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Prince Rupert Journal Aug 4, 1911

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 $
:     /U+'V
J.J
New Wtllimtor
Coal
is the best
ROGERS & BUCK
Sole Agents
Ptinu ftitjrert
TF=?'
iSx~t
VOLUME  II.
Published  Twice  a  Week.
PRINCE   RUPERT,   B.   C.   FRIDAY, AUGUST  4,   1911.
Price, Five Cents.
x ^ctoria, Bws**f
POWER PROPOSALS
R. Brutinel Meets the Board of Trade
and Discusses Plans for
City.
Report Received by Special Committee Recommends Accepting
Proposition  Offered
At a meeting of the Board of
Trade held on Wednesday evening a
report was presented from the special committee appointed to go into
the question of the proposition presented by R. Brutinel on behalf of
the Tsimpshean Power Company.
The report was presented by the
chairman of the committee, J. H.
Pillsbury. It was as follows:
To   the    Prince   Rupert    Board   of
Trade.
Gentlemen—Your committee begs
to report on the above subject as
follows: In considering this proposition, your committee almost immediately encountered two phases of
the question which seem to require
considerable study.
The first is the prices and the second the method of measurement of
power used, on .which the prices are
based. As a matter of fact, these
two questions are so closely related
that they may be discussed as one
subject. There is no explanation in
the company's proposal as to how the
prices of power delivered are to be
based. A price of so much per horse
power per year is set forth, varying
In accordance with the amount of
power used, within certain limits. It
Is the custom when selling electrical
power by the horse power per year
to base measurements on what is
known as the "peak load." Unlike
either water or gas, electricity can
be stored only to a very limited extent and at a relatively great ex,-
pense. A company must be prepared
with a plant, however, for generating and distributing electricity, of
sufficient capacity to take care of the
aggregate requirements of all of its
customers at the moment of their
greatest demand, arid this is called
the "peak of the load." The "load
factor" is another form of expression for the same thing. For Instance, If the "peak load" is five
times the average load, then the load
factor is 20 per cent. Twenty-three
per cent Is a common value for the
"load   factor."
Fixed  Costs
The fixed costs of an electric company are very large as compared to
other business undertakings, because
a considerable proportion of the Investment required to provide for the
"peak of the load" must stand idle
about twenty hours of each day, except for a short period of each year,
and also because of the necessity of
being ready at all times of the day
or night to take care of any demand
which the customers may make.
An essential feature Is that the
cost of being ready to furnish electricity when called for is one thing,
and the cost of manufacturing the
current actually delivered is a different thing. It appears, therefore,
that the custom in vogue of basing
measurements on the "peak of the
load" is justifiable provided measurements are properly taken.
The Tsimpsean company has nothing to say on this point, but we may,
rest assured that Its measurements
will be based on the "peak load."
We do not know whether (he company would use an annual or a
monthly maximum load In figuring
the quantities of current supplied.
The more frequently the maximum is
determined, the less will be the cost
to the consumer. We would recommend that the maximum load be determined at least monthly over a 30
minute period, and this, as far as we
can learn, is customary in other
places.
Alternative  Method
Another method of charging for
electricity, which is being more and
more used, is as follows: A small
fixed charge for so much per H. P.
Is made, commonly $1 per month,
an In addition a price of so much per
K. W. hour is made. By this method the consumer conies much nearer
paying for the power he actually
uses, since only a part of the total
charge Is dependent on the "peak
load" and the balance Is made on the
power actually used.
The Western Canada Power Company has adopted this method of
charges for its power from Stave
Lake and It is understood that It Is
meeting  with   general  favor.     Your
REARRANGE   PLANS
* (Special to The Journal)
* Ottawa,  Aug.   4.—R.  L.  Bor-
* den  has made  a  slight  change
* in  his  plans.     He  will  not,  as
* intended, go to Toronto on Bat-
* urday,      having      engagements
* which will keep him in Ottawa.
* The details of his Ontario tour
* will be arranged In Toronto.
*   *   *   *
*   +   +   *   *
committee would recommend that
the TIslmpsean company be asked to
submit a scale of prices based on this
method of charges.
Considering next the schedule of
prices submitted by the company,
perhaps the best method of determining whether these prices is reasonable is by comparison with those
charged in other cities in this country. The following list shows the
prices charged in various cities, together with the size of the works and
the population of the different
places: ,
Fernle—Population, 6,000; muni-
cipial plant, 300 K.W.; lighting, 15c;
discount; power, 10c to 2%c plus
$1 per month H.P.
Kamloops—Population, 5,000; municipal plant, 320 K.W.; lighting,
16, 14, 13, 12, 10c; discount; power,
10c; discount.
Nanaimo — Population, 8,000;
Lighting, 10 to 15c; discount.
Revelstoke — Population, 3,500;
850 K.W.; lighting, 15, 12 and 10c;
discount.
Lethbridge — Population, 14,000;
municipal plant, 1,000 K.W.; lighting, lie; discount, 10 per cent; power metered, 4 per cent; discount, 10
per cent; power contracted for up
to 50 H.P.;, $30 per H.P. year;
over 50 H.P., $28 per H.P. per year.
(Continued on Page Eight)
REJECT THE TERMS
Michel & Hosner Will Not Agree to the
Findings of Conciliation
Board
Vote   Is   Now   Heing  Taken   by   the
Workers at the Difefrent
Centres
(Special lo The Journal)
Fernie, Aug. 4.—Michel and Hos-
mer miners have rejected the recommendations of the chairman of
the conciliation board, Dr. Gordon.
The striking miners at the different centres are taking the vote on
accepting the majority report' of the
board of conciliation, following its
acceptance by the otherators. This
allows for higher wages, but for the
"open shop" at the same time. An
nonnceinent of the vote will be made
August 4. The Corhin mine closed
Monday indefinitely; also all trains
will stop running on the Eastern
B. C. Railway, MacGillvray and Corhin.
In accepting the board's award,
the operators point out that they
do so because of the suffering certain to be caused the public should
the strike not be ended before the
winter.
"We   wish   it   to   be   understood,"
TOGO IN NEW YORK
Japanese Naval Hero Has Reached United
States-He is Heartily
Received
He   Will    Meet   President   Taft   at
Washington,   Leaving
Tonight
(Special to the Journal)
New York, Aug. 4.—Admiral Togo
arrived here at midnight on the Lusi-
fanla. Representatives of the state,
war, and navy departments met him
at quarantine and extended a welcome.
Admiral Togo went ashore In a cutter, and tonight goes to Washington
to be received  by  President Taft.
 o	
Opera Company
The Cleveland Musical Comedy
Company has been engaged to give
a week's entertainment in the Empress Theatre, commencing tonight
with the "Honeymoon Trail." Popular operas will be given, with a
change of programme each evening.
Saw   Good   Ore
Mr. Justice Galliher returned yesterday from a trip as far as Hazelton. He enjoyed the run up the
Skeena and is pleased with the prospects which are offering for settlement. While he did not visit the
mines .in the district, he says he saw
some samples taken from the different camps which were exceedingly
promising. The ore was all that
could be wished for, so that theret
should be a good account from the
mining  industry.
SHOP  BLOWN  UP
FINDING GOOD COAL
British Pacific Coal Company is Making Good Progress in its
Mining.
Within   Ninety   Days   the   Company
Will   Make   Initial   Shipments Here
W. G. .McMorris, who is the managing director of the British Pacific
Coal Company, reached the city a few
days ago from the Queen Charlotte
Islands on his way south. He left
this morning for Vancouver on business connected with his company.
The development work at the mines
is progressing eminently satisfactory,
and there is every prospect that the
mine will be shipping in a small way
this fall.
The coal, reference to which has
been made in these columns at different times, is an anthracite of excellent quality, rich in fixed carbons
ard with a small percentage of ash.
Mr. McMorris says his manager,
Mr. Archibald, who is an experienced
coal miner, classifies the coal as the
best yet found on the Pacific Coast.
It Is close to salt water, being
easily transported over a short incline from the mine to the shipping
point. Within 90 days he expects
to have an output of about 25 tons
a day for shipment to Prince Rupert,
which will be a boon to the citizens
here. From that time on the increase in output should be quite
marked.
Mr. McMorris is taking half a ton
of the coal south with him for demonstration purposes.
WANT A STATION
THHK   WORLD'S   PEACE
(Special to The Journal) *
Washington,    Aug.    4.—Gen- *
eral arbitration treaties between *
the   United   States   and   Great *
Britain   and   the   United   States *
and France were signed yester- *
day.    They will be sent at once *
to the senate for ratification. *
MET  Itlillli:  HERE
Mr.  Hoi* Ranch of Stewart Wedded
to Miss  Davis of Iowa
on Wednesday
On Wednesday evening In the parlor of the Prince Rupert Inn a pretty
wedding was solemnized in the presence of a company of very close
friends. The marriage was that of
Mr. Bert T. Ranch of Stewart and
-Miss Bertha M. Davis, who arrived
on the Prince Rupert earlier in the
day from Moqukity, Iowa.
The groom is well known in the
north as a mining man and is deservedly popular among a wide circle
of friends. He is the locator of the
Portland Wonder and Main Reef
claims in the Stewart district. His
bride made the trip from her old
home in the United States to take
up her home in Northern B. C.
The guests included Mr. Harry
Smith of Stewart, who, as a particular friend of Mr. Ranch's, acted as
best, man. Miss Hossie Piercy attended the bride. There were also
present: Mr. and Mrs. Sweet, Master
Aubrey Sweet, Mrs. Henning, Mr.
John  Piercy and  Miss Glady  Piercy.
Yesterday morning the bridal
party left by the Prince Rupert for
Stewart under the protecting eyes of
Capt. Barney Johnson and Mr. Harry
Smith. They will reside in Stewart.
 o	
OPENING CAMPAIGN
LOCAL SITUATION
Neither of Political Parties Has Yet Made
Choice of Candidates in
Riding
Conventions   Are   Expected   to   Be
Held by Both Conservatives
and  Literals
Small Smithy on Seventh Street Prey
to Explosion This
Morning
FLAGS  ORDERED   DOWN
(Special lo The Journal)
London, Aug. 4.—As a result
of the protests from the citizens
the Chairman Qf the decoration
committee of the London Old
Boys' Association yesterday
ordered down all American
flags in  the street decorations.
they add, "that we are signifying our
willingness to negotiate an agreement with the United Mine Workers of America along the general
suggested by the board in thhe majority report. This we understand
to mean an absolute open shop with
a • non-discrimination clause to be
conceded to the operators; that we
retain absolutely the management of
the mines, and control all employees.
We also understand that the increase
in the day wages are to be based on
the existing scale of day wages as
provided in the last agreement between the United Mine Workers of
America, District No. 16, and the
Western Coal Operators' Asocla-
tion."
No One Was Hurt but Much Damage
Resulted   to
Windows
This morning residents in the business setcion were given an unwelcome surprise, when a small blacksmith shop used in connection with
the rock cutting near the Central
Hotel was blown up from the explosion of dynamite which happened
to be in it. A fire is supposed to
have started in some way near the
powder but was noticed In time to
allow the blacksmith to escape.
The powder exploded with such
force as to demolish the little building and broke the plate glass fronts
for several hundred feet around. The
Central Hotel, being close, suffered
the most severely, having all the
windows on Seventh street shattered.
The old school house near at hand
had a narrow escape from taking
fire from embers being carried onto
the roof. These were soon put out
through the gathering of citizens and
the  firemen.
Fortunately, no one was hurt, although it is difficult to imagine how
all could escape, as many were close
to the building at the time of the
explosion.
K'tsnmkalum Will Make Application to
4        Railway Commission For a
Depot There
Delegation From the Valley Is Now
in the City on This
Business
VISITED LAKELSE
S.   Corley   Has   Returned   From   mi
(luting in the Interior
Valley
S. Corley of the Royal Hotel returned from a trip made to the Lakelse valley. He Is more than ever
impressed with the possibilities of
that district from every standpoint,
.he agricultural riches of the valley are difficult to overestimate. Mr.
Corley brought with him a few cases
of strawberries which have convinced
his guests that he Is correct In his
estimate of the district In that respect.
Mr. Corley speaks highly of the
roads being built by the government
in that part of the province. When
the work Is completed that has been
begun there will be a way provided
that will enable the settlers and visitors very easy access to the whole
of the,valley. Part of the pay, where
the road is now completed, there
would be no difficulty in taking an
auto over. The rest of it is being
done equally well.
A party of residents from Kitsum-
kalum, including Mr. Weeks and
Mr. Eby, are In the city. They are
engaged preparing data to be presented before the railway commission when It sits here this month.
Fred Peters, K. C, will represent
the residents of that valley before
the commission.
The company is making application to have a station put in at that
point. The residents state that they
have been well treated by General
Superintendent Mehan and the G.T.P.
officials, who have given them a siding and accommodated them as well
as possible, hut they desire a station to be built there in order to
properly conduct all business for the
future.
Sir Wilfrid Will Address First Meeting
in Favor of W. A. Charlton of Annexation Reputation
The political situation in the riding of Comox-Atlin, owing to the immense area covered by it, has not
assumed a campaign atmosphere owing to the fact that neither of the
political parties has yet held its convention and selected its candidate.
On the Conservative side the arrangements for the convention for
the whole riding are now being carried out and the date and place for
the gathering may be expected to be
made at any time. When that is
done the situation will be fully gone
into for the purpose of making
choice   of  a  standard   bearer,
The Liberals likewise have not
held any general voncention, and
have promise of some little excitement when the meeting takes place.
W. Sloan, formerly member for the
constituency, it Is announced, is on
his way from the Old Country, anxious to be the candidate and prepared to put up a fight for il in
convention. He is not believed to
be generally acceptable to the local
Liberal Association, the members of
which body desire to see Duncan
Ross selected.
Then, again, George Morrow is antagonistic to both of these candidates and will contest with them the
chances of being the nominee of the
convention with the avowed intention
of contesting the seat whether he is
turned down or not. For a long time
Mr. Morrow has had decided differences with the party to which he
belongs. He has contended that he
was not properly treated locally, but
at the same time does not, it is
said, differ from Sir Wilfrid. He
has accordingly "plowed his own
furrow" in the party to a very great
etenxt for the last few years.
Changes in Cabinet Are to Be Made
Hon. L. P. Borden Quits Politics
for Bench
SHIPPING RATES
Board of Trade Takes  Dp the Ours.
tlon With u View to Securing
Uniformity
At the meeting of the Board of
Trade a few evenings ago, the question of freight and express rules
was raised by the chairman nnd the
neek of taking some concerted action
was advised. It was pointed out by
several present that this was a long
standing complaint, the chief objection being to the uncertainty as to
what the charges were to be. This
was due to the fact that the charges
were made by weight and by measurement, with the result that tlie
measurement varied very materially
from time to time. Complaints have
been frequent and the matter had
been up from time to time, but It
seemed so far impossible to get the
matter properly fixed.
It was urged that there should
be a more uniform system adopted.
The railway commission, It was
pointed out, was not given power
over this branch of traffic.
The matter was referred to the
council of the Board of Trade to
take the necessary steps to have
something done to right what was
looked upon us vexation condition.
(Special to The Journal)
Ottawa, Aug. 4.—Sir Wilfrid Laurier will open the present campaign
on August 15, at Simcoe, Norfolk
County, where Hon. W. A. Charlton
will run against the present Conservative member, D. McColl. The
Liberals thus expect to redeem the
riding. It will'serve also the ridings of Haldimand and East and
West  Elgin.
Cabinet changes probably will be
announced on Saturday, lion. L. P.
Brodeur, minister of marine and
fisheries, takes a position on the supreme court bench. Hon. R. i.c-
niieux will take the portfolio of marine and fisheries and Dr. Belaud,
representing Beaull, will become
postmaster  general.
ADVERTISING   PRINCE   RUPERT
Motion   Pictures   Are   Being   Taken
by   Expert   in   This
City
A   PRETTY   WEDDING
Mr.    Norman   .Mackintosh   anil    Miss
Angus, Late of Scotland Bound
iu   Weil lock
A pretty wedding was solemnized
al the lionie' of Captain and Mrs.
Roberson when Mr. Norman Mackintosh of the Btaff ul' the News and
.Miss Agnes Ithoila Angus were united
in  marriage.
The ceremony was performed by
Rev. Mr. James of St, Andrew's
Church, ihe immediate friends of the
parties only being present.
Mr. Mackintosh Is justly populat
among a wide acquaintance and Is
receiving the hearty congratulations
of his friends. The bride, who is
the daughter of Rev. James Angus
of Stirling, Scotland, only recently
arrived  from  the Old   Land.
Mr, and .Mrs. Mackintosh have
taken up their residence on Seventh
avenue.
W. H. Harbeck, one of the most
successful takers of motion pictures
is now in this part of the country
in pursuit of films which will be put
on exhibition in various parts of the
country.
He reached here hy the Prince
Rupert and at once joined Dr. Slo-
1'iini, who is assisting in the arrangements for securing photos. The
Skeena River will be visited, as well
as Alaska, the Queen Charlottes and
parts of Alaska.
On Wednesday Mr. Harbeck was
engaged getting films of scenes
about the harbor and the movements
of the steamers of the G. T.  P.
Mr, Harbeck lias no superior in
his chosen line. His pictures of
scenery are unexcelled and are welcomed In all theatres In the land.
Drowned  From  Vadso
Last night J. Ilallcraii, a seaman
on the steamer Vadso, fell overboard
and was drowned. Chief Vickers
was called and tne body recovered
after about one hour's time. The
ironer, J. II. McMullen, considered
inne ■.- eery  to Vile!  any  Inquest.
Freighting Outfit
B. !•'. Chnrleson, manager of thi
Interior Forwarding and Express
Company, arrived In town on Wednesday with Blxty-three mules and
thirty pack and work horses. They
came through from the Chllcotln
country loaded as far as Fraser Lake,
says the Omineca Herald. These
horses he will now use In his
pack trains and stngoa and freight
wagons going oul of Hazelton. He
lias three new stages ai Prince Itupert on their way up here and when
they are In Bhape along with his
wagons he win have six outfits working oul of Hazelton, with a total
of 140 horses and mules. This will
be one of the largest freighting outfits In Northern British Columbia,
and It will do much to solve ihe
transportation tee the' interior this
fall and winter. There will be a
great increase in freigeiting this year
on account of the railway construction camps being east of the town
instead of west as was ihe case last
year. By fall practically all the
camps will have' been moved pnst
the new towns across Ihe Bulkley
River.
Gypsey Hamilton failed to appear
loday to receive the Judgmenl of the
police court. A bench warrant was
ordered to be issued for ber arresl
by .1.   II.  McMullen, s. M, PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Friday,  August  4,  1911.
NEW COAL   MINES
Opening Up Recently Discovered Seams
in the Old Country Will
Give Work.
Doncaster District  Is to Be Affected
by tlie Development Which
Is to Follow
Good times are in store for the
miner. If the signs of tne times are
to be trusted, there is every likelihood in the near future of a boom
in coal mining, such as we have not
had for many a year. Indeed, ihe
story of recent developments reads
more like a Jules Verne romance
than the record of ordinary business
enterprise. The Barnsley bel of coal
is noted throughout the business
world. A line, rich seam some eight
or nine feet thick, it was supposed
to come to an end in tlie neighborhood of Coiiisborough, and for years
no hopes ol' finding such another
seam existed.
The scientists, however, came forward, and succeeded in convincing
the business man that this was a
mistaken idea. They maintained
that through some great upheaval
of nature In prehistoric times the
coal-bed had sunk to a deeper level
but that it could most probably be
located again between Barnsley and
the eastern cost of Yorkshire.
Much money, time and patience
were expended. Borings were successfully sunk in various places uy
different speculators, with the result that today we are faced with the
prospect of a trade development in
Yorkshire that will alter the face of
the countryside.
Within ten years' time 40,000 to
50,000 additional colliers will be at
work in Yorkshire mines that have
not yet been opened, and at the lowest estimate this means an increase
of 150,000 in population of the
broad-acred county. Though the
principal development will take
place in the Doncaster district, the
whole country will be rapidly burrowed until a line of mines is in
existence, extending to the boundaries of the city of Hull itself.
Though in many instances it will be
necessary to sink a shaft 1,000 yards
deep, the thickness of the seam and
the use of the most modern mining
machinery will enable the proprietors
to successfully compete with all comers, and to guarantee good profits
and dividends for tlie capital invested.
With a splendid railway system
tapping the coalfield, and an enterprising port like Hull within easy
reach, the prestige of Newcastle as a
coal centre may be seriously threatened; in fact, there are optimists
who prophecy that the saying, "carrying coals to Newcastle," will not
seem so ridiculous as it has done in
years gone by.
Some of the coalpits in this district of Doncaster, started during the
past few years, already hold the
world s record for out the weekly
output, and the visitor has the opportunity of examining tlie finest
plant in tlie world.
Colliery workers not only of Yorkshire,  but  of all  parts  of  England,
and villages that are of an insani
tary character, and we must remember that to pull down is only half
of the solution." His grace dealt
at length with the conditions existing in mining villages, and it cannot be gainsaid that unless some
sane and satisfactory housing arrangements are made to cope with
an influx of population attracted by
the opportunities of getting work in
the coalpits we shall have a shocking state of affairs brought into existence. In building bouses for the
miner and his family it is to be
hoped that more nouses" and fewer "dwellings" will be designed,
Land is cheap in the district, and
there is no reason to skimp the
room or to build long, dreary rows
of depressing brick boxes with slate
Mils. The miner is naturally passionately fond of gardening. With
a little foresight in planning the new
homesteads, villages and towns all
possibility of furtnre overcrowding
slums  is  prevented.
Many colliery compauies today are
PUBLIC HIGHWAYS
Province of British Columbia
NOTICE is hereby given that all
Public Highways in unorganized Districts, and all Main Trunk Roads in
organized Districts are sixty-six feet
wide, and have a width of thirty-
three feet on each side of the mean
stralghi centre line of the travelled
road. THOMAS  TAYLOR,
Minister of Public Works.
Department of Public Works, Vie-
to: in   n. C, July 7, 1911.   jyl8-ol8
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE.
NOTICE Is hereby given that the
reserve of a  parcel of land situated
ou Graham  Island, notice of which
appeared   in   the   Ilritish     Columbia
-^^^————^—-— Gazette  on  the  25fh  of    February,
doing   noble   work   In   this   respect,  1909,   being   dated   23rd   February,
and   the   model   colliery    village    of [1909,  is  cancelled  to  permit of the
lands being acquired by pre-emption
Woodlands, In ihe neighborhood of
Doncaster, is undoubtedly the pride
of Yorkshire. But the coal owner
cannot be expected to completely
shoulder the burdens of the Empire,
and as the archbishop of York has
hinted, this problem of house hunger is a national concern, and dse-
serves  national   consideration.
Should the solution be found in
the Yorkshire coalfields, then the
coming trade booms will have lost
all its terrors, and Yorkshire can
lookfonward to a long spell of flourishing prosperity in business circles
and satisfied contentment among the
workers.
onlv and for no other purpose
ROBT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy  Minister  of Lands.
Department of Lands,
Victoria, B. C, April 5th, 1911.
4-14—7-5
SUQUASH COAL
Alert Bay, on Cormorant Island,
off Vancouver Island, has been made
coaling station for northbound
steamers. C. C. Mitchener of the
Pacific Coast Coal Company, operating at Suquash, is ready to meet
the supply needed hy steamers after
completing arrangements. The coal
will be taken by scow from the Su-
quash mines to Alert Bay, and the
steamers which call there will be
coaled from the scows. Mr. Michener
says the development work at the
Suquash mines has now reached a
stage whereby with two shifts 600
tons per days can be taken out. Mr.
Michener says the company which he
represents has sent 900 tons of coal
from Boat Harbor to Vancouver for
the United States cruiser West Virginia, which has been sent there to
make tests of Vancouver Island coal.
Similar shipments are being sent
from the other island mines and the
United States cruiser will make a
thorough test. Meanwhile, the Wash
ington mines are placing shipments
on board the United States cruiser
Colorado at Seattle for test purposes. The United States government has been bringing coal by steam
freighters at much expense from the
Atlantic Coast for the Pacific Coast
naval stations, and it has been decided to make thorough tests of the coal
of this coast with a view to supplying the naval craft in the Pacific.
NOTICE.
In the matter of an application for
the issue of a duplicate of the Certificate of Title for an undivided
one-half of Lot 883, Group I,
Cassiar District:
Notice is hereby given that it is
my intention to issue at the expiration of one month after the first
publication hereof a duplicate of the
Certificate of Title to the above
mentioned land in the name of William Jordan Larkworthy, which Certificate is dated the 30th day of September, 1910, and numbered 326R.
WILLIAM   E.   BURRITT,
Di'rict Registrar.
Land Registry Office,
Prince Rupert, B. C,
May  26,  1911. J23
WATER  NOTICE
I, C. N. Pring, of Prince Rupert,
B. C, occupation broker, give notice
that on the 12th day of July I intend tho apply to the Water Commissioner at his office in Prince Rupert, for a license to take and use
2.8 cubic feet of water per second
from Hot Springs on border of Lake
Lakelse in the Skeena Land Division of Coast District. The water Is
to be taken directly from the Springs
and Is to be used on Lot No. 3983,
for sanitary purposes.
Dated June 12th, 1911.
C. N. PRING,
6-13-lm Prince Rupert, B. C.
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that John Kir-
kaldy, of Lakelse Valley, oooupation
farmer, tu.. 1 to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 120 chains south
from the south end of Herman
Lake; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80
cliains; thence north 80 chains.
JOHN  KIRKALDY.
Dated April 11, 1911. 5-5
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that I, V. W.
Smith, of Prince Rupert, occupation
contractor, intend to apply for permission to lease the following described foreshore:—Commencing at
a post planted about 2 miles in a
southerly direction from Port Simpson; thence northerly along high
water mark 25 chains and containing all foreshore between high and
low water mark.
V. W. SMITH,
, Locator.
Staked 31st May,  1911. 6-6
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE.
—0-
A Chicago paper offered three dol-
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^     lars for the most original advertise-
Scotland  and Wales are flocking to j ment  for  a  Sunday  issue.     Among
the new coalfields, and when the
full development has taken place a
cosmopolitan crowd will rapidly proceed to develop an entrely different
type of Yorksliireman to the one of
the present day. To the workman
the prospect of a trade boom is very
welcome, but to the calm thinker
good trade has its problems as well
as its undoubted  benefits.
The Archbishop of York recently
declared that "we must bo excessively   alert    In   removing   all   bouses
those received was the following:
"WANTED—Young man In jail
wants to get out; suggestions solicited that might result in Immediate
release; want poet's address who
wrote 'Stone walls do not a prison
make, nor iron bars a cage.'—Address County  Jail."
This so tickled the public that
readers of the paper became interested in the man, and as a result of
an agitation his pardon was granted
by the governor of the state.
You Can Avoid This
by sending your Clothes to the
PIONEER   STEAM   LAUNDRY
There are Many
Reasons Why
IT   IS   TO   YOUR   INTEREST
We do first-class work and
are careful with your Garments. We can do your work
and return it within 48 hours
If necessary. We call for your
L,aundry and return It to you.
Should anything be lost or misplaced we will make It satisfactory.
When your Laundry goes to the Chinks there are many drawbacks. When you send It to us your money helps pay WHITE
LABOR.
PIONEER STEAM LAUNDRY
Notice is hereby given the the
reserve existing by reason of the
notice published in the British Columbia Gazette of the 27th December, 1907, over'lands on Graham Island, formerly covered by Timber
Licences Nos. Nos. 37055, 37056 and
37057, which expired on the 6th day
of November, 1909, and the lands
embraced within Timber Licence No.
37059, which expired on the 25th
day of January, 1909, Is cancelled,
and that the said lands will be open
for pre-emption only under the provisions of Section 7 of the "Land
Act" after midnight on June 16th,
1911.
ROBERT A.  RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Lands Department,
Victoria, B. C,
9th March, 1911.
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE, that I, Minnie
Meredith, of Victoria, B. C, occupation a married woman, intend to
apply for permission to purchase the
following desoribed lands:—Commencing at a post planted about 40
chains distant and in a South direction from the Southeast corner of
Lot 1733; thence east 40 chains
thence south 40 chains; thence west
40 chains; thence north 40 chains
to point of commencement, containing 160 acres more or less.
MINNIE   MEREDITH.
John Kirkaldy,
Agent.
Dated  February  20th,  1911.
Skeena Land  District—District of
Coast, Range 5.
TAKE NOTICE that T. H. Hughes,
of Lakelse Valley, occupation farmer,
intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planb-
ed at the southeast corner of Lot
4128; thence 40 chains north; thence
40 chains east; thence 40 chains
south; tbence 40 chains west to point
of commencement, and containing
160 acres, more or less.
TOM HUGH HUGHES.
Dated June 5, 1911.
Skeena  Land  District—District
of Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that Thomas Stewart, of Prince Rupert, occupation
accountant, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted 40 cliains nortli from
the southwest corner of Lot 1733;
thence west 40 chains; tlience south
40 chains; thence east 40 chains;
tlience north 40 cliains to point of
commencement.
THOMAS  STEWART.
John  Kirkaldy, Agent.
Dated July 7, 1911.
—THE—
WATER  NOTICE
Skeena   Land    District—District   of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that Prince Ru
pert Sand e& Gravel Company, Ltd.,
of Prince Rupert, occupation Industrial Company, intends to apply for
permission to lease the following described land:— Commencing at a
post planted at the Witness post on
the southerly boundary of Lot 4124;
thence southerly following the sinuosities of the shore line 60 cnains
more or less to southerly end of the
Island; tlience easterly 10 chains
more or less to low water mark;
thence northerly 60 chains more or
less along low water mark; tlience
westerly 10 chains more or .esn to
the point of commencement.
PRINCE   .tUPLRT SAND &
GRAVEL Co., LTD.
Per J. Y.  Rochester, Agt.
Dated May 30, 1911. 6-2
Skeena    Land    District—District   of
Coast—Range  V.
TAKE NOTICE that I, Joseph
Pastl, of Watson, Sask., occupation
fanner, Intend to apply for permission to purchase Ihe following described lands:— Commencing at a
post planted about 30 c.ains In a
northerly direction from the N. E.
corner of Lot No. 2662 or T. L. No.
32598 at Lakelse Lake; thence north
20 cliains; tbence east 40 chains;
thence soutli 20 chains along shore
of Lakelse Lake; thence west 40
chains to point of commencement,
containing 120 acres, more or less.
JOSEPH PASTL.
George Hlr, Agent.
Dated  May  5,  1911. 6-2
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, Intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land:—
Commencing at a post planted six
miles N. E. of the mouth of White
River and the junction of the Naas
River on Canyon Creek, marked
Chas. J. Gillingham's S. E. Corner;
tlience 80 chains North; thence 80
chains West; thence 80 chains
South; thence 80 chains East to
point of commencement and containing 640 acres more or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles M. Huff, Agent.
Dated March 4th, 1911. 4-18
Skeena Land  District—District
of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that Joseph Edward Merryfield, of Prince Rupert,
occupation merchant, Intends to apply for permission to lease the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about 10 chains
norm from the northea-.t corner of
Lot 33; thence west 1500 feet to
shore of Smith's Island; thence following shore in a southerly direction
1200 feet; thence east to shore of
De Horsey Island; thence following
shore in a northerly direction to
point of commencomont.
JOSEPH EDWARD MERRYFIELD.
E. Spro, Agent.
Dated April 4, 1911. 4-7
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast Range 5.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles
James Gillingham, of Prince Rupert,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner of Lot 992 and
marked C. J. Gillingham's N, E.
Corner Application for Purchase; I,
C. J.' Gilllngham, Intend to apply
for permission to purchase 320 acres
of land bounded as follows:—Commencing at this poet; thence 80
chains south; thence 40 ohains west;
thence 80 chains north; thence 40
chains east to place of commencement.
C.iARLES JAMES GILLINGHAM
Robert Osborn Jennings, Agent.
Dated January 5, 1911.
NOTICE is hereby given that an
application will be made under Part
V of the "Water Act, 1909," to obtain a licence in the Queen Charlotte
Islands Division of Skeena District.
(a) The name, address and occupation of the applicant—Orland P.
Merrill; Massett, Graham Island,
B.  0.1   prospector.
(If for mining purposes) Free Miner's Certificate No	
(b) The name of the lake,
stream or source (if unnamed, the
description is)—Ain Lake and Ain
River.
.(c) The point of diversion—At
or near Ain Lake.
(d) The quantity of water applied for (in cubic feet per second)
—700.
(e) The character of the proposed
works-Dam, flume, pipe line and
power  plant.
(f) The premises on w'll li t •
water is to be used (de       In  .-
—Near mouth of Ain River.
(g) The purposes for which
water  is  to    be    used—Gene];:;
power.
(h)    If for irrigation, describe
land to be irrigated, giving acre::'*
(I) If the water is to be used for
power or for mining purposes, describe the place where the water Is
to be returned to some natural channel, and the difference in altitude
between point of diversion and point
of return—Near mouth of Ain River
about 150 feet below point of diversion.
(j) Area of Crown land intended
to be occupied by the proposed
works— About 10 acres.
(k) This notice was posted on
the tenth day of June, 1911, and application will be made to the Commissioner on the fourth day of September, 1911.
(1) Give the names and addresses
of any riparian proprietors or licensees who or whose Iands are
likely to be affected by the proposed
works, either above or below the
outlet—None.
(Signature)  ORLAND P. MERRILL,
(P.  O.  Address)   Masset,  B.  C.
George S. Mayer, Agent,
(P.  O.   Address)   Masset,  B.  C.
Note—One cubic foot per second
is equivalent to 35.71 miner's inches.
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Skeena Land District—District of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that I, Charles
Percy Hickman, of Naas Harbour,
occupation constable, intend to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:— Commencing at a post planted on the
east shore of Naas Bay, about two
miles in an easterly direction from
Lot 3, marked C. P. H., S. W. corner; thence east 20 chains; tlience
north 40 chains to the shore; thence
along the shore line to the place of
commencement, containing 40 acres,
more or less.
CHARLES PRECY HICKMAN.
Dated June 7, 1911. 6-30
Skeena   Land   District —District   of
uiteena,
TAKE NOTICE that the Canadian
Canning Company, Limited, of 224
Winch Building, Vancouver, B. C,
occupation salmon caners, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted adjoining
a poBt marked W. N. about 300 feet
South of Wallace's wharf, Naas Harbour, B. O.J thence east 20 chains;
thence south 20 chains; thence west
20 chains; thence following the
coast line In a northerly direction
back to the point of commencement
and containing forty acres more or
less.
CANADIAN CANNING CO., LTD.
Per G. H. Leslie, Agent.
Dated  6th June, 1911. 6-26
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that I, John Y.
Rochester, of Prince Rupert, occupation broker, intend to apply fir permission to lease the following described land:— Commencing at a
post planted on the northerly end of
an Island in the Skeena River about
Mile 45 on the Grand Trunk Pacific
Railway; thence north 1000 feet
more or less to low water mark;
thence westerly along the low water
mark 1000 feet more or less;
thence southerly 1000 feet more or
less; thence easterly 1000 feet to
the place of commencement.
J. Y. ROCHESTER.
Dated May 30, 1911. 6-2
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that T. M. Turner,
of Lakelse Valley, occupation farmer, Intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands: — Commencing at a post
planted on the Omineca & Hazelton
right of way and adjoining the N. E.
corner of Lot 518; thence west 17
chains to corner of Lot 3996; thence
north 20 chains; thence following
right of way to point of commencement.
T. M. TURNER,
John Kirkaldy, Agent.
Dated 14th June, 1911. 7-4
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Skeena Land Notice—District of
Coast—Range V
TAKE NOTICE that Daniel W.
Beaton, of Prince Rupert, B. C, occupation carpenter, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about five miles
up the Exchumslk River from Its
mouth, and on its south bank; thence
east 40 chains; thence north 40
chains; thence west 40 chains;
thence south 40 chains to place of
commencement.
DANIEL  W.  BEATON.
Dated  June  14,  1911. J-ll
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R. C. BEAN
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General   Offices:   Oliver   Typewriter
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PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE   NOTICE   that   thirty   days
from  date,  I, Austin  M.  Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by  occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and  petroleum
on and  under  640  acres of land on
Graham    Island    described    as    follows:—Commencing at post  planted
one mile east of the southeast corner   of   C.L.   4472;   thence   west   80
chains;    thence   nortli    80    cliains;
thence east 80 chains;  thence south
80 chains to place of commencement.
AUSTIN M.  BROWN.
Dated  July  17, 1911. 	
Skeena  Land  District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, Intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the southeast corner of C.L. 4472; thence east 80
chains; tlience north 80 chains;
tlience west 80 chains; thence south
80 chains to place of commencement.
AUSTIN M.  BROWN.
Dated July 17, 191L	
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date. I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occuiiation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the south corner of
C.L.4475; thence north 80. chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence south
80 chains; thence west 80 chains to
place of commencement.
AUSTIN M.  BRO.vN.
Dated July  17,  1911.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the northeast corner
of C.L. 4471; thence west 80 cliains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east
80 chains; thence north 80 chains to
place of commencement.
AUSTIN  M.  BROWN.
Dated July  17, 1911.
Skeeua Land   District—District of
Queen Charlotte
"ARE NOTICE that th'rty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince tvupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the northeast corner
of C.L. 4471; thence east SO chains;
thence south 80 cliains; tbence west
80 clu.Ins; thence north SO chains,
to place of commencement.
AUSTIN'  M.   BROWN.
Dated July  17,  1911.
Skeena  Land  District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE   NOTICE   that   thirty   days
from   date,  I,  Austin  M.   Brown,  of
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE   NOTICE   that   thirty   days
from   date,   I,   Henry   Edenshaw,   of!
Masset, B.  C,  occupation storekeeper, intend tb apply to tlie Chief Commissioner of  Lands for  a license to
prospect for coal and petroleum on
and under 640 acres of land on Graham   Island  described  as  follows:—.
Commencing at a post planted on the ]
west shore of  Vest  River, one mile
easterly from the mouth of said river;   thence south 80  chains;  thence
east    SO    chains;    thence   north   80
chains; thence west 80 cliains to the
place of commencement.
HENRY EDENSHAW.
Dated July  17,  1911.
|   Skeena  Land  District—District  of
Queen Charlotte
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupationfro™t/T'He^Vens'haw^oi
sadler, Intend  to apply to the Chief Masset    B    C     ^occupation  store
Commissioner of Lands for a license Ueepe,' [nUnd to annlv to the Chief
to prospect  for coal and  petroleum commissioned of"l25u   or a license
GrannamU?sdiearnd64°descr^f TZ <° "**«- f°r ^ «< «»
lows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile north of the northeast corner of C.L. 4477; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence north
80 chains, to place of commencement.
AUSTIN M. BROWN.
Dated July  17,  1911.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to tl | "hief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the northeast corner
of C.L. 4474; thence east 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence west
SO chains; thence nortli 80 chains, to
place of commencement.
AUSTIN M.  BROWN*.
Dated July  17,  1911.
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:
—Commencing at a post planted on
the west shore of the West River,
about one mile easterly from the
mouth of said river; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains;
tlience west 80 chains; thence south
80 chains, to place of commencement.
HENRY EDENSHAW.
Dated July 17,  1911
Skeena Land  District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from dale, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 64(1 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the south corner of
C.L. 4410; thence nortli SO chains;
thence west SO chains; thence south
SO chains; thence east SO chains, to
place of commencement.
AUSTIN  M.  BROWN.
Dated  July 17,  1911.
Skeena  Land  District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE   NOTICE   that   thirty   days
from  date,   I,   Austin  M.   Brown,  of
Prince Rupert, B.  C, by occupation
sadler, intend  to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect  for coal and  petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham    Island    described    as    follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the southeast corner   of   C.L.   4470;   thence   east   80
chains;    tlience   north    SO    chains;
tbence west 80 chains;  tlience south
SO chains, to place of commencement.
AUSTIN*  M.   BROWN.
Dated July  17, 1911.
Skeena Land  District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to tbe Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows*—Commencing at post planted
at the southeast corner of C.L. 4477;
thence east SO chains; thence north
SO chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains, to place of
commencement.
AUSTIN M.  BROWN.
Dated July 17, 1911.
Skeena  Land  District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, Tiy occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
at the southeast corner ofC.L.447S;
tlience north 80 chains; uience east
SO chains; e.eence south 80 chains;
thence west SO chains, to place of
commencement.
AUSTIN  M,  BROWN.
Dated July  17, 1911.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by'occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
at the southeast corner of C.L. 4467;
thence north 80 chains; thence east
80 chains; thence south SO chains;
thence west 80 chains, to place of
commencement.
AUSTIN M.  BROWN.
Dated July  17,  1911.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlote Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Wirt A. Stevens, of Chicago, 111., U. S. A., occupation civil engineer, intends to
apply for permission to purchase
the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on
the shore of Masset Inlet about one
mile northeast of the mouth of the
Ain River; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 40 chains more or less
to the eastern boundary of T. L.
35413; thence south along the
boundary of T. L. 35413 and
T. L. 35414, a distance of 80 chains;
thence east 40 chains, more or less,
to point of commencement, containing  320  acres more or  less.
WIRT   A.   STEVEiNS.
G. S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated  Feb.  24th,  1911.
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that I, Roy.
Chrisman, of Port Essington, B. C
occupation prospector, intend to apply for permission to lease the following described land:—Commencing at a post planted about five
miles distant and m a southwesterly
direction from the point at the entrance to Captain Cove, Petrel
Channel, and on the northeast side
of McCauley Island; thence west 20
chains; thence south 40 chains,
thence east about 20 chains to shore
of Petrel Channel; thence northerly
along shore line of Petrel Channel
to point of commencement and containing eighty acres more or less.
ROY  CHRISMAN.
Dated April 11, 1911. 4-25
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that W. H. Ferguson, of Prince Rupert, B. C, occupation civil engineer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about one
mile southerly, following the sinuosities of the shore line from the
southwest corner of Lot 104, Range
V; thence 20 chains west; thence 20
chains south; thence 20 chains west,
thence 20 chains south; thence 20
chains west; thence about 40 chains
south; thence along shore northerly
to point of commencement.
W. H. FERGUSON.
G. Hansen, Agent.
Dated April 22nd, 1911. 4-25
The Very Highest Point
known to the Art of Modern Brewing is found
within every bottle of
Budweiser
t*
The Old Reliable"
Brews will come and brews will go—have their little day—,
then vanish—but Budweiser goes on forever—everlast-'
ing Quality, Purity and Mildness is the reason.
Bottled only (with Corks or Crown Caps)
at the
Anheuser-Busch Brewery
St. Louis, Mo.
The North British Columbia
Liquor Co., Limited
Distributors        Prince Rupert, B.C.
-District of
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M, Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 6 4ti acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the northeast corner
of C.L. 4469; thence west SO chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east
80 chains*; thence north 80 chains,
to place of commencement,
AUSTIN  M.  BROWN.
Daled July  17,  1911.
Skeena Land  District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE   NOTICE   that   thirty   days
from  date,  I, Austin  M.  Brown, of      _^_^_^^_^^_^^^^_^^^^_
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation j post planted about 6    miles    north
sadler,  intend  to apply to the Chie'
Skeena Land District-
Coast
TAKE NOTICE that F. T. Saunders, of Vancouver, occupation master
mariner, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands:— Commencing at a
Skeena Land District—District  or
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M, Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, Intend to uppiy to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham island described as follows:—Commencing nt post planted
one mile east of the northeast corner
of C.L. 4469; thence east SO chains;
thence south SO chains; thence west
SO chains; thence north 80 chains to
place of commencement.
AUSTIN M.  BROWN.
Dated July 17,  1911.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the southeast corner
of C.L. 4475; thence west SO chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence east
80 chains; tbence south 80 chains,
io place of commencement.
AUSTIN  M.  BROWN.
Dated July 17, 1911.
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
at the southeast corner of C.L. 4465;
thence nortli 80 cliains; thence east
80 chains; thence south SO chains;
tlience west SO chains, to place of
commencement,    ,
AUSTIN  M.  BROWN.
Daled July 16, 1911,
west of Love Inlet on the norlh
east shore of Pitt Island; thence
south 20 chains; thence west 40
chains; tlience north to shore;
thence following shore in a southeasterly direction to point of commencement , containing SO acres
more or less.
FRANK TAUNTON SAUNDERS,
Locator.
W, Hamilton, Agent.
Staked 17th, Feb., 1911.
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE thi.t Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for a
license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Commencing at a post planted about
8 miles N. E. of the mouth of the
White River and the junction of the
Naas, marked Chas. J. Gillingham's
S. E. Corner; thence SO chains
North; thence 80 cliains West;
thence 80 chains Soutli; thence 80
chains East to point of commencement and containing 640 acres more
or less.
CHARLES   J.   GILLLNGHAM.
Charles M. Huff, Agent-
Dated March  6th,  1911. 4-1S
WATER XOX1CE.
Skeena Land Districl—District or
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that George Stan
ley Mayer, of Masset, B. C, oceupa
tlon farmer, intends to apply for per-! Flumes
mission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted on die cast shore of
Tsu Skundale Lake; thence east 80 | River
chains; thence south 40 chains, more j <S) The purposes tor which the
or less, to the north boundary of water is to be used—Generating
T. L. 35413;  thence west and south I power.
along the boundaries of T. L. 35413,       (h)     If     Tor    irrigation,  describe
to the shore of the Ain River; thence |i'-e  laI1(1   intended   to     he  irrigated,
NOTICE is hereby given that an
application will be made under Part
V. of the "Water Act, la09," to obtain a licence in the Queen Charlotte Islands Division of Skeena District.
(a) The name, address and occuiiation of the applicant—Merton A.
Merrill, Masset, Q. C. I., B. C,
Prospector.
(If for mining purposes) Free
Miner's  Certificate No	
(b) The name of the lake,
stream, or source (if unnamed, the
description Is)—I-in-tsna Lake, Tsu-
Skundale Lake and Ain  River.
(c) The point of diversion—At r
near the outlet of Tsu-Skundale
Lake into Ain River.
td) The quantity of water ap
plied for (in cubic feet per second)
—1,000.
(e) The character of the proposed   works—Power    Plant,     Dam,
etc.
(f) The premises on which the
water is to be used (describe same)
At or near the mouth of the Ain
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Carl Nelson,
of Chicago, 111., U. S. A., occupation
draughtsman, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 80 chains east
and 120 chains north of N. E. corner of Lot 35; thence south 80
chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence west
SO chains, containing 640 acres.
CARL NELSON.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated, Nov. 26, 1910.
...-,,._., .. ,       ,  ,    Skeena Land District—District of
Skeena   Land   district—District  of   j Queen   ohtvrlotte  Island.
Queen Charlotte „...„ .,„„,.„,-, .,   . „ ,    L _,
TAKE   NOTICE   that   thirty   days!     TAKE  NOTICE  that  Robert Fra-
I'rom   date,   1,   Henry   E sbaw,   of\*fr    °ell,vle'  of  Vancouver,  occupa-
Masset, B. ('., by occupation store-P00 .•■••.•■••«■'•• *nte*!(*s ■» "Pi* ? 4for
keeper, intend to apply to the Chief j Permission to purchase the folowing
Commissioner of Lands tot a license! Ascribed lands:—Commencing at a
to prospect lor coal and petroleum' \'"st Planted about 2 miles west of
on and   under  u,0  acres of land  on I tn''e7.s°I,t,lwe3t,c1or"er ,of, A*   *   l2~
Graham Island described as follows: j ""*„ th„e"ce, ^ • i, dlalnS; S"iS
<•„.„...„....!,■■> ot „ „^Di- „uni„j „„ n,J north   80   chains;   thence   west   80
chains;   thence  south   SO   chains  to
northerly along the shore, back to
the place of commencement, containing 500 acres, more or less.
GEORGE STANLEY MAYER.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 28, 1910.
Commencing at a post planted on the
bank of west River, about one mile
easterly from the mouth of said river; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; tlience east 80
cliains; thence north 80 chains, to
place of commencement,
HENRY EDENSHAW.
Dated July  17,  1911.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Henry Edenshaw, of
Masset, B. C, by occupation storekeeper, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum on
and under 640 acres of land on Graham Island described as follows: —
Commencing at a post planted on the
west shore of West River, about one
mile easterly from the mouth of said
river; thence north 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence south SO
chains; thence east 80 chains, (o
place of commencement.
HENRY EDENSHAW.
Dated July  17,  1911.
point  of commencement,  containing
640 acres.
ROBERT FRASER OGILVIE.
Arthur  Robertson,  Agent.
Dated Dec.  9,  1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that James G.
Cromble, of Prince Rupert, occupation auditor, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:— Commencing at a
post planted at the northwest corner, 55 chains east and 20 chains
south from northeast corner of Lot
1116 (Horry Survey), Coast DIst.,
range 5; Ihence 20 chains east;
thence 25 chains, more or less,
south to Angus McLeod Pre-emption; thence 20 cliains west; thence
26 chains, more or less, north, to
post of commencement, containing
60 acres, more or less.
JAMES  G.   CROMBIE.
Fred Bohlen, Agent.
Dated June 14, 1911, 6-23
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotle Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Robert Cross
of Masset, B. C, occupation farmer,
| intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted on the east shore of Tsu Skundale
Lake; thence east SO chains; thence
north 80 chains, to or near to the
H. E. corner of Lot 35; thence west
40 chains, more or less; thence
south 40 chains, more or less; tlience
west 40 chains more or less, following the southern boundaries of Lot
35; thence south to the shore; thence
southerly along the shore back to the
place of commencement, containing
500 acres, more or less.
ROBERT CROSS.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 28, 1910.
siving acreage ^^^^^^^^^^^^^
(1) If the water is to be used for
power or mining purposes, describe
tho place wliere the water is to he j
returned to some natural channel,
and tlie difference, in altitude hej-
tween point of diversion nnd point
of return—At or near the mouth of
the Ain River, about 1 no feet below
point ol diversion.
(.11 Area of Crown land Intended to he occupied by the proposed
work:-   -1'I  acres inure or lesn.
fk) This notice was posted on
the 28th day of November, 1910,
and application will be made to the
Commissioner on  tbe  1st    day    or
June,   1911.
(I) Give the names and addresses ol any riparian proprietors or
licensees who or whose lands are
likely  to lee. affected by    the
Skeena     Land    District—District   of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that Freadrlck
.Madden, of Seattle, Wash., occupation laborer, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
lescribed land:—Commencing at a
post planted about two hundred feet
east of mile 77 on the south side of
(I. T. P. Right-of-way; thence west
40 chains following the said Right-
of-way; thence soutli to bank of
Skeena River; thence east following
the sinuosities of said river until
due south of said post; thence north
to point of commencement, containing 130 acres more or less.
FREADRICK  MADDEN.
Thos. L. Fay, Agent.
Dated April 27, 1911.
5-16
NOTICE.
A book is kept in tbe City Clerk's
(ifrii'e In which to inter the names
and addresses, etc. or citizens of
Prince Rupert desiring employment
on City work. All desiring employment   should  register at   onro.
ERNEST A.   WOODS.
City Clerk
Skeena Land District-    District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE  NOTICE    that     Merton  A.
 pro-1 Merrill, of Massi'l,  II. C, occupation
posed  works, either above or below prospector, Intends to apply for per-
""  --"-*     "**•    " '--- ' mission to purchase the following de-
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Christina Orr
ol Masset, B. C., occupation married
Intends  to  apply  for  permission  to
the outlet—Don't know  of any.
(Signature)
MERTON  A.   MERRILL,
(P.   O.   Address)   .Masse-,   B.   C
NOTE.—One   cubic   loot   per   second  is equivalent  to  35.71
inches.
scribed lands:—Commencing at
post planted at the S. W. corner of
T. L. 40787; thence nortli 80 chains;
thence west SO chains; tlience south
miner's i Sn chains, more or less, to the shore
' of Masset, Inlet; thence easterly along
the shore back to tbe place of commencement, containing 640 acres,
more or less.
MERTON A. MERRILL.
Dated Nov. 25, 1010.
Skeent LaLd District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that. Clara Orr, of
Masset,   B    C..   occupation   spinster,
 intends  to  apply  for  permission   to
purchase    the    following    described | purchase  the     following    described
lands: —Commencing at a post plant-1 lands;—Commencing at a post plant-:
ed about 40 chains south and 3 miles , "d   aboul   40   chains  soulh   and   80 j
east of the N.  E. corner of Lot 35;   cliains  east  of  tho  N.  E.  corner  of,
tlience south 40 chains;  thence west | Lot  35;   thence  south     SO     chains;
SO chains;  thence north  40 chains; ! tlience west SO chains; thence north     ,,,,,.,,,, . .     .
tlience east 80 chains, containing 320 . SO chains; thence east SO chains, con-  AM kln"8 or legitimate detective work
acres. I taining 640 acres. handled  for companies and   Indlvld-
CHRISTINA ORR. CLARA ORR. uals.     Business  strictly  confidential.
M. A. Merrill, Agent. , M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 25, 1910. Dated Nov. 25, 1910. -• °- Bo* 8IM — 'I,0Ile ■•-■*
Prince  Rupert   Private   Detective
Agency
X. McDonald,  Manager PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Friday,  August  4,  1911.
prince iRupert journal
Telephone   138
Published twice a week ou Tuesdays and Fridays from the office of
publication. Third Avenue, near
McBride Street.
Subscription rate to any point in
Canada, $2.00 a year; to points outside of Canada, $3.00 a year.
Advertising rates furnished on
application.
0. H. NELSON,
Editor.
■'-S*t>*'
Friday,  August   I,   1911.
assurances be given until Prince Rupert has had a chance to be heard.
The speechs of those interested in
the move in Vancouver give no uncertainty as to the evident intention
to get an advantage over this northern port. We reel satisfied that the
premier of the province, having the
interests of the whole province at
hear rather than any particular portion of ii, will carefully weigh the
interests of Prince Rupert before acting along the lines suggested, .ns
attention should be drawn to the situation as early as possible.
RAILWAY   PROM   VANCOUVER
The movement which has been
started In Vancouver for a railway
to the north is being taken up readily by the various cities of the south.
The promoters of the scheme, namely
the business interests of Vancouver,
are now throwing aside all attempts
tu conceal the real object of the
movement, which is to offset Prince
Rupert in securing the trade with the
interior.
At a recent meeting held in New
Westminster, when the Vancouver
delegation met the business men ot
that city and urged joint action, F.
Carter-Cotton, formerly a member of
the provincial government, devoted
himself in no small measure to showing that the country sought to be
Invaded by a line of railway running
north from Vancouver to the line of
the G. T. P. would bring the territory referred to closeer to the sea
at Vancouver than at Prince Rupert.
"Unless something is done they
would not only lase any new markets, but they also stood to lose
markets which already had, such as
Cariboo. Ashcroft might not always
attract the Cariboo business," Mr.
Cotton  is  reported  to  have said.
Further, Mr. Cotton is reported to
have said: "If people pressed the
matter on the government he thought
the government would see that it
.vas a good business proposition."
A. G. McCandless at the meeting
stated that "with the completion of
the G. T. P. the northern transcontinental line would capture of the
trade of Northern Q. C."
\V. II. Malkin pointed out that
"between Fort George and Fort MacLeod there were 30,000,000 acres of
wheat, lands. The grain from this
territory could be shipped out here
(Vancouver and New Westminster)
as a port open all the year round.
They would have to get the provincial government to guarantee
bonds."
With a strong resolution, backed
up by Boards of Trade and other
bodies in the south, the provincial
government is being asked to guarantee the bonds of a line of railway to
tap the northern areas referred to
and draw the trade to the southern
ports. To Prince Rupert, this trade
naturally belongs, as we have before
referred. It is up to Prince Rupert
to take the best steps possible to
offset the move now made, it may
be urged that it is a selfish view
to take of the situation hut it is
equally selfish the way the south
regards the situation. Prine-e Rupert's interests will not be taken care
of it' an effort is nol made on behalf
of the city tei protect Itself.
The elevators and warehouses
which the members of the Vancouver Board of Trade depict as about
to be erected as a result of the connection which they seek would be
equally possible here if that connection Is not given the south at once
but  is allowed  to  flow  this  way.
Tlie matter is something the Board
of Trade here might well take steps
to checkmate. If deenieden ecesary,
the provincial government might be
petitioned in the matter and asked
to look well to Prince Rupert's interests In tliis connection before undertaking anything along the line
suggested by the soutli. ir considered of sufficient urgency it might
be wise to send word to .Mayor Man-
son, who Is now on his way soutli,
asking liini to put in a preliminary
protest from the Board of Trade to
Premier   McBride   and   ask   that   no
t      News of the Province      %
*. .. -:
PRIZE  WINNING  HERD
NEW WESTMINSTER—Manitoba
newspapers and livestock journals
reaching the coast during the past
few days record—inthelr eulogistic
references to the stock ring display
ai the great Winnipeg exhibition—a
veritable and complete triumph for
the blooded aristocrats from the
model farm at the Coquitlani Retreat
for the Insane, which famous herd
it is part of Dr. Young's well considered scheme to make of infinite
value to provincial stock raisers in
the improvement of the standard of
their herds. The herd at Regina, In
competition with the very best herds
of the American continent duplicated the record at Winnipeg.
DEATH OF JIKS. FRASER
QUESNEL—The news of the death
of Mrs. J. A. Fraser in Vancouver
has caused the deepest regret beret.
Mr. Eraser, who left hurriedly for
Vancouver on receipt, of a telegram
informing him or her serious illness,
did not reach her bedside before
death came, although he had made a
very fast trip. Death was due to
heart failure. The deceased had been
troubled oftentimes with neuralgia of
the lining of the heart. More re-
cently she had suffered especially
from nervous trouble. Early in life
a severe fall from a street car had
made the prospect of her being able
to walk again unlikely. Since then
she had had operations at different
times; so that during the course of
her life she had sufefred much. Mrs.
Eraser's maiden name was Ursula C.
C. Smith. . She was born in Glasgow,
Scotland, and came to Cariboo in the
early nineties. She was at first engaged as governess at Cottonwood
House. About sixteen years ago she
became the wife of John A. Fraser,
at. that time manager of the Reid
estate.
SPORTS
CORINTHIANS COMING
When that ocean greyhound, the
Empress of Britain, plows her majestic way across the Atlantic, and
docks at Quebec in the course of a
couple of week or so there will disembark that famous combination of
association footballers, the London
Corinthians, and cables tell us that
that it is one of tlie greatest aggregations of amateur footballers that
has ever left the shores of the tight
little isle ayont the seas. A glance
at the names of the players who
will make up the team certainly conveys this impression, for many renowned teams, both amateur and
professional, have left the Motherland within recent years for foreign
parts, but somehow or other Canada seems to have been sidetracked
and hasn't got her proper share of
tlie good things along this line, notwithstanding tlie fact that Canada is
Britain's nearest possession, and that
there are probably more Old Country
people in the Dominion than all the
oilier colonies combined. Be that
as it may, however, the anticipation
nf the tans or the past six months
Will  soon   be  a  realization.
The tour ot the Corinthians will
begin at  Toronto on August 5  with
a game with the newly tormed Big
Four League at the Island Stadium,
Toronto and before their itinerary
is completed the tourists will have
traveled some 10,000 miles in Canada and the United States, and played
something like twenty games in a
little over two months.
The Corinthians second game will
be against Toronto and District
League on that city civic holiday,
August 7, and on the following Wednesday, August 9, the amateurs are
due in Hamilton. From Hamilton
the team will go to Montreal, Co-
halt, Fort William, Winnipeg, Regina, Saskatoon, Prince Albert, Edmonton, Calgary, Vancouver, Victoria Fernie, Chicago, Philadelphia,
Newark, New York, Fall River, etc.
In Cobalt and Fort William public
holidays have been declared in honor
of the visitors, and other western
cities are following suit. They are
due In Vancouver the latter part of
August. The Corinthians toured
Spain this spring, tlie amateurs putting on cricket scores against the
Spaniards.
The Corinthian team will consist
of such renowned athletes as: G. G.
Newman, goal; F. N. Tuff and I. E.
Snell of Oxford, backs; W. T. Tim-
mins (English International), H. G,
Howell Jones, M. Morgan Owen
I Wels Internationals), R. G. Thompson, P. A. Sergeant, R. M. Weeks
and R. R. Bradell (the famous sprinter), half backs; S. H. Day (English International), C. E. Brisley,
I). O. Corbett, Al Corbett and G. C.
Vassall (all English Internationals).
R. C. Maniples, H. C. Bache (the
Cambridge captain) and L. Becker-
steet, son of the well known bishop
of that ilk, and also skipper of the
Oxford Blues, will compete in the
forward line. The team will be in
charge of C. Wreford-Brown, president of the Corinthian Club.
Alex. Faulds, M.E., came from up
the Skeena last evening and went
south  this morning.
 o	
Duncan Ross arrived from Hazelton last night on his way south.
 o •
TO   VISIT   COAST
Arrangements   Made   for  Geologists
Who Attend Congress in 11)13
to Come to This Part
In connection with the International Geological Congress to be held
in Canada in 1913, a series of excursions for the delegates has been
arranged to allow visits to the various mining sections of the country.
They will include visits to the Pacific Coast. The arrangements as
they affect the northern part of the
coast have been arranged as follows:
Toronto to Vancouver, via C. P. R.,
C. N. R., G. T. R. and C. P. R.—
Toronto to Edmonton. Excursions
en route, Lake Agassiz, Lake Winni-
pegosis. Edmonton to Yellowhead
Pass. Edmonton to Banff excursions.
BaiiTf to Glacier excursion. Glacier
to Vancouver, fifteen days. Leaders,
Messrs. McEvoy, Tyrrell, Dowling
and Coleman.
Alaska Yukon Excursion—This excursion would leave Vancouver after
the three parties sent across the continent by different routes had all
reached the coast.
The route would be from Vancouver to Skagway by steamer, Skagway
to Whitehorse by rail, and White-
horse to Dawson by river steamer.
A short visit to the copper and iron
deposits on Texada Island, and a trip
up Portland Canal to Stewart. This
canal or fiord cuts completely
through the coast range and an opportunity would be afforded for
studying the still unsettled question
of fiord origin. The mineral deposits and glaciers of the Portland Canal
district are also worth visiting.
From Skagway part of the Lewis
River valley Is followed down to
Whitehorse. The glacial features of
the valley are very interesting.
The river trip from Whitehorse to
Dawson down the great Yukon River
orrers many problems lor discussion,
among the mthose or peneplanatlon
i the  river passes  through  a  typical
• I ■ •I' 0* *•* *I* •!* *•*• *** **• *I* *I* ♦I* *I* *I* *»* ♦** *!*■ 'I* *I* *»* *»* •2* *** *** ••*
-5*
I Remember
| That we
I Import
I Our Wines
direct from Europe; and that
no house in Prince Rupert can
equal them for quality. No
better can be bought anywhere
in the Province. We make a
specialty  of
Family Trade
and guarantee satisfaction
* We  also  carry  a   complete *
* *
* stock of other *
* *
* *
Liquors       1
Try a glass of
Cascade
Beer
jj       The best local beer on the ¥
*   market. £
CLARKE BROS.
.;. Christiansen & Brandt Bid.       •:•
* *
* *
* Telephone 39       Third Avenue  *
* *
* *
* *
* *
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *.;. * * .j. *
one), the cause of the absence of
glaciation nortli of the Rink Rapid,
and the origin of the huge trough
In which the river flows, often sunk
tor thounds of feet below the bordering uplands. Twenty-three day trip.
Vancouver Island Excursion—This
excursion will occupy two or three
days, and will include a visit to Victoria and an examination of the coal
fields of Nanaimo.
WILL   NOT   RUN
NEW WESTMINSTER—Following
hard upon the announcement from
Ottawa of the dissolution or parliament and the Hxing of the polling
date for the general election on September 21 came one or much interest
In local political circles. J. W.
Weart, reeve of Burnaby, vvho was
nominated on April 21 at a convention of the Liberals of New Westminster constituency, as the party standard bearer In the next federal contest, has, in a letter to the president
of the City Liberal Association, Geo.
Kennedy, notified his party associates that he will not. be able to contest the seat of the sitting member,
J. D. Taylor. Mr. Weart gives as
the reason for this decision on the
eve of the opening of the contest
that the pressure ot business engagements stands in the way ot his giving the time necessary to the fight
for reciprocity. At the local convention, when Mr. Weart became the
choice of  the   party,  his   supporters
The British Columbia Company
LIMITED.
AUTHORIZED CAPITAL $100,000.::  PAID UP CAPITAL $41,500
DIRECTORS:—Reginald C. Brown, President; J. C. Maclure, Vice-
President; H. E. Marks, Managing Director; Capt. E. Nash, William
McNair, R. A. Bevan, and F. C.   Williams, Secretary.      :-:      :-:
INTEREST 4 PER CENT. DEPOSITS
This Company acts as Executors,  Administrators, Transferees and
Secretaries to Public Companies.    Commercial, Industrial and other
business propositions underwritten.    Issues  made  on   the
London and New York Stock Exchanges.
TIMBER, COAL, LANDS, and
COMPANY ORGANIZATION
Head Office for Canada, 203, 208, 210, 215 Carter-Ootton Building.
VANCOUVER, B.C.
DURESCO
The King of Water Paints
FIRST IN THE FIELDEEEEFOREIST EVER SINCE
:SOLE AGENTS IN WESTERN CANADA-
The Staneland Co. Ltd
836-840 Fort Street, VICTORIA, B.C.
'  Replenish  '
the
I
I
I
I
Pantry
High-Class....
Grocery
Stock
to choose from
EVERYTHING CLEAN AND FRESH
Goods for the Table to Suit the Most
Fastidious  Housewife
«J
! MERRYFIELD'S ■
i
i
L.
CASH GROCERY
I
I
■
.J
strongly opposed the selection of a
candidate at that time, the impression being general that Mr. Weart
did not wish lo accept the candidature until the redistribution bill liuil
been brought down, which it was anticipated would divide the New
Westminster constituency in a manner favorable to Mr. Weart's chances,
Job  Printing of all kinds neatly
executed at the Journal Office.
J The Thompson
j Hardware Co.
y —Second Avenue	
o
<-   Paints. General Hardware,
''     Oils, Stoves and Ranges.
2nd Avenue
Prince Rupert,
B.C.
Real
Estate
INVESTMENTS
Real
Estate
List Your
Properties
with
Uncle Jerry
JEREMIAH H. KUGLER
He Sells Buildings He Sells Contracts
He has Houses to Rent
He Buys Lots He Builds Homes
He Buys Leases He Loans Money
He Has Farms for Sale
He Sells Houses He Rents Stores
Kama
JEREMIAH H. KUGLER
Special Bargains in
KITSELAS LANDS
FRANCOIS LAKE LANDS
LAKELSE LANDS
HAZELTON   DISTRICT   LANDS
SAND,   GRAVEL   AND   MARBLE   DEPOSITS
BULKLEY  VALLEY  LANDS
KISPIOX VALLEY LANDS
PORCHER  ISLAND LANDS
KITSUMKALUM   LANDS n
Friday,  August  4,  1911.
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
MAKE CHEAP GAS
Plant to be Established in Vancouver to
Manufacture Small Equipments
Under New Process
Inventor With Works Elsewhere Hus
Decided to Locate on This
Coast
With instructions left for his local
agent to start without delay upon his
plans for the construction of a manufacturing plant for his gas machines,
L. B. de Laitte, tbe prominent
French inventor, departed from Vancouver a few days ago for Calgary,
en route to Chicago, where he will
inspect his factory at that place before proceeding lo France. Mr. de
Laitte will spend but little time in
France, for he expects to visit his
various European factories before
sailing for Australia, during the Iat.-
ter part of the year. He will return
to Vancouver from the Antipodes in
March, 1912, by which time he expects his local factory will have been
completed and in working order. "I
am more than satisfied with the success with which 1 met while in British Columbia, and I feel certain that
my determination to make this my
manufacturing centre for Canada will
prove a wise choice. British Columbia is the busiest province of thet
Dominion.'
The idea of Mr. de Laitte's invention Is the automatic production of
gas; in other words, whereas heretofore municipalities had to maintain
costly gas plants, or pay expensive
tributes to operating companies,
communities will now be enabled to
install a gas-producing apparatus
that will work automatically and
which will require no attendants to
lock after it.
Wliere now the average charge for
gas service is $1.36 per 1,00 cubic
feet, the de Laitte gas machine will
produce the same amount for 50
cents. A house of twenty rooms,
burning lights In every room, and
maintaining radiators In every room,
besides running an engine, a milk
cleaner, an Ice making machine, a
vacuum cleaner, a butter making
machine, cooking stove, laundry, two
incubators, and five flatirons, will
not require more than thirteen cents'
worth of gas per hour to operate all
the enumerated necessities and devices, and proprotionately less If all
are not working at the same time.
"A small town may be able to in
stall a perfect gas lighting system
of my design for $.1,000 which will
equal in efficiency and size the usual
$100,000 plant of the carbonating
gas companies," explained Mr. det
Laitte.
"i came here for the express purpose of looking over the field and
before making any definite arrangements, and 1 am so satisfied with
local conditions, as I find them, that
1 have decided upon Vancouver as
my manufacturing centre for Canada
I have already a large plant In Chicago and a financial syndicate in
Montreal, besides factories in Gere-
many, France, London, and Sydney,
N. S. W., and while I have as yet
no plant in this city 1 have already
rush orders for 260 gas machines
for Vancouver, besides .numerous
other orders for places in Alberta.
Canada is a place which every manufacturer of a commodity must reckon with, and Vancouver is, in my
opinion, the best field for the establishment of a manufacturing plant."
STOCK   WIDELY  HELD
Wliere the Shareholders of Canadian
Railway Companies  Arc
Located
Ihe stock of the Canadian Pacific
Railroad Company Is probably the
most widely held of any American
load, with the exception of the Pennsylvania, which recently reported
64,SOU shareholders. There Is considerable difficulty In learning the
number of shareholders of the Canadian railroads and in what countries
the stock is held. Sir Thomas
Shaughnessy has stated that the total number of Canadian. Pai'ific
shareholders is about 24,000, the
number of Canadian holders being
f;,500. Nearly all the 4 per cent
preference stock is held in Great
Britain. Of the common .stock,
holders in Great Britain have approximately 65 per cent, 15 per cent
being held on the Continent, while
the remaining 20 per cent Is divided
evenly between Canada and the United States.
Grand Trunk shares are held by
54,200 persons, against 52,900 a year
ago. This puts the Grand Trunk second only to the Pennsylvania Railroad, which has 64,869 shareholders.
The Grand Trunk has £22,474,992
common and £23,173,632 preferred,
nnd,  as  Is   well  known,   Ihe  shares
are almost eclusivexly held in England.
Charles M. Hays, president of the
Grand Trunk, states that from 75
to 90 per cent of that road's shareholders are residents in Great Britain. Ninety^eight per cent of the securities of the Canadian Northern
Railway are held in the United Kingdom.
Mr. Brunner, of the Brunner banking house, Brussels, twenty-five years
ago first interested Belgian capital
in Canada in the shape of Investments in Canadian Pacific Railroad
stock. At that time, as he says, he
experienced great difficulty in convincing his countrymen that the Dominion was more than a wild stretch
of ice and snow and the Canadian
Pacific something more than a fantasy. In those days Canadian Pacific Railroad was selling at 58. Belgian investors, therefore, have no
reason to regret their confidence in
this Canadian enterprise. Mr. Brun-
ner's clients have invested several
millions of dollars in other Canadian-
owned securities, more especially Sao
Paulo, Rio, and Mexican railroads.
German capital has become interested to a small extent in the Canadian Northern enterprise, and is
likely to become further interested
In  the near future.
PROMISE   OF  OIL
Borings on West Coast of Graham Island
Indicate That Success Wili
Follow Work.
Weather Conditions About Skidegate
Is All That Could Be
Wished  For
Skidegate, Aug. 2. — Mr. Giling-
liani, road superintendent, and his
son lately arrived from Masset, having made tlie trip over the new sections of road being constructed. They
went on to Prince Rupert by
steamer.
The weather continues  very fine,
YOU ARE SURE OP
Engine  Reliability
IP YOU  RUN A
Fairbanks - Norse Marine Engine
OVER 125,000 IN USE THROUGHOUT THE WORLD
TWO
CYCLE
FOUR
CYCLE
HEAVY
DUTY
MEDIUM
DUTY
■
Runabout
Type
MOST  COMPLETE  LINE OP GASOLINE ENGINES IN
THE WORLD
Write  for Catalog P10
The Canadian Fairbanks Co., Ltd.
101-107 WATER STREET     -        - -        VANCOUVER, B. C.
Local Agent—F. M. DAVIS     .... PRINCE RUPERT
Skeena
of
Land    District—District
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that Edward H.
Port, of Prince Rupert, B. O, occupation farmer, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following described lands*.— Commencing
at a post planted in the South West
Corner, on the shore line of Lake
Lakelse; thence 20 chains East, to
South West Corner of Lot 684;
tlience 30 chains North, following
along the West line of Lot 684 to
post; thence South, following along
the shore line of said Lake to point
of commencement, containing about
40 acres.
EDWARD H. PORT,
By C.  N.  Pring, Agent.
Dated June 26,  1911. 6-26
6-26
J. L. PARKER
.MINING ENGINEER
Prince Rupert, B. C.
Open for Consultation and Mine
Examination
allowing those engaged  in  all  lines 'Temporary Address: —
of enterprise to make good progress.
Gardens and such crops as are being cultivated are doing well, the
crops showing what can be done in
this part of the province.
Good reports reach here from the
boring outfit in search of oil on
Frederick Island, on the west coast
of Graham Island. They are making good progress with the drill and
those on the ground are more than
delighted with the prospects.
Bachelors on the Islands have e-x
cused themselves heretofore, saying
it was too far to go to Prince Rupert
for a license. The government is
doing all it, can to help them out
now. Licenses can now be obtained
on the ground. Something should
be doing this  fall.
PULLMANS WERE NOT POUPLAR
Who   the   First   Pullman   Conductor
Was  and   Hon   the  Cars
Were Operated
It isn't generally known, points
out the Kansas City Star, but it is
a fact, neverthe'ess, that Colonel J.
L, Barnes, for nearly a third of a
century superintendent of the Southern Kansas division of the Sante Fe,
was the first Pullman conductor in
the world. While in a reminiscent
mood recently the colonel told of his
experiences as the first Pullman conductor:
"In 1858, George M. Pullman arranged with the Chicago & Alton
Railway for two of their day coaches,
which he fitted up as sleeping cars.
Mr. Pullman at that time had an
office on Madison street in Chicago.
I passed bis office going to and from
my boarding house and on account
of a notice In the papers that Mr.
of the cars that was then used on
Prince Rupert Inn
LOCAL  IMPROVEMENT  NOTICE
TAKE NOTICE that the Municipal
Corporation of the City of Prince Ru
pert intends to make the following
local improvements:
A seventeen foot plank sidewalk
on the north and south sides of 2nd
avenue between centre line of 4th
street and 8th street, and to assess
the final cost, thereof upon the property fronting or abutting thereon, or
to be benefitted thereby, and that a
statement and diagram showing the
lots to be so especially assessed for
the said improvement or work is now
filed in the office of the City Clerk
and is open for inspection during
office hours.
The estimated cost of the work
is $5,090.96.
Dated at Prince Rupert this 28th
day of July, 1911.
ERNEST A. WOODS,
City Clerk.
Wm. Mahlon Davis, City Engineer.
8-1
CITY  OF  PRINCE  RUPERT
Pullman was going to put sleeping
cars on the Chicago & Alton, I made
application to him for a position as
conductor.
"In September, 1858, he took me
to Bloomington to bring out the first
car that he had reay for use. This
car as I remember, was a low deck
one and had been used for a long
time as a.passenger coach. It had
rods running up and down at the end
of each berth. The upper berth was
pulled up on the rear side by a rope
and pu'ley and the front of the berth
slid up on these rods and was fastened with an iron catch. The lower berth was made out of the two
seats turned together.
"As 1 now rememberer, I was paid
$2 a night and made up my report
in Mr. Pullman's office at the end
of eacn round trip, deducting $4
from  my  collections  for niv pay.     1
understood, one one trip, that the' TAKE NOTICE that the Municipal
man who ran opposite m» was short Corporation of the City of Prince
50  cents  of  enough   money  to  pay, Rupert intends to make the following
THE CONTINENTAL TRUST COMPANY, LIMITED
Authorized Capital     8500,000
Officers:
WILLIAM T. KERGIN, M. D., Pies.  DAVID   H.   HAYS,  First Vice-Pres.
M. J. HOBIN, 2nd Vice-Pres. & Mgr.  JAY   KUGLER,   Secretary-Treasurer
C.  B.  PETERSON, Ass't  Munnger
Executor and Administrator Receiver or Assignee
Fiscal Agents Trustees
Real  Estote and  Insurance
Registrar and Transfer Agent K*"'m Lal,ds and *Mll,es
Agent for Care of Real Estate Escrow Agents
Trustee  Under Mortgages  and  Deeds of Trust Collections
SAVINGS DEPARTMENT
4 per cent on Deposits        SAFE DEPOSIT VAULT AND BOXES
We will be pleased to answer any inquiries regarding Investments In
Prince Rupert and Northern British Columbia,
THE CONTINENTAL TRUST COMPANY, LIMITED
SECOM) AVENUE
PRINCE   RUPERT,  11.  C.
Double Weekly Service
S.S. PRINCE RUPERT & S.S. PRINCE GEORGE
Sail for Vancouver,  Victoria and Seattle
Mondays ami Fridays al 8 a.m.
For STEWART Thursdays and Sundays 8 a.m.
special reduced fareSunday's boat $9.50
return,  Including   meals   anel   berths.
S.S.PRINCE ALBERT for Port Simpson, Naas River, Masset and
Naden  Harbor,  Wednesdays, 1 P.M., and for Queen Charlotte
Island   points,   Saturdays, 1  P.M.
RAILWAY SERVICE TO COPPER    RIVER,    mixed    trains from
Prince   Rupert   Wednesdays r.iid  Saturdays,  1   P.M.;   returning   Thursdays   and   Sundays,  5:20 P.M.
THE GRAND TRUNK RAILWAY SYSTEM, connecting with
trains from the Pacific Coast, operates a frequent and convenient
service of luxurious trains over Its DOUBLE TRACK route between
Chicago, Toronto, Montreal, Quebec, Halifax, Portland, Boston,
New York and Philadelphia.
Atlantic  Steamship  bookings arranged via all lines
Full information and tickets obtained from the office of
A. E. McMASTER
Freight and Pasenger Agent, G. T. P. Whart.
LOC/iL IMPROVEMENT NOTICE
Parties requiring dumping grounds
for excavated material are requested
I., forward application to tbe City
Engineer, before August 1, stating:
1st. The location of lot to be
graded.
2nd. Estimated quantity of rock
excavation.
3rd. Estimated quantity of earth
excavation.
4th. Date at which it is proposed
to erect building on excavated lot.
Applicants who have buildings already erected and those contemplating building in the immediate future
will receive preference.
WM. MAHLON DAVIS,
City  Engineer.
E. A. Woods, City Clerk. 7-28
LOCAL IMPROVEMENT NOTICE
his own  wages.
"1 remember well looking at one
the Lake Shore. This ear was railed
'Woodruff Patent, but was very unpopular on acount of the two upper
shelves, as they were actually only
shelves for people to sleep on, Mr.
Pullman, after using the two old
coaches a year or more, commenced
the building of a new car, which was
a very fine one. The construction of
this car was in charge of a Mr.
Field. At that time Mr. Pullman
was in the mining business near
Black Hawk, Col., and had not seen
the car until at was at ...eon, coming
home from Colorado. I showed him
the good points about the car and I
remember what he said: 'It ought to
be good—it cost enough.'
**********************************4.**+***************
!      GROUND      !
Floor Space For Rent
IN THE
HART BUILDING
Corner of Second Avenue and Sixth Street
The Best Business Corner in
Prince Rupert
j Jermiah H. Kugler, Ltd. I
* * * * * * * * * * ***** * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * •;•-"•
local  improvements:
A seventeen foot plank sidewalk
on the nortli side of 2nd avenue between McBride street and the cen-
tie line of 4th street, and to assess
the final cost thereof upon the property fronting or abutting thereon, or
to be benefitted thereby, and that a
statement and diagram showing the
lots to be so especially assessed for
the said improvement or work Is now
filed In the office of the City Clerk
and is open for inspection during
office hours.
The estimated cost of the work is
$2,729.02.
Dated at Prince Rupert this 28th
day of July, 1911.
ERNEST  A.   WOODS,
City Clerk.
Wm. Malhon Davis, City Engineer,
8-1
LOCAL IMPROVEMENT NOTICE
TAKE NOTICE that the Municipal
Corporation of the City or Prime
Rupert Intends to make tlie following local Improvements:
A twelve foot plank sidewalk on
the north and south sides of 3rd
avenue between the centre line of 4th
street and 8th street, and to assess
the final cost thereof upon the property fronting or abutting thereon or
to be benefitted thereby, and that ti
statement and diagram showing the
lots to be so specially assessed for
the said Improvement oi work, is now
filed in the office of the City Clerk
and is open for inspection during
office  hours.
The estimated cost of the work is
$3,077.39.
Dated at Prince Rupert this 28th
day of July, 1911.
ERNEST A,  woons,
City  Clerk.
Wm. Malhon Davis, City Engineer.
8-1
TAKE NOTICE that the Municipal
Corporation of the City of Prince
Rupert intends to make the following local improvements:
A twelve foot plank sidewalk on
the north and south sides of 3rd
avenue between McBride street and
centre line of 4th street, and to
assess the final cost thereof upon
the property fronting or abutting
there on. or to benefitted thereby,
and that a statement and diagram
showing the lots to be so especially
assessed for the said improvement
or work is now filed in the office
of the City Clerk and is open for inspection during office hours.
The estimated cost of the work is
$3,C92.93.
Dated at Prince Rupert this 28th
day of July, 1911.
ERNEST A.  WOODS,
City Clerk.
Wm. Malhon Davis, City Engineer.
8-1
Excursions!
Let us tell you all about the cheap
ROUND TRIP EXCURSIONS
to all Towns and  Cities in Eastern
Canada and United  States
Via
The Great Northern
Choice of Return Route
Tickets to the Old Country by all
Lines. Take any Steamer from
Prince Rupert.
ROGERS STEAMSHIP AGENCY
Phone llfi Second Ave
Prince Rupert, B.C.
LOCAL IMPROVEMENT NOTICE
CHAN PACIFIC RU CO.
B. C. Coast S. S. Service
TAKE NOTICE that the Municipal Corporation of the City of Prince
Rupert intends to make the following
local improvements:
A seventeen foot plank sidewalk
on the south side of 2nd avenue
between McBride street and centre
line of 4th street, and to assess the
final cost thereof upon the property
fronting or abutting thereon, or to
be benefitted thereby, and that a
statement and diagram showing the
lots to be so especially assessed for
the said improvement or work is
now filed in the office of the City
Clerk and is open for inspection during office hours.
The estimated cost of the work
is  $2,734.23.
Dated at Prince Rupert this 28 day
of July, 1911.
ERNEST   A.   WOODS.
City Clerk.
Wm. Malhon Davis, City Engineer.
8-1
>#
Famous
Princess
Line
Princess Royal
Saturday, July 29, 8 a. m.
SOUTHBOUND FOR
Vancouver, Victoria,
AND
Seattle
J. G. McNAR,
General Agent.
******** ******************
I STORAGE?
efe J
*   Household Goods and  Baggage *
':' given careful attention. ...
X   Forwarding,   Distributing   and .;.
Shipping  Agents |
TRANSFERERS |
Prince     Rupert     Warehousing  *
and   Forwarding   Co. *
First   Ave.,   near   McBride   St.  *
DOUGLAS SUTHERLAND,      *
Manager.  .;.
P. o. Box dot Phone zaz *
Free Employment
Office
•;■
For all kinds of help. Cooks, waiters, dishwashers, hotel porters, all
kinds of laborers or mechanics, call
up  178  or call at  the
FREE EMPLOYMENT OFFICE
GRAND HOTEL
Headquarters for Cooks and Walters
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Alice Millard,
of Masset, B. (.!., occupation married
woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:— Commencing at a
post planted about SO cliains east
and 120 cliains north of tbe N. E.
corner of Lot 36; tlience north 80
eliains; thence east 80 chains! thence
south 80 chains: tlience west 80
ehains, containing 640 aires.
ALICE MILLARD.
m. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 2."., 1910.
ROGERS & BLACK
Wholesale Dealers In
BUILDING  MATERIAL,     CEMENT,
LIME,   HAIR-FIBRE PLASTER
COKE,  BLACKSMITH COAL,
COMMON 1IIIICK, PRESSED BRICK
SHINGLES AND LATH
NEW   WELLINGTON   COAL
All   orders   promptly   filled—see   us
for  prices.
PHONE 11(1 PHONE 110
r
F"r Neat Job Printing
<
set' the Journal Man
Tel. 138
v
 / PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Friday,  August 4,  1911.
AUGUST : FURNITURE : SALE
If You have not visited our store it will PAY YOU TO DO SO NOW.   Since lowering to street grade, we have our immense
stock in shape for your inspection and convincing SALE PRICES in all grades of FURNISHINGS.   Have you stopped to consider
the Savings of $ $ $ on the House Furnishing you require?
FOR  CASH       20 and 25 per cent. Discount       FOR  CASH
Carpet Squares
All  Sizes  and   Qualities,  at  our  Big  Reduced Prices.
Draperies and Curtains
The Special Offerings in our Drapery Department are for you. Sales
increasing daily. Make your selections while these good values prevail.
.Madras, Scrims, Cretonnes and Muslins, all go on sa'e at 25 per cent
less;  in some lines at Prices Cut in Two.
Our Drapery and Rug Department
Is proving from our Sale Slips to b  e the Best Values ever offered to our
customers.   Make your selection while the Good Designs hold  out.
Baskets and Hampers
Used for soiled linen. Regular price $2.50.  Special Sale Price, each $1.00
Three different sizes for choice.
Notice our
Big Go-Cart
Special
Regular $13.50 and $12.50 Collapse-
able GO-CART.    Sale Price  . .   $8.50
Quarter Oak Furniture
EARLY  ENGLISH AND GOLDEN  FINISH
Dressers and Stands, Chiffonnlers, Bedroom Chairs and Rockers, Dining
Tables, Leather Upholstered Oak Dining Chairs and China Cabinets. All
reduced to 25 per cent below regular values.
(1   ONLY—MORRIS   CHAIRS
Solid Oak Frames with Velour and Tapestry    Cushions.      Regular    value
$18.00.    Special Sale Price     $10.00
The goods are placed below cost.
50 ONLY—OAK FRAME LEATHER  UPHOLSTERED   FOOTSTOOLS
Early English Finish.    Sale Price   SI.50
IRON BEDS, SPRINGS AND  MATTRESSES
Iron Beds, any size.    Sale Price $3.50   anil   up
Springs, any size.    Sale Price   $2.50 und up
Mattress, cotton tops.    Sale Price $3.50 and up
 i	
CHILD'S IRON  CRIBS
4 Different Styles
Child's Crib, Regular Value $10.00.  Sale Price    $ 7.00
Child's Crib, Regular Value $14.00.  Sale   Price          0.00
Child's Crib, Regular Value $16.00.  Sale  Price       11.50
Child's Crib, Regular value $18.00.  Sale Price    1:5.00
All  Iron Cribs have woven wire spring on iron  frame.    Mattress to fit
cribs.    Sale Price, from    $2.00,  $3.50  aiul.S5.00
Brass Curtain  Poles, all sizes and  trimmings to fit at Sale Prices.
Complete House Furnisher
THIRD AVENUE
GEO. D. TITE
Complete House Furnisher
THIRD AVENUE
HANDLING HARVEST
Arrangements That Have to be Made
to get grain to the Markets
of World.
The   Hunks  Have to  lie  Prepared to
Meet  the  Heavy  Costs
Involved
One of the great financial problems with which aCnada is confronted is the financing of the harvest,
which promises to be greater than
it has ever been in the past, says
the  .Montreal  Herald.
A country with a harvest such as
Cauda expects to put on the market
this year needs a very considerable
volume of currency to meet the demands upon it. The necessity for
getting the larger part of the crop
moved into the consuming centres
before the close of navigation is
pretty fully realized. This is the
principal work that keeps three
transcontinental railways busy in the
autum.i.
The Canadian banking system has
been specially designed to meet such
a conditions as will [shortly manifest
'.' eel'. Tiie right ol note issue equal
eu tlie paid-up capital is accorded
the chartered banks without any requirement of reserve, confidence being placed in each banking company's appreciation of the need of
retaining absolute trust and keeping
« 11 within the liinils of safety.
There Is, indeed beyond this a provision for an emergency issue to be
retired within a specified time should
tlie. necessity for it occur,
The Dominion makes no charge for
Ihis privilege of note issue further
than the requirement that a large
proportion of hank reserves be held
in Dominion legal tender redeemable
notes. When the west makes a very
great demand for its crop movements
ii may mean withdrawal hy the
banks of a considerable amount of
accommodation from the ordinary
trade channels. Only once, In the
year 1906, a great crop year, was
there any difficulty In meeting' the
e'illation, it is rem inhered that in
that year men of standing with per-
t'eetly sound contracts even from
school boards and municipalities were
obliged   in  throw  thein  up  through
failure to get ihe banking accommodation  they required.
Since that year Canada has grown,
the west has grown, and the banks
have grown. Let us glance at the
changed   situation.
In the Canadian West there are
357,000,000 acres of land known to
be capable of producing wheat and
other cereals. Five years ago less
than 5,000,000 acres had been sown
with wheat, and the total cultivated
land for all purposes did not exceed
10,000,000 acres. This season of
1911, 10,200,000 acres have been
sowii with wheat 4,078,000 with
oats, 1,150,000 with barley, and
751,822 acres with flax — a total in
grain crops alone of 16,779,822
acres; the acreage in roots and cultivated grasses is 203,491 acres—a
grand total under cultivation of 17,-
043,317 acres.
The acreage under cultivation has
therefore increased rapidly, more especially in view of the sparse population; but comparison should be
made With the land still to be cultivated—nearly 340,000,000 acres.
.Notwithstanding this small area
of cultivated wheat land, in comparison with the possible whole, the
wheat crop of tlie Canadian Wesl. Is
admitted to be one of the leading
factors in tho world's markets for
breakstuffs. It is the best hard
spring wheal in tbe world and there-
line the most valuable for mixing
with the Inferior wheats, The presenl season Is one of greal promise,
and, If fulfilled, the Canadian West
with have for shipment oul of the
country, it is claimed, ut least  160,-
 ,000   bushels   of   wheat,   besides
15,0011,1)11(1   bushels  ul' oats,   12,200,-
000 bushels or barley, and 7,786,000
bushels of flax. Five years ago the
exportable surplus of wheal was 65,-
849,940 bushels, while oats and flax
were not exported to any great extent.
The value of the wheat crop five
years ago was $67,711,299; for 1910
it   was   approximately   $91,350,-000
1 final returns are not yet In). At
the price of October wheat on .lune
15 the crop now growing, if reaped
under favorable conditions, will represent a value of $176,500,000, that
is, 200,000,000 bushels at SS 1-4
cents. For the handling of the wheat
crop millions of dollars are annually
distributed to country branches of
the great chartered banks, which
form a complete network over the
three wheat producing provinces.
To store and move the wheat crop
in the west is a gigantic task, and
involves an enormous amount of capital. It is estimated that at least
00 per cent of the crop should be
moved to the eastern terminals and
seaboard before inland navigation
closes for the year. Five years ago
it required 47,000 cars to move this
proportion; this year it is estimated
that 145,084 cars will be required,
and niat each car will travel an average of 75U miles after it is loaded
before it reaches the head of the
Great Lakes. These figures give
some idea of the investment of the
railways in rolling stock for the
movement of wheat alone.
There are 1,870 elevators in the
prairie provinces, with a total storage capacity of 59,227,300 bushels,
representing an investment of $15,-
991,371 for buildings alone. At the
head of tho lakes there is a storage
capacity of 25,700,400 bushels,
which cost $9,196,140 to erect. The
investment, therefore, for interior
and lake terminal storage is $25,-
187,511. To this must he added the
costly equipment at Montreal where
there is 3,000,000 bushels of storage capacity and five miles of conveyor belts, making il possible to
load fourteen vessels without their
moving from their original berths.
The growing or wheat In the
prairie provinces has not been without, its drawbacks, but in I lie thlrty-
elglit years it lias been carried on,
it may be remembered with comfort,
ileal there' has never been a tolal
failure of crop, There are elements
ni' chance In wheat growing as there
are iii every oilier business, but Ihe
farmer who has cultivated faithfully,
sown carefully, reaped diligently;
lias never lacked bread and seed and
something for profit. In the grain
bolt, which is, roughly, 850 miles
long and 450 to 500 miles wide, It
is not possible to hope for Ideal conditions over the entire area every
year, but no wheat growing country
In the world has a finer record for
uniform production than the Canadian West.
It will be seen the situation presents certain features of a more stupendous character than have ever
been faced before. There Is no reason to doubt that the banks which
have likewise developed will be able
to serve the west and the east efficiently In a time of abnormal pressure when the pressure means prosperity. The institutions are in the
hands of men of ripe experience and
sound judgment, who realize the re
sponsibility and importance of their
part in sustaining tne country's commerce and industry.
ROCHER   DE  BOULE
Property on This Mountain in Hazelton District Gives Good
Promise
Since the story appeared the early
part of last September about the big
strike made on Rocher de Boule by
Messrs. Sergeant and Munro, the
property has been turned over to
Messrs Trimble and Pemberton, says
the Omineca Herald. At that time
little was known of the property, but
it was enough to satisfy the new
owners that it was worth going after.
This spring, or about six or seven
weeks ago, Messrs. Trimble nnd
Pemberton took men out and work
has been going on steadily. A new
trail cuts the distance from the Skeena to the property by half has been
cut over the ridge and through the
divide down into the camp. This
is about five miles from the sawmill. In addition, a great deal of
work has been done towards uncovering and proving the mineral. A
gang of eleven men are employed.
They have uncovered an Sffoot
vein for a distance of 500 feet, while
the lead can be traced for a distance
of a mile and a half. The big thing
in I lie camp is blue copper which will
run over 30 per cent pure copper.
As yet no assays have been made
this spring but this week Mr. Pemberton has been gathering samples
from every place where work has
been done and will have them assayed. The result will be watched
with keen interest. Last fall one
sample that was asayed gave returns
of $97 in gold, silver and copper.
This Is one of the youngest camps
in the district but there is a great
amount of work being done and before the season is over Rocher det
Boule will be attracting as much, if
not more attention than any other
camp. As one well known authority
remarked when he visited the property: "This is no ordinary find; It
is something extrordinary."
Work will proceed on these claims
all summer. The owners are getting
In 1,600 pounds of supples from below and two tons from Hazelton to
keep them  going until September.
KITCHENER IX  EGYPT
Job Printing of all  kinds neatly
executed at the Journal Office.
The Mail and Empire thinks that
Lord Kitchener's appointment to
Egypt foreshadows a change of policy and discusses the matter as follows: Under the pro-consulship of
Sir Eldon Gorst, the Nationalist
movement made headway, although
in the last year or so of his administration Sir Eldon seemed to abandon
his earlier academic Liberal theories,
and reverted more to those of his
great predecessor, Lord Cromer. His
last report was frank In his statement of opinion that the Egyptians
are unfit for self-government. It
was upon this fundamental idea that
much of Lord Cromer's success was
laid; and it is upon this idea, too
that Lord Kitchener's policy will be
based. But whatever convictions
Lord Kitchener may have on the
Egyptian question, it is certain that
they are not mere theories, but are
the result of long experience of the
Egyptian people. It will be recalled
that it was In Egypt that Lord Kitchener, then an obscrue junior officer,
got his first chance, and that it was
his knowledge of the people and of
♦he country that fitted him lo take
advantage of it. Since that day he
has never looked back,, but .has
inarched forward steadily from one
responsibility to another, until the
great wheel of events brings him
again to tlie country wliere his career began. In those years in India
and South Africa lie did not forget
Egypt, nor have the Egyptians forgotten him. In Ihe army tlie name
of the great Sirdar Is still toasted
and his portrait saluted. The troops
remember the man who made them
tbe formidable fighting machines
they now are. The whole people recall his striking proof of interest in
the country that found expression in
the Gordon Memorial University at
Khartoum. He returns to them, not
as a stranger, but as an old friend,
as the one living Englishman whose
name is known from Khartoum to
Cairo, and is as familiar to the fellaheen as to the crowds in London.
Lord Kitchenr's knowledge of Egypt
and Egypt's knowledge of Lord
Kitchener are in themselves reasons
enough for his selection as successor
to Sir Eldon Gorst. There Is another strong reason. Lord Kitchener
Is probably the greatest military man
In the Empire, and there are indications that It Is In Northern Africa
that our chief military authority
should be.    The Near Eastern ques
tion is today the gravest promblem
in foreign politics. The position of
England's close friend. France, Is
none too secure in Morocco, and for
years to come the status of the European powers along the Mediterranean will be unsettled. In Egypt
itsself the Nationalists constitute a
menace, unless sternly dealt with,
while their friends in England among
the Socialists represent an even
stronger danger to Bgyption peace.
In the settling of all the problems
England will be well represented by
Lord Kitchener, who is not the man
to have accepted the post of agent-
general unless he had a free hand.
Hhis appointment is a credit to the
Britisii  government.
TOURIST ...l'AGK
The McMillan Transfer Company
at Stewart has commenced running
a four-in-hand stage from the wharf
to the concentrator in connection
with the arrival of the urand Trunk
Pacific boats on Thursday and Sunday. As this steamship company Is
developing the tourist traffic it has
been felt that many visitors would
take advantage of a trip through the
town and up the Bear River valley
If a proper conveyance was to be had.
To meet the demand tho transfer
company has put on its stage. Tlie
route from the wharf is down the
approach to Fifth, along this street
to Columbia, tlience nortli to Ninth
past, the general hospital to the railway depot and on out to Glacier
Creek, making the turn at the concentrator, where visitors, through the
courtesy of Manager W. .1. Elmen-
dorf, will be permitted to inspect the
big plant. Returning after passing
the bridge the route is through the
•Mann townsite to Fourth, west along
that street to Brithwell, up Bright-
well to Fifth, thence west to the
approach. Visitors will be given a
ten mile scenic drive, ample time to
visit the stores on returning and be
landed back at the boat for dinner.
Uncle Hiram stroked his whiskers
and watched the big touring car as
it whizzed past him and up the road,
emitting a trail of bluish smoke from
Its oil-choked engine.
"Huh!" he sniffed. "Tney may
be swell city fel'ers, but they certainly was a-smokin' some durn orful
cigars." !&{£■   . F      *»
n
Friday,  August  4,  1911.
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Ir****************************************************
* *
I   Outlook   for   Reciprocity    f
* *
*****************************************************
The government professes to welcome the prospects of an early election, says ah Ottawa letter. They
claim that the force of the Bourassa
wave has spent itself in the province
of Quebec and tat Laurier will again
receive from that province a big majority. In deed, the hopes of the
government are centred upon Quebec
and It Is practically admitted that
outside of that province the Conservatives will have a fair majority.
The final result of the next election
will largely depend on what gains
the Conservatives can make in the
province of Ontario. Ontario has
been appropriately called the workshop of e.he Dominion and with the
"white coal" of Niagara adeiud to
her other sources of power this province bids fair to become one of the
great manufacturing centres of the
world. Nearly every city and town in
Ontario has been built up especially
during the last ten years by the
foundation and increase of manufacturing enterprises. The great American manufacturers have invested
hundreds of millions of dollars in
branch plants throughout the province. Hence there is every reason
to believe that Ontario will vote
overwhelmingly for a continuance of
the national policy.
Not only have the Ontario towns
and cities benefitted but the farmers have prospered amazingly by the
largely increased purchasing power
of their home market. Few Ontario
farmers have far to go In order to
find a profitable and generous market for their products. Along the
border many agricultural products
are higher in, Canada than they are
In the United States. Upon the reciprocity issue alone there is no doubt
but that the people of Ontario are
overwhelmingly in favor of the Conservative party.
Opposition to reciprocity, however,
will not be the only factor against
the government in the approaching
campaign. The government would
be glad, indeed, to have its past record forgotten and to have a mere
plebiscite upon some question like
reciprocity, concerning which honest and patriotic men may differ in
opinion. Any issue, indeed, would
be welcomed by the prime minister
and his followers upon which it is
possible to divide honest men.
The statement is often heard that
no government can ever be put out
of power because of graft or corruption. It is true that in 1908 the
Laurier government managed to hold
office although scandalous maladministration of the public funds had
been proved against it. But it must
also be remembered that Sir Wilfrid
Laurier in 1908 made a pathetic appeal to the people. He said in effect
that he was an old man on the brink'
of the grave and that he did not like
to have his [>ublic career ended by
a popular verdict to the effect that
his government had been a corrupt
one. He said he would only ask one
more term and ask that for the purpose of cleansing the public service.
His prayer was answered but no one
has yet heard of the promised house
cleaning. No corrupt official has
been brought to justice and no stolen
money has been returned to the treasury. The prime minister has apparently made no effort to Implement
his promise. It is marvelous that he
should be so audacious as to appeal
for another term when he has not
kept a single pledge on the strength
of which he obtained his present term
of office. It is no wonder that he
wants to talk reciprocity. If he has
nothing else to talk" about he would
talk about the weather rather than
discuss his speeches and promises of
1908.
It is curious to observe how little
respect Sir Wilfrid Laurier has for
the Intelligence of the people of Can-
ada. He seems to believe, perhaps
he has reason for believing, that the
Canadian people like to be humbugged, P. T. Barnum said the American people wanted to be humbugged
and he certainly catered to the popular taste in this regard. One year
he would whitewash an elephant and
advertise it as a white elephant from
Slam. The next year he would produce a woolly horse. Every year
there was some startling novelty
which attracted the people and If anybody complained of being fooled he
was laughed at for his pains. Peo-
ule knew Barnum was going to fool
them but they turned out every summer to see the woolly horse, the wild
man, the three legged calf or the
bearded lady as the case might be.
Sir Wilfrid has been emulating the
example of the great showman. Jie
has some national ability to begin
with, being a skillful tightrope performer and a clean skater. But he
does not rely entirely upon his own
ability;    he    continually
pliant or woolly horse variety. One
year he will come back from England and say that he has just saved
Canada from being swallowed alive
by the Britisii lion. This announcement made on landing elicits great
applause. The people suppose there
must be something in it because the
prime minister has been in England
and they have not been there. After
a little inquiry and investigation,
however, they find that the whole
story Is a fake, that no Britisii lion
or any other Hon was trying to swallow Canada or even to fake a bite
out of her and they na.'-rally make
up their minds tha': th jy have been
humbugged. The ne:;* year, however, Laurier's tliree ringed circus
starts out again but this time there
is another attraction. Nothing!, is
said about the British lion but the
people are told that Canada has made
a treaty with France, the first and
only one of the kind, and the great
benefits are to fall upon the Canadian people.
Well, the people get the treaty after a while and sure enough they
find wheat, oats, barley, horses, cows
and other farm products are admitted Into France subject only to the
minimum duty. They are highly delighted and commence to think what
they are going to do with all the
money they are to get from France.
But on further examination they find
that on all these products the French
maximum and minimum are really
the same, probably about 250 per
cent, 'lnis time they are sure they
will never again get fooled by Laurier but the next year it is the United
States or some other woolly horse
which looks alright on the billcards
but is a transparent fake when viewed near at hanu.
One reason for bringing on reciprocity was to get rid of the naval
issue. The navy made the government unpopular in Quebec and ridiculous in the English speaking provinces. It is a great navy but It will
be a greater one before we are done
with it. Those who know such matters must be amused at the government's estimate of $15,000,000 as the
cost of an entire navy. Not long ago
New Zealand presented what was
called her Dreadnought to the Imperial navy. It is in fact an armored
cruiser of the first class and not
a Dreadnought at all. But this one
ship cost nearly $9,000,000. We are
told that here six armored vessels
can be built and a flotilla of
smaller vessels at an aggregate
cost of $15 00,000. An efficient navy
for Canada could not cost less than
$150,000,000. Either the govern
ment does not Intend to make our
Canadian navy of any use to the
Imperial fleet or it is deceiving the
people by talking about a $15,000,-
000 navy.
Sir Wilfrid at the Imperial Conference caused it to be understood
that on his motion Canada had been
given complete control of her navy
to the exclusion of the British admiralty. The fact is that the British government had this resolution
passed because the Britisii naval authorities did not want to be lumbered
up with or become responsible for
the junk that might be turned out
by the Sorel shipyard or contractors
in favor with the marine and navy
department. At least one British
firm was represented to have stated
that there was no doing business
with the Canadian government unless
big funds were contributed to the
Liberal party campaign fund.
BRINGS  GERMAN   GOLD
financiers      of      Fatlierlaiiil      Send
$5,000,000  to  This  Province
Through Mr. Alvensleben
With $5,000,000 of German capital secured for British Columbia, and
especially Vancouver enterprises, to
his credit, Mr. Alvo von Alvensleben
is again at his desk in the Pacific
Building, after a flying trip to Berlin, Paris and London, where he went
in the role of the modern Argonaut
in quest for Old World gold, says the
News-Advertiser.
"German capital Is most enthusiastic over Canadian investments,"
said Mr. von Alvensleben In discussing the European financial situation
as found by him during his four
months' trip abroad. "The financiers of the Fatherland, more than
any others, rea"ze with praiseworthy
foresight the great significance and
relative Influence to British Columbia of the Panama Canal, and they
are therefore quite willing to send
their money to a place In which It
will find n safe and highly profitable
place for Investment. Germany is
today enjoying an era of absolutely
unprecedented commercial and itiilus-
advertises! trial prosperity and Is now witness-
some    novelty
the    while    ele- ing the realization  of  the imperial-
I'
THE JOURNAL
$2.00 a Year
I Job Printing |
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THE JOURNAL
$2.00 a Year
A\:
istlc dreams of Bismarck, whose
chief aim was to make the German
Empire a commercial fortress and a
bulwark to Industry. Wherever I
went I found Geran capital ready to
pour into British Columbia and while
I secured $5,000,000 for Immediate
investment in industrial and commercial enterprises in this city and province, twenty times that much will
follow before another year has passed. German financiers have been remarkably fortunate in their transac-
'ons and they are now in a position
where they are looking for new
worlds to conquer.
Canada  Attracts Them
"Immigration of capital is usually
followed by Immigration of Individuals, and where the United States
was formerly the paradise for those
seeking a new out let for their energies, Camilla Is now taking first rank
as the 'promised land.' But there is
quite an interest in Canada shown
by the people of the Dual Monarchy,
Austria-Hungary.
"While no country encourages emigration, Austria at least has not
placed such stringent regulations in
the path of the emigrant as others,
and Hungarians, particularly, are inclined to stray away from home—
for a time only. And here is where
the rub conies In. Hungarians are
persons who are extremely fond of
their own country, but prevailing economic conditions make it desirable
for them to go away and find new
fields. They go to Africa and they
go to the United States, but they
very seldom settle there, for they
usually return to their native home
within six years with their accumulated savings, and therefore they cannot he regarded as very desirable Immigrants.
British Capital Coming
"During a ten days' sojourn in
London I found Britisii capital also
very friendly towards British Columbia nnd I know of five distinct parties,    controlling   an    aggregnte    of
THE CANADIAN  BANK
OF COMMERCE
SIR EDMUND WALKER, C.V.O., LL.D., D.C.L., President
ALEXANDER LAIRD, General Manager
CAPITAL, - 310,000,000        REST, - $7,000,000
DRAFTS ON FOREIGN COUNTRIES
Every branch of The Canadian Bank of Commerce is equipped to issue drafts on
the principal cities in the following countries without delay :
Africa Crete
Arabia .  Cuba
Argentine Republic Ilcnmaik
Australia
Austria-Hungary
Belgium
Brazil
Beilcaria
CeyUn
Chili
China
Greece
Holland
Iceland
India
Ireland
Italy
teipan
ava
latta
Egypt
Faroe Islands
Finland
Formosa
France
Fr'ch Cochin China 1
Ge-ren.eiev Manchuria
Great Britain Mexico
"He amount of these drafts is stated in the money of the country where they are payable ; that is they arc drawn in sterling, francs, marks, lire, kronen, (leerins, yen,
taels, roubles, etc, as Ihe case may be. This ensures that the payee abroad will
receive thee actual amount intended. 233
J. M. CHKISTIK, Manager, Prince Itupert Branch
New Zealand
Noetway
Panama
Persia
Peru
Philippine Islands
Portugal
Roumania
Russia
Servia
Slam
Siberia
Soudan
Soutle Africa
Spain
Straits Settlements
Sweden
Switzerland
Turkey
L'niled Slates
Uruguay
Wesl leedee*. etc
FREDERICK PETERS, K. C.
$11111,000,1100, that are going to visit
our province within the next three
months with a view to investment.
Perhaps the most enthusiastic of
these British financiers is the Duke
of Sutherland, who is already very
much financially Interested In this
country, and who is coming here
again to place some more money in
British Columbia enterprises."
 o	
THE NEW CONCENTRATOR
Barrister, Solicitor and Notary Public
Office in
EXCHANGE BLOCK
WM. S. HA1.L, L. D. S. D. D. S.
:-:    DENTIST   :-:
Crown and Bridge Work a specialty.
All dental operations skillfully
treated. Gas and local anaesthetic*
administered for the painless extraction of teeth. Consultation fre«.
Offices, Helgerson Sk., Prince Rupert
NICKERSON-ROERIG COMPANY
CUSTOMS AND MERCHANDISE*!
BrokerB, Forwarding Agents,
Storage, etc.
J.  W. POTTER
ARCHITECT     AND     STRUCTURAL
ENGINEER
Re-inforced Concrete a Specialty
—o—
Law-Butler Building - Prince Rupert
HAYXOR   BROS.
FUNERAL   DIRECTORS
and
PROFESSIONAL   EMBALMERS
DR.   \V.  B.  CLAYTON
DENTIST
—o—
Office  iu    the    Westenhaver   Block.
Over  Orme's  Drug   Store.
Prince Rupert
LINDSAY'S CARTAGE & STORAGE
O. T. P. CARTAGE AGENTS
Office at H. B. Rochester, Centre St
LADYSMITH COAL
Is handled by us.  All orders receive
prompt attention.  Phone No  68.
 LADYSMITH	
COAL
ROCHESTER & MONROE, Phone 116
Corner Eighth and Fraser Street*
Clinton Rooms
Newly    remodelled    and    furnished.
Board   and   lodging.   Home cooking
a  specialty.     Mrs.   Anderson,  Prop.
Rooms, $3 Per Week
New Knox Hotel
ARTAUD & BESNER
Proprietors
The New Knox Hotel Is run on the
European plan. First-clas service.
All the latest modern Improvements
THE BAR keeps only the best
brands of liquors and cigars.
THE CAFE Is open from 6.30 a.m.
to S p.m. Excellent cuisine; first-
class service.
Board, $1 a Duy — Reds, 50c and np
First Avenu"   Prince  Rupert
Hamblin's Bakery
Just Re-opened
Sale    counter    in    MERRYFIELD'S
STORE, Third Ave. and Fifth St.
Family trade catered to.  Will supply restaurants and steamers.
Cakes and  Confectionery of all
kinds
Portland Canal Mining Company Has
Enlarged Its Mill to Meet
Demands
At the Stewart mines last week,
work was resumed at the concentrator plant of the Portland Canal Alining Company, which for some time
past has been undergoing enlargement. The mill has been brought to
a capacity to treat SU tons of ore
per day, and shannolders who have
patiently waited tlie period when tho
iiinptinw  would  enter  the  permanent
shipping   ranks    will    shortly    lia\o
their hopes realized.
The equipment of the enlarged mill
now consists of seven Wilfley tables,
one Overstrain  table, two Fruo Van-
ners  two four compartment   Bm.m.l
and  two four compartment •)  in.m.j
Jigs.    Tlie wliole plant Is driven by
water power, of which an abundant j
supply is to be had.
The lasl shipment of ."00 ions of I
concentrates, sent to tbe Tyee Cop-1
per Company's smelter the past winter, gave returns In the neighborhood
of $20 per ton. Excellent reports
continue to come from the mine
where new ore bodies are being opened up continuously.
Recent assays from two samplings
taken from a winze in the Bell drift
gave $49.00 and $50.96 in gold, Silvio- and lead. In the Swan raise
some galena is coining in and more
Iron  ami quartz   showing   in   each
round,     Tbe   working   is   in    virgin
ground,    11. Colllnson has accepted
lie. position iis assayer sfor the company.
THE WESTHOLME LUMBER GO.
LIMITED
We handle all kinds of
Building Supplies
First Avenue Telephone 188
GRAND HOTEL
WOKKIXGMAX'S HOME
Spring Beds, Clean
White Sheets
25c
Rooms 50 Cents
Best In Town for the Money
FIRST AVE. AND SEVENTH ST.
J. Goodman, Proprietor
"What made you so late?"
"I met Jinks."
"Well, that's no reason why you
should be an hour late netting home
to dinner."
"I know; but I asked liini how
he was feeling, unil the feeol Insisted
on telling me." PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Friday, August 4, 1911.
POWER PROPOSALS
(Continued From Page One)
Medicine Hat—Population, 2,500;
250 K.W.J lighting, 10 to 8c; discount, 10 per cent; power, 6c to
1 ',4 c; discount, 10 per cent.
Moose Jaw—Population, 17,000;
municipal plant, 975 K.W.; lighting,
9c; discount, 10 per cent; power, 7c;
discount 5 per cent for $10 monthly
to 40 per cent for $40 monthly.
Vancouver—11 to 7c for quantities
ranging from 50 to 1,000 K.W.
hours; for 1,500 K.W. hours, 6c;
for 2,000 K.W. hours, 5c; over 2,000
K.W. hours, 4c; electricity furnished
by   B.   C.   Electric   Company.
B. C. Electric Company charge outside Vancouver—15 to lie for 50
to 1,000 K.W. hours; 1,500 K.W.
hours, 10c; 2,000 K.W. hours, 9c;
over 2,000 K.W. hours, 8c.
West Kootenay—Charges $30 per
H.P. for 2,000 to 3,000 H.P. and $50
to $60 for 400 to 500 H.P.
A large number of towns and cities
in Ontario are purchasing electricity
from the Hydro-Electric Commission
of that province. The following
shows the estimated maximum cost
to some of these cities according to
the last report of the commission:
H.P Est.
City— Applied for      Max. Cost
Toronto 10,000 $25.20
London       5,000 35.18
Gtielph        2,500 36.10
Stratford    ....   1,000 43.90
Woodstock   . . .   1,200 34.27
Berlin       1,000 36.10
and several others at similar rates.
In comparison to these prices, the
schedule submitted by the Tsimpsean
company seems reasonable enough.
Other rates charged are:
Fort     William—Lighting,.   7%c;
power, $25 per H.P. per year.
Port Arthur—Lighting, 6 to 10c.
Sault   Ste.   Marie—Lighting,   5   to
10c; power, $50.
Peterboro—Lighting 10c; power,
$20  to $40.
Kingston—Lighting 12 *J4c; power, Sc.
The price of $34 per H.P. year
submitted by the company for a
quantity ranging from 300 to 500
H.P. figures out at 1 and 7-10c per
K.W. hour, assuming a load factor
of 23 per cent and also a 24 hour
day, which is justifiable in the case
of the city inasmuch as it will be
supplying small power customers
during the day and all the lighting
during the night. It will cost the
city to distribute about 3 55-100c
more, making the total cost delivered
about 5 25-100c per K. W. hour.
Time of Contract
' The next point which the committee considered was the length of
time which the company set forth for
the proposed agreement. We may
be obliged to pay more for power in
the future if a reasonable price is
not fixed upon from the start with
some reliable company for a fairly
long term of years, since if an agreement is reached for only a short
time, there would be nothing to prevent a company from advancing its
prices at the end of that time if it
proved that this company had a cinch
on the hydro-electric power around
Prince Rupert.
We expect within the next five or
ten years to see numerous Industries established here requiring
power, and if it is true, and it probably is, that the Tsimpsean company
has nearly all the water power in this
vicinity corralled, such concerns
would be in a bad position if only
a short term agreement were made,
since they would be in some cases
probably   only   just   commencing   to
earn and could hardly avoid being
compelled to pay an increased price
should the power company so demand. They would probably much
prefer a guaranteed reasonable rate
for a long term, for they would then
know upon what to depend. The
longer the agreement, the cheaper
the rates that may be reasonably e-x
pected.
In the tentative agreement set
forth by the company, the city Is
asked not only to purchase all power required for lighting throughout
the city, but also to purchase from
the company all electricity required
by small consumers up to 5 H.P.
Nothing is said of amounts between
5 and 10 H.P. This may, however,
bo a clerical error. Further on in
the aforesaid tentative agreement,
the company states that it does not
ask for any exclusive rights, but If
the city agrees to the power clause
mentioned above, exclusive rights are
practically guaranteed the Tsimpsean
company, since any electric company
is largely dependent on small consumers.
Your committee would recommend
that that part of the agreement referred to above, viz. that the city
purchase from the Tsimpsean company all less than 5 H.P., be struck
out, and it should be further agreed
upon that the company may not
charge more than $45 per H.P. to
any customer. And your committee
also recommends that the privilege
be reserved to the city of developing
its own power.
In conclusion, your committee reports in favor of the proposition submitted by the company with qualifications as set forth above, but we
regard it as highly necessary that
before any agreement of this sort
is entered into, the city should engage the services of a first class
franchise lawyer and a first class
electrical engineer to carefully go
through the said agreement and
make their recommendations accordingly to the city council.
Following the presentation of the
report, some discussion followed. Mr.
Brutinel was present himself at the
meeting and was able to give information as to the objects which
the company had In view. The discussion was very free in character,
Mr. Brutinel answering all questions
put to him by the members present.
He stated, in reply to a question put
by the president, A. J. Morris, as
to why certain advertisements were
inserted in different papers that his
company was not. directly responsible
for that. He had organized the
Prince Rupert Hydro-Electric Company, which took over the holdings
of the Tsimpsean company and also
the Continental company. While the
capital was available by those interested to carry out the work it was
deemed wise to put on sale a part
of the stock. Certain brokers had,
he was sorry to say, advertised without the knowledge of the company,
and inserted misstatements as to the
facts. As soon as his company's attention was called to it these were
withdrawn.
Mr. Brutinel also stated that his
company was anxious to do business
on fair terms with the city. This
was a wise policy, he felt, by the
company. He mentioned that negotiations were on with the city council, but as to the results reached
he could not yet say. He could say
that the negotiations had taken a
line that was not anticipated by him
when he made the original proposition to the city. How far they would
succeed in reaching a settlement he
could not say, but there was an evident,  disposition   to  deal  fairly  with
the company. It would take a little
time yet before he could say definitely what the result would be. He
would prefer to submit to the directors the propositions before deciding
the matter.
Dealing with the importance of
having the company engaged In business here, Mr. Brutinel explained
that with an expenditure such as his
company had in view, reaching about
$2,500,000, they could not afford to
have the investment He idle. If Industries did not come in to become
consumers of the power it would be
necessary for his company to interest themselves in lines which would
lead to the Introduction of manufactures that would be larg users of
powr. This would be done by his
company and the city of Prince Rupert would reap the benefit.
His company had no desire to Interfere with the city In the development of its own power. They were
willing to furnish the city with power for civic use and for small consumers, leaving the company free to
supply the large consumers.
On motion of H. F. McRae, seconded by W. P. Lynch, the following
resolution  was  carried.
"That inasmuch as the Tsimpsean
Light and Power Company are asking for no exclusive rights in this
agreement, thus leaving the city in
a position to develop their own power at any time they wish, that the
Board of Trade put itself on record
in favor of this tentative agreement
subject to the minor changes recommended by the committee and that a
copy be sent to the city council."
 o	
WILL ALTER PLANS
Canadian Northern Railway Will Change
Its Proposed Route Along
Fraser River.
The
Intention    of    Paralleling   the
P. It. Has Been Abandoned
by  the  Company
Jhitlttle,3-lear.. .tn. . et et et etaii
The Canadian Northern Railway
has with drawn its application to the
railway commission for permission
to parallel the C. P. R. tracks on
the C. P. R. right-of-way along the
Fraser River from Lytton to Cisco
bridge, where the C. P. R. crosses
the river to its west bank. At the
hearing held here last year the application was opposed by the C.P.R.
on the ground that the applicant had
no status as it was a provincial corporation, the Canadian Northern Pacific Railway, and therefore had no
authority to expropriate C. P. R.
right-of-way. It was also urged that
the building of a line lower down
the canyon would be a menace owing to the danger of the C. P. R. embankment  becoming   undermined.
An export report on the question
of the feasibility of the proposition
from an engineering standpoint was
prepared at the instance of the two
roads by C. F. Cartwright, C.E., for
submission to the commission. Mr.
Cartwright made a report, which has
been before the commission for many
months.
The original plan submitted by the
Canadian Northern, whose British
Columbia section is being built under the provincial charter above referred to, involved the bridging of
the main Thompson River a few
miles above Lytton and the paralleling of the C. P. R. main line down
the canyon as far as Cisco bridge. In
stead, it is now proposed to sbumit
to the railway commission an amended plan whereby a line can be ullt
without infringing on the C. P. R.
right-of-way. It provides for onet
bridge across the main Thompson
River and two bridges across the
Fraser. The route as planned and
approved by T. H. White, chief engineer, of the Canadian Northern,
will not be more than 1,000 feet
longer than the original plan to parallel the C. P. R. through the canyon. Briefly, it means the bridging
of the main Thompson two miles
above Lytton. Then the line will
follow the Thompson to Lytton at
the confluence of the two rivers and
descend the east bank of the Fraser
for a distance of half a mile, when
the first crossing of the Fraser will
take place. Next the line will descend the opposite bank five miles,
crossing back to the other side of
the Fraser about 1,000 feet above
the C. P. R. bridge at Cisco. All
the way down the main Thompson
river and down the Fraser the Canadian Northern Railway line will run
200 feet below the C. P. R. tracks
without invading the C. P. R. right-
of-way.
The amended plan, while providing for two bridges across the Fraser, where none were originally intended, will be a substitute for the
project of paralleling the C. P. R.
tracks on C. P. R. right-of-way down
to  Cisco  bridge.
The original survey established the
fact that the line could not be built
through the canyon without the expenditure of a large amount of money for concrete retaining walls for
t.ee embankment. The second, or
lower proposed bridge across the
Fraser at Cisco will be built at a
higher elevation than the existing
C. P. R. bridge there, and willlike-
ly be of the cantilever type. The
proposed bridge, half a mile below
Lytton, as well as the other proposed
bridge across the main Thompson
above Lytton, will be an ordinary
span affair.
Although the amended plan pro.
vides for two additional bridges, the
cost may not exceed the ependitxure
involved in the original design as
the building of a roadbed on concrete
supports through the canyon and below the C. P. R. tracks means a very
formidable undertaking.
To the Ladies of Prince Rupert
Did you ever stop to think how much easier it would be for you,
if at the end of each month, you could pay all household bills
by check? We solicit your account and have special facilities
for handling it. Private writing rooms are provided for the use
of customers and individual attention is given each depositor.
We allow 4 % on Deposits and the use of checks.
The Continental Trust Company, Limited
 SECOND AVENUE	
aEHEEEEEEHEBB^
I
m
m
m
m
is
©
©
i
i
i
1
1
I
m
el
m
M
I
1
HOTEL
ENAMELWARE
HAVE JUST RECEIVED A SMALL SHIPMENT OF HOTEL
ENAMELWARE ESPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR USE IN
HOTELS, RESTAURANTS AND CAMPS. WE GUARANTEE
THEM TO LAST TWICE AS LONG AS ORDINARY ENAMEL
WARE.
A CALL IS SOLICITED
Prince Rupert Hardware & Supply
Company, Ltd.
THIRD AVENUE
PHONE 120
EEEBBEEEEEEEBBEEEEEEEEEEES
Mayor Manson went south this
morning to confer with the premier
regarding the G. T. P. agreement
with the city and endeavor to have
it signed at once.
 o	
Among the arrivals by the Prince
George on her last trip was Archie
V illis of the reportorial staff of the
Victoria Times. He made the round
trip to Stewart on a holiday trip.
»;«.j.^.^. »;«»;«*;• »!••£• .2«»!«»> ** «j.*;*.;. »;»»;«*;« *;«*:*.;. *;« *!••!.
I   FOR RENT   l
* *
* Store     building     on Second *
* Avenue at Seventh Street. *
f Low Rent. t
t *
X JEREMIAH H. KUGLER, LTD. I
I    ..................... t
V V V V V V V V V V *** V V V V *♦* V V *»* *** V V **♦ V V V
* *> •> ♦;• »> **> •*> •;• <*> »;♦ *> ♦> ►> ♦> <• »j ♦;•• *j« »t« •& ♦> •> *;« ♦:*»;«♦>
I 75 x 100 Feet %
I ASK For Lease on Third *
I UNCLE Avenue at Ninth %
I JERRY Street *
| JEREMIAH H. KUGLER, LTD. |
**************************
FOR RENT
ST.   JOHN   HOTEL
Offices and Stores on Third Avenue
FOR SALE
Rooming House on Third Avenue;
close in; completely furnished; at
$800.00—$500.00 cash. Balance on
good terms. Will give three year
lease at,  per month    $05.00
Real Estate,
Insurance and Investments,
Notaries, Mines,
Timber
M.M. Stephens & Co. Ld.
Box 275
PHONE 222
PRINCE RUPERT, B.C.
OFFICE THIRD  AVE.
Ttw*Suy SMtsractory'fi&ivite
Good, Sound Reasons for
MONARCH Economy
Monarch Ranges are built so that they can
never have "air leaks"—
For around every opening Into the body there
is a   Malleable   Iron frame to which the
steel is riveted.
No putty is needed in such joints.    They are
air tight when new and stay air tight,
if these other ranges were built In this way
they might be economical too.
Investigate this matter of rivet construction
versus  stove  bolts  and  stove  putty.    It's
important to  every  one  using  or  buying
a range.
SOLD AND GUARANTEED BY THE
Kaien Hardware Co.
Telephone 3 Third Avenue
The Big
Furniture
Store
We beg to announce to the public that we are going to
remain at the same old stand cor. 6th St. and 2nd Ave.
GRAND 15 DAY SALE
We   are   using   tile   entire
Hurt   Block   for   15  Days— [
A    Grand    l.r>    Day    Sale
Sole Agents for the
Ostermoor
Mattresses
We are using the entire
Hart Block for le*5 Days—
A     Grand     15     Day     Sale.
•>.*.
**
**
* *
**
* *
* *
FURNITURE, STOVES, LINOLEUM, CARPETS, FLOOR COVERINGS, REED AND RATTAN FURNITURE, BLINDS, CURTAINS, QUILTS,
COMFORTS, BLANKETS, SHEETS, PILLOWS, MATTRESSES, SPBINGS,
IBON AND BRASS BEDS. BEST LINES OF UPHOLSTERED COUCHES,
ARM CHAIRS, PARLOR SUITES, ENAMELWARE, CROCKERY, GLASS-
WARE, LAMPS, TABLE CUTLERY, SCREENS, PICTURES, MIRRORS,
WASHING MACHINES, BASKETS, FRUIT JARS, HAMMOCKS, SEWING
MACHINES, BABY CARRIAGES.
**
**
**
**
**
* *
**
WE ARE CLOSING OUT THE
ST0YE DEPARTMENT.
IF YOU ARE INTERESTED
CALL AND GET OUR PRICES
F. W. HART
Cor 6th Street & 2nd Ave
Phone 62      P.O. Box 230
♦♦♦♦♦»»♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦
♦♦♦♦»♦♦

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