep light colored summer
dresses and stockings pretty and
fresh looking, purchase packages of
any standard dye, as many colors as
you have different dresses. iDssolve
each dye In about a quart of boiling
water, and when cool bottle. When
washing your pink or blue dress add
a few drops, or sufficient to make
the desired color of the pink or blue
dye as the case may be, to the last
rinsing water. Just as a few drops of
bluing added to the rinsing water
will benefit white goods, so this
compound will restore the faded
dress to its original brightness. The
dresses muBt be hung to dry in a
shady place.
VISITING   ALASKA
Distinguished   Party   of    Politicians
From U. S. On Way North
A distinguished party of American
statesmen are now on the way north
The leading members are Mr. George
W. Wickersham, attorney-general of
the United States, and Mr. Charles
Nagel, secretary of the department
of commerce and labor. They were
accompanied by Mr. H. H. Stevens,
private secretary to Mr. Nagel; Dr.
W. E. Flschell and J. S. Lioneberger,
of St. Louis, and Charles Coolridge,
of Boston, the two last named being
nephews of Hon. Mr. Nagel.
They came north by the steamer
Albatross. Their mission to Alaska,
It is said, It at the request of President Taft to investigate political conditions.
Mr. Nagel spoke freely in Vancouver before sailing.
"We are on our way to Alaska on
more of a pleasure trip than anything else," he said, "but I want to
tell you that Canada is a great country and is destined to cut no mean
part in the history of nations before
many years. With its great grain-
growing belt, fruit lands and mineral
resources there is nothing that can
keep It from becoming a dictator in
the commercial world." He added
that he was never more surprised in
his life than to see such a metropolis
as Vancouver when landing there.
Mr. Nagel spoke in warm praise of
President Taft. He said that no fair-
minded man would now deny that his
policy had been a success. He was
absolutely sure that he was acting
right before he made a move, and he
believed that his administration
would prove to be one of the bes
1 the country had ever had. The Payne
tariff was one of the best revenue
producers the country had ever
known, though its duties were several
per cent below the Democratic Wilson tariff. It was absurd to say that
the high cost of living was due to the
tariff, as that was universal and not
confined to the United States. Mr.
Nagel thought that the greatest immediate benegt from the completion
of the Panama canal would be the increased trade with South America,
and he thought it behooved the merchants not only of the United States
but also of rBltish Columbia to gel
busy and study conditions there.
LOCATION OF THE
FIRE  ALARM  BOXES
No. 1.-
enue.
No. 2.-
enue.
No.
-Fifth street and Third av-
-Slxth street and Third av-
3.—Seventh street and Third
avenue.
No.   4.—Eighth    street   and   Third
avenue.
No. 5.—Junction of First and Second avenues.
No.  6.—Dominion Hotel.
No.  7.—Eighth street and Second
avenue.
No. 8.—Seventh street and Second
avenue.
No.   9.—Sixth  street  and   Second
avenue.
No.  10.—Centre  street  and First
avenue.
No. 11.—G. T. P. dock.
No. 12.—Front of the Government
building.
No. 13.—Second street and Second
avenue.
No.  14.—First    avenue   and    Mr.
Bride  street.
No.  15.—Third "avenue   and   McBride street.
No. 16—Fulton Hotel.
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that John Cherry,
of Victoria, B. C., occupation mattress maker, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-east corner and about 14 miles
distant In a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence west 80 chains, thence
south 80 chains, thence east 80
chains, thence north 80 chains to
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
JOHN CHERRY.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 3, 1910. Jy8
One of the strangest difficulties
the railway people experienced in
Korea was due to the fact that the
native poor insisted upon using the
tracks as a sleeping-place on warm
nights. The Asiatics do not use a
soft pillow, such as we employ, since
that would disturb the hair which in
China and Korea, as in feminine
Japan, Is put up with great care and
some expense, and is expected to last
several days. A hard frame of
wood is therefore used, on which the
neck rests. A tomato-can affords an
excellent substitute for a pillow for
a poor man. The cool iron rails, so
neatly shaped in regulation pillow
pattern, seemed just suited for use,
and were quite alluring on a hot
night.
 o	
Caller—Is Mrs. Brown at home?
Artless Parlormaid (smiling confidentially)—No, na'am—she really
is out this afternoon.
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Brenton
Brown, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation insurance agent, intends to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands in the vl-
vinity of the Kltwancool or Chean
Wein Valley:—Commencing at a
post planted at the north-east corner and about ten miles distant in
a north-westerly direction from the
north end of Kltwancool Lake,
thence south 80 chains, thence east
80 chains, thence north 80 chains,
thence west 80 chains to point of
commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
BRENTON BROWN.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 1, 1910. Jy8
LAND PURCHASE  NOTICES
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Reginald
Davey, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation machinist, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands, in the vicinity of
tltwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-west corner and about 6>4
miles distant in a north-westerly direction from the north end of Kitwancool Lake, thence south 80
chains, thence east 80 chains, thence
north 40 chains, thence west 40
chains, thence north 40 chains,
chains, thence west 40 chains to a
point of commencement, and containing 480 acres (more or less).
REGINALD   DAVEY.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated  May 30,  1910. Jy8
Coast Land District—District of
Skeena.
TAKE NOTICE that Elijah
Rounds, of Victoria, B.C., occupation
Stewart, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted one-half mile north,
and one-half mile east, of Nettie A.
Lairds N. E. corner of application to
purchase, and 300 feet east of Ana-
ham Lake trail, marked E. R.'s
south-west corner, thence 40 chains
east, thence 40 chains north, thence
40 chains west, thence 40 chains
south to point of commencement,
and containing 160 acres, more or
less. ELIJAH   ROUNDS.
Vincent M.   Schibner, Agent.
Dated May 25, 1910. jn2l
LAND PURCHASE  NOTICE
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Sarah Ward,
of Victoria, B. C., occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands In the vicinity of Kltwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. E. corner and about 22 milec distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north 80 chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence south 80
chains, thence east SO chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or .ess.
SARAH WAR!).
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 6th, 1110 Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that George Mc-
Bain, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
merchant, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. W. corner and about 26% miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north 80 chains, thence
east 80 chains, thence south 80
chains, thence west 80 chains to
point of commencement, and containing (140 acres, more or less.
GEORGE McBAIN.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 8th, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Jessie Stead-
man, of Victoria, B. C, occupation
married woman, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following described lands, in the vicinity of
Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley.—
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-east corner • and about 6%
miles distant in a north-westerly direction from the north end of Kitwancool Lake, thence south 80
chains; thence west 80 chains, thence
north 80 chains, thence east 80
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 640 acres, more or
less. JESSIE STEADMAN.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated May 31,  1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassia
TAKE NOTICE that Bruce Older-
shaw, of Victoria,. B. C, occupation
jeweller, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of the
Citwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at
he north-west corner and about 7 %
miles distant in a north-westerly direction from the north end of Kitwancool Lake; thence south 80
chains, thence east 40 chains, thence
north 80 chains, thence west 40
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 320 acres, more or
less. BRUCE OLDERSHAW.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated May 31, 1910. Jy8
Skeena' Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Echo Dudgeon, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
assistant dentist, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of the
Kltwancool or Chean Wein Valley:
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-east corner and about 7 %
miles distant in a north-westerly direction from the north end of Kitwancool Lake, thence south 80
chains, thence north 80 chains,
thence east 80 chains to point of
commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
ECHO DUDGEON,
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated May 31, 1910. Jy8
LAXI) PURCHASE NOTICES
Skeena Laud District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that William
Hume Grant, of Stewart, B.C., occupation engineer, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a
post marked W.II.G.'s S.W. Cor., and
planted adjoining Alfred Hanson's
corner post, thence 80 chains north,
along W. N. Harrison's west line,
thense east 80 chains, thence soutii
80 chains, thence west 80 chains, following Alfred Mnnson's north line to
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
WILLIAM HUME GRANT.
Frank R. Strolm, Agent.
Dated July 2, 1910. Jy22
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that The Canadian
Fish and Cold Storage Company, of
Vancouver, B. C, occupation mercantile and manufacturing, Intends
to apply for permission to purchase
the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-east corner of lot 34, Range 5,
Coast District, thence south 20
chains, thence east 40 chains, thence
north 25 chains more or less to the
shore line, thence following along
the shore line to the point of commencement and containing 90 acres,
more or less.
The  Canadian  FiBh  & Cold
Storage Company Limited.
J. H. Pillsbury, Agent.
Dated July 14, 1910. Jyl9
Skeena Land District—District of
O&ssiflr
TAKE NOTICE 'that William
Simpson, of Lindsay, Ont., occupation hotel-keeper, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of the Kitwancool or Chean Weln
Valley:—Commencing at a post
planted at the south-east corner and
about 7% miles distant in a north
westerly direction from the north
end of Kitwancool Lake, thence
north 80 chains, thence west 80
chains, thence south 80 chains,
thence east 80 chains to point of
commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
WILLIAM SIMPSON.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated  May 31,  1910. JyS
LAND PURCHASE NOTICES
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Catherine
Welsh, of Vancouver, H. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands in the vi-
vinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein
Valley:—Commencing at a post
planted at the S. E. corner and about
17% miles distant in a north-westerly direction from the north end of
Kitwancool Lake, thence north 80
chains, thence west 80 chains, thence
south 80 chains, thence east 80
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 640 acres, more or
less. CATHERINE   WELSH.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 4, 1910. Jy8
LAND PURCHASK NOTICES
LAM) PURCHASE NOTICES
Skeena Land District—District of
Ccissitir
TAKE NOTICE that Frederick
Tutt, of Selkirk, Manitoba, occupation merchant, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. W. corner about 14% miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north 40 chains, thence
east 40 chains, thence south 40
chains, thence west 40 chains to
point of commencement, and containing 160 acres, more or less.
FREDERICK   TUTT.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 3, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Oil SB] '11*
TAKE NOTICE that Henry Van
Wyck, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation hotel keeper, Intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein
Valley: — Commencing at a post
planted at the north-east corner and
about 20 miles distant in a northwesterly direction from the north end
of Kitwancool Lake, thence soutii SO
chains, thence west 80 chains, thence
north 80 chains, thence east 80
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 640 acres, more or
less. HENRY VAN WYCK.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated   June   6th,   1910. JyS
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Minnie Clarke
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. W. corner and about 28% miles
distant and in a north-westerly direction from the north end of Kitwancool Lake, thence south 40 chains
thence east 80 chains, thence north
40 chains, thence west 80 chains to
point of commencement and containing 320  acres, more or less.
MINNIE  CLARKE.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated  June  8th,  1910. Jy8
JOB PRINTING
LETTER HEADS ENVELOPES
BUSINESS CARDS
VISITING CARDS      STATEMENTS
Prince Rupert Journal
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that John Grieve,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
agent, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wien Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. E. corner and about 20 miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north 80 chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence soutii 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to
point of comemncement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
JOHN GRIEVE.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 6th, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Leihi Cherry,
of Victoria, B. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at tne
S. E. corner and about 21 miles distant In a north-westerly direction
from Ihe north end of Kltwancool
Lake, thence north SO chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence soutii SO
chains, thence east 80 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
LEIHI  CHERRY.
James W. Smith,' Agent.
Dated June 6th, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land  District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE unit Alfred E.
Partington, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation broker, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of
Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. E. corner and about 15% miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north 80 chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence soutii 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to the
point of commencL-ment, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
ALFRED E. PARKINGTON.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 3, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that George Williams, of Winnipeg, Man., occupation
clerk, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool
or Chean Wein Valley:—Commencing at a post planted at the S. W.
corner and about 16% miles distant
in a north-westerly direction from
the north end of Kitwancool Lake,
thence north 4 0 chains, thence
east 40 chains, thence soutii 40
chains, thence west 40 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 160 acres, more or less.
GEORGE WILLIAMS.
James W.  Smith,  Agent.
Dated June  4,  1910.    ■ Jy8
Skeena Land District—District ot
TAKE NOTICE that Edward Cas-
pell, of Cayley, Alberta, occupation
merchant, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of the
Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. W. corner and distant about 15%
miles in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence south 80 chains, thence
east 80 chains, thence north 80
chains, thence west 80 chains to
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
EDWARD CASPELL.
James W.  Smith, Agent.
Dated June 3, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that George Tutt,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation dcn-
ist, Intends to apply for permission
o purchase the following described
anils in the vicinity of the Kitwancool or Chean Weln Valley:—Commencing at a post planted at tho
north-east corner and about 8%
miles distant in a north-westerly di-
rection from the north end of Kilwancool Lake, thence south 40
chains, thence west 40 chains, thenco
north 40 chains, thence east 40
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 640 acres, more or
less. GEORGE TUTT.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 1,  1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District-—District of
Pjl oof O ft
TAKE NOTICE that Lome Thompson, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
dentist, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of the
Kltwancool or Chean Weln Valley:
Commencing at a post planted at the
south-west corner and about 8%
miles distant in a north-westerly direction from the north end of Kltwancool Lake, thence north 80
chains, thence east 40 chains, thence
south 80 chains, thence west 40
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 320 acres, more or
less. LORNE THOMPSON.
James W, Smith, Agent.
Dated June 1,  1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Charles Gei-
ger, of Victoria, b. C, occupation
clerk, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands In the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Comemncing at a post planted at the
S. E. corner and about 19 miles distant In a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kltwancool
Lake, thence north 80 chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence south 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
CHARLES GIEGER.
James W.  Smith, Agent.
Dated June 4th, 1.910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Samuel John
McDtarmid, of Monarch, Alberta, occupation farmer, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following described lands in the Kitwancool or Chean Weln Valley:—Commencing at a post planted at the N.
E. corner and about 4% miles in a
north-westerly direction from the
north end of Kitwancool Lake,
thence south 80 chains, thence west
80 chains, thence north SO chains,
thence east 80 chains to point of
commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
SAMUEL JOHN McDIARMID.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated May 31st, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Sarah Cox,
of Monarch, Alberta, occupation married woman, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands in Ihe Kltwancool or
Chean Wien Valley:—Commencing nt
a post planted at the N. W. corner
and about 4% miles distant In a
north-westerly direction from the
north end of Kltwancool Lake, thence
soutii 80 chains, thence east 80
chains, thence north 80 chains,
thence west 80 chains to point of
commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
SARAH COX.
James W. Smith, Agent
Dated May 31st, 1910.
Coast Land District—District of
Skeena.
TAKE NOTICE that I, George A.
Poole, of Prince Rupert, occupation
printer, Intend to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted on the north-east shore
line of Smith Island, distant about
one mile south-east from Lot 38, and
marked "G. A. P.'s North-west Corner Post," thence 20 chains south,
thence 80 chains east, thence north
to shore line, thence following shore
line to point of commencement, containing 160 acres, more or less.
GEORGE ARTHUR POOLE.
Dated Saturday, July 2, 1910.
(First insertion July 5.)
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiui.
TAKE NOTICE that Thomas Sills,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation machinist, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kltwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at'a post planted at the
N. W. corner and about 26% miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence south 80 chains, thence
east 80 chains, thence north 80
chains, thence west 80 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
THOMAS  SILLS.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 8th, 1910. JyS
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that John Reid,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
broker, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. W. corner and about 15% miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north 40 chains, thence
east 40 chains, thence south 40
chains, thence west 40 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing  160  acres,  more or less.
JOHN REID.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated  June  3,   11)10. Jy8
Skeena Land  District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Grace Cess-
ford, of Victoria, B. C, occupation
married woman, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of
Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. E. corner and about 23 miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence south 80 chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence north 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 64 0 acres, more or less.
GRACE CESSFORD.
James W, Smith, Agent
Dated June Cth, 1910. JyS
Skeena Land  District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that William Wal
lace,  of Toronto,   Ont.,     occupation
insurance agent, Intends lo apply for
permission to purchase th< follov,mg|
diseribed lands in the vie' tlty of Kltwancool   or   Chean   Wein   Valley:—
Comencing at a post planted al the
N.  E.  corner and  about  26%   nillosj
distant in a north-westerly dime! on
from   the  north   end  of   Kltwancool
Luke, thence south SO chains, thence
west    80  chains,    thence    north   80;
chains, thence east SO chains to the
point of commencement, containing
040  acres,  more or less.
WILLIAM  WALLACE!
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated  June  8th,  1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Annie Gowan,
of Victoria, B. C, occupation married woman, intendB to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of Kltwancool or Chean Weln Valley:—-
Commencng at a post planted at the
N. W. corner and about 23 miles distant In a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kltwancool
Lake; thence south SO chains, thence
east 80 chains, thence north 80
chains, thence west SO chains to theiihence
point of commencement,   and    con
Skeena Land  District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Henry Hemming, of Victoria, B. C, occupation
hotel keeper, intends lo apply for
permission io purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of Kltwancool or Chean Weln Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
X. E. corner and about 21 miles ells-
tant, in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kltwancool
Lake, (hence south 80 chains, thence
west SO chains, thence north 80
chains, thence east SO chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
HENRY  HEMMING.
JameB W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 6th, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Nelson
Cowen, of Victoria, B. C, occupation mining engineer, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands in the vicinity of Kltwancool or Chean Weln
Valley:—Commencing at a post
planted at the N. E. corner and about
19 miles distant In the north-westerly direction from the north end of
Kltwancool Lake thence south 80
chains, thence west 40 chains, thence
north 40 chains, thence west 40
chains, thence north 40 chains,
east 80 chains to point of
commencement,  and  containing  480
lalnlng 640 acres, more or less. [acres, more or less,
ANNIE GOWAN. NELSON   GOWEN.
James W. Smith, Agent.' James W. Smith   Agent
Dated June 7th, 1910. Jy8       Dated June 4th,  1910. Jyj PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Friday, August o, 1910
;
,    , _, Everyone wanted to know where and
|&ntlCC   HlipCrt    ^(OUnial  when to buy and what the prospects
^^r^^r^^^r^r—^—T———^——  were.
"The only trouble," he added, "is
that they are not given long enough
options.     If  the  holders  here  would
Published twice a week on Tuesdays
ami Fridays from the oilice of publication, Thii'd Avenue near McBride St.
Subscription rate to any point in
Canada, $2.00 a year; to points oulside
of Canada, 83.00 a year.
Advertising rate furnished on application.
O. H. NELoON,
EllITOtt.
Friday, August 5, 1910
STREET KENT
The regulation passed by the city
council relative to collecting a rate
from those who make use of the
streets during construction on buildings was, we believe, ill advised legislation. It Is true the tax proposed
to be levied Is only nominal, but this
in itself should be sufficient argument
against imposing It at all. It will
bring little or nothing Into the coffers
of the city, will be exceedingly difficult to keep tab on, and will lead to
all kinds of little vexatious complications with little or nothing to show
for it in the end. Upon some one
must fall the duty of keeping a check
upon the amount to be collected, and
the time wasted in so doing might,
we are inclined to think, be far better
employed in some other direction. If
we do not misjudge the sentiment of
the people of this city they would
rather see the streets blocked up to
some exicrit. by those engaged in improving property than in having nothing doing. We do not believe that
the proposed charge will affect in
the least the amount of building that
is done. The fees are too small for
that. It Is the fact of its being a
very light charge that we believe that
it might with advantage be forgotten.
We are inclined, in fact, to believe
that it will stand on the orders of
the city hall without any attention
being paid to it, and that it will be
liable to become a dead letter. It
would have been better, therefore, to
have omitted the regulation.
i allow the English promoters to have
1 longer options they would have a
much better chance of closing deals,
as then the agents could form companies io handle lilt- i (.positions. As
it is now with the trout distance between the timb-v lands and the
I money markets the options generally
i demanded do not give a sufficient
opportunity for the creation of companies to make purchases.
Although Mr. Loewen arrived in
England during the financial slump
following upon the death of the late
King Edward, he found slight difficulty In Interesting the British financiers in this province. Indeed, they
were only too ready to make Investigations and inquiries. The rubber
slump and the lull In American Investment following the drop In Wall
street stocks did nothing more than
make the capitalists slightly timid
about investment across the ocean for
the time being, but they remained
quite eager to learn all they could
about profitable channels for the
placing of money, especially in Brit-
is'i Columbia and its timber lands.
 o	
PUBLICITY   MOVE
Public Meeting is to be Held Tonight
to Advance Interests of City
IS IT JOHN OLIVER?
Sir Wilfrid Laurier was asked by
a delegation on his present tour of
the west to appoint a Western farmer
to the Railway Commission in the
place of Mr. Greenway. Sir Wilfrid
promised that the matter would receive early attention, and added "I
promise that he will be a Western
man and a member of the farming
community." The position has long
been vacant.
The claims of John Oliver, if he
would be agreeable to accept the position, might be considered paramount
for such a place as the railway commission. He would bring industry
and a vast fund of general knowledge
and common sense to the position.
i o	
INFLUENCE OF  PRINCE  RUPERT
A few days ago T. Drysdale Veitch,
manager of the Royal Bank In Victoria, paid a visit to this city. The
trip north was undertaken by him for
She purpose of seeing the northern
part of the Pacific coast before leaving the city of Victoria to take the
management of the Royal Bank in
Halifax. To friends whom he met in
this city he expressed his pleasure
at having visited It and was glad he
had not gone east before seeing what
the north had to offer.
Now comes the announcement that
he has changed his mind and has declined the offer of the Halifax branch.
He is going to stay in the west. Undoubtedly It was Prince Rupert that
did it. A position Is to. be found for
Mr. Veitch in the west and his many
friends on the coast will be delighted
that it is so, for he was a general
favorite,
INVESTING IN PROVINCE
Vancouver  Promoter   Has   Returned
From  Europe  Willi  Funds
Bringing back the news that he has
formed a company in England of half
a million sterling capitalization, having as Its object investment in this
province, Mr. Charles J. Loewen, of
the Vancouver firm of Loewen & Harvey, has returned from Europe, Mr.
Loewen Btates that the capital of the
organization was almost completely
underwritten before he left Great
Britain and it was the Intention to
commence Investing in about two
months. Securities of all sound descriptions will be taken up; while
timber will also likely figure In the
financial operations of the new company to be represented by his firm.
During his five months' visit to
Europe, Mr. Loewen was also successful in sending back a considerable
quantity of capital to Vancouver for
the purchase of timber lands and general securities. The enquiry in England about British Columbia timber
he says, was something astounding.
The public meeting called by the
Publicity Club for this evening, of
which an advertisement apears in another column, should be well attended, as no doubt it will be. Everyone
in these days is interested in publicity and it has come to be regarded as the great archimedeau lever for
all enterprises, whether those of
private individuals or civic communities.
Prince Rupert has greater need of
having its advantages and resources
widely known than most other places
because they are so manifestly superior. From the enquiries reaching
The Journal it would appear that
nearly all that is known of Prince
Rupert is that it is a new town," one
of any number of new towns springing up everywhere, and that it is on
a railroad. Too little is known of
the greatness which lies In its Immediate future, or of the sure foundations upon which this greatness is
to be built.
The Publicity Club has no doubt
done something In this regard, but
much, very much remains to be done,
and the new plans promised to be
made known at the meeting tonight
will meet with large and liberal support If they^are laid upon lines broad
enough to blazon the advantages of
Prince Rupert broadcast over the
continent.
 o	
THE SIKH RELIGION
"There is no caste in the world to
which we go, therefore there should
be no caste In this world," said Mr.
Hery Singh, B. Sc, of Edinburgh
university, In a recent lecture in the
Sikh temple, Falrvlew, near Vancouver, when he took for his topic, "The
Tenets of the Sikh Religion."
"This idea of brotherhood is one of
the foundation stones of Sikhlsm,"
said the speaker. "The accident of
chance or birth, or the achievement
of worldly ambition may create an
outward semblance of difference between man and man, but the Sikh
disregards ail such artificial and temporal disparities, and holds the man
in plain attire in equal reverence
with him who clothes himself in rich
apparel."
Sikhlsm, according to the speaker,
Is a religion of action. Every action
is the result of some bygone action,
and will in its turns engender another action and so on. In fact, actions are the links in the great chain
of existence, each being forged after
the image of its predecessor and affording a pattern for the one which
Is to follow. If a man finds that his
deeds are evil, then the trend of
these deeds must be altered by the
power of right thinking. On this
point the Sikhs lay special signili-
cance, Thoughts of tenderness, of
brotherllness and love, of beauty and
purity Ingrain themselves In the
nature of him who seeks and entertains them.
"It is natural for man to love God,
for rpan comes from God," said the
lecturer, in illustration of which fact
he recited the following lines:
"O man! love God as the lotus loves
the water;
The more it is beaten by the waves
The  more  Its love  Is  excited.
Having  received   Its   life  from  the
water,
It dies without the water."
The religion of the Sikhs was not
originally a militant religion, said the
speaker, but after dire persecutions
this characteristic was forced upon
them. As a consequence they evolved
themselves  Into a race of warriors.
Fighting against Britain they won
her respect, and lighting for her the;
have gained her gratitude. Speaking
of them General Gordon had said:
"They (the Sikhs) stand out prominently as men of action, who have
preserved inherited racial characteristics foreign to Orientals, and evolved themselves by the strength of
their own arms into one of the finest
military types to be found anywhere."
 o	
HISTORY OF BOER WAR
Official Record of Events Connected
With it Has Been Prepared
Eight years have passed since
peace was declared in South Africa
and the fourth and last volume of the
official history of the war has been
published. Some military men with a
historic sense would have preferred
even later date for the publication
looking for the lapse of time to give
a truer view of the war as a whole,
but the lessons to be Imparted to a
rising generation of soldiers were too
valuable to brook longer delay, and
the history Is now complete:
The preparation of this official history has proved not only a long but a
costly business. It began when the
late Colonel Henderson and Captain
Maurice Grant made a tour uv tne
battlefields in 1902, passed through
an interval when General Maurice
took up the work with a large staff,
and has now ended with the produc
tion of the fourth volume by Captain
Grant, with,the aid of two assistants.
Captain Grant, as "Linesman," had
already unofficially written brilliant
accounts of the war.
Up to the most recent estimate the
history had cost $169,500, and some
addition to that has since been made.
Few outside the circle engaged can
have any idea of the stupendous labor
involved in the production of an official history, which must be absolutely accurate in every tiny detail. Tons
of documents have been sorted, in-;
dexed and filed; hundreds of thoir-
sands of reports, letters, orders and
despatches have been examined and
reduced to a form in which they
could be used for reference.
Twenty massive tomes relatm& tv
the operations in different parts of
South Africa during the final guerilla
warfare represent the precis alone
from which the fourth volume was
prepared. Included in these are notes
and transcripts of the most valuable
material a historian could have at
his disposal—the private letters and
mays of commanding officers, staff
officers and all ranks down to the intelligent private. Written hot and
fresh after the events, they give accurate and often brilliant impressions
of the smallest episodes, as well as
the great battles. Some were so confidential that no note could be made
of them, and the originals, after
perusal, had to be returned instantly;
but ait were .'reely offered bv the
owners In ord :r that the historian
might draw a true and final picture.
In the search for accuracy minute
and, to the civilian, apparently unnecessary detail gave the most trouble. There were officers with the
same names, officers holding temporary ranks; there were dozens of
places duplicated. AH these had to
be accurately stated, with an infinite
number of dates and statistics.
The result has been a triumph of
accuracy. In the four volumes not
a single mistake has been detected,
even to the Initial of a subordinate
officer or the location of one of a
doezn places ow the same name. This
is, after all, perhaps not surprising
when it is known that every proof
was submitted for revision to officers
and privates engaged in the events
narrated.
The four volumes contain together
2,603 pages and were issued as follows: Pages. Issued
Volume  I       526 1906
Volume   II    '..   701 1907
Volume III       609 1908
Volume IV       767 1910
In addition there are four cases
containing sixty-four maps, prepared
by the ordnance survey at Southampton. These are also marvels of accuracy and immense labor devolved
upon the historian who had to supply
the detail  to the mapniakers.
Begun under the direction of the
war office the history passed two
years ago under the direction of the
committee of imperial defense, the
head of which Is Admiral Sir Charles
Ottley, which is also engaged upon
the production of an official British
history of the Russo-Japanese war.
The circulation of the South African war history has not yet been
made public. When Its publication
was first announced some 10,000 subscribers were received, but It is
doubtful whether this total will be
finally reached. The volumes are
finding their way Into the libraries
of the regiments engaged In the war
and have been purchased by the war
departments of all foreign governments.
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THE JOURNAL   i I
Mr
Is the Official Advertising
Medium for the City
of Prince Rupert
... Si
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^WWMWWWWWWWWWWWRaWWWI^
DEFENDS INDIANS
The  Case  for  the  Aborigines
Naas River Ably Presented.
the
Paper  Published   In   Their   Interest
Denies That Whites Are
Intimidated
The Hagaga, "The Indians' Own
Paper," published at Alyansh, B.C.,
takes up the subject of the Indians
of the Naas being hostile to the
whites and contradicts the reports
that have been circulated through
the press in which hostility is
charged.
Under the heading "Fiction Stronger Than Truth," The Hagaga says:—
We have just received a small
sheaf of newspaper cuttings from
various provincial papers, and are
surprised to find that' the Indians in
this district are almost, if not quite,
on the warpath.       ,
One cutting gives the highly sensational news that a party of five
landseekers had been "headed off by
a band of Indians," at the Naas canyon, who "threatened them and turned them back," adding: "This is the
latest news from the front."
This was news to the editor of The
Hagaga, who Immediately instituted
inquiries into the matter. Sending
for Chief Paul Zalu, who resides at
the canyon, he questioned him:—
Q. It is true that a party of
whitemen were threatened and turned back by the Indians at the canyon  last spring?
A. No; I heard of no trouble like
that.
Q. Did any whitemen come up as
far as the canyon and then turn
back?
A. Yes; four whitemen cam.' up in
a boat.
Q. Did you Indians do or say anything to them in a disorderly,
rowdy or riotous manner?
A. I spoke to them. I sa,w their
boat come up on the opposite tide and
it hung about there all day. There
were four persons in it, but they
made no camp, neither did they seem
inclined to come over lo the village.
So I got two men to take me over
in a canoe, and I said "How-do-you-
do" to the whitemen and asked them
whece  *hey  were  going.
Q. Were you excited or Jngry
when you spoke to them?
A.  Oh, no; I was quite genial and
respectful. But I told them that tho
Indians on this river did not want
the whlteman to stake land until
their claims had been settled.
Q.   Did, you turn them back?
A. Turn them back! How could
I do that?
Q. Well, they say you threatened
them and turned them back.
A. That is false. I merely told
them that what they were going to do
was not pleasing to us, and that the
Indians further up river would be
troubled also if they went ab.out
staking land. I said, "You had better not proceed any further."
Q. Oh, then you did turn them
back?
A. No; they went back because
the navigation of the canyon was
risky. I certainly advised them not
to try the canyon. I knew very well
that if anything were to happen to
them there it would be blamed upon
the Indians. Whitemen have been
wrecked in that canyon before and
saved with difficulty by Indians. It
is so easy to get In, but very hard
to get out.
Q.   Was that all you said?
A. That was all. One man asked
how many Indians were uprlver, and
I said about 300. He also said to
me, "Will they take us prisoners?"
and I said, "No, of course, not."
Q. Did the men who were with
you say anything?
A. I only spoke to them. They
camped that night a little below my
house, and in the morning they came
and told me they were about to turn
back. That is all I know about them.
So much, then, for one Item of
news—sensational bunkum!
Ice Is not a necessity In order to
secure cool water, for water can be
made sufficiently cool for drinking
purposes by putting it In a bottle or
jug and wrapping a woollen rag
around the latter, then setting It in
a shallow dish of water and placing
the whole outfit In a cool place; if
in a draft, all the better. The principle involved is found in the fact
that when evaporation takes place
heat Is given off. The woollen rag
absorbs the water from the dish below, which Is evaporated from the
rag, cooling the water. If you have
ever had alcohol or ether on your
hands, you will no doubt have noticed
how cool the skin felt. This was because of the evaporation of the
liquid. The faster Is evaporates the
cooler the object gets.
 o	
Subscribe for The Prince Rupert
Journal now.
USEFUL RECEIPTS
Thickened Milk.—Tie one pint of
flour as closely as possible in a piece
of strong muslin and boil for four
hours, well covered with water and
let it cool. Put one pine of milk into a double boiler and bring to a
boll. Grate off one tablespoonful
from the ball of flour, mix it smooth
with a little cool milk, and add to
the boiling milk, and boil until thickened, seasoning with salt and a HttU
sugar, if liked. This is very useful
In come cases of bowel trouble. Ths
flour ball keeps for months In a dry
cool place.
Almond Meal—Pound one-fourtb
pint of blanched sweet almonds in a
mortar until reduced to a smmotb
paste, add one pint of boiling water,
stir well, and strain through a piece
of fine muslin. Add one teaspoon-
ful of sugar and milk and- serve
warm. This milk can sometimes be
taken by infants >uen cow's milk
disagrees with them.
Almond Barley Water — Pound
one-fourth pint of blanched sweet
almonds in a mortar until quite fine,
put Into a saucepan with one-half
pint of well washed pearl barley,
two teaspoonfuls of sugar, and three
pints of boiling water. Boil all together until the water Is about the
consistency of cream. Then strain
and serve either hot or cold. The
time required for preparing will be
about two hours.
Orange Caudle — Dissolve one
tablespoonful of gelatine In two
tablespoonfuls of hot water, add It
to one pint of boiling new milk, simmer slowly for two or three minutes,
remove from the (Ire, add one tea-
spoonful of sugar, and when half
cold add two tablespoonfuls of
orange juice, which will make it
about the consistency of thick cream.
Serve at once.
Toast Jelly—Toast four slices of
stale bread slowly to a rich brown,
put it into a saucepan with one quart
of boiling water and four tablespoonfuls of sugar, and »,mmer until the
whole becomes a glutinous mass. Remove from the fire, and rub through
turn Into a mold to cool and harden.
Serve with cream.
Rice Jelly—Mix two heaping tea-
spoonfuls of rice flour to a thin paste
with water, add one coffee cupful of
boiling water. Sweeten to taste with
loaf sugar, until it is transparent,
and flavor it by boiling with a stick
of cinnamon if the jelly is for patient
afflicted with summer complaint, but
If for a fever patient add, instead,
a few drops of lemon juice. Pour
Into mold to set. Friday, August 5, 1910
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
—THE-
Oliver
Typewriter
—FOR—
Seventeen Cents a Day
Please read the headline over
again. Then its tremendous significance will dawn upon you.
An Oliver Typewriter—the standard visible writer—the most highly
perfected typewriter on the market
—yours for 17 cents a day!
The typewriter whose conquest of
the commercial world is a matter of
business history—yours for 17 cents
a day!
The typewriter that is equipped
with scores of such conveniences as
"The Bajance Shift"—"The Ruling
Device"—"The Double Release"—
"The Locomotive Base"—"The Automatic Spacer"—"The Automatic Tabulator"—"The Disappearing Indicator"—"The Adjustable Paper Fingers"—"The Scientific Condensed
Keyboard"—all
Yours For 17 Cents a Day
We announced this new sales plan
recently, just to feel the pulse of the
people. Simply a small cash payment—then 17 cents a day. That
is the plan in a nutshell.
The result has been such a deluge of applications for machines
that we are simply astounded.
The demand comes from people of
all classes, all ages, all occupations.
The majority of Inquiries has
come from people of known financial
standing who were attracted by the
novelty of the proposition. An impressive demonstration of the immense popularity of the Oliver Typewriter.
A startling confirmation of our belief that the Bra of Universal Type?
writing Is at hand.
A Quarter of a Million People are
Making Money With
TQe.
OLIVER
TVpeWri-ter
The Standard  Visible  Writer
The Oliver Typewriter is a moneymaker, right from the word "go!" So
easy to run that beginners soon get
in the "expert" class. Earn as you
learn. Let the machine pay the 17
cents a day—and all above that Is
yours.
Wherever you are, there's work to
be done and money to be made by
using the Oliver. The business world
is calling for Oliver operators. There
are not enough to supply the demand.
Their salaries are considerably above
those of many classes of workers.
"An Oliver Typewriter in
Every Home!"
That is our battle cry today. We
have made the Oliver supreme in
usefulness and absolutely Indispensable in business. Now comes the
conquest of the home.
The simplicity and strength of the
Oliver fit It for family use. It is becoming an Important factor in the
home training of young people. An
educator as well as a money maker.
Our new selling plan puts the
Oliver on the threshold of every
home in America. Will you close
the door of your home or office on
this remarkable Oliver opportunity?
Write for further details of our
easy offer and a free copy of the new
Oliver catalogue.    Address:
R. C. BEAN
Prince Rupert Agent
General   Offices:   Oliver   Typewriter
Building, Chicago, 111.
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE
NOTICE Is hereby given that the
reserve existing on Crown lands In
the vicinity of Babine Lake, and
situate in Cassiar District, notice of
which bearing date June 30th, 1909,
was published in the British Columbia Gazette, dated July 2nd, 1908, is
cancelled.
ROBERT A. RUNWICK,
Deputy Commissioner of Lands.
Lands Department,
Victoria, B. C, June 16th, 1910.
(First insertion July 5.)
Hear
the
Truth
There's nothing about a set of
harness that requires such careful
attention, in both leather and workmanship, as traces and collars, there's
where the strain lies, there's where
we excel, though we are just as
watchful as to every other detail of
a complete set of harness, be It for
heavy or light work.
B. C. Saddlery Company
Limited
MANUFACTURERS OF SADDLERY
Jobbers of Leather, Harness, Saddles, Whips, Trunks and Valises,
Pads, Blankets, Rugs; Harness Soaps
and Dressings.
566 YATES STREET
VICTORIA, B.C.
Municipal Notice
TENDERS FOR STREET GRADING
C. D. NEWTON
Real Estate
Money to Loan
Notary Public
Exchange Block
Corner 3rd Avenue and 6th Street
P.O. Box 226   Tel. 226
Boost That Ye May Be Boosted !
General Meeting of the
PRINCE RUPERT PUBLICITY
 CLUB	
At Eight o'clock
Friday Evening
In the Rooms of the Board of Trade.
-    EVERYBODY COME
Matters  of Importance and  General
Public Interest to be Discussed by
the Best Speakers in the City
W. COYNEY, Secy.
HARNESSING   TIDES
Aid.   Harrow's   Proposition   Rrought
KoJore the City Council Again
The subject of Aid. Barrow's tide
harnessing scheme at Zanardi Rapids
as a means of supplying the city with
cheap power was introduced again
tnis week at Wednesday evening's
meeting of the council. Aid. Barrow-
wanted to know if anything was being done In the matter.
His Worship explained that he had
communicated with Ottawa and asked that no disposition be made of
the waters until the city had gone
into this matter.
Aid. Barrow said there was a great
deal of data available on the matter.
The engineer was busy and he suggested that some subordinate might
be employed to go Into all this and
put It in such shape I hat the city engineer could have it available without so much labor.
Aid. Mobley sugegsted that as tbe
engineer would have to make a lot
of Investigations regarding the tides,
etc., there In devising a scheme for
carrying the water pipes across, that
the project of Aid. Barrow might be
borne in mind and his investigations
made on that connection at the same
time.
Aid. Pattullo wished to know if the
delay was prejudicing Aid. Barrow
In any way.
Aid. Barrow said it was. He was
anxious to have the matter settled.
Aid. Naden said he thought the
matter should be investigated or the
council should stand out of the way
and let Aid. Barrow make other arrangements.
On motion it was decided to ask
the engineer for a report on the subject.
Municipal Notice
TENDERS FOR PLANK ROADWAY
AND GRADING
SEALED      TENDERS      endorsed
Tender (1)" and "Tender (2)" will
be received  by the  City  Clerk until
FRIDAY noon, AUGUST 12th, 1910
(1) For the construction of a 16
foot   plank   roadway    on    Eleventh
itreet, Beach Place and Tenth street,
between  Second  avenue  and Water
street. ,! .
(2) Grading and close cutting on
Eleventh street, Beach PIac$ and
Tenth street.
Plans and specifications may be
seen and forms of tender obtained'at
the office of the City Engineers, ■'..
The lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted. I .,
ERNEST   A.   WOODS,-
Wm. Mahlon Davis, City Clerk.
City Engineer. :,.'AJi-9
SEALED TENDERS will be received by the City Clerk until SATURDAY noon, AUGUST 27th, 1?L0,
for the grading of Second avenu'e,
between McBride street and Eleventh
street.
Plans and specifications may be
seen and forms of tender obtained at
the office of the City Engineer.
The lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted.
ERNEST A.  WOODS,
Wm. Mahlon Davis, City Clerk.
City Engineer. A5-23
The city council has decided to
charge nominal fees from builders
for the use of the street during the
time that building operations are in
progress. On dwellings the fees will
be $1 for buildings up to $1,000 in
value, and $2 for dwellings over that
value. For business places the charge
is to be ten cents a day for each 25
feet of frontage. This is to apply
only to planked streets.
The fees were placed at a low-
figure so as to offer no obstruction to
construction work, but the majority
of the aldermen thought it wise to
hold control by such a system. There
was some protest   against    it.    The
Municipal Notice
LOCAL  IMPROVEMENT  NOTICE
TAKE NOTICE that the Council of
the Municipal Corporation of the
City of Prince Rupert, intends to
make the following local improvements:—
The Grading of all streets and avenues in Section One, and to assess
the final cost thereof upon the property fronting or abutting thereon, or
to be benefitted thereby, and that a
statement and diagram showing the
lands proposed to be so especially
assessed for the said improvements:
or work, is now filed in the office of
the City Clerk and is open for in
spection during office hours.
The estimated cost of the work is
$400,000.00.
Dated at Prince Rupert, this fifth
day of August, 1910.
ERNEST A.  WOODS,
A5-9 City  Clerk.
Municipal Notice
LOCAL  IMPROVEMENT  NOTICE
TAKE NOTICE that, the: Council
of the Municipal Corporation of the
City of Prince Rupert, intends to
make the following local Improvements:—
A sixteen foot plank road on Second street, between First and Third
avenues, and to assess the final cost
thereof upon the property fronting
or abutting thereon, or to be benefitted thereby, and that a statement
and diagram showing the lands proposed to be so especially assessed for
the said improvements, or work, Is
now filed In. the office of the City
Clerk, and is open for inspection during office hours.
The estimated cost of the work Is
»-,610.00.
Dated at Prince Rupert, this fifth
day of August, 1910.
ERNEST A. WOODS,
A5-9 City Clerk.
Municipal Notice
LOCAL  IMPROVEMENT  NOTICE
TAKE NOTICE that the council
of the Municipality of the City of
Prince Rupert intends to make the
following local Improvement:—
A sixteen foot plank roadway
along Fraser street, from Eighth
street to Fifth street, along Eighth
street, Seventh street, Sixth street,
and Fifth street, from Fraser street
to Third avenue, and to assess the
final cost thereof upon the property
fronting or abutting thereon, or to
be benefitted thereby, and that a
statement and diagram showing the
lands proposed to be so especially assessed for the said improvements, or
work, is now filed In the office of the
City Clerk, and is open for inspection during office hours.
The estimated cost of the work Is
$5,288.00.
Dated at Prince Rupert, this fifth
day of August,  1910.
ERNEST A. WOODS,
A5-9. City Clerk.
STREET IMPROVEMENTS
Principle Set Upon Which to Assess
Corner Lots
At the last meeting of the city
council It was decided on the report
of the city engineer to proceed with
the work of planking Fraser street
and crossing thoroughfares. The
work will be done from Fifth to
Eighth avenues at a total estimated
cost of $5,288.
At the meeting, the principle of
assessing corner lots where works of
local improvement are concerned
came up. After some discussion It
was decided to assess such lots for
half their frontage on the street side
and for their full frontage on the
avenue sides.
STREET  USING  FEES
ROWING CHAMPIONSHIP
Nominal Charges Will be Made by the
City During Bulding
Time.
Aldermen Deem is Essential in Order
to Retain Control of the
Thorough fares
Will New York City be able to
maintain its supremacy in the eight-
oared shell championship race that
is to be rowed in ihe annual regatta
of the National Association of Amateur Oarsmen in Washington, D.C.,
August 11 and 12?
In view of the fact that several of
the members of the New York Athletic club crew which won the coveted
honor last year, will be missing from
the boat next month and that Philadelphia, Boston, Detroit, Baltimore,
Washington, Michigan and Canadian
rowing clubs are training crews to
wrest the honor from New York, the
New York oarsmen are speculating
on their chances.
The race carries with it not only
the championship of the United
States, but of Canada Last year the
New York Athletic club crew crossed
the line first in a sensational struggle. The crew was regarded as the
best the club has developed. It had
to row hard every inch of the mile
and finished with a spurt.
The Argonauts, the Hamiltons, the
Winnipeg and the Ottawa clubs, of
Canada, all of which were represented in some of the events in the Na-
cMH^$$$C$$C^<t>$($<$H$<!><$$$$4^$^
*
/      9
I RT. HON. A. J. BALFOUR %
b Leader of the Opposition in Imperial House of Commons X
;.4>^>i^4>f.cj.4ic^{.4,<>^i{.f.ii>{.^{.{,4..:.{.{.{.{.4,{,{.,2,{.{,{.f,4,j,^,^,{<{,{,f„j,^,^,^,^,^<^,.j,
matter came up on a report from the
building committee.
Aid. Mclntyre pointed out that
buildings were needed. It was a
little contrary to the council's profession not to tax improvements to
impose this tax. In the case of a
cement building this would amount
to quite a sum. He did not believe,
this was the usual practice in other
places. The streets were given freely
for building purposes.
Aid. Mobley said that he did not
think that any builder would be
frightened by this fee. It was a
means of controlling the situation.
Mayor Stork thought this would
be a good plan. It would tend to prevent the obstruction of the streets
for any longer time than was necessary.
Aid. Pattullo pointed out that
builders might under this make use
of the streets claiming a right to
obstruct them for considerable time
on the ground that they were paying for the use of them.
Aid. Barrow was of the opinion
that it would encourage building at
once before the streets were planked,
The report was adopted.
ALPINE OFFICERS
:ional last year, are reported to have
eight crews in training for the senior
eight  honors.
The Argonauts made a desperate
try for the championship last year,
finishing second. Only a short distance separated them from the New
York A. C, with the eDtrolt Boat
Club of Detroit, a close third. The
same Argonaut crew, with possibly
one or two exceptions, is getting in
shape to compete for the honor again
this year.
 o	
Levelling Streets
(Continued from Page One)
.A un mil Meeting of the Canadian Club
Held  in  Consolation   Valley
The annual meeting of the Alpine
Club of Canada was held around the
camp fire In Consolallon Valley,
where the club had its headquarters
again this summer, and the officers
for the coming year were elected.
Mr. A. O. Wheeler, who resigned the
position as president of the club, was
succeeded by Professor A. P. Coleman, F.R.S., of Toronto University.
Following are the officers: Mr. J. D.
Patterson, vice-president for the east;
Mr. M. P. Bridgland, of Calgary, vice-
president for the West; Mrs. C. G.
Henshaw, of Vancouver, honorary
secretary; Mr. C. W. Rowley, of Calgary, honorary treasurer; Mr. S. H.
Mitchell, executive secretary-treasurer; Mr. Stanley Jones, of Calgary,
Mr. Frank Leigh, of Toronto, and
Rev. Geo. Kinney, of Keremeos, advisors. A new office was created, that
of director, to which Mr. A. O.
Wheeler, the retiring president, was
elected.
knocking at the door of the city for
investment.
Aid. Lynch suggested that the call
for tenders might be advertised in all
the papers. They were not looking
for protests from the citizens, and
the advertising of the bylaw did not
need to take any other course than
the regular statutory one.
Aid. Naden did not, in view of the
criticism that had been levelled at
the council by a part of the press of
the city, feel like transferring the
advertising as indicating that the
council was influenced by this
criticism.
Aid. Siniih said be only referred
lo the advertising for tenders for tbe
work. Ii should be given the fullesl
publicity, he thought.
Aid. I'altuiio did not propose to be
driven by adverse criticisms Into advertising in other papers. There were
plenty of local contractors who would
he willing to tender on this work.
Aid. Sniicii said he was not actuated by the adverse criticisms. He did
not believe that that criticism was
fair.
Aid. Mclntyre said he was not actuated by the adverse criticisms,
either. He was just as disgusted at
the criticism by a part of the local
press as any one. He only Intended
that the widest publicity should he
given to the call for tenders.
Aid. Pattullo said he never intended to make an Imputation
against the aldermen of being Influenced by the criticism.
It was decided to call for tenders
for the work on Second avenue In
all the local papers.
IMPERIAL   POLICY
Question   of  Trade   Preference Within
the Empire was Discussed.
Leaders of Both Parties in House of
Commons Express Themselves
In the Commons Mr. Balfour recently took the last opportunity before the next imperial conference to
raise the question of imperial preference.
He remarked on the consistency
with which every colonial statesman, since Canada made first her appeal for fiscal arrangement in 1843,
had pressed the Mother Country on
one policy, and he declared that tbe
views of these great colonial statesmen were not merely commercial.
They had in view the idea of empire
with mutual good offices in the matter of tariffs as one of its bonds.
The leader of the opposition, emphasizing the fact that the colonies
had developed into great nations,
warned the government that they
had also fully realized the value of
tariff negotiations. He urged that
the result of Canada's treaties with
France, Germany and the United
States had been a diminution of the
preferential advantages of the British Government. Those who supported them appeared to think they
could retain preference outside this
network of treaties, which more and
more were arranging the channels
into which international trade was
to go.
Canada had left as an impossibility
the policy of isolation, and it was
quite certain that the great dominions who had entered upon this
course of independent fiscal negotiation could not by force of circumstances stop where they were. The
process was just beginning, and must
go on.
In concluding, he made a strong
appeal that 'the policy of preference
should become the policy of all British statesmen, instead of the policy
of only one party.
Mr. Asqullh, who replied Immediately, said he heard with great satisfaction that the question which had
slumbered so long would be raised
again. It had been suggesrm. mil
the government was insensible and
unresponsive to the wishes expressed
at the colonial conference of 1907,
but that conference had passed
twenty resolutions, and with regard
to seventeen the government had
taken action.
Mr. Asquith, continuing, said that
the resolutions with respect to preference were carried against the British
Government, but the position of the
government was unchanged since
that time. When it came to the practical, concrete working out of the
policy of preference, it remained as
nebulous and full of inconsistencies
and absurdities as It was seven years
ago. The colonials were not going
to allow British manufacturers to
become effective competitors with
their own cheap raw  material.
The premier proceeded': "It is absolutely essential to industries that
the government should not consent,
either upon food or raw material, to
impose a tax which would enhance
the cost, and thereby handicap our
productive power. With the industrial competition of the world the
Empire could never have been kept
together, or be what it is today, an
empire bound not so much by material as by moral and social ties,
loyal affeclion and sympathy."
Mr. Chaplin urged Hint a two-
shilling duty on foreign wheat would
only equal one shilling on the whole
supply, which would not raise the
price of bread the fraction of a far-
thlng. He declared that t what Canada, in effect, said was: "We have
to buy €..".11,000,000 In manufactured
goods every year, and if you give us
preference we are ready to put such
duties respecting these articles on
all foreign countries as will give you
control of the market."
Mr. Donald McMaster said there
was a firm ditermlnatlon In Canada
to build up, with the co-operation of
Great Britain, a great and powerful
nation. The true policy was to lend
all encouragement possible to settlement In Canada by giving her a reasonable  preference.
 o	
Miss Emille Craig entertained a
number of her friends on Wednesday
evening In honor of Miss Milllgan,
who left the city last night with
her parents on the Prince Rupert.
Miss Milllgan has been In the city
for several weeks and has become
quite popular in the social circle
where she will be missed very much.
The family Intends to reside In Ke-
lowna, B.C., for the winter, and Miss
Milllgan will go to Europe next year. ■  ■■■.-'-■■.:  ■
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Friday, August 5, 1910
;
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦+++♦
t   Tlia   D/virnl    C4-nn<1««/l   *
i
The Royal Standard I
p •!• •!* 9 9 9 9 •*"** '5' '•• *»* *»- *5* **• 9 9 * 9 * 9 * 9 9 9 9
It is interesting to note that the
Queen Mother Alevandra has caused
her own standard to be hoisted above
Buckingham Palace while she Is In
residence there. The arrangement
of this standard shows that the
science of heraldry is not a dead one,
as some would have us believe, although of nothing like the importance that It was in the age of chivalry. Following the ancient and honorable laws of heraldry the queen
mother's standard is a combination
of those of England and Denmark.
There are few people who cannot
tell you something of the story of the
Union Jack, but of the history of the
royal standard of Great Britain most
people are ignorant, writes A. St B.
H., In the Montreal Star.
Various writers have from time to
time assigned armorial bearings to
every one of the Saxon kings of England, out as in the pre-Norman age
no heavy disguising armor was worn
necessitating the use of distinguishing marks, it is very probable that
they are absolutely fictitious.
Although some historians state
that the Norman Kings of England
bore two gold lions on a red shield,
the first sovereign for whose armoria
bearings we have contemporary authority is King Richard Coeur de
Lion, who, in the first part of his
reign employed a red shield with two
gold lions on it standing erect and
facing one another—to use heraldic
language, "Two lions combatant."
On the seal which he employed during the latter part of his reign, however, there appear three gold lions
on a red shield, with the right fore-
paw raised; to again employ heraldic terms, "Three lions passant gard-
ant In pale."
This same coat of armor was worn
by King John of evil memory, as
well as by his successors, Henry III,
Edward I and Edward II.
On January 25th, 1340, King Edward III commenced to reign over the
two kingdoms of France and England and in token of this, combined
the arms of France—a blue shield
speckled with golden lilies—to those
of England.
For some time these combined
shields were recognized in England,
if not in France, as the royal arms.
When Charles VI ascended the throne
of France, however, he was so an
noyed at the perseverance of England, in bearing his arms that he altered his own coat by reducing the
number of lilies to three. Henry V
of England, not to be outwitted by
his neighbor, altered his arms in exactly the same manner. [
The royal a. as of England, there-1
fore, contin ed .o be three gold
lilies on a blue field, until the reign
of Queen Mary, when the arms of
Spain were added to those of England through the marriage of the
Queen to King Philip of Spain.
With the return of a Protestant
sovereign the old arms were again
brought into use.
In 1603 the crosess of St. George,
St. Andrew and St. Patrick were
united to form the Union Jack, and
at the same time the familiar harp
of Ireland, and lion of Scotland were
added to the arms of England and
France to form King James standard.
There was no further change In
the royal standard until 1688, when
William III and Mary were elected
joint sovereigns, and the arms of
Nassau were added to the standard.
Queen Anne reverted to the Stuart
standard, which continued to be the
personal flag of the royal house until 1801, when, by a clause In the
treaty ol' Amiens the arms of France,
Municipal Notice
TAKE NOTICE that the Municipal
Council of the City of Prince Rupert
has fixed Monday, the 8th day of
August, 1910, at the City Hall, Prince
Rupert, as the time and place for
taking the vote of the electors on a
by-law of the City of Prince Rupert
to create a debt of $40,000 by the issue of debentures for the purpose of
providing money to take over and
carry on the plant, pole lines, equipment, and entire assets of the Prince
Rupert Telephone Company, Limited.
AND FURTHER TAKE NOTICE
that the poll shall be taken by ballot, and that the poll booths shall be
kept open on the 8th days of
August, 1910, from the hour of 9
o'clock a.m. to the hour of 7 o'clc '•
p.m.
AND FURTHER TAKE
that Ernest. A. Woods has
pointed Returning Officer
charge of said  poll.
Dated at Prince Rupert,
|day of July, 1910.
takes effect, and shall contain a
promise to pay the principal of said
debentures and also the interest
thereon at the said rate of four and
a half (4%) per centum per annum,
and shall have attached to them coupons for the payment of said interest,
and the said coupons shall be for an
amount equivalent to one-half year's
interest at the said rate of (
four    and      a      half      (4%)
LAND PURCHASE NOTICES
-District of
NOTICE
been ap-
to   take
centum per annum upon the amount
of the debentures to which they shall
be respectively attached, one coupon
being made payable each six months
from and after the date of the said
debentures.
6. i The said coupons shall be
deemed to have been properly executed by each one having written,
stamped, printed or lithographed
thereou, the names of the Mayor,
and Treasurer of the city. Each coupon shall be numbered with the
number of the debenture to which It
Is attached.
7. The said  debentures shall  be
this-21st I made payable at the chief offices of
the Canadian Bunk of Commerce in
ERNEST A. WOODS,     | the   City   of   I-'-ince   Rupert,   or   the
City Clerk. iCity of Montreal, Canada, or the City
| oi London, England, or the City of
New York, U. S. A.
8. The amount of the said coupons,
namely, the Interest, shall be payable
at any of the chief agencies of the
said Canadian Bank of Commerce in
the following cities, namely: Prince
Rupert, B.C.; London, England;
New York; Montreal; Toronto; Winnipeg, and Vancouver, B.C.
9. There shall be raised in each
year during the said period of twenty
years, beginning with the year 1910,
and ending with the year 1930, by
special rate sufficient therefor, on
all the ratable land of the Ci.y of
Prince Rupert, the following sums
respectively, namely: the sum of
Eighteen  Hundred  Dollars  ($1,800)
Skeena Land District-
Po coin p
TAKE NOTICE that Phillip Williams, of Sydney, Nova Scotia, occupation accountant, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein
ley:—Commencing at a post planted
Per!at the S. E. corner and about 16%
BY-LAW   NO.   11.
By-law of the City of Prince Rupert to create-a debt of $40,000
by the Issue of Debentures for the
purpose of providing money to
take over and carry on the plant
pole lines, equipment and entire
assets of the Prince Rupert Telephone Company, Limited.
WHEREAS, by Section 27 of the
City of Prince Rupert Incorporation
Act, 1910 , the City of Prince Rupert is empowered to construct, erect,
operate and maintain a telephone system, and to pass by-laws dealing with
the same;
AND WHEREAS, it is deemed expedient and advisable to take over
from the Prince Rupert Telephone
Company, Limited, all their plant,
pole lines, equipment, fixtures, and
other assets;
AND WHEREAS, the said Princa
Rupert Telephone Company, Limited,
is willing to convey and transfer all
its said assets to the said city;
AND WHEREAS, a petition has
been duly signed by the property
owners of the said city, requesting
them to introduce a by-law to take
over the said assets of the said Telephone Company;
. AND WHEREAS, to complete the
purchase of the said assets of the said
Telephone Company, and to carry on
the same, it is necessary that the sum
of Forty Thousand Dollars ($40,000)
should be borrowed upon the credit
of the city by the issue and sale of
debentures therefor, and that the proceeds of such debentures should be
applied  for  the purposes  aforesaid.
AND WHEREAS, it is intended to
issue debentures by the sale of which
to realize the moneys necessary for
said purposes, making the Baid debentures extend over a period of
twenty years from the issue of the
same;
AND WHEREAS, it will be necessary to raise by special rate in each
year, for the period of twenty years,
beginning with the year 1910, and
ending with the year 1930, the sum
of Eighteen Hundred Dollars
($1,800.00) for the purpose of paying Interest upon the said debt at
I the rate of four and a half (4%)
per centum per annum;
AND WHEREAS, it will be necessary to raise annually by special rate
for paying the new debt, namely, the
said sum of Forty Thousand Dollars
($40,000), during such period of
twenty years, beginning with the
year 1910, and ending with the year
1930, the sum of Fourteen Hundred
and Fourteen Dollars and Forty-five
miles distant In a north-westerly direction from the north end of Kitwancool Lake, thence north 80
chains, thence west 80 chains, thence
south 80 chains, thence east 80
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 640 acres, more or
less. PHILLIP WILLIAMS.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 4, 1910. Jy8
LAND PURCHASE NOTICES
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE thai Annie Grieve,
of Victoria, B. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following, described lands In the vicinity of Kltwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. W. corner, and about 17 % miles
distant In a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kltwancool
Lake, thence soutii 40 chains, thence
east 40 chains, thence south 40
chains, thence east 40 chains, thence
north 80 chains, thence west 80
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 4 80 acres, more or
less. ANNIE GRIEVE.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 4, 1910. Jy8
to pay the interest of the said debt
at the rate of four and a half (4%)
per centum per annum during the
currency of the said debentures, and
the sum of Fourteen Hundred
and Fourteen Dollars and Forty-
five Cents ($1,414.45) for the
forming of a sinking fund for the
payment of the said debt, the computation tor the reinvestment of the
said sum by way of sinking fund being based upon an interei percentage of three and a half (3%) per
centum per annum during the currency of the said debentures as aforesaid, the said two sums making in
all the total of Thirty-two Hundred
and Fourteen Dollars and Forty-five
Cents ($3,214.45) to be raised an-
r.ually as aforesaid.
10. The total of tic ; said two sums
for the payment of interest and debt
as aforesaid shall be raised and
levied in each year during ihe said
period of twenty ye; and currency
of said debentures as aforesaid by
special rate sufficient therefor, on
all the ratable land in the City of
Prlu. s Rupert, as provided for in the
next preceding section.
11. The said debentures when so
issued and sold, and the s-id coupous
attached hereto when the debentures aforesaid have been isbued and
sold, shall be deemed a valid and
bin '.Ing charge upon the City of
Prince Rupert.
12. The amount of the debt au-
thoriezd by this by-law is subject to
consolidation with the amount of any
other debt to be authorized by any
other by-law or by-laws of the said
city passed for the Issue and sale of
debentv.ies, and notwithstanding anything herein contained authorizing
and directing the issue and sale of
debentures for the payment of th
debt thereby created, the City
Prince Rupert consolidated stock
may be issued in the place and stead
of debentures to the amount of such
debt.    This section shall apply only
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that John Cox, of
Monarch, Alberta, occupation farmer, inteuds to apply for permission to
purchase the following described
lands, situated in the vicinity of Kit-
wa icool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Comencing at a post planted at the
north-west corner and about five and
one-quarter miles distant in a northwesterly direction from the north end
of Kitwancool Lake, thence 80
chains south, thence 80 chains east,
thence 80 chains north, thence 80
chains west to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres,
more or less.
JOHN COX.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated May 30,  1910. JyS
Skeena Land District—District of
(''I SSI HI"
TAKE NOTICE that Pearl Caspell
of Cayley, Alberta, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands iu the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Weln Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. E. corner and about 15 % miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north .end of Kltwancool
Lake, thence south 80 chains, thence
west 40 chains, thence north 40
chains, thence west 40 chains, thence
north 40 chains, thence east 80
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 480 acres, more or
less. PEARL CASPELL.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 3, 1910. jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
PfiRsiflr
TAKE NOTICE thai. Mary Brown,
of Vancouver, B.C., occupation married woman, Intends to apply .for
permission to purchase the following described lands In the vicinity of
the Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—Commencing at a post planted
at the North-east corner and about
ten miles distant In a north-westerly
direction from the north end of tha
Kitwancool lake, thence south 80
chains, thence west 40 chains, thencs
north 40 chains, thence west 40
chains, thence north 40 chains
thence east 80 chains to point ol
commencement, and containing 480
acres, more or less.
MARY  BROWN.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 1,  1910. Jy8
LAND PURCHASE NOTICES
Skeena Land District—District of
"PftBRijir
TAKE NOTICE that Ethel Welsh,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands In the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
south-east corner and about 10 miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north «nd of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north 80 chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence south 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to
point of commencement and containing 640 acres, more or less.
ETHEL WELSH.
James W. Smith, Agent
Dated June 1st, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that James Alexander McDonald, of Monarch, Alberta, occupation farmer, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands, situated in
the Kitwancool or Chein Wein Valley:—Commencing at a post planted
at the N. E. corner about five and
on > quarter miles distant in a northwesterly direction from the north
end of Kitwancool Lake, thence south
80 chains, thence west 80 chains,
thence north 80 chains, thence east
80 chains to point of commencement,
and containing 640 acres, more or
less.
JAMES ALEXANDER McDONALD
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated May 30, 1910. Jy5
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE thai John Henderson, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
agent, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Weln Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. .W corner and about 25 miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kltwancool
Lake, thence north 80 chains, thence
east 40 chains, thence south 80
chains, thence west 80 chains to
point of commencement and containing 320 acres, more or less.
JOHN   HENDERSON.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 7th, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Henry Welsh,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
printer. Intends to apply foi permission to purchase the following described lands In the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. E. corner and 11 miles distant
in a north-westerly direction from
the north end of Kitwancool Lake,
thence north SO chains, thence west
80 chains, thence south 80 chains,
thence east 80 chains to point of
commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
HENRY WELSH.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 2, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Frederick
Welsh, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation clerk, intends to apply for, permission to purchase the following describe^ lands in the vicinity of Kit-
wanoeol or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-east comer about 11 miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence south 80 chains, thence
west 40 chains, thence north 80
chains, thence east 40 chains to
point of commencement, and containing 320 acres, more or less.
FREDERICK WELSH.
James W. Smith, Agent
Dated June 2, 1910. Jy8
Cents   ($1,414.45), the computation insofai as the city may be empowered
for the reinvestment of the said sum by law 30 to do
by way of sinking fund, being based
upon an interest percentage of three
and a half (3y2) per centum per
annum;
AND WHEREAS, the said two
sums so required to be raised annually by special rate for paying the
new debt and Interest make a total
of Thirty-two Hundred and Fourteen
Dollars and Forty-five Cents
($3,214.45);
AND WHEREAS, the amount of
the whole ratable land and Improvements of the Municipality, according
to the last revised assessment roll
thereof, being that of the year 1910,
is Twelve Million Seven Hundred and
Twenty-one Thousand and Six Dollars   ($12,721,006);
AND WHEREAS, the amount of
the existing debenture debt of the
City of Prince Rupert, inclusive of
local Improvement debts, and school
debts,   is   nil,   and   does   not   exceed
which ba<j been borne by the English j twenty per cent of the assessed value
sovereigns for four hundred years, of '•"' land and Improvements of the
were at length abandoned .Municipality  of  the  City   of  Prince
.   ... , Rupert, according to the last revised
In this way has the royal standard  assessment roll;
us used by King George V and "qunr- \     NOW  THEREFORE, THE  COUNCIL   OF   THE   MUNICIPALITY   OF
THE  CITY    OF    PRINCE   RUPERT
ENACTS AS FOLLOWS: —
'quartered" by the queen mother today
been gradually evolved rrom the
"Three lions passanl gardant" of
King Richard Coeur de Lion.
There may, however, soon be yet
another change, for lately there has
been no little agitation in Wales that
that country should be represented
in the standard. Whether the heralds
—to whom the decision in all such
matters belongs—will allow this principality to rank with the kingdoms
of England, Scotland and Ireland re-
land remains to be Been.
F. G. Pell of the contracting firm
of Pell & Bell, has been appointed
postmaster vice Harry Smith, resigned, at Stewart. Mr. Pell has entered
upon his duties In the Baldwin block
on Columbia street. Mr. Pell was for
twelve years postmaster at Beaumont, a suburb of Victoria, and|FeaJ-
brings to his duties a thorough experience in postal matters.
1. This by-law shall take effect
on the 12th day of August, 1910.
2. The debt hereby created and intended to be created, namely, the
sum of Forty Thousand Dollars
I $40,000) shall he payable in twenty years from the 12th day of August,
1910, namely, on the 12th day of
August, 1930.
3. There shall be issued any number of debentures to be made for
such sums of money as may be required for the purposes aforesaid,
either In currency or sterling money,
payable in gold coin for not less than
$100 currency or £20 sterling each,
and not exceeding in the whole the
said sum of Forty Thousand Dollars
($40,000), and the said debentures
shall be duly prepared, executed
and sold for the purposes aforesaid.
4. The said debentures stall be
deemed to have been properly executed by being signed by the Mayor,
and Treasurer of the said city, and
shall   he   sealed   with   its   corporate
Coast Land District—District of
Skeena.
TAKE NOTICE that I, Ernestine
A. Roney, of Prince Rupert, occupation married woman, intend to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted on the north
bank of the Skeena River about half
a mils south of Geo. T. Church's preemption, thence west 10 chains,
thence north 40 chains, thence east
of|to the Skeena River; thence southwest following the bank of the
Skeena River to the place of beginning, and containing about 80
acres.
ERNESTINE A. RONEY, Locator.
W. A. Roney, Agent.
Dated July 7th, 1910. Jy22
TAKE NOTICE that the above Is
a true cory of the proposed by-law
on which Ihe vote of .he Municipality
will be taken at ihe City Hall, at
Prince Rupert, on Monday, the 8th
day of August, 1910, from the hours
of 9 o'clock a.m. until 7 o'clock p.m.
ERNEST A. WOODS,
City Clerk.
The said dcnenlures shall bear
date the 12th day of August, 1910,
being the date on which  this bylaw
LA VD PURCHASE NOTICES
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte.
TAKE NOTICE that the Queen
Charloti« Whalinf; Company Limited,
of Victoria, British Columbia, occupation manufacturers, intend to ajiply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about fifteen
chains south of a small creek on the
west side of Rose Harbour, Moresby-
Island, thence west forty chains,
thence north forty chains, thence
east fc rty chains, thence southerly
following the sinuosities of the foreshore line forty chains, lo the point
of commencement.
Queen Charlotte Whaling
Company Limited,
P r Sydney Charles Ruck, Agent
Daitil July 14th, 1910.
Rose Hnrbour, Q.C.I.       . A5
Skeena Land District—District of
PllRfliflT
TAKE NOTICE thai Laura Gordon
of Victoria, B. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. E. corner and about 18 miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence south 40 chains, thence
west 40 chains, thence north 40
chains, thence east 40 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 160 acres, more or less.
LAURA GORDON.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated  June  4,   1910. jy8
Coast Land District—District of
Skeena.
TAKE NOTICE that I, J. Adolph
Perry, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation
book-keeper, Intend to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted on the north bank of the
Skeena River, about a mile west of
Lot 31, thence north 40 chains,
thence e .it 80 chains to lot 31,
thence e -uth 40 chains to bank of
Skeena River, thence west about 80
chains following north bank of
Skeena River to point of commencement, and containing about 320
acres.
J. ADOLPH PERRY, Locator.
Wm. A. Roney, Agent.
Dated July 16th, 1910. Jy22
LAND  LEASE  NOTICE
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that The Canadian
Fish & Cold Storage Company Ltd.,
of Vancouver, occupation Mercantile
and Manufacturing, Intends to apply
for permission to lease the following described land:—Commencing at
a post planted at high water mark
on the westerly side of Prince Rupert Harbor and distant about 110
chains from the north-east corner of
Lot 443, thence west 20 chains,
thence south 20 chains, thence east
5 chains, mre or less to high water
mark, thence following along the
high water mark to the point of commencement and containing 20 acres
more or less.
The Canadian  Fish  and  Cold
Storage Company, Limited,
J.  H.  Pillsbury, Agent.
Dated June 20th, 1910. Jyl2
Coast Land District—District of
Skeena.
TAKE NOTICE that I, Mary M.
Rom y, of Stillwaier, Minnesota, U.
S.A., occupat'ou married woman, intend to apply for permission to purchase the foi owing described lands.
Commencing at a post planted on the
north bar' if the Skeena River at
the south-*:, it corner ot Geo. T.
Church's pre-emption, thence north
40 chains, thence east 40 chains,
thence south to the bank of the
Skeena River, thence south-west following the Skeena River to the place
of beginning and containing about
120 acres.
MARY M.  ROENY, Locator.
W. A.  Roney,  Agent.
Dated July 8th, 1910. Jy22
Skeena Land District—District of
pn Gel Q T"
TAKE NOTICE that Walter Marks
of Toronto, Ont., occupation traveller, Intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands in the vicinity of Kltwancool
or Chean Weln Valley:—Commencing at a post planted at the N. E.
corner and about 27 % miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence south 80 chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence north 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to the
point of commencement and containing 640 acres, more or less.
WALTER MARKE.
James vV. Smith, Agent
Dated June 8th, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
CjRSSi IT*
TAKE NOTICE that Richard
Howie, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation dentist, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of
Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:-—
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. E, corner and about 24% miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence south 80 chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence north 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
RICHARD HOWIE.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 7th,  1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Ciissiu..
TAKE NOTICE that James Welsh,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation machinist, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. W. corner and about 12 miles distant In a north-westerly direction
from the nortk end of Kltwancool
Lake, thence south SO chains, thence
east 20 chains, thence north 80
chains, thence west 20 chains to the
point of commencement and containing 160 acres, more or less.
JAMES WELSH.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June  2,  1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Marguerette
Burns, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation married woman, Intends to apply for permission .u purchase the
following described lands In the vicinity of Kltwancool or Chean Weln
Valley:—Commencing at a post
planted at the N. E. corner and distant about 12 miles In a northwesterly direction from the north
end of Kltwancool Lake; thence
soutii 80 chains, thence west 20
chains, thence north 80 chains
thence east 20 chains to point of
commencement, and containing 160
acres, more or less.
MARGUERETTE   BURNS.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 2,  1910. jyg
-District of
Skeena Land District-—District of
Ofl rrIay
TAKE NOTICE thai Violet Geiger,
of VI : ciria, B. C, occupation married v iinBn, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kltwancool or Cbein Weln Valley:—
Commencing a, a post planted at the
N. W. corner and about 23% miles
distant In a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence south 80 chains, thence
east 40 chains, thence north 40
chains, thence east 40 chains, thence
north 40 chains, thence west 80
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 480 acres, more or
less. VIOLET GEIGER.
James W. S'nlth, Agent.
Dated  June  7th,  19*0. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE 'that Sandford
Burton, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation mining engineer, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein
Valley:—Commencing at a post
planted at the N. E. corner and
about 23% miles distant In a northwesterly direction from the north
end of Kltwancool Lake, thence south
80 chains, thence west 80 chains,
thence l orth 80 chains, thence east
80 chains to point of commencement
and containing 640 acres, more or
less. SANDFORD BURTON.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 7th, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land Distriet-
Casslar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles F
Burns, of Moncton, New Brunswick
occupation auditor, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity  of  Kltwancool   or   Chean   Wein
,;,„ityI ~T 9,ommencinS at a post
planted at the south-west corner and
about 12 miles distant in a northwesterly direction from the north
end of Kitwancool Lake; thence
north 80 chains, thence east 80
chains, thence south 80 chains
thence west 80 chains to point of
commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
CHARLES F.   BURNS
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated  June  2,  1910 jys
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Norman Cle-
land, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation printer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool  or  Chean  Weln  Valley:	
Comencing at a poBt planted at the
S. E. corner and about 26% miles
distant In a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north 80 chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence south 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
NORMAN  CLELAND.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 8th, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that James Jar-
dine, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
merchant, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands In the vicinity of Kitwancool oi' Chean Weln Valley —
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. W. corner and about 13 miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence south SO chains, thence
east. 80 chains thence north SO
chains, thence west SO chains to
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
JAMES JARDINE.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 2, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that John McDIar-
mid, of Lucknow, Ont., occupation
farmer. Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in th« vicinity of the
Kltwancool or Chean Wein Valley	
Commencing at a post planted at the
s. w. corner and about 13 miles distant In a north-weBterly direction
rrom the north end of Kitwancool
Lake; thence north 80 chalnB, thence
east 40 chains, thence south 80
chains; thence west 40 chains to
point of commencement, and contaln-
inj  320 acres.
JOHN  McDIARMID.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 2, 1910. Jyg Friday. August 5, 1910
THE   PRINCE   RUPERT   JOURNAL
OPENING  UP  NORTH
Trip to Fort George is to be Robbed
of Many of its Difficulties.
Improved Service is Promised Which
Will  Allow   Easy Access to
Interior Point
Henceforth the trip to Fort George
the new northern city, the building
of which thousands of men are watching, will be robbed of much of its
Interest and all of Its uncertainty.
The journey to the old Hudson Bay
fort, that within the last year has
shaken from Itself the torpor of over
a century, will henceforth be as much
a matter of organization and routine
as taking the Imperial Limited for
Winnipeg or one of the Princesses to
Seattle, says the News-Advertiser.
A bl-daily service 1b scheduled and
within a few days will go into eqect.
The trip from Vancouver will be by
rail, auto and steamer. Close connections will be made at all points, and
the time actually consumed in travelling from this city to Fort George—a
distance of 630 miles—has been
made in less than thirty-six hours.
When it is considered that a large
part of this Journey is made by
steamer, that has to buck against an
eight to ten mile current, and that
change had to be made from train to
auto, and from auto to river steamer,
and that the latter had to run two
dangerous canyons, the average speed
of fifteen miles an hour through the
whole trip becomes impressive.
The return journey is regularly
made in less than thirty hours of
actual running time, an average speed
of eighteen miles an hour.
This really fine performance, conditions considered, has been rendered
possible by the placing in commission of the British Columbia Express
company's fine new steamer, the
B. X. This boat, which is 130 feet
in length, and as luxuriously fitted
as the Princess Charlotte, has ample
power to ascend the worse canyons In
the Fraser between Soda Creek and
Fort George under her own steam,
and without "lining up.' She climbs
through the dreaded Fort George
canyon in three minutes, the record
previously being four hours. Many
a steamer has come to grief at this
point, at which, In addition to a terrible current, rocks and islands make
the deep water channel tortouous and
doubly dangerous.
It Is the Intention of the British
Columbia Express company to Immediately inaugurate a three-round-
trlp-a-week schedule between Soda
Creek and Fort George, the B. | going up one day and down the next.
This decision was announced by
Messrs Miller and West, the managing director and superintendent respectively of the company, who were
in Vancouver last week.
In connection with this river service, the company will supplement
their present stage service between
Ashcroft and Quesnel by a new auto
service. Orders are being placed for
the necessary machines, and the service will be so arranged as to make
closer connections between steamer
and railroad.
At the same time that these improvements have taken place in the
transportation facilities to Fort
George, corresponding improvements
have been achieved in the accommodation that will greet the traveller on
his arrival at the town. This is a
much-needed change from tie conditions of two months ago. A vigorous
and successful advertising campaign
has made all America familiar with
Fort George and its future. Almost
the moment spring opened up, hundreds rushed Into the country. The
existing transportation facilities
broke down utterly under the pressure. Hundreds got no farther than
Ashcroft, hundreds more did not get
past Quesnel. None of these people
ever got within over a hundred miles
of the place they had come, In many
cases great distances, to see. And
those who did endure the hardships
and delays necessary to a disorgan-
iezd and Inefficient system -of travel
found on their arrival that the town
could neither properly feed or sleep
them. Under those conditions is required much both of faith and fortitude to continue to strongly believe
in the future destiny of a city that
gave its well-n ishers such discomforts in travelling to view It, and
such a chilling reception on their arrival.
It speaks volumes for Fort George
—for the hold it has on the people
who know it—that It came triumphantly through this unavoidable phase
of its development. The remedy lay
wholly with the improvement In the
means of access to the city. As soon
as this was done, immediate betterment took place In the town Itself.
The regular receipt of necessary supplies by the merchants, the lifting
of the freight blockade at Ashcroft,
resulted in instant Improvement in
the conditions at the Fort George
end. The local mill worked day and
night sawing and planing lumber,
and every week saw additions to the
permanent buildings, both at Fort
George proper and the older settlement south of the Hudson Bay fort.
Today Fort George boaBts an hotel
that will accommodate 100 guests,
and at which the meals are second
only to those that can be secured at
the best hotels in Vancouver and
Victoria. Every week the town is approaching more and more the status
of a hustling, modern metropolis, and
every week the Fort George of a year
ago—the Fort George that was
founded in 1806, the lonely, fur-
trading post—is receding towards a
mere historic memory.
For those who want a week's holiday trip that Is out of the highways
of summer travel, and that will give
them an opportunity to see the tremendous forward strides of a country just beginning to feel the qulck-
enlngs of an enormously rapid development and of a city in the making, few towns present greater attractions than a journey to Fort
George, which today offers visitors
not only an Interesting trip, but also
care and comfort that are astonishing
when it is remembered that six
months ago there were less than a
score white people In the place.
 o	
MONEY FOR CANADA
Col. Davidson Tells of Conditions in the
Old Land Affecting
Investments.
Land    Commissioner    of    Canadian
Northern Railway Had Prominent
Part in Raising Capital
Luminous and interesting observations on the growth of Imperial
unity, the changing attitude of the
motherland towards the Dominions
over Seas, Canada's wonderful development, the vast and varied resources of British Columbia, railway
and financial affairs were made
by Col. A. D. Davidson, land commissioner of the Canadian Northern
railway on his visit to the coast.
He recently returned from London,
Eng., where he assisted Mr. Wm.
Mackenzie, president of the new
transcontinental line In successful
financial negotiations respecting
various enterprises. Sixty-two million dollars represents the amount of
capital secured—a larger amount
than any figure ever raised by any
two Canadians in England for the up
building and development of the Do
minion. A noteworthy feature is that
nearly half of this immense sum was
secured purely on behalf of British
Columbia Industrial enterprises in
which Messrs. Mackenzie, Mann &
Co. are interested. Not one cent has
yet been raised either for the building of the British Columbia section
of the Canadian Northern, its two
chief owners having ample facilities
of their own for getting the work under way, west of the Rockies without
entering the money market.
While Col. Davidson unreservedly
gives all the credit of the success of
the London mission to Mr. Mackenzie
bis friends declare that he is too
modest in his estimate of himself.
The colonel to those who are familiar
with his career, describe him as "a
modern wizard of finance." He-deals
in millions with the same nonchalance that smaller men handle thousands. Perhaps his strongest characteristic is the quiet reserve he displays in closing deals involving enormous amounts. In every sense ne is
a clear-headed, far-sighted, broad-
guage Canad'an, the type of man that
has contributed so much to the creation of (he great Canadian West.
Col. Davidson laid great stress upon the growing Importance of Can-
ade in England as a field for every
variety of investment. He was no less
emphatic in expressing his opinion
about the growth of imperial sentiment and its inevitable result in the
direction of strengthening imperial
unity. His facilities for forming correct impressions about British sentiment are exceptional. For over
thirty years he has paid frequent
visits to the Mother country. His
early visits In the eighties were, on
business in connection with colonization and land enterprises In Minnesota and the Dakotas before the
building of the Canadian Pacific railway.
During their stay in England the
two Canadians raised fourteen million dollars In connection with the
flotation of the Dunsmuir collieries
on Vancouver Island and another
seven and one-half million dollars
for the Western Canada Lumber Co.,
the   successor   of   the   Fraser   River
Lumber Co. of Millside. Conversion
of the bonds of the Canadian Northern railway also represented another
l.i'teen million dollars. There was
also represented another twelve million dollar transaction for completing the company's line from Winnipeg to Duluth and for other railway
construction. The colonel also assisted In the organization of the company's steamship system known as
the Royal line.
"Looking back over the Impressions formed on the occasions of
many visits to England covering
thirty years, I cannot recall any
period when the British people exhibited as much friendliness towards
the Dominion as they entertain at
present. Among high and low, rich
and poor, it is Canada, Canada, every
where. Never before has our young
nation held so premlnent a position
In the limelight of newspaper attention, everyday conversation of the
calculations of shrewd bankers and
capitalists," said Col. Davidson.
"This sentiment 1b a mixture of
business acumen and genuine admiration for the way Canada Is coming
to the front. We are looked upon
over there as one of the most pro-
people who have been entrusted with
gressive countries on earth, as a
a priceless heritage that Is being
wisely administered. I forsee a period
in the near future when the Dominion will exercise a great, if not
dominating influence in the councils
of the empire. Our place as the biggest and strongest of the junior partners in the firm is already conceded.
Within the past three or four years
there has been a remarkable trend of
sentiment in Great Britain in favor of
the relization of some all-embracing
scheme of closer imperial unity.
It will come, it is inevitable for the
feeling is in the air. We will live to
see representatives from the various
self-governing dominions sitting at
Westminster to deal with matters of
purely Imperial concern. Already
they are represented by British subjects from overseas who have secured
seats in the Imperial House. Hon,
Joseph Martin, one of Vancouver's
bright men, can be cited as an example.
"On various public occasions during my stay in England I had an
opportunity to express the opinion
that England is our largest and most
natural market for all our surplus
products, notably, grain, meats, fish
and lumber and that to her we should
be indebted for a large proportion
of the capital that has been and is
now developing our vast natural resources. Our country is so vast that
It Is a certainty we shall have to be
a borrower over there for many years
to come. While I am in favor of
Canada manufacturing all she can
at home, I realize that many lined
can be manufactured more cheaply
over there. Well, as long as those
conditions exist I am in favor of our
people buying as much English-made
goods as possible In those varieties of
manufactures in which our home industries can not compete. This is
not only a good business but a real
sentimental policy. With increased
trade relations comes more personal
inter-communication and acquain-
tainship and with it will follow increased investments in the Dominon
by the people of the British Isles.
"British Columbia is beginning to
occupy a unique' position of favor
over there. Its vast and varied resources are now becoming better
known, and financiers already speak
of it as one of the best fields for Investment in the entire Dominion.
Lumber, timber, mines and fish are
the chief resources about which I
was besieged with inquiries. In your
climate you also possess an asset that
can not be overestimated. Fruitgrowing in this province also occupies public attention. There are
thousands of well-to-do people in the
Uritish Isles who are ideally adapted
for  cultivating  small   holdings,   say
JOE MARTIN'S STAND
His
Difference  With  Liberals of the
Old Land Made
Clear.
Other Politicians in  Imperial House
Give Their Views on His
Break
devoted to garden truck or fruits, in
scores of your fertile valleys. I (eel
confident that next year will see a
big trek across the water to British
Columbia. Anticipating this movement as well as for other reasons the
Canadian Northern is now inaugurating Its own Immigration system In
the agricultural districts of the Old
Country, so next year we hope to do
our share in bringing to this province a large number of the most desirable settlers."
During their stay In London,
Messrs. Mackenzie and Davidson sold
150,000 acres of Saskatchewan farm
lands to an English company, which
it proposes to colonize. Another deal
for the sale of 25,000 acres of Saskatchewan lands was closed with a
Dutch company, which will bring out
settlers from Holland. This company
is now erecting dwellings and farm
buildings so that the immigrants will
find everything in shape when they
arrive, thus enabling them to devote
their energies to tilling the soil.
— o	
Subscribe  for  The  Prince  Rupert
Journal now.
The London Times of recent date
contains the following correspondence:—
The Hon. Joseph Martin, M.P.,
dealing with the Conference on the
Constitutional question, and the possibly of a compromise being reached,
writes:
On the strength of Mr. Asquith's
pronouncement (that the Liberal
party would not remain In office unless their policy embodied in the
veto resolutions could be carried
through), I pledged myself that I
would oppose the government If I
were elected just as soon as they
showed any signs of weakening. I
must carry out that pledge or resign
my seat.
I am very much alarmed at the
attitude of the government. Statements have appeared in practically
all the Liberal papers, apparently
Inspired by the government, that the
compromise which would be accepted would be an arrangement by which
the House of Lords would give up
all right to interfere with measures
of finance, and, so far as other legislation is concerned, the provisions of
the veto resolutions would be dropped if an assurance were obtained
that Liberal measures would be con
sldered by the House of Lords on
their merits and have a chance of
being passed.
This means a complete abandonment by the government of the most
Important part of the veto policy.
Mr. Asquith cannot get the support of many Liberals elorlul on the
veto policy to a compromise en that
policy, but h-3 can get Tory -upport;.
and it seemn clear to m-3 that tho
government intend to put thoir compromise ih.'oigh the House by tit-
aid of the Opposit'on, thus dishing
the Nationalists, the Lilior party and
the Radicals.
I do not think thj Liberal party
was returned to power at the last
election through any confidence
which the electors had In the Premier, but the electors who supported
the government had confidence In Mr
Lloyd George and Mr. Winston
Churchill. J
Let me ask what has become of
those two gentlemen in these stirring-times? I very much fear that
they have been found wanting, and
that the great Liberal fight against
the House of Lords will have to start
all over again.
Mr. H. H. Raphael writes:
Mr. Martin affects to speak on behalf of the Radical party. By what
right or title that claim is justified
is not very apparent, and, in fact,
as a Radical, I entirely disavow his
leadership. He is very ready to impute interested motives to those who
disagree with his views, and shows
his  loyalty by an  all-mannered and
ill-conditioned  sneer   at   the prime
minister.
Mr. .Martin appears to belong to
that class of politician who thinks all
reform bad which is not effected by
violence, and that the aim and object
of statesmen should be not to effect
their policy by peaceful methods, but
by stirring up as much heat and unrest as possible in the country.
Let Mr. Martin carry out his threat
to resign his seat; there will be then
one leader the less in the House of
Commons and the party system will
be vindicated, but perhaps not In the
sense he may anticipate.
Mr. R. D. Denman, M.P., writes:
As a fellow Liberal I read with
regret Mr. Martin's letter.
To suspect the government of proposing to drop the provisions of the
veto resolutions Is to show a distrust of the government for which
they have given no shadow of justification. I do not wish unduly to emphasize the fact that ordinary party
loyalty should dispose a i dvate member to give his '.caderb the benefit of
the doubt In a matter of that sort.
But I would point out that to advertise yourself as one who a few
months ago fought under the victorious leadership of persons whom you
now suspect of lacking the rudiments
of pilitical intelligence is an indiscretion.
 o ■	
China's great wall was conceived
by the Emperor Shlh Hwang Ti jn
214 B.C., for the purpose of keeping
the hordes of the north out of his
domain. It commences at the town
of Shan-hai and extends westward to
the barrier of Chla-yu, known to the
ancient Chinese as the "Gate of the
Western Regions." If the wall had
been built in a bee line it would have
been 1,225 miles In length, but following all its curves and windings
the actual length is 1,500. West of
the River Ho, It Is not so Imposing,
being of lesser height. Two retaining walls constructed of brick were
filled with earth and stones; at the
base it is twenty-five feet wide, gradually narrowing, till at the top it is
but fifteen to thirty feet. On top It
is covered with bricks, and at the
present time Is green with grass.
Atlantic Steamship
 Agency	
Through tickets and excursion
rates to
England, France, Germanv,
and all
Scandinavian Ports.
Call or write for rates to any
part of the world. I am also
agent for all American steamers
to and from Prince Rupert;
Northern Pacific Railway; Alaska Pacific Express.
J. H. ROGERS
General Steamship and Railway
Agent, Prince Rupert, B.C.
Canadiar  Pacific R'y
Steamers leave Prince Rupert for Vancouver,
Victoria, Seattle
Princess Beatrice, every Monday at 1 p.m.
Princess May or Princess Royal
every Saturday morning.
Steamers leave Vancouver
Princess Beatrice every Thursday night.
Princess May or Princess Royal
every Saturday night at 11
o'clock.
Union Steamship Co'y
of B.C. Ltd.
A great many women believe
everything that a man says and suspect everything he does.
Fred Stork
General Hardware
...Complete Line of...
VALVES
Pipe and Pipe Fittings
The
The new Steel Passenger Steamer
"Camosun"
PRINCE RUPERT every Sunday at 9 a.m. for Vancouver,
arriving Monday afternoon.
For Stewart City on arrival from
Vancouver Friday night.
Northbound, leaves Vancouver
Wednesdays at 9 p.m.
Steerage Fare $5.00
The "Camosun" is the only steamer
on the run having water-tight bulkheads and double bottom, thus ensuring- safety of passeng-ers in case of
collission or wreck.
J. H. ROGERS,   Ticket Agent
HAYNOR  BROS.
FUNERAL   DIRECTORS
and
PROFESSIONAL   EMBALMERS
Diamonds !
Diamonds !!
Diamonds !!!
I have a stock that is unsurpassed in
variety and quality and for ten days
I am offering any in the stock at
prices that will warrant you looking
at them whether you have any intention of purchasing or not.
Don't miss this opportunity of seeing the best values ever offered in
British Columbia.
C. B. WARK
Washington Cafe
A PLACE TO EAT
Seats For Ladies
Everything Clean and Tasty
Prices Reasonable
W. F. CARPENTER, PROPRIETOR
Second Avenue, near Seventh Street
DR.  W.   B:   CLAYTON-
DENTIST
—o- —
Office   In    the    Westenhaver   Block,
Over  Orme's   Drug   Store.
Prince Rupert
WM. S. HAxiL, L. D. S. D. D. S.
:-:    DENTIST   :-:
Crown and Bridge Work a specialty.
All dental operations skillfully
treated. Gas and local anaesthetics
administered for tlie painless extraction of teeth. Consultation free.
Offices, Helgerson Bk., Prince Rupert
Clarmont Rooms
Sixth Avenue near Fulton Street
Comfortable, Homelike Rooms; Newly Furnished Throughout; Bath
Rooms   with   Hot  and
Cold Water
Rates, $3.00 a Week   and   Upwards j
Mrs.   Annie  McGrath,   Proprletoress
Some Rock
Bottom
Prices
See Us For Investment
Rupert City Realty & Inform
ation Bureau, Ltd.
PRIME RUPFR1,
B.C.
3. H. IMLLSIHRY
CIVIL     ENGINEER
Surveying,   Designs,   Estimates,   etc.
Room   7,   Exchange   Block,
Corner  Third  Ave  and   Sixth   Street
Prince Rupert
C. W. NIOKERSON & CO.
—o—
CUSTOMS AND MERCHANDISE
—o—
Brokers, Forwarding Agents,
Storage,  etc.
J. W. POTTER
ARCHITECT    AND    STRUCTURAL
ENGINEER
Re-lnforced Concrete a Specialty
—o—
Law-Butler Building - Prince Rupert
The Roland Rooms
Splendid  Accommodations
Newly Furnished
Hot  baths;   right  down   town;   good
table board  all  round
RATES, FIFTY CENTS AND UP
 LAD YSMITH ——
COAL
H. B. ROCHESTER,   -   Centre Street
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE
NOT ICE is hereby given that the
reserve existing on Crown lands In
the vicinity of Babine Lake, situate
in Range B, Coast District, notice of
which was published in the British
Columbia Gazette, dated December
17, 1908, Is cancelled In so far as
said reserve relates to lots numbered 1519, 1518, 1517, 1516, 1515,
1510, 1507, 1506, 1506A, 1503 1501,
1502, 1512, 1511, 1505, 1504, 1513,
1514, 1509, 1508, 1530, 1527, 1528,
1529, 1531, 1532, 1533, 1534, 1535,
1537, 1539, 1536, 1538, 1540, 1541,
1544, 1543, 1545, 1546, 1542, 1547,
1548, 1549, 1550, 1520, 1521, 1522,
1523, 1524, 1525, 1526, nnd 1561.
ROBERT A. RENWICK,
Deputy Commissioner of Lands.
Lands Department,
Victoria, B. C, June 16th, 1910.
(First Insertion July 5.)
GRAHAM ISLAND — "The surest
sign of tiie progress of a town or
district Is Its newspaper—live, active, hustling." "The Masset Review,"  MasBet,  Q.C.I.
The Thompson \
Hardware Co.
-Second Avenue—
Paints. General Hardware,
Oils, Stoves and Ranges.
{ THE   PRINCE   RUPERT  JOURNAL
Friday, August 5, 1910
(
c
MARINE NEWS OF THE COAST
BELLE OF SCOTLAND LEAVES
The steamer Belle of Scotland has
left after discharging her cargo of
rails. She will take on lumber for
the Orient.
WILL OVERHAUL
In order to be overhauled, the
Prince Rupert, which has been running continuously since she arrived
on the coast will be taken off her run
on reaching the south this trip. She
will miss one trip north, not arriving next Wednesday.
MARINE  NOTES
The Cottage City arrived this
morning on her way north with about
100 tons of freight, 70 of which was
lumber for the G.T.P. Beside her
regular Prince Rupert passengers she
had quite a number of tourists who
spent the morning looking over the
city.
MOW JAPANESE STEAMER
Arriving at Seattle, the steamship
Panama Maru, Capt. Ogata, of the
Osaka Shosen Kaisha line, completed
her maiden voyage from Japan.
She is under traffic arrangements
with the Milwaukee & Puget Sound
railroad, and after taking on board
cargo will sail August 6 for the
Orient.
The Panama Maru is a sister ship
to the Mexican Maru and the Canada
Maru, all three of which were built at
the Nagasaki shipyards and launched
within the last six months.
The Panama Maru is the fastest
of the triumvirate. Her 5400 indicated horsepower gave her a speed of
15% knots during her trial trip.
She is equipped with four boilers,
while the Canada Maru and the Mexico Maru have only three.
Although the Panama Maru is pri-
marly ,1 freight boat, with a net tonnage of 3750, splendid accommodations have been made for passengers.
The quarters of the 186 steerage
passengers are better than th second
cabin on most trans-Pacific liners.
The crew numbers eighty men, including twenty-three officers.
SHIPPING GUIDE
from
To Arrive
Friday, August   5.—Camosun
Vancouver.
Saturday, August 6.—Humboldt from
Skagway.
Princess Beatrice from Vancouver.
Princess  May from  Skagway.
Prince Albert from Skigedate, etc.
Sunday,  August   7.—Camosun   from
Stewart.
Prince George  from  Seattle, Victoria and Vancouver.
Monday,   August    8.—Cottage   City
from Skagway.
Princess Beatrice from Stewart.
Prince George from  Stewart.
Princess Royal from Vancouver.
Tuesday, August 9.—City of Seattle
from Seattle.
Prince  Albert  from   Masset,  Port
Simpson, etc.
Wednesday, August 10—Cottage City
from Skagway.-
Prince- Rupert from Vancouver.
Thursday,   August   11.—Pj'ince   Rupert from Stewart.
Friday, August 12.—Humbodlt from
Seattle.
Camosun from Vancouver.
To Depart
Friday,    August     5.—Camosun    for
Stewart.
Saturday,  August  6.—Humboldt  for
Seattle.
Princess Beatrice for  Stewart.
Princess May for Vancouver.
Sunday,   August    7.—Camosun    for
Vancouver.
Prince George for Stewart.
Prince   Albert    for    Masset,   Kin-
eolith, Port Simpson, etc.
Monday, August 8.—Cottage City for
Seattle.
Princess Beatrice for Vancouver.
Prince George for Vancouver.
Princess Royal for Skagway.
Tuesday, August 9.-—City of Seattle
for Skagway.
Wednesday,     August     10.—Cottage
City for Seattle.
Prince Rupert for Stewart.
Thursday,   August   11.—Prince   Rupert for Vancouver, etc.
Prince  Albert  for  Skidegate.
Friday,   August   12.—Camosun    for
Stewart.
MAMMOTH DOCK
Liverpool has determined to maintain her reputation as one of the
premier ports of the world. The big
dock scheme, involving an expenditure of three and a quarter millions,
which was decided upon In 1905, but
was held back for financial reasons,
still remains in abeyance, but the
dock board has decided to proceed at
once with a smaller scheme, which
will provide accommodation adequate
to meet the requirements of the port
for many years to come.
The new dock will cost $2,500,000,
and will be.completed in three years.
It will be 1,020 feet long, with an
entrance 120 feet wide, and a sill laid
at a level of 25 feet below the old
dock sill. It will be so constituted
as to be available when specially required as a graving dock. The river
at the entrance to the channel and
the channel itself will be deepened 27
feet below the old dock itself, so as
to allow very- big vessels to come
straight into dock from the river. The
channel will be protected by an embankment, which will shield vessels
entering the dock from the fierce
winds  blowing from  the  northwest.
The channel entrance will present
the apearance of a huge bell mouth,
and will be 400 feet wide, gradually
narrowing down to a width of 120
feet at the entrance to the dock.
When one remembers that the
Mauretania, the largest ship in the
world, measurer 790 feet in length,
it will be seen that the new dock,
over 1,000 feet long, will be able U
accommodate aly of the ocean moa •
sters now afloat or building.
Two Irishmen were in a city bank
recently waiting their turn at the
cashier's window. "This reminds me
of Finnegan," remarked one of them.
"What about Finnegan?" inquired
the other. " 'Tis a story that Finnegan died, and when he greeeted
St. Peter he said, 'It's a fine job
you've had here for a long time.'
'Well, Finnegan,' said St. Peter, 'here
we count a million years as a minute and a million dollars as a cent.'
'Ah!' said Finnegan, 'I'm needing
cash. Lend me a cent.' 'Sure,' said
St. Peter, 'just wait a minute.' "
THE LABOR SITUATION
Collingwood   Schreiber   Does   Not
Why Workers Do Not Offer
Services.
See
He Hints That There May be Spirit
of Rivalry in Soutii Which
is Affecting it
TEMPORARY   LIGHT
City Engineer is Going Into the Subject
of a Supply for This
Winter.
Collingwood Schrieber, of the Dominion government staff, who is here
Inspecting the work on the G.T.P.
line, has made an official trip over
the part on which the rails are laid
and reports that It is in good shape.
He is now going up the Skeena to
work along the line which the contractors have in hand.
Asked by a Journal representative
how the work looked to him, Mr.
Schrieber, who never minces matters
in the least, replied that the work
was being done all right. It was in
good shape but there was not enough
of it. He lamented the fact that the
company could not get sufficient
labor 10 prosecute the work as vigorously as it would like to do it.
"I don't know what's the matter,"
added he, "with the labor in British
Columbia, On the prairies there is
good' labor available but for some
reason it cannot he got in this province."
When ii was suggested to him that
there was reported to be plenty of
laborers offering In Vancouver and
Seattle, Mr. Sc-lirii-licr suggested that,
possibly Vancouver did 1101 fee! very
much Inclined to direct labor this
way in view or ihe rivalry in the matter ul' the future*seaports, lie agreed
there should be nothing of the kind- •
Unci Vancouver would nol ho affected
by the rise- nf another greal shipping
port here, bul he hinted thai some
spirit of this kind seemed to pro-
vail.
If the labor were to offer now the
liciiiiiniciii .-nun i- believed the company could handle several thousand
more men than they had this winter.
' It was a serious thing, he realized,
for Prince Rupert that the work
should be delayed.
.Now that Ihe restrictions had been
taken off by the Dominion government there should he more offering
but he agreed that it might take a
little time liefore labor lost its
timidity in the matter, having been
turned back because of the lack of
$25 on the part of those who had
attempted to come in previously.
Rollers of B. C. Tie & Timber Com-
puny Suggested as Menus of
Power
OFFICIALS COMING
G-T.P. Party Will Reach Here on Inspection on August 24 by Prince
Rupert.
At Wednesday evening's meeting
of the city council, in reply to a question, it was explained that the city
engineer is at present in possession
of data furnished him by the light
committee and which was collected
from various sources by that body.
The engineer is going into the subject of a temporary system of lighting
and is expected soon to make a report.
Aid. Naden called attention to. the
fact that a representative of the B. C.
Tie & Timber Company was now in
the city with instructions to either
sell or move the machinery to Vancouver. There were some boilers In
place and while he did not know in
what shape these were, he thought it
might be worth Investigating to see
if they could be used to supply power
for a temporary light system.
■Aid. Pattullo moved to have the
light committee look into this.
Hit; GAME HUNTERS
A  Number Will  Pay  Visits  to This
Province This V'ear
President of Company, Vice President
And Others Will Pay Visit
to the City
Following the visit of the Premier
of the Dominion, Prince Rupert will
have an opportunity to welcome a
party whose connection ' with this
city is fraught with the greatest
promise for the future. It is the officials of the G. T. P., including
Charles M. Hays, the president of
the company, and E. J. Chamberlin,
the vice president and general manager. There will also be a number
of the other officials, among those
expected being D'Arcy Tate, the
solicitor, G. TJ. Ryley, land commissioner. The party will reach here
on August 24 by the Prince Rupert.
The visit of the officials of the
company Is always looked forward
to with the deepest Interest In view
of the fact that questions of policy
relative to the Pacific section are always expected to be made then. The
subject of additional mileage to he
let will probably be gone into during
the visit, as the engineer, C. C. Van
Arsdol is now covering the route.
Sir Richard Musgrave, of England,
the man who se'eral years ago cap-
lured 11 72-pound salmon, the largest
ever caught in British Columb
waters with a hook and line, Is now
on his way from Groat Britain to tills
province with a party of friends. They
will spend some weeks fishing in
the Campbell, river, the stream from
which Sir Richard made his phenomenal catch, according to information received by Bryan Williams, provincial game warden. Sir Richard's
wife Is a sister of James Dunsmuir,
formerly Lieutenant-Governor of tha
province.
Several  people  of  note  will  visit
the province this fa. rrnt in the
Cassiar and Lillooet districts during
the season for big game, which opens
September '. and closes December 31.
The northern portion of British Columbia is one of the few sections of
the world In which big game can still
be  found  In  numbers  and  In  their
F. O. E.
Prince Rupert aerie, No. 1845, is
still growing rapidly. Last Wednesday night a class of twelve was
initialed. The aerie will meet every
Wednesday at S.20 hereafter in the
K. of P. Hall, which is in the Helgerson black, The Grand Aerie will
be held in St. Louis, Mo., from August 22 to 27. $1,500 is to be given
in casli priezs for best drill teams.
primitive wlidness. Among those who
have signified their intention of coming are: Colonel A. L. Parry, D.S.O.,
England; Mr. Homer Sargeant, Philadelphia, Pa.; Mr. A. I. Smith, Pittsburg, Pa.; Mr. Franz Rasenberg, Norway, who is now hunting in Patagonia; Mr. George Wilder, of England, and Mr. A. C. Smith, of Boston, Mass. Al these men are more
or less famous as big game hunters.
Pleads Insanity
(Continued from Page One)
Mrs. Unmuth, who had been housekeeper for a long time for accused
in her cross examination gave evidence that she believed Williams was
not responsible. She had been a
nurse and had had to do with apoplectic people. "He was a queer little
man," she said. When she first saw
him she thought he was subject to
apaplectlc fits or was a heavy drinker.
She was led to believe he was apoplectic because of the sleepiness. He
would go to sleep with men talking
in the office. He would sleep at the
dinner table. He had been worse
since the fire on First avenue and
had been getting worse.
Her husband had had experience
in an asylum. They regarded him
as not right. He was known as
"Dippy Williams." He would be cross
when these fits were on him and Irritable. He did not sleep at nights,
lacked appetite and complained of
headaches.
She understood that he had fracture of the skull. He had told her
how the accident happened. It was
that a heavy iron bolt or peg had
dropped from the top of a ship on his
head. He was insensible for some
time. That was three years ago last
may. She had read letter from
friends asking if the operation had
been successful and if his head
bothered him. She had advised the
accused to go back to Wales to be
treated, telling him he would lose
his mind entirely if he did not. He
was very timid about fire. He would
not allow anyone to go upstairs
smoking and ordered lights out at
11 o'clock. He used to take a step
ladder and peep over the transoms
to see if they were using 16 candle
power lights. This was after the electric lights were not in use. He would
mumble about it. Witness said he
wasn ot stingy. He was ready always
to give to anything. He had lack of
memory. His bad spells were brought
on  by excitement.
Accused, she said, slept in the
linen room . He kept the window
locked and the door locked. He
said some one wanted to harm him
and he wanted to be safe. He kept
a lantern burning always after dark.
Accused was always afraid of people
stealing from him.
Witness said she understood that
accused had been an engineer. He
bad twelve years experience on boats
Witness said that when he had
these despondent fit* sne used to get
him in the kitchen and make him tell
what was the matter. When he had
done this he was better for some
weeks. He would follow witness about
like a child. Since March he had
been in one of these fits continuously.
Questioned as to the habits of Mr.
Williams towards women, witness
said she considered he was altogether
too good to them. He could not do
enough for them. After witness left
Mr. Williams was in one of these
spells. He would come down very
day to the .Queen's  Hotel.
When in these fits Mr. Williams
lost his nerve completely. About
four or five weeks before the fire
Mr. Williams was offered $7,000 for
his place.    He wanted $10,000.
Witness had no doubt about his insanity at the time of the fire.
In reply to Mr. Fisher, witness said
she considered Mr. Williams harmless. During these spells she thought
he realled what was right and what
was wrong.
In reply to Mr. Patmore witness,
said that she did not believe that Mr.
Williams would do anything wrong
when In his senses. She did not believe that when he set fire to the
house he knew what he was doing.
To tho judge she said she never
saw him do anything criminal when
under these spells. He had a high
standard of honor as far as she knew
him.
Chief McCarvell of the police force
told of his vlslis to the scene of the
tire, and of his arerst of Williams.
His cautioning of him and the confession later by the accused, all of
which was given at the time of the
preliminary hearing.
Mr. Naden being recalled, andask-
Mr. Naden, being recalled and asked as to Williams actions, said "he
acted more like a kid than a sane
man."
For the defence, Mr. Patmore called O. M. Helgerson. He always regarded Williams as "light-headed."
He told of playing a practical jcke on
him in which he had him accept a
twenty-five cent bill (shin plaster( as
twenty-five dolalrs.
John Goodwin testified that assuc-
ed acted strangely on July 16, asking
witness why he did not talk to him.
Max L, Unmuth, who had had
charge of wards in an insane asylum,
testified to the accused having delusions at times. His wife was housekeeper and he lived there also.    He
■WHERE  QUALITY IS KING.'
GEO. D. TITE
Furniture Dealer
3rd. Avenue
Prince Rupert
An inspection of our stock
of House Furnishings will
convince you. For quality and
economy you will leave us a
Satisfied customer.
Dininc Room Furniture, Sideboards,
Boffeta, Dlnlnf Tablei, 6ft.
anil 8ft. Extension
Dlnlnf Room Chain, Quartered Oak with
Lather Seats, Golden or Early Enfllah
finish. Prices ranting from
Just Received a
Handsome Line of
Iron Beds, Springs and
Mattresses, all sizes
WINDOW BLINDS
Manufactured here to tit any
window up to 10 feet wide.
Tapestry and Lace Curtains,
Poles and Trimmings
Special orders for Upholstering
of any kind.
$22.50 to $50
Wicker Chairs and Rockers
GEO. D. TITE,    -    3rd Ave.
Dj^N2Jigj[^[rjj[rjjy|r^yy^
SHERWIN & WILLIAMS
-PAINTS-
COVER THE EARTH.
AVE   ARE   SOLE   AGENTS
CARLOAD JUST ARRIVED
Ready Mixed Paints,
Paints Ground in Oil,
Paints Ground in Japan,
Varnishes, Shellac, etc.
Water Stains
and
Decotint
IN ALL COLORS
Prince Rupert Hardware & Supply
Company, Ltd. thos. dunn, m*.
MBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBB
The Westholme
Lumber Company, Ld.
We carry the largest stock of
Building Supplies in the North.
Quotations given on short notice in all lines.
Rough and Dressed Lumber
Shingles and Lath
Mouldings and Cases
Doors and Windows
We handle Plaster and Lime at reasonable prices
Get our quotations for nlljclasses of buildings.
FIRST AVENUE
OFFICE AND   .
WAREHOUSES
W
said he regarded the man as insane
at times.
C. R. Stewart said It was a standing joke that accused was "batty."
E. W. McCulloch said he thought
there was something wrong with him
the first time he met him Witness
said he had haa experience in the
asylum in Australia.
The evidence of Dr. McNeill was
here submitted when the case was adjourned.
M. Eastman, who has been running
a men's clothing store on Third avenue, sold out his stock and left last
night on the Prince Rupert with his
wife, and Mr. and Mrs. Milllgan and
family. He will take up his residence
in Kelowna.
RICH MINING
Engineer   Has   Faith   in   Properties
Abont Hazelton
Mr. Cue, a well known mining engineer, was a passenger on the Prince
Rupert's last trip. He went on to
Stewart to examine some mining
properties there.
Mr. Cue recently visited Hazelton
In an advisory way and was quite
taken with the mining prospects
there. He believes that some very
rich propositions will be opened up
about Hazelton and looks forward to
that becoming quite a good mining
centre.

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