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Prince Rupert Journal Jul 21, 1911

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Array /)
/' A.
New Wellington
Coal
is the best
ROGERS & BLACK
Sole Agents
Ptmu Mttpett
v
High Class
Job Printing
in all Lines
VOLUME II
Published Twice n Week.
PRINCE RUPERT, B.  C,   FRIDAY   JULY 21, 1911
Price,   Five   Cents.
NO.  10
WATER SITUATION
Inspection Made of the Source of Supply
Now in Use by the
City
City   Engineer   Piloted   Party   About
the Watersheds to Demonstrate
Situation
An investigation of tlie water situation was the object of a tour made
Wednesday afternoon by a party
headed by Mayor Manson and the
city engineer, Col. Davis, and which
included Aid. Kerr, Aid. Douglas and
the representatives of the press. The
line of march, which was anything
but an easy one, lay for the most
part along parts of the city but seldom frequented by citizens or by
visitors. While the trip proved
highly educative in character it was
under the weather conditions prevailing anything but a light task. Excepting the fact that one of the aldermen got lost at a critical point
on tlie route, which was satisfactorily explained later in the day, the
tramp was without special incident
but was accompanied by much puffing. As the water courses were followed quite closely frequently the
■whole brigade was to be seen prostrate drinking In the most primitive
way out of the streams.
The object in connection with the
trip was to acquaint the aldermen
With the exact situation along the
line of the recommendations made
some few weeks ago by tlie engineer
looking to a supplementary water
supply. Unfortunately, the majority
of the aldermen demurred at the trip
and the full results were thus not
attained.
Morse Creek was visited, where
work is already commenced upon the
dam which is to be built there to
provide an emergency reservoir. The
dam is not far beyond the end of
the G. T. P, "Y" that runs up Morse
Creek. Is was formerly used by the
company in the early days of the
city and the frame work of the dam
still stands. It will not he a heavy
task to repair it and put it n shape
to hold all the water that conies
down. In the townsite, none of which
land is inhabited, there are 400
acres, all draining into this area Independent of the streams that flow
from the mountain side into the
creek.
in case of a heavy rainfall there
would thus be a large volume of
water harnessed by the dam. At
the present time a steady stream is
running down the course which Col.
Davis estimates is more than suffi-
eient to counteract the evaporation
that may follow the darning up of
tlie stream. A reservoir capable of
holding over 8,000,000 gallons can
be cheaply provided hy the repair of
the dam.
The plans prepared by the engineer, which are endorsed by tlie
mayor, provide for a pump heing installed below the dam near the end
of the dump on Second avenue beyond Lynch's and the putting in of
a pipe up the embankment to connect
with the regular distribution system
of the city. The short length of pipe
used to connect the pump with the
distribution system would be capable
of being used again, while all the
pipe laid on the streets beyond the
connection would be part of that
used under the permanent water system to be installed, so that the extra
expense would not he great.
Furthermore, if it became necessary to fill up this Morse Creek res-
ervolr and there was too much water
going to waste- at Hays Creek Col.
Davis has discovered a point on the
mountain side where, by a very easy
system of diversion, a large volume
of water may be turned from Hays
Creek into Morse Creek, the two
watersheds coming very close together..
Following Morse Creek to the
point where it conies from the mountain side the party crossed lo the
Hays Creek watershed and followed
that stream down to the pumping
station. There is still a good volume
of water In Hays Creek and In the
afternoon the volume is such that
there Is quite a flow going to waste.
During the night with cooler air on
Hie mountain the discharge is re-
pump is supplied alono.
An Inspection of the water supply,
while sufficient to warrant the ex-
erclse of due care, shows tliat the
situation Is not bad. The reservoirs
mi the hill side arc kepi filleel and
by using the pump on Hays Creek to
force water from the lower levels
to keep the reservoirs replenished
the supply on the mountain side is
being kept constant. Under normal
conditions without any specially
heavy demand caused by a large fire
or an excessively long period of dry
weather the supply should meet the
demand. With the emptying of the
reservoirs to meet the demands of a
fire, however, tlie citizen wont be
left dependent very largly upon the
amount  pumped   from   Hays  Creek.
The advantage of having a storage
reservoir on Morse Creek would be
that this might be drawn upon in
case of a fire, thus saving the mountain supply for the ordinary domestic
use.
As it Is the situation seems to
be much better than it was a year
ago but there is no auxiliary supply
to fall back upon in case of fire.
Monday evening the ability of
those who took part in the great trek
to convince their fe"ow councilmen
as to the necessity of action will he
tested.
 o	
AN AVERAGE SEASON
Salmon  Taken   on   the  Skeena  Will
be as Good as
Formerly.
Catch So Far Is a Little Light  Being
Only  -15,000  Case's—Better
Prospects
While the fishing season on the
Skeena has not this year been a
record breaker there is every indication, the cannery men say, that the
close of the fishing months will see
an average catch taken in. The Skeeua has come to be looked upon as
probably the best salmon river in the
province, taking it year after year.
There is a steady production and
every indication that its wealth in
tliis respect will remain permanent.
The restrictions in the way of limiting the number of boats is intended
to maintain the river as a salmon
producer, it being provided in this
way that a good supply get to the
spawning grounds. Doubtless some
readjustments could be made with
advantage in the assigning of boats
but the principle involved seems to
be a good one.
Up to the present the catch has
been about 45,000 cases. The take
has been distributed as follows
among  the  canneries  operating:
Cases
Carlisle     4,200
Cassiar     4,400
Dominion      4,200
Skeena River Commercial. 2,000
Cunninghams     2,000
Alexandra    2,000
Balmoral    0,000
British  America    3,000
Inverness    5,000
Oceanic     8,500
Claxton     4,600
North  Pacific    3,600
With a change In the tides approaching the cannerymen look for
better conditions for fishing within
the next few days and the consequent bringing up of the take to
what it usually is.
A CRISIS IN HOUSE
IS EXPECTED SOON
BACK  FROM   HOLIDAY
FEWER LIVES LOST
H.
Wilson of Royal Hank Has
turned   From  a   Visit  in
Southern Cities
Sir Wilfrid Takes Initial Step Towards Forcing Reciprocity Through Parliament*-Will Make Quick
Appeal to Country if His Will
Does Not Prevail.
I Special to The Journal)
Ottawa, July 21.—News is in circulation that the forcing process is
to be started by the Laurier'government. Sir Wilfrid Laurier has
given notice that commencing Wednesday there will be a morning sitting of the House, meeting at 11
o'clock and sitting until 1 p. m.|
adjourning for a couple of hours and
meeting  again  in  the afternoon.
That the sittings will be also prolonged at night, or more likely to
the early hours of morning, goes
without saying. Nobody seems now
to doubt that the programme of the
government is to try out the avowed
mention of the opposition to resist
the adoption of the reciprocity agree-
mi'iit "to the bitter end," and then
throw up the cards and call for a
new deal—in other wards, to ask for
a dissolution and bring on an election with all possible speed.
Cabinet Changes
With dissolution apparently so
near, conjecture is quickened as to
the possible cabinet changes. It is
accepted as settled that Sir Wilfrid
will replace at least two of his war
worn lieutenants with new men, to
wit, the minister of militia and the
minister of marine. E. H, Macdonald will succeed Sir Frederick Borden, who goes to London as high
commissioner, Dr. Belaud taking the
Quebec portfolio now held by Mr.
Brodeur. 11 is hinted that other new
blood is likely to be brought In lie-
fore an election, it is known that
Walter Scott is anxious to enter the
Federal cabinet. The Saskatchewan
premier thinks he e-oulil wrest the
constituency from tlie opposition if
given the prestige of the portfolio
of the interior.
To gratify his ambition would
mean the shelving of Mr. Oliver, and
it is to be borne in mind in this
connection that the membership on
the board of railway commissioners,
made vacant by the death of Mr.
Greenway, remains unfilled. One reporl has it that Mr. Scott may be
provided with a seat on the treasury
bench by cutting down the cabinet
represenatlon of Nova Scotia, but it
is scarcely probable that the prime
minister would make a move so unpopular as that would be down east.
SEEK INFORMATION
Granby Officials are Investigating North
Country Preparatory to Building Smelter.
They
Are   Well   Satisfied   With
Results of the Work at
Mines
the
(Special to The Journal)
London, July 21. The veto
bill passed its third reading
without division in the House
nf  Lords  on  Thursday evening.
Lord Morley, while dissociating the government from the
amendments Introduced in the
upper house, moved the adoption  of  the measure.
The real crisis may still arise
on July 2-"., when the bill is
returned to the Lords for final
acceptance  or  rejection.
Enjoyable Afternoon
The ladies' auxiliary of the hospital held a social afternoon yesterday in the K. of P. Hall, where tea
and light refreshments were served
to all citizens who attended. There
was a very good attendance of citizens and the arrangements were all
that could be desired. Gray's orchestra was in attendance and contributed to the enjoymenl of the afternoon.
The proceeds are to go to the. use of
iho hospital,
In an effort to arrive at the mineral prospects in the northern part
of the province and Alaska Mr. Yolen
Williims of the Granby company left
yesterday morning for Prince of
Wales island, where he will look into
the prospects there. Later he will
visit other mining centres In the
north before reporting back to the
company   on   the   conditions.
As mentioned previously In these
columns, the Granby company has
decided to invade this northern
country. The officials are quite impressed with the prospects and then,,
are reasons for believing that that
great corporation will make this part
of tlie province 'the scene of their
main operations before many years
pass. So far they are very favorably
impressed. After Mr. Williams has
spent a few more weeks in investigations the plans of the company will
be  arrived   at  and  unfolded.
Already in the Adder Creek mines
the Granby company has invested an
immense amount. Further investments are contemplated and before
the full plans of the company are
complete it is sale to prophesy that
there will be an Investment which
will give a decided Impetus to mining in ibis northern section of the
province.
Prince Ruperl will be the centre
of the trade to be built up and will
reap a •!<'<• iti<-ii benefit from (he pol-
Icy in be pursued, The very tacl
that the Granby company, after Investigation of the resources, is prepared in Invesl in this pari of the
province on a huge' scale, is a guarantee thai the deposits are valuable
and will have1 a marked effeel upon
the investments in a mining line' In
this country,
O, B. Smith, another of the company's experts, has returned from
the Hidden Creek mine, and lofl this
morning for the south, lie says
work is being carried along steadily
at the mine. The diamond drills are
being kepi going blocking oul the
ore bodies for fuller development.
The- prospects arc eniiiee up In u'lmi
was anticipated.
—o—
Mr. and Mrs. c. C. Perry of Mi'tla-
liiula are In the city. They will
probably make their headquarters
here for a little time so Hun Mr.
Perry may be more com enlenl lo tho
means of transportation.
Tl USE TELEPHONE
II. P. Wilson, manager of the.
Royal Bank of Canada In this city,
has returned from a holiday spent
in the south. While his visit was
one of pleasure alone, Mr. Wilson
did not fail to note the general trend
of business as it  related to this city.
Real estate he found active In his
old home city of Victoria as compared with what it formerly was there.
Bul while Vancouver and Victoria
were the scenes of marked real estate
activity, there was everywhere a feeling that the day of Prince Rupert
was not far distant. Money was being used in the southern cities which.j
would be diverted here just as soon
as it was felt the time had approached when this city's real business life was to open up. It was
felt in these cities that the movement would be shortly before the
railway was completed.
 o	
CANADIANS AT BISLEY
Team From Dominion Tied With   the
Mother Country for Kola-
pore Cup.
Second
Stage    for    Kings    Prize
Being Shot Today by
Canucks
Grand Trunk Will Adopt That System
in Train Dispatching.
Pacific Coast Section of the O.
Has Already Put This
In Use
T. P
(Special to The Journal)
Toronto, July 21.—W. W. Ashall,
superintendent of the Grand Trunk
Railway telegraphs, announces that
the company will adopt the telephone
system instead of the telegraph for
train dispatching over the entire [
system.
Reduced Number of Victims in the Fires
in Northern Ontario
Reported.
Number   Is
Down   to   Sixty
List oi  the
Deuel
\o\v-
(Special  to  The  Journal
Bisley, July 21.After outshootlng
the Mother Country riflemen, their
nearest opponents at the two shorter
rangers and with a lead of 13, tlie
Canadian team struck bad luck at
at the last and longest range, seven
shots at, COO yards. They lost so
much ground at this range that the
old countrymen crept up and tied at
759 in competition for tlie Kolapore
Cup.
The Mother Country, having the
biggest score at the longest range,
won  tlie cup.
The aggregates at the tliree ranges
were: Canada, 759; the Mother
Country, 759; India, 756; Guernsey,
7.",3; Soutli Africa, 7:12; New Zealand, 729.
Fifteen Canadians are shooting in
the second stage for the King's
Prize today.
 o	
The telephone system In connection with train dispatching is being
used by the G. T. P. on this the most
western portion of the system under
the charge of W. C. C. Mehan, general superintendent, and .1. II. Todd,
the chief dispatcher, it has been
found to work most conveniently and
has many advantages over Hie old
telegraphic  system.
Mr. Mehan has equipped the new
line here in a most convenient style
to overcome all danger of accident.
Bach train is equipped with a telephone system and at any moment
the apparatus can be connected up
In the most simple manner with the
wire along the route. No trained
operator is necessary but on the con
trary headquarters or any place on
the line can be communicated with
by telephone, in this way there is
no necessity for hurrying someone
in the nexl station to reporl when
anything   goes   wrong on   the  line.
Personals
Mr, Justice Gallaher of the Appellate Court of British Columbia paid
a holiday visit to Prince Ruperl this
week accompanied by .Mrs. Gallaher.
They were making the round trip
by the Prime Ruperl during the
long court vacation. Many from the
Koeitenays, where the judge was better known as "big Bill," took occasion to meet the appellate court judge
on bis stay here. Mrs. Gallaher and
Mrs. Duncan Ross went south again
by the Prime Rupert, Mr. Justice
Gallaher will accompany Mr. Reiss
lee the camp at Hazelton as a holiday
trip.
.1. IL McNIven, fair wage officer In
the departmenl of labor at Otawa,
visited the city this week in order
to gather information relative to labor matters. He made the trip by
the Prince Rupert, returning again | Spokane, Wash
this morning.   Mr, McNIven, who
(Special to The Journal)
Porcupine, July 21.—The total
death list in the Porcupine and Cochrane fires is now reduced to sixty.
All the fires are out. The Toronto
relief fund is $47,000, and distress
lias all been relieved. The work of
rebuilding the town of Cochrane and
the opening up of tbe mines at Porcupine has been commenced,
The bodies of 17 victims were interred at Deadman's Point, Soutli
Porcupine, last Sunday. One ser-
vice, conducted by II. II. Saunders, a
local Methodist preacher, sufficed for
all.
Rain has been falling for several
days, according to official advices,
and it is considered improbable that
the flames will start afresh.
List of Dead
The following list of dead to date
is contained In a press despatch from
Porcupine. To them must be added
William Wilson, Dldela Dipro and
Mike Rubenstein. The known dead
to date are:
At the West Dome—Robert Weiss,
wife   and   child,   New   York;   Angus
Burt and  wife,  Cobalt;   Duncan   McQueen  and  wife,   Scotland;     .lames
Jennie,  a   visitor,   Edinburgh,  Scotland; R. J. Welsh, Cache Bay; John
McLaughlin,      Venlsotti;      William
King,   Elk   City,   Idaho;   Angus   McDonald, Turner street, Ottawa; John
tl.   D'Epterre,   Toronto;   John   Wall,
Butee,   Mont.;    Harry   Brokens   and
wife,  Toronto   Hospital;   .1.   Launch,
Workman;    Hugh   McLeod,   Glencoe
Mills;   Lestor   Kenninger,  Nova  Scotia; J. W. Cranshaw, Phoenix, Ariz.;
William McLain, Calgary;  J. Paulin,
Montcera;   John  Orr and  W.  Becita,
laborers;    A.   .1.   Ryan,   51)   Church,
New   York   City;   Victor   Puera,   laborer;  one unidentified  man. a  visitor, who ran across the Dome property and  is said  to  lie in  tlie Dome
outlying shaft.
At tne Dome—Harry Hardy, Bath,
Eng.; Fritz Manse; Norman What-
nough, student. Toronto; Thomas ,1.
King, Copper Cliffe; Charles Jackson, colored, Pittsburg; Archer Johnson, Sudbury; Leo II. Sullivan. London, Eng.; Stanley Fitzmaage, Melbourne-, Australia; Jack T, Dllor, stu-
dent, Toronto; J. Alhod, Kelso,
Ai Porcupine United- Andrew
Pulll, Toronto; R. A. Dwyer i has a
brother In Bulte, Mont.); Joe Flynn,
Bracebrldge; Joe Fletcher, Cocker-
mouth, Eng.
At Philadelphia Mines C. A. Adams, Phoenixville, I'a. Two more
missing.
south Porcupine T. Geddes, formerly of Toronto; Mack Smith, New
Liskeard; Capt. Dunbar, Pembroke;
William  Moore,  Porcupine.
Goose Lake—Shaw Hugh Meehan,
Sudbury; John McDonald, Eganvllle.
Bodies found in tbe roadside—T,
Bodin; E. Sherridan, Ottawa.
Victims claimed by water- William Taylor, shoemaker, Reading,
Eng.; Andras Leroy, Montreal; Ar-
prilla Mondoux, Cobalt; Mervtn
Strain, Porcupine; Nathan Haas,
Stanley Nicholson,
This is especially advantageous Inlbeen visiting Prince Ruperl for sev-
a territory like this, where the Bta- oral years In connection with his
lion  have nol  yet   been  tent   in and|offlee, remarked upon tha wonderful
equipped.
Parly
GAMBLERS FIXED
Arrested hy the-  I'eelie
Guilt)'  lee Charge
rie.e.i
In the police courl a tew days ago
Magistrate Carss Inflicted fines upon
seven men charged with gambling.
The connecting evidence was secured
by Special Police Officer Morrison,
who took pari in the game. Jesse
Hall, who was charged with running
the game, was Eined $20 and costs.
It was shown that he gut a rake-off
each game, six others were charged
wiih playing and were fined amounts
ranging from $16 to $20,
This morning Jesse Ford was fined
$5 and costs on n charge of being
disorderly.
Harry Howson, after a trip io
Alice Ann. hns gone south to Vlc-
toria again.
advances which were lieing made "ii
the civic work sinec he- was here last
year. He Is a firm believer in the
future  of the  city.
*    •     *
Mr. Peck nf New Westminster Is
in ihe city mi a visit to Ills son, Cyrus
Peck, Mr. Peck Sr. is 84 years nf
age, inn in spiic nf his advanced
years takes 8 deep Interesl in affairs,
He., senile, years ago, retired from active life' inn manifests concern in
nil Hint is inking place. In appear-
ance he serins much younger than
his years Indicate, if it be true thai
a man is no older than ho feels, Mr.
Peck Sr. is certainly very much
nearer (ho ago of his s<m than (he
si years which are registered agalnsl
him.
Tlie-   Empress   Theatre beet
drawing largo bouses this week with
■Ki'  moving  pictures  of the coronation,    STcxl   week   May   Roberts ami
company win he Ihe attraction,    I
Guelph;  .leet   1
ebreta, i
wresth r, Ot-
tawa.
A  erne- day-e
eld  child
, killed  in  it:-
mothers  arms
Li
iter llcpi
ii t
Owing in n
error at Wo'
Dome ;e man
reported
missing nevei
existed,    \nother muni' « I
in list t.y nii-iuli.- after Identification
eel   tin'  victim.
Found s. P. C, A.
A ideal branch of the Soe lety for
i in' Prevention of Crueltj ne Animals
hns ie. en formed here with the. following officers: Honorary president
Mayor Manson; president, Dr, Keel-
.Mi': vice president, Chief Vickers;
secretary, Neil McKay; executive
committee, w. E, Fisher, M, Wei]-.
Capt. Haimm. Frank Kelly, W. W.
Law sun, i'. i'. Perry nml .1   s. . Dade
Duncan    Ueess    returned    to    the
north ley the Prince Ruperl and will
oceed  lo the   Intel lor,    He. is very
Inently   In   the   publle   pyi
• m\. In  ng ie garde 'I as a verj  llkelj
 Delate   for   the   Liberal   election
In the 1    ■     !   uterpsl PRINCE  RUPERT JOURNAL
Friday, July  21,  1911
PROPHETIC  VISION
Lord Curzon and Lord Rosebery Before
the Overseas Representatives.
Permanent    (invention
Out of (In- Gathering
foront Parts of the
May    Grow
Ki-om  Hit-
World
The visting press representatives
from the overseas dominions who
went to London to attend the corna-
tion celebrations were probably as
greatly Impressed by the wonderful
speech made by Lord Curzon at the
banquet given in their own honor as
by any of the great spectacular events
of the memorable period. It shared
the honor with the speech delivered
hy Lord Rosebery in welcoming the
overseas members of parliament ut
Westminster Hall of having reached
the oratorical liighwater mark.
The two speeches were acknowledged to have been great performances, worthy of the illustrious (last
of imperial oratory. Each orator
pointed the lessons of the hour with
the most supreme rhetorical skill and
the most fervid patriotism. With
homely and felling metaphor each
led the minds of his hearers over the
storied past and spread out the
glories of the rich Inheritance of the
present.
Lord Curzon, who spoke as one
who had once been a pressman himself, made this brilliant reference to
the event and the setting:
"You have only to go ahout in
the streets of London—if, indeed,
you can manage perambulation at
all (laughter)—to see the Empire
reproduced in microcosm in our
midst. If you move about the streets
you will see Indian princely potentates, great personages of immense
power in that country, pillars of the
state, many of whom, I believe, regard a visit to this country almost as
if they were going home. (Cheers.)
You will see dusky and uniformed
warriors walking in the streets bearing on their bosoms the medals that
recall the fact that they have rendered service to the king on the
distant frontiers of the Empire
(Cheers.) You will see the picturesque sultans from the Malay Peninsula; you will see colonial premiers
and members of parliament jostling
each other in the streets; you will
hear the English language spoken in
almost every variety of inflection
I am told we are not the custodians
of tlie real and original form, and
that it is only to be found across
the seas. Indeed, in many manifestations and forms you see the Britisii
Empire at our doors and gates.
"By a happy coincidence we have
the premiers of the great self-governing dominions in this country engaged in daily and serious conference
with the leading statesmen of our
own government. Thus it is, when
you come to London on this occasion, instead of bringing the Empire
with you, you almost find the Empire here already. I am not certain
that we ought not, as citizens of
London, apologize for the appearance of our ancient and picturesque
and at the present moment not too
beautiful metropolis. I hardly know
to whal to compare it, whether to
a city in a state of siege, to a patient in splinters, or to an American
football player encased in that peculiar garb iii which he meets the
dangers of the field. However that
may be, in a day or two's time I
hope all these ugly casings will bo
covered up in gala attire, nml on
Thursday next, when the great, cero-
monj takes place, 1 truly believe the
capital nf Un- Empire will present an
appearance at thai time thai no city
in the past, neither Babylon in its
splendor, nor Rome in iis pride-, can
• ■'■!■ have presented,
"Take the mosl dramatic Instances
we can Imagine in history tin- Em-
peror Alexander entering into Babylon, ii,. entered Babylon, so io
speak, over ihe body of prostrate
peoples and deposed kings. Taki
Caesar, in his triumphant chariot
mounting the.- slopes of Capitoline
Jove, In the train that followed him
were captive kings and queens, ob-
jcts of pity and humiliation. But
In our rejoicing on Thursday next
there will be notbin but peace and
unanimity and spontaniety on every
side. (Cheers.) No note of pain or
even of contrast will mar the proceedings, and In the midst of this
unparalleled assemblage and amid
the acclamations of his people the
King of Great Britain and Ireland,
the Emperor of India, the Monarch
of the Overseas, Dominions, from
which you come, will go down to
the ancient shrine of the history and
traditions of his people to accept
the crown of his ancestors, and to
render his duty to the King of
Kings."
ians in Westminster Hall, Lord Rosebery said, amid great enthusiasm:
"It is in the first place not a banquet to the leaders or the prime ministers—for which, I think, the prime
ministers will he devoutly grateful
(laughter)—not a banquet given to
the great people of the parliaments
of the Empipre hut a banquet offered by the private members, the backwoodsmen, as we say (laughter) —
of parliament to the private mem
hers, the backwoodsmen, of the Do
minion parliaments. The humblest
of the backwoodsmen has been placed in the chair (laughter) and has
in the name of the committee, to
welcome the brethren of the same
kind and character from across the
seas. This is, I think, the first col
lection of elected deputies from the
various parliaments of the Empire
to meet in the capital of the Empire. Is not that a great, and pregnant fact? And the hall in which
we are met is not unworthy of the
occasion. It is, in a phrase, the historical and secular centre of the
British Empire. In the few minutes
allotted to me today i am not going
lo dilate on the history of Westminster Hall, hut I can recall to you
the description in Macaulay's famous
essay on Warren Hastings wliere he
summarizes the history or the building in which we are meeting. He says
it is the hall of William Rul'us. I
am Inclined to think that, strictly
speaking, it is Hie hall or Richard
11, hut it. is on tlie site of the hall
of William Rul'us: It is the hall
of William Rufits, the hall where
Soniers was acquitted and Bacon was
condemned—the hall where against
Warren Hastings was arrayed the
greatest company ot eloquence, ability, and genius, that has ever been
collected within the walls of any
parliament. It was in this hall that
Strafford and his master confronted
their judges with a majesty that robbed death of its terror.
"If at this deeply interesting moment a visitor comes in for whom
one has regard and respect, we may
be certain that the mistress of this
house is somewhat embarrassed at
her appearance. Well, it is washing
day with us. Some of us had hoped
that that inconvenient period of domestic leaning might have been got
over before our children from the
Dominions paid us their visit. We
might have hoped that all would
be spick and span when tey arrived,
but 1 am sorry to say that as things
are, we can only extend to you a
warm (hough soap-suddy hand,
which I hope you will accept in the
spirit in which it is offered.
"As to the result of our domestic
operpation, there are two schools of
opinion. One thinks that the ancient Mother of Parliaments will
emerge from the process which she
process which sue is undergoing with
renewed life and vigor, though with
a shortened life. But there is another less sanguine school, which
thinks that when it is'over she will
be found to have only one leg to
stand upon. Whether that will be
beneficial to her or not, I daresay
you from the Dominions will be able
to discuss with more freedom from
prejudice than we. But this opinion
I will offer—that I do not believe
that any parliament in the world has
yet reached its final shape, and I
advance this proposition—so often
overlooked, but so fundamentally
true—that parliaments are made for
the people, and not tlie people for
parliaments.
ber of those who refused to handle
cargo on Sunday unless paid overtime. Judge Grant holds that he
was within his rights in this, and that
the C. P. R. must pay him tlie $8
they deducted from his wages because of his refusal to work on the
Sabbath. On the other hand, he dismissed the action brought by Green
against the C. P. R. for wrongful
dismissal, as he holds that they were
within their contract rights. As the
trial was a summary one there can
he no appeal from it. G. E. McCrossan appeared for the plaintiff and
J. E. McMullen for the defendants.
The case is one that affects about a
hundred men.
PUBLIC HIGHWAYS
Province of British  Columbia
NOTICE is hereby given that all
Public Highways in unorganized Districts, and all Main Trunk Roads in
organized Districts are sixty-six feet
wide, and have a width of thirty-
three feet on each side of the mean
straight centre line of the travelled
road. THOMAS  TAYLOR,
Minister of Public Works.
Department of Public Works, Victoria. B. C, July 7, 1911.    jyl8-ol8
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE.
NOTICE is hereby given that the
reserve of a parcel of land situated
on Graham Island, notice of which
appeared in the British Columbia
Gazette on the 25th of February,
1909, being dated 23rd February,
1909, is cancelled to permit of the
lands being acquired by pre-emption
only and for no other purpose
ROBT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Department of Lands,
Victoria, B. C, April 5th, 1911.
4-14—7-5
WATER  NOTICE
I, C. N. Pring, of Prince Rupert,
B. C, occupation broker, give notice
that ou the 12th day of July I intend tho apply to the Water Commissioner at his office in Prince Rupert, for a license to take and use
2.8 cubic feet of water per second
from Hot Springs on border of Lake
Lakelse in the Skeena Land Division of Coast District. The water is
to be taken directly from the Springs
and is to be used on Lot No. 3983,
for sanitary purposes.
Dated June 12th, 1911.
C. N. PRING,
6-13-lm Prince Rupert, B. C.
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
CoaBt—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that John Kirkaldy, of Lakelse Valley, oooupatlon
farmer, iu. 5 to apply for permission to purchase tht following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 120 chalus south
from the south end of Herman
Lake; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains.
JOHN  KIRKALDY.
Dated April 11, 1911. 5-5
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that I, V. W.
Smith, of Prince Rupert, occupation
contractor, intend to apply for permission to lease the following described foreshore:—Commencing at
a post planted about 2 miles in a
southerly direction from Port Simpson; thence northerly along high
water mark 25 chains and containing all foreshore between high and
low water mark.
V. W. SMITH,
Locator.
Staked 31st May, 1911. 6-6
NOTICE.
In the matter of an application for
the issue of a duplicate of the Certificate of Title for an undivided
one-half of Lot 883, Group I,
Cassiar District:
Notice is hereby given that it is
my intention to issue at the expiration of one month after the first
publication hereof a duplicate of the
Certificate of Title to the above
mentioned land in the name of William Jordan Larkworthy, which Certificate is dated the 30th day of September, 1910, and numbered 326R.
WILLIAM   E.   BURRITT,
DP'.rid Registrar.
Land Registry Office,
Prince Rupert, B. C,
May 26,  1911. J23
"We can hardly help dreaming
dreams when we think or what is
happepning round us, but I will limit
myself to two. I said al the beginning of my speech that I was confident no parliament in the world had
reached its final form. May wo not
here say that mine emphatically
than in any country in llii' world?
Un we- not see, in that Imperial Conference which is silting in our midst,
the germ of nn Imperial Council
which will represenl the imperial
aspirations of all parts of our Commonwealth, and which will represent
Hie unity or the Empire in a ilel'inte
and permanent form, and wlrlch then
will be the mosl. august parliament
that  the world  has ever seen?
"Do we not even see in our banquet,  nt  which,  for  the  first  time,
.- elected representatives from the
various Empire parliaments are
around us—do we not see in it the
germ of such a permanent convention where, without Infringing in the
slightest degree on the domestic concerns of any of the dominion parliaments, will yet be in cordial and
permanent co-operation in matters
of Imperial concern?"
NEED NOT WORK SUNDAYS
VANCOUVER—His Honor Judge
Grant has handed down judgment in
the test case brought by Sidney
Green, a deckhand, against the Canadian Pacific Railway and Steamboat
At the gathering of parliamentar-'Company.    Green was one of a num-
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE.
Notice is hereby given the the
reserve existing by reason of the
notice published in the British Columbia Gazette of the 27th December, 1907, over lands on Graham Island, formerly covered by 'limber
Licences Nos. Nos. 37055, 37056 and
37057, which expired on the 6th day
of November, 1909, and the lands
embraced within Timber Licence No.
37059, which expired on the 25th
day of January, 1909, is cancelled,
and that the said lands will be open
for pre-emption only under the provisions of Section 7 of the "Land
Act" after midnight on June 16th,
1911.
ROBERT A.  RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Lands Department,
Victoria,  B.  C,
9th March, 1911.
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that. Prince Rupert Sand & Gravel Company, Ltd.,
of Prince Rupert, occupation Industrial Company, intends to apply for
permission to lease the following described land:— Commencing at a
post planted at the Witness post on
the southerly boundary of Lot 4124;
thence southerly following the sinuosities of the shore line GO chains
more or less to southerly end of the
Island; thence easterly 10 chains
more or less to low water mark;
thence northerly 60 chains more or
less along low water mark; thence
westerly 10 chains moro or -eso to
the point of commencement.
PRINCE RUPERT SAND &
GRAVEL Co., LTD.
Per J. Y. Rochester, Agt.
Dated May 30, 1911. 6-2
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE, that 1, Minnie
Meredith, of Victoria, B. C, occupation a married woman, intend to
apply for permission to purchase the
following desoribed lands:—Commencing at a post planted about 40
chains distant and in a South direction from the Southeast corner of
Lot 1733; thence east 40 chains;
thence south 40 chains; thence west
40 chains; thence north 40 chains
to point of commencement, containing 160 acres more or less.
MINNIE   MEREDITH.
John Kirkaldy,
Agent.
Dated  February  20th,  1911.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Flora Orr, of
Masset, B. C, occupation spinster, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:
—Commencing at a post planted
about 40 chains south and 80 chains
east of the N. E. corner of Lot 35;
thence north 80 chains; thence west
80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains, containing 640
acres.
FLORA ORR.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated November 25, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Arthur Ives,
Sr., of Masset, B. C, occupation hotel
keeper, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:— Commencing at a
post planted about 40 chains south
and 120 chains east of the S. E.
corner of Lot 35; thence south 80
chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence west
SO chains, containing 640 acres,
ARTHUR  IVES, Sr.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 25, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte   1   ends.
TAKE NOTICE that Lynn Sutherland, of El Paso, Texas, U. S. A., occupation auditor, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 40 chains south
and 120 chains east of the S. E. corner of Lot 35; thence north 80
chains; thence east SO chains; thence
south SO chains; thence west 80
chains, containing 640 acres.
LYNN SUTHERLAND.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 25, 1910.
Skeena Land  Distrlct-
of Coast.
-D.sirlct
TAKE NOTICE that Joseph Edward Merryfield, of Prince Rupert,
occupation merchant, Intends to apply for permission to lease the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about 10 chains
nortn from the northea t corner of
Lot 33; thence west 1500 feet to
shore of Smith's Island; thence following shore in a southerly direction
1200 feet; thence east to shore of
De Horsey Island; thence following
shore in a northerly direction to
point of commencement.
JOSEPH EDWARD MERRYFIELD.
E. Spro, Agent.
Dated April 4, 1911. 4-7
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that I, Joseph
PastI, of Watson, Sask., occupation
farmer, intend to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:— Commencing at a
post planted about 30 chains In a
northerly direction from the N. B.
corner of Lot No. 2662 or T. L. No.
32598 at Lakelse Lake; thence north
20 chains; thence east 40 chains;
thence south 20 chains along shore
of Lakelse Lake; thence west 40
chains to point of commencement,
containing 120 acres, more or less.
JOSEPH PASTL.
George Hir, Agent.
Dated May 5, 1911. 6-3
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast Range 5.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles
James Gillingham, of Prince Rupert,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply for permission to purohase the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner of Lot 992 and
marked C. J. Gillingham's N.
Corner Application for Purchase; I,
C. J. Gillingham, intend to apply
for permission to purchase 320 acres
of land bounded as follows:—Commencing at this post; thence 80
chains south; thence 40 chains west;
thence 80 chains north; thence 40
chains east to place of commencement.
C.iARLES JAMES GILIINGHA.V
Robert Osborn Jennings, Agent
Dated  January 5, 1911.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Arthur W.
Nelson, of Chicago, 111., U. S. A., occupation clerk, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing
at a post planted about 4% miles
north of the S. E. corner of T. L.
40859; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence south
80 chains; thence west 80 chains,
containing 640 acres.
ARTHUR W. NELSON.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 27, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Wesley Singer, of Masset, B. C, occupation farmer, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing ai a post planted about 4 miles north of the N. W.
corner of T. L. 40859; thence south
80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence east
80 chains, containing 640 acres.
WESLEY SINGER.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 27, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that A. Walter De
Lisle, of Masset, B. C, occupation
farmer, intends to apply for permls-
sionu to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 40 chains south
and 120 chains east of the S. E. corner of Lot 35; thence south 80
chains; thence west 80 chains
thence north 80 chains; thence east
80 chains, containing 640 acres.
A. WALTER DE LISLE.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 25, 1910.
—THE—
Oliver
Typewriter
—FOR—
Seventeen Cents a Day
Please read the headline over
again. Then its tremendous significance will dawn upon you.
An Oliver Typewriter—the standard visible writer—the most highly
perfected typewriter on the market
—yours for 17 cents a day!
The typewriter whose conquest ot
the commercial world is a matter of
business history—yours for 17 cents
a day!
The typewriter that is equipped
with scores of such conveniences at
"The Balance Shift"—"The Ruling
Device"—"The Double Release"—
"The Locomotive Bte.se"—"The Automatic Spacer"—"The Automatic Tabulator"—"The Disappearing indicator"—"The Adjustable Paper Fingers"—"The Scientific Condi used
Keyboard"—all
Yours For 17 Cents a Day
Skeena   Laud    District—District    of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that Annie Kirkaldy, of Melville, Sask., occupation
married woman, Intends to apply for
P irmlssloii to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted 120 chains southwesterly from Herman Lake; tlience west
80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence north
80 chains, containing 040 acres more
or less.
ANNIE KIRKALDY.
John Klrkaldy, Agent.
Dated May 13, 1911. 5-19
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that George
Rudge, of Port Simpson, occupation
marble worker, intends to apply for'
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 2 miles in a
southerly direction from mouth of
Union Bay and on south side of Bay;
thence south 20 chains; thence west
20 chains; thence north 20 chains to
shore; thence following shore in an
easterly direction to point of commencement, containing 40 acres
more or less.
GEORGE RUDGE.
Lionel Crippen, Agent.
Staked 11th May, 1911. 5-23
For Job Printing of all kinds see
The Journal man.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Fred. A. De
Lisle, of Masset, B. C, occupation
farmer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 40 chains south
and 120 chains east of the S. E. corner of Lot 35; thence north 80
chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains, containing 640 acres.
FRED.  A.  DE  LISLE.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 25, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Frank Nelson,
of Chicago, 111., U. S. A., occupation
clerk, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following de
scribed lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about one mile north ot
N. W. corner of Application to Purchase G953; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence north
80 chains; thence east SO chains, containing 640 acres.
FRANK NELSON.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 25, 1910.
Skeena
;Land   District—District
Coast—Range V.
of
We announced this new sales plan
recently, just to feel the pulse of the
people. Simply a small cash payment—then 17 cents a day. That
is the plan in a nutshell.
The result has been such a deluge of applications for machines
that we are simply astounded.
The demand comes from people of
all classes, all ages, all occupations.
The majority of inquiries has
come from people of known financial
standing who were attracted by the
novelty of the proposition. An im-
presBive demonstration of the immense popularity of the Oliver Typewriter.
A startling confirmation of our belief that the Era of Universal Typewriting is at hand.
A Quarter of a Million People are
Making Money With
TAKE NOTICE that William H.
Hargrave, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation banker, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lanas:—Commencing at a post planted on the west
shore of Lakelse Lake, and about
1% miles distant and in a southwesterly direction from the S. W.
corner of Lot 3982, Skeena Land
District, District of Coast, Range V;
thence west 40 chains; thence south
80 chains, more or less, to the shore
of Lakelse Lake; thence following
the shore of said lake to point of
commencement, containing 160
acres more or less.
WILLIAM H. HARGRAVE.
Mancell Clark, Agent.
Dated 20th March, 1911.
GRAHAM ISLAND —"The surest
sign of the progress ot a town or
district Is Its newspaper—live, ao-
tlve, hustling." "Th* Manet Re-
Tier." Masset. Q.U.I
OLIVE??
The Standard Visible Writer
The Oliver Typewriter Is a moneymaker, right from the word "go!" So
easy to run that beginners soon get
in the "expert" class. Earn as you
learn. Let the machine pay the 17
cents a day—and all above that Is
yours.
Wherever you are, there's work to
be done and money to be made by
using the Oliver. The business world
is calling for Oliver operators. There
are not enough to supply the demand.
Their salaries are considerably above
those of many classes of workers.
"An Oliver Typewriter In
Eve y  Home!"
That Is our battle cry today. We
have made the Oliver supreme In
usefulness aud absolutely indispensable In business. Now comes the
conquest of the home.
The simplicity and strength of the
Oliver fit It for family use.    It is booming an  Important factor In  the
home training of young people.    An
educator as well as a money maker.
Our new selling plan puts the
Oliver on the threshold of every
home In America. Will you close
the door of your home or office on
this remarkable Oliver opportunity?
Write for further details of our
easy offer and a free copy of the new
Oliver catalogue.    Address:
R. C. BEAN
Prince Rupert Agent
General  Offices:   Oliver  Typewriter*
Building, Chicago, IU.
HISS HENNY WENNERSli, V
8WEDI3H SPECIALIST
Electric, racial and .Scalp treatment;
Scientific Massage treatment for
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circulation. Manicuring also Chlre-
pody work. •■ "■      '• ■■$ ■ ■
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/-.
^3fM
Friday, July 21,  1911
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
SUBMARINES TRIP
Long  Voyage   Undertaken    by
Vessels of the British
Navy.
Small
Made Run From Portsmouth to Hong
Kong  Without Any  Mishap
to  the  Craft
Submarines C36, C37, and C38—
though curiously enough they show
the numbers C66, C07, and CM.
which, it is explained, are their war
numbers—now lie here safe and
sound after their voyage of 900
miles from Portsmouth, writes the
Hongkong correspondent of the London Standard, and England may well
be congratulated that her navy possesses officers who can bring such
frail craft so far without accident,
and bluejackets who can endure and
make light of the conditions of life
on a submarine through the tropics.
After the vessels left Spithead it
was expected that they would hug
the shore, but they carried right
through the dreaded Bay of Biscay,
and proceeded tinder their own power as far as Gibraltar without any
untoward event. Life in the small
compass of a submarine is not very
entertaining, but the men, with the
true spirit of the British bluejacket,
contrived to make the most of things.
In one boat there were two gramophones and a fair supply of Caruso
records; in another there was a banjo, and in the other there were one
or two mouth organs, so that the
musical tastes of the crews were not
allowed to rust. All the cooking was
done on board by electricity. The
plates were heated electrically, and
the food was prepared hy the same
agency. From Gibraltar there was
a fairly long sail of about 900 miles
to Tunis, but the weather was all
that could be desired, and the African port was reached without any
incident  of note.
Three days were spent the*re, and
then rough weather was experienced,
and so great was the force of the
wind that when it caught even the
small surface of the conning towers
it made the boat keel over. However, the weather improved, and the
trio were able to set out for Malta
where a fresh supply of petrol waa,
obtained, and where only a short stay
was made. A glorious trip from
there to Port Said ensued. By this
time the men were becoming conscious of the heat, and electric fans
had to be kept going. At Port Said
the convoying cruiser Diana left the
Squadron, and the farewell was made
the occasion of a concert, which was
thoroughly enjoyable. The songs
were illustrated, and many topical
illusions were introduced on the
screen. The submarines had the un-
usal experience of being allowed to
go through the Canal at 12 knots.
Moreover, all traffic was stopped to
allow them to make the passage.
Suez was reached, and it seemed
as if there adventures were about
to begin, as a sandstorm was expected. They put into Port Tewfik, and
the boats were battened down and
the periscope covered. But nothing
occurred. The voyage was resumed,
and the Red Sea was entered. Here
the conditions were far from pleasant. A following sea came continually over the stern of the bridge.
Still the boats stood the great strain
thus put upon them, but in the rough
weather all the boats parted company, and they did not pick up each
other until past Perim. Two days
were spent at Aden, and then they
entered the Indian Ocean, which was
navigated with safety, though it was
there that Lieutenant Codrington
was washed overboard from C38, but
was picked up after he had been
ahout a quarter of an hour in the
water.
It was customary for some of the
men to enter a compartment on the
upper portion of the vessel and to
enjoy a bath as the submarine drove
through the water. If she dipped
the bather got more than he wanted,
but all the same the sensation was
cooling and pleasant. When Colombo
was reached tbe submarines, winch
had become rather rusty looking after their long sail, were painted
white, and the cruiser Highflyer
turned over her charge to the Monmouth. Four days were spent at
Colombo, and then the squadron resumed the voyage to Singapore, to
which port they made a good trip
By this time the men were becoming rather tired of the continuous
salt provisions. Singapore was left
on April 24, and despite the monsoon, when all had to batten down,
they made Hongkong on April 30
and entered the harbor in state, the
monmouth leading the three submarines, with the Pelorus and Flora
bringing up in the rear. Salutes
were fired, and they drew alongside
the camber. A few days were spent
in  airing  the ships, and  then they
dived 30 feet, after which they reported to the admiralty that they
were ready for service.
doth officers and men are proud
of the privilege they have had of
bringing the first summarines so unprecedented a distance, and the admiralty will doubtless feel pleased
that their experiment has proved so
satisfactory.
 o	
FOR   UNKNOWN   DEAD
Skeletons   of   Four   Britisii   Soldiers
Reburied  At Fort
Niagara
Impressive almost beyond description was the ceremony which took
place at Fort Niagara on the United
States side of the river recently, when
the remains of four British soldiers,
who were killed in the assault on the
fort by the British when It was taken
from the French In 1859, were re-
buried in one coffin in the old military burying ground which standso
outside the old fort, which is one of
the oldest In America. Last fa• 1,
while excavations were being made
for a new building just outside the
grounds the workmen unearthed
three skeletons and a number of
military buttons. Although nearly
eaten through by the,rust, Ihe buttons still bore the crest of the Kin's
Liverpool regiment, previously
known as the 8th King's. Another
skeleton was found ten days ago.
Instead of handing the remains
and buttons over to the museum,
Mayor Styr, who is in command of
the 29th'battalion of U. S. infantry
stationed at the permennnt barracks
at Fort Niagara, decided to have tiie
bones placed in a coffin and buried
by the Canadian troops In camp at.
Niagara-on-the-Lake and the United
States soldiers at Fort Niagara. It
was a sight which will not often he
seen, when six non-commissioned officers of the United States reguilar
army carried to the grave in the
quaint old cemetery, wrapped In a
Union Jack, the coffin containing the
remains of the British soldiers. Then
a company of American troops fired
three last shots over the grave into
which the coffin was reverently lowered.
In addition to General Cotton and
the entire headquarters staff from
the Canadian camp, 100 men were
detailed to participate in the general
procession, together with the ban 1
of the Toronto Army Service Corps
Several hundred visitors who are
here for the camp, also went across
the river, as well as many soldieri
who were not in the offlcal party.
As the general and staff landed at
the fort landing place a salute of 11
guns was fired by the United States
troops, while the officers and troops
stationed there stood to attention
to receive the Canadian visitors.
The general then Inspected the
United States regulars, after which
the solemn procession moved towards
the cemetery, the band playing the
"Dead March In Saul" with muffled
drums. As the troops marched
through the line of old trees and
the building erected more than 100
years ago every soldier who was not
in the parade, both Canadian and
American, saluted the two flags.
At the cemetery a hollow square
was formed by the troops and thi
staffs of the Canadian and United
States forces took their position near
the grave which had been dug between the graves of other unknown
soldiers killed In the war of 1812.
The full burial service of the Anglican church was read over the remains by Rev. S. R. Wood, chaplain
of the United States army; Rev. Major Chapp, of the 97th Algonquin
Rifles, and Rev. Major Baynes-Reed,
of the 9th Mississauga Horse, while
the band played "Nearer My God to
Thee," and the onlookers stood reverently by. At the conclusion of
the service the troops presented
arms, three volleys were fired ovel
the grave by Bcompany of the 29th
United States infantry and four Canadian trumppeters sounded the last
post.
 o	
"How Is your daughter getting on
with tier music?"
"Well, It isn't proper for me to
compliment my own girl, but several
of the neighbors have told me thnt
they often stay awake at night listening to her playing, so she must be
pretty good."
—, o	
An old darkey wanted to join a
fashionable city church, and the minister, knowing It was hardly the thing
to do, and not wanting to hurt his
feelings, told him to go home and
pray over It. In a few days the
darky  came  back.
"Well, what do you think of it
by this time?" asked the preacher
"Well, sah," replied the colored
man, "Ah prayed, an' prayed, an
de good Lawd he says to me: 'Ras-
tus, Ah wouldn't boder mah haid
about dat no mo. Ah've been trying
to get into dat chu'eh mahself fo'
de last 20 years and Ah done had
no luck."
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that James Mul-
lin, of Murdo, So. Dakota, U. S. A.,
occupation farmer, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands: — Commencing at a post planted on the
shore of Masset Inlet, about one
mile northeast of the mouth of the
Ain River; thence west 40 chains,
more or less, tj the eastern boundary of T. L. 35414; thence south
CO chains, more or less to the shore
of Masset Inlet; thence northeasterly along the shore to point of
commencement, containing 60 acres
more or less.
JAMES   MULLIN.
G.  S.  Mayer, Agent.
Dated Feb. 24th, 1911.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE t at J. E. Anderson, of Masset, B. C, occupation farmer, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted on the shore of Masset Inlet,
ahout two miles west of the S. W.
corner of T. L. 40787, thence north
80 chains; thence west 40 chains;
thence south 80 chains more or less
to the shore of Masset Inlet; thence
easterly along the shore back to the
place of commencement, containing
320 acres, more or less.
J. K. ANDERSON.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 25, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlote Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Wirt A. Stevens, of Chicago, 111., U. S. A., occupation civil engineer, intends to
apply for permission to purchase
the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on
the shore of Masset Inlet about one
mile northeast of the mouth of the
Ain River; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 40 chains more or less
to the eastern boundary of T. L.
35413; thence south along the
boundary of T. L. 35413 and
T. L. 35414, a distance of SO chains;
thence east 40 chains, more or less,
to point of commencement, containing 320  acres more  or  less.
WIRT   A.   STEVENS.
G. S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated Feb.  24th,  1911.
COAL MIXES ACT
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that I, Roy,
Chrisman, of Port Essington, B. C.
occupation prospector, intend to apply for permission to lease the following described land:—Commencing at a post planted ahout five
miles distant and in a southwesterly
direction from the point at the entrance to Captain Cove, Petrel
Channel, and on the northeast side
of McCauley Island; thence west 20
chains; thence south 40 chains,
thence east about 20 chains to shore
of Petrel Channel; thence northerly
along shore line of Petrel Channel
to point of commencement and containing eighty acres more or less.
ROY CHRISMAN.
Dated April 11, 1911. 4-25
Skeena    Land    District—District    of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, iLtends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of laud: —
Commencing at post planted 6%
miles N. E. of the mouth of the
White River and the junction of the
Naas, marked Chas. J. Gillingham's
S. E. Corner; thence 80 chains
North; thence 80 chains West;
thence 80 chains South; thence 80
chains East to point of commencement and containing 640 acres more
or  less
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles M. Huff, Agent.
Dated March 4, 1911. 4-18
Skeena   Land    District—District   of
Cassiar.
TAK.J NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land:—
Comencing at a pc t planted 7 miles
N. E. of the mouth of the White
River and the junction of the Naas,
marked Chas. J. Gillingham's S. E.
Corner; thence 80 chains North;
thence 80 chains West; thence 80
chains South; thence 80 chains East
to point of commencement and containing 6 40 acres more or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles M. Huff, Agent.
Dated March 5th, 1911. 4-18
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Commencing at a post planted 7 Vi
miles N. E. of the mouth of the
White River and die junction of the
Naas and marked Chas. J. Gillingham's S. E. Corner; tlience 80
chains North; thence SO chains
West; thence SO chains South;
thence SO chains East to point of
commencement and containing 640
acres more or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles M.  Huff, Agent.
Dated March 5th, 1911. 4-18
thence 80 chains North; thence 80
cliains west; thence 80 chains
South; thence 80 chains East to
point of commencement and containing  640  acres more or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles M.  Huff, Agent.
Dated March 4th, 1911. 4-18
Skeena    Land    District—District   of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect tor Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land:—
Commencing at e. post planted about
8 miles N. E. of the mouth of White
River and the junction of the Naas
River, marked Chas. J. Gillingham's
S. E. Corner; thence 80 chains
North; thence 80 chains West;
thence 80 chains South; thence 80
chains East to point of commencement and containing 640 acres more
or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles M.  Huff, Agent.
Dated March Oth, 1911. 4-18
Skeena    Land    District—District   of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land:—
Commencing at a post planted about
8 miles N. E. of th) mouth of White
River and the junction of the Naas
River, marked Chas. J. Gillingham's
S. E. Corner; thence 80 chains
North; thence 80 chains West;
thence 80 chains South; thence 80
chains East 1.0 point of commencement and containing 640 acres mo: i
or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles M. Huff, Agent.
Dated March 6th, 1911. 4-18
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that W. H. Fergu
son, of Prince Rupert, B. C, occupation civil engineer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:-—Com
mencing at a post planted about one
mile southerly, following the sinuosities of the shore line from the
southwest corner of Lot 104, Range
V; thence 20 chains west; thence 20
chains south; thence 20 chains west,
thence 20 chains south; thence 20
chains west; thence about 40 chains
south; thence along shore northerly
to point of commencement.
W. H. FERGUSON.
G. Hansen, Agent.
Dated April 22nd, 1911. 4-26
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast
TAKE NOTICE that F. T. Saunders, of Vancouver, occupation master
mariner, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands:— Commencing at a
post planted about 6 miles northwest of Love Inlet on the north
east shore of Pitt Island; thence
south 20 chains; thence west 40
chains; thence north to shore;
thence following shore in a southeasterly direction to point of commencement , containing 80 acres
more or less.
FRANK TAUNTON SAUNDERS,
Locator.
W. Hamilton, Agent.
Staked 17th, Feb., 1911.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Island.
TAKE NOTICE that Robert Fraser Ogilvle, of Vancouver, occupation banker, Intends to apply for
permission to purchase the folowing
described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 2 miles west of
the southwest corner of A. P. 12-
037; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains to
point of commencement, containing
640 acres.
ROBERT FRASER OGILVIE.
Arthur  Robertson,  Agent.
Dated Dec. 9, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that James G.
Crombie, of Prince Rupert, occupation auditor, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:— Commencing at a
post planted at the northwest corner, 55 chains east and 20 chains
south from northeast corner of Lot
1116 (Horry Survey), Coast DIst.,
range 5; thence 20 chalnB east;
thence 25 chains, more or less,
south to Angus McLeod Pre-emption; thence 20 chains west; thence
25 chains, more or less, north, to
post of commencement, containing
50 acres, more or less.
JAMES  G.   CROMBIE.
Fred Bohlen, Agent
Dated June 14, 1911.
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Or ^^si 11"
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. O,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Commencing at a post planted 7 %
miles N. E. of the mouth of the
White River and the junction of the
Naas, marked Chas. J. Gillingham's
S. E. Corner; thence 80 stains
North; thence 80 chains West;
thence 80 chains South; thence 80
chains East to point cf commencement and containing 640 acres more
or less
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles M. Huff, Agent.
Dated March 5th, 1911. 4-18
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for a
license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 64 0 acres of land: —
Commencing at a post planted about
S miles N. E. of the mouth of the
White River and the junction of the
Xaas, marked Chas. J. Gillingham's
S. E. Corner; thence 80 chains
North; thence 80 chains West;
thence 80 chains South; thence 80
chains East to point of commencement and containing 640 acres more
CHARLES  J.   GILLINGHAM.
Charles M. Huff, Agent.
Dated March 6th, 1911. 4-18
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that George Stanley Mayer, of Masset, B. C, occupation farmer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted on the east shore of
Tsu Skundale Lake; thence east 80
chains; thence south 40 chains, more
or less, to the north boundary of
T. L. 35413; thence west and south
along the boundaries of T. L. 35413,
to the shore of the Ain River; thence
northerly along the Shore, back to
the place of commencement, contaia-
Ing 500 acres, r.ore or 'ess.
GEORGE STANLEY MAYER.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 28, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotle Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Robert Cross,
of Masset, B. C, occupation farmer,
intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted on the east shore of Tsu Skundale
Lake; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains, to or near to the
S. E. corner of Lot 35; thence west
40 chains, more or less; thence
south 40 chains, more or less; thence
west 40 chains more or less, following the southern boundaries of Lot
35; thence south to the shore; thence
southerly along the shore back to the
place of commencement, containing
500 acres, more or less.
ROBERT  CROSS.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 28, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Qneen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Christina Orr,
of Masset, B. C, occupation married,
intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described
lands: —Commencing at a post planted about 40 chains south and 3 miles
east of the N. E. corner of Lot 35;
thence south 40 chains; thence west
80 chains; thence north 40 chains;
thence east 80 chains, containing 320
CHRISTINA ORR.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 25, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gilllngham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Commencing at a post planted 6v*
miles N. E. of the mouth of the
White River and the junction of the
Naas, and marked Chas. J. Gillingham's S. E. Corner; thence 80
chains Nortn; thence 80 cnains
West; thence 80 chains South;
thence 80 chains East to point of
commencement and containing 640
acres more or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles M.  Huff, Agent.
Dated March 4th, 1911. 4-18
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
TAKE NOTICE t'lu.t Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for a
license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Commencing at a post planted about
8 miles N. E. of the mouth of the
White River and the junction of the
Naas, marked Chas. J. Gillingham'fl
S. E. Corner; thence 80 chains
North; thence 80 chains West;
thence 80 chains South; thence 80
chains East to point of commencement and containing 640 acres more
or less.
CHARLES  J.   GILLINGHAM.
Charles M. Huff, Agent.
Dated  March  6th, 1911. 4-18
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Clara Orr, of
Masset, ft C, occupation spinster,
intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted about 40 chaius south and 80
chains east of the N. E. corner of
Lot 35; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence north
80 chains; thence east 80 chains, containing 640 acres.
CLARA ORR.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 25, 1910.
WATER NOTICE.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Merton A.
Merrill, of Masset, B. C, occupation
prospector, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted at the S. W. corner of
T. L. 40787; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south
80 chains, more or less, to the shore
of Masset Inlet; thence easterly along
the shore back to the place of commencement, containing 640 acres,
more or less.
MERTON A. MERRILL.
Dated Nov. 25, 1910.
Skeena   Land   District—District-   of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gilllngham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, Intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Commencing at a post planted about
8 miles N. E. of the mouth of White
River and the junction of the Naas
River, marked Charles J. Gillingham's S. E. Corner; thence 80
chains North; thence 80 chains
West; thence 80 chains South;
thence 80 chains East to point of
commencement and containing 640
acres more or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles M.  Huff,  Agent.
Dated March 5th, 1911. 4-18
Skeena   Land   Dislrict—District   of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gilllngham, of Prince Rupert, B. C.,|
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal nnd 1
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Commencing at a post planted Ct'ty
miles N. E. of the mouth of White
River and tha junction of the Naas,
marked Chas. J. Gillingham's S. E.
Corner; thence 80 cliains Nortli;
thence 80 chains West; thence 80
chains South; thence 80 chains East
to point of commencement and containing 640 acres more or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles M. Huff, Agent.
Dated March -Jth, 1911. 4-18
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Cassiar.
TAKE     NOTICE  that  Charles  J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation    contractor,    Intends    to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect   for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Commencing at a post planted    six
miles N. E. of the mouth of White
River and the junction of the Naas
River  on   Canyon    Creek,     marked
6-23 Chas. J. Gillingham's S. E. Corner
NOTICE is hereby given that an
application will be made under Part
V. of the "Water Act, la09," to obtain a licence in the Queen Charlotte Islands Division of Skeena District.
(a) The name, address and occupation of the applicant—Merton A.
Merrill, Masset, Q. C. I., B. C,
Prospector.
(If for mining purposes) Free
Miner's  Certificate No	
(b) The name of the lake,
stream, or source (if unnamed, the
description is)—I-ln-tsua Lake, Tsu-
Skundale Lake and Ain River.
(c) The point of diversion—At T
near the outlet ot Tsu-Skuudale
Lake into Ain River.
,d)     The  quantity  of  water  applied for (in cubic feet per second)
1,000.
(e) The character of the proposed works—Power Plant, Dam,
Flumes, etc.
(f) The premises on which the
water Is to be used (describe same)
-At or near the mouth of the Ain
River.
(g) The purposes for which the
water Is to be used—Generating
power.
(h) If for Irrigation, describe
the land Intended to be Irrigated,
giving acreage	
(I) If the water Is to be used for
power or mining purposes, describe
the- place where the water Is to be
returned to some natural channel,
and the difference, in altitude between point of diversion nnd point
of return—At or near the mouth of
the Ain River, about 100 feet below
point of diversion.
(j) Area of Crown land Intended to be occupied by the proposed
works—10 acres more or lesre.
(k) This notice was posted on
Ihe 28th day of November, 1910,
and application will be made to the
Commissioner on the 1st day of
June,  1911.
(1) Give the names and addresses of any riparian proprietors or
licensees who or whose lands arc
likely to be affected by the proposed works, either above or lielow
the outlet—Don't know of any.
(Signature)
MERTON  A.   MERRILL,
(P.   O.   Address)   Masse,,  B.  C.
NOTE.—One cubic loot per second is equivalent to 35.71 miner's
Inches.
Job  Printing of all  kinds  neatly
executed at the Journal Office.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Carl Nelson,
of Chicago, 111., U. S. A., occupation
draughtsman, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a
post, planted about 80 chains east
and 120 chains north of N. E. corner of Lot 35; thence south 80
chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence north 80 cliains; thence west
80 chains, containing 640 acres.
CARL NELSON.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated, Nov. 26, 1910.
Skeena   Land    DlBtrlct—District  of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that Freadrick
Madden, of Seattle, Wash., occupation laborer, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described land:—Commencing at a
post planted about two hundred feet
east of mile 77 on the south side of
G. T. P. Right-of-way; thence west
40 chains following the said Right-
of-way; thence south to bank of
Skeena River; thence east following
the sinuosities of said river until
due south of said post; thence north
fo point of commencement, containing 130 acres more or Icsb.
FRKADRICK  MADDEN.
Thos. L. Fay, Agent.
Dated April 27, 1911.
5-16
NOTICE.
A book is kept In the City Clerk's
Office in which to enter Ihe names
and addresses, etc. of citizens of
Prince Rupert desiring employment
on City work. All desiring employment should register nt once.
ERNEST A.  WOODS,
City Clerk.
Prince  Rupert   Private   Detective
Agency
N. McDonald, Manager
All kinds of legitimate detective work
handled for companies and Individuals.    Business strictly confidential.
P. O. Hoi MS — Phone 210
If yon want the honey
That romes from Ihe hive
Take ap the phone and
Call one, double five. PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Friday, July 21, 1911
prince Rupert journal
Telephone   138
Published twice a week on Tuesdays and Fridays from the office of
publication, Third Avenue, near
McBride Street.
Subscription rate to any point in
Canada, S2.0D a year;-to points outside of Canada, $3.on a year.
Advertising rates furnished on
application.
0.  H. NELSON,
Editor.
Friday, July 21,  lull
ELECTION   SIGNS
It Is <■ Idenl tho ■' any moment
the announcement ol a Dominion
election  maj  be made.    If Ihe elec-
ti akes  place  upon  a  dissolution
granted    before    the    redistribution
, 5Ui-e is put through ii musl of
iii i sslty be (oughl oul on the- reciprocity question,
Sir Wilfrid's one concern now
.- to i-e- '" pul upon the Opposition the responsibility of bringing
on an election at lie is time before
the readjustment of the seats.
Mr. Borden has taken the stand
all ailing that the electors should be
consulted before such an agreement
as Is proposed is entered into. The
principle he has put forward should
surely be one thai a Liberal gov-
ernmenl would be expected to endorse but the government at Ottawa
seems always to be counted upon to
run contrary to accepted Liberal dic-
trines and has refused to give the
electorate a chance to pass upon tlie
agreement, preferring to pass it in
the closing days of their parliamentary term.
The responsibility for creating Ihe
situation when an appeal may he
made upon the old distribution of
seats with the new one within sight
must rest with Sir Wilfrid and his
government. It was,they who framed
the pact and who attempted to force
it through the House without any
appeal to the people. With that government must rest the further responsibility if it is necessary to
appeal on the old lists.
FINANCES OF   PROVINCE
of the Campbell river. A very few
veins will elapse before the locomotive whistle will echo through the
interior valleys as trains thunder to
their destinations on the shores of
Nootka and Quatsina or onward to
Cape Scott, to connect with fast
steamers to the Queen Charlottes
Prince Ruperl and Stewart. In those
days, fast appropachlng, Victoria
will have two or tliree times its present population and will be on the
fair way toassuming her deserved
title- the London of Vancouver Island for im combination of circumstances can rub her of her supremacy. Other cities, Important and
flourishing, may arise, bul all vviii
contribute to her greatness and stability. All the signs of the limes
Indicate a marvelous expansion In
the trade of ihis port."
few
IVEH   DISTRICT
('.   i:.   McCainmon  of   Victoria   Will
Report Upon tin- Vast  Hinterland
of British Columbia
C,   10.   McCi linn   of   Victoria,  a
veteran railway engineer, known in
all sections of British Columbia, both
In connection with government and
private exploration, lias just received
Instructions from the provincial minister of lands, Hon. W. R. Ross, to
go in and thoroughly inspect that
vasl urea commonly known as the
Peace River district of British Columbia—that section of the province
lying to the east of tlie Rocky Mountains and at present forming part of
the Cariboo district, but certain at
no very distant date to be created
into a separate district to be known
as Peace River. Mr. McCammon is
now making his preparations for an
immediate departure to execute his
assignment. He will go via Edmonton and continue his examinations o
the country undeterred by the ad
vance of winter, inspecting as much
as possible of the forty million acres
which the province has available to
ofrer prospective settlers in that region. Preemptors are already going
in in considerable numbers and it
is the desire and the determination
ot the department to be in advance
of the preemptors' rush with a
knowledge or prevailing conditions,
so that all inquiries may be quickly
and satisfactorily answered as to this
new country so soon to be brought
into direct touch with clvilzation and
markets by the Grand Trunk Pacific
and Canadian Northern construction.
 o	
SPORTS
Hon. Dr. Young acting premier of
the province, speaking at the annual
meeting of the Victoria Board of
Trade as tlie representative of the
provincial government, supplemented
a report on the financial affairs of
of the province with the information
that in the preparation of conservative estimates for 1910 the government had arranged to exceed tits
estimated revenue for expenditures,
but in place of an estimated income
of $7,026,1100 the actual income of
the province was $10,481,419.61. Al
the commencement of his remarks
he asserted that there- was a spirit
of optimism afloat in the province
bul thai it was not half optimistic
enough, and at the end of his address he said the government was
i ol booming but building for the future.
Dr   Young slated thai the government assayer, Herbert Carmichael, is
about    to    leave   with   an   equipped
launch for the west coast, where he I
will   make'  tests  on   lines  that   have
been suggested by the Vancouver Is- j '» one of the greatest tennis
land Development League that 'tim- matches In the history of the Pacific
her contains certain lime properties Northwest,  .loe-  Tyler    of    Spokane,
A new incentive to the popular
sport of indoor baseball has been created by the anouncement made on
behalf of Mayor Manson at the last
meeting of the local league that he
linil donated a cup for competition
among the clubs.
Tlie meeting of the representatives
of the different clubs passed a resolution of thanks to Mayor Manson
for his kindness In donating a trophy.
Last evening the Brotherhood
Crescents met and del'eated the new
team, the Quill Drivers.
TKWIS CHAMPION
ex-champion ol' the northwest, regained the title, forfeited by the nonappearance of Bernard Schwengers of
Victoria, by defeating Brandt Wick-
ersham in the finals of the North
Pacific International1 Tennis Tournament at Portland, Oregon. The contest was played in the hot sun. It
required 68 games and three hours'
time-   iii   decide   Hie   championship,
Practically all the games went to
deuce anil it was a right from start
to finish ami anybody's victory till
Hie- end.
Ai a business meeting of the nsso-
clatlon a. Remington of olympia was
re-elcted  honorary president;  Judge
e conquer in thai  vast and  Lampman of Victoria, vice president;
unknown    territory    lying Cave-Brown-Cave of  Vancouver,   n.
from which cordite and other explosives could be manufactured. The
investigation is in the nature of an
experiment and if successful the government will establish an experimental station, wiili a view to providing
a means of livelihood for the settler
during the bind clearing part of his
career and providing a use for the
waste ti tuber.
The acting premier spoke al some
length on presenl E. & x. and
C. v R. railway construction, in
which connection he Bald:
"When the- lasl spike- has been
driven on them their builders, lueek-
Ing further afield, win discover new
worlds
lelllleesl
north of ihe Alberni canal and westlC,  secretary
(re-elected),     A   new
member, the Spokane Tennis Club,
was admitted to the association and
Victoria was chosen for the tournament In 1912,
Summary
Singles, finals—Tyler, Spokane,
defeated Wiekorshani, Portland, 6-3,
B-7,  4-6,   0-2.
Gorrill and Wick.ersham of Portland captured the doubles championship in the runners-up from Tyler
and Fulton of Spokane, taking two
out of three sets played. Owing lo
the excessive heat it was decided
between the competing teams thai
tlie best two out Of tliree should be
declared the winner, instead of three
out eif five, as is usually played,
Doubles, finals Gorrill and Wick-
irsham, Portland, defeated Tyler and
Fulton, Spokane, 6-8, 6-8,  6-1,
MR.    BORDEN'S   MESSAGE
In bis speeches throughout his
tour of the prairie provinces, .Mr.
Borden has given utterance in a
message thai stamps him as un hones! man anil a tearless leader, says
tlie Vernon News, lie has mel a
plain issue in a straightforward way
There has been no trace oi quibbling or equivocation in his pronouncement regarding the reciprocity
agreement. His unfaltering attitude
cannot fail to make for him friends
even among those who do nol agree
with his views on this important
matter. Absolute frankness and sincerity always command respect, and
his refreshing candor stands out in
marked contrast lo the studied ambiguity of Sir Wilfrid Laurier's utterances during his western tour last
year. He does not speak like a
man that can be coerced or cajoled
into relinquishing a position to which
he has advanced hy sound reasoning
and firm conviction. He met the
grain growers face to face, and confronted their sectional prejudices
with a presentation of National and
Imperialistic arguments that must
have made them do a little thinking.
In a word, he showed himself to
be a man. Not for the fraction of
a minute, he declared, would he accept the premiership of this country
if it were offered to him on the condition that he endorse the reciprocity
pact.
Mr. Borden is equally "explicit in
stating what he stands for as well
as what he opposes. He would hold
fast to the fiscal autonomy of Canada, and would not consent to have
our tariff framed for us at Washington. He would as far as possible
have our own natural resources utilized, and our own labor employed for
the production of all articles that
can be manufactured at home. He
would establish a permanent tariff
commission of able and independent
representative men, who should be
on guard against monoply, exaction
or oppression, and no political pressure of any kind should he allowed
to determine any item in the tariff.
To the prairie provinces he would
give control over their own public
lands. He would extend the boundaries ot .Manitoba in accordance
with the province's demand. He
would build the Hudson Bay Railway and would operate it by an independent commission under the government. State control and operation
of terminal elevators and state aid
of the chilled meat industry are other
articles In his programme.
Speaking at one of his western
meetings, he gave expression to some
reasons for his stand against the
proposed revolutionary change in our
fiscal policy which will well bear
repetition.
"We firmly oppose this agreement," he said, "because we believe
that if carried to Its logical conclusion It will lead to commercial union, and commercial union will inevitably end in political absorption.
President Taft has repeatedly referred to this agreement ns a 'commercial union.' In its present form
ii is noi an absolute commercial
union, but as the president has
shrewdly said, Il means nothing else.
No one questions the loyalty nf tho
Canadian people; nn one' questions
the devotion to Canada and the Empire',  bin   thai  man  is blind  or  fool-
*****i
Remember
That we
Import
Our Wines
* direct from Europe; and that
¥ no house in Prince Rupert can
•J equal them for quality. No
£ better can be bought anywhere
£ in  the  Province.     We  make a
* specialty   of
Family Trade
and guarantee satisfaction
We  also   carry   a   complete  *<
stock of other *
*
Liquors       1
Try a glass of
Cascade
Beer
*
The best local beer on the ¥
Y   market.
CLARKE BROS.
Christiansen & Brandt Bid.
*   Telephone 39        Third Avenue -+
fj, * ** * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
ish who cannot realize the meaning
of the proposals.
"What said Edward Blake in
1891? 'I believe that commercial
union can only come as an incident
or at least a well understood precursor  of  political   union.'
"What said Sir John A. Macdonald in 1891? 'Unrestricted reciproc
ity would, in my opinion, result in
the annexation of the Dominion to
the United States. Its friends in the
United States urge as the chief reason of its adoption that unrestricted
reciprocity would be the first step
in the direction of political union.'
"What said Sir Oliver Mowat in
1891? 'I am not willing that Canada
should commit national suicide. Are
you? I am nol willing that both-
our Britisii connection and our hope
of Canadian nationality shall be forever destroyed.'
"Hon. Samuel W. McCall—one of
the ablest and most farsighted statesmen of the continent—used these
words not many years ago: 'Add to
the tremendous influence that Is pulling the two countries together the
entangled web that is woven by reciprocity in trade and the inevitable
day will be more quickly reached
when the two countries shall be politically  one.' "
These, of course, are only a few
of the reasons advanced by tbe Conservative leader for his opposition to
this untimely and unwise attempt
lo Interlace our trade interests with
those of the- United States. Our
readers whu have followed the argu-
The British Columbia Company
LIMITED.
AUTHORIZED CAPITAL $100,000. ::   PAID UP CAPITAL $41,500
DIRECTORS:—Reginald C. Brown, President; J. C. Maclure, Vice-
President; H. E. Marks, Managing Director; Capt. E. Nash, William
McNair, R. A. Bevan, and F.  C.   Williams, Secretary.      :-:       :-:
INTEREST 4 PER CENT. DEPOSITS
This Company acts as Executors,  Administrators, Transferees and
Secretaries to Public Companies.    Commercial, Industrial and other
business propositions underwritten.    Issues  made  on   the
London and New York Stock Exchanges.
TIMBER, COAL, LANDS, and
COMPANY  ORGANIZATION
Head Office for Canndo, 203, 208, 210, 215 Carter-Cotton Building.
VANCOUVER, B.C.
61 Floor Varnish
Made
Especially
for Floors
Will not crack nor peel off.
Water will not turn it white.
Sold only in sealed cans.
Ask for sample panel.
If your dealer does not stock It write
The Staneland Co. Ltd
836-840 Fort Street, VICTORIA, B.C.
•!)
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1  High-Class....
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to choose from
El EHYTH1XG CLEAN AND FRESH
Goods for the Table to Suit the Most
Fastidious  Housewife
! MERRYFIELD'S
S       CASH GROCERY
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.J
ments against this pact which have
been advanced In these columns during the past few months will realize
that Mr. Borden has a splendid case;
and it Is not too much to say that
he is handling it in a masterly manner. His rectpion in the west has
been a surprise to his opponents, and
leaves no room for doubt that Ihere
is a strong sentiment against reciprocity growing up even in those
parts of Hie country where It was
expected to receive an almost unanimous support.
The Thompson
Hardware Co.
-Second Avenue-
Paints. General Hardware,
Oils, Stoves and Ranges.
2nd Avenue
Prince  Rupert,
B.C.
Real
Estate
INVESTMENTS
Real
Estate
JEREMIAH H. KUGLER   -   -   -
He Sells Buildings He Sells Contracts
He has Houses to Rent
He Buys Lots He Builds Homes
He Buys Leases He Loans Money
He Has Farms for Sale
He Sells Houses He Rents Stores
JEREMIAH H. KUGLER
Special Bargains in
List Your
Properties
with
Uncle Jerry
KITSELAS LANDS
FRANCOIS LAKE LANDS
LAKELSE LANDS
HAZELTON   DISTRICT   LANDS
BULKLEY VALLEY  LANDS
KISPIOX VALLEY LANDS
PORCHER  ISLAND  LANDS
KITSITMKALUM   LANDS
SAND,   GRAVEL   AND   MARBLE   DEPOSITS ?-****-.
mm
■ Ml
Friday, Ju'y 21, 1911
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
MARINE NEWS
IAISING SPOKANE
'The work of raising the steamer
Spokane will he accomplished atiiigh
water on Sunday, it i g expected.
Bullens have made all the necessary
arrangements and with the high tide
of that date It is expected the sunken
vessel will be brought to the surface.
NAVAL   POLICY
That Canada compares most disadvantageous^ uiih Australia in ils
beginnings of a naval policy, was the
statemenl made by Admiral William
llaiinaui Henderson, It. .V, who left
Victoria a tew days ago for Australia on tlie- li. M. s. Makura, Admiral Henderson said;
"Australia is a lung way In advance of other parts of the Empire
in its preparations for a navy, and
while Canada Is playing al the business, Australia has gone about the
formation of a navy in a businesslike
way. li is not because my brother
is planning the Commonwealth navy
that 1 say this. It is well known
that when Australia determined to
have a naval unit it consulted the
admiralty, and ascertained the best
pplan to follow. An admiralty was
then formed. Canada has not even
an admiralty. Then my brother, Admiral Henderson, was called, and he
sketched a programme providing foi
eight fleet units, eight battle squadrons, to be built within 22 years
with the necessary cruisers, destroyers and submarines for each unit.
The Commonwealth Is now spending
two million pounds a year in its
naval requirements.
"Of course it is in the Pacific
that Canada requires ils navy most.
I can't quite see what your advisors
have in view. They have (he Niobe
and Rainbow, bought from the admiralty, and I a mtold that anothei
cruiser, an old vessel, is to be bought
at scrap price for use as a training
vessel. Admiral Kingsmill was in
England when I left, I presume
arranging for the invitation to shipbuilders to prepare plants in Canada
for the construction of the vessels
decided upon.
"Canada does not seem to have
the same amount of fear of strife
in tlieh Pacific as that which prevails in Australia, and personally I
am not alarmed as to any grave danger in the position, at least from
Japan, Japan could not possibly take
any steps in the Pacific without the
consent of Great Britain and the Empire, and also of the United States,
for in my opinion Japan could not
stand up against the United States.
I am a great friend o fthe Japanese,
and I do not think that the rulers
of Japan have any such intentions
as many credit them with in the
Pacific. Japan has made great advances, going from the feudal system to a place as a world power within my lifetime, and there is no doubt
but that the nation will become, more
powerful, but I ilo not anticipate
danger to Canada or Australia from
Japan."
C. P.  R. ON   PACIFIC
Contracts have been awarded to
the Fairfield Shipbuilding and Engineering Company Of Glasgow for the
Immediate constructon of two large
Empress liners for the Pacific trade
of the C. P. R., to be ready to enter
service out of tbe ports of Victoria
and Vancouver to the Orient at the
close of next year. The two steamers will he of 16,000 tons register
much larger than any vessel now
employed on the Paciflcz, and they
will he fi70 feet long, with engines
giving a sea speed of eighteen knots
an hour. This speed would enable
tlie vessels to make- the voyage between Yokohama and Victoria In ten
days. An average speed of eighteen
knots an hour between Yokohama
aud this port would, without delays
allow of tin- trip being made in !)
days is hours and 26 minutes, The
fastest time that has been made
across the Pacific is 10 days 10
hours, made twelve years ago by the
Empress of Japan.
The anticipated announcement of
the construction of the new Empresses Is official, having been made
hy William T. Payne, manager of the
Pacific service of the C. P. R., prior
to his departure for his headquarters
in Yokohama on the Empress of
China.
"The Canadian Pacific officials
have contemplated, for some time
past, changes to improve our transpacific service," he said. "The Increase In freight and passenger traffic, even during the last few months,
has made Imperative the securing of
increased transportation facilities.
"Plans which have been under advisement for some time resulted recently in the awarding of contracts
lo  the   Fairfield   shipbuilding  Com
pany of Glasgow one of the famous
firms along the Clyde, for the immediate construction of two new boats
for the Canadian-Oriental trade.
"The vessels, which will also be
known as- Empresses, are specified
as boats of about 15,000 tons register; they will be 570 feet long and
have a speed of eighteen knots an
hour.
"Insize they are a trifle large?
than the Atlantic Empresses, and will
have accommodation for 200 first
cabin passengers and 6,000 tons of
freight each. The engines will lie
of lil.iiiiii io 17,000 horsepower, and
the fuel used will be oil, although
coal huriiin gequlpmenl will be installed for emergency use. The new
liners win materially decrease the
running time from Vancouver ti
Yokohama.
"A feature of the saloon accommo)
elation will b/.e the size and equipment of the staterooms, none or
which will contain more than twe
berths. Several will he fitted with
only mil' berth, and there' will also
I"' suites on the vessels for private
parties. There will also he Increased
protection of the shelter and promenade decks against wind and spray.
"The new Pacific Empresses, while
of 500 tons more register than the
Atlantic Empresses, will be the same
length as the Empress of Ireland and
Empress of Britain. These vessels
are 570 feet long with a beam of
65.6 feet. The largest steamer now
in the transpacific trade is the Minnesota of the Hill line, which is of
13,324 tons register. This vessel is
slow in comparison with the present
Empress steamers, however. The
Empresses, which have been in the
service for over two decads, have
been found too small in their freight
carrying capacity for the trade, their
carrying power being sma'l."
Other Lilies' Improvements
The addition of the two fast and
large Empress liners next year is not
the only improvement in the services plying across the Pacific contemplated for that year. The Nippon Yusen Kaisha has under construction at Japanese yards the first
two of six larger steamers for Its
transpacific line, and the Osako Sho-
sen Kaisha, the opposition Japanese
line, is understood to be negotiating
for the steamers America Maru and
Nippon Maru, recently retired from
the Toyo Kisen service, to improve
the service operated by that com
pany.
The proposed Chinese line will be
another factor in the transpacific
trade before long. News was given
some days ago of the arrangement
for taking over some steamers of
the Dollar line b ythe Chinese government to operate them in a subsidized service similar to that of the
N. Y. K. line. Although credited
with the invention of the mariner's
compass, China has hitherto been
one of the most backward or maritime countries. Signs of greater activity are now, however, apparent.
These efforts are naturally by no
means welcomed by several of the
steamship lines trading in the Far
East, and the North German Lloyd,
in particular, is beginning to feel
their effect on the Bangtese Swato
route. The results there have been
unsatisfactory, and in spite of a re-
cent visit of Herr Heineken, director
general of the Bremen concern, to
the scene of operations, the rate cutting still  continues.
, o	
OX   LARGER  SCALE
Operation  on   Big Thing   Mine  Is  to
Be  Increase at
Once
H. W. Vance, general manager for
the various mining properties in Car-
cross and Windy Arm vicinities, ac-
conipanied by Mrs. Vance, has returned to tbe north from Seattle, to
wrich place he went to purchase additional machinery to be used Sn
operating the properties, principally
iIn- llig Thing group, which is now
being exploited on a large scale, and
on which a tuiinte lately driven on
tin- 1,400 foot level has revealed a
vast body of ore, proving it to he,
beyond all conjecture, the largest
largest body of medium grade ore
ever revealed in the north.
Colonel Conrad, who is spending
the summer at Carcross, and who
lately visited Whltehorse, informed a
Star representative while here that
It is the intention to not only work
the property all summer, fall and
winter, but to increase the force to
150 men and continue it at that number Indefinitely.
The Yukon government is constructing a substantial road to the
mine from Carcross and the company
has already purchased a traction
caterpillar freighter for the purpose
of transporting the output of the
mine to the depot, a large number
of teams having been engaged at
the same work for the past several
months. Later it is proposed to connect, the mine with the railroad by
an aerial tramway.
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Write  for Catalog P19
The Canadian Fairbanks Co., Ltd.
101-107 WATER STREET
Local Agent—F. M. DAVIS
VANCOUVER,  B. C.
-  PRINCE RUPERT
THE CONTINENTAL TRUST COMPANY, LIMITED
Authorized Capital    $500,000
Officers:
WILLIAM  T.  KERGIN, M. I)., Pres.   DAVID    H.    HAYS,   First  Vice-Pres.
IM. J. HOBIN, 2nd Vice-Pres. & Mgr. JAY   KUGLER,   Secretary-Treasurer
C.  B.  PETERSON, Ass't Manager
; Executor and Administrator Receiver or Assignee
Fiscal Agents Trustees
Real   Estate anil   Insurance
Registrar and Transfer Agent l'"'"1 I'"m,s and Mims
Agent for Cure of Real Estate Escrow Agents
i   Trustee Under Mortgage's anil Deeds ol' Trusl Collections
SAVINGS DEPARTMENT
4 per cent on Deposits        SAFE DEPOSIT VAULT AND BOXES
We will be pleased to answer any Inquiries regarding Investments in
Prince  Rupert and  Northern British Columbia.
THE CONTINENTAL TRUST COMPANY, LIMITED
SECOND AVENUE
*.;..;. * * * * * * * * * * * * * * »> * * * *** *•- -*•
* *
* News of the Province     %
* t -j
HEAVY STREET WORK
VICTORIA —With a total o(
approximately 1,000 men engaged in
civic works, independent of those
employed hy contracting firms doing
city jobs, and a monthly payroll of
approximately $66,000, Victoria is
making a new record for activity
in carrying out works of improvement. The payroll is the largest in
the history of the city, it is said,
and the number of men employed on
the day labor system is also near
the record if not up to it. With the
fine weather, work on sewer laying,
street construction, sidewalk laying
and water works, together with many
other odd jobs which are under way
and require a large number of men,
the arrears of work, some of which
has been carried over from previous
years, are being rapidly overtaken.
In addition the paving work now
under way is calling for the employment of a large force of men. Never
before in the history of the city has
the same activity prevailed. Sewer
construction alone, including work
on surface drains, calls for the engagement of 2 5 gangs or approximately 500 men. Now that, the new
sewer loan bylaw has been passed,
appropriating ample funds for this
work, no time is being wasted in
pushing forward the project as fast
as possible. About 100 workmen
are engaged on sidewalk work, a
large amount of which must be carried through this year. The balance
of the men is made up of the gangs
employed on boulevard construction,
boulevard maintenance, water works
construction and street work on Oak
Bay avenue, View street, and other
thoroughfares which are being got
in readiness for paving or being Improved by the city. The payroll for
the month for employees other than
water works gangs amounts to about
$55,000, while the expenditure on
water works construction is at a rate
of about $11,000 a month.
any other race than white men can
assimilate with the whites, mingle
freely and intermarry and adopt the
customs and language of the white
race, they should he barred. We
know this to be practically impossible."
Alderman H. M. Fullerton declared
the Hindu came to this country to
work for what he could get and take
his savings back to India. While
the Hindus had fought for the Empire and every white man appreciated
it, still he personally stood for a
white British Columbia. He moved
that city work he restricted wholly
to white men.
DEATH OF THOS. EARLE
PRINCE Rl PERT, B. C,
mill i—i^——
vm
Double Weekly Service
S.S. PRINCE RUPERT & S.S. PRINCE GEORGE
Sail for Vancouver,  Victoria  and  Seattle
Mondays nml Fridays nt 8 a.m.
Keer STEWART Thursdays and Sum!
lys 8 a.m.
Special reduced fare Sunday's boat $9.50
return,   Including   meals   nml   In-iihs.
S.S. PRINCE ALBERT lor Port Simpson,   Naas   River,   Mnsset and
Naden  Harbor,   Wednesdays, 1 P.M., and for Queen Charlotte
Island  points,  Saturdays,  1   P.M.
RAILWAY SERVICE TO COPPER    RIVER,     mixed     trains  from
Prince   Rupert   Wednesdays and  Saturdays,   1   P.M.;   returning  Thursdays   and   Sundays, 5:20 P.M.
THE GRAND TRUNK RAILWAY SYSTEM, connecting with
trains from the Pacific Coast, operates a frequent and convenient
service of luxurious trains over its DOUBLE TRACK route between
Chicago, Toronto, Montreal, Quebec, Halifax', Portland, Boston,
New York and Philadelphia.
Atlantic  Steamship bookings arranged via all lines
Full information and tickets obtained rrom the office of
A. E. McMASTER
Freight and Pasenger Agent, G. T.  P. Wharf.
AGAINST   HINDIS
VICTORIA—Thomas Earle, an old
timer of this city and at one time
one of its most promient citizens,
passed away at the family residence.
1461 Fort street, last evening after
an illness of two or three weeks'
duration. Mr. Earle had been suffering from ill-health for the last three
or four years and his death was not
unexpected. He is survived by a
widow, one son, Walter, and two
daughters, all of whom reside at
home. Mr. Earle was born in Lans-
down, county of Leeds, Ontario, on
September 23, 1837. He was the
youngest son of the late William
Earle, who emigrated from Ireland
during the early part of the last
century and was among the first settlers in western Ontario. Mr. Earle
was educated in his native place and
after gaining a thorough knowledge
of mercantile pursiuts opened a general store in the town of Brockville,
which he continued to conduct till
he left Ontario for British Columbia
in 1862. In the spring of ISO:!, he
went to the Cariboo district aiul
mined for two seasons on Williams'
creek without, however, having much
success. He returned to Victoria in
1864 and entered business as a railway contractor and later a wholesal
merchant. For 16 years he sat in
the House of Commons at Ottawa as
a Conservative member from Victoria.
STORAGEJ
Household Goods and Baggage •:
given careful attention.    .   <
Forwarding,   Distributing   and •:
Shipping Agents i
TRANSFERERS \
Prince    Rupert    Warehousing •
and   Forwarding   Co.
First   Ave.,   near   McBride   St.
DOUGLAS SUTHERLAND,
Manager.
P. O. Box 007 Phone 202
VICTORIA—If the unanimous
opinion of the city council as voiced
at a recent meeting goes for
anything, Hindus will not be allowed
to labor on any civic works, either
those done by day labor or under
contract, This applies even if the
Hindus are willing that none of their
nationality shall work for less than
the standnrd wage paid hy the city.
This decision was voiced following
a discussion Introduced by Mayor
Morley, who stated that a number
of Influential gentlemen of the city
had approached hi nirelativo to the
securing by Mimliis of work on city
works. It was represented, the mayor
staled, thai as Ihe Hindus are British subjects and have fought side
by side with the British in war they
should be allowed to work side by
side with white workmen in time's
of peace. It was further represented
to the mayor that as the Hindus are
recognized hy the Imperial government as citizens of the Empire, the
stigma which rests upon them under
the city regulations, classing them
with other Orientals, should be removed. The friends of the Hindus
were willing that It should be understood that the Hindus should not
be permitted to work for less than
the white man or in any way seek
to reduce the rate of wages.
"I am bringing this to your attention, for consideration," said the
mayor. "As a matter of fairness to
citizens of the Empire we ought to
give it thought. But It should be
provided that until an alien race or
GRAND HOTEL
WORKINGMAN'S HOME
25c
Rooms 50 Cents
Spring Beds, Clean
White Sheets
Excursions!
Let us tell you all about the cheap
ROUND TRIP EXCURSIONS
to all Towns and Cities in Eastern
Canada and United  States
Via
The Great Northern
Choice of Return Route
Tickets to the Old Country by all
Lines. Take any Steamer from
Prince Rupert.
ROGERS STEAMSHIP AGENCY
Phone 110 Second Ave
Prince Rupert, B.C.
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY CO.
B. C. Const S. S. Service
Best in Town for the Money
FIRST AVE. AND SEVENTH ST.
J. Goodman, Proprietor
fr^tk^
% The Discovery of Chloroform |
* .*.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
Sir .lames Young Simpson, the discoverer of the anaesthetic properties
of chloroform, was horn on June 7
1X11, at Bathgate, in Linlithgowshire,
the youngest of the seven of the village baker. Sulphuric ether had been
first used as an anaesthetic in surgery in IS 16, and Dr. Simpson de-e
ii-rinini'd, as soon as a suitable case
occurred to test Its efficacy in sub-
dulng the pains of childbirth. lb
first ii-e el it fur this purpose on January lit, 1847; ami although ii more
than answered bis expectations, lie
though! lhat sonic still better agent
for tin- suppression of sensation
mlghl possibly he found, and determined to experiment upon hlmsell
wiih a variety of volatile liquids supplied to bom by chemists. After many
disiippopintnients, a trial was made]
of the techloride of formyle, which
had been suggested by Mr. Waldle
of Liverpool, bul had been at first
rejected as too heavy. On the night
of November -I, 1S47, Dr. Simpson
and his two assistants, Dr. George
Keith and Dr. Matthews Duncan, sat
at a table, each of them provided
with a tumbler Into which a portion
of the teri'hloride had been poured
and from which they inhaled as they
conversed. They were all agreeably
surprised by the pleasurable sensations arising from the new agent;
and their next conscousness was that
of rinding themselves on the floor,
more or less under the table at which
they had  been sitting,  bin   in other
respects uninjured. The Inhalation
was repeated many times that night,
and the new drug was administered
to Simpson's neice, .Miss Alice Petrie, I
under the supervision nf the three!
doctors who had themselves been the
first subjects. The chemical name
was soon abandoned for the simpler
"chloroform," under which the preparation become universally known
and used; and one of the greatest
discoveries of modern times wai
practically complete. Of the suffering which chloroform has prevented
of tlie operations which it has.rendered possible, and of the lives which
It has saved it would now be super-
flops to speak; but many stories are
tulil uf the opposition which its erne
ploynieiit in childbirth al first e.-xcit-
i'il, and which was supposed, by many
of those who took part in it, lei be
of a ■■religious" character, it wai
nut until Queen Victoria hail consult
i'il Silllpseili em the- slllejc.i, and hail
herself taken chloroform during a
conflmnent, thai tin- clamor nf a]
section nf tin' clergy began to give
way before tin- teachings nf experience. Simpson's combative spirit
plunged him iiiin the thickest of the
fray, ami his varied knowledge rendered him ns much al home »i'li Its
theological as with its physiological
aspects.
So long as anaethesia is tin- handmaid of surgery, Simpson's fame '■annul die; but Ms experiments wit
anaesthetics formed only a small pari
eif his professional and other actlvl
ties. He was essentially a man nf
genius in the Hue sense of the word:
a man whose mind threw out brilliant flashes of side light upon many
Bubjects, ami whose Intuitions in
many eases only just missed being
great discoveries. As a physician he
was of ihe highest type, giving himself    without    slim   lo   tl •iluous
work of liis lulling and un his death,
in ist"i. leaving behind him a deservedly he-loved and honored name.
Famous
Princess
Line
Princess May
Monday, July 24, at 9 a. m,
SOUTHBOUND FOR
Vancouver, Victoria,
AND
Seattle
J. G. McXAB,
General Agent
Free Employment
Office
For all kinds of help. Cooks, waiters, dishwashers, hotel porters, all
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up 178 or call at the
FREE EMPLOYMENT OFFICE
GRAND HOTEL
Headquarters for Cooks and Waiters
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for prices.
PHONE 11(1 PHOXE  110
r
For Neat Job Printing
see the Journal Man
Tel. 138
J
i
* PRINCE  RUPERT JOURNAL
Friday, July 21, 1911
BALFOUR'S WARNING
British Statesman's Views on the Effect
of  the Reciprocity
Pact.
The Question of Treaties for the Future Will Enter Into the
Proposition
The Right Hon. A. J. Balfour,
speaking at a dinner given in celebration of the birthday of tlie Right
Hon. Joseph Chamberlain, said that
everything that happened in Canada
and the Unee.ed States, everything
which was happening at the present
time, and everything that was going
to happen with regard to the great
complex treaties, was going to cause
incomparable trouble to the Britisii
foreign office in the future, and the
abrogation of those treaties, he affirmed, was going to make Britain's
free trade policy totally impossible.
"I don't say," asserted Mr. Balfour, "that this was foreseen by Mr.
Chamberlain, as it could not possibly have been foreseen by anyone,
but if the policy what he advocated
had been adopted in time, and If we
as a nation, had understood our opportunities and had realized that a
policy of imperial preference would
have saved us from these complication, and had taken those opportunities, then the difficulties which are
undoubtedly coming upon us could
not have occurred."
Great Harm Done
"Whatever happens lo the reciprocity treaty in Canada," continued
Mr. Balfour, "please remember that
whether the treaty passes the Canadian parliament or whether it fails
to pass, the mischief lias been done,
and our groat Dominion statesmen
have begun to realize how extraordinarily they are hampered, and how
they are going to be hampered in
all their technical relations by what
seems to be technical and unimportant things. The different interpretations the United States chooses to
put on the most favored nations
clause from that which all other nations put upon it; that simple formula
indicates the complex international
difficulties of which we already see
the beginning and of which even the
most farsighted of us can by no
means see the end.
Not Too Late
"Even now," went on the speaker,
"if the reciprocity treaty were
thrown out, and if the Mother Country saw some way to that kind of
an arrangement, Mr. Chamberlain so
so ardently desired, it would be possible to carry out to the full all the
advantages he foresaw and avoid all
the perils which beset any course rigidly and uncomprisingly directed
upon the old line ot so-called orthodox free trade, an old system which
must go."
 o	
YOUR OWN COAT OF ARMS
Anybody   May   Have   Heraldic   Emblems by Simply Picking It
Out and  Using It
Those in this country who have
pretended to a knowledge of this sub-
■ ject have generally treated it as
though armory were an exact and
settled science governed by certain
fixed and rigid laws of world wide
application, says the Boston Transcript. The regulations these learned
ones have set forth as the guide in
these matters are found upon examination to be almost Invariably the
rules of the present English College
of Arms, with some additions for
which no precedent can be found in
England.
As the college has no shadow of
authority of any name or nature outside of England and Wales (not even
in Scotland or Ireland or the colonies) and as the practice, custom
and rules of Ihe officers of arms In
other parts of the kingdom are radically different from the English heralds and us each of the Continental
nations act independently, it becomes
perfectly apparent that such a thing
as a uniform system of heraldy can
have nn existence.
Armorial bearings may be assumed
ti. e., created at pleasure) by the
bearer or they may be the grant of
a monarch or great noble or of a herald acting under the monarch or
noble. In all countries arms were
first assumed by the hearer; arms
by grantj of king or lord came later,
but in most countries private assump
Hon was still permitted. This right
exists in England, If for no other
reason, because the power to prevent
the bearing of sucharms is not, as
some claim, vested in the crown, but
in parliament. Britain is not an absolute monarchy.
Only one king ever presumed to
assail this privilege of every Englishman, Henry VIII, "an unlawful
encroachment upon the rights of his
subjects." Some decrees of the
crown restricting the arms to be exhibited on certain occasions of military display have been distorted by
the advocates of the herald into the
assertion of authority by the king to
govern the use of arms by the individual. These have no bearing
upon the subject for there is no pretence to contro' the display of family
arms in private houses, in churches,
on seals or tombstones.
In Germany it is lawful for every
citizen to assume a coat-of-arms. It
is, however, forbidden to assume a
coat-of-arms which is already in use
hy another family. The same rule
obtains  in  Austria.
There is not even this restriction
in England. A man may take the
arms of the family upon which he
Ih inks lie is descended or he may
devise a new coat for himself, and
upon the payment of a yearly two
guinea fee to the inland revenue may
bear those arms upon his carriage,
upon his plate, his bookplate and his
signet   ring.
Another man may go to the college and upon payment of the fees
there exacted obtain a grant of arms,
yet he cannot make use of these arms
in any of the ways mentioned until
he pays for the inland revenue license
like his neighbor.
The law makes no distinction between arms of assumption and the
grants of the college.
 o	
OPPOSED TO THE PACT
French Investor Warns the Canadians
Against the Reciprocity
Agreement.
The Financial Situation Will Be Better if Country Remains as at
Present
With a line of Crusaders, marshals
of France, embassadors and Knights
cf Hie Golden Fleece on his ancestral
tree looking with pride upon his
spirit of ultra-modern enterprise and
—perhaps a bit too democratic quest
for gold—Prince Francois de Croy,
accompanied by the Princess de Croy,
has come to British Columbia from
La Belle France, to look in person
after the financial interests of his
family in this country, which are reported to be valued in millions, and
are still growing in scope and importance.
Prince de Croy, whose family has
branches in Austria, Germany and
Belgium, comes from the ancestral
seat of the House of Croy in Northern Prance, where the Ville de Croy,
near Amiens, bears proudly his family's name. The Croys, while aristocratic in lineage, have long ago forsaken noble pastimes for more ple-
bian—and more lucrative—pursuits
until today their financial sagacity
is on a par with their ancestors'
achievements.
Prince de Croy is also a captain in
the 147th Infantry regiment of his
country, having been advised of his
promotion from a lieutenancy since
his departure from France about two
months ago.
"We arrived here from Paris via
New York, Chicago, St. Louis and
San Francisco on Sunday evening,"
said the prince, in speaking of his
movements to a newspaper man in
the city of Vancouver, "and while we
were greatly impressed with the large
cities of the States, we must confess than the western spirit of British Columbia reminds us more of
the Bohemian atmosphere of France
than any other part of the country
we have seen. Stanley Park Is very
beautiful and pleases us more than
New York's famous Central Park or
San Francisco's widely heralded Golden Gate Park. In fact, the princess
and I are agreed in our preference
lor British Columbia and Vancouver."
Turning to the more serious subject ot finance, the prince, as representative of his family, being largely Interested in C. P. R. stocks and
other listed on 'change, remarked
that French capital did not make any
mistake in speculating on Canada's
future. "One can see lor oneself,"
remarked the prince cautiously,
"that Vancouver has more than doubled its population in 'ess than ten
years and there is too much money
involved in the present prosperity
of this city to permit of a serious
decline. I am here chiefly to look
out for further outlets for investments of my family's capital and
since I have conversed with local
men of affairs and looked Into conditions a little myself, I am frank
to admit that I shall recommend
more extensive participation in British Columbia's activities on the part
of my family.    .
"If you can only keep from forming a commercial alliance with the
United States, such as a reciprocity
treaty    between    Canada   and    that
Anheuser-Busch's
3UDWII518
t?mp
Budweiser
Its sale in many lands is due entirely and solely
because of its surpassing Quality and Purity. Its
nutritious properties come from the choicest Northern
Barley and its tonic properties from select Saazer
Bohemia Hops—its in a class by itself.
#*t
Bottled only {with corks or crown caps) at the
Anheuser-Busch Brewery
St. Louis, Mo., 15. S. A.
North B. C. Liquor Co.
Distributors
Prince Rupert B. C.
**&&£:
country would constitute, you will
have no trouble in attracting foreign
money, but I am afraid that any
pact with any other than your
Mother Country would prove a boomerang in the long run. Great Britain
is to day on the eve of a political
crisis and a change in government
might mean the long deferred establishment of an 'imperial preference,'
which would naturally make Canada
a most important factor in the shaping of England's commercial policy,
and it would therefore not be well,
in my opinion, to do anything at this
moment which would re-act to the
detriment of the commercial plans
in store for the entire British Empire. The guarantee of the entire
Britisii Empire for commercial stability is, after all, more acceptable
to foreign capital than that given
by the Dominion alone, though I do
not mean to reflect upon the wisdom
and foresight of the able statesmen
guiding the affairs  of  Canada."
You Can Avoid This
by sending your Clothes to the
PIONEER  STEAM  LAUNDRY
There are Many
Reasons Why
'■"'Mi    IT  IS  TO  YOUR  INTEREST
We do first-class work and
are careful with your Garments. We can do your work
and return it within 48 hours
if necessary. We call for your
laundry and return It to you.
Should anything be lost or misplaced we will make it satisfactory.
When your Laundry goes to the Chinks there are many drawbacks. When you send it to us your money helps pay WHITE
LABOR.
PIONEER STEAM LAUNDRY
TIDES AT PRINCE iRUPERT, JULY, 1911
HIGH WATER
LOW WATER
DATE   AND   DAY       | TIm0| Ht| Time| Ht|| Tlme| Ht | Time| Ht
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
Saturday  .
Sunday.    .
Monday   .
Tuesday   .
Wednesday
Thursday  .
Friday.
Saturday  .
Sunday .   .
Monday  .   .
Tuesday.   .
Wednesday
Thursday  .
Friday.    .
Saturday  ,
Sunday  .   .
Monday.   .
Tuesday .  .
Wednesday
Thursday .
Friday.    .
Saturday  .
Sunday .   .
Monday.   .
Tuesday.   .
Wednesday
Thursday .
Friday.    .
Saturday  .
Sunday.   .
Monday.   .
44
42
50
:06
:21
:28
:22
:09
■17
:54
:30
:06 :
:43 :
:21
:01
:46
:42
:49
:14
:38
:48
:49
•26 :
:17 :
:06 :
:53 :
:40 :
:28
:18
19.7
17:47
18.9
11:15
3.7
18.1
18:39
18.4
16.6
19:33
18.0
0:49
7.9
15.6
20:29
17.8
1:58
7.7
15.3
21:24
17.11
3:10
7.2
15.4
22:14
18.3
4:14
6.4
15.9
22:58
18.8
5:05
5.5
16.4
23:39
19.3
5:49
.4.7
12:50
17.0
6:28
4.0
19.8
13:26
17.5
7:03
3.5
20.2
14:01
17.8
7:36
3.1
20.4
14:35
18.1
8:08
2.9
20.4
15:08
18.2
8:41
2.9
20.2
15:40
18.3
9:15
3.0
19.8
16:13
18.4
9:50
3.6
19.2
16:48
18.4
10:27
4.2
18.3
17:30
18.3
14:07
5.0
17.3
18:20
18.4
11:52
6.0
16.3
19:20
18.6
0:49
6.9
15.8
20:26
19.0
2:03
6.4
16.0
21:33
19.8
3:19
5.3
16.8
22:34
20.8
4:28
3.9
17.9
23:^2
21.8
5:26
2.3
12:41
19.0
6:18
1.1
22.6
13:29
19.9
7:06
0.2
22.9
14:15
20.4
7:52
—.1
22.8
15:00
20.7
8:37
0.2
22.2
15:44
20.6
9:21
1.0
21.1
16:27
20.2
10:04
2.3
19.8
17:09
19.5
10:46
3.9
18.1
17:52
18.7
11:28
5.7
23
■17
7.6
12
05
5.3
12
58
6.9
13
56
8.3
15
00
9.1
16
on
9.6
16
50
9.6
17
34
9.5
IX
14
9.2
18
53
8.8
19
31
8.4
20
IIS
8.1
20
4 5
7.7
21
23
7.5
22
03
7.2
2 2
4S
7.2
23
43
7.0
12
48
7.0
13
57
7.9
15
13
8.2
16
21
8.0
17
22
7.4
18
18
6.8
19
11
6.0
20
02
5.5
20
51
5.2
21
39
5.2
22
28
5.5
23
18
6.0
The Time used Is Pacific Standard, for the 120th Meridian west. It
Is counted from 0 to 24 hours, from midnight to midnight.
The Height is In feet and tenths of a foot, above the Low Water datum
adopted for the Chart. The Harbor datum, as established by the Grand
Trunk  Pacific  Railway,  Is  one  foot lower.
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast, Range 5.
TAKE NOTICE that T. H. Hughes,
of Lakelse Valley, occupation farmer,
intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted at the southeast corner of Lot
4128; thence 40 cliains north; thence
40 chains east; thence 40 chains
south; thence 40 chains west to point
of commencement, and containing
160  acres,  more or less.
TOM HUGH HUGHES.
Dated June 5, 1911.
of
Skeena   Land   District—District
of Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that Thomas Stewart, of Prince Rupert, occupation
accountant, intends to apply for per*
mission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted 40 cliains north from
the southwest corner of Lot 1733;
thence west 40 chains; thence south
40 chains; thence east 40 chains;
thence north 40 chains to point of
commencement.
THOMAS STEWART.
John   Kirkaldy,  Agent.
Dated July 7, 1911.   .
WATER  NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that an
application will be made under Part
V of the "Water Act, 1909," to obtain a licence In the Queen Charlotte
Islands Division of Skeena District.
(a) The name, address and occupation of the applicant—Orland P.
Merrill; Massett, Graham Island,
B. O.J  prospector.
(If for mining purposes) Free Miner's Certificate No	
(b) The name of the lake,
stream or source (if unnamed, the
description is)—Ain Lake and Ain
River.
(c) The point of diversion—At
or near Ain Lake.
(d) The quantity of water applied for (In cubic feet per second)
—700.
(e) The character of the proposed
works—Dam, flume, pipe line and
power  plant.
(f) The premises on w'li.h tin
eviner Is to be used  (d be s
—iN'ear mouth of Ain River.
(g) The purposes  lor  which
water Is  to    be    used—General Ik
power.
(h)    If for irrigation, descr'ho
land to be irrigated, giving acreay
(1) If the water Is to be used for
power or for mining purposes, describe the place where the water is
to be returned to some natural channel, and the difference In altitude
between point of diversion and point
of return—Near mouth of Ain River
about 150 feet below point of diversion.
(j) Area of Crown land intended
to be occupied by the proposed
works—■ About 10 acres.
(k) This notice was posted on
the tenth day of June, 1911, and application will be made to the Commissioner on the fourth day of September, 1911.
(1) Give the names and addresses
of any riparian proprietors or licensees who or whose lands are
likely to be affected by the proposed
works, either above or below the
outlet—None.
(Signature)  ORLAND P. MERRILL,
(P. O. Address)   Masset, B.  C.
George S. Mayer, Agent,
(P.  O.  Address)   Masset, B.  C.
Note—One cubic foot per second
is equivalent to 35.71 miner's inches.
Skeena   Land    District—District
Coast—Range  V.
TAKE NOTICE that I, John V.
Rochester, of Prince Rupert, occupation broker, intend lo apply f)r permission to lease the following described land:— Commencing at a
post planted on the northerly end of
an island in the Skeena River about
Mile 45 on the Grand Trunk Pacific
Railway; thence north 1000 feet
more or less to low water mark;
thence westerly along the low water
mark 1000 feet more or less;
thence southerly 1000 feet more or
less; thence easterly 1000 feet to
the place of commencement.
J. Y. ROCHESTER.
Dated May 30, 1911. 6-2
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that T. M. Turner,
of Lakelse Valley, occupation farmer, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands: — Commencing at a post
planted on the Omineca & Hazelton
right of way and adjoining the N. E.
corner of Lot 51S; thence west 17
chains to corner of Lot 3996; thence
north 20 chains; thence following
right of way to point of commencement.
T. M. TURNER,
John Kirkaldy, Agent.
Dated 14th June, 1911. 7-4
Skeena    Land    Notice—District    of
Coast—Range V
TAKE NOTICE that Daniel W.
Beaton, of Prince Rupert, B. C, occupation carpenter, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about five miles
up the Exchumsik River from its
mouth, and on its south bank; thence
east 40 chains; thence north 40
chains; thence west 40 chains;
thence south 40 chains to place of
commencement.
DANIEL W.  BEATON.
Dated  June  14,  1911. J-H
Skeena   Land    District—District   of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that I, Charles
Percy Hickman, of Naas Harbour,
occupation constable, Intend to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:— Commencing at a post planted on the
east shore of Naas Bay, about two
miles in nn easterly direction from
Lot 3, marked C. P. II., S. W. corner; thence east 20 cliains; thence
north 40 chains to the shore; thence
along the shore line to the place of
commencement, containing 40 acres,
more or less.
CHARLES PRECY HICKMAN
Dated June  7,  1911. 6-30
Skeena Land District—District of
oKeena.
TAKE NOTICE that the Canadian
Canning Company, Limited, of 224
Winch Building, Vancouver, B. C,
occupation salmon caners, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted adjoining
a post marked W. N. about 300 feet
South of Wallace's wharf, Naas Harbour, B. O.i thence east 20 chains;
thence south 20 chains; thence west
20 chains; thence following the
coast line in a northerly direction
back to the point of commencement
and containing forty acres more or
less..
CANADIAN CANNING CO., LTD.
Per G. H. Leslie, Agent.
Dated 6th June, 1911. 6-26 Friday, July  21,  1911
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
AEROPLANE COST
Some Interesting Figures Relative to the
Latest Method of Transportation.
Navigation of the Air Is At Presenl
il   Very   Expensive
Operation
The extraordinary fascination
which the conquest of the air exercises over the ordinary mind is
shown by the interest with which
every development of the new science Is followed, says the Montreal
Herald.
The word science is used advisedly
as comprehending the whole field ot
aeronautics, but the average man
would probably be willing to admit
that It is the art of aeroplaning that
arouses his keenest interest and the
reason of that is the startling swlt-
ness of the achievements made after
man realized the character and quality of the motion needed lo enable
him to soar through aerial space with
the  rapidity  ol' a  swallow.
The path through the air has in
a sense been strewn with wreckage
and amongst il must of course be
Included the fall ot a French ministry, which is directly traceable to
the killing of M. Berteaux, French
minister of war, and the serious
injury ol' tlie prime minister, M.
Monis, on the day of the Paris-Madrid race. It was M. Berteaux's successor at the war office, General
Goiran, who was defeated in the
chamber and who thus brought
ahout the break up of the ministry.
Neither this nor the succession of
disasters, nor the frenzied exploitation ol horrors that have occurred
are likely to have a discouraging effect on aerial enterprise. The dangerous side of aeroplaning has of
course been greatly magnified and
little account has been taken of the
part that such ordinary human frailties as recklessness and carelessness
has played in the disasters.
Thus it happens that many otherwise well informed persons have
come to view aeronautical progress
as the development of a desperate
and dangerous folly. How far do
facts support this idea? In all the
thousands upon thousands of miles
that have been flown since man first
got into the air with power driven
aeroplanes—the prototype of nature's
mechanism, the bird, and the only
type of flying machine that has really
flown—there have been, according
to the most reliable statistics obtainable, no more than fifty-five fatal arcldencts with such machines.
This is an insignficant mortality
list compared with what the railways claimed when they had been
in existence for a similar length of
time. Possibly the thought of an
individual tumbling from the skies
grips harder on the popular Imagination than the slaughter of a few
scores in a factory fire, or a million
deaths from tuberculosis. Yet it is
no worse than being killed as many
are, by an automobile.
Something like a million miles is
the aggregate of all aeroplane flying
to date, while it is conservatively
estimated that present mileage totals
about 55,000 miles a week for the
whole world. Not less than 6,000
persons have made passenger flights
that are matters of definite record,
and fully thirty million dollars is
invested in tlie industry in Europe
alone.
As nearly as can be calculated, the
deaths figure- out at about one- to
each 60,0011 miles of flight, which
statistically and therefore unpreju-
dieially considered, proves human
flight to lie only about one-sixtielh
as dangerous as it was two years
ago,
No doubt a greal deal more' would
lie   ace plishcil    but    fur   the    fae't
that aeroplaning is rather an expensive pastime.
Clifford It. Harmon, dean of the
American amateur aviators, and chief
of the staff of the United Stale's
aero-nautical reserve, has recently
gone into this question very thoroughly and his investigation will
show those who aspire to fame In
the empyrean blue just what they
may expect. An aeroplane can be
as expensive a toy as a steam yacht.
Although this question comes up almost daily, it is difficult to give
more than an approximate answer to
it; for the aeroplane has not yet been
commercialized to the extent of the
automobile.
Thi sarticle does not profess to
settle the much mooted discussion
as to whether a monoplane or a biplane or a multiplane Is the best
kind of aircraft. Many incline to
the biplane, believing that It Is easier
to operate and less treacherous. And
yet no American monoplane has made
any marked success. There Is one
being manufactured In the United
States,   the  Walden-Dyott;   but   the
Bleriot people have an American
agency.
Abroad, the best known types perhaps are the Bleriot monoplane and
the Farman biplane. These may be
bought at the factory for twenty-five
hundred and five thousand dollars.
The duty on aeroplanes is very high,
and in addition one must calculate,
if he desires a foreign machine, on
spending about five hundred dollars
to bring it over the ocean. This
amount takes account of the services
of a mechanician to put the machine
together on this side. The imported
machines come pretty close to costing
not far from five thousand dollars
for the twenty-five hundred dollar
machine, and eight thousand for the
one listed at five thousand dollars.
It is possible that manufacturers
put too high a price on aeroplanes;
hut during the experimental stage
automobiles were much more expensive than they are these days
when they have become so universally commercialized. Examine an aeroplane e'losely and you will see that
it is made up of something more than
a wooden frame covered over with
cloth and held together with wires.
'I'" fly, a aeroplane must be a perfectly constructed craft, combining
In itseir the best materials and the
finest  workmanship  in  every  detail.
An industrial exhibit recently held
in New York City had for sale a
number of aeroplanes ranging in
price from two thousand to seven
thousand dollars. The attendants in
the booths explained that some of
these had already successfully flown.
Although on the market only one
year, there are in this country today ten thousand machines in actual
existence or in course of construction.
There are schools in England, Germany and 1-ranee where you can be
taught to fly. At Grahame-White's
school, considered one of the best,
you many learn to operate a monoplane or a biplane for something
over five hundred dollars. To master both types costs about seven
hundred and fifty. Of course a nominal deposit is required to cover any
passible damages to the machines.
The Wright brothers have two
two schools, one at Dayton, Ohio,
and the other, used mostly during
the winter, at Augusa, Georgia. The
charge Is $25 a lesson, and the instruction is given by one of the
Wright fliers. At the Curtiss school,
just opened at San Diego, California,
$500 is charged. Mr. Curtiss gives
the instruction himself, and this is
credited toward the purchase price
of an aeroplane should the student
decide to purchase. This does not
exhaust the list.
Then there are quite a number of
"birdmen" about the larger cities
who will teach you to fly for sums
ranging from $400 to $500. Most of
these, however, require a bond of
$2,000 for protection against accidents to the aeroplane. Many aviators may be found who will take
you taxicahbing in the sky for $100
a trip.
If one desires to build his own
aeroplane he can do so. One can
secure the manufactured parts or
make them in your own factory, if
you happen to have one. One supply
house advertises, "Everything from
a turnbuckle to the machine itself."
Complete sets of working drawings
of all parts for a Bleriot XI (Cross-
Channel type) are to be had for from
$1.50 up to $10.
Here are the prices of some of
tlie parts: Propellor, from $40 24
$121"!; motor, from $1,200 to $4,500;
gas tank, from $00 to $20; radiator,
from $40 to $75; rubber wheels,
from $7 to $15 each; spruce timber
for repairs, $7.1 per 1,000 feet; 400
feet special grade of piano wire tor
connections, 5 cents per foot; patent
airtight cloth for covering, $liu);
$600 to $1,500 for a "hangar," which
serves for the aeroplane the same
purpose as a stables docs for a
horse; and $100 a week for working
crew tor repairs, it will be seen that
aeroplaning has possibilities for becoming a fairly expensive pastime,
 o	
l* * * * *.;..;. * * .J..;.,;. * * .;, .;.,;,,;..;..;,.;,,;,,;..;..;. ,;.
J THE YUKON'S NEEDS |
-..•:..:•.:-.:. *•:..> .> .:..;..>.:. * ** ***.> .:.*.:..»..:..:.
When Mr. Arthur Wilson, who Is
well known to many in this city,,
was lately sworn In at Dawson as
the future executive head of the Yukon government, he delivered an address which we reproduce from the
Dawson Daily News as follows:
It must appear to the most casual
observer that the hour In the history of this territory has now struck
for our people to get together and
comb'ne their forces In an earnest
endeavor to revive the one Industry
upon which depends the prosperity
and well-being of each and all of us.
1 am not referring to nor Including the big mining companies who
are now operating within our territory. They are well able to manage
their own affairs, and we wish them
-;,
:->»
THE JOURNAL
$2.00 a Year
| Job Printing I
If you want your printing
handled   expeditiously   by
thoroughly trained and ex
perienced printers have it
done at the Journal Office.
THE JOURNAL
$2.00 a Year
mm
every success. What I want to say
at '.his time is something regarding
conditions and men outside the aforesaid big companies. I am very well
aware that many of our good citizens have in the past gone to the
limit of their resources in an effort
to open up the undoubted riches,
both lode and placer, which abound
in the Yukon Territory. The Yukon
council and local administration
have likewise in the past, though
spasmodically, spent considerable
sums of money in the way of bonuses
to prospectors and steamboats, providing Diamond, Keystone and Empire mining drills, and at one time
operating a quartz sampling mill, all
ol which has been done with the
best intention, hut the results of
such expenditures have not met with
the success anticipated; owing to the
fait, in my opinion, thai we have
not had expert control and direction of such expenditures. We need
and must have attached to the permanent staff ill this territory, the
best mineralogist thai money can
obtain. Our experience in tlie past
has taught us how essential it is
lo have proper expert and scientific
direction in the matters pertaining
to mines, it Is also absolutely necessary that uniform action and co-operative endeavor be the guiding principle between our prospectors, Individual miners, boards of trade, Yukon council and member of parliament In respect to:
1. (a) Securing the reduction of
rates in transportation of all kinds,
to all sections of the territory, to a
fair and reasonable basis; lb)securing larger road appropriations, and
(c) to securing aid from the federal
government for the construction of
large trunk roads to all outlying districts, where it can be shown that
such expenditure Is necessary to open
up promising mining districts, and
the building of a first class wagon
road to Whltehorse and  beyond, to
THE CANADIAN  BANK
OF COMMERCE
SIR EDMUND WALKER, C.V.O., LL.D., D.C.L, President
ALEXANDER LAIRD, General Manager
CAPITAL, - $10,000,000        REST, - $7,000,000
DRAFTS ON FOREIGN COUNTRIES
Every branch of The Canadian Bank of Commerce is equipped to issue drafts on
the principal cities in the following countries without delay
Africa Crete
Arabia Cuba
Argentine Republic Denenark
Australia
Austria-Hungary
Belgium
Brazil
Bulgaria
Ccvlon
Chili
China
Egypt
Fartw Islanels
Finland
F.ermejsa
France
Fr'ch Crechin Chi
Germany
Great Britain
Greece
Holland
Iceland
India
Ireland
Italy
Japan
Java
Ina Meelta
Macecheeria
Mexico
New Zealand
Norway
Panama
Persia
Pel
Sibe-ria
Souetan
Soeetle Africa
Spain
Straits Settlements
Philippine Islands Sweden
Portugal Switzerland
Roumania Turkey
Retssia United Stata
Servia Uruguay
Siam West   lenlirs, etc.
The amount of these drabs is stated in the money of the country where liny arc payable ; that is the=y ae-e drawn in sterling, francs, marks, lire, kronen, florins, yen,
tacls, roubles, etc., as the rase maybe. This ensures that the payee abroad will
receive the actual amount Intended* 233
J. M, CHRISTIE, Manager, Prince Ruperi Branch
FREDERICK PETERS, K. O.
iii(. British Columbia boundary line,
over Ihe shortest possible- route, hav-j
ing elm- regard in ihe matter or lowest grade's to be' found along the
route.
8, To securing appropriations to
enable the Yukon council to provide
assistance io bona-flde prospectors
and individual small miners, by way
of transporting their supplies, so long
us It Is found necessary to do so,
up the side streams of the Yukon
river, thereby making it possible to
open up the undoubted rich placer
and lode deposits that are distributed
over vast reaches of this territory,
hitherto only roughly explored, If at
all, by our geological survey, and
seldom—if ever—visited by any
white man other than trappers and
fur traders.
4. The Yukon council should work
out and enact a scheme of Insurance
for all laborers against death and
accident while In the course of employment within the territory.
,r>. The   opening   of   a   school   of
mines, anil the maintaining of a bureau nf Information relating lo the
mines nml other Industries within
Un- territory,
ii. imposing mi companies and
other persons Importing laborers Into
the territory the duty of maintaining
the persons so imported for at least
two years or taking them out of the
territory.
7. I believe it possible to evolve
a scheme whereby the appropriations now being given to tlie hospitals by the local government, the
medical fees now being contributed
by employees of large corporations,
along with certain contributions
from large Corporations, to be agreed
upon, could be consolidated and
placed Into a general fund, under
the control of a commissioner to be
named by all parties Interested, Who
could supervise and expend such
fund in a manner that would relieve
our hospitals of their financial stress,
provide a medical staff and other
employees, and give as good service,
If not  better,   for  less  money  than
Barrister, Solicitor and Notary Public
Office in
EXCHANGE  BLOCK
WM. S. HAi^L, L. D. S. D. D. S.
:-:    DENTIST   :-:
Crown and Bridge Work a specialty.
All dental operations skillfully
treated. Gas and local anaesthetic*
administered for the painless extraction of teeth. Consultation free.
Offices, Helgerson 3k., Prince Rupert
NICKERSON-HOEKIG COMPANY
CUSTOMS AND MERCHANDISH
Brokers, Forwarding Agents,
Storage, etc.
J.  W.  POTTER
ARCHITECT     AND     STRUCTURAL
ENGINEER
Re-inforced Concrete a Specialty
Law-Butler Building - Prince Rupert
H.1YNOR   BROS.
FUNERAL   DIRECTORS
and
PROFESSIONAL  E.MBALMERS
DR.  W.  I!.  CLAYTON
DENTIST
Office   in    the    Westenhaver   Block,
Over  Orme's  Drug    Store.
Prince Rupert
LINDSAYS CARTAGE & STORAGE
G. T. P. CARTAGE AGENTS
Office at H. B. Rochester, Centre St
LADYSMITH COAL
is handled by us.  All orders receive
prompt attention.  Phone No  68.
 LADYSMITH	
COAL
ROCHESTER & MONROE, Phone US
Corner Eighth and Fraser Streets
Clinton Rooms
Newly remodelled and furnished.
Board and lodging. Home cooking
a   specialty.     Mrs.   Anderson,  Prop.
Rooms, $3 Per Week
New Knox Hotel
ARTAUD & BESNER
Proprietors
The New Knox Hotel Is run on the
European plan. Flrst-clas service.
All the latest modern Improvements
THE BAR keeps only the best
brands of liquors and cigars.
THE CAFE Is open from 6.30 a.m.
to 8 p.m. Excellent cuisine; first-
class service.
Board, $1 a Day — Beds, 50c and ap
First Avenue   Prince Rupert
Hamblin's Bakery
Just Re-opened
Snle    counter    in    MERRYFIELD'S
STORK, Third Ave. and Fifth St.
Family trade catered to.   Will supply  restaurants and  steamers.
Cukes and Confectionery of all
kinds
IHE WESTHOLME LUMBER CO.
LIMITED
We handle all kinds of
Building Supplies
Flrit Avenue Telephone 18fl
is now applied to Ihe same- purpose
by Hi.- iii»ej\,. mentioned parties,
There are many other matters
that need Immediate and careful attention un the lean eel' our peoplo
anil legislators, but I shall peel refer
to them ai ihis linn-. Such mat-
te-rs will be taken up and dealt with
nt   the   proper  time   and   place.
In conclusion, allow me to express
my grateful appreciation for the
many expressions of good will that
huve been extended to me by our
fellow citizens since the announce*
ment was made that 1 was to succeed Mr. Henderson.
And permit me to say In reply to
all the good wlRhes expressed by
my friends that 1 Hhall earnestly try
try  to  do  my  duty.
 o	
"Do you think you could learn to
love.' ' said the young man.
"Learn to love!' replied tbe experienced flirt. "Why, I could give lessons nt  II." PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Friday, July  21,  1911
POLITICAL PURITY
Subject Was Discussed at Baptist Convention in Vancouver   Strong
Words Spoken.
Criticism of the Practice of Covering
I'p Corruption .Made on Floor
of Gathering
"Fifteen years ago, when scandals
In connection with the government
administration cropped up, there
there thorough Investigations made
ai the request of the premier. Within the last two years Bcandals of
the most outrageous character of t>o-
lltlcal corruption have come to light.
and the present premier of Canada
has blocked any efforl of making an
Inquiry. Fifteen years ago there
ago there were no politicians who
became wealthy through politics, and
today more than one man has attained wealth by this method."
Before the Baptist convention in
Vancouver, t'. M. Woodworth littered
the above remark.
Has political corruption increased
in Canada? This question caused
the introduction of politics into the
conference. A resolution, moved by
Rev. E. 11. Morgan and seconded by
Rev. Dr. Silencer, "that tbe present
increase of political corruption, resulting in the control or undue influence or administrations by the vicious elements of society, calls tor
the most thoughtful investigation
and vigorous action by the leaders of
our church," was the source or many
speeches on government and municipal administration and as to what
the church should do to keep them
clean.
The word "increase" embodied in
the resolution bothered the minds of
some of the members. They did not
feel that it was correct to insert this
word and put themselves on record
without something to back it up.
There were lengthy arguments pro
and con, with the result that Mr.
Woodworth seemingly endeavored to
prove that by eliminating the objectionable word it would "whitewash"
the government and make all its
officials Immaculate in all transactions. Hence, he tried to explain
"where the money came from" In
connection with the accumulated
wealth of politicians being attached
to the Laurier government.
As the scheduled introducer of the
resolution was absent, Rev. Mr. Waring of Kltsilano spoke in support of
it. He said it was absolutely necessary for Christians to enter politics if it was the intention to keep
them clean. "Are we to face political
corruption?" he asked. "Politics
ought to be Christian and Christians
ought to be in politics. God is at
the helm of tilings but there is something tor us to do in the ship. Our
aim should not simply be to get
rascals out of power but to see that
those who cannot stand the test
should not have power." He declared that ii was Idotic for Christians
tc only be concerned in their business affairs and let those of the
state alone. "We should select the
candidates and get our candidates
elected," he went on. "Too many
people think only of politics on election day. This is sad, tor we Chris-
tions who look for clean administration should study the questions at
issue and pass intelligent ballots. The
law is enforced by the government,
but  it  is for us to see that  it is en
forced honestly and impartially. The
law is like a cobweb—the small fly
Is caughl and the big fly gets
through."
Rev. R. H. West of Jackson Avenue Baptist Church seconded the
resolution in lieu of Dr. Russell, who
was absent from the assembly. "To
use a proverb, the love of money is
the root of all evil," he said, "if
we have political corruption, behind
it is lhat unmitigated scourge of selfishness. Tlie Socialists have a truth
with which all of us agree, and that
is: "the selfishness rampant in so-
ciety is tlie primary cause of political
corruption.' The nation stands for
justice, liberty and humanity. No
government should be called Chrts-
linn If ii so unfortunately has graft
on its hands. The only possible way
Bin will be driven out is by the application of the Gospel of the Naz-
arene."
C. S. Stephens of Suniiiierland did
nol know what ihe convention was
"getting at" by a resolution which
bore the words, "increase of political
corruption," if nothing of a specific
nature was shown regarding the said
Increase, lie spoke of conditions in
British Columbia during the past 20
years. lie was sure there was no
political corruption in existence in
this province today. The civic govern ment, too, stands more today than
ever tor righteousness.
Ai this point Mr. Woodworth objected to the "whitewashing method, and referred to the grafting
politicians, lie wanted the resolution changed to read, "members of
the church or the rank and file," and
not "leaders." It was every person's
duly to wipe away graft. "In a
thousand years from now the
churches will be rooted out by that
political corruption which happened
in the Roman Empire," he asserted.
He said that Vancouver had a "high-
water mark" political organization.
Or the Conservatives in the city
aboutfi per cent participated in the
last election, while tbe Liberals had
less than that number. And those
who go to the booth, tor the most
part, know nothing about what they
were voting on, because they had not
given the issues serious thought.
"The political leaders In this city
have pleaded and begged with Christian churches to take an Interest In
politics with little result," he said
"Politics are just as good as you
make them. We try to improve the
nominees—get temperance men and
Christinas, and we need the assistance of the church. If the members
of the First Baptist Church would
do their utmost to help their respective party—whatever it may be—in
the cause of good, they can control
one political organization in this city
Get all the members of every Baptist,
church in this city and they can con
trol all the organizations. If the
churches would get into politics there
would be no necessity of such a resolution as the one before you now.
Incorporate all the Baptist churches
in British Columbia months before
the election and try to get a political
conscience of the issues. If you don't
the country will go down."
"Political Independence is the
main idea, and we should insert
something in the resolution to the
effect that the members should have
this quality," interjected C. S. Stev-
ens. in explaining, Mr. Stevens said
that the Liquor License Act passed
at the Conservative caucus by two
votes and naturally the rest of the
Conservatives followed the trail
chosen by the leaders.
A. B. McNeil of Victoria did not
like Mr. Woodworlh's resolution regarding   the   mercenary   individuals
who had obtained money by wrongful methods. "Why, I know men in
politics today in Victoria, and rather
wealthy, who seven years ago could
not pay for a meal," he said. "But,
then, I don't say that it was through
political corruption that they became
opulent." Referring to elections, he
said that not 5 per cent of the Baptists in Victoria attended the primaries at the last election. "Everybody should have a chance to vote,"
he said. "There should be universal
suffrage, for the women should
have a chance along with the men
to prpotect themselves. There should
be no opponents against such a
great scheme."  (Applause.)
Another amendment was suggested
to i hi' effect that the people should
put "measure before party" in all
elections. Eventually, after many
words on initiative and referendum
the convention decided to rest the
responsibility on the shoulders of
the resolution committee.
 o	
MYSTERY OF CENTURIES
American    Sees   Similarity    Between
English Riddle and Cyreilce Discovery—Clue  to   Stonchenge
The mystery of Stonehenge, the
unread riddle which has for nun
dreds of years perplexed savants, is
believed to have been unveiled by
Prof. Richard Norton of Harvard, according to reports which have reached this country from Cyrenalc
(Greek)  Libya.
Prof. Norton, who is the son of
Charles Eliol Norton, has just
reached tlie American School of Classical Studies at Rome. He will soon
announce discoveries made by the
American archaeological exepdition
in the excavation of the Greek city
of Cyrene, founded 631 B. C.
The connection between the discoveries at Cyrene and the mystery
of Stonehenge is said lo lie in the
similarity of the megalithic or great
stoned columns common eo each.
Stonehenge is located In Wiltshire,
England, and was there centuries before Christ. It was the chief temple
and seat, accordcing to some writers,
of Druidical justice. The outer circle is carried on the top of a continuous circle of large, flat stones
ot the same width.
A link between the two ruins is
believed by some to lie in the great
stones of the lowest courses in the
Jewish place ot lamentation in the
temple at Jerusalem, these stones
being thought to date from the temple wall ot Solomon.
The parallel between the remarkable megalithic groups discovered in
the Cyrenaic and the great circular
Stonehenge is said to be most striking, the Cyrenaic monument, according to scientists, being the outer circle of continuous trilithons of Stonehenge simply streached out straight.
The theory now advanced Is that
the trilithons, or three stoned structures, ie'•e actually in part an improved sore of dolmen, or sepulchral
monument, the horizontal stone being supported by two upright stones
used as legs instead of by three or
four after the cruder fashion.
The Harvard exepeditlon found a
subterranean necroplis, which will
be explored. The tombs, however,
had already ben rifled, so that the
finds in them were limited to fragments of sculpture and inscriptions
and a considerable quantity of
broken pottery.
 o	
Mifkins—Would it hurt your feelings if I should call you a liar?
Blfklns—Oh, no, but it might hurt
my knuckles.
THE TOURIST TRADE
Visitor to City Sees a Great Opportunity
for the City in the Near
Future.
An Ever Increasing Number Will Be
Coming  Here—Demand for
Accommodations
Among the more recent visitors to
Prince Rupert looking into the opportunities of business here has been
a resident of Porl Hamilton, Bermuda Island. .Mr. Harnett, who is
harbor master al that port, has long
been Interested in this city and impressed with opportunity that must
offer for trade here. He is but one
of the many thousands scattered all
over the globe who have their eye
upon this city as the opening to
which they will eventually come.
.Air. Harnett determined this summer that he would spend his holidays
on a trip to this port and see for
himself just what the conditions are.
He is not sorry be did so lor he
realizes that the time is ripe for
investing here. He has friends in
the Bermudas and also in the United
States who are awaiting his report
before deciding upon locating here.
Mr. Harnett left this morning on his
way home but he has sent a report
that puts Prince Rupert in a good
position as an investment and which
will likely result in some new firms
coming in either this fall or next
year.
■Mr. Harnett sees in this port a
great business centre but he also
sees in it a wonderful tourist resort.
He has been accustomed to the tourist trade and knows what it means
to a place. The first year after Hie
railway is complepted, he says that,
on a very low estimate, there will
be 10,000 people come over the new
line to Prince Rupert to spend vacations here 'extending over different lengths of time. These will be
tourists alone, independent of those
seeking business. The result, he
points out will be that a tremendous
hotel accommodation will have to
be provided and with it other lines
ot business. Under these circumstances, work upon the business
buildings cannot be long delayed and
permanent structures will have to go
up in the city to meet the demands.
The second year of the road will
see the tourist trade double at least,
he says, while from that on there will
be still more rapid increases each
year.
Mr, Harnett has in view one firm
of contractors who deal in heavy
material and the erection of concrete
and steel buildings who are making
arrangements to come here to enter
into trade and which may locate
here within a very short time.
Mr. Harnett has left the city more
than satisfied with the prospects for
the future. He sees every reason
for believing that there will he an
immense city here and anticipates a
most remarkably rapid growth. He
expects to return next summer at
the latest and may decide to make
his home here then.
 o	
Mr, Justice Gallaher, who is in
the city and who lias had experience
in new places in the west, is very
much impressed with the prospects
of Prince Rupert. It is the first
visit he has paid to the north and
he is satisfied it will have a very
rapid growth.
To the Ladies of Prince Rupert
Did you ever stop to think how much easier it would be for you.
if at the end of each month, you could pay all household bills
by check? We solicit your account and have special facilities
for handling it. Private writing rooms are provided for the use
of customers and individual attention is given each depositor.
We allow  4 7r   on Deposits and  the  use  of checks.
The Continental Trust Company, Limited
 SECOND AVENUE	
o][5]|D|@[nE|l@^^
HOTEL
ENAMELWARE
HAVE JUST RECEIVED A SMALL SHIPMENT OF HOTEL
ENAMELWARE ESPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR USE IN
HOTELS, RESTAURANTS AND CAMPS. WE GUARANTEE
THEM TO LAST TWICE AS LONG AS ORDINARY ENAMEL
WARE.
A CALL IS SOLICITED
Prince Rupert Hardware & Supply
Company, Ltd.
THIRD AVENUE PHONE 120
olfaiiairaiaiiirara^^
We Require Listings of Inside Business Property
Also Residence Property at Right Prices
M.M. Stephens & Co. Ld.
Real Estate, Insurance and Investments,
Notaries, Nines, Timber
Box 275
PHONE 222
PRINCE RUPERT, B.C. ,
OFFICE THIRD  AVE.. I
The "Stay Satisfactory' Range
Good, Sound Reasons for
MONARCH Economy
Monarch Ranges are built so that they can
never have "air leaks"—
For around every opening into the body there
is a   Malleable   Iron frame to which the
steel is riveted.
No putty is needed in such joints.    They are
air tight when new and stay air tight.
If these other ranges were built in this way
they might be economical too.
Investigate this matter of rivet construction
versus stove  bolts and  stove putty.    It's
important  to  every  one  using  or  buying
a range.
SOLD AND GUARANTEED BY THE
Kaien Hardware Co.
Telephone 3 Third Avenue
S3 fit
i
■■
We beg to announce to the public that we are going to
remain at the same old stand cor. 6th St. and 2nd Ave.
Tin- ii-.t of tlie month of July we- an- offering extraordinary values in all lines of HOUSE FURNISHINGS.   We are busy opening up new slock
nml placing all broken lines and odd lota on  (lie  Bargain  Tables  for quick selling.
NOTE PARTICULARLY THE VARIETY OF MERCHANDISE WE CARRY
The Big
Furniture
Store
Sole Agents for the
Ostermoor
Mattresses
•:• .;.
FURNITURE, STOVES, LINOLEUM, CARPETS, FLOOR COVER.
INGS, REED AND RATTAN FURNITURE, BLINDS, CURTAINS, QUILTS,
COMFORTS, BLANKETS, SHEETS, PILLOWS, MATTRESSES, SPRINGS,
IRON AND BRASS BEDS. BEST LIVES OF UPHOLSTERED COUCHES,
ARM CHAIRS, PARLOR SUITES, ENAMELWARE, CROCKERY, GLASS.
WARE, LAMPS, TABLE CUTLERY, SCREENS, PICTURES, MIRRORS,
WASHING MACHINES, BASKETS, FRUIT JARS, HAMMOCKS, SEWING
MACHINES,  BABY CARRIAGES.
WE ARE CLOSING OUT THE
STOVE DEPARTMENT.
IF  YOU   ARE INTERESTED
CALL AND GET OUR PRICES
F. W. HART
Cor 6th Street & 2nd Ave
Phone 62      P.O. Box 230
♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦ »'♦■♦-♦-♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ ♦-■» ■»■»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦■»♦ + ,»»♦»■»+.+,,»»»,

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