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Prince Rupert Journal Aug 12, 1910

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 New Wellington
Coal
is the best
ROGERS ft BUCK
Sole Agents
Ptinu ftojiert ftmtnal
High-Class
Job Printing
In all Lines
VOLUME  1
Published Twice a Week
PRINCE RUPERT, B.  C,   FRIDAY, AUGUST 12, 1910.
Price,  Five Cents
soyf,/
ORE  UNDER WRECK
Princess  Nay's  Passengers Have Gone
South—Crew Standing by
Steamer.
Mineral     Shipment.    Turned     Into
Foundation For Forward Part
of the Wreck
The arrival of tho C. P. R. steamer
Princess Beatrice in port on Tuesday evening brought to Prince Rupert further particulars of the condition of the Princess May. The vessel will easily be floated again, it is
anticipated, provided no storm arises
in the meantime to work devastation.
The May was resting easily according
to the latest reports.
The Beatrice made a special trip
to Juneau for the purpose of taking the passengers of the May to
their destination. Capt. MrLeod and
the crew remained at the scene of
the wreck to do what they could to
relieve the steamer until the salving
ontfit arrived.
There was never any danger to
the passengers according to the account obtained from the arrivals.
The best of order prevailed and the
officers and crew behaved in a becoming manner, looking well after
the passengers' safety. Between 4
and 6 In the morning the boats from
tne May were kept busy landing the
passengers on Sentinel Isle. In
some cases the landing was made at
rallier rocky spots and women had
to join with the men in working out
their own salvation in climbing the
slippery rocks.
At the lighthouse every attention
was given them until they were taken
to Juneau.
Immediately after the passengers
were got off the work of salving the
contents of the staterooms was commenced and the crew was also put
to work moving provisions, etc., forward to the part of the vessel which
is elevated and out of reach of the
water.
A considerable quantity of ore was
on board the vessel and this was
dumped over from the forward batch
while the crew built it up under the
forward part of the steamer to prevent any danger of the vessel breaking. Tons of this ore were used and
was found very convenient for the
purpose as the forward part of the
vessel would otherwise have been
■without support at low water.
The position of the May indicates
that just before the vessel touched
Pilot Richardson saw the danger and
attempted to avoid the reef. He was
too late, however, and the steamer
idled up. She has a long tear on the
starboard side and two large holes
are punctured by the rocks on her
port side. At low water the bow of
the steamer Is elevated about 2 5 feet
above the rocks. With good weather
there should be no difficulty in getting her off.
THE  STRfeET LINES
GAYNOR IS STRONGER
Mayor of New York Shows Signs of
Recovering
(Special to The Journal)
New York, Aug. 12.—Mayor Gay-
nor is reported cheerful and stronger
today and is resting quietly.
Awaiting the outcome of the case,
Gallagher, the discharged workman
who Is charged with the shooting is
being held without pleading, should
the mayor not recover he will men
be charged with murder.
 o	
ROTHA'S LOYALTY
Soulli   African    Leader   Appeals   to
Country as Thoroughly  British
(Special to The Journal)
Pretoria. Aug. 12.—Gen. Botha,
speaking here, said the government
still awaited the Unionist piogivmme.
He had heard of people being stirred up to vote "British" but had not
the Empire every reason to regard
himself and his party as persons
equally as good and as loyal as any
of them?
 o	
There is a movement on foot In
the city to seek the co-operation of
emp'oyers and employed, and including all classes of business, to ensure
an eight-hour day in city work and
to promote reasonable hours In all
lines of business. A committee Is at
work in connection with the movement which Is known as the Eight
Hour Day League and a general
meeting Is to be held in the Carpenter's Hall next Monday evening.
City  Engineer Says Location of These
Is Natter for Practising
Surveyors.
He Disapproves of Municipality Undertaking This Duty — Would
Give Grades
The city engineer does not approve
of the city undertaking the task of
giving street lines to owners of property who want to build. He approves
of givng the street grades, however,
at a feet ot if 6.
The engii eer's report was presented on Tuesday evening on a reference
made to him from the council last
week. Aid. Hilditch had brought
the question up stating that he believed the city should give the street
lines. After discussion it was referred to the city engineer and on
Tuesday night the report was presented.
Col. Davis pointed out in his report that the street lines could only
be given by a B. C. Land surveyor
and if the system was adopted of the
city giving these grades there would
have to be such a surveyor employed
in the engineer's office.
The report further pointed out
that there was on record at the Government registry office the plans of
the city and these were available for
any surveyor so that the information
necessary to give lines was easily obtainable. He did not know of any
city that gave the lines and he could
not recommend it in this case.
On the other matter of giving
grades, however, he was of the opinion that the city might weH^under-
take that. The grade should be given,
he thought, by the city and for so
doing he suggested that there should
be a fee of if 5 charged.
On motion of Aid. Barrow the engineer's report was referred to the
streets committee.
There are nine steam shovels on
the upper Skeena, some of them being of the 75-ton type. All but ons
or two are at work and these last
are being put together.
GEN. BADEN-POWELL
Head of Boy Scouts Movement Is Now
on the Pacific
. Coast.
Well Received by Force—Proposal to
United With Christian Endeavor Society
(Special to The Journal)   .
Victoria, Aug. 12—General Baden-
Powell arrived here yesterday.    He
was received by the Boy Scouts and
officers.    He will inspect the whole
brigade of 250 on Saturday.
Might   Unite Forces
It Is understood that Gen. Baden-
Powell is to be invited to attend the
THREATENED BY FIRE
Bellingham  Has  Conflagration  Within
Four Miles of
Place.
Wind Favors Those Who Are Trying
to Save the Factories From
the  Flames
(Special to The Journal)
Bellingham, Aug. 12.—Forest fires
are raging within four and a half
miles of Bellingham in the Alki
neighborhood. With :lie wind in
favor of the fighter" the r.rl! men
hope to save the plants of the lumber mills. Several hundred cords of
iliingle-bolts and much standing timber has been destroyed.
k**** VVVVV l**,U* cm %* V TT *** V *** V *** *#* *** %* V **♦* *V* **' *»* VVVVVW *#* *V* *"** *** *J* *x K
THE MAYOR'S CHALLENGE
At Wednesday evening's meeting of the city council, Mayor
Stork took occasion to cull ntten lion to a report Hint lie had placed
himself in a position to disqualify himself as mayor through the
alleged acceptance of pay for supplying the ballot boxes to the city.
His Worship does not seem to be losing any sleep as a result of
the report and fuitlier indicated that he was not afraid of a test
in the courts.
lu bringing the matter up, His Worship said that since he was
elected mayor he had received about one dozen anonymous letters
relative to this subject. As these were not signed he put them in
the waste paper basket. He was inclined to do the same with respect to the letter in the Optimist that evening, but in view of the
fact that the public were concerned in the matter he had decided
to make a statement to the council.
"If the man who si^ns himself'Ratepayer'has any doubts in
the matter,'" said the mayor, "the courts are open."
:»i>cfrie/i$H^i$i+*****lH-''Hl^'">ci}Hf^^
LIGHTING THE CITY
Report Is Expected From Engineer at
Tomorrow Nights Council
Meeting.
Aid.   Hilditch   is   Getting   Impatient
And Prefers Charges of Shelving
the Proposition
THE   RICH SKEENA
Mining Prospects About Hazelton Give
Excellent Promise   Variety
of Ores.
Recent    Strikes    Indicate    That    the
Country Will Soon Become a
Good  Producer
Christian Endeavor convention, when
the proposal to unite the Boy Scout
movement with that organization
will be broached.
H. Carmichael, provincial assayer
in the department of mines at Victoria, is in the city on his way from
Atlin where he has been making
examinations for the department. He
is accompanied by Mrs. Carmichael
and will leave in a few days.
D1K1) FROM INJURIES
Mrs. McCaughiin Succumbs to Effects
of Injuries
(Special to The Journal)
Belfast, Aug. 12.—Mrs. W. J. Mc-
Caughan, injured in the Kelvin
Hotel fire, -.has died from her injuries. Her husband. Rev. Dr. Mc-
Caughan, who died from injuries on
July 21, was formerly In charge of
St. Andrew's church, Toronto.
A report on the question of a
power proposition Fir electric lighting in the city is expected from the
engineer at Saturday evening's meeting of the council. Several members
o'f the council expressed the opinion
at a recent meeting that the report
would be a very ripe and careful'y
considered proposition when it was
put forward.
Aid. Hilditch, who can be counted
upon at every meeting to raise the
question, wanted to know on Wednesday evening when the report
could be expected. He could not see
why this should be shelved.
Aid. Pattullo at once rose and
wanted to know what grounds Aid.
Hilditch had for saying this was being shelved. It if were not so that
the matter was being shelved, he
wanted to know why Aid. Hilditch
made use of such an expression.
Aid. Hilditch said he wanted information. This seemed lo be taking
a long time.
Aid. Mobley explained that the city
engineer was a busy man. He had
three propositions to consider. He
could say, however, that Col. Davis
expected to have a report ready for
the next meeting of the council.
Mayor Stork said there was no attempt to shelve this. A local firm
had made a proposition with respect
to the matter and that was now before th'e engineer also. Col. Dav's
would, when he reported, make a
complete one. It would not, he felt,
like some reports received, be 100
per cent below the cost.
 o	
J. Piercy, of Piercy, Mortis & Co.,
is again in the city.
 o	
Good progress is being made on
the big warehouse for the Kelly-
Douglas company on the waterfront.
G. T. WILLIAMS IS PRONOUNCED SANE-
SENTENCED TO TEN YEARS IMPRISONMENT
G. T. .Williams, formerly proprietor of the Talbot rooming house in
this city, was sentenced yesterday
morning to ten years imprisonment
by Judge Young. Medical evidence
was put in to show that the man was
sane and that there was nothing to
indicate that at the time he committed the act of setting fire to the
building he was not in a position to
discriminate between right and
wrong. The judge expressed his
readiness to accept any medical evidence that would relieve him of the
finding him guilty of the charge laid
against him. He, however, could not
find anything in the evidence that
pointed to anything else but that of
guilt.
On the opening of the case yesterday morning the question of the admission of the medical evidence
came up. W. E. Fisher, the crown
prosecutor, proposed to put evidence
in to establish the question of the
sanity  of  the  prisoner.
The judge said that he felt that
the issue would have to be tried now
as It had begun. The contention of
the defence was that the man was not
responsible at the time lie committed the act. Unless It were shown
that the man was now Insane and as
such incapable of conducting his defence the trial would have to proceed.
L. W. Patmore, who represented
the prisoner, said that he had been
informed by the medical men who
made the examination that they were
of the opinion that the accused was
not Insane. The issue that the man
was not in a position to conduct his
case could not, in view of this, be
put forward. It would only be a
waste of time to do so.
Dr. McNeill was recalled in order
to make an explanation. He said
that when he gave his evidence a few
days before It was based on a hurried
examination of the accused. It was
not made for the purpose of seeing
whether he was Insane or not.    He
wished to modify his answers given
at that time to that extent.
Dr. Eggert was then called as a
medical expert. In reply to the
crown prosecutor he said that he had
examined the accused as to his sanity. He had examined him on three
occasions since the court last sat.
He found no symptoms of insanity.
Dr. McNeill was with him on one of
these occasions. Both agreed on the
point.
In reply to the court, witness said
he had,examined the accussed very
closely as to the Injury to his head.
He had been told that he had had his
head hurt by the falling of a bolt. He
had been taken to the hospital and
was told that It was only a scalp
wound. After leaving the hospital
there had been no signs that Indicated that the brain was affected. Later
lie had had pains which indicated
that there was an abscess formed
Going back to the hospital he had
undergone an operation for this abscess when It was found that there
had been formed what Is known as
"dead bone."
Asked if such Injuries as were described would affect one mentally,
witness said that such sometimes resulted.
Further questioned by the judge,
witness said that the injury in all
probability had caused an infected
scalp wound with subsequent formation of "dead bono." Such Injuries
have sometimes caused mental deterioration, but accused showed no
evidence  of such.
Under cross examination by Mr.
Patmore, witness said that paralysis,
partial paralysis or partial comatose
condition would have followed had
there been a pressing on the brain.
Submitting symptoms which Mrs.
Unmuth in her evidence had said she
detected In the accused, witness was
asked If these symptons did not Indicate that the man was mentally
affected. Witness said that the symptoms were such as might be expected
to be found in a wide variety of af
fections.      The   symptoms   must   be
taken in conjunction with actions to
determine insanity.   He had gone Into the history of the case and the
family  history  before  coming  to a
conclusion  in the matter.    A man
might have all the symptoms which
were ennumerated but   yet    distinguish between right and wrong. Such
symptoms when shown  in  the case
of an insane person usually produced
a type that was inclined to boast of
any acts.    Witness aid he had made
a careful study into all the circumstances connected with the fire, and
he found that   accused    knew    the
wrongness of the act.    He realized
what was right and what was wrong.
Mr. Patmore in an effort to press
the insanity claim to its fullest, attempted to submit In the form of a
question     evidence    that   had   been
given  at  the trial  and   to  press  it
upon the witness in order to ascertain  if he would not classify these
acts as those of an Insane man. The
judge  Interfered, however, contending that the only way In which these ,
could  he put would  be as an  hypothetical question.    The witness could
not  sum   up   the  evidence   for   thai
purpose of reaching an opinion with- •
out having  both  sides  of  the  easel
before  him.
Mr. Patmore argued that lie had
brought in what could he regarded [
as expert evidence In the persons of
those who had had experience in asy-!
lums and in caring for persons whose
minds were affected. These were in
a better position to decide whether
the man was insane than was even
a medical man. They had had opportunities to study the man's actions.
The judge differed from this He
said that he could only be bound by
Ihe evidence of medical exjierts on
such a point.
.Mr. Patmore said according to the
evidence the judge must come to the
conclusion that the man was "either
insane or a low rogue."
Ills honor replied, "Yes, he Is that.
Nothing would have given me greater pleasure than for the doctors to
have stated that the man is insane.
I want to see it in your way, but I'm
afraid I cannot. I do not like to
think a man would do as he has
done."
Mr. Patmore pleaded for the greatest leviency In the case. The only
way to havo proved the man insane
would have been to have had a medical man examined him the day before the Are. This was impossible,
of course.
His Honor admitted the force of
this and complimented Mr. Patmore
by stating that the evidence that
would be necessary to prove the position taken by him could not be obtained.
Mr. Fisher, for the crown, lamented the situation into which the accused had got himself, but argued
that the law must he enforced.
Judge Young 'In passing sentence
said he could come to no other conclusion except that he was guilty.
lie had  to make com nt  un  the
seriousness of the offence, Apart
from murder It-was one of the worst
crimes in the calendar. Ac-c-usi-cl had
selected the hour when mosl peo-
ple were asleep. Hail in- been successful in his attempts it was appalling to think of what the results In
loss of life and destruction of prop-
city would have been. The lire department was an excellent one here,
but the facilities for fighting lire
were not all they should be In consequence of the rapid growth of tlie
city.
The crime was committed for a
paltry sum of money, lie could assure the prisoner that even If he had
been successful he would never have
got $8,000.
He must sentence him to ten years
imprisonment.
The convicted man showed little or
no emotion on receiving the sentence
bidding friends good-bye after It unmoved.
Mining men are turning their attention more and more in the direc
tion of the Skeena River and its
tributaries, and it is prophesied that
before next summer is far advanced
there will be a decided rush into dif
ferent parts of that, country, With
railway facilities such as the G. T. P
will soon offer the greatest drawback will be done away with and
those interested will have the opportunity of getting quickly to the point
they wish  to go.
As an evidence of the interest in
the Hazelton district alone there are
constantly being brought here accounts of rich  finds.
Ben Severson, a prospector, who
has been around Babine Lake this
summer, came to Hazelton recently
with samples of ore from new finds
close to the lake.' Some of the pieces
were plentifully sprinkled with native silver, occurring as flakes and
nuggets in the quartz. Other pieces
were largely composed of what-passes for gray copper, lie is sending
samples away for assays and upon
the receipt of returns will be able
to tell more of the value of bin
claims.
Prospecting for coal in Bulkley
valley is being carried on more extensively this year than ever before.
Many new seams have been found,
some of them reaching over ten feet
in width in places where for years it
has been considered the seams were
too narrow to be profitably miner.
Work is being carried on vigorously
and before fall it will be possible to
tell something of the ultimate worth
of the new  finds.
John Blume and Fred Roeger have
made discoveries that have must promise. Several claims have been staked and some good ore samples
brought in. The values are chiefly
silver contained in galena and gray
copper, and compare favorably with
assays obtained in any part of the
district. The claims staked are on
both sides of Babine river, close to
the Skeena. At present they are too
far from transportation to be deemed of any great value, but if a rail-
line is built up the Skeena to reach
Groundhog mountain coal, what Is
thought to be an extensive district
would be at once opened up.
These are but some of the most
recent finds In the onp district which
is being prospected to some extent
this year.
The Copper River promises exceedingly well also and there are vast
fields yet to be developed in a mining way along the Skeena.
DASTARDLY ACT
(Special to The Journal)
Chicago, Aug. 12.—J. C. Lewis,
eminent comamnder of the .Minneapolis Knights Templar commandry,
was badly burned and several other
occupants of an auto In which they
were riding, less seriously injured,
when a bottle of sulphuric phosphorus was tin-own Into the var al Michigan avenue, by some one hidden In
the grand stand for the parade.
f.. & \
EXTENSION
"".   I'.   R.   Exports  lo  Run  Trains  to
( iiiiieioii Lake Tills lull
i Special ici The Journal I
Victoria, Aug. 12,- By October 1
the Esquimau & Nanaimo will Inaugurate a service over tbe Alberni extension of the E. & N". railway as
far  as   Cameron   Lake.
The C P, It. Intends to make Cameron Lake a pleasure point. It Is
located beautifully at the base of
snow capped  mountains.
NEW ASPECT OF CASE
London, Aug. 12.—Experts who
have examined the body found in the
(,'rlpperi home In London, declare It
lu be'thai or a woman who had undergone an operation.
This corroborates the rumor cabled
by the Quebec correspondent of the
Chronicle that Dr. Crippen has Intimated to the Canadian officials that
his wife died rrom the effects of an
operation performed by him. THE   PRINCE   RUPERT   JOURNAL
Friday, August 12, 1910.
NEWS OF THE PROVINCE
Items of General Interest From Centres in British Columbia.
Well Remembered
Nanaimo.—Through the death of
an uncle named Burns, Which occurred in Iowa four months ago, Miss
Smith, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William Smith of tbe Grand Hotel, Lady-
smith, has been remembered in his
will  to  the extent  of  $23,900.
German Capital
Vancouver.—British Columbia is
attracting the attention of German
financiers, according to Baron von
Bredow and Baron Richtofen, who
are at present in Vancouver. Both
already own property in the province,
having acquired it through their
agent, Mr. A. von Alvensleben, and
their present visit is a combined
business and pleasure one. They state
that more German capital is likely
to be invested here should the inducements meet with the approval of capitalists in that country.
What is Rock?
Nanaimo.—Construction work on
the city's sewerage system is at a
standstill owing to a dispute which
has arisen between Contractor Mac-
dougall and City Engineer Waters
regarding the question as to what
constitutes  "rock."
In submitting to the council his
statement of the work done "i„ia„
the past month with the request of
payment of the same, the contractor
included so many yards of rock which
the engineer claimed was not rock at
all, contending that that material
should alone be classed as rock which
could only be removed with powder.
The council supported the contention
of the engineer and refused to pay
rock prices for what It contended
was ordinary material, whereupon
the contractor instructed his men not
to come out to work. Unless his claim
is paid at once the contractor threatens to enter suit against the city.
Timber  Sale
New Westminster.—The largest
timber berth that, has ever been put
up for sale in Britisli Columbia will
be offered by auction at the local
crown timber office on Wednesday
next.     The  berth    comprises     23.92
square miles in township 20 on ihe
east side of Adams Lake. The upset
price is $162,203 and it takes a cash
deposit of one-quarter of the purchase price to handle the proposition.
As It is a difficult place to get tim-
oer out of, it is probable that the
purchaser will build a mill right on
the spot and a railway to handle the
lumber. The sale will be conducted
by  Crown Timber Agent Leamy.
New Mining Town
Comox.—A new mining town to be
known as Wednesbury will shortly
spring up in the Comox district of
Vancouver Island. The town will be
built in connection wlt'i the development work which the Canadian Collieries company is about to carry out
The company which recently took
over the holdings of the Hon. Jas.
Dunsmuir is operating diamond drills
in a number of places with a view to
locating the best points for sipking
new pits which will lead to the output of the collieries being largely
increased.
With the growth of the operations
of the Island Colliery plant a large
number of additional expert coal
miners will be needed, and to procure
the the management has entered into
negotiations with the Imperial Federation League, of which Mr. Graham
Forester is the British Columbia
commissioner. The league will bring
out a number of miners from the
old country who will supply the
needs which an enlarged scope of
mineral labor demands. The extension of the mineral area of the Canadian Collieries company will lead
to the establishment of a new mining townsite which will be called
Wednesbury at the request of Mr.
Norman Griffiths, the English member of parliament for the town of
that name in the Old. Country. Mr.
Griffiths is vice-president of the Imperial Federation League and is now
on his way to Vancouver Island to
make arrangements for bringing in
miners who will be employed by the
Canada Collieries company, which
are controlled by Mr. William Mackenzie, president of the Canadian
Northern railway, and a syndicate of
Britisli   capitalists.
TELEPHONE SYSTEM
Provision  Is Hade to  Take Over the
Entire Undertaking by the
City Council
Garbage  Disposal to  Receive Attention — Other Questions Are
Disposed  of
Tuesday evening's sitting of the
city council was not a very lengthy
one. The business was for the most
part confined to the transaction of
general business.
The city clerk, as returning officer, made an official report to the
-council of the passing of the telephone bylaw, and the bylaw was accordingly finally disposed of by the
council.
A second bylaw related to it was
Introduced and with the consent of
all the members put through its different stages. It authorized the taking over of the undertaking and
the signing of the agreement.
Accounts  Passed
Accounts to the amount of
$1,242.32 and a pay roll of $4,293.28
were ordered paid on the recommendation of the finance committee.
Aid. Pattullo, the chairman of the
comlttee, called attention to the fact
that In conectlon with the amount of
the pay roll, a very considerable portion of it would be charged to capital account, It included the expense
connected with the Woodworth Lake
survey unci other work like that.
Garbage Disposal
The medical health officer recommended that the council take up the
question of the collection and disposal of garbage.
The matter was referred to the
city engineer for report.
Temporary Street Work
Aid. Hilditch asked if he would
be allowed to build a plank way on
a street and then take It away. He
•-xplalned that it was proposed to
put in the drive way so that supplies could be got In as there was
no roadway now. As soon as that
was done the planking would be
taken up and used about the building.
His Worship suggested that a
formal application be made to the
council when he had no doubt permission would he granted.
Later in the evening Aid. Hildltch
made this formal application, when
it was suggested that as a precaution the work should be subject to
the city engineer to be ordered removed by him at any time so that
the city might be protected.
Aid. Barrow recalled the rule for
charging for the use of the streets
during building time and suggested
in a jocular way that In this case
Aid. Hilditch would be subject to 10
cents a foot per day.
Aid. Lynch said that only applied
to planked streets.
Aid. Barrow: "This would be
planked."    (Laughter.)
Permission was given.
Food and  Fuel
Aid. Pattullo's bylaw relating to
weights and measures, which has
been designated as the Food and
Fuel Bylaw, passed its second reading and was put through the committee stage. The bylaw proposes
that an officer may- be appointed by
the city to superintend the weighing
of coal, etc., used in the city, but
does not bind the city council to put
it in force.
 .—o	
RAPID DEVELOPMENT
OFFERS OF REWARD
Scotland Yard and Its Policy Exempli
fied in Dr. Crippen
Case.
Activity in lode mining in the vicinity of Hazelton commenced  with
the  staking  of  the   first  claim  on
Nine Mile mountain two years ago.
In  that time new discoveries    and
their development has   been    rapid, j
says the Omineca Herald,   There are
now five groups of properties under
bond for large figures and one other!
group incorporated.    It may be said
without exception  they have profit-.
able ore on the surface and to such,
depth  as their workings have pene-!
trated.    This is remarkable progress. I
.Most of the Portland Canal    mines;
were staked nine years before capital was interested.
Within sixty days there will be
fifty or more miners at work opening up ore bodies within ten miles of
Mazelton with a possibility of further additions before winter from
new deals being put through.
At the present rate of progress It
will not be long before the question
of treatment facilities will have to be
dealt with In order that the mining
companies may realize the percentage of profit that they are entitled to.
Kates on shipments to existing smelters are prohibitive. Even the laying of rails to the nearest point to
the mines will not be sufficient.
"Blood-money"   is   no  Longer   Considered a Proper Procedure in
Crown   Cases
in offering a reward of $1,250 to
any person or persons giving information which might lead to the apprehension of Dr. Crippen, Scotland
Yard was not reverting to the practice of many years ago of awarding
"blood money" on the conviction of
persons accused of murder. The objection to giving a reward for information leading to a conviction is
that it produces false evidence, and
innocent persons may suffer, but this
objection does not prevail when the
reward is merely for giving information as to a person's whereabouts,
There are precedents in recent years
for offering rewards for similar Information, though these offers have
generally been made In regard to
persons who were wanted on charges
other than murder.
The reasons why the practice of
giving government rewards was discontinued is set out in Mr. Hall Richardson's book, "Police!" The reward
system was practically abolished during the home secretaryship of Mr.
Henry Matthews (Viscount Llandaff)
and, in giving his opinion in support
of the abolition of the practice, the
right hon. gentleman said: "I do not
mean that the rule may not be subject to exceptions, as, for instance,
where it is known who the criminal
is, and information is wanted only
as to his hidingplace, or on account
of other circumstances of the crime
itself." These words, in the opinion
of a high Scotland. Yard official,
justify the offer of a reward on the
present  occasion.
Before 1884 is was the frequent
practice of the Home Office to offer
rewards, sometimes of large amount,
in serious cases. In 1883, in particular, several rewards, ranging from
£200 to £2,000, were offered In such
cases as the murder of Police Constable Boans and the dynamite explosions in Charles street, and at
various railway stations. These rewards, like the reward of £10,000 in
the Phoenix Park murders, proved
ineffectual, and produced no<evidence
or any value. In 1884 there was a
change of policy. Early in that year
a remarkable case occurred. A conspiracy was formed to effect an explosion at the German Embassy; to
"plant" papers upon an innocent person, and to accuse him of the crime
in order to obtain the reward which
was expected. The revelation of this
conspiracy led the then secretary of
state (Sir W. Harcourt) to consider
the whole question. He consulted
the police authorities both in England and In Ireland, and the conclusions he arrived at were—that the
practice of offering large and sensational rewards in cases of serious
crime is not only ineffectual, but mischievous; that rewards produced,
genarlly speaking, no practical result beyond satisfying a pubi.'c de-
nu nd for conspicuous action; that
they operate prejudically by relaxing
the exertions of the police; and that
they tend to produce false rather
than reliable testimony. He decided,
therefore, In all cases to abandon the
practice of offering rewards, as they
had been found by experience to be
a hindrance rather than an aid in the
detection of crime. These conclusions were publicly announced, and
acted upon in two important cases in
1S84—one, a shocking murder and
'.iolation of a little girl ut Middles-
l-ji'ougli; the other the dynamite
mite outrage at London bridge, In
which case the city offered a reward
of £5,000. The principle thus established has since been adhered to,
without exception at the Home Office.
The whole subject was reconsidered
in 1885 by Sir Richard Cross in a
remarkable case of infanticide at Plymouth; and again in 1880 by the
right hon. member for Edinburgh
(Mr Childers) in the notorious case
of Louisa Hart. On both occasions,
after careful consideration, and with
the concurrence of the best authorities, the principle was maintained,
and rewards were refused. "Since 1
have been at the Home Office," said
the Home Secretary of the day, "I
have followed the rule thus deliberately laid down and steadily adhered
to by my predecessors. I do not
mean that the rule may not be subject to exceptions, as, for instance,
where it Is known who the criminal
Is, and information Is wanted only
as to his hiding place, or on account
of other circumstances of the crime
it self. In the Whltechapel murders,
not only are these conditions wanting at present, but the danger of a
false charge Is Intensified by the excited state of public feeling.   1 know
HAYNOR BROS.
1
1
House Furnishers
Located temporarily, since the Are,
in Dunediii Block, corner of Second
, »
Avenue and Eighth  Street.
Some snaps in slightly dnmaged   goods  which   we  want  to  clear
out before moving into new quarters in Manson ISlk., Third Ave.
FUNERAL  FURNISHERS
<*iBiEiBiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiniiinHiiwiiiniiBiHini
J
how desirable it is to allay that public feeling, and I should have been
glad if the circumstances had justified me in giving visible proof that
the authorities are not heedless or
indifferent."
 o	
IRRIGATION  ASSOCIATION
Calgary  Will  be  the  Next  Meeting
Place
Calgary was chosen at the closing
session of the Western Canada Irrigation convention as the meeting
place for next year. The claims of
the Alberta city were put forward in
a letter from the city council, and
also by its mayor, Mr. R. R. Jamie-
son. There was little discussion on
the point. Calgary was the choice
of the delegates, the selection being
unanimous.
The election of officers resulted as
follows: Hon. pres., Lieut.-Governor
G. H. V. Bulyea, Edmonton, Alta.;
president, Wm. Pearce, Calgary; first
vice-president, F. J. Fulton, retiring
presdent, Kamloops; second vice-
president, Mayor R. R. Jamieson,
Calgary, Alta.; treasurer, C. W. Rowley, Calgary; executive, C. W. Peterson, Calgary, W.' H. Fairfield, Leth-
bridge, Alta., C. A. McGrath, Alta.,
R. S. Greeley, Maple Creek, Sask.,
Dr.' Dixon, Kelowna, B.C., R. H. Agur
Summerland, B.C., R. M. Palmer,
Fruitlands, B.C. Messrs. M. .Burrell,
Grand Forks, B.C., A. M. Grace, Medicine, Hat, Alta., and J. T. Robinson,
Kamloops, were also nominated for
the executive, but their names were
withdrawn, making all the electons
unanimous.
 o	
AID BRANCH LINES
WATERWAY  ON  PRAIRIES
The Cost of Navigation Route From
Winnipeg to Edmonton
Preliminary reports received at the
public works department at Ottawa,
indicate that surveying along the Saskatchewan river for which a party
wa3 sent out some time ago, Is going ahead, and by the time parliament assembles there will be available preliminary estimates of the cost
of the proposed waterway for grain
from Edmonton to Winnipeg.
While not officially stated, it is
roughly estimated that the work
necessary to navigation along the
Saskatchewan can be done for about
$15,000,000. This is exclusive of the
construction of locks to overcome the
Grand Falls. In some places the river
Is six feet ii depth and In others
forty, and it will require much
dredging.
It seems to be a sure thing that
the waterway will be built, and If the
estimates are received In time, to
remove any doubts as to Its feasibll-
it, a preliminary appropriation is expected next session.
Oliver
Typewriter
—FOR—
Seventeen Cents a Day
Please read the headline over
again. Then Its tremendous significance will dawn upon you.
An Oliver Typewriter—the standard visible writer—the most highly
perfected typewriter on the market
—yours for 17 cents a day!
The typewriter whose conquest of
the commercial world is a matter of
business history—yours for 17 cents
a day!
The typewriter that Is equipped
with scores of such conveniences as
"The Balance Shift"—"The Ruling
Device"—"The Double Release"—
"The Locomotive Base"—"The Automatic Spacer"—"The Automatic Tabulator"—"The Disappearing Indicator"—"The Adjustable Paper Fingers"—"The Scientific Condensed
Keyboard"—all
Yours For 17 Cents a Day
The citizens of Vernon have endorsed the single tax system, which
was submitted to a vote.
Premier McBride Hints That He Will
Consider This Next
Session.
Canadian  Northern  Negotiating Foi'
Further Assistance in Railway
Construction
When Premier McBride made the
announcement of aid to the Canadian
Northern last session, there were
nints that this was but the beginning. The aid applied only to the
mainline It was generally understood that other assistance would be
sought for branch lines and that the
Premier was prepare'd to grant It.
This Is borne out by a statement
made by Premier McBride at Kamloops recently when he said:—
"I have recently been in conference with D. D. Mann, vice-president
of the Canadian Northern, relative to
the extension of the lines of the
company on Vancouver Island and
the mainland of the province.' said
Hon. Mr. McBride.
"Of course it is essential that following the completion of construction of the mainline of the railway
It should have branches which may
serve as traffic feeders. It is probable that in order to bring about further developments of various portions
of the province through the furnishing of transportation facilities, the
government may consider the advisability of lending such assistance to
the railway as will bring about the
object desired. However, it may not
be that the assistance granted for
proposed extensions of the Canadian
Northern system will be as great as
that given under the agreement for
the building of the mainline and the
Victoria & Barclay Sound railway.
"The Canadian Northern is desirous of constructing an additional
hundred miles of line on Vancouver
Island.
"Such an extension there would
mean building from Alberni north to
Quatsino Sound, near the northern
end of the island at a locality now
unserved by rail transportation
"The company will also build
branches into the Okanagan and the
Kootenay. The question of the granting of aid to the building of these
oranches and extensions may be dealt
with at the next session of the legislature."
 o	
"I wonder what the teacher
meant about the singing of my two
daughters?"
"What did he say?"
"He said that Mamie's voice was
good, but Maude's was better
still."
Diamonds !
Diamonds !!
Diamonds!!!
I have a stock that is unsurpassed in
variety and quality and for ten days
I am offering any in the stock at
prices that will warrant you looking
at them whether you have any intention of purchasing or not.
Don't miss this opportunity of seeing the best values ever offered In
Britisli Columbia.
C. B. WARK
Some Rock
Bottom
Prices
See Us For Investment
Rupert City Realty & Information Bureau, Ltd.
PRINCE RUPERT,
B.C.
Clarmont Rooms
Sixth Avenue near Fulton Street
Comfortable, Homelike Rooms; Newly Furnished Throughout; Bath
Rooms   with   Hot  and
Cold Water
Rates, $3.00 a Week   and   Upwards
Mrs.   Annie   McGrath,   Proprietoress
The Roland Rooms
Splendid Accommodations
Newly Furnished
Hot baths;  right  down  town;   good
table board all round
RATES, FIFTY CENTS AND UP
 LAD YSMITH	
COAL
H. B. ROCHESTER,  -   Centre Street
Fred Stork
General Hardware
...Complete Line of...
VALVES
Pipe and Pipe Fittings
—THE—
We announced this new sales plan
recently, just to feel the pulse of the
people. Simply a small cash payment—then 17 cents a day. That
is the plan In a nutshell.
The result has been such a deluge of applications for machines
that we are simply astounded.
The demand comes from people of
all classes, all ages, all occupations.
The majority of inquiries has
come from people of known financial
standing who were attracted by the
novelty of the proposition. An Impressive demonstration of the immense popularity of the Oliver Typewriter.
A startling confirmation of our belief that the Era of Universal Typewriting Is at hand.
A Quarter of a Million People are
Making Money With
Tlje.
OLIVER
TypeWri-tcr
The Standard Visible Writer
The Oliver Typewriter is a moneymaker, right from the word "go!" So
easy to run that beginners soon get
In the "expert" class. Barn as you
learn. Let the machine pay the 17
cents a day—and all above that is
yours.
Wherever you are, there's work to
be done and money to be made by
using the Oliver. The business world
Is calling for Oliver operators. There
are not enough to supply the demand.
Their salaries are considerably above
those of many classes of workers.
"An Oliver Typewriter in
Every  Home!"
That is our battle cry today. We
have made the Oliver supreme in
usefulness and absolutely Indispensable in business. Now comes the
conquest of the home.
The simplicity and strength of the
Oliver fit it for family use. It is becoming an important factor in the
home training of young people. An
educator as well as a money maker.
Our new selling plan puts the
Oliver on the threshold' of every
home in America. Will you close
the door of your home or office on
this remarkable Oliver opportunity?
Write for further details of our
easy offer and a free copy of the new
Oliver catalogue.    Address:
R. C. BEAN
'   Prince Rupert Agent
General   Offices:   Oliver   Typewriter
Building, Chicago, 111.
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE
NOTICE! Is hereby given that the
reserve existing on Crown lands in
the vicinity of Babine Lake, and
situate in Cassiar District, notice of
which bearing date June 30th, 1909,
was published In the British Columbia Gazette, dated July 2nd, 1908, Is
cancelled.
ROBERT A. RL'NWICK,
Deputy Commissioner of Lands.
Lands Department,
Victoria, B. C, June 16th, 1910
(First insertion July 6.) "■'"'  ••■•.• ■ ■ .-■ I ■■ ,
Friday, August 12, 1910.
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
GREAT  NORTHLAND
Hon. Frank Oliver on the Country Along
the Route From Edmonton
to Dawson.
The Vast Territory is of Incalculable
Value to the Dominon of
Canada
Hon. Frank Oliver in an interview
given in Vancouver upon his return
from his overland trip to Dawson by
way of Edmonton and the Peace
River, Intimated that It was oa-s of
pleasure purely. His description of
the territory and its poslbillties Is
extremely Interesting.
"The first 2,400 miles of the journey," said Mr. Oliver, "was by rail
to Edmonton; thence 100 miles with
team; thence 160 miles with canoe;
thence 80 miles In a scow; thence 200
miles In canoe; steamer, 100 miles;
team, 16 miles; steamer, 1,300 miles,
landing us at Fort McPherson. The
portage from McPherson to the headwaters of the Porcupine is called 60
miles. It is a liberal 60, with mosquitoes also more than liberal. More
than 4,00 miles down the Porcupine
waters by canoe, and we landed safely at Fort Yukon. The rest of the
way is by palatial steamer ana the
railways, and is counted easy sailing.
"I deem my trip this side of Fort
Yukon nothing unusual as a feat in
travelling. In fact, I think that aside
from the portion provided with the
established means of conveyance foi
steady travel that the trip is not so
marvelous, but of course it is a long
trip, and one over a course seldom
covered in one continuous jaunt, and
possibly has never been covered over
the same full course as I am travelling in as short a time as x shall
make.
"We found everything serene and
all traders and settlers prospering
along the route. In the Mackenize
valley the vegetation was high. We
were there the last of June, and I
was surprised to find the growth so
rank at that time.
The Mackenzie Is a vast river, with
a wide valley, largely boggy, but
doubtless ofs, a nature that can be
drained. Hundreds after hundreds of
miles of fine land are there. If the
Mackenzie river only penetrated the
heart of the prairies instead of the
remote region it does that valley
would now be the one of the most
productive in the world. But I do not
say that it will not be occupied. The
pressure of the population will see
the Mackenzie country brought into
the range of desirability. It will be a
country for homes. The trip from
Edmonton to McPherson is northwesterly. Many fall to appreciate
how much so it is. McPherson is as
far west as Skagway. By this one
can better realize how far towards
the west one travels in going from
Edmonton to McPherson. The turn
to the west, however, is not until
one is well along on the journey out
from Edmonton, or near Fort Chlp-
pewyan.
"The mineral belt of the northern
country is so vast that it is difficult
to say how far it extends. However,
from what I gathered ou the trip and
data available I believe that the precious minerals may not be found in
the Mackenzie valley unless in its
most easterly reaches. The formation does not seem favorable for gold
and such precious mineral except In
that extreme portion. Along the
course which 1 followed the resources
to be gathered In mining most likely
will be in the form of petroleum and
natural gas, in the Athabasca region; salt, in or near the Great Slave
and the Mackenzie districts; coal In
the Mackenzie and possibly other portions; and sulphur on the shore of
the Great Slave lake. It is said there
also is galena in some portions. Timber is plentiful along the whole
course, and the lakes and streams
are  of  considerable  value.
"Studying Hie country as a field for
human habitation, the chief question
is that of growing crops, and raisins
herds. 1 cannot say how far north
success might eventually be experienced, but I feel safe in saying it
will be much farther north than
many have Imagined. The possibilities for agriculture will be revealed
In time, and I should not be surprised
that some time that part of Canada will sustain a large population.
Yukon likewise has Its resources, all
of which are well known here.
"I am persuaded that this region Is
of Incaluable value to Canada, and 1
feel thai future generations will look
on the Northland with far greater
appreciation of the true worth and
the vastness of the resources than
do* the people of the Dominion and
the rest of the world in this day."
LOCATION OF THE
FIRE   ALARM  BOXES
No. 1.—Fifth street and Third avenue.
No. 2.—Sixth street and Third avenue.
No. 3.—Seventh street and Third
avenue.
No.   4.—Eighth    street   and   Third
avenue.
No. 5.—Junction of First and Second avenues.
No. 6.—Dominion Hotel.
No. 7.—Eighth street and Second
avenue. ;
No. 8.—Seventh street and Second
avenue.
No.   9.—Sixth   street  and   Second
avenue.
No.  10.—Centre  street and  First
avenue.
No. 11.—G. T. P. dock.
No. 12.—Front of the Government
building.
No. 13.—Second street and Second
avenue.
No.  14.—First    avenue   and    Mr.
Bride  street.
No.  15.—Third   avenue   and   McBride street.
No. 16—Fulton Hotel.
Blotting-paper was discovered
purely by acicdent. Some ordinary
paper was being made one day at a
mill in Berkshire, when a careless
workman forgot to put in the sizing
material. The whole of the paper
made was regarded as being useless.
The proprietor of the mill desired to
write a note shortly afterwards, and
he took a piece of waste paper, thinking it was good enough for the purpose. To his intense annoyance the
ink spread all over the paper. Suddenly there flashed over his mind
the thought that this paper would do
instead of sand for drying ink, and
he at once advertised his waste paper
as "blotting." There was such a big
demand that the mill ceased to make
ordinary paper and was soon occupied in making blotting only, the use
of which spread to all countries.
Subscribe for The Prince Rupert
Journal now.
LAND PURCHASE NOTICES
Skeena Land District—District of
C Jissi fir
TAKE NOTICE that Reginald
Davey, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation machinist, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands, in the vicinity of
fitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-west corner and about 6%
miles distant in a north-westerly direction from the north end of Kitwancool Lake, thence south 80
chains, thence east 80 chains, thence
north 40 chains, thence w*est 40
chains, thence north 40 chains,
chains, thence west 40 chains to a
point of commencement, and containing 480 acres (more or less).
REGINALD  DAVEY.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated May  30,  1910. Jy8
Coast Land District—District of
Skeena.
TAKE NOTICE that Elijah
Rounds, of Victoria, B.C., occupation
Stewart, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted one-half mile north,
and one-half mile east, of Nettie A.
Lairds N. E. corner of application to
purchase, and 300 feet east of Ana-
ham Lake trail, marked E. R.'s
south-west corner, thence 40 chains
east, thence 40 chains north, thence
40 chains west, thence 40 chains
south to point of commencement,
and containing 160 acres, more or
less. ELIJAH   ROUNDS.
Vincent  M.  Schibner,  Agent.
Dated May 25, 1910. jn2T
LAND  PURCHASE  NOTICE
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that John Cherry,
of Victoria, B. C, occupation mattress maker, intends to apply for permission to purchase ihe following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-east corner and about 14 miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence west 80 chains, thence
south 80 chains, thence east 80
chains, thence north 80 chains to
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
JOHN CHERRY.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 3, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar. .
TAKE NOTICE that Brenton
Brown, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation insurance agent, intends to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands in the vi-
vinlty of the Kitwancool or Chean
Wein Valley:—Commencing at a
post planted at the north-east corner and about ten miles distant in
a north-westerly direction from the
north end of Kitwancool Lake,
thence south 80 chains, thence east
80 chains, thence north 80 chains,
thence west 80 chains to point of
commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
BRENTON BROWN.
Jame6 W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 1,  1910. JyS
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Jessie Stead-
man, of Victoria, B. C, occupation
married woman, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following described lands, in the vicinity of
Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-east corner and about 6%
miles distant in a north-westerly direction from the north end of Kitwancool Lake, thence south 80
chains; thence west 80 chains, thence
north 80 chains, thence east 80
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 640 acres, more or
less. JESSIE STEADMAN.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated May  31,  1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassia
TAKE NOTICE that Bruce Older-
shaw, of Victoria, B. O, occupation
jeweller, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of the
tltwantool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at
he north-west corner and about 7 %
miles distant in a north-westerly direction from the north end of Kitwancool Lake; thence south 80
chains, thence east 40 chains, thence
north 80 chains, thence west 40
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 320 acres, more or
less. BRUCE OLDERSHAW.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated May 31, 1910. Jy8
LAND PURCHASE NOTICES
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Echo Dudgeon, of Vancouver, B. O, occupation
assistant dentist, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of the
Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-east corner and about 7 %
miles distant in a north-westerly direction from the north end of Kitwancool Lake, thence south 80
chains, thence north 80 chains,
thence east SO chains to point of
commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
ECHO DUDGEON,
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated May 31, 1910. Jy8
LAND PURCHASE NOTICES
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Sarah Ward,
of Victoria, B. C., occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. E. corner and about 22 milec distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north 80 chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence south 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or -ess.
SARAH WARD.
James W. Smith, Agenl.
Dated June 6th, 1110 Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
CilKKl i\ V
TAKE NOTICE that George Mc-
Bain, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
merchant, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. W. corner and about 26% miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north 80 chains, thence
east 80 chains, thence south 80
chains, thence west 80 chains to
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
GEORGE  McBAIN.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 8th, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
On Q^ifl v
TAKE NOTICE that Catherine
Welsh, of Vancouve,, B. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands in the vi-
vinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein
Valley:—Commencing at a post
planted at the S. E. corner and about
17% miles distant in a north-westerly direction from the north end of
Kitwancool Lake, thence north 80
chains, thence west 80 chains, thence
south 80 chains, thence east 80
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 640 acres, more or
less. CATHERINE   WELSH.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 4,  1910. Jy8
LAND PURCHASE NOTICES
LAND PURCHASE NOTICES
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE   NOTICE    that     Frederick
Tutt,  of Selkirk,  Manitoba, occupation merchant, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that John Grieve,,
of  Vancouver,     B.     O,     occupation
agent,  intends  to apply  for  permission   to  purchase  the   following   de-
descrlbed lands in the vicinity of Kit-1 scribed lands in the vicinity of Kit
wancool or Chean Wein Valley,-—
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. W. corner about 14 % miles distant in a north-westeriy direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north 4 0 chains, thence
east 40 chains, thence south 40
chains, thence west 40 chains to
point of commencement, and containing 160 acres, more or less.
FREDERICK   TUTT.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 3, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Henry Van
Wyck, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation hotel keeper, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following' described lands In the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein
Valley:—Commencing at a post
planted at the north-east corner and
about 20 miles distant in a northwesterly direction from the north end
of Kitwancuol Lake, thence south 80
chains, thence west 80 chains, thence
north 80 chains, thence east 80
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 640 acres, more or
less. HENRY VAN WYCK.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated  June  6th,   1910. JyS
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Minnie Clarke
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. W. corner and about 28% miles
distant and in a north-westerly direction from the north end of Kitwancool Lake, thence south 40 chains
thence east 80 chains, thence north
40 chains, thence west 80 chains to
point of commencement and containing 320 acres, more or less.
MINNIE   CLARKE.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated  June   8th,   1910. Jy8
m
JOB PRINTING
LETTER HEADS ENVELOPES
BUSINESS CARDS
VISITING CARDS      STATEMENTS
Prince Rupert Journal
m
wancool or Chean Wien Valley:
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. E. corner and about 20 miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north 80 chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence south 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to
point of comemncemeni, and containing 64 0 acres, more or less.
JOHN GRIEVE.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 6th, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Lelhl Cherry,
of Victoria, B. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at tne
S. E. corner and about 21 miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north 80 chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence soutii 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
LEI HI  CHERRY.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 6th, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE unit Alfred E.
Parkington, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation broker, intends to apply for
permission lo purchase the following
described lands in ihe vicinity of
Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. E. corner and about 16% miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north SO chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence soutii 80
chains, thence east So chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
ALFRED E.  PARKINGTON.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 3, 1910. JyS
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that George Williams, of Winnipeg, .Man., occupation
clerk, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands in the vicinity of Kltwancool
or Chean Wein Valley:—Commencing at a post planted at the S. W.
corner and about 16% miles distant
in a north-westerly direction from
the north end of Kitwancool Lake,
thence north 4 0 chains, thence
east 40 chains, thence soutii 4 0
chains, thence west 40 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 160 acres, more or less.
GEORGE WILLIAMS.
James  W.  Smith,  Agent.
Dated June 4, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that William
Hume Grant, of Stewart, B.C., occupation engineer, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a
post marked W.H.G.'s S.W. Cor., and
planted adjoining Alfred Manson's
corner post, thence SO chains north,
along W. N, Harrison's west line,
thense east 80 chains, thence south
80 chains, thence west 80 chains, following Alfred Malison's north line to
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
WILLIAM  HUME GRANT.
Frank R. Strolra, Agent.
Dated July 2, 1910. Jy22
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that The Canadian
Fish and Cold Storage Company, of
Vancouver, B. O, occupation mercantile and manufacturing, intends
to apply for permission to purchase
the following described lands: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-east corner of lot 34, Range 5,
Coast District, thence south 20
chains, thence east 40 chains, thence
north 25 chains more or less to the
shore line, thence following along
tho shore line to the point of commencement and containing 90 acres,
more or less.
The Canadian  Fish  &  Cold
Storage Company Limited.
J. H. Pillsbury, Agent.
Dated July 14, 1910. Jyl9
Skeena Land District—District of
fUSSicfl.!*
TAKE NOTICE 'that William
Simpson, of Lindsay, Ont., occupation hotel-keeper, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands In the vicinity of the Kitwancool or Chean Wein
Valley:-—Commencing at a post
planted at the south-east corner and
about 7 % miles distant In a north
westerly direction from the north
end of Kitwancool Lake, thence
north 80 chains, thence west 80
chains, thence south 80 chains,
thence east 80 chains to point of
commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less,
WILLIAM SIMPPON.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated  May  31,  1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Edward Cas-
pell, of Cayley, Alberta, occupation
merchant, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of the
Kitwancool or Chean Weln Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. W. corner and distant about 15%
miles in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence south 80 chains, thence
east 80 chains, thence north 80
chains, thence west 80 chains to
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
EDWARD CASPELL.
James W.  Smith, Agent.
Dated June 3, 1910. Jy8
-District of
Skeena Land District-
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that George Tutt,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation den-
ist, intends to apply for permission
o purchase the following described
ands in the vicinity of the Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—Commencing at a post planted at the
north-east corner and about 8 %
miles distant in a north-westerly direction from the north end of Kltwancool Lake, thence south 40
chains, thence west 40 chains, thence
north   40  chains,    tnence    east
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles Gei-
ger, of Victoria, b. C, occupation
clerk, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands In the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Comemnclng at a post planted at the
S. E. corner and about 19 miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north 80 chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence south 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
CHARLES GIEGER.
James W.  Smith, Agent.
Dated June 4th, 1910. Jy8
-District of
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Samuel John
McDiarmid, of Monarch, Alberta, occupation farmer, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following described lands in the Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—Commencing at a post planted at the N.
E. corner and about 4 % miles in a
north-westerly direction from the
north end of Kitwancool Lake,
thence south 80 chains, thence west
80 chains, thence north 80 chains,
thence east 80 chains to point of
commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
SAMUEL JOHN McDIARMID.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated May 31st, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District-
Cassiar.
TAKE   NOTICE   that   Sarah   Cox,
of Monarch, Alberta, occupation mar-
led woman, intends to apply for permission  to  purchase   the    following
described lands in the Kltwancool or
Chean Wien Valley:—Commencing at
a post planted at the N,  W. corner
and  about   4%   miles  distant   in     a
north-westerly   direction    from    the
north end of Kitwancool Lake, thence
south   §0   chains,   thence     east     80
40lchalns,    thence    north    80    chains,
Skeena Land District—District of
OflSSl L.
TAKE NOTICE that Thomas Sills,
of Vancouver, B. (?., occupation machinist, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands In the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Weln Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. W. corner and about 26% miles
distant In a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence south 80 chains, thence
east 80 chains, thence north 80
chains, thence west 80 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
THOMAS SILLS.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 8th, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land Diicrict—Dlstrict'"or
[1 *i tj c \ n t*
TAKE NOTICE that William Wallace, of Toronto, Ont., occupation
insurance agent, intends lo apply for
permission to purchase the follnv, mg|
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that John Reid,.
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
broker, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. W. corner and about 15% miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north 40 chains, thence
east 40 chains, thence south 40
chains, thence west 4u chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 160 acres, more or less.
JOHN REID.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated  June  3,   1010. ,Iy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Grace Cess-
ford, of Victoria, B, C, occupation
married woman, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of
Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. E. corner and about 23 miles distant In a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence south 80 chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence north SO
chains, thence east 80 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 040 acres, more or less.
GRACE CESSFORD.
James W. Smith, Agent
Dated June 6th, 1910. Jyi
Skeena Land  District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Henry Hemming, of Victoria, B. C, occupation
hotel keeper, intends to nnnly for
permission to purchase ill" following
described lands In the vicinity of Kltwancool   or  Chean   Wein   Valley: —
discrlbed lands in the vi.T ilty ot Kit- Commencing at a post planted at the
wancool   or  Chean   Wein   Valley:--- f' ?• ?°rner an<labout J1 ™'lea dls-
chnins to point of commencement,
and containing 640 acres, more or
less. GEORGE TUTT.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June  1,  1910. JyS
thence west 80 chains to point of
commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
SARAH COX.
James W. Smith, Agent
Dated May 31st, 1910.
Coast Land District—District of
Skeena.
TAKE NOTICE that I, George A.
Poole, of Prince Rupert, occupation
printer, intend to apply for permission to purchase the following de-
Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley: scribed lands:—Commencing at a
Commencing at a post planted at the jpost planted on the north-east shore
south-west corner and about 8 % |line of Smith Island, distant about
miles distant In a north-westerly di- lone mile south-east from Lot 38, and
rectlon from the north end of Kit- marked "G. A. P.'s North-west Cor-
wancool Lake, thence north 80 ner Post," thence 20 chains soutii,
chains, thence east 40 chains, thence | thence 80 chains east, thence north
south 80 chains, thence west 40 jto shore line, thence following shore
chains  to   point   of  commencement, iline to point of commencement, con-
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Lome Thompson, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
dentist, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described  lands  in  the vicinity  of  the
and  containing  320  acres,  more  or
less. LORNE THOMPSON.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 1,  1910. Jy8
talning 160 acres, more or less.
GEORGE  ARTHUR  POOLE.
Dated Saturday, July 2, 1910.
(First insertion July 5.)
Comencing at a post planted at the
N'. E. corner and about 26% miles
distant in a north-westerly diroc: on
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence south 80 chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence north 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to the
point of commencement, containing
640  ucrcs, more  or  less.
WILLIAM   WALLACE.
James \v. Smith, Agent.
Dated  June   8th,   1910. JyS
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE .NOTICE that Annie Cowan,
of Victoria, B. C, occupation married woman, Intends to apply for permission lo purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of Kit-] Valley:
tant, in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kltwancool
Lake, thence south SO chains, thence
west SO chains, thence north 80
chains, thence eaBl 80 chains to the
iioini of commencement, and containing G40 acres, more or less.
HENRY  HEMMING.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 6th, 1910. jy8
wancool or Chean Weln Valley: —
Coinmencng at a post planted at the
N. W. corner and about 23 miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kltwancool
Lake; thence soutii SO chains, thence
east 80 chains, thence north 80
chains, thence west 80 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
ANX1E  COWAN.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 7th, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Nelson
Gowen, of Victoria, B. 0„ occupation mining engineer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the
t'ollowing described lands In the vl-
initv of Kltwancool or Chean Weln
Commencing at a post
planted at the N. E. corner and about
19 miles distant in the north-westerly direction from the north end of
Kitwancool Lake thence south 80
chains, thence west 4 0 chains, thence
north 40 chains, thence west 40
chains, thence north 40 chains,
thence east 80 chains to point of
commencement, and containing 480
acres, more or less.
NELSON   GOWEN.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 4th, 1910. Jy8 PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Friday, August 12, 1910.
prince Bupcrt journal
Published twice a week on Tuesdays
and Fridays from the office of publica-_
tion, Third Avenue near MoBride St.
Subscription rate to any point in
Camilla. -Coo a year; to points outside
of Canada, 83.00 a year.
Advertising rate furnished on application.
0. II. NELoON,
Editor.  ■
Friday, August 12, 1910.
WITH APOLOGIES
The Journal has ever since the
issue of its first number carefully
refrained from thrusting upon Its
readers concerns that have to do
with this publication and this office.
We were not vain enough to believe
that the citizens of Prince Rupert
were very much concerned with respect to the personality of the one
who .guides the destinies of the
paper, They were more concerned
we were convinced, in getting the un-
garbled news than in reading of the
troubles which the management of
The Journal had. We are still of the
same opinion. It is, therefore, with
apologies to our readers that we deviate from the .course at this time
and reluctantly bring ourselves somewhat into the lime light. Circumstances have arisen, however, which
we feel calls for such an explanation
as we now give and we trust our
readers will overlook the breach in
good taste that we feel obliged to
make.
A campaign has been carried on
by a section of the press in this city
which appeared to have for its object the belittling of The Journal.
That, the objects aimed at have been
unsuccessful was but the consequence
that any newspaperman would have
anticipated under the conditions.
The city council has been brought
into what, by grace, we may call the
discussion. We want to make it perfectly clear that The Journal has
asked no favor from any member of
the city council. We never asked a
member for even a share of the
printing. Without any reference to
ourselves the council decided to call
for tenders in the matter of printing.
We accepted the situation as a matter of necessity. We were unsuccessful in our first tender for work from
the council because we were underbid by another firm. We were successful in the next bid because we
in turn were the lowest tenderer.
We have got no work from the city
council that we did not have to enter
Into competition for, which is more
than any other printing establishment in the city can say. We are not
offering any comment at this time
upon that condition of affairs, but
it shows that neither from the members of the council nor the officials
of the city hall have we depended
for any business.
In our younger days the most of
us had to meet competition in the
school room and on the field of sport.
We were taught then to take defeat
or victory in a sportsmanlike way.
The lessons taught then should surely follow us into real life and we
should be expected to take defeat
Willi grace, and success without vain
boasting.
We may now be excused If we explain  at a  little  length  the reason
for our presence In this city.    It Is
over four years ago that we decided
to locate here because, as a journalist
actively engaged in that calling, we
were given opportunities to "size up"
the situation on this coast and were
convinced that this was to be a great
city.    We have never since that time
had any reason to doubt the estimate
then  formed  or  to  alter  our  deter- +
minallon to take part in the development of the city.    We were among
the  first  of  the newspapermen  that
visited the site of Prince Rupert after  its selection  as the terminus of
the G. T. P., and before any business
places could be established, when the
location  stood  practically  as nature
left it with only the slight alterations
which a small party of O. T. P. engineers   under   Mr.   Bacon   and   Mr.
Pillsbtiry were able to accomplish in
the shori time they had had at their
disposal.    Our    Impressions    of    tbe
townsite and  the future of the city
which   were  very   optimistic    were
given to the public in an article that
found very wide circulation, not only
In the English press of Canada, but
also among the papers published In
French.    Never since that day have
we ceased to do what, we could to advance the interests of Prince Rupert.
Had the G. T.  P. granted permission at the time to establish a paper
on the townsite we would very shortly after that have established a paper
here.    The  policy  of the  company,
however, was against such a course
and with alterations in the policy of
the company respecting Its work on
this  coast  and  other  circumstances
arising, The Journal's appearance
was delayed. But the paper is no intruder. Every reputable newspaperman on the Pacific coast of British
Columbia was well aware of our intentions including that trail-blazer,
tiie late John Houston, whose ability
we appreciate after many years acquaintanceship during which we had
excellent opportunities to study him
as legislator and journalist.
We reluctantly give publicity to
matters dealing alone with ourselves.
It is only in view of peculiar circumstances by which we have been subjected to a species of attack that we
dispise—that of a covert nature In
which by insinuation impressions are
sought to be created that would
prejudice The Journal in the eyes of
the  public.
We know the West well enough to
realize that this will not have the
desired effect and for that reason we
might possibly have been well cpn-
tent to have left the question alone.
We, however, thought It wise to put
the facts before the public and again
ask their pardon for doing so. We
will, as in the past, refuse to perpetrate upon our readers a recital of
our own perplexities and troubles,
believing that each lias enough of
his own to forbid a desire to continually listen to those of others.
| Sir Wilfrid |
* Laurier's Tour *
•$»>*.;. & •;♦ •;. *i*.;..;..;.,;..;..;. ►;,.;..;..;. .♦, %. ►*,,;, .j, ,$. $ ,j
The itinerary of Sir Wilfrid
Laurier's tour of Britisli Columbia
lias been finally arranged as follows:
Leave Banff, 9.20 a.m., Monday,
August 15.
Arrive Golden, 13 p.m., Monday,
August  15.
Leave Golden, 14 p.m., Monday,
August 15.
Arrive Revelstoke, 19 p.m., Monday, August 15.
Leave Revelstoke, 20 p.m., Monday, August 15.
Arrive Vancouver, 12 noon, Tuesday, August 16.
Public meeting at Vancouver on
niglit of Tuesday, August 16.
Leave Vancouver, 13 p.m., Wednesday, August 17.
Arrive Victoria, 19 p.m., Wednesday, August 17.
Public meeting in Victoria on
night of Thursday, August 18.
Leave Victoria about midnight,
August 18.
Arrive Prince Rupert, Saturday,
August 20.
Leave Prince Rupert, Monday
night, August 22, or next morning.
Arrive Vancouver, Wednesday
night, August 24.
Leave Vancouver, 6.25 a.m.,
Thursday, August 25.
Arrive Kamloops, 13.50 p.m.
Thursday, August 25.
Leave Kamloops, 9 a.m., Friday,
August  26.
Arrive Vernon, 15 p.m., Friday,
August 26.
Public meeting at Vernon on night
of Friday, August'26.
Leave Vernon, 1 a.m., Saturday,
August 27.
Arrive Revelstoke, 6.25 a.m., Saturday, August 27.
Leave Revelstoke, 7.45 a.m., Saturday, August ^7.
Arrive Arorwhead, 9.05 a.m., Saturday, August 27.
Leave Arrowhead, 11.10 a.m., Saturday, August 27.
Arrive West Robson, 21.40 p.m.,
Saturday,  August  27.
Leave West Robson, 22 p.m., Saturday, August 27.
Arrive Nelson, 23.10 p.m., Saturday, August 27.
Public meetin gat Nelson, Monday night, August 29.
Leave Nelson,  6 a.m., August 30.
Arrive Kootenay Landing, 10 a.m.
Tuesday, August 30.
Leave Kootenay Landing, 12 noon,
Tuesday, August 30.
Arrive Cranbrook, 16 p.m., Tuesday, August 30.
Leave Cranbrook, 17 p.m., Tuesday, August 30.
Arrive Fernie, 19.25 p.m., Tuesday, August 30.
Leave Fernie, 20.15 p.m., Tuesday,
August  30.
Arrive Lethbrldge, 4 a.m., Wednesday, August 31.
ANGLICAN  SYNOD
Bishop Du Vernet's Charge Reviews the
Year's History of
Diocese.
Dill'iculties Encountered in the Work
of the Church in This Part of
the Country
The chancellor of the exchequer
stated recently that there were at
present four recipients of perpetual
pensions. The first was the .£5,000
granted to Lord Nelson, drawn by
the present holder of the title. The
pension of £2,000 to Lord Rodney
was shared today by Corisande
Evelyn Vere, Baroness Rodney, and
Lord Rodney. The £720 to heirs
of the Duke of Schomberg was taken
by the trustees of the will of the
late Henry P. Powys and Robert
Gosling (each £360). A pension of
£375 16s to Selgnor D'Auverquerque
was now paid to the governor and
company of the Bank of England
This week the Anglican synod has
been meeting here in St. Andrew's
hall. The charge of Bishop Du Vernet, In view of the many perplexing
problems that the church has to face
in a new country like this and the
rapid development that is taking
place is of importance. The bishop's
charge was as follows:—
Reverend Brethren and Brethren pf
the Laity:—
While we have met as a Synod in
this church hall on three former occasions, this is the first time that we
extend to you a welcome to the City
of Prince Rupert. When we met
here three years ago Prince Rupert
was little more than a railway surveyors' camp with a few shacks and
tents, now it is an incorporated city
with many miles of streets rapidly
filling up with houses. It is a seaport with many lines of steamships
calling here, and already railway
trains are making their way up the
Skeena River, bringing nearer and
nearer to those of the interior tho
hope of easy transportation. Assembled here in this city, which is destined to become a great metropolis,
the centre of a mighty development
in the northern half of this province,
we of the Diocese of Caledonia, which
embraces the same region as members of that historic church which
began Christian work in this neighborhood fifty-three years ago must
have felt the thrilling interest of the
present moment as wc watch the unfolding of events and endeavor to do
our part in laying the foundation foi
the moral and spiritual welfare of a
nation In the West.
In reviewing the year since last
we met as a Synod, we must first
mention some of the losses which the
church has sustained. Last May tho
whole Empire felt the shock of the
unexpected death of him who while
occupying the highest position in the
realm was ever a loyal member of the
Church of England. King Edward
VII will long live in history as the
great Peace Maker of his age.
Bishop Dart's Death
In this province the Church of
England has met with the loss of a
bishop who by his fidelity to duty and
consistent Christian character en-,
cleared himself to all who knew him.
As I was an nndergratuate of King's
College Windsor, N.S., when Dr. Dart
was president of that university, I
felt the death of the late Bishop of
New Westminster as a personal loss.
This Diocese has been called upon
to mourn the loss of a devoted layman who labored with marked ability
as principal of the Indian Industrial
School at Metlakatla for nearly
twenty years. Many of our native
young men will remember with gratitude the debt they owe to Mr. J. R.
Scott.
Not only by death but also by removal we have suffered loss as a
Diocese. Rev. M. H. Jackson, who
for nearly two years did most efficient work at Atlin was obliged on
account of his wife's health to leave
up and take work where he could
be near expert medical advice.
We have also met with a serious
loss from fire. The beautiful new
church at Essington, only opened by
me a year ago last month, was totally destroyed by fire early in the
morning of June 8. This second loss
of a church building in less than
eighteen months has been a staggering blow to the Rev. W. F. Rush-
brook, but thanks to the S. P. C. K.
insisting upon a larger insurance before giving a grant we shall be enabled to build a smaller church with
the insurance money and local assistance In the way of labor given,
without appealing for putslde help.
From our losses let us turn to our
gains.
It was my privilege on St. James
Day to take part In the consecration
of Rev. A. U. De Pencier as Bishop
of New eWstminster. Having labored In the same diocese with him as
a neighboring clergyman for some
years I feel that the Church in this
province has been greatly strengthened by the promotion to so high a
position of one so familiar with Canadian Church life and so vigorous In
action. The southern boundary of
this Diocese Is the northern bound
ary of the Diocese of New Westminster. For example, one side of the
river at Fort George is in our Dlo
cese, the other in   his.    As    neigh-
^mmmmmKamm&aiffli«.i&
THE JOURNAL   I I
*
*
*
't
is the Official Advertising
Medium for the City
of Prince Rupert
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boring Biships I  feel  sure we shall
work well together.
As Prince Rupert is not only a
growing city but also a convenient
centre from which to work outlying
missions, I am most thankful to be
able to announce that I have secured the assistance of two clergymen,
Rev. T. C. Des Barres, B.A., formerly
curate in charge of St. Jude's Nottingham, and Rev. W. G. James, B.
A., formerly rector of Pincher Creek,
Alberta. While not neglecting the
centre, but giving it men of different
gifts we shall be able to do more In
the way of ministering to the small
settlements which are springing up
in the neighborhood.
The Stickine Mission
Ever since I came to this Diocese
I have had on my conscience the
abandoned Mission to the Stickine
Indians. There were two difficulties
in the way of re-openlng this Mission—the man and the money. Rev.
Frank Palgrave, as a holiday trip,
revisited this Misison last summer
and brought me such an appealing
account of the Indians still loyal to
the hurch of England, still waiting
for us to send them a missionary,
that I could not refrain from doing my utmost. The way seemed to
open wonderfully—the Indian Department promised a grant for tho
day school at Tahl-tan, kind friends
in England made a generous donation, and Rev. T. P. W. Thorman
accepted my call to return with his
son from England and reorganize the
work which he laid down on account
of his wife's declining health seven
years ago. After a dangerous trip
up the Strlcklne In a gasoline launch
lie and his son arrived at Telegraph
Creek on June 9, and a few days after reached the Indian village of
Tahl-Tan, where he found things
which he had left In the Mission
House seven years before untouched
—a tribute to the honesty and loyalty of the natives. He opened the
day school at once and soon had fifteen scholars in attendance. It Is a
matter of rejoicing that our Church
and Mission House at Tahl-Tan are
once more in use and that the Indians who have waited so patiently
are again being ministered to by one
who can talk their language.
The Church has advanced during
the year not only in the way of more
e'ergymen being brought into tho
diocese, but also in the way of new
missions being opened.
The transfer of Rev. Wm. Hogan
from Port Simpson to Masset has
placed at the entrance to Masset Inlet one eminently adapted to minister
to the settlers who are beginning to
fringe that remarkable water-way Into the heart of Graham Island. .New
Masset has been given regular Sunday services and the congregation
there are ready for a church building. A few months ago Stewart was
only a hamlet of half a dozen log
houses. Today it is a town of about
2,000 inhabitants. We have there a
church and a parsonage with Rev. W.
E. Colli3on in charge of this new mission.
Provincial Organization
Forced on account of the railway
to tear down our church and mission-
house at Inverness, we have built on
a better site a building consisting of
church, with rooms attached, which
the Rev. J. H. Keen has found most
serviceable during the fishing season,
Another step in advance which we
as a church have taken this year has
been the incorporation of the Synod
of the Diocese. While the Bishop has
for some time past been a "Corporation So'e" to hold church property In
trust, yet with the growth of our
church work it will be found more
satisfactory to have church property
vested in the Synod. This can now
be done under the Act of Incorporation of March 10, 1910.
Turning to matters which effect
the church in this province, I have
to report that a forward step has
been taken within the last few week^
in the way of preparing for some
kind of provincial organization.
While I have expressed myself on
former occasions as in favor of as
simple an organization as possible, it
seems that under the constitution of
the General Synod, there is no other
way of our organizing than in the
form of a Provincial Synod, realizing
this I have attempted to draft a constitution for a Provincial Synod,
which, while safeguarding our Diocesan Rights, will allow us to take
united action as a church in British
Columbia. The chief work assigned
to a Provincial Synod by the General
Synod is the subdividing of Dioceses
and the appointing of Bishops.
Naturally this vast missionary diocese will be the region most affected
by this if we agree to the formation
of a Provincial Synod, therefore in
the draft, which has met with the
approval of delegates from the other
three dioceses in this province who
were in Vancouver, July 6th, and
which I hope to submit for your consideration at this sesison of the Synod, a clause is inserted which will
protect the Interests of a missionary
diocese founded by a missionary so
ciety. By resolution of the General
Synod the whole question of the
formation of an Ecclesiastical Province of Britisli Columbia depends upon whether the dioceses Involved
"desire to form such." As we hope
to have another session of our Synod
in September of next year, we need
not take final action now, hut we
should fully discus the question.
Theological College
Another matter of provincial importance which has given me most
anxious thought is the question of
Theological colleges. We are building
for the future and we should build
wisely. We have an open field before us. The Provincial University
and the two proposed theological col-
lges—St. Marlr.'s and Bishop Latimer
—are still In a state of flux, nothing
as yet crystaiized. Surely no words
can express the importance of starting right. Let me repeat what I said
in my charge of last year, for these
words suggested a poslble solution
to a most difficult problem:
"The comprehensive character of
the Anglican church is its glory.
Within certain limits men holding
divergent theological views can yet
be loyal churchman. This being the
case, the only way to ensure harmonious action between men of different schools of thought Is by the
frank recognition of these differences
It so happens that the prevailing type
of chiirchmanship In Southern British Columbia is of one kind, and the
prevailing type of churrhmanshlp in
Northern British Columbia is of another kind. The first step, therefore,
towards united action is a frank
recognition of this fact and the establishment of a feeling of mutual
confidence. For this reason it is
much to be regretted that an attempt
has recently been made to form a
theological college for the whole
province without any consultation
with the authorities of this Diocese
as to a basis of agreement and without any guarantee that on the teaching staff of this college there will be
any representative of that school of
thought which predominates in this
Diocese."
The solution suggested by these
words may under God's blessing yet
be accepted. As my words upon this
vital question will be read far and
wide by those interested on both
sides, not only in this province and
Eastern Canada, but also in England, I shall state even at the risk
of being somewhat lengthy, the posi-
(Continued on Page Five) Friday, August i2, 19i0.
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
C. D. NEWTON
Real Estate
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Exchange Block
Corner 3rd Avenue and 6th Street
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watchful as to every other detail of
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Limited
MANUFACTURERS OF SADDLERY
Jobbers of Leather, Harness, Saddles, Whips, Trunks and Valises,
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and Dressings.
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VICTORIA, B.C.
ANGLICAN SYNOD
(Continued from Page Four)
CARE OF EXPLOSIVES
Warning Hns  Rcen  Given to Those
Engaged in Work
The building Inspector has made a
tour of the different places where
blasting is being done and given a
warning that the greatest care must
be taken to avoid any danger from
leaving explosives where they may be
a menace to life or in any way endanger the public.
The matter came before the city
council some days ago when Aid.
Mobley presented a case of explosive
caps which had been picked up by a
child playing. The child was actually
hammering a cap when discovered.
Only that It happened to be a little
damp there would have been disastrous results the alderman pointed out. The mother had later used
a hairpin to investigate what was In
the shell which likewise might have
caused an explosion. Prince Rupert
stood a good chance of being a city
of maimed people If there was not
more care exercised by those using explosives.
It was decided to have the building inspector visit all places where
blasting was going on and give warning. The caps complained of had
been left where some blasting had
been done, and picked up by the
child.
Aid. Pattullo proposed to have the
bylaw looked into and if provision
was not already made to have severe
penalties attaching to such carelessness.
At a subsequent meeting the report was brought in by the building
inspector that he bad visited all these
places and given warning that the
explosives were to be kept under
lock and In charge of one of the
gang.
 o	
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Hon which I have taken. It will be
remembered that this Synod at its
last session confirmed the stand
which I then took by passing the following resolution: "Tthat this Synod declines to recognize any theological college as being for the whole
church of this province without this
Synod having due representation on
the governing body of the same."
This was at once met by the supporters of St. Mark's College offering
to descind their, provisional constitution and give this Diocese proper representation. After consultation with
our diocesan delegates, Rev. J. H.
Keen and myself, this principle was
embodied in the new constitution.
There yet remained the still more
difficult question of a representative'
on the teaching staff which was men
tloned to me as a second matter of
vital importance. This led me to
suggest to the authorities of St
Mark's Colege a scheme of an affiliated school in which lectures on controversial subjects would be given by
professors in sympathy with the line
of teaching imparted. Not being asked to act for those at Vancouver who
were promoting BishopLatimer College, my suggestion took the form
of an affiliated Diocesan institution
taking the students of the final year
for lectures on Eccleslology, or the
doctrine of the church, the ministry,
and the Sacraments, but I made this
suggestion, which was freely accept
ed by St. Mark's College, with th-
earnest hope that it might open thi
door for the affiliation of Bishop La
timer College on similar lines.
A few days ago it was my privilege
to meetin Vancouver the promoters
of both colleges with our Diocesan
delegate, Mr. G. W. Cowan, M.P.,
present to support me. Negotiations
are still in progress and no formal
action has yet been taken, but I believe there is good hope for at least
a measure of co-operation. Perhaps
I could not be doing the cause of
truth and harmony greater servico
than to outline the foundation upon
which we are endeavoring to build.
The church throughout the Dominion of Canada by resolution of
the General Synod has agreed upon
a common standard known as "The
Preliminary Examination for Holy
Orders." All the theological colleges
of whatever type of churchmanship
accept this, and the ground covered
in the different courses of study is
practically the same. There is a com
mon Board of Examiners for Divinity
Degrees with representatives upon
this Board from all the theological
colleges.
Further in this common standard
set by the church as a whole there is
a frank recognition of the different
schools of thought in the church.
This is done in the way of alternate
text books. Still further if a candidate chooses certain text books, as
allowed, the examiner is a member of
the board in sympathy with the
teaching contained therein. Surely
it is an easy step which must com-
mend Itself to all broad-minded
churchmen to allow, in a college professing to be a provincial institution
the teaching upon controversial subjects which Is embodied in author
ized alternate text-books to be given
by professors in sympathy with the
views embodied therein. Such teach
ers on controversial subjects being
supported by voluntary contributions
of interested donors. Upon such non
controversial subjects as Old Testament Exegesis, the Canon of Holy
Scripture, Apolegetics, Christian
Ethics, Homiletics, Elocution, etc.,
there can be united action, all stu
dents attending lectures by the sama
professors supported by the whole
Church. The only serious objection
which I have heard raised against
this scheme is the question of resi
dence, the spiritual life of an institu
Hon is as potent an influence as
lecturing. A boarding house for th„
students, however, is not a vital part
of a provincial college. The simple
expedient of two residences, each
with Its own Dean, meets the objection.
The outcome would be this: Ono
"Anglican Theological College of
British Columbia" affiliated with the
provincial unlverslay, with a handsome building on the university
grounds, containing lecture rooms,
library, reading room, convocation
hall, etc. All lectures to be delivered
in this college, with two adjacent
residences—"St. Mark's Hostel" with
a warden, and "Bishop Latimer Hall"
with a principal, both being not on'y
deans In residence, but members of
the College staff of lecturers. All
students would register at the ont
college but would be free to choose
their residence, and alternate set ot
lectures on certain subjects. Thera
would be a common board of exam
iners as outlined and a diploma issued by the one college.
If untrammelled by the association
of the East, we in the West can at
the very foundation of things agree |
heartily upon some such broad and
united policy as this and escape tho
scandal of two rival colleges, we
shall be setting an example to the
whole church in Canada which will
redound to the glory of God and the
advancement of His Kingdom ol
Truth and Love.
Indian Lands
In regard to the Indian land question I take the ground that the Indians are wards of the Dominion
Government and that if they have
any grievances It Is for the Dominion Government to take up their
cause with the Provincial Government and see that they get their
rights. I deem it unwise and unnecessary to stir up the minds of the
rank and file of the Indian bands
throughout the country by circulating petitions and asking them to
raise money for lawyers to fight their
battles. I am glad to say that no
clergyman In this Diocese has done
this. As a church we have appealed
to the Dominion Government and received the assurance that earnest efforts are being made to obtain a decision which will be recognized by
all as final.
In facing the future, we, as a Diocese, while doing our utmostjn the
way of self-support through contributing to our Diocesan Mission fund,
must of necessity look for assistance
in our pioneer work from the church
in Eastern Canada and in the Mother
Land. We are deeply grateful to the
English societies known by the letters, C.M.S., S.P.G., S.P.C.K., C. &
C.C.S., as well as to the Missionary
Society of the Canadian Church and
the Woman's Auxiliary.
A month from today our brethren
in Nova Scotia will be celebrating on
the histortic spot the 200th anniversary of the first Anglican service in
Canada.   While we cannot be present
in  person  we  can  in  spirit  stretch
forth our hand from the Pacific to
the Atlantic across the vast Dominion of Canada and give the Diocese
of Nova Scotia in the extreme East
the heartfelt greetings of the Diocese
of Caledonia in the far West.
"We are not divided
All  one body we
One in hope and doctrine
One in charity."
Christian love above everything
else is the bond which binds us to
gether. May we as a Synod in all
our deliberations feel more than ever
that while there are diversity of
gifts and differences of opinion we
are all working for the one end under the leadership of the One Master
Christ or King, to Whom we would
once more bend the knee and take
the oath of allegiance that we may
the better serve, under the Banner
of the Cross, our day and generation
in the uplifting of humanity.
The financial report for the year
showed that there had been iaised
in the diocese $5,338.68. The total
receipts for the diocese was $17,-
004.67, there being $11,671.99 contributed from outside the diocese.
A balance is left on hand of $;,-
475.19.
Dealing with the question of Indian marriages, the committee recommended that the government pro-
provide proper facilities for the recording of Indian marriages, and
that the Indians be urged to have
the ceremony performed among their
own tribes by the resident missionary.
Another recommendation of the
committee urged the Synod to press
upon the city the necessity for a
by-law regulating the time for young
people without protection being on
the public streets.
SPORTS
VISITING  Till:  CITY
THE CITIZEN'S LOAN
It is a mistake to suppose, says a
Paris contemponary, that the dignity
of Marshal of France does not exist.
The first law for the reorganization
of the army passed in 1875 maintains
the title, the conditions to be denned
in a subsequent law to be passed
later. This provision has never been
fulfilled, and no one has been appointed. Yet the minister of war recalls the existence of the dignity in
a recent official memorandum on the
duty of a soldier. He enumerates how
every man is to submit to his superior
the soldier to the corporal, the
corporal to the sergeant, right up
to the general, who Is subordinate to
the "Marechal de France."
"Johnny," said the boy's mother,
I hope you have been a nice,
quiet boy at school this afternoon."
"That's what I was," answered
Johnny. "I went to sleep right after dinner, and the teacher said
she'd whip any boy In the room who
waked  me up."
ATTELL AM) MOHAN MATCHED
Abe Attell and Owen Moran will
appear in a twenty-five round sparring match billed for the featherweight championship of the world on
Wednesday night, August 31, if Jimmy Coffroth carries out his plans,
says a San Francisco despatch. The
promoter declares that It will/be a
no-decision affair, and that It will be
left to the newspapers to pick the
winner. He declares, further, that
while he has not consulted with the
officials of the state In reference to
Is right to handle the match, he
believes it is a boxing match pure
md simple, and that as such it will
be permitted under the laws of California.
The outcome of this bout will be
awaited with much interest, not only
from the standpoint of the match Itself, but also because of the attitude
that may be'assumed by the officials.
Since the late affair in Reno the boxing game has been unusually quiet
in San Francisco, and following the
announcement of Governor Gillett
no matches have been held in San
Francisco save the four-round bouts.
Whether the question will be raised
round bouts remains to be seen,
as between the ten and twenty-
Should this match be put on, it
will be the fifth meeting between the
two featherweights. Attell and Moran
have had two fights at Coffroth's
Colma arena, one of twenty-five and
the other of twenty-three rounds.
They also had a ten-round match in
New York, and quite recently a ten-
round go in Los Angeles.
RACING  YACHT
World Tourists .\rv Spending a Few
Days Here
Mr. Stonhal, who is in charge of
the local branch of the Bank of
Britisli North America, is enjoying a
visit from his brother and his wife
who are making a tour of the world.
Coming from Australia here they
will spend a little time in Prince
Rupert before starting across the
continent by easy stages on the way
back to England. This city has won
the heart of Mr. Stonhal, and he
only laments the fact that he cannot make a longer stay with his
brother here.
In the manager of the bank of
British North America, the city has
a firm friend who may be depended
upon to impress his visitors with
the importance of the place.
 o	
SAVED BY A CAT
Draftsman   in   Mr.  Barker's   Office
Miraculously Avoided  Injury
The Victoria Yacht club will be
represented in the international races
for the Alexandra cup at next year's
regatta by a fine yacht. Any doubt
that may have existed In the minds
of local yachtsmen was removed at
the last executive meeting of the
Victoria Yacht Club, when it was
announced that C. Bennett Thompson
and H. P. Simpson had agreed to furnish the necessary money to have a
boat ready for next year. An- application will immediately be made
to the cup trustees for permission
to build the racer under universal
rules, as advocated by Ted Geary and
others at the last meeting of the international association held here recently.
It Is not anticipated that the trustees, although known to favor the
Vancouver idea of adopting international rules, will refuse permission
but, in any event, a yacht will be
constructed. The sentiment of the
meeting was "We want the cup," and
"Ted Geary must look to his laurels."
As soon as the trustees render their
decision to the local club respecting
the rules, plans will be obtained from
Fyfe or some other famous designer
and the craft will be built In a local
shipyard.
At present, the Alexandra cup is in
the hands of the trustees who declared the races at Seattle last year
"no contest."
What might have been a very serious accident was fortunately averted by the merest chance yesterday
morning. A large stone, weighing
about two pounds was thrown up by
a blast near the government buildings and sent through the window of
W. .L. Barker, architect. The
draftsman, H. Rogers, has his desk
directly in front of the window and
sits right in the path which the rock
followed. Fortunately he had left
his place for a moment to watch
a playful cat, which the workingmen
were trying to get out of the way.
Had ,it not been for _this little incident, the rock, without a dqubt,
wou'd have struck the draftsman and
the chances are that it would have
been attended with fatal results. The
stone made a deep abrasion on a
railing as well as breaking the window.
There is room for more care in the
blasting operations here. It would
appear from such a case as this that
the blanketting in connection with
the blasts is not done perfectly
enough.
 o	
FEWER MEETINGS
Council Discussed the Question of AI lev;.
ing Bonus on Money Advanced
for Telephone.
Aid. Hilditch Regards Such a Course
as Means of Fostering Public
Spirit
cJmJ,#**i5hiM"<hS,IM,4,***,MhM,*****S
*
Cleaning Black Goods
Where black must be worn In summer, as for mourning, it is hard to
keep it from getting gray and dusty
looking.
A .frock must be well shaken as
soon as it Is taken off and the hem
of the skirt gone over with a stiff
brush. Then dust carefully with a
fine whisk, using a soft velvet brush
or piece of black crepe for silk or
net trimmings.
This treatment should he insisted
upon where a maid Is kept, and other
wise should be done by the wearer.
When the habit Is once established it
does not take long and a frock Is always  ready  when   needed.
If the material has grown gray or
shiny it can be freshened by wiping
off with alcohol. This is particularly
good for black hats, and does not
hurt crepe if carefully applied.
Where black goods are much spotted they can be cleaned with common brown soap—such as is used in
the kitchen. Sponge well with a thick
suds of the soap, rinse and press on
the wrong side or under a thick cloth
to prevent shininess.
When mud stains remain on a
black skirt after careful brushing
they can often be removed by rubbing with half a raw potato.
Do not use ammonia to clean black
gowns. This is a common cleanser,
but makes the material, especially
woollens, rusty.
Cottons or linens arc apt to turn
gray unless carefully washed. Black
starch should be used.
City Council  Will   Hold  Only  Three
Sittings a Week in Future
The city council, with the completion of a lot of the urgent business
connected with getting the municipality under way, has decided to
meet less frequently than in the past.
Last evening on adjournment the
council rose'until Saturday evening.
It is the intention in future to meet
only three evenings a week. Since
the election the members of the
council have been meeting practically every night in the week except
Fridays and Sundays. At the meeting Wednesday evening all the members were present and quite a little
routine business came up for consideration. The fuel and food bylaw
was put through its final reading.
Street Improvements
A petition was presented asking
that Sixth avenue from Fulton street
to the junction with Summit avenue
be put to grade.
The petition was referred to the
city  engineer   for  report.
H. H. Roe petitioned for the privilege of putting in a retaining wall
for the purpose of bringing his place
to grade on Second avenue.
This was also referred to the engineer.
 o	
INSPECTION  OF FOODS
Regulations Have Been Passed Covering the Protection of the Public
An order-in-councll has been passed at. Ottawa bringing into force
regulations governing the inspection
Of preserved fruits, vegetables and
milk under the meat and canned
foods act. The regulations apply
only to the Inspection of canned
foods for expori from Canada, or
from one province to another, Tlic>
are similar to regulations now in
force governing cleanliness nnd sanitary conditions in factories and
slaughterhouses handling meal for
export trade.    Ii Is provided that nil
In connection with the taking ovei
of the telephone system by the city,
the committee of the council having
charge of that matter Is now busily
engaged going through the legal processes connected with that work.
Five trustees, on the advice of thij
city socilitor, have been appointed to
take over the works pending the final
transfer to the city. These trustees
were selected from the city hall staff
so as to have them available on short
notice. They are the city clerk, tha
city assessor, the city accountant, Mr.
Stewart, and Mr. F. S. Clements, assistant engineer. The accounts of tha
company will have to be audited before the city pays over the necessary
money to meet the present demand,
but the transfer will be made just
as quickly as it can be done.
Aid. Hilditch at Wednesday evening's meeting of the council raised
the question again of the remunerating of the citizens who contributed
money to take over the telephone
pending the city acquiring it. He
asked if the citizens who so generously gave their money to hold this
franchise for the city were to receive
only the actual money put In.
His Worship said that this had
been settled. It had been decided to
return only the actual money put in.
Aid. Hilditch thought this was
hardly fair. He thought the citizens
who put their money up should be
given at least bank interest.
Aid. Mobley said he felt like Aid.
Hilditch, but in view of the fact that
the members of the council held
some of this stock and they were so
notoriously crooked now, he did not
think it wise to grant any more than
the actual amount.
Aid. Naden suggested that a vote
of thanks should be passed by the
council. He moved in this way more
particularly because there were men
who were not voters who had come
forward very generously and put up
money In this connection. Me referred to Messrs. Law and Westenhaver.
Aid. Mobley said this action on the
part of the citizens had been of great
benefit. He felt tha! the citizens who
contributed the money were entitled
to far more than interest, but these
men had expressed themselves as not
wanting more than the return of the
money put in, and he thought in view
of all the circumstances it was better
to let it stand at this.
Aid. Barrow and Aid. Smith moved that a hearty vote of thanks be
tendered the citizens for their public
spirit in coiling to the assistance of
the city and contributing the funds
to purchase the telephone system.
Aid. Pattullo In replying thanked
the council for the appreciation
shown. He suggested that a bonus
be paid the shareholders outside the
members of the council. He would
not accept any bonus If offered, but
he believed there were others who
would.
Aid. Hilditch wanted this done to
keep up the public spirit. If it were
not done he would fear that It would
be difficult perhaps to again enlist
assistance in such a work.
Mayor Stork said that the citizens
had received the benefits In the shape
of a municipally owned system.
Aid. Naden sajd he did not believe
they could foster public spirit in the
way sugegsted by Aid. Hildltch.
HOME   HINTS
The fueling of colored articles is
due often, not to the washing, bul
tn the Ironing, The hot Irons are
usei] directly on the material, and
this will more quickly fade delicate
colors Hum any amount of washing.
The effect Is even worRe than strong
sunlight. He sure that the nrllcle Is
evenly dampened,! and that the Iron
is only hot enough to smooth tbe
wrinkles properly by firm, even pros-
operations in connection with the sure and you will have no more trou.
preparation or packing of products ble from fading. Skirts must neve:
in establishments coming within the! be Ironed  across the gores, but un
scope of the act shall be carried on
with the strictest regard for cleanliness and the public health, All
fruits, vegetables, milk or other
articles used for canning purposes
must be In a wholesome condition,
buildings must be kept clean and
well lighted, no injurious drug, dye
or preservative? may be used, nnd :ill
tmpioyees must he free f"o'u. tnber-
niU-sli-. or any other comniunii able
disease. All cans must haV' libels
flung the name of the packer, the
late of packing, and n true ami rot-
•ect description of the contents.
nnd  down;   otherwise  the  lit  of  the
garment  is ruined.
Babies who seem hungry and fret
ful all the time are sometimes merely thirsty.    All people do not renllza
Rice Pudding I.—One-half cupful
of rice washed In salt water. Stir the
rice in a pint, of milk with a cupful
of water added, then pour Into buttered pudding dish. Add pinch of
salt and one-half cupful of sugar,
plave In hot oven for one hour. Do
nol stir while baking. To be served
will, milk. Tills makes a satisfying
and  wholesome menl. PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Friday. August 12. 1910.
The Newest Battleship
It is four years since the first
Dreadnought made her appearance,
and it is interesting now to notice the
improvements that have been evolved
In this type of warship during this
time, says an English exchange.
H. M. S. Vanguard, the latest addition to the Royal navy was built
in the shipyards of Messrs. Vickers,
Sons & Maxim, at Barrow. She is
490 feet long, has a beam of 82 feet
and displaces 19,250 tons, as compared with the 17,900 tons of the
original Dreadnought.
A number of "water-tube" boilers
provide steam for turbines of the latest design, producing between 24
and 25 thousand horse-power. Four
propellers give her a speed of 21
knots an hour.
The engines, boilers, shell, powder,
torpedoes, auxiliary machinery,
work-shops, and stores are all carefully protected; firstly by an armored deck 2% 'nches in thickness, running the full ength of the vessel; and
secondly, by 2-inch side armor. In
addition to this, the coal bunkers art
so arranged as to encircle the engine rooms and thus give further
protection, tor ten feet of coal will
stop most shells.
The ship i". steered by two rudders which can be worked either by
steam power or by hand.
That part of the vessel above the
armored deck is protected by side
plates and an upper deck of 2-inch
armor.
The stern is taken up by the
crew's quarters, whilst the bows are
given up to those of the officers. The
result is thai the quarter-deck which
in all pre-Dieadnought battleships is
sacred to the officers, is now the
habitation of the crew—an arrangement which is much more convenient in that the officers have direct
access to the bridges and "control
station."
The main armament of the Vanguard consists of five barbettes of
9%-inch armor; each enclosing two
twelve-inch guns of the latest pat-
fern. These are so ararnged that
eight guns can be fired on a broad
side; and as the shells employed
weigh 850 pounds apiece, the total
broadside  weighs  6,800   pounds.
The weight of a single twelve-Inch
gun is 58 tons.
Directly under each barbette is a
Epace extending to the full depth of
the vessel surrounded with 3%-inch
armor in which is to be found the
hydraulic machinery for turning,
raising or lowering the guns, and the
hand gear which is provided in case
of an emergency. Lifts are also provided for bringing tbe ammunition
up from the store rooms below.
On the top of each barbette is
mounted a pair of 4-inch quick-firing guns, fitted with light shields.
These are provided in order to repel
torpedo attacks. Ten others of the
same type are distributed about the
upper deck for the same reason. Six
machine guns completes the list of
guns.
As it is all important that the captain of a ship Bhall be as much as
possible out of danger of the enemies' fire, a battleships is always provided with a small circular shelter
constructed of very thick armor,
known as the "conning tower," from
which he may control the vessel In
comparative safety.
These "conning towers" are fitted
with compass steering wheel, telephones, speaking tubes, and keys for
firing torpedoes; whilst slits are pro-
ELECTRIO   ENGINE
Railway   Locomotive  Tluil   Does  Not
Require Wires lo Assist it
A remarkable railway engine, with
;- saloon hitched on, has just made a
vi.-iy successful run from Glasgow to
Gartsherrle, on the Caledonian &
North Britain railways. The locomo-
•tive i onsists ol three separate parts—
a steam turbine, a dynamo for generating electricity, unci electric motors tor ihe actual ih i\ Ing.
The boiler Is fixed at one end of
lice engine, ,v,icli is a very large one;
the gc nerator is situated in the centre, and consists of a Zotlly steam
turbine working at 3,000 revolutions
per minute directly coupled to the
dynamo, which supplies the electric
current to four motors; these motors
give a direct drlce to tour sets ot
heavy driving wheels. The nominal
power of the locomotive Is one thousand horse, and considerable economy
ii   ruel is anticipated.
All the advantages of an electric
engine are obtained without recourse
to external wires, and it can therefore travel over any lines. The exhaust  steam   is  also  condensed,  so
vided  through  which  the  occupants
can watch an engagement.
The Vanguard is fitted with a
novel "coning tower." It is divided
into two parts. The upper part is a
duplicate of the lower and is armored with a complete wall of 12-inch
steel. The two communicate
through a trap door in the 6-lnch
floor of the upper tower so that
should the upper part be shot away
the captain has only to slip through
into the lower tower.
Above the "conning tower" Is the
lower and upper bridge and "chart
room," from which the ship is controlled in time of peace.
A third and single "conning tower" Is provided behind the rear funnel.
Each of the two masts is fitted
with a "fire-control station," at a
height of auout 120 feet above the
level of the water. During an action
specially appointed officers are stationed here lo discover the range and
to note the results of the firing, and
telephone the results to the gunners.
By a marvellous system of motors
the officers in the control top can
aim the barbette guns themselves.
Each motion guided by the officer
in the top for training the guns is
transmitted directly and simultaneously to point the guns and also to
fire them independently of the men
in the barbette.
Perhaps tne most interesting feature of H. M. S. Vanguard is the
complete electrical installation that
she possesses. Everything on board
except the propelling engines are
worked by means of electricity.
The ammunition lifts are electrically worked. The anchor is weighed
by means of an electric motor. The
ship is lighted, the torpedoes are fired, boats are hoisted, and water
pumped, all by electricity.
Precautions, however, have been
taken in case of a breakdown of the
electric installation and hand gear
is always provided.
Electric searchlights are to bo
found on the bridge, on the searchlight platform on the masts, as well
as on the observation platform between the two rear barbettes.
Some idea of the extent of the electrical installation may be gathered
from the fact that more than 140
miles of electric wire is used in the
ship; carried in cables nine inches in
circumference from which smaller
cables diverge every few yards.
Now let us consider the cost of this
leviathan.
The hull with its fittings cost the
Admiralty over $4,000,000; the
searchlights and other electrical fittings, $250,000; the boilers and turbine machinery, $1,616,990; the torpedo   tubes,   $45,000.
The steam and motor launches
which she carries are worth $40,000
alone.
The twelve-inch guns cost over
$55,000 apiece, whilse the whole barbettes cost $550,000 apiece—$2,500,-
000 altogether.    .
Enormous as this cost is It would
not be so bad if the cost of running
the ship were not so heavy.
She burns, for instance, about 18
tons of Welsh coal an hour, ..which
works out at about $65 an hour—
no small coal bill.
The cost of firing one shell from
a twelve-inch gun is $750; whilst
torpedoes cost $3,000 apiece.
The Vanguard is certainly a very
costly warship, but we must never
forget that—"The fleet of England
is her all In all."
neighboring states is not affected seriously during storage when only the
changes in weight and losses in heating value are considered. The losses
due to disintegration of the coal and
to spontaneous ignition seem to be
of far greater importance than any
changes in weight or heating value,
although they can not be expressed
in figures for comparison. Aside from
certain advantages In favor of storing coal under water, there seems to
be very little to be said in favor of
any particular method of storing coal.
SCIENTIST'S  TRAGEDY
Death of Harry to. Cox Removes One
Mho Sacrificed Life
Mr. Harry W. Cox died at his residence In London.
Behind this bald telegraphic an
nouncement lies a tragedy, the intense pathos of which has rarely been
equalled during the whole history of
scientific research. Only forty-six
years of age, he died a victim to the
science of X-rays, of which he was a
pioneer, and his death deprives the
world of a man who gave up the
whole of his life to the cause of alleviating the sufferings of others.
Some fourteen or fifteen years ago,
Mr. Cox, then a, smart and enterprising young electrician, took up X-ray
investigation with enthusiasm. He
worked hard at this new department
of science, in which the late King
anil Queen Alexandra took so much
interest, and during the course of his
research about twelve years ago, by
acicdent placed the tube of the apparatus near his face, with the result
that through the rays he contracted
X-rays dermatitis, which in the end
resulted in his death.
Although knowing that he aws afflicted with this dread disease, Mr.
Cox threw himself into the work of
perfecting the apparatus, and so successful was lie. that he took out some
eighty patents, one of them being a
valuable invention which, by means
of two radiagraphs, locates not only
the position of a bullet, but also its
depth, so that a surgeon can remova
the' obstacle with the minimum of
probing. This Invention proved of
inestimable service during the South
African war, and Mr. Cox's apparatus
was used almost exclusively by the
British forces during that campaign.
LAND PURCHASE NOTICES
Skeena LandTjlstrict—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Phillip Williams, of Sydney, Nova Scotia, occupation accountant, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein
ley:—Commencing at a post planted
at the S. E. corner and about 16%
miles distant in a north-westerly direction from the north end of Kitwancool Lake, thence north 80
chains, thence west 80 chains, thence
south 80 chains, thence east 80
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 640 acres, more or
less. PHILLIP WILLIAMS.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 4, 1910. Jy8
MASSET PIONEER'S DEATH
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Annie Grieve,
of Victoria, B. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands In the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. W. corner, and about 17% miles
distant In a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence south 40 chains, thence
east 4 0 chains, thence south 40
chains, thence east 40 chains, thence
north 80 chains, thence west '80
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 480 acres, more or
less. ANNIE  GRIEVE.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 4, 1910. Jy8
LAND PURCHASE NOTICES
Skeena Land District—District of
pRRsiftr
TAKE NOTICE that Pearl Caspell
of Cayley, Alberta, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. E. corner and about 15% miles
distant In a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence south 80 chains, thence
west 40 chains, thence north 40
chains, thence west 40 chains, thence
north 40 chalnB, thence east 80
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 480 acres, more or
less. PEARL CASPELL.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 3, 1910. jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that John Cox, of
Monarch, Alberta, occupation farmer, intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described
lands, situated in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Comencing at a post planted at the
north-west corner and about five and
one-quarter miles distant in a northwesterly direction from the north end
of ' Kitwancool Lake, thence 80
chains south, thence 80 chains east,
thence 80 chains north, thence 80
chains west to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres,
more or less.
JOHN COX.
James W. Smith, Agqnt.
Dated  May  30,  1910. Jy5
Wallace Purdy Died at Advanced Age
On Queen Charlotte Islands
that a very 'ong run could be made.
The current of air which passes
through tiie cooler for the condensed
steam is driven by a fan to the furnace of the boiler, which is thus under forced draught.
Extraordinary Ingenuity has, In
fact, been displayed in order to make
the greatest use of every possible
feature to increase the efficiency of
til engine.
The new locomotive is now having i
the finishing touches applied preparatory to being exhaustively tested at
pulling heavy express trains.
After a brief Illness, Wallace
Purdy, of Bear River, Dlgby County,
N.S., died at nis homestead on Mas-
set Inlet, August, 2, says the Masset
Review.
Mr. Purdy came to Masset about
a year ago last April, accompanied
by a son, leaving his wife at Bear
River, where she is at present. He
was a member of Keith Lodge No.
16, A. F. and A. M.
homestead,  Mr.  Chas.  Harrison  of-
The funeral took place at the
flclating, Dr. Fraser attending In
an official capacity. A small group
of fellow-settlers attended the ceremony. A compass of cedar was
placed on the coffin.
The decased was sixty-two years
of age.
 o	
For Job Printing of all kinds see
the Journal man.
LAND PURCHASE NOTICES
STORAGE OF COAI
Experiments ( onductcd to Test What
Loss Followed
Engineering describes experiments
with carload lots of American coal
under conditions comparable with actual experience In the storage of coal,
Lots of both nut and screenings were
exposed In covered Dins, in open bins,
and under water for a period of one
year, and analyses were made approximately after two days, ten dny3, two
months, six months and one year. In
general the conclusions are that coal
of   the   type   found   in   Illinois  and
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte.
TAKE NOTICE that the Queen
Charlotte Whaling Company Limited,
of Victoria, British Columbia, occupation manufacturers, intend to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about fifteen
chains soutii of a small creek on the
west side of Rose Harbour, Moresby
Island, thence west forty chains,
thence north forty chains, thence
east forty chains, thence southerly
following the sinuosities of the foreshore line forty chains, to the point
of commencement.
Queen Charlotte Whaling
Company Limited,
Per Sydney Charles Ruck, Agent
llnted July 14th, 1910.
Rose Harbour, Q.C.I.       . A5
LAND   LEASE   NOTICE
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that The Canadian
Fish & Cold Storage Company Ltd.,
of Vancouver, occupation Mercantile
and Manufacturing, Intends to apply
for permission to lease the following described land:-—Commencing at
a post planted at high water mark
on the westerly side of Prince Rupert Harbor and distant about 110
chains from the north-east corner of
Lot 443, thence west 20 chains,
thence south 20 chains, thence east
5 chains, more or less to high water
mark, thence following along the
high water mark to the point of commencement and containing 20 acres
more or less.
The Canadian  Fish  and Cold
Storage Company, Limited,
J. H.  Pillsbury, Agent.
Dated June 20th, 1910. Jyl2
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that James Alexander McDonald, of Monarch, Alberta, occupation farmer, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands, situated in
the Kitwancool or Chein Wein Valley:—Commencing at a post planted
at the N. E. corner about five and
one quarter miles distant in a northwesterly direction from the north
end of Kitwancool Lake, thence south
80 chains, thence west 80 chains,
thence north 80 chains, thence east
SO chains to point, of commencement,
and containing 640 acres, more or
less.
JAMES ALEXANDER McDONALD
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated May 30, 1910. Jy5
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE thai Mary Brown,
of Vancouver, B.C., occupation mar-,
rled woman, Intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity ol
the Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—Commencing at a post planted
at the North-east corner and about
ten miles distant in a north-westerly
direction from the north end of tha
Kitwancool lake, thence south 80
chains, thence west 40 chains, thenca
north 40 chains, thence west 40
chains, thence north 40 chains
thence east 80 chains to point ol
commencement, and containing 480
acres, more or less.
MARY  BROWN.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 1, 1910. Jy8
LAND PURCHASE NOTICES
Skeena Land District—District of
PftRfilflr
TAKE NOTICE that Ethel Welsh,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
south-east corner and about 10 miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north 80 chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence south 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to
point of commencement and containing 640 acres, more or less.
ETHEL WELSH.
James W. Smith, Agent
Dated June Jst, 1910. Jy8-
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that John Henderson, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
agent, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. ,W corner and about 25 miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north 80 chains, thence
east 40 chains, thence south 80
chains, thence west 80 chains to
point of commencement and containing 320 acres, more or less.
JOHN   HENDERSON.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 7th, 1910. Jy8
Coast Land District—District of
Skeena.
TAKE NOTICE that I, Ernestine
A. Roney, of Prince Rupert, occupation married woman, intend to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted on the north
bank of the Skeena River about half
a mile south of Geo. T. Church's preemption, thence west 10 chains,
thence north 40 chains, thence 'east
to the Skeena River; thence southwest following the bank of the
Skeena River to the place of beginning, and containing about 80
acres.
ERNESTINE A. RONEY, Locator.
W. A. Roney, Agent.
Dated July 7th, 1910. Jy22
Coast Land District—District of
Skeena.
TAKE NOTICE that I, J. Adolpb
Perry, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation
book-keeper, intend to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted on the north bank of the
Skeena River, about a mile west of
Lot 31, thence north 40 chains,
thence east 80 chains to lot 31,
thence south 40 chains to bank of
Skeena River, thence west about 80
chains following north bank of
Skeena River to point of commencement, and containing about 320
acres.
J. ADOLPH PERRY, Locator.
Wm. A. Roney, Agent.
Dated July 16th, 1910. Jy22
Coast Land District—District of
Skeena.
TAKE NOTICE that I, Mary M.
Roney, of Stillwater, Minnesota, U.
S.A., occupation married woman, intend to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands.
Commencing at a post planted on the
north bank of the Skeena River at
the south-east corner of Geo. T.
Church's pre-emption, thence north
40 chains, thence east 40 chains,
thence soutii to the bank of the
Skeena River, thence south-west following the Skeena River to the place
of beginning and containing about
120 acres.
MARY M. ROENY, Locator.
W.  A.   Roney,' Agent.
Dated July 8th, 1910. Jy22
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Violet Geiger,
of Victoria, B. C, occupation married woman, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. W. corner and about 23% miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence south 80 chains, thence
east 40 chains, thence north 40
chains, thence east 40 chains, thence
north 40 chains, thence west 80
chains  to  point  of  commencement,
?ind  containing  480  acres,  more or
ess. VIOLET GEIGER.
James W. S'nith, Agent.
Dated  June 7th,  19*.0. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Laura Gordon
of Victoria, B. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of Kltwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. E. corner and about 18 miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence south 40 chains, thence
west 40 chains, thence north 40
chains, thence east 40 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 160 acres, more or less.
LAURA GORDON.'
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June  4,  1910. jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
dfl SHI "11"
TAKE NOTICE that Henry Welsh,,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
printer, intends to apply foi permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Weln Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. E. corner and 11 miles distant
in a north-westerly direction from
the north end of Kitwancool Lake,
thence north 80 chains, thence west
80 chains, thence south 80 chains,
thence east 80 chains to point of
commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
HENRY WELSH.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 2, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Frederick
Welsh, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation clerk, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-east corner about 11 miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kltwancool
Lake, thence south 80 chains, thence
west 40 chains, thence north SO
chains, thence east 40 chains to
point of commencement, and containing 320 acres, more or less.
FREDERICK WELSH.
James W. Smith, Agent
Dated June 2, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Walter Marke
of Toronto, Ont., occupation traveller, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool
or Chean Wein Valley:—Commencing at a post planted at the N. E.
corner and about 27% miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence south 80 chalnB, thence
west 80 chains, thence north 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to the
point of commencement and containing 640 acres, more or less.
WALTER MARKE.
James W. Smith, Agent
Dated June 8th, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Richard
Howie, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation dentist, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of
Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—•
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. E. corner and about 24% miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence south 80 chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence north 80
chain's, thence east 80 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
RICHARD HOWIE.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June  7th,  1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
C\f\ Rfllfl.1*
TAKE NOTICE that Sandford
Burton, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation mining engineer, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Weln
Valley:-—Commencing at a post
planted at the N. E. corner and
about 23% miles distant In a northwesterly direction from the north
end of Kltwancool Lake, thence south
SO chains, thence west 80 chains,
thence north 80 chains, thence east
SO chains to point of commencement
and containing 640 acres, more or
less. SANDFORD BURTON.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 7th, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Laud District—District of
Cassim.
TAKE NOTICE that James Welsh,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation machinist, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing at a post plauted at the
N. W. corner and about 12 miles distant In a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kltwancool
Lake, thence south SO chains, thence
east 20 chains, thence north 80
chains, thence west 20 chains to the
point of commencement and containing 160 acres, more or less.
JAMES WELSH.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated   June  2,  1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassli.
TAKE NOTICE that Marguerette
Burns, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission ,u purchase the
following described lands in the vicinity of Kltwancool or Chean Weln
Valley:—Commencing at a post
planted at the N. E. corner and distant about 12 miles in a northwesterly direction from the north
end of Kltwancool Lake; thence
south 80 chains, thence west 20
chains, thence north 80 chains,
thence east 20 chains to point of
commencement, and containing 160
acres, more or less.
MARGUERETTE   BURNS.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 2, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles F.
Burns, of Moncton, New Brunswick,
occupation auditor, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Weln
Valley:—Commencing at a post
planted at the south-west corner and
about 12 miles distant in a northwesterly direction from the north
end of Kitwancool Lake; thence
north 80 chains, thence east 80
chains, thence south 80 chains,
thence west 80 chains to point of
commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
CHARLES  F.   BURNS.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated   June  2,   1910 Jv8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Norman Cle-
land, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation printer. Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of Kltwancool or Chean Weln Valley:—
Comencing at a post planted at the
S. E. corner and about 26% miles
dlBtant In a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north 80 chalnB, thence
west 80 chains, thence south 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing  640 acres, more or less.
NORMAN  CLELAND.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 8th, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
ClflRfii fl T*
TAKE NOTICE that James Jar-
dine, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
merchant, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of Kltwancool or Chean   Wein    Vnllev:	
Commencing nt a post planted at the
N. W. corner and about 13 miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence soutii SO chains, thence
east SO chains thence north sO
chains, thence west 80 chains to
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
JAMES JARDINE.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 2, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that John McDIar-
mid, of Lucknow, Ont., occupation
farmer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of the
Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:	
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. W. corner and about 13 miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kltwancool
Lake; thence north 80 chains, thence
east 40 chains, thence south 80
chains; thence west 40 chains to
point of commencement, and contain-
tnf   320 acres.
JOHN  McDIARMID.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 2, 1910. Jy8 : »'    -,,
Friday, August 12, 1910.
THE   PRINCE   RUPERT   JOURNAL
MINERAL OUTPUT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
THE REPORT of the mines
department at Victoria for the
year 1909 has just been issued from the printing office.
By it the value of the mineral products of the province for
the year 1909 amounts to $24,443,-
025, which while it is less than
that of 1906 and 1907. is still considerably greater than that of any
other previous year.
The tonnage of ore mined in the
province during the year 1909, exclusive of coal, was 2,057,713 tons,
a decrease from the preceding year of
25,893 tons, or 1.24 per cent.
This total tonnage was produced
by the various districts in the following proportions: Boundary, 71.03
per cent; Rossland, 11.55 per cent;
Fort Steele, 7.28 per cent; coast
district 1.92 per cent, al lother districts, 8.22 per cent.
The number of mines from which
shipments were made in 1909 was
89, and of these only 52 shipped
more than 100 tons each during the
year, while but 32 shipped in excesB
of 1,000 tons each. Of these latter;
8 were in the Nelson mining division,
6 in the Boundary district, 5 in the
Ainsworth division, 4 in the Slocan
district, 3 in the Coast district, 3 in
the Trail Creek (Rossland) division,
2 in the Fort Steele division, 1 in
the Trout Lake division and 1 in
the Queen Charlotte division.
Coal Production
The coal production of British Columbia in 1909 was chiefly mined by
three companies—the Wellington colliery company, and the Western Fuel
company on Vancouver island, and
the Crow's Nest Pass Coal company
in East Kootenay—these companies
producing about 88 per cent of the
total coal mined.
Of the smallei collieries of the
coast district, the Pacific coast coal
mines at South Wellington and Suquash, V.I., mined about 70,000 tons
of coal, and the Nicola Valley C. &
C. Co. about 62,210 tons, while the
Vancouver-Nauaimo produced about
10,000 tons, and the Diamond Vale
company about 1,700 tons.
In the East Kootenay field, the
Hosmer and Corbln collieries each
produced about 60,000 tons of coal
during the year; neither ... u^txp eol-
lieries is as yet in full operation.
A new colliery was opened at
Princeton, in the Nicola Valley district, by the Vermilion Forks M. &
D. Company during the last month
of the year, and shipped a few tons
of lignitic coal.
The Pacific Coast Coal company,
as well as equipping its South Wellington colliery with direct railway
connection with salt water and a
shipping port, has opened up a new
colliery at Suquash, from which it
has already mined about 2,000 tons
of coal.
The old Gilnllan colliery at Nanaimo is now being operated by
Henry Biggs—an individual-—who is
producting coal In a small way.
About sixty per cent of the gross
coal output of the province was mined in the Coast district, and about
72 per cent of the coal, sold as such,
was from that district.
Of coke, however, the Coast district only produced about 5 per cent
of the total amount made during the
year, and of this over half was added to stock.
The gross output of the coal mines
of the province for the year 1909 was
2,400,600 tons (of 2,240 pounds) of
which 5,780 tons were aded to stock,
making coal disposed of 2,394,818
tons. Of this gross amount, 998,494
tons were sold for consumption in
Canada, 678,137 tons were exported
to the United States and 63,509 tons
were exported to other countries,
making the total amount of coal sold
1,740,140  tons.
In addition to the sales there was
used in making coke 394,124 tons of
coal, while 260,554 tons were consumed under colliery boilers, etc.
From the 394,124 tons of coal were
produced 258,703 tons of coke, of
which amount 7,199 tons were added
to stock and 142 tons were used under colliery boilers, leaving the net
coke sales of 251,362 tons. Of this
amount, 210,884 tons were sold for
consumption in Canada, while the remainder, 40,478 tons, was exported
to the United States.
Const Collieries
The coast collieries mined in 1909
1,476,735 tons of coal, of which 5,346
tons were added to stock, making
1,471,389 tons, distributed from
these collieries in 1909. This amount
was distributed thus: Tons.
Sold as coal In Canada...1. 862,088
Sold as coal in United States 324,748
Sold as coal, other countries    63,5091    boilers      923,429
Total sold as coal 1,250,345
Used under companies' boilers, etc., . . .. ,    192,884
Used in making coke     28,660
Total   1,471,389
The total coal sutcs of the coast
collieries for the year show, as compared with the sales of the previous
year, an increase of 202,053 tons,
equivalent to 19.3 per cent.
The consumption of coal in that
portion  of British  Columbia served
by the coast collieries shows in 1909
an increase of 44,124 tons, equal to
6.1 per cent over the preceding year,
while the amount sold for export to
countries  other   than    the    United
States also shows an increase of 33,-
626 tons, equal to 112.5 per cent. Export sales  to  the  United  States  in
1909 show  an    increase   of   24,303
tons, or 8.08 per cent.    The smaller
sales  in   1908   were  attributable  to
the  California  oil-fuel     competition
and imported Oriental coal.
Coke Produced
The production of  coke   in    the
Coast district in  1909 was confined
to the one company producing the article, and  amounted  to  13,686  tons,
of  which,  however,  only  5,493  tons
were  sold.     This  was  entirely  disposed of In Canada.    The remainder
8,193tons waj added to stock These
figures show an increase in the coast
output  of  coke,  as  compared   with
1908, of 1,156 tons, or 9.70 per cent
The coke export to the United States
from the Coast district in 1908  was
3,118 tons, but in 1909 there were no
exports at all.    The reason for  this
is that the smelting plants formerly
operating on Prince of Wales Island,
Alaska, have since been shut down.
In  the Coast district,  among the
newer collieries that are beginning
to make an apreclable output, maybe mentioned the Nicola Valley Coal
&  Coke company, which shipped in
1909 some 62,210 tons of coal, and
this production wa^  limited  uy the
market which the C.P.R. freight rates
would allow it to reach, rather than
by  the  capacity  of  the  mines.    Adjoining this colliery is the Diamond
Vale   Colliery  Company's    property,
which, though still in a state of development,  mined   in     1909     some
1,700  tons of coal.
Vermilion Forks Mining & Development Company of Princeton,
mined 150 tons of coal in 1909
On Vancouver Island, the Pacific
Coast Coal Mines, Ltd., mined at
South Wellington, a few miles south
of Nanaimo, some 69,055 tons of coal.
Railway and bunkers have been built
at Boat harbor.
Gilnllan colliery was shut down.
Henry Biggs, as an individual, produced 1,236 tons of coal from the
property.
East Kootenay Field
The annual returns of the eastern
slope, or Alberta side, of the Rocky
mountains are made to the govern-
men of that province, whence they
may be obtained by any one interested. Three companies were operating
on the British Columbia side in 1909,
viz.: The Crow's Nest Pass Coal Co.,
Hosmer Mines, Ltd., and the Corbin
Coal & Coke Co., Ltd. The details
of their several operations are given
elsewhere, together with particulars
of other properties at present under
development. A description „, ...r
coal field by the provincial mineralogist is given in this report, under the
heading of "Coal Mining."
By far the greatest proportion of
coal is produced by the Crow's Nest
Pass Coal Company, operating collieries at Michel, Coal Creek (Fernie)
and Carbonado, the united gross output of which, In 1909, was 802,717
tons. Of this output 330,189 tons
were used in making coke. The resulting coke amounted to 223,442
tons. Hosmer mines produced 60,-
324 tons of coal and 21.575 tons of
coke. Corbln Coal company produced 60,824 tons of coal and no coke.
The collieries In the East oKote-
nay district made in 1909 a gross
production of 823,865 tons of coal,
of which 436 tons were added toe
stock during the year, leaving the
amount of coal distributed 923,429
tons. Of this amount, 365,464 tons
were used for making coke, the resulting coke being 246,017 tons.
The following table shows the disposition made of the coal output of
this district:—
Tons.
Sold as coal In Canada....   136,406
Sold as coal in U. S    353,389
Total       923,429
The amount of coke actually produced In 1909 was 245,017 tons. Of
this, 142 tons were used under boilers, and the remainder, 244,875 tons,
together with 994 tons taken from
stock, was sold, making total coke
sales for the year of 245,869 tons.
As compared with the previous
year, the coke production of 1909
shows an increase of 10,148 tons, or
4.3 per cent. Total coke sales show
an increase of 5,260 tons, or 2.2 per
cent. Coke sales In Canada show
an Increase of 1,022 tons, or 0.40
per cent. Coke sales to the United
States show an increase of 6,282 tons,
or 18.4 per cent.
Gold Mining
The production of placer gold during the past year was about $477,000
as nearly as can be ascertained, which
is $170,000 less than' was produced
in 1908, being a decrease of 26 per
cent.. Placer mining Is entirely dependent upon the water supply,
which in turn depends upon the
snowfall of the previous winter and
the character of the spring weather
-—variables upon which It is impossible to forecast—and the conditions
this past season have not been favorable.
There is no question but wnat, in
the placer camps of the province,
most of the more easily available deposits have been worked out, leaving only those the operation of which
called for greater capital and plant,
with greater attendant risks and less
security of immediate profits.
In the Atlin district the Atlin Consolidated Mining company's plant
was again idle this past season, being under process of alteration to a
design dictated by experience obtained.
The Pine Creek Power company
(Ruffner's holdings) was unfortunate
in that the dam, constructed at the
outlet of Surprise lake to conserve
the . water for the season's supply,
broke, and not only was the water
lost, but much damage was caused
to the plant by the sudden flood. The
dam has been replaced by a more substantial structure, and it is expected that the satisfactory returns looked for last season will only have been
deferred until 1910.
McKee creek is now entirely controlled by one company, and wnile a
very fair return was obtained this
year, there is good reason to hope for
better in the future.
In the Dease Lake district the
Berry Creek company again failed
to do any tno;e work, and very little
gold was obtained in that sect'oi. of
the province.
In the Omlneca district thj excitement of the previous seasjn over
placer gold - findi on the Ingenika
river and McConneil creek proved to
be without foundation, and no product was obtained from these. In the
Manson Creek section one of the
mines produced about $10,000 worth
of gold, but the other properties were
not successful.
In Caiibou
In the Cariboo district none of the
deep drifting enterprises have made
a success and all are p, »...«cally at a
standstill. A concentration of various
Intersts into larger companies, with
the consequent concentration of
water rights, has enabled better
plants to be Installed, and although
there Is a small output this year, the
larger plants are almost ready for
work and should prove their utility
during the coming season.
In the Quesnel division the plant
at Bullion  has been idle, but J. B.
Hobson   is  putting  in   a  new  plant
in  the Spanish lake division, while
W. DuBois Is establishing a very
Municipal Notice
TENDERS FOR STRFIOT GRADING
Atlantic Steamship
 Agency	
Total sold as coal    489,795
Used  by   the   company   in
making coke      365,464
Used by the company under
II.
Boundary district made an increase
of $35,000 in its gold output this
year, despite the fact that the tonnage of ore mined in the district was
lower than last year. About 86.5
per cent of the lode-gold output of
the province was recovered from the
smelters of copper-bearing ores; the
remaining 13.5 per cent was obtained
from stamp milling, etc.
The only 'arge stamp mill in operation Is at the Nickel Plate mine, at
Hedley, In the Osoyoos mining division, which milled some 31,000 tons
of ore, and produced from amalgamation, concentrates and cyanlding
some 16,200 ounces of gold. A couple
of small stamps were at work in the
Sheep Creek camp of Nelson mining
division, working an exceptionally
rich ore.
Silver Ore
The total amount, of silver produced in the province during the year
1909 was 2,532,742 ounces, valued
at $1,239,270, a decrease in amount,
as compared with the previous year,
of 98,647 ounces and in value of
$82,213; about 98.2 per cent of the
total silver was produced from ores
in which it was found associated
with lead, the remainder being obtained from copper-silver ores.
The Slocan district—including the
Ainsworth, Slocan, Slocan City and
Trout lake mining divisions—produced about 50 per cent of the total
provincial output of silver this year,
and the Fort Steele mining division
about 23 per cent, all from argentiferous galenas.
Lead Output
The lead production of the province for the year 1909 was 44,396,-
346 pounds of lead, having a market
value of $1,709,259, showing, as compared with the previous year, an increase in amount of 1,200,613 pounds
of lead, or 2.8 per cent, and an increase in value of $76,460, or 4.7
per cent.
The average market price for this
metal for the year 1909 was a little
higher than for the previous year.
The lead production is this year,
as usual, derived chiefly from tha
Fort Steele mining division.
Copper Mined
The amount of copper in ores
mined in the province in 1909, and
smelted during the year, was 45,597,-
245 pounds fine copper, vmuea at
the average New York market price
for copper at $5,918,522. These
figures do not take into acount smelter charges  or  deductions.
As compared with the preceding
year there Is, therefore, a decreased
production in amount of 1,677,369
pounds, and in value of $321,727.
There is a slight ..icrease in the
Boundary district and in the Nelson
mining division, with a heavy falling
off in the Rossland mining division
and in the coast districts.
The average assays of the copper
ores of the various camps, based upon the copper recovered, were as follows:
Boundary, 1.41 per cent; Coast,
1.5 per cent, and Rossland, 0.75 per
cent.
Other Minerals
There has been no iron ore mined
in the province this past year, other
than that necessarily mined in development work, and none of this has
been Shipped, the reason being that
there is no Iron blast furnace in operation within the district, and consequently no market for iron ore.
There has been a comparatively
small quantity of zinc ore produced
tills past year, although the industry
has not been neglected. The total
amount of zinc ore and concentrates
produced and sold during the year
was about 10,000 tons, ranging from
38 to 48 per cent zinc. The only
distinctly zinc-mining in tiie province
SEALED TENDERS will be received bv the City Clerk until SATURDAY noon, AUGUST 27th, 1910,
for the grading of Second avenue,
between McBride street and Eleventh
street.
Plans and specifications may be
seen and forms of tender obtained at
the office of the City Engineer.
The lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted.
ERNEST A. WOODS,
Wm. Mahlon Davis, City Clerk.
City Engineer. A5-23
CANCELLATION   OF   RESERVE
Through
tickets nnd
rates to
excursion
NOTICE is hereby given that the
reserve existing on Crown lands in
the vicinity of Babine Lake, situate
in Range 5, Coast District, notice of
which was published In the British
Columbia Gazette, dated December
17, 1908, Is cancelled In so far as
said reserve relates to lots numbered 1519, 1518, 1517, 1516, 1516,
1510, 1507, 1506, 1506A, 1503 1501,
1502, 1512, 1511, 1505, 1504, 1513,
1514, 1509, 1508, 1530, 1527, 1528,
1529, 1531, 1532, 1533, 1534, 1535,
1537, 1539, 1536, 1538, 1540, 1541,
1544, 1543, 1545, 1546, 1542, 1547,
1548, 1549, 1550,' 1520, 1521, 1522,
1523, 1524, 1525, 1526, and 1551.
ROBERT A. RENWICK,
Deputy Commissioner of Lands.
Lands Department,
Victoria, B. C, June 16th, 1910.
(First insertion July 5.)
COAL CLAIMS
England, France, Germane,
and all
Scandinavian Ports.
Citll or write for rates to any
part of the world. I am also
agent for all American steamers
to and from Prince Rupert;
Northern Pacific Railway; Alaska Pacific Express.
J. H. ROGERS
General Steamship and Railway
Agent, Prince Rupert, B.C.
Canadian Pacific  R'y
Skeena District—Queen  Charlotte
Islands.
To all to whom It may concern:—
NOTICE is hereby given that I, the
undersigned, intend to apply for a
license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum upon the following lands
situate on Graham Island, one of the
Queen Charlotte Group, in the Province of British Columbia, and' more
particularly described as follows, viz:
Commencing at a stake planted one
and a quarter miles west of the
north-east corner of Louis Inlet, and
marked "P. C. Coates' S. E. Corner
Claim No. 1," thence west 80 chains,
thence north 80 chains, thence east
80 chains, thence south 80 chains to
the place of commencement.
Staked June 14th, 1910.
Dated this 28th day of July, 1910.
P. C. COATES,
By his Agent, Wm. Edward Laird.
A9
Steamers leave Prince Rupert for Vancouver,
Victoria, Seattle
Princess Beatrice, every Monday at 1 p.m.
Princess May or Princess Royal
every Saturday morning.
Steamers leave Vancouver
Princess Beatrice every Thursday night.
Princess May or Princess Royal
every Saturday night at 11
o'clock.
Union Steamship Co'y
of B.C. Ltd.
COAL CLAIMS
Skeena  District—Queen   Charlotte
Islands.
To all to whom it may concern:—
NOTICE is hereby given that I, the
undersigned intend to apply for a
license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum upon the following lands,
situated on Graham Island, one of
the Queen Charlotte group, In the
Province of British Columbia, and
more particularly described as follows, viz:—Comemnclng at a stake
planked at the S. E. corner of P. C.
Coates' Claim No. 1, and marked
"Wm. Penman's S. W. Corner, Claim
No. 1," thence east 80 chains, thence
north 80 chains, thence west 80
chains, thence south, 80 chains to the
place of commencement.
Staked, June 14th, 1910.
Dated this 28th days of July, 1910.
WM.  PENMAN.
By his Agent, Wm.  Edward Laird.
A9
limestone and clay are quarried on
the company's property adjoining
the works.
In the Flathead valley of East
Kootenay where seepages of oil occur
and where a great number of locations of oil claims have been taken
up, no serious attempt has as yet
been made to prove the value of the
claims, and the district is no further
advanced than it was four years ago.
— o	
MAXIFACTIRKRS  COMING
extensive hydraulic plant at Twenty-
Mile Creek, on Quesnel river, (lie
water for the operation of which is
brought over from Swift river. It
is not probable that either of these
plants will be producing gold until
1911.
The value of gold produced from
lode mining in the province during
the year 1909 was $4,924,080, a decrease as, compared with previous
year, of $358,790 or 6.75 per cent.
This decrease is due to a reduced
tonnage and output in the Rossland
camp, which Is only partly compensated for by Increased production in
the Nelson, Boundary and Coast districts. The greatest increase In output has been in the Nelson district,
where the output this year is nearly
$100,000 greater than during the preceding year, and is now 50 per cent
greater than it was in 1907. There
was also an increased gold production in the Coast district, amounting
to about $80,000 greater than the
preceding year, due to a renewal of
mining    on    Texada    island.    The
Convention of Business Men is to be
Held at Vancouver Tills Year
It Is probable that Prince Rupert
will be visited by sOnie of the members of the Canadian Manufacturers'
Assocation in September, on the occasion of the annual convention, which
tills year is to be held in Vancouver.
The   arangements   for   the   excursion
The new Steel Passenger Steamer
"Camosun"
PRINCE. RUPERT every Sunday tit 9 a.m. for Vancouver,
arriving Monday afternoon.
For Stewart City on arrival from
Vancouver Friday night.
Northbound, leaves Vancouver
Wednesdays at 9 p.m.
Steerage Fare $5.00
The "Camosun" is the only steamer
on the run having water-tight bulkheads and double bottom, thus ensuring- safety of passengers in case of
collissionor wreck.
J. H. ROGERS,   Ticket  Agent
HAVNOR   BROS.
FUNERAL   DIRECTORS
and
PROFESSIONAL E.MBALMERS
DR.
to.  B.  CLAYTON
DENTIST
Office  in    the    Westenhaver   Block,
Over Orme's  Drug   Store.
Prince Rupert
WM. S. HAi^L, L. D. S. D. D. S.
:-:   DENTIST   :-:
Crown and Bridge Work a specialty.
All dental operations skillfully
treated. Gas and local anaesthetics
administered for the painless extraction of teeth. Consultation free.
Offices, Helgerson Bk., Prince Rupert
J. H. PILLSI5UHY
CIVIL     ENGINEER
Surveying,   Designs,   Estimates,
etc.
which   il   is   proposed   to   run   lo   thee
at the Lucky Jim, in  the Slocan |''"ast are now well advanced, In iliis
Room   7,   Exchange   Block,
Corner  Third  Ave  and   Sixth   Street
Prince Rupert
C. W. NICKERSON & CO.
—o—
CUSTOMS AM) MERCHANDISE
—o—
Brokers, Forwarding Agents,
Storage,  etc.
where  about  4,700
rent   zinc  ore   was
mining division,
ions of 48 per
produced.
The Canadian Zinc company's electro-thermic smelting plant at Nelson
has remained idle, but there is a
chance that this coming year renewed experiments may be tried to perfect the process.
While platinum is found in many
of the alluvial gold workings, where
it can ve saved as a by-product, the.
saving of It In a small way is attended with so much trouble that It has
beeen practically neglected and no
appreciable production  made.
The only company manufacturing
cement in the province is the Vancouver ortland Cemene company, with
works at Tod Inlet, on the Saanich
arm, about twelve miles from Victoria. The capacity of these works at
present Is about 300,000 barrels a
year, and this past year the company
manufactured about 238,000 barrels
of cement, valued in the neighborhood of $360,000. The raw materials,
connection the Montreal Herald says: . ,   ...   pnTTEirt
"Thus fur over ::mi  have signified  ARCHITECT    AND    STRUCTURAL
their  intention  of  participating anil ENGINEER
the  number  is  increasing dally,     li        Ite-inforced Concrete a Specialty
is  expected  that  when   the  party  is, —°—
complete it will be  4 00 strong.    As  Law-Butler Building - Prince Rupert
as most  that can  be carried  in    one ,
GRAHAM    ISLAND —"The     surest
sign of the progress of a town or
district  is  its  newspaper—live,   active,   hustling."     "The    Masset   Re
train conveniently is 250, It will he
necessary to divide the party Into
two trainloads, running on a 15 to 30
minute block.
"A most carefully prepared Itlner-1 view," Masset, Q.C.I
ary has been outlined by the commit-   	
tee in charge. The party is to leave i »»»♦»»>,
Toronto on Sunday, September 11th
and will arrive in Vancouver on Tuesday, September 20th. The return trip
will commence on Sunday, September
25th, and the party will be in Toronto on October 2nd.
"Mr. Meldrum says at least thirty
members will go out from Montreal,
and the majority will be accompanied
by  their  wives and  families."
The Thompson
Hardware Co.;:
-8E0ONO AVKNTK-
A   high  roller cuts a  queer figure
when he gets a skate on.
Paints. General Hardware,
Oils, Stoves and Ranges.
• -
••
'. THE   PRINCE   RUPERT  JOURNAL
Friday, August 12, 1910,
C.P.R. LAND HOLDINGS
Immense Returns From Sale of Property
Held By Big Company.
Comparative  Tables  Showing  Growing Increase in Rate Charged
by  the  Company
The Canadian Pacific railway is
one of the largest land holders in the
world. Exclusive of the receipts of
the past fiscal year, $66,610,000 has
been received from the sale of parcels of land out of the original grant
of 25,000,000 acres, and of this
amount approximately $36,193,521
has been expended on the company's
property, with the result that fixed
charges amount to only $954 per
mile This compares with $1,123 for
the Great Northern, $2,279 for the
Northern Pacific, and $2,795 for the
Union Pacific.
Canadian Pacific now holds notes
amounting to over $18,000, representing part payments on lands. The
Interest on these notes has enabled
the company to pay an extra dividend
of one per cent since 1906, making
the annual interest rate seven per
cent.
The company is regarded as one ot
the most expert and extensive colon
iers in existence. It is the operator
of a 3,000,000-acre farm, and to in
come from this source, together with
the revenue derived from the operation of a fleet of steamers on the Atlantic and Pacific oceans, and a number of hotels located along the line
from Montreal to Victoria, contributed, It is conservatively estimated,
$7,500,000 to the company's gross
for the past fiscal year.
An idea of the large receipts realized from the sale of lands may he
gathered from the following:
Acres Av. price   Amount
Year. sold,     per acre,    realized.
1910., 700,000 10.50 $6,650,000
1909., 370,646 13.52 5,085,517
190S.. 164,450 9.54 l,569-,16b
1907.. 994,4S0 5.92 5,887,377
1906, ,1,115,743 fl,S4 6.513,452
1905.. 609,888 4.SO 2,4-16,300
1904.. 923,854 4.10 3,807,248
1903. . 2,639,617 3,67 9,695,673
1902. . 1,689,068 3.29 5,277,762
1901.. 399, SOS 3.15 1,262,224
1900..     26S.669      3.20 860,006
In 1901 the fiscal year changed
from December 31st to June 3rd.
The'figures for 1900 are for six
months, January 1 to June 30, only.
The above sales, together with
prior sales, make a total, exclusive
of 1910, of $66,610,000. The aver
age price per acre for 1909, $13.52,
Includes 69,963 acres of irrigated
land sold at an average price per
acre of $24.71.
The company's irrigation works In
what is known as the western block,
consisting of 995,000 acres, made
ready during the early part of 1909,
some 353,000 acres of it; the greater part of this vast track was sold
for about $20,000,000, or at an average price of about $20 per acre. Canadian Pacific is now extending Its
irrigation work to still another block,
comprising nearly 1,000,000 acres.
Unsold lands now amount to about
13,000,000 acres. No estimate of the
value of this land can be fairly undertaken, but setitng it down at the
conservative figure of $10 per acre,
the total value would be $130,000,-
000.
Canadian Pacific has approximately
$.'.■,000,000 of cash in hand. There
is no reason to believe that the policy
of the management in regard to
keeping down fixed charges and raising capital by the sale of new stock,
is to be abandoned. In 1904 the comically offered $16,900,000 new stock
to shareholders at par; in 1906 and
1908, $20,280,000 and $24,336,000
respectively were sold at the same
price, and in 1909, $30,000,000 was
offered at 1.25. Since 1905 the Canadian Pacific hns paid out to stockholders over $46,000,000 in Common
and aboul $13,500,000 In preferred
dividends, and during th's period it
has given subscription rights to new
issues, worth In the aggregate $42,-
772, ,   based   on   average   market
values.
The company is moving rapidly in
tbe inidsi of a large programme of
extensions and Improvements, The
total mileage projected is about 635,
of whhh 11 u miles are to be completed before the end of the autumn
of 1910. The next year and the
years succeeding it, it can be taken
for granted that as large, if not
larger, programme of extension will
be   undertaken.
■ o	
Vancouver, Aug. 12.—Port Mann,
the townsite of the Canadian Northern Railway, opposite \'"'v Westminster, will be placed on the market
this autumn, There the company
will locate its car-building and machine shops, as well as lay out what
it is claimed will be the largest railway yards on the coast.
c
MARINE NEWS OF THE COAST
TO REPAIR SHEARWATER
The Imperial government is calling for tenders for overhauling the
sloop Shearwater as soon as she returns to Esquimau. A great deal
of repair work will rave to be done
to her.
TRANS-PACIFIC   SERVICES
The Pacific Mail is planning the
construction of two liners of the Atlantic type, vessels similar to the
.Martha Washington for the transpacific trade. These steamers, It Is
planned, will cost $3,000,000 each,
and will be fitted up in the best of
style to accommodate 500 saloon
passengers. Mr. Scherwin, manager
of the Pacific Mail line, speaking of
the proposed liners, said: "These
steamers are each to be 6 50 feet in
length, with a 70-foot beam and will
draw at the maximum 33% feet of
water. They are to have 38,000 tons
displacement, a dead tonnage weight
of 8,000 and combined tonnage and
space measurement of 22,000.
"In the way of accommodations
they are to have ample quarters for
500 cabin passengers, ■ 150 second
class and 700 steerage or Asiatic.
There are to be 100 bath rooms In
connection with the first cabins.
"They will exceed the length of
tiie Hill steamer by 28 feet. Hill
built two sister ships, the Minnesota
and Dakota, at a total cost of about
$5,000,000. Both had remarkable
tonnage capacity."
Within a few months two new-
liners with modern passenger accommodation for saloon passengers are
to be added to the Weir line, whose
steamers are at present not a factor
in the saloon passenger trade, carrying only ste-erage passengers and
freight. These vessels, the Oteric and
Luceric, modern 11,000-ton liners,
will be contenders for the passenger
trade.
MISSION BOAT
Rev. John Antle, superintendent
of the Columbia Coast mission is
ready for his first cruise in the new
mission boat Columbia. It. is the intention to visit the various camps
along the coast from Van Anda to
Alert Bay, according to regular
schedule, making the round trip
about once in two weeks. With the
old boat such an arrangement was
impracticable.
The new Columbia is equipped with
a hospital and dispensary, everything being arranged in the most
compact order, and there is ever a
portable X-ray machine. Dr. Nivin,
the physician, states that his pharmacy aboard the boat is fully equal
to that of any physician in Vancouver, and larger and more varied than
most. The operating room was equipped at a cost of $1,100, and is maintained by a Montreal lady who wishes
her name withheld. The cabin of
the boat is fitted with a folding altar
and a melodeon, and can be transformed into a chapel in a few moments.
The new boat Is one of the largest
gasoline-propelled craft on the coast,
being -00 feet long and 17 feet wide,
with a draft of 6 feet.
SHIPPING GUIDE
To Arrive
Friday, August 12.—Humbodlt from
Seattle. >
Camosun from Vancouver.
Saturday, Aug. 13.—Princess Royal
from Skagway.
Prince Albert from Skidegate.
Sunday,    Aug.   14.—Camosun from
Stewart.
Prince George from Vancouver.
Monday, Aug. 15.—City   of   Seattle
from Skagway.
Prince George from Stewart.
Tuesday, Aug.  16.—Humboldt from,
Skagway.
Prince Albert from Masset, Port
Simpson, etc.
Wednesday,   Aug.- 17.—Prince   Rupert from Vancouver, Victoria and
Seattle.      s
Thursday, Aug.  18.—Prince Rupert
from Stewarl.
-   To Depart
Friday,   August   12.—Camosun    for
Stewart.
Humboldt for Skagway.
Saturday,  Aug.   13.—Princess Royal
for Vancouver.
Sunday, Aug. 14.—Camosun for Vancouver.
Prince George for Stewart.
Prince Albert   for    Masset, Kln-
colich, Port Simpson, etc.
Monday, Aug.   15.—City of Seattle
for Seattle.
Prince George for Vancouver.
Tuesday,   Aug.   16.—Humboldt   for
Seattle.
Wednesday, Aug. 17.—Prince Rupert
for   Stewart.
Prince Albert for Skidegate.
Thursday,  Aug.   IS.—Prince  Rupert
for Vancouver, Victoria, Seattle.
have to pay $130,000 to Install the
system, and nearly $50,000 a year to
maintain it.
OIL-CARRYING   STEAMERS
WIRELESS IN PACIFIC
The minister for external affairs in
the Australian government, Mr. Bat-
hcelor, announces that the Commonwealth government has agreed to the
recenimondations of the conference
of representatives of the commonwealth, New Zealand, the high commissioner of the Western Pacific, the
admiralty, and the Pacific cable
board on the question of establishing
a wireless telegraphic system in the
Pacific.
The federal government is now in
communicate i i with the other p, r-
ties to the conference asking for
their concurrence.
A number of telegraphists aie now
undergoing a couise of training ia
Sydney with a view to appointment
as wireless operators when the Australian stations are established.
The conference recommended that
high-power wireless stations should
be established at or near the following places in Sydney: Sydney in
Australia, Doubtless Bay in New
Zealand, Suva in Fiji and Ocean
Island; the Sydney staton to be capable of communlcatng with Doubtless
bay, that at Doubtless bay with Sydney and Suva, and that at Suva with
Doubtless bay and Ocean Island, and
that at Ocean Island wth Suva; and
that such stations be capable of receiving and transmitting waves up
to 6,000 feet, in addition to the ordinary commercial  waves.
Under the scheme proposed by the
conference   the   commonwealth   will
Not so vary long ago there was
great haste to build large steamers
for the carriage of oil in bulk. Such
steamers, it was known, had been
making a great deal of money, and
there were many who wished to
share in what promised to be a rich
and continuing harvest. Today the
other side of the picture is disclosed.
Recent reports from the Tyne speak
of a considerable number of tank
steamers as laid up, all of them comparatively modern vessels of large
tonnage, and one of them a vessel
which has never been to sea since her
trial trip. On the surface, it would
look as if there had been over-building of this particular class of steamer. In the face, however, of the
oil "boom" this sfeems difficult to
believe. There may be circumstances
collected with the immediate condition of the trade which are responsible for the state of things described, and which may prove of a purely
temporary character. It Is safe to
say, however, that if anyone had predicted a year ago that tank steamers would be found lying idle at the
buoys he would have been scoffed
at. The situation, whatever its precise causes, is one that surprises a
good many people, and it is certainly not welcomed by shipbuilders.
BOUGHT RANGER
Steamer Ranger', which has been
lying on the beach at Skidegate,
Q. C. I., has been purchased
by Captain Victor Jacobson, of
Victoria, and will be taken to the latter city under sail. Orders from the
captain for a new set of sails for the
steamer have been placed. These
will be shipped north as soon as possible, and when the steamer has been
properly fitted up she will be taken
down by the captain. At piesent
Captain Jacobson is at Skidegate
overhauling the steamer and getting
her ready for the voyage. The engines of the vessel will not be used
on the trip, for, not having been used
for so long a time, they are not in
working order. It is not known
what will be done with the Ranger
on her arrival at Victoria.
Captain Jacobson is the owner of
the sealing schooner Eva Marie,
which was formerly a steam craft,
but has been converted to a sailing
schooner.
ROUND   SOUTH
The Cottage City arrived from the
north on her way to Seattle, yesterday afternoon. She took on 24 first
class passengers and a large number
of steerage.
BROUGHT EXPLOSIVES
The G. T. P. freight carrier, the
Henriette, Capt. Buckholtz, has returned to port from the south and
is discharging cargo. She had a
quick trip, taking on little other than
coal and explosives. The coal was
loaded at Boat Harbor and the powder at the new works on Bowen
Island near Vancouver. She had a
full cargo on the trip.
Local News
The statutory petition asking that
a vote be taken on the "Scott Act"
in this district has *been- duly filed
with the sheriff of the county, and
will go forward to Ottawa.
* *    »
There will be a general meeting
of the Liberal association of this
city in the Presbyterian church this
evening, August 12, at 8 p.m. All
are requested to be present at this
gathering.
* *     *
The Prince Rupert Real Estate
Exchange, after its first year's existence, will give a banquet to the members this evening. The Premier
Hotel is to do the catering which Is
an assurance that all will be In first
i class style.
* *     *
Evangelistic services are still being held every night in the Baptist
church by the Rev. J. W. Litch. Mr.
Litch is a very able speaker, and an
opportunity of hearing him while he
Is in the city should not be missed.
Tonight he will speak on the subject
of  "Divorceless Pairs."    Mr.  Dawes
(lllmore will sing a solo.
* *     *
Rev. F. II. Waring, M.A., of Hall-
lax., N.S., will deliver a lecture ac,
ihe Methodist church of this city on
Sunday, August 21, on the subject
"Men of Prince Rupert and the Can
ada Temperance Act." He will not
lecture next Sunday, Aug. 14, as wa»
announced from the various pulpits
last Sunday, but will be here on the
21st and also on the 28th.
»    *     »
A petition is being circulated In
the city asking for the early completion of the Government wharf at the
foot of McBride street. The shipping interests of the city are developing at such a rate that those interested think the work should be
finished as soon as possible. It will
probably be presented to Premier
McBride on his arrival here In the
course of a few weeks.
♦    *    *
J. McGrath, who recently disposed
of his two claims, the Red Bird and
the Red Wing, on Goose Bay, to the
Pacific Metals Company, is in the
city this week in connection with the
deal. He expecls to return to Observatory Inlet where he has other
claims that promise quite as good
us the Red Bird group. He expects
there without any booming, but substantial in every respect.
Personals
In laundering skirts made of plqiK,
cotton goods or of woolen material
it is better to pin them to the line
by the waistband so that they will
hang straight down, instead of by tho
hem. If pinned at the top they will
shrink evenly all around instead ol
sagging as they to often do by the
other method.
John Dorsey, of Aldermere, Is In
the city.
»    *    »
E. Hodgson, well known as a coal
prospector arid expert, Is In the city
after examining some prospects in
this district,
*    *     *
The dance to be given this evening
at the skating rink under the Young
Peoples Dancing Club promises to
draw a very large attendance. The
management of the skating rink
where the dance Is to he held has
gone to a great 1"al of trouble to
put the maple floor In first class condition so that nothing will be lacking in that respect. Kauffmans
orchestra will provide the music,
while the refreshments will be looked after by the Fulton Bakery. The
doors open at 8.30.
 o	
"How do you find your way home
when out of sight of land?" asked
i lie girl of the captain. "By means
of the compass," he replied, genially.
"Oh, yes," she exclaimed, delightfully; "and when you are going from
horn I suppose you use the go-pass."
After that he kept busy, and allowed
no passengers to come near him.
.   .    .   ...:.      o  ,
Yo,ur luck is good if the other fellow's  Is  worse.
"WHERE QUALITY IS KING."
GEO. D. TITE
Furniture Dealer
3rd. Avenue
Prince Rupert
An inspection of our stock
of House Furnishings will
convince you. For quality nnd
economy you will leave us a
satisfied customer.
Dining Room Furniture, Sideboards,
Buffets, Dining Tables, 6ft.
•nd 8ft. Extension
Dining Room Chairs, Quartered Oak with
Leather Seats, Golden or Early English
finish. Prices ranging from
Just Received a
Handsome Line of
Iron Beds, Springs and
Mattresses, all sizes
.    WINDOW BLINDS
Manufactured here to fit any
window  up  to 10 feet wide.
Tapestry and Lace Curtains,
Poles and Trimmings
Special orders for Upholstering
of any kind.
$22.50 to $50
Wicker Chairs and Rockers
GEO. D. TITE,    -   3rd Ave.
I
SHERWIN & WILLIAMS
-PAINTS-
COVER THE EARTH.
WE   ARE   SOLE   AGENTS
CARLOAD JUST ARRIVED
Ready Nixed Paints,
Paints Ground in Oil,
Paints Ground in Japan,
Varnishes, Shellac, etc.
Water Stains
and
Decotint
IN ALT., COLORS
Prince Rupert Hardware & Supply
Company, Ltd.  thos: dunn, u».
The Westholme
Lumber Company, Ld.
We carry the largest stock of
Building Supplies in the North.
Quotations given on short notice in all lines.
Rough and Dressed Lumber
Shingles and Lath
Mouldings and Cases
Doors and Windows
We handle Plaster and Lime at reasonable prices
Get our'quotations for nll'classes of buildings.
FIRST AVENUE
OFFICE AND
WAREHOUSES
Grand Trunk Pacific  Steamships
For VANCOUVER, VICTORIA, SEATTLE.
Connecting   with   Bastbound   Trains
"Prince Rupert" sails every Thursday, 8.30 p.m.
"Prince  George"   sails  every Monday 8.30 p.m.
FOR STEWART:
"Prince Rupert" sails Wednesdays 8 p.m.
"Prince George"  sails Sundays at 8 p.m.
Steamer for Masset, Kincollth,Naas  Bay  and  Port  Simpson,  Sundays, I p.m.
For Skidegate,  Queen Charlotte City,   and   other   Moresby Island
points, Wednesday, 1 p.m., returning via Queen Charlotte City.
Tickets, reservations and Information    from
A.'E. McMASTER
Freight and  Passenger Agent, G. T. P. Wharf.
*

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