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Prince Rupert Journal Nov 1, 1910

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Array Jl.
T^f-.-. ..\-w.f. MMM
Hew Welllnjton
Coal
is the best
ROGERS & BUCK
Ptinct Mnpttt limrtwl
l8lative me^
mo
v
VOLUME  1
Published Twice a Week
PRINCE RUPERTr.B.  O,   TUESDAY, NOVEMBER   1,   1910.
Price,  Five Cents
XO. 4 0.
REBUILDING CITY
Victoria Will Quickly Recover From the
Loss Through
Fire
Firms   Have   Already   Started   Work
In Restoring the Business
Section
(Special to Tiie Journal)
Victoria, Nov. 1.—With the ashes
not yet cool, the progressive spirit ot
the firms whose losses reached into
the hundreds of thousands In the recent fire here, are planning to extend
their businesses and to erect larger
premises forthwith.
David Spencer, Ltd., have already
laid their plans for a new structure
and meantime will secure quarters in
the Driard; hotel where the firm will
immediately open. A large quantity
of goods Intended for the holiday
trade, have arrived, while additional
stock will be ordered. Other firms
are also showing the same spirit.
Henry Young & Co. will make an
early start on a new structure,
larger and better than that which
they occupied, but which was practically rebuilt only a few months ago.
Others of the burned out firms are
now awaiting adjustment of the insurance, when plans will be prepared
for new buildings.
Over two score firms were burned
out, and the aggregate loss, which is
estimated variously at from a million to a million and a quarter dollars, will be about two-thirds covered by insurance.
A notice to the effect that Luney
Bros., contractors, will give work Immediately to one hundred men, indicates the energy with which the
work will be started.
No time' was lost by those whose
premises had been ruined by the
flames In securing new quarters, and
the demand for office quarters was
probably keener than has ever before
been experienced here.
The solid, unbroken fire wall surrounding the Melrose building on
two sides was the salvation of the
lower business section. The firemen
knew of these walls and made their
big stand there. Eight men played
lines of hose from the roof of the
Melrose building during the worst
partf'of the fire at the Five Sisters
block, despite the heat, which was
simply scorching.
It was owing to their efforts and
the strength of the fire wall that the
paint and oil stock did not ignite.
This would surely have doomed the
opposite side of Fort, street, and it
Is doubtful if the fire would have
stopped short of Broughlon street.
The effectiveness of the salt water
system, although not yet In full
working order, was demonstrated
during the fire. Some idea of the
pressure from the system can be
gained when it is stated that the
suction hose connecting the Merry-
weather engine to the hydrant was
torn from its fastenings.
Eight streams were served by the
high pressure system as well as the
engines and from the hydrant stream
20,000 gallons of water per minute
were pumped.
HOLDING INQUEST
Joseph Pregent'8 Death is Being In
quired Into by Coroner's Jury
The accident which Joseph Pre-
gent met witli last Friday at the new
wharf being put in by the G. T. P. unfortunately proved fatal. Before he
reached the hospital dealh resulted,
the Injuries being more serious than
was at first expected.
An Inquest Is being held this evening. On Saturday Coroner McMullin opened the inquest tcking the evidence of Superintendent Mehan as
to the facts connected with the accident. No one seems to have been to
blame for the occurrence. As part
of the pile driving apparatus was
swinging, Mr. Pregent was caught
across the abdomen and sustained
what later proved fatal internal Injuries.
The deceased was well known
here. He formerly lived in the Yukon, being a miner. He holds property in this city and was in good
circumstances. He has a brother ln
the Yukon and another ln Cobalt.
 o	
N. M. Brewer, of the Pacific Metals
company, of Victoria, after visiting
his mining property on Prince of
Wales Island, Is in the city.
RECEIVE  RAINBOW
Hon. W. Templeman is on his way to
the Pacific
Coast
New Cruiser Will lie Formally Welcomed by Representatives of
Department
(Special to The Journal)
Ottawa, Nov. 1.—Hon. to. Templeman has left for the Pacific to look
into his private affairs incidental upon the fire. He will represent the
administration at the ceremony of
welcoming the Rainbow. The Rainbow will be stationed at Esquimau,
and will take a part in the fishery
protection in the northern waters.
Mr. G. J. Desbarats, deputy-minister of naval affairs, Admiral Kings-
mill, and Commander Roper will
formally greet the Canadian cruiser
Rainbow also, which is scheduled to
arrive in Victoria on November 7.
The Canadian cruiser Rainbow,
now on her way to Esquimau, was
visited before leaving Portsmouth by
a correspondent of the Toronto Globe
who says:—
The Rainbow looked as spick and
span as any warship of his majesty's
navy in spite of the fact that she Is
about eighteen years old. Two wicked-looking six-Inch guns, weighinf
over seven tons each, are mounted
one points ahead and the other astern
Each is capable of hurling a hundred
pound   projectile   through     eighteen
(Continued on  Page Eight)
*    CONFERENCE IN DECEMBER
(Special to The Journal)
Fredericton, Nov. 1.—Hon. J.
D. Hazen states that another
interprovincial conference
would be held early In December.
Sir James Whitney, of Ontario, and Sir Lomer Gouin,
of Quebec, will select the date
and name the place. The principal subject of discussion
will be the representation of
the provinces in the federal
parliament.
Mr. Hazen says the provinces can carry an appeal to
the privy council and claim
the jurisdiction of the supreme court of justice on the
matter of provincial companies.
TO MEET PREMIER
Stewart City Representatives are in the
City to Confer With Hon.
Richard McBride.
They Will Ask the Head of the Government   For   Public  Works
Deemed Necessary
There have arrived in the city a
delegation from the Citizens' Association of Stewart, who are empowered to confer with Hon. Richard
McBride in matters affecting that
place. The delegates comprise T. J.
Vaughan-Rhys president of the association; D. J. Rainey, vice-president, and P. F. Godenrath.
Arrangements are being made
with Wm. Manson, the representative
of the district in the legislature, and
with the local Conservative Association to allow of the Stewart delegation having a very early conference
with the Premier upon bis arrival
so that they may return to their
city by the Bruno.
The matters which the delegation
has been commissioned to take up
with the Premier have to do with
sewerage, trails, fire protection and
a number of other pressing needs of
the place pending incorporation. The
Citizens association has gone quite
fully Into the whole of these and the
delegation have the fullest information relative to the requirements.
They will confer with Mr. McBride
and arrive at the best possible means
of meeting the needs of the place.
The subject of Incorporation may also be informally discussed at the conference.
PREMIER McBRIDE TO
ARRIVE TOMORROW
Public Meeting Arranged to Take Place Tomorrow Night
—Conservative Smoker to be Held the Following Evening—Steamer Will be Held to
Suit Convenience of Visitor
Hon. Richard McBride will reach
the city tomorrow by the Prince Rupert. It is anticipated tbat the
steamer will not be in until sometime early in the afternoon, when
the Premier will be extended a welcome by the members of the executive of the Liberal Conservative association, who will be at the wharf
to meet him. Many personal friends
will also be present.
It has been arranged that very
early after arrival the Premier shall
meet the Stewart City delegation and
go into matters affecting that place.
In the evening at 8 o'clock a public
meeting will be held in the Empress
Theatre to which everybody is invited. Ladles are asked to attend
and for their accommodation seats
will be reserved. The arrangements
in connection with his visit are in
the hands of the Liberal Conservative Association.
Thursday evening the Premier will
be shown about the city inspecting
public works, etc., and during the
day will meet the city council and
discuss matters affecting the relations between the city and the government.
In the evening at 8 o'clock the
Premier will be entertained at a
smoker given at Mclntyre's Hall. All
friends and supporters of the Government are asked to be present. The
steamer Prince Rupert will remain
over until 12.30 so as to allow the
Premier an opportunity to attend the
gathering and address his many supporters in this city.
The Conservative association is
sparing no trouble to give the fullest
opportunity for the citizens to meet
Mr. McBride and hear his views on
public questions. The time at the
disposal of Mr. McBride is very limited, but the most will be made of
every moment he is here.
FEDERATION SCHEME
Empire Hay Alter Constitution to Suit
Changed Conditions.
Earl Grey's Visit  to Old Lund, it is
Reported, Hml to do With
Programme
London, Nov. 1.—-The negotiations
between the government and the opposition party on the constitutional
question have raised an issue destined profoundly to influence British
politics in the near future.
Whatever the issue of the present
conference it can be predicted with
confidence that the devolution of
some of the powers of the imperial
parliament to national assemblies in
Ireland, Scotland and Wales is a project that will bulk largely henceforth
in the programme of the Liberal
party. Pride of place belongs of right
to Ireland, whose demand for home
rule, pressed consistently for so
many years, has established her unquestioned right to priority of treatment.
There are no shrewder students
of the signs of the times than Irish
politicians, and it is noteworthy that
Mr. John Redmond and Mr. T. P.
O'Connor, during their present tour
in    the   United  States and  Canada
have spoken with warm approval of
home rule for Ireland as part of a
larger scheme of devolution, and is
preparing a road leading to the goal
of imperial unity.
In conjunction with these declarations by the Nationalist leaders must,
be placed the important declarations
favoring home rule all round which
were made by Mr. Birrell before the
Eighty club three months ago, and
by the chancellor of the exchequer
and the Master of Elibank recently.
It will be recalled, too, that shortly before tb^ rising of parliament the
Scottish Liberal members formed an
association to promote the establish
ment of a national assembly in Edin
burgh. That movement is not regard
ed with disfavor by the Liberal leaders.
Such is the enormous quantity of
business which the imperial parliament has now to transact, that, aside
from the claims of the nationalities,
some method of relieving the house
of commons of a crushing burden has
become absolutely necessary. National assemblies or parliaments, in
Dublin, Edinburgh and Cardiff
would do much to ease the strain
under pressure of which the overdriven legislative machine has all hut
broken down.
' A scheme of home rule all round
has this further advantage, that it
would practically settle by automatic
action the^ vexed problem of the
house of lords' veto. With Ireland
governed   according   to   Irish   ideas,
(Continued on Page Eight)
t Public Meeting!
A Public Meeting  will be held in the
EMPRESS THEATRE
ON
Wednesday Evening, November 2
AT 8 P.M.
At which the
Hon. Richard McBride
PREMIER OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
}. Will address the citizens — Everybody   welcome — Reserved   seats
£ for the  Ladies.
| J. A. KIRKPATRICK,
% President Liberal-Conservative Association.
EXPERIMENTAL FARM
Graham Island is   Strongly Agitating
for it to Assist Settlement There.
Qood Roads Are fleiiig Constructed
by tiie Government and Progress
on the Wireless Station
(Special Correspondence)
Skidegate, Oct. 29.—Mr. Gllling-
hani's bridge gang have completed
Miller Creek bridge and are proceeding to construct one over Lawn Hill
creek, while another party will build
a bridge across Talel river about
twenty-five miles north of Skidegate.
These are much needed improvements.
Tiie wireless station at Dead Tree
Point, seven miles north of the Indian village, Is in course cf erection,
Mr. Mclntyre being in charge' of the
work.
Among the things needed on Graham Island is an experimental farm.
Here are thousands of acres of excellent land, with a very mild climate.
A few dollars spent in that way by
the government would be not, only an
excellent method of advertising the
islands, but would be the means of
interesting many desirable settlers.
As far as agricultural and fruitgrowing interests are concerned, but
little is known as to what can be
done in the district. It has been
demonstrated, however by Mr. Hodges, an old settler, and Mr. Drain
that things grow remarkable well.
With Prince Rupert for a market
mixed farming, dairying and fruit
and stock raising will all be lucrative.
An experimental farm would convince men in Britain, Australia or
elsewhere of the great possibilties
within the reach of even poor men
since there is labor here for those
who need to spend a part of their
time earning money to develop their
pre-emptions.
With good roads, which the district will have by next year, a wireless station and telephone connecting up the island, together with an
experimental farm to lead the way,
Graham Island would become a most,
desirable place to live and would
soon settle up.
It is to be hoped that Mr. Manson
and Hon. Mr. Taylor, who; travelled
over part of the island this fall, have
already laid plans for an experimental farm for Graham Island in the
near future.
PRINCE GEORGE OFF
G.T.P. Will Give But  One Steamer a
Week for Few
Months.
Prince    Ruperl    Will    Maintain    the
Service Alone Por
a Time
The G. T. P. has made a change in
its steamer schedule lo cover the
winter months. When the Prince
George, which left last night for the
south, reaches Seattle, she will have
completed her services to tlie north
for a time. The vessel will go to Vic-
oria to be overhauled. After undergoing her regular overhauling the
steamer will go into service again
and the Prince Rupert will be taken
off the run.
The latter steamer will be off
about two months, being thoroughly
gone over and put In readiness for
the trip to Honolulu in February.
This latter trip, as announced before,
is under a special charter for an excursion to the Hawaiian Islands.
The new schedule will be the same
as the steamer Prince Rupert's present sailing. The steamer will leave
Vancouver Monday night at midnight and will return Saturday morning. The steamer Prince Albert,
running out of Prince Rupert to
Stewart and Queen Charlotte Island
ports, will cancel one of her trips
to Stewart, and sail for that port
only once a week, leaving Prince Rupert on Wednesday soon after the arrival of the steamer from the south.
A trip to some ot the othei centres
of the northern country will be substituted for the run to Stewart.
The single service a week from
the south will continue until after
after the return from Honolulu of
the Prince Rupert.
INDIANS NEW HOME
Songhees of Victoria Will Make Headquarters Near
Esquimalt
Choico Made   of   Reserve  Which  is
Suitable to all Concerned
in the Deal
ATTRACTED TO CITY
Dr. McPhee Will Probably Take Up His
Residence in Prince
Rupert.
Accident Willie Drilling for Foundation  for Cold  Storage  Plant at
Port   Essington
Thursday Evening, November 3 I
THE |
Liberal-Conservative Association       |
I Will entertain  PREMIER  McBRIDE  at a SMOKER %
| IN |
j       McINTYRE'S HALL, ATr8 P.M.       f
£    All  friends and  supporters  of the Government are cordially Invited    £
f to be  present. *
f f
je ff.;. .;. »;..j. .5. fe i|, .;. .j, .j. .;. .j. .5..;..;. .J, *"t .J. .:.*:.»>»:.•;. ♦ »>* •>•> <5» *!»*>»> ♦ •> fy <k •5"5"*> •> & ♦> & <> <« »> »>• ♦ ♦ * ♦
(Special Correspondence)
Port Essington, Oct. 29.—Dr. T. J.
McPhee, who has been medical practitioner in Port Essington and
Skeena district for some considerable time, is leaving Port Essington.
He will In all probability start practice In Prince Rupert. Dr. Mc I'be,
has many friends in the Skeena district having acted as company's doctor in the camps on the G.T.P. railroad.
Mr. Leonard Bentley, who lias been
employed for some time pasl on the
excavating work tor the foundation
of the new cold storage plant at ('lax-
ton, had liis rlghl eye rather badly
damaged by u piece of living flint
during drilling operations. He was
conveyed to Port Essington Thursday night where he received every
attention and it was found thai the
injuries were not serious. Mr. Ilent-
ley is a rancher from Porclier Island.
Tbe steamer Islander left Port Essington last Wednesday morning at
fi o'clock for Hazelton. She bad a
full cargo of winter supplies and general freight for up-river points. The
Inlander will only make one more
trip up river, and she will be put on
the ways at this port for the winter.
C. C. Perry and bride have returned to the city. They have taken up
their residence at Metlahkatla, the
headquarters of the Indian agency of
which Mr. Perry is the head.
(Special to The Journal)
Victoria, Nov. 1.—What is known
as the MacCallum property, fronting
on the harbor of Esquimalt, will be
the new home of the Songhees tribe
at Victoria, this site having been
agreed upon when Chief Cooper and
five other members of the tribe, accompanied by Premier McBride, Hon.
to. R. Ross, chief commissioner of
lands; J. S. II. Matson, and II. D.
Helmcken, K.C., visited the property
in question.
After but very little parley Chief
Cooper and his associates agreed on
tiie selection and the entire party
then proceeded to the office of the
Premier where the papers lo this end
were signed by all duly authorized
parties. Nothing remains but to get
the consent of the Dominion government to the terms of the agreement
before giving effect to the same.
nameTput on list
About Two Hundred and Fifty Applicati
ons Made as Householders
or Licensees
According to the ruling of the city
solicitors, tiie taking of applications
at the city hall from those qualifying
as householders and license holders
closed Saturday. Up to the time of
closing about 260 names had been received.
A difference of opinion as to the
date on which the names may be received exists, it being held that as
Monday was a statutory holiday the
applications should be acceptable today acco-ding to the procedure in
tliis province. Some applications
were submitted in consequence today
but were refused by the city clerk
who Is guided by the city solicitors
in the matter.
The question may come up for argument at the court of revision later
mt^m THE   PRINCE   RUPERT   JOURNAi.
Tuesday, Kejrramber 1, 1910\
HISTORIC  LE ROI
Famous Rossland Nine is Now Offered
for Sale by Controlling
Interests.
Property Has Been Great Producer—
Mismanagement and Waste Hus
Been Evident at Times
The historic Le Roe mine, once the
banner producer of Rossland, and iti
smelter at Xorthport, Wash., jus
south of the international boundary
are for sale. Mr. A. J. Macmillan
managing director of the Le Roi Mining Company, a British corporation
makes tliis anouncement. Mr. Mac
mlllan, at a recent meeting of the
directors held in London, Eng., wa>
appointed sole liquidator and authorized to dispose of the properties
to the best advantage.
A smal working force is still at
work. Extensive exploratory work
earried out during the past two years
has failed to locate any new or rich
ore bodies. Thousands of dollars
were expended in diamond drilling
and other underground work. The
mine has large ore reserves on various levels but the values being low
and th costs of extraction and treatment being considerable the question of securing a profit was considered very problematical.
Company Owes Notliing
"The affairs of the company are
not in bad,shape.| It does not owe a
cent and there is a balance In the
bank. The assets exclusive of the
mine comprises one of the most complete mining plants in existence costing as it did probably nearly one million dollars," said Mr. Macmillan.
The passing of the old Le Roe is
an event of more than passing importance and will be learned with regret by thousands of people once residents of the camp and now scattered
to every corner of the globe. It laid
the foundation of the fortunes of
several Spokane millionaires, and enriched others before the control was
transferred to England. Although
the glamor of romance cast a halo
around the pioneer operations oi
Red Mountain the sequel brought
tragedy in its wake.
Mr. Whitaker Wright, a famous
English promoter who through the
efforts of ex-Governor Mackintosh
acquired the mine and refloated'it in
London, committed suicide in the
prisoner's dock after having been
found guilty of alleged manipulation
of its affairs. The premature death
of the late Earl Dufferin, once gov-
srnor-general of Canada, a man of
stainless character, and a director of
the company is ascribed to worry
over the unfortunate disclosures of
crooked work for which he was not
responsible. Le Roi money paid for
hundreds of cases of champagne on
both sides cf the Atlantic. .. At the
time of his ragic fate Mr. Whitaker
Wright owned one of the historic
homes of England.
Col. Topping Buys
The Le Roi mine was staked in
June, 1890, by Joe Bourgeois, a
French half-breed prospector, who
was attracted to the spot by the red
showing of oxide of iron on the surface of what later came to be known
as Red Mountain. The next day he
planted his stakes on the adjoining
claims, the War Eagle and Centre
3tar, as extensions of the pioneer
claim. When he reached the mining
recorder's office at Trail he offered
the Ln Roi to Col. Topping, the recorder, in return for $10 and the
cost of filling the other claims. The
colonel accepted. The ore on the surface ran phenomenally high, and
soon a stampede to the new camp
took place. The Le Roi was acquired
by a Spokane syndicate, and development paid from the grass roots, llun-
Ireils of tons of ore run sufficiently
nigh to stand the long haul by wagon
to a point below Northport at the
then terminus of the Corbln line,
which was being bulll north from
Spokane. Within Ave years Rossland
became a city of ten thousand people
Irajvn from cities and remote confines t t civilization. Life Ihere by
lay and by night had a decidedly
scarlet hue, but withal law and order
was preserved. Mr. John Kirkup,
the burly provincial constable, armed with a big stick, ran the hard
characters out of town. His feai:ess-
ness was the terror of bad "gun men"
from American camps. If a row
started he was as likely as not to
make the men fight il out. and per
sonally see that fair play »as shown.
"When tho^e t'n-hovn men spc that
that have to M.ue to a showdown
they will soon ;;el tired tit pummelling each other," he Mice remarked
when critlcizjl for his methods. His
prediction proved  corn-i'
Rise and Full of Stoik
Ex-Governor   Mackintosh   made   a
vast fortune in negotiating the sale
of the Le Roi to Mr. Whitaker
Wright and associates. The holding
companies were the British American Corporation and the London &
Globe Corporation, two creations engineered by the fertile brain of
Wright, who also transferred to It
the control of numerous other mining
properties, a number of them in the
United States and in the Yukon.
Finally the mine was transferred to
the present corporation, the Le Roi
Mining Company, for $4,750,000. In
the various financial transactions in
which Wright figured au era of
tremendous speculation in which millions of pounds were made and lost
on the London stock market set in.
The shares went to a high premium
as great as the Antipodean stage to
which  they subsequently slumped.
Mr, Wright was ousted and ex-
(lovernor Mackintosh resigned from
the position of managing director,
the lalter's name never having been
seriously dragegd into the mix-up.
Then a new element in control
choose Mr. Macmillan as managing
director. He had an uphill fight,
when investigation showed that the
mine had been gutted and that the
main reserves consisted of low-grade
ore. Withal efforts were made to find
new ore bodies. Last year Mr. W. A.
Carlyle, who at one had been in
charge of mining operations at the
property, came out from London to
make an exhaustive examination of
the mine. His report proved the requiem of the Le Roi.
Produced Twenty-four Millions
Despite many disadvantages Mr.
Macmillan during his connection
with the property paid the shareholders three dividends of a total of
$450,000. Extravagant management
at. various stages are said to have
been the reason why larger dividends
had not been paid in the early days.
The greatest depth attained in the
mine .was 1750 feet. In its twenty
years history it produced 1,500,000
tons of ore with a value estimated
at $24,000,000, mostly In gold with
subsidiary values in copper and silver
GEN. BOTHA'S POLICY
Party Will Aim to Make South Africa
a Great Commercial
Power.
Will Endeavor to Make' Country a
Rival of America in Export Trade
TECHNICAL   SCHOOLS
General Botha, speaking at Wel-
verdiend (Transvaal) recently, said
that the aim of the Nationalists
would be to make South Africa a
happy home for all its inhabitants.
They did not intend to squeeze South
Africa dry and then throw it away.
They wer not "pocket patriots," desirous of enriching themselves and
then leaving South Africa.
Pople must forget his defeat at
i'retoria. eH had frequently been
driven out fiom his pos lions, but
ne had alwajs taken frest and better
positions behind another kopje. He
pas prepared to jump into the breach
for South Africa. He wanted to see
it take its place In the empire as a
great and prosperous country containing a great and happy nation.
The object of the Unionists opposing Mr. Hull at Barberton was to
create had feeling. It was a challenge
and General Botha warned the
Unionists that If it was forced on him
lie would take off the gloves. He
had done his utmost to avoid a fight,
but if they drove a man too far he
might turn.
The government would continue to
deal with the mines, commerce and
agriculture alike honestly and fairly.
He foreshadowed an elaborate land
policy and a wholesale development
of agriculture that would make South
Africa a rival to America in her export trade.
He had played only a small part in
politics In tbe past, but he Intended
lo play a big part in the future. He
had no Intention of working on racial
lines, hut would continue the policy
of conciliation and co-operation.
In contrast to tills attitude he commented on the action of those who
"voted British." He had, notwithstanding, received splendid support
from the English section in Pretoria
East.
He ridiculed the Idea of a crisis ln
the cabinet, and said that the most
harmonious relations existed among
ministers, all of whom gave the
heartiest support to his policy.
 o—'———
Upon experiments in aerial navigation for military purposes, Franca
spent $238,500; Germany, $1,993,
055; Austria-Hungary, $27,500; and
Great Britain, $26,350, ln 1908.
What France is Doing in Training Women for Useful Employment
Advantages Which Follow From the
Course Adopted in That
Country
In view of the fact that the Canadian commission on technical education will Bhovly visit the coas' a ;'"-
view of the work carried on by tech-
;. -al schools in France will be of interest at  thb  time.
in the discussion of the relations
betv een the school and the workshop
which has beer, gong on it lilt. E-g-
lii-h tapers, coinpla'm is rui.d? ! ♦ ' J
'.ck rf prov'siot. for technical t"iin-
!tm or practical t'ade teaching for
M.irls. The mere manual de.< tority
that is acqui.'ed l.l some schools in
said to be of no permanent use eiiht-r
for domestic life oi for '.uat of iu-
e'.-.i' try. The consequence of this la:k
cr facilities for technical e'.'cation
is t! at many young English women
a e poorly p.iid while '.he bet'er
trained Frenchwomen are sure of
I rotltable employment in the higher
departments ot dressmaking, millinery and corset-making. Th» super
lority of the French training is said
to be due to a movement started by
M. Greard, director of elementary
education, ln 1872. By that time, Ir.
France, as ln England, the old apprenticeship system had become obsolete and absolutely nothing had
definitely taken its place. According to M. Greard, apprenticeship had
really done nothing to meet the
child's needs. Parents were thoughtless, employers indifferent, legislation was insufficient and the apprentice suffered from them all. But
it was in the workshop that he suffered the greatest injury, for instead
of developing his mental and physical energies It impaired his undeveloped body, withered his heart and
brain and destroyed all love for his
craft. In 1872 whoever was most
public-spirited in France was determined to raise the nation from the
slough of despond into which the war
with Germany had plunged it, and
M. Greard's appeal found a fruitful
answer. In 1873 the first experiment
in the way of trade schools was made
and, when it proved successful, six
trade schools for boys and six for
girls were established. The value of
the training given in the latter was
recognized by the late Mrs. Oakes-
hott when in 1905 and 1906 she was
engaged in investigating the condition of the women's trades for the
London county council. French
women, she found within the area
of her inquiries, to be the best workers. They had the touch of mastery
and were devoted to their craft. She
attributed their pre-eminence as
much to training as to the French
temperament. After giving details of
the workrooms that she had visited,
Mrs. Oakeshott expressed a wish that
sometliink like the Ecoles profes-
sionelies of France were organized
in England.
Since the something has been
done for the technical training of
British women, which however inadequate in view of the extent of
the need, has been at least sufficint
to prove that, where instruction is
available there is no lack of ability
on the part of English girls. In fact,
capable workers among them are just
in proportion to the opportunities
for making themselves capable. Half
a dozen years ago the governors of
the Borough Polytechnic thought it
well to organize a lady trade school
on the French model, for one branch
of dressmaking. The experiment
aroused much Interest and next year
classes were organized in other departments. The county council also
made granlB for the opening of
'•hisses In Its own technical institutes.
Eighty trade scholarships were provided for girls of from 14 to 16
years. Before long it was resolved
to double the grants and to establish
a trade school in an Independent
building. Two line old bouses (once
occupied by the Royal Female School
of Arts) were remodelled and thoroughly repaired and adapted for the
accommodation of 200 girls. The
occupations In which technical Instruction was given at this girls'
trade school were dressmaking, millinery, lingerie, corsetmaklng, ladies
tailoring and photographic processes.
The staff comprises a lady superintendent, trade teachers who are
skilled craftswomen with practical
experience at the head of workrooms,
teachers of English subjects, drawing mistresses and Instructresses In
physical exercises. It Is a rule of
the establishment that every girl, before she enters, must make choice
of her occupation and, %vhether she
holds a scholarship or pays the fees,
must undertake to complete the two
years' course of training. There is
a consultative committee of experts
attached to each class. These experts
aid in selecting craft teachers and in
finding places for students whose
course is completed. Such students
are not mere craftswomen. The
training le social as well as technical
—about 22 hours weekly being devoted to trade subjects and ten
hours to English composition, literature, business arithmetic, drawing,
design and drill. Thoroughness is
the watchword. Initiative and creative powel are encouraged. The instruction is not narrowly spciallzed
—girls being taught many processes
and second-year girls being allowed
to experiment in muslin, etc., or to
frame designs of their own for braiding or embroidery. Nor Is moral
training neglected. The highest estimate is placed on character, while
as not unrelated to it, physical ef-
ticiency Is promoted by all healthy
exercise.
The Bloomsbury trade schools thus
provide an excellent training for
some 600 girls—the number under
Instruction at one time. But while
the results so far are admirable, and
a fine standard of industrial efficiency is set up, it is quite evident that
only a limited number of workers
can profit by the training. It cannot
be too earnestly insisted that additional accommodation is urgently
needed. There Is also required some
provision for adult workers who are
not too old to profit by instruction.
But what the Bloomsbury experiment
makes especially clear Is that technical training for women Is a real desideratum and that, when It is applied, there is no failure to appreciate it.
 o	
FIELD FOR DAIRYMEN
Dominion  Official   Says   Britisli   Columbia Offers Great Opportunities
Representing the Dominion department of agriculture and especially
the cold storage and dairy branches
of it for which he Is the commissioner, Mr. J. A. Ruddick made some
statements on his visit to the coast
which are of the greatest interest to
British Columbia dairymen. The
cheese, butter, and allied industries,
he said, had increased to an extraordinary extent and the amount of
money turned over to the farmers of
LOTS FOR SALE
IK
Ellison
AND
Prince Rupert
Houses, Stores, Offices to Rent.
MONEY TO LOAN
C. D. NEWTON
Real Estate       Exchange Block    Notary Public
Canada last' year was in excess of
$100,000,000.
"Since British Columbia imports
both butter and cheese by the carload
there ought to be a great field here
for dairymen," said Mr. Ruddick. "I
understand that the market is always short in these commodities, but
it is good to know that there are
plenty of creameries already In working order on this side of the Rockies
and that these are highly successful."
Mr. Ruddick is of the opinion that
the country in the north of the province is eminently adapted for farming
and that much nearer at hand there
are lots of opportunity for the dairyman. There were, he said, large
areas adapted for grazing.
 o	
MOTOR TO DAWSON
Modern Vehicle to Ply Over Ice Between White Horse and Yukon
To place Dawson in quicker communication with the outside world
during the long winter months,  for
the flrst time In the history of the
Yukon Territory, an automobile will
be put into stage work to cover the
snow-covered route from White
Horse to Dawson. The announcement
that this was to be put In operation
was made some weeks ago by the
Journal. The final arrangements
seem now to be completed.
The automobile, a powerful 48 h.p.
seven passenger White Six, will have
to travel 360 miles each way all
through the winter and carry the
mail as well as passengers. During
the first winter Mr. Mullin, a gasoline
motor and electrical expert on the
staff of the White Pass and Yukon
railroad, will be personally at the
wheel every trip because he Is familiar with every foot of the trail between White Horse and Dawson, having spent over a dozen years in that
part of the territory.
A commercial college Is a place
where the young are taught which
side of their bread the butter Is on.
The Best
Publicity j$2.00
Channel
Subscription
a Year
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Tuesday, November 1, 1910.
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
I     PORTUGAL AS COLONIAL EMPIRE      |
* *
Portugal porsesses one of the four
greatest colonial empires in the
world. The fact may surprise those
who think of t'-e country as a mere
strip of land less than a 'lird the
size of the United Kingdom, with nat
as many inhabitants as London. So
p, >s a Load on Standard's c-.rres-
r. adept, who proceeds:-—■
But th} Portuguese colonic were
veil won, 'fyi y are the fruit of cen-
.U'l'les Of fploiirilil enterprise and
dtrlng un-tti'pHWfu ih all ill' history
cf Huropei'.u seamen Prlnc' Henry
the Navigator, end liis flfla.'r.ih :.n-
lury captai:. 1, hv.o sei out to discover
9 vay to India by sea, did discover
tin wealth 0' lb'.- Guinea roust in
West Africa. It was '.i %■ aier
triumph wiltn Vasco da Gama lou-
bled the Capo of Good Hope, and after a year's perilous voyage, anchor-
vd off tho IiKl'nn coast. Fo- Ibat ad.
v'nturous journey brought rich gain
I; all the w<.t-an world. When the
way to Int'.i'i by sea was dlaiovered
the dich products of the east were
no longer rave, priceless 1 ixuries for
Hie few, but tia'.erials for a world-
ci mmerce f v, hich al na'ion-, fel'
<i c benefit
Vo Vasci de Gama, Port igal owes
i'cr   colon;a!   rossessions   in   Uidia,
China, and   the   Malay Archipelago.
China, and   the   Malay Archipelago.
To the sea captains who, following in
his wake, explored  the    coasts    of
Mozambique and Madagascar, she Is
indebted for the wide extent of Portuguese East Africa.    That is was a
Portuguese   sailor   who     discovered
Brazil,  and  a  Portuguese  who  first
visited the River Plate is still worth
record, though for many a year Portugal has owned no part of her own
vast territories in South America.
Possessions in the Hast
"Her   possessions   in   the   eastern
hemisphere suffice  to make her  the
fourth of colonial powers.    England,
Of course, stands first without a competitor, ever though  we exclude  India  from   the   calculation,  but   Portugal's place is by no means inconsiderable.    The figures are interesting, in square miles: —
England       9,438,900
France       4,000,000
Germany    1,000,000
Portugal         800,000
As accuracy with regard to the African territories of Portugal is impossible, the total given is the lowest
estimate.
Asset in Delngon Bay
"The importance to our South African dominion of Delagoa Bay, the
natural port of the Transvaal, has
made the East African territory the
most, familiar to us of all the Portuguese colonies. Delagoa Bay is the
finest natural harbor In South Africa.
It. is only fifty- \\j miles from the
Transvaal border and less than 300
from Pretoria. Even since the Transvaal was colonized it has Inevitably
been a place of the first significance
io Soutii African trade and government. In 1868 the Transvaal laid
claim to it, and, in reply, England
and Portugal set up counter pretensions, The dispute was referred to
the arbitration of President Mac-
Mahon, who gave bis award in favor
of Portugal. English negotiations
for its sale or cession have always
been rejected. With the development
of the gold mines in the Transvaal
the importance of Delagoa Bay was
multiplied. President Kruger's policy
sought by every means to divert
trade to that, route, In order to make
the Transvaal as far as possible, independent of the British colonies.
"During the war Delagoa Bay and
Its railway were, of course, Invaluable to his government. Delagoa Bay
was the only door to the Transvaal
not In tho possession of the British,
and therefore the only means for the
Introduction of munitions of war. Although the Transvnal liself Is now a
part of the British dominions, Its
commercial Interests must still compel It to regard the government
which controls the harbor and railway with anxious eye. One other
port In the East African territory Is
of high Importance to British trade.
Belra, some 400 miles due north of
Delagoa Bay, Is connected by railway and telegraph with Salisbury
and Bulawayo, and serveB as an out-
le for much of the trade of Matebele-
land and Rhodesia. Though Its Imports are, as compared with Delagoa
Bay's figures, of minor importance,
Its exports are far larger, to the
value ln 1908 of some £300,000.
Portuguese East Africa has a coast
line of 1,430 miles, bounded on the
north by German and on the south
by English territory. Its chief products are vegetable oils of various
kinds, India rubber, wax, gums, cof-
feet and tobacco. In the north, gold
mining Is carried on, mainly by
British subjects. The territory there
is administered under royal charter
by the Mozambique company.    The
rest of the colony is under a governor-general appointed for three years
who resides at Lourenco Marques,
the town of Delagoa Bay. He is advised by a council of officials and
representatives elected by the commercial, industrial and agricultural
classes, and has to support his authority an army of 3,000 men, chiefly natives. The colony is to a large
extent undeveloped territory, and
even imperfectly explored, It Is estimated at 300,000 square miles With
a  population   of  3,000,000,  but   the
figures should be taken with some
reserve. The districts along the coast
are unfit for European occupation,
but inland the mountains afford a
temperate and healthy climate. The
trade of the colony shows Imports
to the value of some £1,400,000 with
exports of more than £500,000. Some
considerable portion of this is trans
i ■ rt trade to the Transvaal and
Sfctabeleland.
Cocoa Islands
The attention of English people
has lately been directed to another
of the African possessions of Portugal, the "Cocoa Islands," San Thome
and Principe. From these comes one-
fifth ot the world's supply of cocoa.
As the consumption of cocoa is an-
to. Goa is a town with a past, but
there are no signs that It is to have
a great future. It was once the seat
of a huge trade, but has now fallen
into decay, and is probably best
known for the "Goa boys," who serve
as valets to many English travellers
in India. Goa lies south of Bombay, on the Malabar coast, far away
from Damao, the other Portuguese
town, which is 100 miles north of
Bombay. One hundred and forty
miles from Damao is Diu, a small
island, which also flies the Portuguese flag. All three places manufacture salt, and Goa and Damao
have some transit trade with the interior of British India.
The one Chinese possession of Portugal is Macao, an island at the
mouth of the Canton river, with two
smaller islands close by. The whole
population is about 80,000, nearly all
of whom are Chinese. The trade Is
chiefly in transit to the mainland,
for the whole area of the islands Is
only five square miles. Macao has,
however, the distinction of being one
of the few Portuguese colonies with
a surplus. Of this it has to contribute some portion to the most remote of the colonies of Portugal,
Timor. This consists of a part of an
island at the southern extremity of
the Malay archipelago. It exports
coffee in some quantity, but the island is quite undeveloped, and to
Europeans almost unknown. Like
the greater part of Portugal's great
ttE.Trwr^ti'nrasr*?-"-.,
PHONE 138
Letter Heads, Envelopes,
Statements, Business Cards
Visiting Cards, etc., etc.
Prince Rupert Journal
LAM) PURCHASE NOTICES
-District of
Coast Land District-
Skeena.
TAKE NOTICE that I, J. Adolph
Perry, of Vancouver, B.C., occupatlor.
book-keeper, intend to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at • a
post planted on the north Lauk of the
Skeena River, about a mile west of
Lot 31, thence north 40 chains,
thence east 80 chains to lot 31,
thence south 40 chains-to bank of
Skeena River, thence west about'80
chains following nortb bank of
Skeena River to point of commence-
I ment, and containing abo«i'„ 3>2C
acres.
J. ADOLPH PERRY, Locator.
Wm. A. Roney, Agent.
Dated July 10th. 1910. Jy22
.NOTICE
OLD AGE PENSIONS
French Scheme for Ensuniig Against
Want
nually  increasing  ln   every  part  of   inheritance it is the fallow land of
the world, the economic importance | empire,
of the Islands Is obvious.   They are
situated in the Gulf of Guinea, and
though their area is only 454 square
miles   they   exported   goods   to   the
value of  nearly  £1,500,000   in  the
last year for which    statistics    are
available.    This remarkable total  is
due to the extraordinary fertility of
the island  soil  and  to  the valuable
nature    of    the  crops  cultivated—
cocoa,  coffee,  rubber  and  cinchona.
It will be remembered that a report
made to the foreign office, and published in 1908, stated that the plantations     were     worked   by  laborers
whose state differed from slavery In
no point of importance.    Many cocoa
manufacturers have subsequently announced that they will buy no more
San Thome cocoa till the abuses of
its labor system are removed. Whetb-
ed a republican  government, will be
mode efficient   in    securing   reform
than   the  monarchy  remains   to   be
seen.
The servile labor of the 'Cocoa
Islands' comes for the most part
from Angola, one of the oldest and
largest of the Portuguese colonies.
It occupies the territory south of the
Congo Free State and north of the
territory in southwest Africa which
has given Germany so much trouble.
It Is supposed to be some half-million square miles in area with 5,000,-
000 inhabitants, but the figures are
to be received with caution. The
greater part of the country is still in
the hands of the native tribes, and
its undeveloped character may be
seen from the fact that there are
less than 400 miles of railway in
operation. A line of more than
1,200 miles in length is, however,
under construction, from the coast
to Katanga, where there are rich
copper  mines.
Trade by Barter
Other schemes are in process of
development. At present trade is
chiefly carried on by barter with the
natives. Cotton was once an Important crop, but is now neglected. Rubber is of lessi mportance than formerly, whether because the supplies
are becoming exhausted or through
lack of enterprise. It remains, however one of the chief exports. Coffee
and sugar are also grown. There
are known to be minerals of value,
and the agricultural possibilities of
the colony are great, but Its exports,
despite Its vast area, were, In 190(5,
less than £1,000,000 In value, whllo
the expenditure exceeded the revenue
by a quarter of a million. This, however, Is not a unique example of the
finances of the Portuguese colonies,
which annually demand nsslslnnco
from the revenues of the small mother country.
The remaining African colonies of
Portugal, Portuguese Guinea and the
Cape Verde Islands, call for little
consideration. The islands are
chiefly important by reason of the
coaling station at St. Vincent, a halfway house between the Canary Islands and Brazil or West African
ports. The population is less than
150,000, the majority being negroes.
Portuguese Guinea Is a small colony
of 4,400 square miles, about the
mouth of the Rio Grande, encompassed on the land side by the French
Senegamblan provinces. It produces
some considerable quantity of rubber.
Territory in India
Though the Portuguese were pioneers In the Eurepean discovery or rediscovery of Asia, their Asian possessions have always been small. In
India Portugal owns two towns, with
The French old age pensions will
commence to be paid at the beginning of next July.    The scheme provides for nominally nineteen million
pensioners, or twelve million obligatory and seven million voluntary pensioners.     This  is  supposed  to  be  a
maximum.     It   is   thought   that   in
practice for the flrst few years there
will be some ten million regular and
two   million   vooluntary   pensioners.
The  service   will  be  carried  on  by
cards,  and   so   twelve  million   cards
will have to be handled every year.
Every pensioner will   be    furnished
with one of these, and with ninety-
six    stamps   corresponding  to  payments made—plus a card of identity.
Each year when the card has been
filled with  all its ninety-six stamps,
it will be handed to the mayor of the
parish,     who     will    obliterate   the
stamps and  send it to the  prefect,
who will forward it to Paris to the
central pensions office.    Every year,
consequently,   twelve    million   cards
will have to undergo this manipulation.
Every card will start from the
birthday of the pensioner, and it is
thought that the flrst twelve million
will roughly be divided amongst the
twelve months of the year, so that
there will be an average of from 35,-
000 to 40,000 to be handled daily by
the Paris central office. The whole
of France will be divided into twelve
districts, and at the head of each will
be placed a comptroller with subordinates. These officials will make up
the exterior service, as distinct from
the central. The central service will
be styled the National Pensions Office, and will be divided into four
sections, each section having distinct,
duties and beinb manned with as few
officials as possible. There will be
three heads of sections, 38 sub-heads,
ten secretarial clerks, 577 manipulators, and 46 general utility men, or
674 in all.
The exterior or- provincial service
will only have 90 employees, making
a total of 764. Comparatively small
as this may seem for the proper examination, verification, and passing
of twelve million cards, each with
nearly a hundred stamps, the commission, whilst granting M. Vlvianl
his credit, expressed a hope that he
would make as much use as lie could
of the local government staffs, and
then passed his estimate of £36,280.
The contracts and competitions for
designing the cards and stamps will
at once be begun, and it is hoped that
by April it may be possible to start
registering the candidates for pensions.
NOTICE is hereby given that application will be made to the Legislative Assembly of the Province  of
British Columbia at Its next Session
for an Act lo incorporate a company
with    power    to    construct,    equip,
maintain and operate a line or lines jleum
of  railway   of  standard  guage  with    *"  "'
any kind  of  motive  power  for  the
conveyance of passengers and freight,
aud with  all  the  powers  contained
ln the "Model Railway Bill":  Commencing from a point at   or    near
Port Simpson, or Work Channel, in
the Coast District, British Columbia,
by the most feasible, desirable and
practicable route to a point on the
Eastern boundary of the Province of
British Columbia, via the South-west
side of Work Channel to the Skeena
River;  thence up the North side of
the   Skeena   River   to  a   point  near
Hazelton;  thence to the junction of
the  Bulkley   River;   thence  up  the
right bank  of  this River eight   (8)
miles to the Suskewa River;  tbence
up this River by a low divide to the
head of Babine Lake; thence to the
north  end  of   Stuart  Lake;   thence
north of McLeod Lake to the Mis-
nichinca River;  thence up the Mis-
nlchinca River by Summet Lake  to
Pine River Pass; thence north-westerly to head of Pine River, and down
ibis  River  to  Moberley  Lake;   and
COAL NOTICES
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that I, K. M. Mclnnes, of Prince Rupert, occupation
mariner, intend to apply for a
license to prospect for coal and petro-
on the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted on the soulli shore of Crow Bay,
thence north 80 chains, thence west
80 chains, tbence south 80 chains,
thence east 80 chains to post marked
K.M.McI.'s S.E. corner.
Dated August 18th, 1910.
S16 KENZIE McLEOD MclNNES.
Coast Land District—District of
Skeena.
TAKE NOTICE that I, Mary M.
Roney, of Stillwater, Minnesota, U.
S.A., occupation married woman, intend to apply for permission to purchase the following described landB.
Commencing at a post planted on the
nortli bank of the Skeena River ai
the south-eaBt corner of Geo. T
Church's pre-emption, thence north
40 chains, thence east 4 0 chains,
thence south to the bank of tbe
Skeena River, thence south-west following the Skeena River to the place
of beginning and containing about
120 acres.
MARY M. ROENY, LocaAm
W.  A.   Roney,   Agent.
Dated July 8th, 1910. Jy22
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that I, K. M. Mclnnes, of Prince Rupert, occupation
mariner, intend to apply for a license to prospect for coal and petroleum over the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted on the south shore of Crow Bay,
tnence nortb 80 chains, thence east
80 chains, thence south 80 chains,
thence west 80 chains to post marked
K.M.McI.'s S.W. corner.
Dated August 18th, 1910.
S16 KENZIE McLEOD MclNNES.
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast.
 „   „            —,^ TAKE NOTICE that I, K. M. Mc-
thence  by  the  Peace  River  to  the innes, of Prince Rupert, occupation
Eastern boundary of the said Prov- ] mariner,   intend   to   apply   for   a   II-
ince of British Columbia; and with
power to construct, operate and
maintain all necessary bridges, roads,
ways and ferries; and to build, acquire, own and maintain wharves and
docks in counection therewith; and
to build, acquire, own, equip and
maintain steam and other vessels and
boats, and to operate 'the same on
any navigable waters; and with
power to build, equip, operate and
maintain telegraph and telephone
lines in connection with the said
Railway and branches, and to transmit messages for commercial purposes, and to charge tolls therefor;
and to generate and to sell electricity
for the supply of light, heat and
power; and with power to expropriate lands for the purposes of the
Company; and to acquire lands,
money bonuses, privileges or other
aids from any Government, municipal corporation or other persons or
bodies; and to levy and collect tolls
from all persons using, and on all
freight passing over any of such
roads, railways, ferries, wharves and
vessels built by the Company; and
with power to connect with and make
traffic or other arrangements with
railway, steamboat, or other companies:
Dated at Victoria, B.C., this 11th
day of August, 1910
BARNARD &  ROBERTSON,
cense to prospect for coal and petroleum over the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted 011 the south short of Crow Bay,
thence south SO chains, thence west
80 chains, thence north 80 chains,
thence east 80 chains to post marked
K.M.McI.'s N.E.  corner.
Dated August 18th, 1910.
S16 KENZIE McLEOD MclNNES.
-District of
A19.
Solicitors for the Applicants.
spending well to this strenuous cure.
It is also employed with good results in cases of spinal curvature and
is occasionally used when it is necessary to place a patient in a plaster
cast.
The aparatus used consists of a
strong metal tripod, eight feet in
height with a pulley at. the apex.
Over this pulley is passed a rope attached to two large metal stirrups,
well padded with leather, one of
which fits beeath the patient's chin
and the other beneath the protruding
back part of the head. The patient's
head is in exactly the same position
as that of a person's foot whose toes
are resting on the bar of one stirrup
Skeena Land District
Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that I, K. M. Mclnnes, of Prince Rupert, occupation
mariner, intend to apply for a license to prospect for coal and petroleum over the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted on the soutii shore of Crow Lake,
thence south 80 chains, thence east
80 chains, thence north 80 chains,
thence west 80 chains to post marked
K.M.McI.'s N.W. corner.
Dated August 18th, 1910.
S16 KENZIE McLEOD MclNNES.
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that William
Hume Grant, of Stewart, B.C., occupation engineer, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a
post marked W.H.G.'s S.W. Cor., and
planted adjoining Alfred Manson's
corner post, thence 80 chains north,
along W. N. Harrison's west line,
thense east 80 eiiains, thence south
80 chains, tlience west 80 chains, following Alfred Manson's nortli line to
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
WILLIAM HUME GRANT.
Frank R.  Strolm, Agent
Dated July 2, 1910. Jy22
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that The Canadian
Fish and Cold Storage Company, of
Vancouver, B. C, occupation mercantile and manufacturing, inteuds
to apply for permission to purchase
the following described lands: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-east corner of lot 34, Range 5,
Coast District, thence south 20
chains, thence east 40 chains, thenee
north 25 chains more or less to the
shore line, thence following along
the shore line to the point of commencement and containing 90 acres,
more or less.
The  Canadian  Fish  &  Cold
Storage Company Limited.
J. H. Pillsbury, Agent.
Dated July 14, 1910. Jyl9
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Reginald
Davey, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation machinist, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands, In the vicinity of
Citwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing at a posl planted at the
north-west, corner and about 6 >/t
miles distant in a north-westerly direction from the nortli end of Kltwancool Lake, thenee soutii 8 0
chains, thence east SO chains, thence
north 40 eiiains, thence west 40
chains, tlience north 40 chains,
eiiains, thence west 40 chains to a
point of commencement, and conta.n-
ing 480 acres  (more or less).
REGINALD   DAVEY.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated  May 30,  1910. Jy8
NOVEL TREATMENT
Hanging Employed in Hospitals For
Nervous Complaints
 „ __    _„   .   Queen Charlotte Group, In the Prov
Iron, while the heel rests on the bar ilnce of  British  Columbia,  nnd  more
of another.
"We begin the treatment," a logical medical man explained, "by gently pulling on the free end of the rope
until the patient Is raised on his
toes. After being kept in Ibis position for a few seconds he Is given a
few moments' rest. The second time
lie is raised a little higher, so that
more strain falls on the nerk muscles. The process Is continued every j
morning for a fortnight, the 'dose'
being gradually increased until towards the end of the treatment tho
patient   can   stand   being   suspended
Coast Land District—District of
Skeena.
TAKE NOTICE that I, Ernestine
A. Roney, of Prince Rupert, occupation married woman, intend to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted on the north
bank of the Skeena River about half
a milo south of Geo. T. Church's preemption, thence west 10 chains,
thence north 4 0 chains, thence east
to the Skeena River; tlience southwest following the bank of the
Skeena River to the place of beginning, and containing about 80
acres.
ERNESTINE A. RONEY, Locator.
W. A. Roney, Agent.
Dated July 7th, 1910. .Iy22
Skeena Land District—District of
Qu<"ii Charlotte.
TAKE NOTICE that the Queen
Charlotte Whaling Company Limited,
of Victoria, British Columbia, occu-
ation manufacturers, Intend to apply
for permission to purchase the fol-
owlng described lands:—Commencing at a posl planted about fifteen
eiiains soutii of a small creek on the
west side of Rose Harbour, Moresby
Island, thence west forty chains,
thence north forty chains, thence
east forty chains, thence southerly
following the sinuosities of the foreshore line forty chains, to the point
of commencement.
Queen Charlotte Whaling
Company Limited,
Per Sydney Charles Ruck, Agent
Dated July 14th,  1910.
Rose  Harbour,  Q.O.I,       . A5
Skeena Land  District—District  of
Queen   Charlotte   Islands.
 ^^^     TAKE   NOTICF,   that    Arthur    A.
marked "P. C. Coates' S. E. Corner ! Wilson, of Fort William, Ont., occu-
Clalm No. 1," thence west 80 chains, patlon banker, Intends lo apply for
thence north 80 chains, thence easl 1 permission to purchase the following
80 chains, thence Bouth 80 chains to]described lands: Commencing nt a
the plnce of commencement. posl     planted aboul   7  miles south
Staked June 14th, 1910, from the southeast corner of Lot 227
Dated this 28th day of July, 1910. :nnd  I ',(.   miles west  from shore line,
Skeena
COAL CLAIMS
District—Queen   Charlotte
Islands.
To all to whom it may concern:—
NOTICE is hereby given that I, the
undersigned, intend to apply for a
Icense to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum upon the following lands
situate on Graham Island, one of the
particularly described as follows, viz
Commencing at a stake planted one
and   a   quarter   miles   west    of     the
north-oast corner of Louis Inlet, nnd 1
P. C.  COATES,
By bis Agent. Wm. Edward Laird
A9
COAL CLAIMS
Skeena   District—Queen   Charlotte
clear of the ground for from twenty |To a„ to ^m^mls concern:—
to thirty seconds.    Immediately after)     NOTICE is hereby given that I, the
Ithence west 80 chains, thence north
SO chains, tbence east SO chains,
thence south SO chains to point of
commencement, containing oio acres.
ARTHUR  A.  WILSON.
Arthur Roberlson, Agent.
Dated August 20th, 1910. S30
-District of
A writer in a London newspaper
few days ago seemed inclined to excitement over the fact that hanging
by the neck is a recognized form ol
treatment for certain cases of nervous diseases in some of the London
hospitals. The method has been in
use for a long time in Canadian lios
pitals, so medical men say. In wry
neck in particular "hanging" has
given good results, certain cases
totally unrelieved by other more con
Skeena Land District
Coast
-            • j     -.---.-—.-.  , „;  t„   „,„,„   fnr   ,,       TAKE   NOTICE    that    I,  William
each morning's treatment the patient' undersigned intend '« PCoal Ind Davld Allen' of Victoria, B.C.. agent,
is at once put back to bed, where ne^™8 ™ ESmthe following lands, Intend to apply for Permission to
stays until the next, morning's treat-1aitualed   on   Graham   Island,   one  of lease the following described land: —
he Queen Charlotte group, in „,e Commencing at a pos planted at the
Province of British Columbia, and norlhwest corner of Lot 542, Range
more particularly described as foi- 6 Coast (Skeena), thence east 60
lows! viz:-Come,„ncing at a stake chainsto the inner part.of Klnnealon
planked at the S. E. corner of P. C. I Inlet, thence south 80 chains to south
Coates' Claim No. 1, and marked east corner of said "t thence west
"Wm. Penman's S. to. Corner, Claim SO chains to westerly limit of said
No 1 " thence east 80 chains, thence lot, thence north and at right angles
north' 80 chains thence west SO to the southerly limit, of said lot to
chains  thence south, SO chains to the'the shore l'ne, tbence north along the
ment.
 0	
Pat (gazing at small sign on a
tree in the woods)—"Keep off! Well,
who could git onto a shmall bhord
the loikes of that?"
 0	
11 island appertaining there-  servatlve  methods of  treatment  re- ' plan
One of the hardest things In this| ,iace 0f commencement.
world to do Is to admire a man who      Staked, June 14th, 1910
has confidence In his ability to sell'    ""ed this "BO^ot^lWO-
us a set of books on the Installment |By  n)B  Agent,  Wm.   Edward  Laird.
A9
shore line of said Inlet to place of
beginning: containing about GOO
acres, more or less.
WILLIAM DAVID ALLEN.
Robert Mason, Agent.
Dated Sept. 23. S.2S PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Tuesday, November 1, 1910.
prince ffiupert journal
Telephone  138
Published twice a week on Tuesdays
and Fridays from the office of publication, Third Avenue near McBride St.
Subscription rate to any point in
Canada, $2.00 a year: to points outside
of Canada, 83.00 a year.
Advertising°i'ate furnished on application.
O. H. NELaON,
Tuesday, November 1, 1910.
MACHINE POLITICS
The Liberal organ in the city is
certainly amusing if not consistent.
For six months that paper has, in
season ami out of season, when there
was reason for it and more frequently when there was no reason for it,
attacked the city council and the administration of civic affairs. With
the change of ownership, when the
control passed into the hands of a
syndicate of local Liberals, who decided to conduct the paper as a
medium for spreading the doctrines
of the Liberal party, a sudden change
was affected. Now nothing Is wrong
at the city hall. The pessimistic
views of only a few days ago when
:the city was going to ruin, when the
financial credit of the place was being
•sacrificed, when the city hall was
crowded with employees treading In
each  other's  footsteps,    when    the
. streets were deserted as far as laborers were concerned and when nothing
but an absolute change of city government would redeem the city, have
. all    passed   away   and ln the place
- that organ breaths out In classic
language after dilating on the excellent work being done by the council,
"it looks as If things have been doing down at the city hall."
Why the change? It is the same
old city council; there Is the same
number employed in the administration of affairs at the city hall. The
change must, therefore, be in the
newspaper. As a Liberal organ i*
sees things entirely different from,
what it saw them as an independent
organ. Party politics is the only explanation. For party purposes the
council must be lauded.
We believe the city council is entitled to a fair show. We have always
stood by that principle. The council
Is not above criticism because it is of
one particular complexion of politics.
On the other band it Is not to be
more severely criticised because of
the party to which its members may
belong.
An attempt at a system of machine
politics, however, is quite apparent
now judging from tbe columns of the
Liberal organ in dealing with municipal affairs and the result can only
be to the disadvantage of the city. It
is a dangerous precedent to set and
Is very liable to come back against
the clique that would attempt to
force party into everything in the
city. Prince Rupert is not prepared,
unless we are greatly mistaken, to
submit to any machine politics and
the guiding spirits In such a movement should he early taught a practical lesson along Hint line. It may
be true that there are very clever
men guiding the machine here, but
the public cannot be deceived very
long and those responsible for the
Introduction of machine politics will
have little sympathy should the
weapon lliey use prove a boomerang.
 o	
EXPERIMENTAL FARM
Graham Island is anxious to have
an experimental farm and these
seems to be good reason why such
should be provided. The agricultural
possibilities of that part of the province require thorough testing before
It, can lie definitely stated what are
the best methods to pursue in cultivation and as to the varieties of products to plant.
An Instance of the necessity for
experiment is shown by the fact that
Mr. Drain, who is making quite n
success of farming there, has found
thai seeds sown aboul June 1 fare
quite us well as those sown a month
earlier, it was only after experimenting along this line that this fad
was broughl out by Mr. Drain, The
Individual farmer, however, has not
usually (lie means to spend several
years experimenting, If something
could he done by the Government the
advantages as far as settlement is
concerned would be very great.
In the past the experimental work
In the Dominion has been carried out
by the federal government and stations have been placed at different
points to test grains, etc., suitable
to the locality. The Dominion government might in this instance do
something for Graham Island.
The province has not so far opened
up any experimental farms in the
broad sense. Appropriations have
been made for assisting In the planting of experimental orchards at various points, but it Is somewhat, doubtful if consent could be obtained from
the local administration to invade a
field that has been generally carried
out by the Dominion government.
If information could be obtained
ahead of any pronounced move in
the line of settlement the advantages
to the incoming settlers and to the
country at large would be very material, As a district tributary to
Prince Rupert this city will doubtless
lend any assistance towards securing
an experimental station  there.
PREMIER'S VISIT
Tomorrow there will reach the city
Hon. Richard McBride, Premier of
the Province of British Columbia. His
\isit lo Prince Rupert is to be all too
.lion to suit the wishes of the citizens of this place. Steps are being
taken, however, to crowd into the
limited time available all that can
possibly be done.
The city council will this evening
go fully into the matters which it
will press upon the attention of the
premier so that the fullest advantage
may be taken of bis visit. There can
be no doubt that the Government, of
which Hon. Mr. McBride is the head
will be asked for plenty by the city
council, probably much more than
is expected. This is perhaps a proper
course. Few get what they do not
ask for. The city made a mistake
when Sir Wilfrid was here In not
asking for some of the necessary
works that will have to be .undertaken here. The speeches of S,tr Wilfrid revealed the fact that he was
somewhat surprised at not being asked for something. Profiting by the
mistakes, the Premier of the province will not be allowed to escape.
In Hon. Mr. McBride the city will
find a warm friend and one who will
do all that Is possible for Prince Rupert. The council must not expect
impossibilities to be done, however,
and should bear In mind that thb
Premier represents the who'e province.
INDIAN QUESTION
Settlement Accomplished of the Songhees Reserve in the City
of Victoria.
Agents of the McBride Government
Succeed in Solving Vexed Subject for City
Through the agency of Mr. J. S. H.
Matson and Mr. H. D. Helmcken, representing the provincial government,
a basis of settlement of the Songhees
Indian reserve question was reached
this evening.
An agreement has been ratified between a majorily of the members of
the tribe and Hon. Richard McBride,
premier of the province, whereby upon the payment of $10,000 to each
of the forty-three beads of families
as a bonus, they agree to remove to
another reserve. Tbe latter, by the
terms of agreement, is to be chosen
by Mr. McBride and a committee of
fiw members of the band.
The agreement reached the signature of the premier at his residence
when the indenture was conveyed
thither by Ihe two gentlemen representing tiie government, Chief Cooper
and eight members of the tribe.
The reserve question lias been a
burning one for Ihe past thirty
years. The reserve consists of one
hundred and fifteen acres in the
heart of the city, having a waterfront
of over a mile just west and across
the inner harbor from the business
section of the city. It has shut off
Victoria West, and Esquimalt from
the city and prevented the growth of
Victoria in that direction.
It was granted to the Songhees in
1850 and their removal has been
Bought since 1881.
The agreement just, ratified will be
also sent to Ottawa to obtain the assent of the Dominion government as
wards of the Indians.
Willi tliis received the present reserve reverts to the crown, represented by tbe governmenl of British Columbia. It is understood the latter
will plat the same and auction it, the
proceeds going to decoup the provincial government for the expenditures
In connection with It.
 o	
CAMPED ON DIGBY
The Boy Scouts returned yesterday
from an enjoyable outing of two days
on Digby Island. With full equipment the mebers of the local brigade
were taken over on Saturday afternoon and spent two nights ln the old
headquarters of the G. T. P. engineers there. Guards were mounted
and during the whole night by
changes every two hours the headquarters  were  kept  safely  guarded.
Monday the boys marched through
Ihe woods to the wireless stalion, returning home during the day, feeling very happy over their outing.
SPORTS
BURNS TO TRAIN
Tommy Burns, the former heavyweight champion of the world, will
start training in Seattle about the
middle of November for bis fight
with Langford early next spring. The
match with the colored fighter is assured, and nothing more needs be
settled but the date of the go. Tommy has been handicapped in training
on account of a knee that be twisted
badly in the Labor day lacrosse
match in Vancouver; otherwise the
fight would have been staged on
a much earlier date.
"There is no question about my
light with Langford," said Tommy in
Vancouver. "I am signed up to meet
him before the Olympic club of London, some time after February 1.
The date is indefinite yet, as I have
been unable to train at all since I
played that game of lacrosse, and my
doctor tells me that he won't stand
for any real work on my part until
November 15th at the earliest.
"However, I am gaing to buckle
down to the hardest kind of conditioning stunts and training, starting
on November 15th, and from then
until I leave for London, which will
be about the flrst of January, I will
be good and busy."
PAPKE BEATS WILLIAMS
Billy Papke knocked out Ed. Williams, of Victoria, Australia, at the
Sydney stadium last week in the
sixth round of a scheduled 20-round
fight. It was an uninteresting battle. Both men indulged in a lot of
roughing, particularly in the second
round, when Williams went to the
boards as a result of wrestling tactics
in clinches. In the fourth and fifth
rounds Papke floored Williams with
hard jolts. The sixth round was very
tame. Williams was weak and shortly after the round opened Papke
sent in a swinging uppercut and Williams went down and was counted
out.
BRITISH FAIR PLAY
Addressing the school children of
Winnipeg he other day, Joe Lally,
the enthusiastic booster of amateur
lacrosse, said in part:
"I believe lacrosse is the best physical exercise to be found among the
many kinds of games today and if
you boys start right, learn to be honest in sport, take probably some bard
bumps and raps now and then, you
will grow up to be all the better
business men when you get older.
"Be honest boys, above all things,
in all the time I have been in lacrosse
I have never known of a single case,
no, not, one, where any dirty or mean
player ever gained by liis dirty work.
When you see one fellow hit. another
over the head, a deliberate whack
probably because he got a little acci-
il 'iitnl crack, shows that he is bad at
the core. 1 say bad to the core because auy prayer who would do a
tiling like that must be dishonest and
bad to tiie bottom of his heart.
"I tell you there is something in
that old saying about British fair
play and which we should try to follow. If ever any of you boys should
he tempted to be dishonest turn it
down. Don't hesitate a minute, but
turn any such thing down. Begin
right and you will carry thos"> things
through life. Even in your little
game of marbles be honest.
"A thing happened when the Canadian lacrosse learn was playing In the
Olvmpic games at London that seemed funny to us, though it wns only an
example of that British fair piny that
Is so common In the Old Country.
Dillon, one of the Canadian players,
broke his stick. Rushing over to his
friends in the crowd he yelled 'Hurry
up, get me another slick, quick.'
When the man who was checking
him came up nnd quietly said, 'All
right ,old chap, I'll wnil until you
gel your slock,' and so lie did. Tills
sounds funny to us over in America,
where such a thing would he laughed
LAND  LEASH  NOTICE
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that The Canadian
Fish & Cold Storage Company Ltd.,
of Vancouver, occupation Mercantile
and Manufacturing, Intends to apply
for permission to lease the following described land:—Commencing at
a post planted at high water mark
on the westerly side of Prince Rupert Harbor and distant about 110
chains from the north-east corner of
Lot 443, thence west 20 chains,
thence south 20 chains, thence east
5 chains, more or less to high water
mark, thence following along the
high water mark to the point of commencement and containing 20 acres
more or less.
The Canadian Fish and Cold
Storage Company, Limited,
J. H. Pillsbury, Agent.
Dated June 20th, 1910. Jyl2
The British Columbia Company
LIMITED.
AUTHORIZED CAPITAL $100,000.::   PAID UP CAPITAL $41,500
DIRECTORS:—Reginald C. Brown, President; J. C. Maclure, Vice-
President; H. E. Marks, Managln g Director; Capt. E. Nash, William
McNair, R. A.  Bevan, and F. C.   Williams, Secretary.      :-:       :-:
INTEREST 4 PER CENT. DEPOSITS
This Company acts as Executors, Administrators, Transferees and
Secretaries to Public Companies.    Commercial, Industrial and other
business propositions underwritten.     Issues  made  on  the
London and New York Stock Exchanges.
TIMBER, COAL, LANDS, and
COMPANY ORGANIZATION
Head Office for Canada, 203, 208, 210, 215 Carter-Cotton Building,
VANCOUVER, B.C.
The Staneland Co. Ltd
-IS THE-
Paint Supply House
of British Columbia
ALL GOODS ARE GUARANTEED
WRITE FOR PRICES AND SAMPLES
The Staneland Co. Ltd
836-840 Fort Street, VICTORIA, B.C.
-mm
GRAND TRUNK PACIFIC STEAMSHIPS
For VANCOUVER, VICTORIA, SEATTLE.
Connecting  with   Eastbound   Trains
Prince Rupert sails every Thursday, 8.30 p.m.
Prince George sails every Monday, 8.30 p.m.
FOR STEWART:
"Bruno" sails every Sunday after the arrival of the "Prince George"
and returning Monday evening will connect   with    the    same
steamer southbound.
"Bruno" sails Wednesday after the arrival of the "Prince Rupert,"
returning Thursday evening, connecting with the same steamer
southbound.
FOR MASSET—Bruno sails 10 p.m. every Monday, returning Tuesday night, and for Skidegate and other Moresby Island  Ports,
Bruno sails 10 p.m. Thursday, returning Saturday.
Tickets, reservations and information    from
A. E. McMASTER
Freight and  Passenger Agent, G. T. P. Wharf.
=*
FOR FIRST CLASS
GROCERIES
-CALL AT-
MERRYFIELD'S CASH GROCERY
CORNER 3rd AVENUE AND 5th STREET
at, but that is a sample of  British
fair play."
. o	
Stewart has opened a public school
witli Mr. Rowe as teacher. Tbe government allows $100 a month salary.
The school will be held in tbe Methodist church, starting today.
 o	
In most of the civilized countries
of Ihe world, except Ireland, Italy
and Bulgaria, the death-rate Is lower
among females than among males.
Municipal Notice
TENDERS FOR STREET GRADING
Sealed Tenders will be received by
the City Clerk until 12 O'CLOCK
N'OON, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER
3rd, 1910, for the grading of Third
Avenue and adjoining streets, from
McBride street south-westerly.
Plans and specifications may be
seen, and forms of tender obtained at
the office of the City Engineer from
10  a.m.  to  4.30  p.m.  daily.
The lowest or any tender not
necessarily accepted.
ERNEST A. WOODS,
Wm. Mahlon Davis, City Clerk.
City Engineer. 014-N1
CITY VOTER'S LIST
TAKE NOTICE that all persons
wishing to have their names entered
on the Voter's List of the Municipality of the City of Prince Rupert, as
householders or as holders of a trade
license, must, during the month of
October, apply to the City Clerk to
have their names so entered on the
Voter's List, by delivering to the
City Clerk a statutory declaration as
required by the Municipal Election's
Act. Copies of such declaration may
be obtained from the City Clerk.
All persons who are not assessed
owners of property, must make a new
application In order to qualify as a
Voter in the coming election.
ERNEST A. WOODS,
014-028 City Clerk.
NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
.• pplicatlon will be made by tbe City
of Prince Rupert at the next sitting
of the Legislative Assembly of Hie
Province of British Columbia for an
act amending the City nf Prince Rupert Incorporation Act, 1910, so as
to enable the City to borrow and
raise money by the issue of Inscribed
slock to convert debentures already
Issued Into such slock, and to consolidate debts provided fur by individual by-laws so that consecutive
debentures or Inscribed stock may be
issued for such debts as consolidated.
Dated at Prince Rupert, this 14lh
day of. October, 1910.
WILLIAMS & MANSON,
Solicitors for the Applicants.
LAND PL'RCHASE NOTICKS
Coast Land District—District of
Skeena—Range  Five.
TAKE NOTICE that I, Chas. P.
Perry, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation
contractor, Intend to apply for permission to purchase the following described Iands:—Commencing at a
post planted on the north bank of the
Skeena river at the southwest corner of Lot B30, thence north 40
chains, thence west about 40 chains
to line of Cassiar Cannery, thence
south to the Skeena River, thence
east about 40 chains following the
shore of the Skeena River to the
place of beginning, and containing
about 160 acres.
CHAS. P. PERRY, Locator.
R. P. Perry, Agent.
Dated Sept. 28, 1910. 018
Atlantic Steamship
 'Agency	
Through tickets and excursion
rates to
England, France, Germany,
and all
Scandinavian Ports.
Call or write for rates to any
part of the world. I am also
agent for all American steamers
to and from Prince Rupert;
Northern Pacific Railway; Alaska Pacific Express.
J. H. ROGERS
General Steamship and Railway
Agent, Prince Rupert, B.C.
Union Steamship Co'y
of B.C. Ltd.
The uew Steel Passenger Steamer
"Camosun"
PRINCE RUPERT every Sunday at 9 a.m. for Vancouver,
arriving Monday afternoon.
For Stewart City on arrival from
Vancouver Friday night.
Northbound, leaves Vancouver
Wednesdays at 9 p.m.
Steerage Fare $5.00
The "Camosun" is the only steamer
on the run having water-tight bulkheads and double bottom, thus ensuring safety of passengers in ease of
collission or wreck.
J. H. ROGERS,   Ticket Agent
HAYNOR  BROS.
FUNERAL  DIRECTORS
and
PROFESSIONAL  EMBALMERS
DR. W. B. CLAYTON
DENTIST
Office  in    the    Westenhaver   Block,
Over Orme's Drug   Store.
Prince Rupert
WM. S. HAiX, L. D. S. O. D. S.
:-: DENTIST :-:
Crown and Bridge Work a specialty.
All dental operations skillfully
treated. Gas and local anaesthetics
administered for the painless extraction of teeth. Consultation free.
Offices, Helgerson 3k., Prince Rupert
G. W. NICKERSON & CO.
—o—
CUSTOMS AND MERCHANDISE
Brokers, Forwarding Agents,
Storage, etc.
.1.  to. POTTER
ARCHITECT     AND     STRUCTURAL
ENGINEER
Re-inforced Concrete a Specialty
—o—
Law-Butler Building - Prince Rupert
-o—»~«>~» ♦♦»♦»»♦»
< *
Tfee Thompson ;
Hardware Co.;:
-Second Avenue—
Paints. General Hardware,   • >
Oils, Stoves and Ranges.
Clarmont Rooms
Sixth Avenue near Fulton Street
Comfortable, Homelike Rooms; Newly Furnished Throughout;  Bath
Rooms   with   Hot   and
Cold Water
llntes, $8.00 a  Week   and   Upwards
Mrs.   Annie   McGrath,   ProprietoreSS
The Roland Rooms
Splendid Accommodations
Newly Furnished
Hot baths;, right down town;  good
table board all round
RATES, FD7TV CENTS AND OP
Corner Eighth and Fraser Streets
Clinton Rooms
Newly   remodelled   and   furnished.
Board   and   lodging.   Home cooking
a  specialty.    Mrs.  Anderson,  Prop.
Rooms, $3 Per Week
WANTED—To   buy   cheap   lots   in
Prince Rupert direct from ownera.
Price must be right. Give description,
price and terms.   Address X, Journal
c-ice." tram
■■■■■Mi
.••*■*«'
Tuesday, November 1, 1910.
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
ROGERS' ADDITION TO
ELLISON!
in
ROGERS' ADDITION TO
ELLISON!
The future commercial centre and distributing point of the Bulkley, Kispiox and
Skeena River Valleys, is now platted and lots offered to the
investor on the most liberal terms.
Rogers' Addition to tills new G. T. P. Town of Ellison is located on
high level land only seven blocks from the propsed station and depot
grounds.
The G.T.P. Railway Company expects to reach this town early next
summer with the rails and property will then advance by leaps and bounds.
There is no Investment like Real Estate; it is safe, certain and profitable. We have all had this experience in the past and have bnt recently
experienced the marvellous Increase made on investment here ln Prince
Rupert.
TERMS:
Cash $10.00; Balance
Easy Payments
Another opportunity Is now before you.    Do not fail to take advantage of this; get In on the ground floor nnd reap the benefit of advance.
A limited number of these lots are now offered at the low price of,
$100.00 TO $125.00
for corner lots
Size of lots are 33 by 120 feet, street alleys  and  blocks  all conform
to the Main Townslte of Ellison.
FOR NAPS AND FURTHER PARTICULARS CALL OR ADDRESS
The Christiansen-Brandt Company
Financial Agents
Corner 3rd Ave. and 5th St.
Prince Rupert, B.C.
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!   MARINE NEWS   {
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To Arrive
Tuesday,    Nov.    1.—Prince    Albert
from Masset.
Wednesday, Nov. 2.—City of Seattle
from Skagway.
Prince Rupert from Vancouver.
Thursday,  Nov.   3.—Prince     Albert
from Stewart.
Friday, Nov. 4.—Camosun from Vancouver.
Humboldt from Seattle.
Saturday, Nov. 5.—Princess Beatrice
from Skagway.
Prince  Albert  from  Queen  Charlotte City.
Sunday,    Nov.    6.—Camosun    from
Stewart.
Prince George from Vancouver.
Cottage City from Seattle.
Monday, Nov. 7—Prince Albert from
Stewart.
Princess Royal from Vancouver.
To Depart
Wednesday, Nov.   2.—Prince Albert
for Stewart.
City of Seattle for Seattle.
Thursday,   Nov.   3.—Prince   Rupert
for Vancouver.
Prince Albert for Skidegate.
Friday, Nov. 4.—Camosun for Stewart.
Humboldt for Skagway.
Saturday, Nov. 5.—Princess Beatrice
for Vancouver.
Sunday, Nov.  0.—Camosun for Vancouver.
Prince Albert for Stewart.
Cottage City for Skagway.
Monday, Nov. 7.—Prince George for
Vancouver.
Princess Royal for Skagway.
ADDITIONAL LIGHTS
As a result of the promise, made to
Captain Robertson of the G. T. P.
steamer Prince George, of the installation of flfleen more beacons and
lights on the passage between Victoria and Prince Ruperl, the marine
and fisheries department have announced their Intention of proceeding to establish the marks. The premier was impressed with the dangers
that besel navigation as a result of
the lack of n proper number of lighls.
The promise was made after the
navigator had pointed out to the premier, from the bridge of the Prince
George, the lack of lights.
The following lights will be installed, according to the information
given out by the marine and fisheries
department: Gas beacon on Mary
Ann Point, Active Pass; gas beacon
either for Camp Point or Helmcken
Island, Johnstone Strait, as may be
found by the department's local officers to be most efficient; acetylene
light on 13-foot rock off Crane Islands, New Channel; a white beacon
on the point of Denny Island, opposite Serpent Point, Lama passage, to
mark a change of course; gas beacon
and bell on Camp Island, Lama passage; lighted beacon on Jorkins
Point, Millbank Sound, recommended
but question is to be raised whether
the better location would be North
Island, Mlllbank Sound; lighted beacon on the north extreme of White
Cliff island, Arthur passage, granted
instead of gas light on Genn Island,
Malacca passage; lighthouse and fog
alarm to replace acetylene light at
present marking Holland Island, outside Prince Rupert harbor; gas beacon on Low Islands, at the entrance
to Selwyn Inlet, Queen Charlotte
Islands.
SEAL PRESERVE
Capt. Carden, of U.S.S. Manning,
says the United States government
will be recommended to declare the
Pribyloff islands government reserves and to refuse water and food supplies at Ounlaskan ports to Japanese
sealers as a means of preventing
their work in Bering Sea. No British
vessel under the previous treaty can
fish within sixty miles of the islands,
while the Japanese are allowed to go
up to the three-mile limit. The
United States government, this year
killed 12,000 seals.
There were twenty-five Japanese
vessels, with 816 men, engaged in
th traffic last season. Officers from
the revenue cutter patrol boarded
the aliens at. will and kept a careful
watch upon them. The members of
the crews live on seal mean when
they are unable to get fish, and fishing by the strangers in any of the
harbors is forbidden.
The Seattle I'.-I. says: "More and
more the law has been tightening on
the Japanese fishermen by cutting
off their food supply, and with another step or two tho government
will be able lo compel them to provision their vesesls in Japan for the
fishing season. As yet the water supply has been uninterrupted, but If
the government acts on the recommendation of the seal patrol this will
be a government reserve, not to be
visited by any person save officials,
under heavy peualtis. Such a move
would not Injure Ameilcan companies, for there are none in the isl-
lands, said Capt. Carden.
In Dcporablc State
"The nativse in some of the islands at Dutch harbor and westward,"
said Capt. Carden, "were In a deplorable stale. They had little food, and
their clothing was in rags. Disease
had broken out. among them, Their
principal industry Is basket weaving
nnd fishing, but they do not realize
enough from either to suslain themselves, and are often In a starving
condition.
"With the simplicity of children,
their plastic minds quickly respond
to civilization. Our government could
do a master stroke by gathering up
the scattered tribes and placing them
in one or two groups, under education by the white man.
"We planted vegetables on the
mainland at Unalaska when we arrived on June 1. Before we started
south we had plenty of lettuce, turnips and radishes for our own tables.
The natives know nothing about this,
and with the means at hand for
abundance, they starve.
"A herd of 800 reindeer, brought
over from Siberia nine years ago by
the government have increase to 30,-
000. There is plenty of good moss
for these animals, and the natives
could,  with  a  little  encouragement
and training, raise them and lift
themselves beyond the chance of a
famine forever."
FLEET IN NORTH SEA
Important changes are to be made
at the end of this month in the composition of the German high sea
fleet.
The Dreadnought battleships
Rhelnland and Posen, which for
some months have been carrying out
a special series of trials, will join
the first battle squadron, replacing
the Wittelsbach and Zahrlngen. The
displacement of the former ships is
18,900 tons each, and of the latter
11,611, so that the change means an
acquisition of 14,578 tons to the
fighting displacement of the fleet.
The gunfire of the two Wittels-
bachs amounts to 7,842 pounds, and
of the new ships to 20,928 pounds,
so that this change is almost equal
to adding two battleships of the older type to the fleet.
In the cruiser squadron tbe Gnei-
senau, of 11,420 tons and twenty-
three knots, is to be replaced by the
Von der Tann, of 18,700 tons and
twenty-seven knots. The Gncisenau
proceeds to the Far East, while the
Von der Tann, which is similar to tbe
British Indefatigable, now approaching completion, is to make a Ions
cruise in Soutii American waters before joining the fleet.
A considerable addition is also to
be made to I lie Wtlhelmshavon destroyer flotillas, each consisting c,
eleven boats in full commission and
two iu reserve.
A sixtli flollila is lo be added ai
the end of October, so that at this
port alone there will be sixty-six destroyers in full commission and
twelve In reserve.
Great Britain nominally keeps Ihr
first flotilla of destroyers, twenty-five
strong, at Harwich, but this force Is
usually not to be found In the North
Seat at all, but cruising with the
home fleet In various other waters.
Besides this fully commissioned
flotilla we have also a reserve force
of fourteen destroyers nnd twenty-
four first claBS lorpedo boats al
Sheorness, while in a few weeks the
twenty-six old destroyers, and possibly also the four lorpedo boats, in
the fifth (I)evonporl) flotilla of the
home fleet are to be transferred tn
Harwich,
The torpedo forces of the two
powers in the North Sea after these
changes have taken place will be as
follows: —
Britain. Germany
Full  commissioned...     25 66
In reserve, the Nore. .     14 12
do.    Harwich         26
65 78
It is also anticipated that by the
end of the year there will be at least
twelve submarines based at Wilhelm-
shaven and Heligoland.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Mary Smith,
of    Fort William, Ont.,    occupation
married woman, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 7 miles south of
the southeast corner of Lot 227, and
5 %  miles west from the shore line,
thence   80   chains   west,   thence   80
chains south, thence 80 chains east,
thence 80  chains north  to point of
commencement, containing 640 acres.
MARY SMITH.
Arthur Robertson, Agent.
Dated August 20th, 1910. S30
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE    NOTICE    that    Frederick
Babe, of Fort William, Ont., occupation  barrister,  intends  to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about five miles south
of the southeast corner of Lot 227
and two miles west from shore line,
thence 80 chains east,    thence    80
chains south, thence 80 chains west,
thence  80  chains north  to point of
commencement, containing 640 acres.
FREDERICK BABE.
Arthur Robertson, Agent.
Dated August 20th, 1910. S30
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that James Murphy, of Fort William, Ont., occupation coal merchant, intends to apply
I for permission to purchase the fol-
;lo\vi:.g described lands:—Conimenc-
ling at a post planted about five miles
south from the southeast corner of
jLot 22V, and two miles west from
shore lin^, tbence east 80 chains,
ttlience nortli So chains, tlience west
!SO chains, tlience soutii SO chains to
pent of commencement,, containing
6*0 acres.
JAMES MURPHY,
Arthur Robertson, Agent,
tinted August 20th, 1910. S30
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that I, K. M. Mclnnes, of Prince Rupert, occupr'ion
mariner, intend to apply for a license to prospect for coal and petroleum over the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted on the south short of Crow Bay,
thence south 80 chains, thence west
80 chains, thence north 80 chains,
thence east 80 chains to poBt marked
K.M.McI.'s N.E. corner.
Dated August 18th. 1910.
S16 KENZIE McLEOD MclNNES.
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that I, K. M. Mclnnes, of Prince Rupert, occupation
mariner, Intend to apply for a license to prospect for coal and petroleum over tbe following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted on the south shore of Crow Lake,
thence soutii 80 chains, thence east
80 chains, thence north SO chains,
thence west 80 chains to post marked
K.M.McI.'s N.W. corner.
Dated August 18th, 1910.
SI 6 KENZIE McLEOD MclNNES.
okeeua Land  District—District of
Queen  Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE   that    Arthur    A.
Vlckers,  of Fort  William,  Ont., occupation agent, Intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described  lauds:—Commencing at a
post  planted about five miles south
from the southeast corner of Lot 227,
and two miles west from shore line,
thence west SO eiiains, thence soutii
80 chains, thence    east    80 chains,
thence  north  80  chains to point of
commencement, containing 040 acres.
ARTHUR A. V1CKERS.
Arthur Robertson, Agent.
Dated August 20th, 1910. S30
Skeena  Land   District—District  of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that John C. Mur-
jray, of Fort William,  Ont., occupation  capitalist,  intends  to  apply  for
permission to purchase the following
described  lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about live miles soutii
from the southeast corner of Lot 227
and two miles west from shore line,
thence west SO chains, thence north
SO  chains,     thence  east  80  chains,
thence south  80  chains  to point of
commencement, containing G40 acres.
JOHN  C.   MURRAY.
Arthur Robertson, Agent.
Dated August 20th, 1910. S30
Skeena Land District—District of
C^r* CCS I Qf
TAKE NOTICE that Reginald
Davey, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation machinist, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands, In the vicinity of
kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-west corner and about 6Vi
miles distant in a north-westerly direction from the north end of Kltwancool Luke, tlience south 80
chains, tlience east. SO eiiains, thence
north 40 elm ins, tlience west 40
cbalus, thenee norlh 40 chains,
chains, tlience west -10 chains to a
point of commencement, and containing 4 80 acres (more or less).
REGINALD   DAVEY.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated   May  30,   1910. JyS
NOTICE 1
In the County Court of Atlin, holden
at PrJnce Rupert.
In   the  matter  of Francis   Patrick
Murphy, deceased, and in the matter of the "Official Administrator's
Act."
Dated 24th day of October, A.D. 1910
UPON reading   the   affidavits   of
John Hugh McMullin, and the certificate of death of the deceased, it is
ordered, that John Hugh McMullin,
Official Administrator for the County
Court    District   of Atlin embracing
Skeena    and   Queen Charlotte Divisions, shall  be Administrator of all
and singular the estate and effects of
Francis   Patrick   Murphy,   deceased,
intestate, and that this Order is published in the Prince Rupert Journal
for two issues.
• J.  McB. YOUNG,  J.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Josephine J.
Davidson, of Victoria, II. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about 9 miles
soutii of the southeast corner of Lot
227, and hy2 miles west from shore
line, thence east SO chains, thence
south 80 chains, thenco west 80
chains, thence nortli SO chains to
point of commencement, containing
040 acres.
JOSEPHINE J. DAVIDSON.
Arthur Roberlson, Agent.
Dated August 20th, 1910. S30
Blackmail In a serious case may
be punished with penal servitude fcr
life in England.
In the English "Black Country"
there are thirty thousand waste
acres, of which fourteen thousand
might be profitably afforested.
COAF. CLAIMS
Skeena   District—Queen   Charlotte
Islands.
To all to whom it may concern:—
NOTICE is hereby given that I, the
undersigned, Intend to apply for a
Icense to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum upon the following lands
situate on Graham Island, one of the
Queen Charlotte Group, In the Province of British Columbia, and more
particularly described as follows, viz:
Commencing at a stake planted one
and a quarter miles west of the
north-east corner of Louis Inlet, and
marked "P. C. Coates' S. E. Corner
Claim No. 1," thence west 80 chains.
Ilience north SO chains, thence east
80 chains, thence south SO chains to
'lie place of commencement.
Staked June 14th, 1910.
Dated this 28th dav of Julv, 1910.
P. C.  COATES,
By his Agent, Wm. Edward Laird
A9
Skeena  Land  District—District  of
Queen  Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that .lames Henry
Smith, of Victoria, B.C., occupation
agent, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 9 miles south of
the southeast corner of Lot 227, and
5 ',2 miles west from shore line,
thence east 80 chains, thence north
SO chains, thence west 80 chains,
thence soutii 80 chains to point of
commencement, containing 640 acres
JAMES HENRY SMITH.
Arthur Robertson, Agent,
Dated August 20th, 1910. S30
COAL CLAIMS
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Alexander C.
Moffat, of Fort William, Ont., occupation agent. Intends to apply for permission   to   purchase   the   following
described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about seven miles south
from southeast corner of Lot 227 and
1 y.   miles  west  from     shore    line,
thence east 80 chains, thence north
80   chains,   thence  west   80   chains,
thence south  80 chains  to point of
commencement, containing 640 acres.
ALEXANDER C. MOFFAT.
Arthur Robertson, Agent.
Dated August 20th, 1910. S80
skeena  District—Queen  Charlotte
Islands.
To all to whom It may concern: —
NOTICE Is hereby given that I, the
undersigned intend to apply for a
icense to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum upon the following lands,
situated on Graham Island, one of
the Queen Charlotte group, ln the
Province of British Columbia, and
more particularly described as follows, viz:—Comemncing at a stake
planked at the S. E. corner of P. C.
Coates' Claim No. 1, and marked
"Wm. Penman's S. W. Corner, Claim
No. 1," thence east 80 chains, thence
north 80 chalnB, tlience west 80
chains, thence south, 80 chains to the
dace of commencement.
Staked, June 14th, 1910.
Dated this 28th days of July, 1910.
WM. PENMAN.
By his Agent, Wm. Edward Laird.
A9
Look! Look! Look!
Prince Rupert
Cafe
Newly Opened
(Under New Management)
Best Neal in Town
FOR THE WORKINGMAN
25c.
Corner Sixth and Fraser Street*
 LADYSMITH —
COAL
H. B. ROCHESTER,   -   Centre Street
T /
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Tuesday, November 1, 1910.
NEWS OF THE PROVINCE
Items of General Interest From Centres in British Columbia.
ENLARGING BUILDINGS
Victoria.—Immediately upon his
return to the capital, Hon. Mr. Taylor, provincial minister of public
works, will, under the instruction
from the Premier, proceed lo the investigation of the necessities of the
case as a preliminary to action toward the enlargement of the legislative wing of the provincial buildings.
in connection with which an appropriation will, it is expected, he included in the estimates at the January meeting of parliament.
UMBER ACTION
Victoria. — Rev. Norman I'liiss
former president of the Redeemable
Investment company, of Boston,
whose offices were recently raidsd
by federal officers and books and
cash seized, began action today
against Mr. John Arbuthnot and the
Vancouver Island Timber company,
charging misrepresentation of twenty
three timber limits sold to Rev. Mr.
Plass for the Norman Plass Lumber
company, one of the concerns controlled by the Redeemable Investment company.
Rev. Mr. Plass sues for repayment
of the purchase price and asks $125,-
000 damages. It is charged that Mr.
Arbuthnot represented the timber
limits to contain 365,000,000 feet
whereas when cruised contained but
16,000,000  feet.
AUTO FATALITY
Ashcroft—On Sunday, October 24,
this quiet burg was informed of a
serious automobile accident having
occurred on the Cariboo road some
ten miles from town. The news of
the auto fatality, the first of its kind
here, caused widespread sympathy.
The party, consisting of five, left
here shortly after dinner for a "joy
ride," and it was in passing one of
the numerous double turns on the
road that the chauffeur, Henry Nortb
was unable to get the steering gear
to respond sufficiently quick to make
the second turn, causing the car to
leave the road and turn over, instantly killing Charles Davis, a barber
lately employed by H. Koelkenbeck,
and seriously Injuring his brother-in-
law, J. McCurtain and Arthur Gibson,
a B.-X. employee. Another B.X. employee who was sitting in front, was
able to jump off the car before it
turned over, and the driver, who held
to his steering wheel, escaped without injury.
An inquest was held before Coroner Clark of Kamloops, and after examining various witnesses the jury
brought in a verdict of "accidental
death."
Both injured men are progressing
satisfactorily.
night of the fifth of last September,
while on the streets of the town.
Mr. Herchmer was cross-examining the chief of police, Mr. R. Clark,
when the fact that lie was mayor of
the town was brought to the judge's
notice.
Asked his justification for appearing in the case, Mr. Herchmer stated
that li \ had never appeared in a case
where municipal regulations were involved, and It had not occurred to
him that ther was anything to prevent liis appearance in this case.
The judge replied: "Under our system the wholeb urden of prosecution
of a crime committed within a city UP
ty commitment is laid on the municipality. Therefore, I cannot understand how the mayor can act for prisoners accused of crimes committed
withlr  tho city,
Mr. Herchmer said he had not understood that it was not done elsewhere. He had refused to take cases
that involved the city ordinance, but
had not thought that cases coming
under the criminal code of Canada
came under the same heading.
The judge said that he entirely disagreed with him. He thought It highly reprehensible and it would have to
be stopped. How could the public
have confidence in the administration
of justice in Fernie if the mayor of
the city appeared for persons charged
with offences and cross-examined the
chief of police?
"It seems to me," added the judge,
"that the outside public will simply
curl its lips in scorn when the administration of justice in Fernie is talked of."
Mr. Justice Clement accepted Mr.
Herchmer's statement that he had
not given the matter proper thought,
but adjourned the court to allow
time to secure other counsel for the
accused man, Serino.
SPOUT  KIS1I
Nelson. — That Lake Superior
white-fish are giving Okanagan lake
anglers good sport was the statement
made by Captain J. C. Gore, superintendent of the inland lake and river
service of the C.P.R., who has just
returned from a trip of inspection in
that district.
These lisli are, it. is presumed, the
progeny of a quantity of this variety
which were imported from Lake Superior in 18117 and placed In the Oko-
nagan lake.
Up to a few months ago, when
local anglers caught two of them and
were undecided as to ther variety, It
was believed that they had all been
killed by the trout In the lake. On
Sunday. October 16, the steward of
one of the lake strainers succeeding
in catching six of the lisli which gave
hi in good sport and fought as vigorously and gamely as trout, and since
thai time several schools of the fish
have been seen on the lake. It is now
established beyond all doubt that
they are white-fish of the Lake Superior variety and there seems to be
no doubt whatever that they are
there as a result of the small fish
placed in tbe late 1 ii years ago.
Those caught so far have varied
In weight between one and one-half
and three pounds. In appearance
they are of a silver color, and move
in the water at a great speed.
CONVICTS ESCAPE
New Westminster.—There was an
exciting finish to the trial of the
three convicts charged in the assize
with.. ..I ,k4' -i-i (lcmostwbeET
court with atempting to escape from
the penitentiary, for they had just
received their sentences, and were
being taken to the wagon when thy
made a determined break for freedom Two of them, Patrick Mullin
and William Ellis were quickly
caughi Ernest Dodds was located
at an early hour in the morning hiding in the Royal City livery stables.
Patrick Mullen was convicted In
Fernie for manslaughter, and was
sentenced in 1908 to serve twenty
years in the penitentiary. When he
attempted to escape this evening
about G o'clock, he managed to get
free of bis handcuffs, and ran down
Columbia street. He was caught at
the corner of Columbia and Lome
streets, opposite Ryan's drug store.
Ho was very desperate when caught
and threatened the officers who had
charge of him.
Wm. Ellis, the second man caught,
was under sentence of three years,
and had only served about, seven
months of his time. Ernest Dodds
was also serving a three-year sentence. He was sent up from Vancouver last year. The three of them
appeared In court this afternoon for
attempting to escape a short time
ago. On that occasion they made a
ladder about, eight fet long, but were
Intercepted before they had a chance
to get away. They each received a
six-months sentence, to run concurrently with their previous sentences.
The time chosen for their escape
yesterday was at 6 o'clock p.m. when
It was nearly dark. The three men
were handcuffed, but not together,
and Immediately they were led outside, bolted, each in different directions. Several shots were fired in
Ihe air to try and stop them, but the
men were evidently desperate, for
they showed no signs of slackening
their speed.
are mild and do not result in paralysis, to which the term abortive and
atypical has been applied. It Is to
this class of cases I wish to draw
attention for a double reason.
First: Many of such cases are passed over unnoticed until the disease
assumes a most serious aspect in the
form of paralysis, which may remain
irremediable, and in some instances
even death occur, when ata early
recognition of the disease mlglu have
saved the patient's life and also escaped permanent injury. Therefore,
it is advisable when it is known that
cases of the disease are in the community for parents to be auspicious
of acute attack of disturbance Ot digestion, accompanied by fever and
pain, or even if a child is only
slightly indisposed, complains of
feeling tired, if accompanied by a
raise in temperature. In such cases
I would advise parents to call in their
physician and run no risk of perhaps
losing their child or having the child
crippled for life when it might have
been otherwise.
Secondly: An early recognition of
the malady is very desirable for tbe
reason that precautionary measures
agaihst the spread of infection may
be taken. No doubt infectioh is often
transmitted fro unrecognized cases
and the disease spread in this way.
In conclusion I wish to quote an
extract from the September bulletin
of the state board of health of Maine
on abortiev and atypical cases, as follows: "In connection with outbreaks
of poliomyelitis, many cases have
been observed in which paralysis did
not occur, and it will be a great advantage in epidemics which may occur in this state that we have clearly
in mind the fact that there need
not necessarily be paralysis to render
cases infectious and capable of transmitting the disease. Mclntyre, of
Minnesota, states that the milder
cases outnumber those that are
paralyzed by a ratio of at least two
or three to one. Dr. Ostraner of
Michigan, saw when a number ot
families of children had the disease
that some of the adults presented
acute symptoms of the onset of the
disease. They had a rise of temperature, a severe pain and bowel
trouble, but no paralysis follow."
 o	
IN CONVENTION
LAND PURCHASE NOTICE
Coast Land District—District of
Skeena.
TAKE NOTICE that we, George
Hie and Robert Corlett, of Little Canyon, B.C., occupation farmer and
farmer, intend to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:-—Commencing at a
post planted at the south-east portion of an Island situated and lying
about two miles below Little Canyon,
near the south bank of the Skeena
river, Range V, Skeena Land District,
District of Coast, thence northerly,
thence easterly, thence southerly
around the shores of the Island buck
to the point of beginning and inclosing 30 acres, more or less
GEORGE HIE,
ROBERT CORLETT.
Dated August 1. 1910, a.19
LAND  PURCHASE  NOTICES
LAND PURCHASE  NOTICES
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Thomas Samuel Smith, of Fort William, Ont., occupation contractor, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about 7 miles
south of the southeast corner of ot
227, and hy2 miles west from shore
line, tbence east 80 chains, thence
soutii 80 chains, thence west 80
chains, thence north 80 chains to
point of commencement, containing
040 acres.
THOMAS SAMUEL SMITH.
Arthur Robertson, Agent.
Ogled August 20th, 1910. S30
I  gfej.ona  l.fnd  District—District of
i.)iif«li C'lia.rlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Nelson Noel
Smith, of Winnipeg, Man., occupation
(Contractor, intends to upply for per
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Edward Robert Wayland, of Fort William, Ont.,
occupation grain merchant, intends
to apply for permission to purchase
the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted about
7 miles south from southeast corner
of lot 227, and 3% miles west from
shore line, thence east 80 chains,
thence north 80 chains, thence west
80 chains, tlience south 80 chains to
point of commencement, containing
640 acres.
EDWARD  ROBERT  WAYLAND.
Arthur Robertson, Agent.
Dated August 20th, 1910. 330
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen 0'iarlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that William Curtis Llllie, of Fort William, Ont., occupation agent, intends to apply for
permislson to purchase the following
described  lands:—Commencing at a.
Skeena Land  District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE  NOTICE  that  Charles  Ru-
bidge   Dunsford,     of  Fort  William,
mission to purchase the fallowing dn. i post  planted  about  7   miles     south
scribed lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 9 miles soutii of
the southeast corner of Lot 22?, and
miles  west  from    shore     line,
Ont., occupation retired, intends <o thence west SO chains, thence soutii
apply for permission to purchase the "
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about
seven miles south of the southeast
corner of lot 227 and l\'2 miles west
from shore line, thence east SO chains
thence soutii 80 chains, thence west
SO chains, thence north 80 chains to
point o£ commencement, containing
640 acres.
CHARLES RUBIDGE DUNSFORD.
Arthur Robertson, Agent.
Dated August 20th, 1910. S30
Salvation Army Officers Are Gather,
ed  in  Vancouver
The officers of the Salvation Army
in British Columbia are in convention in Vancouver. Ensign Johnstone
of this city is in attendance. Among
others who are attending from outside points are Lieutenant-Colonel
Pugmire, of Toronto, the territorial
social secretary of the Salvation
Army for Canada; Capt. Adams and
Lieutenant Stride, from Lethbridge;
Capt. Kerr, Lieut. Wright; Ensign
and Mrs. Laidlaw, from Toronto;
Capt. Holland and Capt. Marshall,
from Fernie.
Lieutenant-Colonel Pugmire has
recently returned from attending, as
a delegate, the American Prison congress and the International Congress
in Washington, D.C. He has much
to say of the prison work of the Salvation Army, and gives great praise
to the prison officials who have cooperated so heartily with them in
their work. He mentions in this connection Warden Brown of the provincial penitentiary, Governor Brym-
ner of the provincial goal, New Westminster, and Supt. Donaldson of the
Point Grey industrial school.
 o—	
RATTLESHIP POLICY
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Norman M.
Patterson, of Fort William, Ont., occupation grain merchant, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about 7
miles south from southeast, corner of
Lot 227, and 1% miles west from
short line, thence west 80 chains,
thence south 80 chains, thence east
SO chains, thence north 80 chains to
point of commencement, containing
640 acres|
NORMAN M. PATTERSON.
Arthur Robertson, Agent.
Dated August 20th, 1910. S30
80   chains,   thence   east   80   chains,
tlience north SO  chains to point of
commencement, containing 640 acres.
NELSON NOEL SMITH.
Arthur Robertson, Agent.
Dated August 20th, 1910. S30
Skeena Land District—pistrlct q£
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that E. N. Ens-
worth, of Fort William, Ont., occupation accountant, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about 9 miles
south of the southeast corner of Lot
227, and 5^ miles west from shore
line, thence west 80 chains, thence
nortb SO chains, thence east 80
chains, thence south 8 0 chains to
point of commencement, containing
640 acres.
E. N. ENSWORTH.
Arthur Robertson, Agent.
Dated August 20th, 1910. S30
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Benjamin Os-
trander, of Fort William, Ont., occupation grain merchant, intends to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about 7
miles south from southeast corner of
Lot 227, and 3% miles west of shore
line, thence east SO chains, thence
south 80 chains, thence west 80
chains, thence north 80 chains to
point of commencement, containinfi
640 acres.
BENJAMIN OSTRANDER.
Arthur Robertson, Agent.
Dated August 20th, 1910. S30
Skeena Land  District—District  of
Queen  Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE  that Mary  Smith,
of    Fort William, Ont.,    occupation
married woman, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described  lands:—Commencing  at a
post planted about 7  miles south of
the southeast corner of Lot 227, and
a y2  miles west from the shore line,
thence   SO   chains   west,   thence   80
chains south, thence 80  eiiains east,
thence  So   chains  north  to  poiut  of
commencement, containing 640 acres.
MARY SMITH.
Arthur Robertson, Agent.
Dated August 20th, 1910. S30
fiom  southeast corner  of Lot  227,
and 3 y2  miles west from shore line,
thence west 80 chains, thence south
80   chains,   thence   east   SO   chains,
thence north  SO chains to point of
commencement, containing 640 acres.
WILLIAM CURTIS LILLIE.
Arthur Robertson, Agent.
Dated August 20th, 1910. S30
Skeena Land District*—District of
Queen Chorions Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that John Russel
Smitli, of Fort William, Ont., occupation grain merchant, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about seven
miles south from southeast corner of
Lot 227, and 3V2 miles west from
short line, tlience west 80 chains,
thence north SO chains, thence east
80 chains, thence soutii 80 chains to
point of commencement, containing
640 acres.
JOHN RUSSEL SMITH.
Arthur Robertson, Agent.
Dated August 20th, 1910. S30
Skeena  Land  District—District  of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Agnes Smith,
of Fort William,    Out.,    occupation
widow,  intends to apply for permission  to  purchase  the  following described  lands:—Commencing    at    a
post     planted  about   9   miles  south
from the southeast corner of Lot 227,
and 3 %  miles west from shore line,
thenctie east SO chains, thence south
80    chains,    thence west 80 chains,
ithence north 80  chains to point of
commencement, containing 040 acres.
AGNES SMITH.
Arthur Robertson, Agent.
Dated August 20th, 1910. S30
LAND PURCHASE NOTICES
Resolutions Adopted by Navy Lengne
on Ruilding For Empire
INFANTILE PARALYSIS
Warning Given by City Health officer of Victoria
MAYOR DEFENDS PRISONER
Fernie.—Mr. Justice Clement stopped the proceedings in court here
la.st week when lie discovered that
Mr. Sherwood Herchmer, the mayor,
was defending a man named John
Serino, an Italian, charged with stabbing John aJncho, a Slav,    on    the
In view of the frequent occurrence
of infantile paralysis In Victoria and
Vancouver this year, Dr. C. A. B.
Hall, city health officer of Victoria,
lias thought It well to draw public
attention to the matter in the following terms: —
I deem it in the Interst of public
health that a word of caution be given regarding poliomyelitis, or epidemic infantile paralysis, as It Is
frequently called. Epidemic poliomyelitis is a disease of which we have
still   a   lot   to   learn.     However,   we
The Canadian branches of the
Navy League have received from
headquarters in London a copy of
resolutions adopted at a meeting of
the central executive.
These resolutions embody the policy of the Navy League The resolutions run as follows:—
11) To advocate the laying down
as a minimum of two capital ships
to every one commenced by the next
strongest naval power, and the main
tonance of the proper complement of
men, vessels of other classes, stores
and armaments.
12) To recommend that the expenditure be met. by a naval loan if It
should prove to be necessary to adopt
that course.
13) To advocate immediately a national system of training to seamanship open to all classes of the population with a view to augmenting the
naval reserve of the country.
These resolutions were endorsed
by Mr. Robert Yerburgh, M.P., Mr.
Geoffrey Drage, alderman London
county council, the president and
vice-president of the Navy League,
also by Lords Somerset and Ampthill,
Rear-Admiral S. Eardley-Wilmot and
Mr. to. to. Ashley, M.P., members of
the committee; by the Hon. Allan H.
Omlneca Land District—District of
Coast, Range Five.
TAKE NOTICE that E. Lucas, of
West Carnie, Ont., occupation banker,
intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described
lands:—-Commencing at a post planted at the southwest corner of lot
2287, District of Coast, Range Five,
and marked E.L.'s N.W. corner,
tlience east SO chains, thence soutii
80 chains, thence west 80 chains,
tlience north 80 chains to point of
commencement, containing 640 acres
more or less.
E.  LUCAS,
Steven McNeill, Agent
Dated Sept. 22, 1910. S27
Skeena Laud  District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE    NOTICE    that    Frederick
Babe, of Fort William, Ont., occupatiou  barrister,  intends  to apply  for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a
post  planted about five miles south
of  the southeast corner of Lot  227
and two miles west from shore line,
thenee  SO  chains east,     thence     80
chains south, thence 80 chains west,
thence  SO  chaius nortli  to point of
commencement, containing 640 acres.
FREDERICK BABE.
Arthur Robertson, Agent.
Dated August 20th, 1910. S30
Skeena  Land   District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE  NOTICE  that  James  Murphy, of Fort William, Ont., occupa'
tion coal merchant.   '
Skeena  Land  District—District  of
Queen  Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Sidney Smith,
of  Fort  William,    Ont.,     occupation
gentleman, intends to apply for permission   to   purchase   the   following
described  lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about nine miles south
from the southeast corner of lot 227,
and 3 y2 miles west from shore line,
thence east SO chains, thence north
SO   chains,  thence  west  80   chains,
thence south  80  chains to point of
commencement, containing 640 acres
SIDNEY SMITH.
Arthur Robertson, Agent.
Dated August 20th, 1910. S30
Skeena  Land  District—District  of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Ardagh Smith,
of Fort   William,    Out.,    occupation
agent, intends to apply for permission
Omineca Land District—District of
Coast, Range Five.
TAKE NOTICE that to. G. White-
sides, of South Bend, Ont., occupation bank clerk, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:-—Commencing at a
post planted at the southeast corner
of lot 1729, District of Coast, Range
Five, and marked G.G.W.'s N.E. corner, thence west 40 chalnB, thence
south 80 chains, thence east 40
chains, thence north 80 chains to
point of commencement, containing
320 acres, more or less.
W. G. WHITESIDES,
Steven McNeill, Agent.
Dated Sept. 22, 1910. S27
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that Alice M.
Tovey of Vancouver, B.C., married
woman, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted at the N. W. corner of
John Furlong's pre-emption and near
Lakelse Lake, thence east 40 chains,
thence north 40 chains, thence west
40 chains more or less to the shore
line of Lakelse Lake, and thence
south 40 chains along the shore of
the Lake to point of commencement,
and containing 160 acres, more or
less.
ALICE TOVEY.
Dated October 17, 1910. N2
intends to apply [to purchase the following described
for permission to purchase the foi- lands:— Commencing at a"post plant-
""''"f,11,""1,ed lands:—Commenc-|ed about nine miles south from
ing at a post planted about live miles southeast corner of Lot 2->7 and 1«
south from the southeast corner of j miles west from shore line
Lot   227,  aud  two  miles  west   from [west   SO   eiiains,   thence
 "   ''U5'  tl,ence  east  SO   chains, chains, thence east 80 chains,"thence
tlience
south     80
thence north 80 chains, tlience west
80 chains, thence south SO chains to
point of commencement, containing
G40 acres.
JAMES MURPHY.
Arthur Robertson, Agent.
Dated August 20th, 1910. S30
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE   that    Arthur    A.
Vickers,  of Fort William,  Ont., occupation agent, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about five miles south
from the southeast corner of Lot 227,
and two miles west from shore line,
thence west 80 chains, thence south
80 chains, thence    east    80 chains,
thence north 80 chains to point of
commencement, confining 640 acres
ARTHUR A. VICKERS.
sArthur Robertson, Agent.
Dated August 20th, 1910. S30
have a sufficient knowledge of it to   Burgoyne.M.P.,   honorary   treasurer,
know  that many cases occur which   and by Mr. H. NIeld, M.P., Mr. Pope-
Hennessy, Mr. J. Trower, Mr. H. de
Labrosse and Mr. Wm. Calus •rutch-
ley, secretary.
 o	
The United StateB Weather Bureau
is making arrangements for a p»»-
fect system of communicating warnings of coming storms to all iteam-
erns at sea fitted with wireless apparatus.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charloite Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that John C. Murray, of Fort William,  Ont, occupation capitalist, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lauds:—Commencing at a
post planted about five miles south
from the southeast corner of Lot 227
and two miles west from shore line,
thence west 80 chains, thence north
80   chains,    thence  east  80   chains,
thence south 80 chains to point of
commencement, containing 640 acres
JOHN C.   MURRAY.
Arthur Robertson, Agent.
Dated August 20th, 1910. S30
north     SO   eiiains to point of commencement,  containing G40 acres.
ARDAGH   SMITH
Arthur Robertson, Agent.
Dated August 20th, 1910. S30
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE    NOTICE    that    John    L.
Davidson, of Victoria, B.C., occupation agent, intends-to apply for permission   to   purchase   the   following
described  lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 9 miles south of
the southeast corner of Lot 227, and
3 y2   miles  west  from   shore    line,
tlience west 80 chains, thence north
80  chains,     thence  east  80  chains,
thence south  80  chains to point of
commencement, containing 640 acres
JOHN L. DAVIDSON.
Arthur Robertson, Agent.
Dated August 20th, 1910. S30
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Alexander C.
Moffat, of Fort William, Ont., occupation agent, intends to apply for permission   to  purchase   the  following
described lands:-—Commencing at a
post planted about seven miles south
from southeast corner of Lot 227 and
1 y2   miles  west  from    shore    line,
thence east 80 chains, thence north
80   chains,   thence  west   80   chains,
thence south  80 chains to point of
commencement, containing 640 acres.
ALEXANDER C. MOFFAT.
Arthur Robertson, Agent.
Dated August 20th, 1910. 830
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Josephine J
Davidson, of Victoria, B. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about 9 miles
south of the southeast corner of Lot
227, and 5 y2 miles west from shore
line, thence east 80 chains, thence
south 80 chains, thence west 80
chains, thence north 80 chains to
point of commencement, containing
640 acres.
JOSEPHINE J. DAVIDSON.
Arthur Robertson, Agent
Dated August 20th, 1910. S30
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that James Henry
Smith, of Victoria, B.C., occupation
agent, intends to apply for permission to purchase the  following described lands:—Commencing    at    a
post planted about 9 miles south of
the southeast, corner of Lot 227, and
5%   miles west   from    Bhore   'line
thence east 80 chains, thence north
80 chains, thence west    80    chains
thence south  80  chains to point of
commencement, containing 640 acres
JAMES HENRY SMITH.
Arthur Robertson, Agent
Dated August . adSriMir
llMiM)
. .   • ■
Tuesday, November 1, 1910.
THE   PRINCE  RUPERT  JOURNAL
EUROPE'S   LESSONS
Bon. W. L. Mackenzie King on Conditions
in the Old
World.
Canadian    Minister   of   the   Crown
Speaks of Unrest Among the
Laboring Classes
In the course of an interview, Hon.
W. L. Mackenzie King, minister of
labor, who has lately returned from
government missions to Europe,
said: "That his stay across the water
■was too short to admit of careful
study of conditions. Speaking generally," he went on, "one cannot but
observe a condition of unrest among
the laboring classes in Great Britain
and Europe. It has come about ln
large part through the Increased cost
of living, which Is being felt generally, and is especially noticeable in
the large Industrial centres. This
unrest is in part economic and in
part political, exhibiting Itself ln
■strikes and retaliatory lockouts on
the one side, and ln an effort to secure government action or intervention in one form or another on
the other. The workers seem anxious
to test the power of organization on
a large scale.
"I attended In all four Important
International conferences on Industrial problems. At all of these gath-
e ing:- sime suten or seventeen different ii »tic ns v »re represented. The
first *•' at The Hague and had to do
■with the problem of =o"lal insurance,
■such questions as old-age pensions,
accident, sickness and Invalidity Insurance, Insurance against unemployment, etc.; a conference at Brussels
tin technical education; ln Paris on
unemployment; and a meeling of the
International Association of Labor
Legislation at Lugano, Switzerland.
The discussions at these conferences
were carried on In French, German
and English. In the main they consisted In obtaining from the representatives of the different countries
and societies their views on papers
previously prepared and distributed
for consideration. In a general way
one could not but feel that the old
world Is grappling with a class of
problems which have grown out of
the pressure of population upon subsistence, and which, with planing and
foresight, this country should be
spared for years to come. In one
form or another the loss of all contact with the soil on the part of the
mass of the workers, and their consequent overcrowding under artificial
conditions in the large centres, seems
in the main, responsible for the class
of problems, social and political,
which have arisen.
"There is no duty more incumbent
upon those holding positions of trust
In our municipalities and governments, both provincial and federal,
than that of observing the unhappy
and unfavorable condition into which
through apathy or neglect large numbers of people of those older lands
have been brought, and to guard,
through regulation and legislation,
against the possibility of similar conditions arising here. With our unpeopled areas, the variety and extent
of our resources, and our ever-Improving transportation facilities, it
will be little short ot a national crime
if the condition of our workers approaches for generations to come
what seems today the Inevitable lot
of hunareds of thousands in tbe old
countries. Just as one observes ln
Europe a condition for the mass of
the people far superior to that prevailing in the Far East, so, In Canada, the most casual observer must
be Impressed with how Infinitely better than in Europe are the chances In
life for every man, woman and child
who has not been specially favored
by birth, fortune or privilege.
"The conferences were especially
valuable in the opoprtunlty they afforded of meeting with those in other
lands who have made and are making
a special study of social problems. I
found among the public men with
whom I conversed an exceptional Interest in the working of our industrial disputes investigation act, which
seems to have been followed with
very general Interest in all the countries visited. In anticipation of what
the parliaments of those countries
may do it is as well perhaps to omit
the mention of names, but it may be
of interest to Canadians to know that
the ministers of not less than three
European countries mentioned to me
their intention of introducing measures similar to our industrial disputes investigation act, and have asked to be supplied with all available
Information as to the working of the
measure since the time of its enactment.    This information will be for
warded immediately by the department."
To several questions by the reporter, Mr. King answered:—
"I was greatly impressed by the
Important part that industrial training and technical education are playing in all trades and Industries, and
by the important place assigned to
thiB branch of instruction by the
state in the several countries visited.
The conference at Brussels was composed chiefly of a body of experts,
who were concerned mainly with a
consideration of the curricula of Institutions having to do with the higher branches of technical training.
Their discussions 'have been recorded
and the printed reports will be available for the consideration of our
Royal commission. By meeting with
members of this conference I was
enabled to enlist the sympathy of
many present, and of the government
represented, In the work of the commission, and I think Canadians may
feel that, when the members of the
Royal commission on Industrial
training and technical education visit
Great Britain and Europe they will
be afforded every facility for observation and information by the governments of the several countries and
those directing their technical schoosl
and colleges.
"In Canada nature has been so
generous in her gifts that we have
come to feel that our wealth lies in
her prodigality; ln the older lands,
where population has begun to press
on subsistence, necessity has become
the mother of invention, and inventive genius and efficiency in workmanship and organization and the direction of Industrial processes are
being looked to as the promoters and
mainstay of Industrial progress In
one respect this was the great lesson to be learned from the Brussels
exposition. Canada's exhibit, generally and deservedly regarded as the
most attractive feature of the entire
exhibition, was the story of Nature's
bounty to a people. There were depicted our boundless natural resources, our wheat fields, our fisheries, our
great forest and mineral wealth. Germany's exhibit, on the other hand,
one of the most splendid and Impressive, was an object lesson of
what technical skill and efficient
workmanship can accomplish in developing the power and industry of a
nation. With this combination—
natural wealth in abundance and variety, and an industrial population
highly efficient and intelligently organized—It Is only a matter of time
before the Dominion should be preeminent industrially among the nations of the world."
 : o	
SILVER CUP OUTLOOK
Manager  of  Mine  Speaks  in Highest
Terms of the Prospects
There.
I). Campbell Has Gone Soutii For
u Few Months—Will Return
In the Spring
J. D. Campbell, who has managed
the Silver Cup mine at Nine Mile
Mountain ever since it was opened up
went south last night. He is going
to California, and will return in the
spring. Speaking of the outlook at
tbe property, Mr. Campbell was most
optimistic. He did not pretend to
say it was a world record breaker.
It possessed excellent high grade ore,
however, and in quantity enough to
give good returns. At present it
would be a $30,000 a year producer
over and above the cost of operation.
With greater expenditure this could
readily be increased quite materially.
There is a splendid showing and the
character of the formation lends Itself to the expectation of continuity
in the ore body.
In a general way Mr. Campbell expresses satisfaction with the Hazelton district as a mining centre. There
are good properties hut there is a lot
of work to be done In getting the
roads built to transport, the ore to
the railway. The advent of Ihe railway will, he thinks, cut the transportation charges in half.
 o	
The difference between fame and
notoriety is that notoriety commonly lasts longer.
o	
A Portmadoc, Eng., schoolboy, at
Imminent peril of his life, rescued a
playmate who was carried by a current into a whirlpool while bathing
In a forbidden spot, and afterwards
restored him to consciousness by artificial respiration. Fearing chastise-
men, both resolved to keep the incident, secret, but the rescuer was betrayed through shouting during his
sleep, "A rope, a rope, to save
David!" He has been awarded a
Royal Humane certificate
CONSERVATION WORK
John Hendry Interviewed Provincial Government Seeking Cooperation.
Premier McBride Will  Give Hearty
Support to the Movement
of Association
"The Government of British Columbia has assured me that it will
work heartily with the Conservation
commission," said Mr. John Hendry
of Vancouver, a member of the commission. "What we want next year,"
he continued, "is to enter into the
matter thoroughly and to make the
commission wide and effective. We
have learned the early mistakes of
the United States in giving away its
natural resources. We can benefit
by these mistakes and provide against
them accordingly.
"The next meeting of the commission will be held in Ottawa on January 24 and this session will be of
great importance. Last session the
commission got things In working order and now it is going to work on a
large scale. The commission has for
some time been issuing periodically
bulletins of education along conservation lines and these are having a
large Influence on the public in promoting its interest in the subject.
"The commission this year had
only a little money at its disposal,
$50,000, and next year I believe the
amount will be largely increased,
and I am in favor of at least $200,-
000. The commission is not in any
sense local and the researches which
it Is proposed to carry on will require
more money. There should be enough,
money In hand to prosecute the work
on a large scale.
"The aim is not altogether conservation for the future of all the
resources of Canada, but to provide
for the use of some right away. Our
great forests will require much more
research, so will our mining industry.
"I look upon the Dominion as a
big business concern of millions of
dollars and believe that the other
commissioners will readily see that a
great amount of money will be necessary to find what should be conserved. I stood for a large appropriation
at the last session of Parliament and
I have not changed my mind a bit
for I believe that a concern of many
millions of dollars worth of property
should have sufficient money to find
out just what is needed in its various
branches.
"Some of the things the commission is working for are not only the
conservation of the forests, and their
care and protection against fire, but
the public health generally, and
working against the exporting of our
power, also to force railway companies to maintain staffs for protection of forest lands along their
routes against fire.
"The government is appointing for
the commission experts ln each
branch, so the commission will have
the best advice on all matters pertaining to its resources."
Mr. Hendry it not prepared at this
time to say a great deal concerning
the plans he will lay before the commission at its meeting in January
but reference to the report of the
commission, which was lately received, shows that Mr. Hendry was an
energetic member who stood for sensible conservation In every partlcu
lar. He was among the members who
wanted a fair-sized sum to carry on
the work, he sugegsting $00,000,
and although that amount was not
given then, Mr. Hendry thinks he
commission has become of so great
Importance to the Dominion bj Its
work of the past few months that
the government will recognize the
far-reaching effects possible were the
commission able to carry out the researches It desires.
—THE—
WOOD PI LP IX DEMAND
It is Being Used in Great Quantities
in the United States
The Westholme
Lumber Company, Ld.
We carry the largest stock of
Building Supplies in the North.
Quotations given on short notice in all lines.
Rough and Dressed Lumber
Shingles and Lath
Mouldings and Cases
Doors and Windows
We handle Plaster and Lime at reasonable prices
Get our quotations for all classes of buildings.
FIRST AVENUE
OFFICE AND
WAREHOUSES
SHERWIN & WILLIAMS
-PAINTS-
COVER THE EARTH.
WE   ARE   SOLE   AGENTS
CARLOAD JUST ARRIVED
Ready Nixed Paints,
Paints Ground in Oil,
Paints Ground in Japan,
Varnishes, Shellac, etc.
Water Stains
and
Decotint
IN ALL COLORS
Prince Rupert Hardware & Supply
Company, Ltd.  thos. dunn, m*.
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The
Washington Cafe
A PLACE TO EAT
Seats For Ladies
Everything Clean and Tasty
Prices Reasonable
to. P. CARPENTER,  PROPRIETOR
Second Avenue, near Seventh Street
IN THE COUNTY COURT OP ATLIN
HOLDEN AT ATLIN
Portland Canal Short Line Railway
Pursuant to Section 7 of the Navigable Waters Protection Act (R. S.
Can. cap 115) notice is hereby given
that there has been deposited In the
office of the Minister of Public
Works at Ottawa and a duplicate In
the Office of the Registrar of Titles
at Prince Rupert, plans and description of the site and side elevation of
a proposed railway wharf and trestle
approach thereto to be constructed
near the mouth of Bear River at
Stewart, British Columbia, and that
one month after the first Insertion of
this notice the Company will apply
to the Governor-ln-Council for the
approval thereof.
Dated at Victoria, British Columbia, this 16th day of September,
1910.
GERARD RUEL,
Chief Solicitor.
EBERTS & TAYLOR,
S23 Agents at Victoria, B.C.
Ih the matter of the Estate of Thomas D. Kearns, deceased, intestate
All parties having claims against
the above Estate are required to for
ward the same, with full particulars
thereof, duly verified, to the undersigned, nol later than the sixteenth
day of February, 1911, after which
said date the Estate of the said deceased will be distributed amongst
those entitled thereto.
Dated at Atlin,   B.C.,   this    nineteenth day of August, A.D. 1910.
PATRICK FOLEY,
A6-OS Administrator.
NOTICE  TO CONTRACTORS
Over 4,000,000 cords of wood were
used In the manufacture of wood
pulp for paper making in the United
States In 1909, as shown by the annual report of the Industry Issued by
the census buearu. The cost of the
transformation of wood, of which
there was 4,002,000 cords, was $37,-
487,000. This was an Increase of
about 50,000 cords over the con-
Riimption of 190S, but of only about
39,000  over  1907.
The advancing cost of pulp wood
of al lspecies is brough out In the
report. The total consumption In
1907, though exceeding that of 1997
by less than 40,000, the cost was
over $2,000,000 more.
Probably the most noteworthy de.
tall ln connection with the repart is
the decrease In the consumption of
sprue In the manufacture of pulp.
A slight decrease In hemlock also
is noted whereas increases have occurred in the consumption of woods
bertofore little used as pulp material,
such ns balsam, white fir and several
bard woods, Including birch, beech,
maple, gum and basswood.
There has also been an Improved
demand for white fir.    Of the 2,4 21,-
000     cords   of  spruce  consumed   In
1909, almost 770,000 were imported.
 o	
A model  wife  is a   woman     who
flushes with pleasure when her husband asks her for car fare.
 o	
The National Demographic Bureau
of Buenos Ayres estimates the population of Argentina on December 31,
1909, as 6,805,084, an increase of
311,684 ln one rear. In population
Argentina ranks second among the
South American republics. Brazil lg
first, with 22,000,000. Chili ranks
third with 3,520,000. Of Argentina's
population, five-fifths are native Argentines, 843,540 Italians, 424,805
Spaniards, and  104,990 French.
Graham  Island  School
SEALED TENDERS, superscribed
"Tender for Graham Island School,"
will be received by the Honourable
the Minister of Public Works up to
and including Monday, the 10th day
of October, 1910, for the erection and
completion of a small one-room
school building at Graham Island,
one of the Queen Charlotte Islands,
Skeena Electoral District.
Plans, specifications, contract and
forms of tender may be seen on and
after the 12th clay of September,
1910, at the offices of John L. Barge,
Secretary to the School Board, Queen
Charlotte City; the Government
Agent, Prince Rupert; the Mining
Recorder, Jedway; and the Department of Public Works, Victoria.
Each proposal must be accompanied by an accepted bank chequ*
or certificate of deposit on a chartered bank of Canada, made payable
to the Honourable the Minister of
Public Works, for the sum of $125,
which shall be forfeited if the party
tendering decline to enter Into con-
trac. when called upon to do so, or
if he fail to complete the work contracted for. The cheques or certificates of deposit of unsuccessful tenderers will be returned to them upon
the execution of the contract.
Tenders will nol be considered unless made out on the forms supplied,
signed with the actual signature of
the tenderer and enclosed in the envelopes furnished.
The lowest or any tender not
necessarily accepted.
P. C. GAMBLE,
Public Works Engineer.
Public Works Department,
Victoria, B.C., September 7, 1910.
EXAMINATION    FOR    INSPECTOR
OP STEAM BOILERS AND
MACHINERY
Oliver
Typewriter
—FOR—
Seventeen Cents a Day
Please read the headline over
again. Then itB tremendous significance will dawn upon you.
An Oliver Typewriter—the standard visible writer—the most highly
perfected  typewriter  on  the market
yours for 17 cents a day!
The typewriter whose conquest of
the commercial world Is a matter of
business history—yours for 17 cents
a day!
The typewriter that is equipped
with scores of such conveniences aa
"The Balance Shift".—"The Ruling
Device"—"The Double Release"—
"The Locomotive Base"—"The Automatic Spacer".—"The Automatic Tabulator"—"The Disappearing Indicator"—"The Adjustable Paper Fingers"—"The Scientific Condensed
Keyboard"—all
Yours For 17 Cents a Day
We announced this new sales plan
recently, just to feel the pulse of the
people. Simply a Bmall cash payment—then 17 cents a day. That
is the plan ln a nutshell.
The result has been such a deluge of applications for machines
that we are simply astounded.
The demand comes from people of
all classes, all ages, all occupations.
The majority of Inquiries has
come from people of known financial
standing who were attracted by the
novelty of the proposition. An Impressive demonstration of the immense popularity of the Oliver Typewriter.
A startling confirmation of our belief that the Era of Universal Typewriting Is at hand.
A Quarter of a Million People are
Making Money With
Tl)c.
Examinations for the position of
Inspector of Steam Boilers and Machinery, under the "Steam Boilers
Inspection Act, 1901," will be held
at the Parliament Buildings, Victoria,  commencing   November     7th,
[ 1910.    Application   and   instruction
firms can be had on application to
j the undersigned, to whom the former
must bo returned correctly filled in,
I not later  than  October 24th,   1910.
i Salary $130 per month, Increasing at
i the rate of $5 per month each year
to a maximum of $180.
JOHN PECK,
i       Chief Inspector of Machinery,
New Westminster, B.C.
OLIVER
TVpeWri-ter
The Standard  Visible  Writer
The Oliver Typewriter is a moneymaker, right from the word "go!" So
easy to run that beginners soon get
in the "expert" class. Earn as you
learn. Let tbe machine pay the 17
cents a day—and all above that Is
yours.
Wherever you are, there's work to
be done and money to be made by
using the Oliver. The business world
is calling for Oliver operators. There
are not enough to supply the demand.
Their salaries are considerably above
those of many classes of workers.
"An Oliver Typewriter In
Every  Home!"
That Is our battle cry today. We
have made the Oliver supreme In
usefulness and absolutely Indispensable ln business. Now comes the
conquest of the home.
Tbe simplicity and strength of the
Oliver fit It for family use. It Is becoming an Important factor In the
home training of young people. An
educator ns well as a money maker.
our new Belling plan puts, the
Oliver on the threshold of every
home in America. Will you close
Hie door of your home or office on
this remarkable Oliver opportunity?
Write for further details of our
easy offer and a free copy of the new
Oliver  catnlogue.     Address:
R. C. BEAN
Prince Rupert Agent
General   Offices:   Oliver   Typewriter
Building, Chicago, 111.
CANCELLATION   OF  RESERVE!
NOTICE Is hereby given that the
reserve existing on Crown lands in
the vicinity of Babine Lake, and
situate in Cassiar District, notice of
which bearing date June 30th, 1909,
was published In the BrltlBh Columbia Gazette, dated July 2nd, 1908, is
cancelled.
ROBERT A. RENWICK,
Deputy Commissioner of I.nnds.
Lands Department,
Victoria, B. C, June 16th, 1910
(First Insertion July B.) THE PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Tuesday, November 1, 1910.
DEMANDS OF CHINA
Awakening of the Nation to the Needs
of Representative Parliament.
Determined   Move   in   the   Celestial
Empire for More Modern
Systems
A surprising revolt has taken place
against the government in China.
The imperial senate, not three weeks
old, has voted to memoralize the
throne for the early opening of the
general parliament. This action appears to indicate that the new senate
will not be a submissive or mock institution, but one with which the
grand council must reckon.
As far back as last June an informal demand was made for the immediate convocation of a national
parliament, the establishment of
which had been promised for the
year 1915. An imperial decree was
then issued refusing the demand,
which was adopted by delegates to
the provincial assemblies and was
supported by organizations of merchants throughout the country.
The imperial senate no sooner assembled on October 3 than the provincial delegates formed an opposition party and arrayed themselves
against the throne. The question of
the parliament was brought up daily
and the demand was made that it
have executive power. The campaign
culminated yesterday, when impassioned speeches were made in which
it was pointed out that a change was
imperative for the salvation of the
country. This plea won over a large
majority.
The Russo-Japanese agreement
with reference to the annexation of
Korea by Japan has been employed
by the agitators and the press during
the last few months to create a wave
of patriotism, and this propaganda
has male considerable progress
among the intelligent classes, the
progressive party showing a strong
front against the united officials and
the Manchu army. It is generally
recognized, however, that the prince
regent is sincere in his desire that
the best, interests of the country be
served, and that he has resisted the
plan to change because he has been
advised to do so by the venerable
grand councillors, who believe that
the country is not prepared for such
a sweeping change and that the establishment of liberal institutions
might result in a calamity.
Following this action of the senate there are intimations that many
political leaders are determined to
obtain their demands. In private conversations, educated Chinese speak
of the revolution within two years
unless the throne surrenders. A
factor in the situation, however, Is
tiie garrison in Peking, and army
divisions stationed in neighboring
districts, which are all Manchu. The
Chinese troops are always kept at a
distance from the new capital.
 o	
FEDERATION SCHEME
be represented. That was the idea
of Cecil Rhodes; it is the ideal of his
disciple. Earl Grey, governor-general
of Canada, whose old antopathy to
home rule—the original cause of his
severance from the Liberal party—
is known to have passed away.
It would be a blunder, however, to
underrate the difficulties that stand
in the way of this imperial conception. The self-governing dominions
are, as is well-known, jealous of
their rights of nationhood, and will
not surrender any of them, least ot
all any part of the taxing power.
There is no immediate prospect, that
an Imperial senate, even when called
into being, would hav aught but consultative functions on questions common to the whole empire, and the
probabilities are that for years to
come ther will be nothing but the
rough and ready methods of a triennial Imperial* conference in  London.
A correspondent of the Times has
just made public a fact, known already to many behind the scenes,
that during his recent prolonged visit
to England, Earl Grey pressed on his
rfiends among Unionist statesmen
the wisdom of resorting to the federal system as a solution of our constitutional difficulties.
Earl Grey has seen for himself the
satisfactory working of the provincial assemblies in Canada and the
state legislatures in America.
METHODIST BANQUET
Enjoyable Evening Spenr at Thanksgiving
Entertainment in
Church
Gratifying  Results  From   Gathering
of Friends in Church Last
Night
THE PEAC|E RIVER
Investigations   Have   Been   Made
Party Sent to'fZ.-~
Report
By
The Country is Found to be Rich in
Various Resources—Open Char.
acter of the District
(Continued from Page One)
Wales according to Welsh Ideas,
Scotland according to Scottish ideas,
most of the standing causes of quarrel with the house of lords would be
removed.
In fact, given a scheme of home
rule all round, with the re-establishment beyond all possibility of cavil
of the supremacy of the house of
commons over finance, and there are
not a few Liberals who would be content to leave the house of lords as
It stands, with all its Imperfections
on its head.
Many Liberals and Conservatives
look upon devolution in the United
Kingdom as a clearing of the site
preparatory to the upbuilding of an
Imperial senate in Westminster, In
which the over-seas dominions would
Messrs. Heaney, Montizambert and
Taylor have just returned from the
Peace River country, to which they
had been despatched by the provincial government to investigate and
report upon the resources of the district.
They spent approximately two
months in exploring its various valleys, and it is understood that their
report will be an exhaustive and
highly favorable one. Little is known
by the outside world save in a most
general way, of this immense country and in order to be in a position
to furnish reliable information to
those seeking it, the government sent
out this party.
The members of the expedition
state that almost the entire country
examined consists of fine agricultural
land, and that vast stretches of open
country only await the hand of man
to be transformed into veritable gardens. Some few settlers are already
located in various parts of the district, but these have as yet paid scant
attention to the cultivation of the
soil except in the raising of potatoes
and other garden products for their
own use or local sale. Stock raising
is the chief industry of the settlers,
the country being admirably adapted
for this industry. Cattle and horses
range all winter and are in splendid
condition when the spring arrives.
Much of the country is of open character, interspersed with small groves
of poplar. Game is very plentiful in
the timbered sections, moose, caribou, bear, beaver and feathered game
being met with in large numbers.
Coal and indications of precious
minerals  are also encountered.
The   city   council  will   meet   this
evening.
Mr. Pemberton, of Victoria, after a
trip to Hazelton, spent a few days
here, going south last evening.
*    *    *
G. W. Morrow and family left last
evening for the south where they en-
tend to make their home.
:•.:.*•:••:..:..:..:..:..:..>••:..:• .:.•> ■;•>:••:• .i.****.;
> »>•>*»:
THE   GENUINE f
Red Oak Coal and Wood Heater S
All castings made of pure pig" iron, body made of $
boiler plate, htis cone  centre grate forcing coal to <•
sides of lice pot; hot blast around lire pot: it burns till £
tfttses nnd black smoke: it cokes the coal, making an .;.
even, steady lire: feed  and draught doors ground on *
and all  joints air tig-ht.   The most durable and eco- j£
nomical Stove ever put on the market, and a reputa- *
tion of nearly 40 years behind it.  Shovel, Poker and #
Ash I'tin furnished with each Stove. j£
OUR BONA FIDE OFFER delivered f.o.b. wharf Prince |
Rupert, at our Victoria prices as sold in our showrooms *
No. 12,  $25.00: No. 14,  $30.00; No. 16, $35.00; No. 18, $40.00 *
CASH   TO   ACCOMPANY   EACH  ORDER |
Watson & McGregor I
I   647 Johnson Street VICTORIA, B.C. |
<. ►;..;. .j,.;..;..;..;..;..;..»..;..;,.;, .j, ,j..;,......,»,,.,,., ,5,,♦, ,j, ,j, ^...... ^, ,j, ,5,... ,j.,;, .g, ^,,, ,j. ,j, ,j, ^ ,j,,.,,», ,j, ,j, ,j, ,j, ,j,,., ,,4,;,
The Methodist church last evening
held it's third annual banquet in the
church when the building was crowded with guests. This event, which
takes place on Thanksgiving evening
each year, has come to be looked upon as a very pleasurable re-union of
the citizens generally and last evening's gathering was no exception.
The voluntary offering amounted to
a little over $200, which will be tie-
voted to the church work.
The ladies' aid provided an excellent banquet and the church was
suitably decorated.
After the banquet had been served
a toast list was gone through with a
start being made on this part of the
programme before eight o'clock. The
speeches were short and the proceedings closed at a very suitable hour.
Rev. Charles Sing, the pastor of
the church, presided. "The King"
was duly honored, followed by a
toast to "Our Country."
In proposing the toast Dr. Mclntyre remarked upon the kindly way
in which they took to water in
drinking the toasts. In a very eloquent speech the doctor called attention to the religious and political
freedom which were enjoyed under
the Britisli flag. Canadians took no
thought of what the ultimate end of
the country was to be. They were
well satisfied to continue as at present. The lustre of arms was passing
away and constancy, Integrity and
public and private virtue were now
more admired.
W. Manson, M.P.P., suitably responded, referring to the reasons for
thankfulness which the country had.
The "Maple Leaf Forever" was
sung by the whole gathering.
"The Methodist Church of Canada" was proposed by M. M. Stevens,
who expressed his high appreciation
of the services rendered by Methodism. In his own happy manner Mr.
Stevens Introduced the toast.
Rev. Mr. Sing, in the absence of
Rev. Mr. Raley, replied. He made reference to the fact that counting the
adherents of the church, Methodism
represented about one-quarter of the
population of Canada.
Mr. Burrett proposed the toast of
"The Local Church Organization,"
congratulating the church upon the
energy of its minister. Enumerating
the different societies in the church
he laid special stress upon the work
of the ladies.
Rev. C. C. Perry, in replying, also
paid a compliment to the ladies' part.
He was glad to see bigotry having
little place now. The energies of the
church were devoted rather to the rebuilding of blasted humanity.
Rev. Mr. Pearce of Port Essington,
in an entertaining way told of the
work among the Indians and the part
the natives were taking in church
work.
"The Sister Churches" was proposed by Mr. J. E. Davey, who was
pleased to see the friendly feeling
which existed among all branches of
the church.
In response, Rev. Mr. De Barres,
representing the Anglican church,
made a very happy allusion to the
Methodist branch of his family tree,
closing with a plea for united work
to further the cause of God.
Rev. Mr. Kerr, representing the
Presbyterian church, was delighted
to be present. He was not able to
trace any Methodism in his family,
but he expressed a willingness to join
In marriage with the Methodists as
the proposed church union had been
referred to.
"The City of Prince Rupert" was
proposed by O. H. Nelson, and responded to by Mayor Stork and the
aldermen  present.
His Worship did not know any
place that had greater reason to be
thankful than Prince Rupert. There
were no poor people here. It was a
land of plenty. He wished Method-
Ism every success.
Aid. Pattullo said that the moral
aspect of the city's development concerned the aldermen as well as the
churches. He lamented the misconceptions that bad got abroad relative
to the climate of Prince Rupert.
Aid. Mclntyre spoke very briefly
also.
"The Press" was proposed by T. J.
Davidson, who alluded to the task
which the papers had In helping to
weld the various nationalities In this
new country Into one whole.
The toast was responded to by S.
M. Newton and G. R. T. Sawle.
During the evening solos were ren
dered by Mr. Davey and Mr. Fletcher,
and a violin solo by Miss Barker with
Miss Froud acting as accompanist.
Capt. T. H. Alcock told an amusing
experience he had in the londike.
The company dispersed after singing
"Auld Lang Syne" and the Doxology.
 0	
CATHOLIC BAZAAR
Contest  for Magnificent Cane Promises to be Lively
The ladles of the Catholic church,
under the efficient leadership of Mrs.
J F. Ritchie, will hold a bazaar on
Friday, Nov. •), opening at 3 p.m.,
and closing at 11 p.m.
Hustle, hustle, hustle for our
bazaar! Attractive display ol many
fancy nnd useful articles donated by
Catholic ladles and non-Catholic
friends, delicious refreshments, good
musical programme, fishing pond,
raffle, popularity contest, all winding up In a dance.
Don't miss to come; here will be
barrels of fun for old and young.
Have a look at the charming
bridesmaid, donated by Mrs. J. F.
Ritchie and exhibited at Miss Bar-
beau's millinery store. A gilt-edge
opportunity for the lucky Individual
to win a doll which will make the
delight of any girl.
A novel and lively feature of the
bazaar will be a voting contest at ten
cents a vote, between Mayor Stork
and Aid. Vernor Smith. The most
popular candidate will be presented
with a magnificent seventy-five-dollar
gold-headed cane the generous gift
of Mr. J. Fred Ritchie. Go and see
it exhibited at Keeley's drug store.
It is a beauty.
The many friends of both candidates who so gracefully accepted, are
preparing to make this contest a
lively one. Join right in! Your votes
will help.
 0	
IMMIGRATION WORK
Thomas Howell Representing  the Canadian Northern Has Very
Decided Plans.
All the Operators of Company Will
he Directed From This Side
of the Atlantic
Mr. Thomas Howell, general Immigration agent of the Canadian Northern railway, who has bis headquarters at Toronto, was a visitor to the
coast a few days ago, making his
first tour in his new capacity, and
getting In touch with necessities of
the important work to which he will
hereafter devote his energies.
The colonization and immigration
work of the Canadian Northern railway is to be directed solely from
Canada, Mr. Howell said. This is in
contrast with the system of other
railway companies, which maintain
separate and distinct emigration
branches in the * old country, these
branches being less directly in touch
with the needs of this new nation.
The Canadian Northern company's
immigration policy embraces both
Eastern and Western Canada, it being intended to place many newcomers on the lands of New Ontario.
These will assist, no doubt the upbuilding of lands opened up by the
G. T. P. and C. P. R., but the C. N. R.
counts upon deriving its share of
benefit from the augmented population in the final reckoning.
The keynote of the policy which
Mr. Howell aims to initiate is: Get
the right class of Immigrants and go
to the right places to get them and to
others ln the first instance. Mr.
Howell's work with the Canadian
Northern company may be said to begin where his work with the Salvation Army terminated.
Mr. Howell's first party of special
agents for England left by the Royal
Edward on the 13th proximo to canvass thoroughly for desirable colonists adapted for domestic service or
farm labor.
 0	
RECEIVE    RAINBOW
tContlnued from Page One)
inches of wrought iron at a distance
of over a mile. This projectile is tha
heaviest In the navy that Is manhandled. For heavier guns machinery
is used. The possible rate of fire is
twelve rounds a minute.
Protruding menacingly over the
sides of the vessel are six 4.7-inch
guns, the kind for which Sir Percy
Scott devised a special carriage, hauling one to Ladysmlth during the Boer
war, and undoubtedly saving that
place for the British forces. No other
gun in the belaguered city could
compete with General Botha's Long
Tom.
Other Armament
The cruiser Is also equipped with
eight six-pounders and four of those
deadly Maxim guns whose rapid fire
at close quarters mow men down like
ninepins. Originaly lshe possessed
four torpedo tubes, from which are
fired the long cylinder-shaped weapons tapered off at either end, which
properly placed, might sink a battleship. The fore and aft torpedo tubes,
however, have been removed and only
those on either side, forward can be
used. The others were not in workable condition, and probably were not
considered necessary for the purposes
of the Canadian naval service.
The armament described completes
the ship's offensive powers with the
exception of small arms. A full stock
of shell, shot, powder and torpedoes
was taken on shortly before the vessel left Portsmouth on August 18.
Convex Steel Deck
The Rainbow is not an armored
ship, but just above the waterline
she has the convex steel deck that is
a distinctive feature of the protected cruiser. This runs her whole
length and covers her magaines and
engines, shielding them from an
enemy's projectiles that may have
pierced the hull or decks above. It
performs an equally Important duty
in keeping the vessel afloat after she
has been badly damaged beneath.
The vessel's Interior is divided Into
various watr-tlght compartments, and
the armored deck prevents the in-
rushing water from a well-placed1
shot from compassing her destruction.
The Starting Stations
The cruiser may be started from
four different stations. One of these
is the bridge, which would have to
be abandoned during a battle for the
connig tower, as it offers no protection against a heavy fire. It is reach-
from below by a narrow, winding,
iron-cased stairway, up which one
fairly has to crawl, so low Is the
headroom. Once inside the tower, a
little more space is found. Here the
commander, encased in three inches
of Harveyized steel, can peer through
minute apertures and direct the conflict. The oempass is before him.
The wheelsman is at his side. The
speaking tube and electric system,
connecting with the different parts of
the ship, are immediately available.
A signal from him, and a torpedo is
discharged ,the engines reversed, or
any other course taken that, the
exigencies of the struggle demand.
Modern military tactics require that
a commander-in-chief shall direct
operations from a safe position in
the rear, where his headquarters are
established, and there he is kept
posted by means of maps and the
wireless and telephone system that
reach to the extreme positions, perhaps fifty miles away on either hand,
as at the battle of Mukden. No such
development has come In naval conflicts. The commander himself goes
into the hel lot shot and shell and
shares with his men the dangers of
combat.
Has Wireless Telegraph;
The Rainbow rates at 3,000 tons.
She has had a large Iron-protected
room built for the operation of wireless telegraphy. Her crew number
163, with 10 officers. About 20 pel-
cent of the crew, it is said, were picked from the active service of the
British navy, and will stay as instructors as long as needed. The
balance are men from the service
list, who volunteered with service
with the Canadian government. It Is
understood many of them will return to England as soon as recruits
are gathered in Canada to take their
places, so few will bring their fam1-
lies cross tbe sea.
The rate of pay for the commander
is $10.05, which compares favorably
with that all.nved In tbe British navy.
The seamen get ."X cents per day,
as against 30 cents to $1 30 ln the
Imperial fleet.
Niobe Getting Heady
The Rainbow does not compare In
fighting efferllveno--s with the Niobe,
the other vessel acquired for the Canadian navy. That vessel Is a first-
class protected cruiser, carrying sixteen of the tig six Inch guns. She
cost the Canadian government at bargain prices, $1,075,000, whereas the
Rainbow was secured for $250,000.
The former Is undergoing renovation
at Devonport, and was to have been
ready by the middle of August, but
further changes found desirable will
delay her departure for Halifax until
September. Both vessels will bo used
as training ships, but the Rainbow
will also render Important Bervlce In
connection with the fisheries off the
British Columbia coast.
The Next 2 Months
Will be a busy season with us, as we
are getting goods from Eastern and
European markets.
COMBINATION   COPPERED   WIIJE
SPRING   REDS   AND RED STEADS
Are amongst our new arrivals at
THE
BIG FURNITURE STORE
F. W. HAUT
Complete House Furnisher
Entrance Oth St., near cor. 2nd Ave
Prince  Rupert  Private   Detective
  Agency 	
N. McDonald,  Manager
All kinds of legitimate detective work
handled for companies and  Individuals.    Business strictly confidential.
P. O. Rox 803 — Phone 210
Some Rock
Bottom
Prices
See lit For Investment
Rupert City Realty & Information Bureau, Ltd.
PRINCE RUPERT,
B.C.
j« ►;« »*« <-*•» tjt »*♦ »!• »j» tjt »j»»;«»*« tjt **4 »> ♦;« »;■» »jt »jt tjt <g» tj» »*• »jt tj»
Don't Forget    f
William Rellly is on a visit to Bellingham for a few weeks.
* *    *
Henry Edenshaw, of Masset, is in
the city this week on business.
* *    *
Blair Fleming, purser of the Distributor, has gone soutii to Victoria
for the winter.
THAT CLARKE RROS.
Importers and Wholesalers  of
Wines and Liquors
Are making a specialty of the
FAMILY TRADE We a*e sole
agents In Northern British Columbia for
Budweiser
the acknowledged champion of
American Beers. For those
who prefer a local beer we have
Nanaimo Beer
the best local beer on the
market. We also carry n complete stock of all standard
brands of
WHISKY,  liRANDV. GIN,
etc.. etc., and our
WINES
are   selected   by    an    expert.
t
♦
CLARKE BROS.
Christiansen & Brandt Rid.
Third Avenue
|
Ki A A A »*.
'WW
* ♦ * ,i*
I* v v v v *!* **« *♦* *»* v "I* *** v v v *!• *< * * * *•• v
LINDSAY'S GARTAGE &ST0RAGE
G. T. P. CARTAGE AGENTS
Ollice nt H. B. Rochester, Centre St.
—o—
LADYSMITH  COAL
is handled by us.  All orders receive
prompt attention.  Phone No  68.
Fred Stork
General Hardware
...Complete Line of...
VALVES
Pipe and Pipe Fittings
CANCELLATION   OF  RESERVE
NOTICE is hereby given that the
reserve existing on Crown lands in
the vicinity of Babine Lake, situate
In Range 5, Coast District, notice of
which was published in the British
olumbla Gazette, dated December
17, 1908, is cancelled In so far as
said reserve relates to lots numbered 1619, 1518, 1517, 1516, 1516,
1510, 1507, 1506, 1506A, 1603 1501,
1502, 1612, 1511, 1506, 1504, 1618,
1614, 1609, 1508, 1630, 1527, 1628,
1529, 1531, 1532, 1533, 1534, 1535,
1537, 1539, 1536, 1538, 1540, 1541,
1544, 1543, 1545, 1546, 1542, 1547,
1548, 1549, 1550, 1620, 1621, 1622,
1523, 1524, 1526, 1526, and 1551.
ROBERT A. RENWICK,
Deputy Commissioner of Lands.
Lands Department,
Victoria, B. C, June 16th, 1910.
(First Insertion July 5.)
GRAHAM ISLAND — "The surest
sign of the progress of a town or
district is Its newspaper—live, active, hustling." "The Masset Review," Masset, Q.C.I.
I i m
\

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