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Prince Rupert Journal Aug 11, 1911

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Hew WelUmtM
Coal
is the best
ROGERS & BUCK
Sole Agents
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in all Lines
VOLUME  II.
Published  Twice  a  Week.
PRINCE   RUPERT,   B.   C.   FRIDAY,  AUGUST   11,   1911.
Price, Five Cents.
No.   16.
G.T.P. NEW STEAMER
Prince John is a Model for the Trade
in Which She is to
Engage.
Queen   Charlotte   Settlers   Will   Be
Able to Travel With    ■■
Greatest  Comfort
WRITS  ISSUED
(Special   to   The  Journal) *
Ottawa, Aug.  11.—Writs au- *
thorizing   the   election   in   two *
hundred   and   twenty-one   con- *
stituencies    in    the    Dominion *
were issued yesterday. *
The G. T. P. is showing that not
alone with respect to land transportation are the facilities of the company to be the best procurable but
it has given evidence that the same
rule is to apply to the marine end
of the services. The latest manifestation in this line is the advent of
the Prince John to this port. The
trade into which this latest vessel
of the G. T. P. fleet is to enter is
a growing one and undoubtedly the
time will soon come when much
larger steamers will be required to
fill the duties. The G. T. P., however, did not take the course so
often pursued by companies of purchasing a cheap vessel that would
meet the immediate denrand. It purchased a vessel and had her rebuilt
at heavy expense to make her adaptable to -the trade.
It is questionable whether any
other trade that has developed as
little as the Queen Charlotte one
as yet has a vessel combining the
same comforts for passengers as has
the Prince John. The little steamer,
which arrived here from the south
on Tuesday evening, had on board
Captain Nicholson, the superintendent of the G. T. P. steamship service, and Mrs. Nicholson. The superintendent came north to see the
new vessel put into active service.
He Is delighted with the latest addition to the fleet, and well he
might be.
The vessel Is a new one, having
been built but a few months before
tbe G. T. P. secured her. She was
constructed for trade as a freighter
about the coasts of the Old. Land and
is built  to  withstand any  sea.
When acquired by the company
she was at once put in the shipyards and house work put in her
to meet the requirements of the new
trade. Captain Nicholson himself
supervised the drawing up of the
plans, which have had very careful
consideration. The result is that the
little vessel would be difficult to
improve upon for the class of trade
she is to enter. Everything is convenient and not a foot of space has
been lost. The house work is all of
a substantial character, being of
steel throughout. A charming little
observation room has been provided
and excellent staterooms fitted up
along the general lines of the large
Princes. There is accommodation
for thirty-six people in the stateroom
while if needed the dining saloon
can be made to accommodate eighteen more. This dining saloon is a
credit to the builders, being airy and
exceedingly comfortable. The galley
Is commodious and there is the fullest provision made in the way of
a smoking room. t
For steerage passengers' there has
been fitted up quarters far superior
to those generally provided for this
class of travellers.      .»
The vessel is exceedingly staunch,
being built to weather any seas, and
being fitted up to go anywhere. She
is an  economical  vessel, consuming
heaviest weather, and Is a remarkable sea boat. The placing of the
engines aft gives her an appearance
of staunchness unexcelled in many
larger vessels:'
In addition to a large and well
arranged steerage accommodation for
150, she has first class accommodation; a very neat and comfortable
smoking room finished in fumed oak
with leather upholstery, and buffet
in connection. This is accessible
only from first class quarters. The
dining saloon, seating forty-four, is
done In mahogany with crimson upholstery and drapings, and is situated on the anchor deck. Attached
to it is a large pantry and galley,
conveniently laid out. The . chief
steward's offices and men's washrooms are located also on this deck.
The dining room Is reached by a
mahogany stairway leading from the
lounge room on the shade deck into
a well proportioned , and air vesti-
but, also mahogany panelled and
decorated. The principal stateroom
accommodation is situated on the
shelter deck, and consists of eighteen two berth staterooms of large
sibe, well ventilated and all having
outside windows. These rooms are
furnished with folding lavatories,
spring berts and hair mattresses.
Forward of this is a very neat
semi-circular observation room, with
large plate glass windows, done in
white and gold and furnished with
wicker chairs. This room is the
most attractive feature of the steamer. Above this Is the pilot house
and  officers'  quarters.
On the after-part of the lower
deck there is ample promenading
space for steerage passengers, and
on the shade and upper decks there
is ample shelter and lounge space for
first class passengers.
The ship has a cargo capacity of
450 tons, In addition to ber bunkers, and altogether will be a convenient and comfortable vessel, well
adapated for the purpose for which
she is intended.
 o	
DROWNED IN FRASER
FEELING DEVELOPS
AGAINST RECIPROCITY
Ontario Farmers Show a Revulsion of the Terms of the
Pact Proposed to be Entered Into by the Government—Conservatives are Gaining
as the Fight Continues.
(Special to The Journal)
Toronto, Aug. 11.—Beyond nomination conventions in a few ridings
the political campaign in Ontario
has not yet begun in real earnest.
The fight will commence next Tuesday, when R. L. Borden, leader of
the Conservative party, opens the
Ontario campaign at Ion.
The  Conservative   party  throughout the province is thoroughly organ
ized and the indications from all
over the province augur well for the
future.
In .many sections where at first
reciprocity was hailed as beneficial
to Canada, there has been a marked
change in sentiment and the confidence that was expressed by the Liberals that the farmers of the province will endorse the pact has received  a  decided  setback.
KILLED AT TUNNEL
Cave in of Rock at Kitselas Results in
the Death of One Workman.
Two
Others   Were   Injured   in
Accident at Head of Construction  Work
the
RETURNING  OFFICER
* (Special   to  The Journal)       *
* Ottawa, Aug. 11.—P. P. Har- *
*' rlson  of  Cumberland  has  been *
* appointed  returning officer for *
* Comox-Atlin    electoral    district *
* for   the   forthcoming  election.    *
only about twelve tons of coal a day.
Under command of Captain Wear-
mouth, the Prince John entered
upon her service on Wednesday, proceeding to the Queen Charlottes. A
more detailed description of the vessel is as follows:
The steamer is 185 feet long, 30
feet beam, and 13 feet 3 inches
moulded depth, built of steel and
classed 100 Al at Lloyds. She has
seven watertight bulkheads with
double bottom, affording ample ballast and fresh water storage, large
bunkers, two multitubular Scotch
boilers, triple expansion engines,
capable of a speed of 12 knots under full doaded conditions. The vessel has been  modelled to stand  the
Five Nen Working on Canadian Northern
Construction Lose
Live;.
Addition  to List of Fatalities Connected   With   Work
Near Hope
(Special to The Journal)
Hope, Aug. 11.—Five men, names
unknown, were drowned on Wednesday in the Fraser River at Saddle
Rock, the first flag station above
Yale. They were part of a gang
attempting to place a cable across
the  river.
The scow with three men was
swept away but made the shore lower
down. The five men were In a
small boat and were overcome by
the current.
This makes a total of nine
drowned sinf'e the beglning of preparations for railway construction
from Hope northeastward on tlie line
of the Canadian Northern  Pacific.
 o	
A Rich Country
Aid. George Kerr has returned to
Prince Rupert after a visit to Hazelton and district, where he looked
into conditions. He Is more than
pleased with the outlook in the interior. There Is an immense country with facilities in the way of agriculture and mining that It will take
years to fully develop. The northern
Interior, in the opinion of Aid. Kerr,
is second to no place in the Dominion.
Fires Do Damage
Robert Jennings, road superintendent, has returned from a tour
of inspection among the various road
camps up the Skeena. He reports
that good progress is being made.
The continued dry weather has made
It very difficult to keep the forest
fires under control and in consequence there lias been considerable
loss in tlie Lakelse, Kiliuaiigan and
other  valleys in  tlie district.
A cavein of rock at the G. T. P.
tunnel now under construction near
Kitselas resulted in the death of one
workman. Two other men were injured in the accident. The rock at
this point is not very solid and has
given the workmen quite an amount
of trouble.
The details of the accident are not
fully known. It was not due, however, to any explosion, but to the
rock  caving.
CHANGES IN CABINET
Dr. Beland Has Been Taken in as Postmaster-General-Other Appointments Made.
Successor   to   Sir   Alan   Aylesworth
Has Not Yet Been Named by
the Government
CLEARING RIGHT OK WAY
Mr.    Shendy    of   Contracting    Firm
Leaving for Interior to Push
Forward Work
M. Sheady & Co. have already commenced work in a small way on the
clearing of the right-of-way for the
G. T. P. beyond Aldermere. Mr.
Sheady is at present in the city and
will leave, In company with J. C.
Shepard, the superintendent of
Foley, Welch & Steward on th*
coast, and V. W. Smith tomorrow for
the interior.
Mr. Sheady will then take steps
to have the work pushed' forward
with all expedition. The contract
entered into into is for twenty miles
of the way, the cost being $60,000.
Reserved Judgment
Judge Lampman has been hearing
the evidence in Guraski vs. McMordie for the past few days. The evidence is all in now and judgment
has been reserved. The action is
one for alleged breach of contract
preferred by station men. Fred
Peters, K. C, represented the prosecuting station men, while L. W. Patmore appeared for the defense.
(Special to The Journal)
Ottawa, Aug. 11,—The government yesterday made an order appointing Dr. Beland of Beauce postmaster general; Hon. R. Lemieux
minister of marine, and Hon. L. P.
Brodeur a judge of the supreme
court.
A successor to Sir Alan Aylesworth
as minister of justice will be named
later.
BORDEN'S     CANDIDACY *
(Special  to  The  Journal) *
Halifax,    Aug.    11.—At    the *
Conservative     convention      the *
nomination of R. L. Borden and *
Adam    B.    Crosby    was    made *
unanimous.      No   other   names *
were submitted. *
INSPECTED   ROAD
Officials of the Railway Commission
Looked    Over    the
G. T. P. Line
James Ogilvie, assistant chief operating officer of the board of railway commissioners, and E. C. Lalonde, his associate in the work,
inspected the Grand Trunk Pacific.
They arrived in the city by the Prince
Rupert and yesterday proceeded by
special train, in company with W.
C. C. Mehan, general superintendent,
and G. A. McNicholl, superintendent,
to the end of the track. They made
a full inspection of the line,
getting exact information for the
guidance of the  board.
The board of railway commissioners is to sit here on August 19, when
any questions of a local nature coming within the scope of the board's
work will  be taken  up.
NEGOTIATIONS  PROGRESSING
Government Is Considering the Question  of Agreement  with
G. T. P. at Present
Held   Picnic
The Ladies' Aid of the Methodist
Church held a picnic to Metlakatla
yesterday. A delightful day was
was sp£nt on the beach there.
SELECT DELEGATES
Liberals Name Those Who Will Represent Association at Convention.
Duncan  lloss  Will   lie  the Choice of
the Local  Liberal   Party
Representatives
Pleased  With   City
E. P. Miller, secretary-treasurer of
the Dominion Trust Company, Vancouver, is in the district. He came
north on a holiday trip, going as far
as Skagway. On the way south, however, he was attracted to Prince Rupert and stopped off in order to take
a look over the place. He became
more or 'ess enamored of the city
and has finally decided to visit the
interior of the province and see what
that part has to offer. He has gone
as far as Kitselas but will return in
a day or two. Mr. Miller is very
agreeably surprised to find the progress Prince Rupert is making. He
is satisfied that there is a great future for it and is pleased to see the
progress already made.
Harry Howson of Victoria, so well
known to the mining men of the
north, returned to the city this week.
He has gone to Goose Bay and Alice
Arm in connection with some properties he represents there. He will
probably go up the Skeena on his
return to the city.
l^*+^^^**^**********»*^**»*^*+**+***»-if**+»*»**#»*»***
Meeting Tonight!
A meeting of the Conservative Association will be held in Melntyre Hall this
Friday Evening, Aug. 11
at 8 p.m., to meet the delegates prior to their
departure for the nominating convention.
«
J. A. KIRKPATRICK.
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A message received yesterday
from Mayor Manson by Aid. Kirkpatrick, the acting mayor, indicates
that negotiations are progressing
satisfactorily relative to the agreement with the G. i. P. The matter
has been before the executive council and an answer is expected from
the government on Monday as to
th decision reacned on all the points
The message fr- .. the mayor
reads as follows:
J. A. Kirkpatrick, Prince Rupert.
Negotiations with government re
agreement proceeding satisfactorily.
Final conference next Monday.
WM. MANSON.
 o	
CONSERVATIVES MEET
At a meeting of the Liberal Association of the city held last evening
the delegates to the nominating convention of the party to be held in
Nanaimo on August 19 were selected. The twelve named were: Frank
Mobley, A. J. Morris, D. A. McKin-
non, S. P. .McMordie, J, J. Sloan,
A. D. Pattullo, G. R. Naden, Frank
Keeley, J. M. Lynch, Alex. Manson
and Dr. Hall. Five alternates were
elected as follows: Robert Ross, H.
F. MscRae, H. Campbell, K. Mun-
roe and W. P. Anderson.
Tbe choice of the local association
for a candidate is Duncan Ross, and
the delegates from here will press
his claims upon the convention next
week.
 o	
Had a Gun
Charged with pointing a gun at
the mirror in one of the hotel bars,
J. McCuIl, was brought before J. H.
McMullIn, S. M., this morning. His
case was remanded until tomrrow.
 o	
Baseball Match
The Quill Drivers of the city defeated the Maple Leafs in a scheduled match of the local baseball
league last night. The score was
30 to 28 In favor of the Quill Drivers, who attained their first victory
of the season.
Association  Will  Hold   a   Gathering
Tonight Before Delegates Leave
for South.
Those Who Will Attend  Convention
iii Nanalmo Will  Leave
.Monday    .Morning
An important meeting of the Conservative Association of the city will
be held this evening In Melntyre
Hall at 8 o'clock. A few weeks ago
the association met and elected delegates to go to the convention whenever it met. Fourteen were elected,
but it was understood that before
the dat of the convention a second
meeting should be called In order to
give the members of the association
Fining   Drunks
In the city police court this morning a drunk was given the usual
fine. Several Indians have been
brought up during the last few days.
Mrs. Rada, on a charge of selling
without a license, was fined $200
and costs a few days ago.
 o	
MAY EXTEND  LINES
T.   P.   Reported   lo   lie   Heading
for   Pine   River   Pass
From  Edson
FAVORS   PRINCE   RUPERT *
Speaking at a dinner given In *
his  honor   In   London* Premier •
McBride, during bis recent visit, *
said   from   his  own   knowledge *
of Prince  Rupert and  the ail- *
joining  territory,  anil   with   the •
development    promised    by    the *
Grand Trunk Pacific, he bad no *
hesitation in saying that within *
five years those who wished to *
seek   a   new   home   would   find *
none better than at  Prince Ru- •
pert. «
an opportunity to meet the delegates
and express their wishes as to the
candidate to be selected. This Is the
object  of  the   meeting   tonight.
The delegates attending the convention in Nanalmo will leave by the
Prince George on Monday morning,
reaching Nanaimo on Tuesday afternoon.
While there is consederable speculation as to the probable candidate,
nothing will be known definitely until the delegates have nn't In Nanalmo and considered the* whole question.
There is every indication that the
Grand Trunk Pacific will head for
the South Pine Pass with their projected branch line north from Edson, construction work on which Is
expected to commence this summer,
says the Edmonton Capital. E. A.
Knudson, a prospector and trapper
who has spent the last four years on
the shores of Rocky Mountain Lake,
200 miles south of Fort St. John,
B. C, stated that U, T. P. survey
stakes extend right from the Pouce
Coupe Prairie through the Soulh
Pine Pass. Through this section of
the country the levels of the right-
of-way have been taken and the route
has been staked out carefully, all the
stakes rearing the marks of tlie
(Irani! Trunk Pacific.
Mr. i-vnudson says that this line
was staked In tbe summer of 1907.
Canadian Pacific surveyors have also
been through this pass. They ran a
trail line some time before the G.
1*. I'. and the route they have chosen
is not so clearly defined. Mr. Knudson stated thai tbe grade through
the pass should not lie a difficult
one, as the summit Is very low at
tills point. The pass is qutle wide
and there Is ample room for railway
lines. In ibis ii differs from tlie
Yellowhead Pass, farther Bouth. Mr,
Knudson lias visited 111*> pass several times with other prospectors and
trappers, lie' came from his post
at Rocky Mountain Lake aboul a
month ago.
Since tlie opening of spring G.T.P,
surveyors have been running trail
lines north of Kelson toward the
Athabasca River and il is understood
that they have selected a suitable
location with respect to grades and
other nee'essary consideration. This
Is presumably a line to serve the
Grande Prairie country but the fact
that the copany has already made
definite surveys through the Pouce
Coupe country nnd on to the mountains is substantial ground for the
belief that the company is looking
for a northern route to the Pacific
Coast.
Factory Inspector Gordon eif van-
couver is in tin- city in connection
witii the duties ol bis office, He
will l.e'' fur the Interior after mak-
Ing Inspections here. PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Friday, August 11, 1911.
j« **« •;+ »ji *j* »*- .*• .j. •*<! »j» tj» ►*♦»;« •*«»
PEACE MOVEMENT
At the meeting of tlie Peace Society In the Unitarian Church, Tokio,
Count Okuma made an address on
modern tendencies. Tbe following
. report appeared in the Japan Times:
"Mr, Mtrko asked me to address
the meeting today on the subject put
up, by liim when l was present al
the Keio University yesterday to
speak for the Economic Society there,
so you must know thai I stauel here
with no preparations made, but that
I stand here with empty bands to
grasp something beneficial and Instructive for you tie enlist your cooperation in the movement In which
1 myself am a member."
Turning to the paper hanging from
the wall, he read the topic on which
he himself was announced to speak,
and continued: "The tendency of
the world: Tliis is the problem I
can hardly give any justice to, but
i am firmly convinced of the fact
that It Is the tendency of the world
that has brought so many people
here just to listen to my humble
statements. As a member of the
Japan Peace Society, i should say
peace will be realized In the near
future, but 1 confess it is yet far
to seek. One who is to dwell upon
the tendency of (be world must, first
of all, mention the population of the
world. Though 1 do not remember
the exact numbers of the world's
population, let me say that there are
about 1,600,000,000, one-fourth of
which are Europeans and Americans,
and of the remaining two-thirds Asiatics. So, if discussed from the
standpoint of number, it is sufficiently obvious the Asiatics are innately
responsible for the immediate participation in the peace movement before western friends advance in the
march of the movement. But here
a lamentable difficulty follows, that
we Asiatics are yet inferior to the
Westerners in intellectual development and remain fast in the cradle
stage of civilization. Why does not
Japan stand up and enforce this enlightened movement of peace and human happiness? Japan's activity in
the movement would, certainly result
in the awakening of other nations of
the Orient and encourage them to
follow her example.    ,
"Tbe political difficulty that now
perplexes the heads of European
statesmen is along the coast of the
Mediterranean Sea, especially from
Morocco to Alexandria. Morocco Is
the centre of this serious question.
If the country is ever exposed to
danger, it will have an effect upon
the peace of the world. Centre our
ateentlon upon Turkey, since the
foundation of Turkey by Ottoman,
the constant struggle is between this
empire of Muhammadanism with the
.Christian countries of Europe, and
few years passed without a quarrel
is raised among the countries. What
they call 'Glory In heaven and peace
on earth' is not yet realized after
many centuries. I hastily proceed
lo the conditions of Egypt. Our
intelligent friend Mr. Roosevelt once
gave a severe blow to the administration of Egypt with words quite
unusual and striking for a prominent citizen of a republic. Anyway,
Egypt is not altogether well administered. As for India, if Mr. Roosevelt is again called to speak, he will
criticize tlie country in a similar way.
Mr, Bryan also severely criticized
India, but Americans should be reminded eif bow they treated the
American Indians, Tlie United
States includes every race of the
world extensively scatter over forty-
tliree stales, with a population of
more than 100,000,000. But t lie
more the Latins have become introduced Into tlie country, the harder
has become the assimilative power of
tin- Anglo-Saxon, hence the natural
difficulty of the unification of their
ideas. In not more than a century
the population of the United States
will be multiplied to 400,000,000.
Then it will be another Europe from
the standpoint of numbers. Europe
has already reached its climax of
wealth, but America's wealth is still
growing, as fields and mountains are
the source of abundant riches. So,
naturally, many people will enter the
United States and the country will
be more and more complex. Prudent and sensible Americans are a
peace loving people. The spirit of
Christianity is In conformity with
thai of love, humanity, and freedom,
but regrettable enough to contest
such a spirit is not felt west of tin
Rocky Mountains. Tbe Rocky Mountains arc rocky indeed.
"The slieiri International peace is
far tu seek, judging from the presenl tendency of the world. But I am
a constant believer in international
peace. You say you are discouraged
by my words? Don't say so. Cheer
up! A great light is before us. It
is nothing less than international arbitration. President Taft is going
to secure peace by international arbitration. His efforts may soon convince tlie kaiser of assisting this
movement. 1 dare say If America,
England, Germany and France would
unite and seriously face this question in order to bring it to a happy
solution, the peace of the world at
least would be brought to light.
Then how should Japan face this
question? The emporer himself, being the great advocate of peace, his
subjects, one and all are urged to
be peacemakers. Then this question
is solved But here is the one obstacle which greatly impedes the
peace movement of the world—that
is, racial prejudice. This is my urg-
ent entreaty—nay, it is that of the
Japanese nation. But at the same
time you must bear in mind that
you ought to be circumspect about
your conduct. Whatever religion you
may believe in, you must try not to
forget this advice of mine. Let me
repeat again, the removal of racial
prejudice is an important condition
for ensuring the peace of the world."
 o	
BERING  SEA   PATROL
Under the terms of the naval
agreement between the Imperial,
Canadian and Australian governments entered into at the Imperial
Conference the sphere of action of
the Canadian Pacific warships is
placed as follows: "The Canadian
Pacific station will include the waters north of 30 degrees north latitude and east of the meredian of
ISO degrees longitude." This
sphere includes tbe waters as far
south as Lower California and
about half way across the Pacific
and northward to the Arctic, including Bering Sea. Under the terms
of the sealing agreement it is anticipated that the station will have
hereafter to provide the patrol vessel to go yearly to Bering Sea, as
Great Britain, as one of the signatory nations included In the treaty,
lias agreed to provide a patrol vessel. As Britain acted for Canada in
the agreement and Canada is to receive the advantage derived it is
expected that Canada will have to
supply the patrol and next season
will probably see the Rainbow started for Bering Sea on a cruise similar to that now being undertaken
by 11. M. S. Algerine.
GRAND HOTEL
WORKINGMAN'S HOME
25c
Rooms 50 Cents
Spring Beds, Clean
White Sheets
Hest in Town for the Money
FIRST AVE. AND SEVENTH ST.
J. Goodman, Proprietor
You Can Avoid This
by sending your Clothes to the
PIONEER  STEAM LAUNDRY
There are Many
Reasons Why
mm    IT   IS   TO   YOUR   INTEREST
We do first-class work and
are careful with your Garments. We can do your work
and return it within 48 hours
if necessary. We call for your
uaundry and return It to you.
Should anything be lost or misplaced we will make it satisfactory.
When your Laundry goes to the Chinks there are many drawbacks. When you send It to us your money helps pay WHITE
LABOR.
PIONEER STEAM LAUNDRY
PUBLIC HIGHWAYS
Province of British Columbia
NOTICE is hereby given that all
Public Highways in unorganized Districts, and all Main Trunk Roads in
organized Districts are sixty-six feet
wide, and have a width of thirty
three feet on each side of the mean
straight centre line of the travelled
road. THOMAS TAYLOR,
.Minister of Public Works.
Department of Public Works, Victoria. B. C, July 7, 1911.    jyl8-ol8
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE,
NOTICE is hereby given that the
reserve of a parcel of land situated
on Graham Island-, notice of which
appeared in the British Columbia
Gazette on the 25th of February
1909, being dated 23rd February,
1909, is cancelled to permit of the
lands being acquired by pre-emption
only and for no other purpose
ROBT.  A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Department of Lands,
Victoria, B. C, April 5th, 1911.
4-14—7-5
NOTICE.
In the matter of an application for
the issue of a duplicate of the Certificate of Title for an undivided
one-half of Lot 883, Group I
Cassiar District:
Notice Is hereby given that It Is
my intention to issue at the expiration of one month after the first
publication hereof a duplicate of the
Certificate of Title to the above
mentioned land in the name of William Jordan Larkworthy, which Certificate is dated the 30th day of September, 1910, and numbered 326R.
WILLIAM  E.   BURRITT,
DP.'.riot Registrar.
Land Registry Office,
Prince Rupert, B. C,
May 26,  1911. J23
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE.
Notice is hereby given the the
reserve existing by reason of the
notice published in the British Columbia Gazette of the 27th December, 1907, over lands on Graham Island, formerly covered by Timber
Licences Nos. Nos. 37055, 37056 and
37057, which expired on the 6th day
of November, 1909, and the lands
embraced within Timber Licence No.
37059, which expired on the 25th
day of January, 1909, is cancelled,
and that the said lands will be open
for pre-emption only under the provisions of Section 7 of the "Land
Act" after midnight on June 16th,
1911.
ROBERT A.   RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Lands Department,
Victoria,  B.  C„
9th March, 1911.
Skeena   Land   District—-District   of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that Prince Rupert Sand & Gravel Company, Ltd.,
of Prince Rupert, occupation Industrial Company, intends to apply for
permission to lease the following described land:— Commencing at a
post planted at the Witness post on
the southerly boundary of Lot 4124;
thence southerly following the sinuosities of the shore line 60 chains
more or less to southerly end of the
Island; thence easterly 10 cliains
more or less to low water mark;
thence northerly 60 chains more or
less along low water mark; thence
westerly 10 chains more or .ess to
the point of commencement.
PRINCE   .tUPLKT   SAND  &
GRAVEL Co., LTD.
Per J'. Y. Rochester, Agt.
Dated May 30, 1911. 6-2
Skeena   Land    District—District   of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that I, Joseph
Pastl, of Watson, Sask., occupation
farmer, intend to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:— Commencing at a
post planted about 30 c.alns In a
northerly direction from the N. E.
corner of Lot No. 2662 or T. L. No.
32598 at Lakelse Lake; thence nortli
20 chains; thence east 40 chains;
thence south 20 chains along shore
of Lakelse Lake; thence west 40
chains to point of commencement,
containing 120 acres, more or less.
JOSEPH PASTL.
George Hlr, Agent.
Dated  May  5,  1911. 6-2
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C.,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Commencing at a post planted six
miles N. E. of the mouth of White
River and the Junction of the Naas
River on Canyon Creek, marked
Chas. J. Gillingham's S. E. Corner;
thence 80 chains North; thence 80
chains West; thence 80 chains
South; thence 80 cliains East to
point of commencement and containing 640 acres more or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles M. Huff, Agent.
Dated March 4th, 1911. 4-18
WATER  NOTICE
I, C. N. Pring, of Prince Rupert
B. C, occupation broker, give notice
that on the 12th day of July I in
tend tho apply to the Water Commissioner at his office in Prince Ru
pert, for a license to take and use
2.8 cubic feet of water per second
from Hot Springs on border of Lake
Lakelse in the Skeena Land Division of Coast District. The water is
to be taken directly from the Springs
and is to be used on Lot No. 39S3,
for sanitary purposes.
Dated June 12th, 1911.
C. N. PRING,
C-13-lm Prince Rupert, B. C.
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Coast—Range  V.
TAKE NOTICE that John Klrkaldy, of Lakelse Valley, oocupatlon
farmer, n... *, to apply for permis
sion to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 120 chains south
from the BOuth end of Herman
Lake; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains.
JOHN   KIRKALDY.
Dated April 11, 1911. 5-5
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that I, V. W
Smith, of Prince Rupert, occupation
contractor, intend to apply for permission to lease the following de-
sejrlbed foreshore:—Commencing at
a post planted about 2 miles in a
southerly direction from Port Simpson; thence northerly along high
water mark 25 chains and containing all foreshore between high and
low water mark.
V. W. SMITH,
Locator
Staked 31st May,  1911. 6-6
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast—Rang.2 V.
TAKE NOTICE, that I, Minnie
Meredith, of Victoria, B. C, occu.
pation a married woman, intend to
apply for permission to purchase the
following desoribed lands:—Commencing at a post planted aboflt 40
chains distant and in a South direction from the Southeast corner of
Lot 1733; thence east 40 chains
thence south 40 chains; thence west
40 chains; thence north 40 chains
to point of commencement, containing 160 acres more or less.
MINNIE  MEREDITH,
John Kirkaldy,
Agent.
Dated  February  20th,  1911.
Skeena  Land  District—Desirict
of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that Joseph Edward Merryfield, of Prince Rupert,
occupation merchant, intends to apply for permission to lease the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about 10 chains
norm from the northea-.t corner of
Lot 33; thence west 1500 feet to
shore of Smith's Island; thence following shore in a southerly direction
1200 feet; thence east to shore of
De Horsey Island; thence following
shore in a northerly direction to
point of commencement.
JOSEPH EDWARD MERRYFIELD.
E. Spro, Agent.
Dated April 4, 1911. 4-7
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast Range 5.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles
James Gillingham, of Prince Rupert,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner of Lot 992 and
marked C. J. Gillingham's N. E.
Corner Application for Purchase; I,
C. J. Gillingham, intend to apply
for permission to purchase 320 acres
of land bounded as follows:—Commencing at this post; thence 80
chains south; thence 40 chains west;
tlience 80 chains north; thence 40
chains east to place of commencement.
C.iARLES JAMES GILI-INOHAX
Robeert Osborn Jennings, Agent.
Dated January 5, 1911.
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that I, Charles
Percy Hickman, of Naas Harbour,
occupation constable, intend to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:— Commencing at a post planted on the
east shore of Naas Bay, about two
miles In an easterly direction from
Lot 3, marked C. P. H., S. W. corner; thence east 20 chains; thence
north'1' 40 chains to the shore; thence
along the shore line to the place of
commencement, containing 40 acres,
more or less.
CHARLES PRECY HICKMAN.
Dated June 7, 1911. 6-30
Skeena   Land   District —District   ol
oKeena.
TAKE NOTICE that the Canadian
Canning Company, Limited, of 224
Winch Building, Vancouver, B. C,
occupation salmon caners, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described Iands:—Commencing at a post planted adjoining
a post marked W. N. about 300 feet
South of Wallace's wharf, Naas Harbour, B. C.; thence east 20 chains;
thence south 20 chains; thence west
20 chains; thence following the
coast line In a northerly direction
back to the point of com mencement
and containing forty acres more or
less.
CANADIAN CANNING CO., LTD.
Per G. H. Leslie, Agent.
Dated   6th  June,  1911. 6-26
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast, Range o.
TAKE NOTICE that T. H. Hughes,
of Lakelse Valley, occupation farmer,
intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted at the southeast corner of Lot
4.12S; thence 40 chains nortli; thence
40 chains east; thenco 40 chains
south; tlience 40 chains west to point
of commencement, and containing
160 acres, more or less.
TOM HUGH HUGHES.
Dated June 5,  1911.
Skeena  Land  District—District
of Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that Thomas Stew
art, of Prince Rupert, occupation
accountant, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted 40 chains north from
the southwest corner of Lot 1733
thence west 40 cliains; tlience south
40 chains; thence east 40 chains;
thence north 40 cliains to point of
commencement.
THOMAS STEWART.
John  Kirkaldy,  Agent
Dated July 7, 1911.
WATER  NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that an
application will be made under Part
V of the "Water Act, 1909," to obtain a licence in the Queen Charlotte
Islands Division  of  Skeena District,
(a) The name, address and occupation of the applicant—Orland P.
Merrill; Massett, Graham Island,
B. C; prospector.
(If for mining purposes) Free Miner's Certificate No	
(b) The name of the lake,
stream or source (if unnamed, the
description is)—Ain Lake and Ain
River.
(c) The point of diversion—At
or near Ain Lake.
(d) The quantity of water applied for (in cubic feet per second)
—700.
(e) The character of the proposed
works—Dam, flume, pipe line and
power plant.
Cf)     The  premises  on   w'li.h   tlie
ivater is to be used  (describe s.
—Near mouth of Ain River.
(g) The purposes for which :
water is to be used—General:)
power.
(h) If for irrigation, describe I
land to be irrigated, giving acreag
(I) If the water is to be used for
power or for mining purposes, describe the place where the water is
to be returned to some natural channel, and the difference in altitude
between point of diversion and point
of return—Near mouth of Ain River
about 150 feet below point of diversion.
(j) Area of Crown land intended
to be occupied by the proposed
works— About 10 acres.
(k) This notice was posted on
the tenth day of June, 1911, and application will be made to the Commissioner on the fourth day of September, 1911.
(1) Give the names and addresses
of any riparian proprietors or licensees who or whose lands are
likely to be affected by the proposed
works, either above or below the
outlet—None.
(Signature)  ORLAND P. MERRILL,
(P.  O. Address)   Masset, B.  C.
George S. Mayer, Agent,
(P.  O. Address)   Masset, B.  C.
Note—One cubic foot per second
is equivalent to 35.71 miner's inches.
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that I, John Y.
Rochester, of Prince Rupert, occupation broker, intend to apply fir permission to lease the following described land:—■ Commencing at a
post planted on the northerly end of
an Island in the Skeena River about
Mile 45 on the Grand Trunk Pacific
Railway; tlience north 1000 feet
more or less to low water mark;
thence westerly along the low water
mark 1000 feet more or less;
thence southerly 1000 feet more or
less; thence easterly 1000 feet to
the place of commencement.
J. Y. ROCHESTER.
Dated May 30, 1911. 6-2
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that T. M. Turner,
of Lakelse Valley, occupation farmer, Intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands: — Commencing at a post
planted on the Omineca & Hazelton
right of way and adjoining the N. E.
corner of Lot 518; thence west 17
chains to corner of Lot 3996; thence
north 20 chains; thence following
right of way to point of commencement.
T. M. TURNER,
John Klrkaldy, Agent.
Dated 14th June, 1911. 7-4
Skeena    Land    Notice—District    of
Coast—Range V
TAKE NOTICE that Daniel W.
Beaton, of Prince Rupert, B. C, occupation carpenter, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a poBt planted about five miles
up the Exchumslk River from Its
mouth, and on its south bank; thence
east 40 chains; thence north 40
chains; thence west 40 chains;
thence south 40 chains to place of
commencement.
DANIEL  W.  BEATON.
Dated June  14,  1911. j-n
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Write for further details of our
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General   Offices:   Oliver  Typewriter
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MISS HENNY WENNERSli-.N
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PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
************************$,*
| PRINCE OF WALES !
**************************
Albert Edward was a onth old
when he was created Prince of
Wales, and the ceremonies attending the granting of the title were
necessarily brief. At the age of 36
the present king was raised from
the rank of Duke of Cornwall and
York to the title so long held by his
father. In the case of King George,
too, the ceremonies were simple, and
were not such as would interest the
people of Wales more than the people of Ireland or New Zealand. On
Thursday last, however, Prince Edward Albert was Invested with thhe
title of Prince of Waies In surroundings hardly less Impressive and magnificent than those of the coronation
itself, in the ancient Castle of Car-j
narvon, wliere the first English
Prince of Wales was given the title,
the future king was solemnly charged
with his new office, and swore to
hold the principality to the king and
his heirs. It is needless to say that
the revival of the ancient ceremonies
in the heart of Wales delighted the
Welsh people, who regard the coro-i
nation as a small affair compared
with the investiture of a Prince of
Wales.
Many people learned for the first
time shortly after King Edward came
to the throne that the title of Prince
of Wales is not a hereditary one. The
general supposition was, the male
heir apparent to the British throne
is always Prince of Wales, and entitled to the tile the instant he became the heir. As a matter of fact,
the present king was not made
Prince of Wales until several months
had elapsed with his father on the
throne. It rested with the king to
say when he should be given the
title, or whether he should be given
it at all. Indeed, the question has
been raised whether the king could
not create anyone he chose Prince
of Wales, and the Constitutionalists
seem to be of the opinion that nothing but precedent selects the heir-
apparent as the proper wearer of the
title. The fact remains that of the
24 British kings since Edward II,
the first English Prince of Wales,
only 12 have been prices of Wales,
and that six otner Princes of Wales
have never sat on the throne of England.
There were Princes of Wales before there were English kings,
though the holders of that title were
then little more than mountain
chiefs. Llewellyn, the last of the
Celtic line was a great man and a
fit foeman for Edward I, who was
to break his power and attach Wales
to the English crown. For years
Llewellyn, who had united the Welsh
people against the invader, kept up
a gallant struggle, but was eventually slain in battle, and Edward was
sullenly acknowledged as overlord of
the mountain principality. He realized that his hold on Wales was
none too strong, and might be
broken when a fovrable opportunity
arose for revolt, so he sought to
placate the people. He promised
them, it is said, that he would create a new Prince of Wales, one of
noble birth, with no stain upon his
honor, and who could speak no word
of English. The assembled chiefi-
tains were delighted with the pledge,
and then, so the story goes, Edward
caused to be brought down among
them his son, who had been born in
Carnarvon Castle two days before.
"This is your Prince of Wales," said
Edward.
It cannot be said that the first
Prince of Wales was one to shed
much honor on the name, for his
period of misrule was ended by a
conspiracy that resulted in his pedo-
sltion and violent" death. It has
been pointed out that five of the
succeeding Princes of Wales have
been the victims of tragedies—four
being beheaded. Of the 18 Princes
of Wales, only four, namely, the
Black Prince, Henry V, George IV,
and Edward VII, died natural
deaths, the others on the list either
meeting violent deaths or having
their deaths hastened by insanity or
dissipation. Had not King Edward
refuted the suverslltion, it might
have been urged that Edward was
an ill-omened name for a Prince of
Wales to bear since Edward II, Edward IV, and Edward V, all Princes
of Wales, were murdered. No name
has been so intimately associated
with the Princedom of Wales as that
of Edward, and it is to be remembered that it was an Edward, the
Black Prince who made the title
honored throughout Europe.
The young prince who received the
title is, as the Duke' of Connaught
remarked, only a boy, but he is a
boy of promise, and in the past few
months has matured rapidly. He is
still a cadet at the Royal Naval College at Dartmouth, but will soon go
to Oxford for a short university
course. Afterwards be will probably
be gazetted into one of the cavalry
regiments. Before then, however,
we are likely to see him in Canada,
for a tour of the world is projected
for the prince in the near future,
and he will be welcomed to this
country by his uncle, the Duke of
Connaught, our next governor general, and by eight million loyal Canadians.
NOTICE.
A book Is kept in the City Clerk's
Office in which to enter the names
and addresses, etc. of citizens of
Prince Rupert desiring employment
on City work. All desiring employment should register at. once.
, , ERNEST A. WOODS,
City Clerk.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Christina Orr,
ol Masset, B. C, occupation married,
Intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described
lands: —Commencing at a post planted about 40 chains south and 3 miles
east of the N. E. corner of Lot 35;
thence south 40 chains; thence west
80 chains; thence north 40 chains;
thence east SO chains, containing 320
acres.
CHRISTINA ORR.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 25, 1910.     	
Skeena Land  Listrict—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKri NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 64 0 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the southeast corner of C.L. 4472; thence west 80
chains; thence nortli 80 chains;
thence east. 80 chains; thence south
80 chains to place of commencement.
AUSTIN  M. BROWN.
Dated July  17,  1911.
Skeena Land  District—District  of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE   NOTICE   that   thirty   days
Skeena Land Districl—District
of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that F. C. Pillsbury, of Boston, Mass., occupation
civil engineer, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—beginning a*, a
post planted at high water mark on
the northerly end of Pitt Island, on
Ogden Channel, and about 2 miles
southwesterly from Swede Pt; thence
east 60 chains thence south 40
cliains; thence west 50 chains more
or less to high water mark; thence
following along the high water mark
back to the point of commencement,
and containing 240 acres more or
less.
F. C. PILLSBURY,
J. H. Pillsbury, Agent
Dated Fob. 19, 1911.
Skeena Land District—District- of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the southeast corner of C.L. 4472; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence soutli
SO chains to place of commencement.
AUSTIN M. BROWN.
Dated July 17,  1911.	
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the northeast corner
of C.L. 4471; thence west 80 chains;
thence south SO chains; thence east
80 chains; thence north SO cliains to
[.lace of commencement.
AUSTIN  M. BROWN.
Dated July 17, 1911.
Prince Rupert Land District—
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that P. McLachlan,
of Prince Rupert, occupation broker,
intends to apply for permission to
lease the following" described land:
—Commencing at a post planted
one-third of a mile northerly from
head of Alice Arm, on its Easterly-
Side; thence 40 chains northerly;
thence 40 chains easterly; thence 40
chains southerly; thence 40 chains
westerly to place of commencement.
PETER  McLACHLAN.
Thos. L. Fay, Agent.
Dated 2nd Feb., 1911.
Skeena Land  District—District of
Queen Charlotte
"AKE NOTICE that liv'rty days
from date, I, Austin it. Brown, of
Prince nupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, Intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and tinder 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the northeast corner
of C.L. 4471; thence east SO chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence west
SO (hf.ins; thence north 80 chains,
to place of commencement.
AUSTIN  M.  BROWN.
Dated July 17,  1911.
Skeena   Land  |District—District   of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that Alice Munro,
of Vancouver, B. C., occupation
married woman, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted on the west
shore of Lakelse Lake, and about
1% miles distant and In a southwesterly direction from the S. W,
corner of Lot 3982, Skeena Land
District, District of'Coast, Range V;
thence west 40 chains; thence north
40 chains; thence east 60 chains,
more or less, to the shore of Lakelse
Lake; thence following shore of
said lake to point of commencement,
containing 200 acres, more or less.
ALICE MUNRO.
Mancell Clark, Agent.
Dated  20th  March,  1911.
Skeena    Land    District—District   of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that Edward H.
Port, of Prince Rupert, B. C, occu-
eiation farmer, Intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following described Iands:— Commencing
at'a post planted in the South West
Corner, on the shore line of Lake
Lakelse; thence 20 chains East, to
South West Corner or Lot 684;
thence 30 chains North, following
along the West line of Lot 6S4 to
post; thence South, following along
the shore line of said Lake to point
of commencement, containing about
40 acres.
EDWARD H. PORT,
By C. N.  Pring, Agent.
Dated June 26,  1911. 6-26
6-26
Skeena  Land  District—District  of
Queen Charlotte
I TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of I from date, I, Henry Edenshaw, of
Pr.nce Rupert, B. C., by occupation Masset, B. C, occupation storekeep-j
COAL MINES ACT
Skeena
Land   District—District    of
Cassiar.
TAKE     NOTICE   that   Charles   J.
pert, B. C,
pation    contractor,    ii.tends    to
apply to  the  Minister  of Lands  for
a license to prospect   for Coal  and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Commencing at post    planted    6%
nillps   N.   E.   of  the   mouth   of   the
While River and the junction of the
SO chains; tlience west SO chains to'east    80    chains;   tbence   north   80 I?** !"'*. Chas'  J'  *->--lingbam's
sadler   intend  to apply to the Chief j er, intend to apply to tne Chief Com-loini""T     "VAT   -""*"
Commissioner of Lands for a license  missioner  of  Lands  for a  license to "g" °f Prince H"r
to prospect for coal and petroleum prospect for coal and petroleum on °CCUDn rontra(-'tor. '
on and under 640 acres of land on and under 640 acres of land on Gra-
Graham Island described as foi- ham island described as follows*—
lows:—Commencing at post planted: Commencing at a post planted onthe
one mile east of the south corner of i west shore of West River, one mile
L.L.4475; tlience north 80 chains; I easterly from the mouth of said riv-'
thence east SO chains; thence south]er;   thence south  SO  chains'   thence
place of commencement
AUSTIN* M.  BRO.vN
Dated July  17,  1911.
Skeena Land  District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE   NOTICE   that   thirty  days
from  date,   I,  Austin   il.   Brown,  of
.   .        ,, , „,,    ,   . ..    i a.   i^.   t/uiutsce     th°nee     80     chains
.•hams; tbence west SO chains to the Xorth      t„ence    30    cnaiDS    West
place of commencement. :tIience so (.ljains Poutll.  thence so
ii .   i   i  ,    ,-,,,,,                   '     .chains  East  to point of comnienee-
u.iitii .liny   ie.   i.ui. ment an(] contair,ing C40 acres more
or   Ipq*^
Skeena   Land  District-District  of   | ChARLES j. GILLINGHAM.
Queen Charlotte ~,     ,      .,    ,,   fe    .     _±
 I    TAKE   NOTICE   that   thirty   days. Charles  M.   Huff,  Agent.
Prince Rupert, II. C, by occupation! from   date,   I,   Henry   Edenshaw,   of      Dated  March 4, 1911, 4-18
sadler   intend  to apply to the Chief | Masset,   B.   C,  by  occupation   store- Skeena    Land    District—District    of
Commissioner of Lands for a license; keeper, intend to apply to the Chief, Cassiar
to prospect for coal and petroleum Commissioner of Lands for a license! tak • NOTICE that Charles J
on and under 040 acres of land on: to prospect for coal and petroleum ' ejniingbam,' of Prince Rupert, B. c'
Graham Island described as fol-|on and under 640 acres of land on
lows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile north of the northeast corner of €.L. 4477; thence west 80
chains; thence south SO chains;
thence east So chains; thence nortli
80 chains, to place of commencement.
AUSTIN il. BROWN.
Dated July  17,  1911.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert. B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to t! I Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as foi
lows
__^^__■ssssBnsssssanssiHi    ■ ., e occupation    contractor,    intends    to
Graham Island described as follows: , t0 the Mitllstel. of Lands for
—Commencing at a post planted onL ,!cense t0 prospect for Coal and
tie west shore of the West River, petroleum over 64 0 acres of land:-
about  one  mile easterly   from   the I fjomencing at a pt t planted 7 miles
N.  E.  of the mouth of    the White
mouth of said river;  thence east 80
chains;    tbence   north    80   chains; |m d tn   ]unction of the Naas,
tlience west SO chains;  tlience south j -    -   — -	
80    chains,    to   place  of  commence
ment.        M
HENRY EDENSHAW.
Dated July .17,  1911.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen  Charlote Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Wirt A.  Stevens, of Chicago, 111., U. S. A., occupation   civil   engineer,     intends     to
_^^___^_^__^__ apply   for  permission   to     purchase
Commencing at post planted] the   following    described    lands
marked Chas. J. Gillingham's S. E.
Corner; thence 80 chains North;
thence 80 chains West; tlience SO
chains South; thence SO chains East
to point of commencement and containing 640 acres more or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles M. Huff, Agent.
Dated ilarch 5th, 1911, 4-18
of
Skeena   Land    District—District
Cassiar.
one mile east of the northeast corner I Commencing  at  a   post  planted   on I GIlTltrtl™ N£T-£S5n-h!t  CharlJ;s „J'
of CL. 4474; thence east SO chains;|the shore, of Masset' Inlet'abouf one | oeiupflion' ItaSSr^iStlu    to
thence south SO chains; thence west
SO chains; tbence north SO chains, to
place of commencement.
AUSTIN il.  DROWN
Dated  July  17,  1911.
Skeena Land  District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend lo apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 610 acres-of land on
Graham Island described as follows'—Commencing at post planted
at the southeast corner of C.L. 4477;
thence east SO chains; thence north
SO chains; thence west SO chains;
thence soutli 80 chains, to place of
commencement.
AUSTIN  il.  BROWN*.
Dated July 17, 1911.	
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin II. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the south corner of
C.L. 44(0; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; tlience south
80 chains; thence east 80 chains, to
place of commencement.
AUSTIN  M. BROWN.
Dated July 17, 1911.
mile northeast of the mouth of the j apply to the Minister of Lands for
Ain River; thence north 80 chains; a license to prospect for Coal and
thence west 40 cliains more or less • Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
to the eastern boundary of T. L. J Commencing at a post planted 7V*
35413; thence soutli along the j miles N. E. of the mouth of the
boundary of T. L. 35413 and [White River and the junction of the
T. L. 35414, a distance of 80 chains; -Naas and marked Chas. J. Gilling-
thence east 40 chains, more or less, j nam's S. E. Corner; thence 80
to point of commencement, contain-! chains North; thence 80 chains
ing 320  acres more or less. I West;   thence    80    chains     South;
WIRT   A.   STEVENS. thence  SO     chains East  to  point  of
G. S. Mayer, Agent. , commencement  and  containing   640
Dated Feb.  24th, 1911."
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C., by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under G40 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the southeast corner of C.L. 4470; thence east 80
chains; tlience north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south
80 chains, to place of commencement.
AUSTIN il.  BROWN.
Dated July 17,  1911.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Alice Millard,
of Masset, B. (J., occupation married
woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:— Commencing at a
post planted about SO chains east
and 120 chains north of the N. E.
corner of Lot 35; thence north 80
chains; thence east SO chains; thence
south SO chains; tlience west 80
chains, containing 640 acres.
ALICE MILLARD.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 25, 1910.
Skeena Land  District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin il. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, ti. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the northeast corner
of C.L. 4469; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; Ihence east
80 cliains; thence north. 80 chains,
to place of commencement.
AUSTIN   il.  BROWN.
Dated July 17, 1011.
Queen Charlotte Land District—District of Skeena
TAKE NOTICE that S. Barclay
Martin, Jr., of New Westminster,
occupation engineer, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted at the
northeast corner of ungazetted lot
1428, said lot being T.L. 39979;
thence north and following the
westerly shore of Massett Inlet SO
chains; thence west 20 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east
40 chains, more or less, to the point
of commencement, and containing
240 acres, more or less.
S.  BARCLAY MARTIN, Jr.
Dated July 21,  1911. 8-8
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin il. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, Intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at. post planted
one mile east of the northeast corner
of C.L. 4469; thence east 80 chains;
thence south SO cliains; tlience west
80 chains; tlience north SO chains to
place of commencement.
AUSTIN M. BROWN.
Dated July 17, 1911.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin il. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, By occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
at the southeast corner ofC.L.4478;
thence north 80 cliains; tnence east
80 chains; e.eence south SO chains;
thence west 80 chains, to place of
commencement.
AUSTIN M.  BROWN.
Dated July 17,  1911.	
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast.
TAKE NO'lICE that I, Roy,
Chrisman, of Port Esslngton, B. C .
occupation prospector, intend to apply for permission to lease the following described land:—Commencing at a post planted about five
miles distant and in a southwesterly
direction from the point at the entrance to Captain Cove, Petrel
Channel, and on the northeast side
of McCauley Island; thenco west 20
chains; tlience south 40 chains,
thence east about 20 chains to shore!
of Petrel Channel; Ihence northerly j v. fh ,
along shore line of Petrel Channel!;,0!1:.'  Z%~Sz
acres more or less.     	
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Pharles il. Huff, Agent.
Dated March oth, 1911. 4-18
Skeena   Land   District—District    of
C1 i s q i *i p
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gilllngham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land:—
Commencing at a post planted 7's
miles N. E. of the mouth of the
White River and the junction of the
Naas, marked Chas. J. Gillingham's
S. E. Corner; tbence SO nhains
80     chains     West;
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
at the southeast corner of C.L. 4467;
thence north 80 cliains; thence east
80 chains; tlience soutli 80 chains;
tlience west SO chains, to place of
commencement.
AUSTIN  il.  BROWN.
Dated July 17, 1911.	
to point of commencement and con-1 th,el?ce *° lch.ains ?°uth,*   theDCe  80
taining eighty acres more or less.      chalns E,ast    °.".I"Dt°    commence-
'ment and containing 640 acres more
Dated April 11, 1911.
ROY CHRISMAN.
4-25
Skeena   Land    District—District    of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that W. H. Ferguson, of Prince Rupert, B. C, occupation civil engineer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about one
mile southerly, following the sinuosities of tbe shore line from the
soutlfVest corner of Lot 104, Range
V; thence 20 chains west; thence 20
chains south; thence 20 chains west,
tlience 20 chains south; thence 20
chains west; thence about 40 chains
south; thence along shore northerly
to point of commencement.
W. II. FERGUSON.
G. Hansen, Agent.
Dated April 22nd, 1911. 4-25
or less.       	
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles il.  Huff, Agent.
Dated  March 5th, 1911. 4-1S
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Commencing at a post planted 6 '4
miles N. E. of the mouth of the
White River and the junction of the
Naas, and marked Chas. J. Gillingham's S. E. Corner; thence SO
chains North; thence SO cnains
West; thence SO chains South;
thence 80 ehains East to point of
commencement and containing 640
acres more or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles il,  Huff, Agent.
Dated March 4th, 1911. 4-18
Skeena
of
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast
 I TAKE NOTICE that F. T. Saund-
Skeena Land District—District of  j ers, of Vancouver, occupation master
Queen Charlotte | mariner,   intends  to  apply   for  per-
TAKE   NOTICE   that   thirty   days  mission   to  purchase  the     following
from  date,  I,  Austin  if.   Brown,  of described lands:— Commencing at a I Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
Prince  Rupert,  B.  C,  by  occupation1 Dost planted about 6    miles    north-1 occupation    contractor,    intends    to
Land    District—District
Cassiar.
TAKE     NOTICE  that   Charles   J
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief! west  of  Love  Inlet on     the    north
Commissioner of Lands for a license j cast shore of Pitt    Island;     tlience
to prospect for coal and petroleum | south  20  chains;   thence    west
on  and  under  640  acres of land on    '""' " ""     '"     "'
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
at the southeast corner of C.L. 4465;
tlience north SO chains; thence east
SO chains; thence south SO chains;
tlience west 80 chains, to place of
commencement.    ,
AUSTIN il.  BROWN.
Dated July 16, 1911.
m
chains;    tbence    nortli    to    shore;
thence  following  shore  in   a  south-
apply to the .Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land:---
Commencing at a post planted about
8 miles N. E. of the mouth of White
easterly direction  to point of com-[River and the Junction of the Naas
mencement  ,   containing   SO      '
more or less. H	
FRANK TAUNTON SAUNDERS,
^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Locator
VV, Hamilton, Agent
Staked  17th, Feb., 1911.
Skeena  Land  District—District  of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE   NOTICE   that   thirty   days.
from   date,   I,   Henry   Edenshaw,  ofiser       	
Masset,  B,  C,  by occupation  store-! tlon   banker,   intends   to  apply   for
keeper, intend to apply to the Chief|permission to purchase the folowlng
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen  Charlotte  Island.
TAKE NOTICE  that Robert Fra-
Ogllvle, of Vancouver, occupa-
acres [ River, marked Charles J. Uilllng-
bam's S. E. Corner; tbence 80
chains North; thence 80 chains
West; thence SO chains Soutli;
thence SO chains East to point of
commencement and containing 640
acres more or less.
CHARLES .1. GILLINGHAM
Charles il.  Huff, Agent.
Dated March 5th, 1911. 4-1S
Commissioner of Lands for a license
lo prospect  for coal  and  petroleum
described lands:—Commencing at aj
post planted about 2 miles west of
Skeena  Land  District—District
of Coast.
TAKE     NOTICE   that   Victor     H.
Reynolds, of Hull, .Massachusetts, oc-
on and under i,,o acres of land on, the southwest corner of A. P 12- oupatlon chauffeur, intends to apply
Graham Island described as follows: 087j thence east SO chains; thence f permission to purchase the fol-
Comnienclng at a post planted on the1 north   80   dial,i^   thence   west   80 .,     ,'     iwaiM     and:- Commenc-
thence  south   80   chains   to
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, Intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the southeast corner
of C.L. 4475; thence west 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence east
80 chains; thence south 80 chains,
to place of commencement.
AUSTIN   M.   BROWN.
Dated July 17, 1911.
bank of west  River, about  one mile  '-bains;
easterly from Hie mouth of said ru--: point  of  commencement,  containing : '„ , * " ''"."'  i"**"^" ■"• "■="   '"V,""
easieri)  nom un    uiu oi s.iiu n\  ,'rin  B | mark  on  the northerly  side  of  the
Ing at a post planted at high water
er; thence west 80 chains; tlience
south 80 chains; tlience easl SO
ediains;   thence  north   SC   chains,  to
place of commencement.
HENRY EDENSHAW.
Dated  July 17,  1911. 	
64 0 acres.      	
ROBERT FRASER OGILVIE.
Arthur  Robertson,  Agent.
Dated Dec.  9,  1910.
-District of
Skeena Land District
of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE    that    James    G
Cromble, of  Prince Rupert, oceupa
tion auditor, intends lo    apply    for
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE   NOTICE   that   thirty   days    ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
from   date,  I,   Henry  Edenshaw,  ofj permission to purchase the "following
Masset,  B,   C,  by  occupation   store- described lands:— Commencing at
keeper   intend to apply to the Chief I post   planted   at   the   northwest   cor
Commissioner of Lands for a license; ner,   55   chains  east   and   20   cliains
to prospect for coal and petroleum on
and under 640 acres of land on Graham Island described as follows: —
Commencing at a post planted on the
south  from  northeast  corner  of  Lot |
1116   (Horry   Survey),  Coast  Dist.
range    5;    thence 20    chains   east;
thence  25   chains,     more    or     less
west shore of West River, about one j south to Angus McLeod Pre-emp-
mile easterly from the mouth of said tlon; tlience 20 chains wesl; tbence
river; thenco north 80 chains; tbence, 25 chains, more or less, north, to
west SO chains; thence south SO post of commencement, containing
chains; tlience east 80 chains, to 60 acres, more or less,
place of commencement. | JAMES Q   CROMBIE
HENRY EDENSHAW*.
Dated  July 17,  1911.
entrance to a small unnamed cove on
the west coast of Pitt Island, about
one-quarter mile south of the entrance to Kltkatla summer village;
tlience east forty chains: thence
south twenty chains; thence west
forty chains; thence north ten
chains more or less to high water
mark; thence following along high
water mark around the head of the
cove back to the commencement, and
containing sixty (60) acres more or
VICTOR H. REYNOLDS.
J.  H. Pillsbury, Agent.
Dated Feb. 18th, 1911.
LINDSAY'S CARTAGE a STORAGE
G. T. P. CARTAGE AGENTS
Office nt H. H. Rochester, Centre St.
^^^^^^^^^^M LADYSMITH  COAL
Fred Bohlen, Agent. I Is handled by ub.   All orders receive
Dated June 14, 1911, 6-23      prompt attention.  Phone No  68. PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Tuesday, August 8, 1911.
prince Bupert journal
Telephone   138
Published twice a week on Tuesdays and Fridays from the office of
publication, Third Avenue, near
McBride Street.
Subscription rate to any point in
Canada, $2.00 a year; to points outside of Canada, $3.00 a year.
Advertising rates furnished on
application.
0. H. NELSON,
Editor.
-*jggej,r,.
Friday, August   11,  1911.
NOMINATION OF CANDIDA!
Next week the Conservative party
will nominate a candidate to contest
tin.- Comox-Atlin riding, if a strong
candidate is selected there is little
doubt as ie' tlie' results. The party
can  win  tin- seat.
The question of reciprocity is an
Importanl one in a new country like
this— just as Importanl as in any
part of tlie province or of the Dominion. There is an immense new
territory to develop here. This city
should become a manufacturing and
distributing centre witli a producing
territory all around it furnishing the
raw material and ihe means of living for tlie population that must
live here.
On the face of it protection to
these producers should be of decided
benefit. Anything that will prevent
the building up of prosperous farming settlements within reach of this
city will be a drawback to the place
to that extent. The experience in
this province has been that it requires a lot of fostering and encouragement to induce agricultural
settlement. Other lines of enterprise, such as mining, hold out such
strong inducements that the farms
are liable lo.be neglected owing to
the fact that the making of a farm
in a wooded country is attained only
after years of hard work with small
returns when compared with the results often obtained by a prospector.
The retention of the home market
for the settlers upon the lands of
tlie district Is therefore something
to be sought if iliese occupiers of
the land are to remain satisfied with
their lot.
AS UNDERSTOOD IN GEHMAXY
I News-Advertiser)
It Is more interesting that pleasant to note what is said in European
countries over tbe reciprocity treaty,
and Sir Wilfrid Laurier's recent declaration of neutrality in British wars.
A setrlking comment is found in tha
Frankfort Zeitung, one of tlie leading journals of the German Empire,
whose leader on tlie Britisii Imperial
Conference we find translated in part
In the Toronto News. The Zeitung
states that the keynote of the Imperial Conference was given by Canada, and "is a thoroughly anti-imperialist note."
Tlie German  journal adds:
"What we have in mind is the
declaration of the prime minister of
Canada, a declaration so incredible
that when we first published it we
were inclined to doubt if our message had been correctly transmitted,"
Sir Wilfrid Laurier's declaration is
next quoted and the Zeitung wants
to know where ih« different parts
of the Empire to come in. Then
it adds:
"It is characteristic thai all the
chief Liberal papers In England
maintain a silence as to the grave
on Laurier's declaration—almost as
if the word of command had been
passed round to tell them to do so
Possibly attempts may be made later
on to minimize the effect of tlie
declaration but no one who will read
it In its context can receive the impression that it was innocuous. Af-
ti'i- all there can be no doubt that
tlie Empire would cease to be in
existence once the colonies really
took the line indicated by Laurier's
declaration. The Empire would be
no more an empire than a marriage
is a'marriage which on ly counts in
good times and nol in bail limes.   If
the conception of political unity is
to have any meaning whatever it
must follow the idea so beautifully
expressed In the English wedding
service, 'for better, for worse, In
sickness and In health.
"We outsiders call treat this question of the relations between England and her self-governing colonies
purely as spectators. And as such
we are bound definitely to note the
seriousness of the declaration, coming as it does from Canada, which
in the last decade has with astonishing consistency and vigor extended
its internal Independence to external
affairs, and which has now let its
economic policy culminate In the
reciprocity treaty with the United
States, which Is directly injurious to
England."
There, is a note of exultation as
well as surprise in the comments of
the German journalist. Canadians
may protest against the conclusions
of the Zeitung, but it is not easy
to construe the premier's words into
any other meaning. Whatever explanation Sir Wilfrid himself may
make, it. cannot be disputed that he
has given foreigners sufficient reason to believe that the British Empire can no longer depend upon Canada in time of need.
|     News of the Province      j
* i
* * * * * * * * * * * *»■ * * * * * * * * * * * * * i
LIBERAL CANDIDATES
NEW* WESTMINSTER—A meeting of the Liberal Association was
held on Monday and local prospects
were discussed. Two names were
mentioned as possible candidates for
tlie Westminster riding and these
may be suggested to the convention.
The names were Alexander Henderson, late commissioner of the Yukon, and His Honor Judge .Mclnnes.
Nothing definite was decided, and
after the meeting was adjourned the
executive of the club held a private
discussion about the coming campaign.
VICTORIA—"There are so many
complaints reaching the office of persons illegally starting land clearing
fires during this dry weather that
we have decided to make an example
of a few of these offenders," says
Fire Commissioner Gladwin. "The
department recognized the wisdom
and paramount necessity of refusing
further permits for the present, on
account of the tinder-like condition
of the forests, but several fires have
of late been started by settlers ignoring the regulation of the department.
We know who these offenders are
and will push prosecutions against
them. Warnings and argument as
to the public danger do not seem-suf-
ficient with some." According to
Mr. Gladwin the fires along the
northern mainland coast are now
well in hand, with the exception of
a fire still raging on Nelson Island.
A special force of fighters has been
sent there, and It is hoped will soon
have it subdued.
ARBITRATION TREATY
Text of Agreement Entered Into Between  United States ami
(heal  Britain
Tlie arbitration treaty between
Great Britain and the United States,
which lias passed the United States
senate,   provides   as   follows:
Article 1—All differences hereafter arising between the high contracting parties, which it has not
been possible to adjust by diplomacy,
relating to international matters In
Which the high contracting parties
are concerned by virtue of a claim
of right made by one against the
other under treaty or otherwise, and
which are adjustable in their nature
by reason of being suceptible of decision by the application of the prin-
eiples of law or equity, shall be submitted to the permanent court of
arbitration established at Tbe Hague
by the convention of October IS,
1907, or to some other arbitral tri
bunal as may decided in each case
by special agreement, which special
agreement shall provide for the organization of such tribunal if necessary, shall define the scope of the
powers of the arbitrators, the question or questions at issue, and shall
settle the terms of reference and the
procedure thereunder. ,
"The spcial agreement in each
case shall be made on the part of
the United States by the president
of the United States, by and with
the advice and consent of the senate thereof, his majesty's government reserving the right before concluding a special agreement in any
matter affecting the interests of. a
self-governing Dominion of the British Empire to obtain the concurrence
therein of the government of said
dominion.
Such agreement shall be binding
when confirmed by the tw*i governments by an exchange of notes.
Article II—The high contracting
parlies further agree to institute as
occasion arises, and as hereinafter
provided, a joint high commission of
inquiry, to which, upon the request
of either party, shall be referred for
impartial and conscientious investigation any controversy between the
parties within the scope of Article
A, before such controversy has been
submitted to arbitration, and also
any other controversy hereafter
arising between them, even if they
are not agreed that it falls within
the scope of Article 1; provided,
however, that such reference may be
postponed until the expiration of one
after the date of the formal request
therefor, in order to afford an opportunity for di'splomatic discussion and
adjustment of the questions in controversy, if either party desires such
postponement.
Whenever a question or matter of
difference is referred to the joint
committee of inquiry, as herein provided, each of the high contracting
parties shall designate three of its
nationals to act as members of the
commission of Inquiry for the purpose of such reference; or the commission may be otherwise constituted
in any particular case by the terms
of reference to be determined in each
case by an exchange of notes.
Article III—The'joint high commission of inquiry instituted in each
case as provided for in Article II,
is authorized to examine into and
report upon the particular questions
or matters referred to it, for the
purpose of facilitating the solution
of disputes by elucidating the facts,
and to define the issues presented
by such questions and also to include in its reports such recommend-
! ations and conclusions as may be
appropriate.
It is further agreed, however, that
In cases in which the parties disagree as to whether or not a difference is subject to arbitration under
Article 1 of this treaty, that question shall be submitted to the joint
high commission of inquiry* and if
all are but one of the members of
the commission agree and report that
such difference is within the scope
of Article 1, it shall be referred to
arbitration in accordance with theh
provisions of this treaty.
Article IV—The commission shall
have power to administer oaths to
witlinesses and take evidence on oath
whenever deemed necessary in any
proceding, or inquiry, or matter
within its jurisdiction under this
treaty; and the high contracting parties agree to adopt such legislation
as may be appropriate and necessary
to give the commission the powers
above mentioned, and lo provide for
the issue of subpoenas and for compelling the attendance of witnesses
In the proceedings before the commission.
Article V—The commission shall
meet whenever called upon to take
an examination and report under the
terms of this treaty, and the commission may fix such times and
places for its meetings as may be
necessary at all times at special call
or direction of the two governments.
Each commissioner, upon the first
joint meeting of the commission, after his appointment shall, before
proceeding with the work of the com-
fl, * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * **** -!•
♦ f
*
*
Remember I
*
That we I
Import |
Our Wines l
direct from Europe; and that
no house in Prince Rupert can
equal them for quality. No
better can be bought anywhere
in tbe Province. We make a
specialty  of
Family Trade
and guarantee satisfaction
*   stock of other
*
We  also   carry  a   complete *
Liquors
Try a glass of
Cascade
Beer
* The best local  beer on  the *•'
* market. £
CLARKE BROS.
* Christiansen & Brandt Bid.       .*.
* *
* *
* Telephone 39       Third Avenue  *
:•*•>•»
mission, subscribe a solemn declaration in outlining that he will faithfully and impartially perform the
duties imposed upon him under this
treaty and such declaration shall be
entered on the records of the proceedings of the commission.
Article VI—This treaty shall supersede the arbitration treaty concluded between the high contracting
parties on April 4, 1908, but all
arguments, awards and proceedings
under that treaty shall continue in
force and effect, and this treaty
shall not affect in any way the provisions of the treaty of June 11,
1909, relating to the questions arising between the United States and
the Dominion of Canada.
Article VII—The present treaty
shall be ratified by the president of
the United States of America, by and
with the consent and advice of the
senate thereof, and by his Britannic
majesty.
The ratification shall be exchanged
at Washington as soon as possible,
and the treaty shall take effect on
the date of the exchange of ratifications. It shall thereafter remain in
force continuously unless and until
terminated by tw nty-fottr months'
written notice given by either high
contracting party to the other.
Crcosoting Ties
The C. P. R. has made a contract
for a term of years with the Dominion Tar and Chemical Co,, Ltd.,
to treat about one million ties a
year.    The plant is located at Trans-
The British Columbia Company
LIMITED.
AUTHORIZED CAPITAL $100,000.::  PAID UP CAPITAL $41,500
DIRECTORS:—Reginald C. Brown, President; J. C. Maclure, Vice-
President; H. E. Marks, Managing Director; Capt. E. Nash, William
McNair, R. A. Bevan, and F. C, Williams, Secretary.      :-:      :-:
INTEREST 4 PER CENT. DEPOSITS
This Company acts as Executors,  Administrators, Transferees and
Secretaries to Public Companies.   Commercial, Industrial and other
business propositions underwritten.    Issues made  on the
London and New York Stock Exchanges.
TIMBER, COAL, LANDS, and
COMPANY ORGANIZATION
Head Office for Canada, 203, 208, 210, 215 Carter-Cotton Building,
VANCOUVER, B.C.
The Staneland Co. Ltd
•TS THE-
Paint Supply House
of British Columbia
ALL GOODS ARE GUARANTEED
WRITE FOR PRICES AND SAMPLES
The Staneland Co. Ltd
836-840 Fort Street, VICTORIA, B.C.
r
Replenish
"i
the
Pantry
High-Class....
Grocery
Stock
to choose from
EVERYTHING CLEAN AXD FRESH
Goods for the Table to Suit the Most
Fustidious  Housewife
S MERRYFIELD'S !
i       CASH GROCERY      !
cona, near Winnipeg. The preservative used is creosote, a distillation
of coal tar or the heavy oils of tar.
The treatment Is to place the ties
in cylinders, and, after closing the
doors, apply a vacuum, subsequently
filling the cylinders with creosote
and subjecting the timber to an oil
pressure, maintaining the same for
as long a time as the class of the
timber treated necessitates. The
charge is then withdrawn and the
operation is complete.
♦ ♦  ♦
The Thompson
: Hardware Co.
—Second Avenue—
j   Paints. General Hardware,
Oils, Stoves and Ranges.
2nd Avenue
Prince Rupert,
B.C.
Real
Estate
INVESTMENTS
Real
Estate
List Your
Properties
with
Uncle Jerry
JEREMIAH H. KUGLER
He Sells Buildings He Sells Contracts
He has Houses to Rent
He Buys Lots He Builds Homes
He Buys Leases He Loans Money
He Has Farms for Sale
He Sells Houses He Rents Stores
e.essssssssssssWWBttHWBtiMB8W^BssssWWH^BHBWBWBBWBHM^WI^Wis^BBI^BBI
JEREMIAH H. KUGLER
Special Bargains in
KITSELAS LANDS
FRANCOIS LAKE LANDS
LAKELSE LANDS,
HAZELTON*   DISTRICT   LANDS
BULKLEY VALLEY LANDS
KISPIOX VALLEY LANDS
PORCHER   ISLAND  LANDS
K1TSUMKALUM   LANDS
SAND,   GRAVEL   AND   MARBLE   DEPOSITS Friday, August 11, 1911.
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
*****************************************************
j     AMONG THE MINES     !
V *
I*************,****************************************
STARTS SHIPPING
Red Cliff Mine at Stewart is Connected
by Rail With Salt
Water.
Arrangements Made  to  Ship Ore to
Ladysinilh   Smelter at
Good Rates
The Red Cliff Mining Company is
celebrating today the connecting up
of the mines with the railway from
Stewart. A party of shareholders
went north on the Prince Rupert this
week, including Erskine Smith, A.
D. Tennant, who represents a large
amount of English capital, and several of the Old Country Investors.
They will mark the occasion in a
fitting manner, and from now on
shipments will be made from the
property
Speaking of the prospects there,
Mr. Tennant pointed out that the
company finds it possible to have
the ore shipped to Ladysmith and
smelted there, to whole cost, including mining, not exceeding $4-50 a
ton. This is possible owing to the
quality of Ihe ore, which does not
require the addition of any fluxes.
With the ore running into values
to $20 a ton the returns to the company are thus excellent.
At the present stage of development the company will take out and
ship about 2,000 tdns a month to
the Ladysmith smelter.
The body of ore In sight warrants
the putting in of a smelter on the
ground, Mr, Tennant thinks, and
this may be done a little later. Under
the exceptionally good rates obtained, however, the company is prepared to ship to Ladysmith . for a
time  at  least.
RARE   MINERALS
Excitement Reigns in the Kootenays
Over Discovery of Platinum
Ore
TO TAKE OUT COAL
Interior Property Will be Fully Developed to Neet Demands of
North.
Measures Located on the Line of the
G. T. P. Will Re Opened Dp
Hy Owners
Alexander Faulds, M. E., after examining the coal measures of the
Grand Trunk Pacific Coal Company
near Hazelton, has gone south. Ills
mission was one of deciding where
the work to develop the property
properly should be carried out. This
location of the shaft, after the results of drilling, will be within one
hundred feet of the Grand Trunk
Pacific main line, says the Omineca
Herald. The site Is an ideal one
for an operating colliery because of
the facilities in the shape of water
power, townsites and excellent agri-
culturanl lands.
.lames Wright, the manager, stated that Mr. Faulds had been engaged to thoroughly examine the
property and to present his report,
which would enable the company to
determine the quickest and most
economical way to develop this new
coal field.
The company has ine seams varying in width from nineteen inches
to si xfeet. The six foot seam, or
No. 2 tunnel, is 148 feet on the
strike, and a slope of 32 feet. No.
1 tunnel has about 140 feet slope,
while No. 3 tunnel is in 54 feet on
the strike. Considerable work has
also been done on one or two other
seams for the purpose of locating
for drill holes, and it is intended to
send up a diamond drill this fall and
drill at least 2,000 feet. The coal
is a semi-anthracite .and is excellent
as steam or coking coal.
 o	
NOT IX PAYING QUANTITIES
C.   Oamscll,   Dominion   Government
Expert, Makes Examination
of  Tulameen   Diamonds
Not for many years has there been
so much excitement in the Kootenays
over a milling discovery as that
which has followed the announcement by A. Gordon French-that platinum and other almost priceless
metals of the same group had been
found in paying quantities at the
Granite Poorman mine. For the
past month a few Nelson men who
had heard of the discovery have been
staking all the available ground in
the vicinity of the dyke in which
the chief values were found and
which extends for many miles in the
direction of Eagle and Foiiy-Nnine
creeks, and many scores of claims
have been recorded at the government   offices.
Since the news became public
every morning scores of prospectors
have left the city, returning at Intervals to record claims. The result Is that at present there is believed to be hardly a foot of tin-
staked ground in the territory supposed to be traversed by the dyke,
which lias been proved at and near
the Granite Poorman to contain vast
quantities of high priced metals.
Many of the claims first staked
have been recorded in the names of
J. . P. Swedeberger, A. Gordon
French, Thomas Gough, Mrs. Ida E.
Wilson, Dr. \V. X. Wilson, J. G.
Devlin and E. E. Gullle, but dozens
of others are ready to be recorded.
That the discovery was known and
kepi a secret for some weeks is indicated by the fact that samples were
sent for assay to Butte and Ottawa
in order to make absolutely sure that
no mistake had been made as to
the existence of the group of five
metals, platinum, Iridium, palladium,
rhodium and osmium. The result
was thai answers came back giving
returns which, especially considering the low cost of mining; ore from
the dyke and cost of treating, make
the operation of the properties upon
which the minerals exist amazingly
profitable.
The direction of the dyke has not
yet been fully established, but it
was reported that It had been traced
across the Kootenay River below
Eagle Creek and that on the other
hand it extends to the soutli of Nelson In the direction of the Venus
mine. .Yesterday all assayers in the
city' were hard at work testing many
hundreds of samples, In some of
which the, metals of the platinum
group were plainly visible to the
naked eye.
YOU ARE SURE OP
Engine  Reliability
IF  YOU  RUN  A
Fairbanks - Morse Marine Engine
OVER 125,000 IN USE THROUGHOUT THE WORLD
TWO
CYCLE
FOUR
CYCLE
HEAVY
DUTY
MEDIUM
DUTY
Runabout
Type
MOST  COMPLETE  LINE OP GASOLINE ENGINES IN
THE WORLD
Write for Catalog P10
The Canadian Fairbanks Co., Ltd.
101-107 WATER STREET      -        - -        VANCOUVER, B. C.
Local Agent—F. M. DAVIS     - ... PRINCE RUPERT
THE CONTINENTAL TRUST COMPANY, LIMITED
Authorized Capital     S500,000
Officers:
WILLIAM T. KERGIN, M. D., Pres. DAVID   H.   HAYS,  First Vice-Pres.
M. J. HOBIN, 2nd Vice-Pres. & Mgr. JAY   KUGLER,   Secretary-Treasurer
C.  B.  PETERSON, Ass't Manager
Executor and Administrator Receiver or Assignee
Fiscal Agents Trustees
Real  Estate and Insurance
Registrar and Transfer Agent 1'a,m Lamls a"d Mines
Agent for Cnre of Real Estate Escrow Agents
Trustee Under Mortgages and  Deeds of Trust Collections
SAVINGS DEPARTMENT
4 per cent on Deposits        SAFE DEPOSIT VAULT AND BOXES
We will he pleased to answer any Inquiries regarding in vestments in
Prince Rupert and Northern British Colombia.
THE CONTINENTAL TRUST COMPANY, LIMITED
SECOND AVENUE PRINCE  RUPERT,  B. C.
Rev.   R.   W.   Lee,   Methodist   missionary at Kispiox, was in the city
on his way south.    He left for Vancouver this morning,
Charles Camsell, Dominion govern-
ment niineralogical and geological
surveyor, arrived a few days ago in
Merritt from Tulameen and Princeton. Mr, Camsell has become famous reecntly as the discoverer of
diamonds in the Tulameen, about
which so much has been written in
American papers, and which has
caused widespread discussion in the
Old World and throughout the Empire. In conversation, whi'e at Merritt, Mr. Camsell stated that he and
his party had been working in the
Tulameen for about three weeks, endeavoring to extract specimen diamonds  from the rocks.
"In this I cannot say we were very
successful," said Mr. Camsell, "inasmuch as the river was very high
and we were unable to go down so
far as we did last year. We secured
a few fair samples, however, and I
have sent them on to Vancouver."
"Are they in payable quantities in
the Tulameen?" he was asked.
"Well," he replied, "I cannot say
that I think they are. There is undoubtedly a large and valuable deposit there, but we have found that
the chromite, In which the diamonds
occur, being so hard, and not having disintegrated, or rotted and softened, as is the case of diamond pipes
in the Klmberley fields, tends to
powder up as soop as the pressure
of the surrounding rock is removed.
The shock Invo'ved in breaking up
the rock around the chromite also
shatters the diamonds; so that we
found that about all we were able
to get was In the form of ine dust,
and valueless. We did, however, manage to get a few well preserved samples, which we have sent away."
"Then," he wns asked, "you think
that the work Involved In getting out
the diamonds would make It costly
to operate on a paying basis?"
"1  think so," he said.
Mr. Camsell will now go Into
Steamboat to make an investigation
for the Dominion government. He
has sent his party into the mountains
with pack trains by way of Princeton. They would have gone In
earlied, even last fall, had 'not the
snowfall In that section been too
heavy for it to be possible to make
any accurate survey of the mineral
deposits of the district.
 o	
Bright Future
"Vancouver is destined to be to
Canada what San Francisco is to the
United States, and Prince Rupert
will be the Canadian Seattle." This
Is the prophecy made by President
.1. C. Si'Iitiriiian of Cornell University.
I Where Togo Trained I
•*••**•••••••***•*•****••*
Togo's nava.1 training was begun
in England, where, as a young man,
he attended the naval > college in
Greenwich. He also inherited his
taste for the sea, as he came of the
Satsuma c'an, a tribe noted for its
great sea warriors, says the New
York Evening Post. Indeed, prior
to the time of the Chino-Japanese
war, the Japanese fleet was manner
.almost wholly by the Satsuma clan,
just as the army was drawn from
the Choshit clan. Nowadays, neither
navy nor army is entirely given over
to these, the two most powerful of
the clans of Japan, but many men
fronr' all over the empire are to be
found hi both services. When Togo
entered the navy, however, its whole
personnel  was Satsuma.
Returning to Japan, he was employed in various capacities. In 1894,
when war borke out between China
and Japan, he was in command of
the Naniwa, a cruiser of 3,650 tons,
one of the vessels composing what
was then known as the first flying
squadron of the Japanese navy. During the war he greatly distinguished
himself, and earned the reputation
of being a first class fighting man.
It was in connection with the episode of the sinking of the Wow-
shing that his name first came into
world wide prominence. At the time
some adverse criticism of his action
on that occasion were heard, but
these died away on a fuller knowledge of the circumstances. The story
reveals something of the character
of the man, so it is worth telling.
The Kowshing, a transport vessel
flying the Britisii flag, with a Britisii
captain and crew, and carrying some
1,100 Chinese soldiers for Asan, was
met by Togo in the Naniwa, who signalled to her, by firing two blank
cartridges, to stop, which she did.
Thereafter a Japanese lieutenant
went on board, the Kowshing with
a peremptory order from Togo that
the transport must proceed no farther
toward her destination, but at once
accompany ihe NaniVa to the main
Japanese fleet. Captain Galsworthy
of the Kowshing was willing to obey
these orders, but not so minded were
the officers of the Chinese force on
the vessel; they inunediatly raised
a great clamor, and threatened Galsworthy.
Seeing what was occuring Togo
sent a boat to bring off Captain Galsworthy and his crew, but meanwhile
the disturbance and confusion on the
nowshing had increased and the Chinese provented them from leaving
hi*. Some time thn passed, and at
length Togo signalled Galsworthy to
take one of his own boats and come
over to Hi .Naniwa, but the British
captain was not allowd by the Chinese to do so. For four hours Togo
stood off and on, trying to save him
and his ship, but, finding there was
no chance of this, he at last ordered
the red flag, which announced that
he was about to fire, to be hoisted.
A few moments later a well directed
shot from the Naniwa struck the'
engine room and penetrated the hull
of the Kowshing, which soon afterwards filled and sank. As Galsworthy and his men leaped Into the
sea, they were fired ou by the Chinese. Togo at once sent out boats,
and rescued as many as he could.
In this way Togo began the Chino-
Japanese war. His countrymen
never forgot the part he played In
this episode. Incidentally, he was
surprised to find that the English
captain, Galsworthy, bad been an "hi
classmate of his years before. In
the Greenwich  Naval College.
CANADA'S   BEST   MARKET
L. Borden Condemns Reciprocity
Agreement  from  Standpoint
of Economics
The Financial News of London
publishes an Interview which its special representative had a few days
ago at Ottawa with R. L. Borden,
in the course of which the leader
c-f the Opposition states:
"My views-upon the threatened
reciprocity .agreement have been expressed many times in parliament
and upon the public platform. That
agreement completely reverses the
policy of the past forty years and
strongly tends to destroy the whole
meaning of our confederation and
to disintegrate its fabric. Its avowed
object is to withdraw Canada from
any closer trade connections with the
Empire. Even from the purely economic standpoint its results must in
the long run be of disadvantage to
our people, whose best markets are
in the Motherland and whose keenest competitors are the producers of
the United  States."
The Journal (twice a week),
$2.00 a year.
only
rTe-RpM
Double Weekly Service
S.S. PRINCE RUPERT & S.S. PRINCE GEORGE
Sail for Vancouver, Victoria and  Seattle
Mondays and Fridays at 8 a.m.
Ken'STEWART Thursdays anel Sundays 8 a.m.
Special reduced fee re Sunday's boal $9.50
return,   including   meals   anel   berths.
S.S.PRINCE ALBERT for Port Simpson, Naas River, Masset and
Naden Harbor, Wednesdays, 1 P.M., and for Queen Charlotte
Island points, Saturdays, 1 P.M.
RAILWAY SERVICE TO COPPER RIVER, mixed trains from
Prince Rupert Wednesdays and Saturdays, 1 P.M.; returning   Thursdays   and   Sundays,  5:20 P.M.
THE GRAND TRUNK RAILWAY SYSTEM, connecting with
trains from the Pacific Coast, operates a frequent and convenient
service of luxurious trains over its DOUBLE TRACK route between
Chicago, Toronto, Montreal, Quebec, Halifax, Portland, Boston,
New York ami Philadelphia. ,
Atlantic Steamship bookings arranged via all lines
Full information and tickets obtained from the office of
A. E. McMASTER
Freight and Pasenger Agent, G. T. P. Wharf.
** ** ***************** ****•'■
! storaceI
* Household Goods and Baggage •:•
X given careful attention. „>
X   Forwarding,   Distributing   and *
* Shipping Agents *£
I TRANSFERERS J
* Prince    Rupert    Warehousing .;.
* and   Forwarding   Co. £
* First  Ave.,  near  McBride  St. *
DOUGLAS SUTHERLAND,      *
Manager. %
P. O. Box 007 Phone 262 £
> * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *!• **4 ** *
TIDES AT PRINCE RUPERT, AUGUST, 1911
Excursions!
Let us tell you all about the cheap
ROUND TRIP  EXCURSIONS
to all Towns and Cities in Eastern
Canada and United  States
Via
The Great Northern
Choice of Return  Route
Tickets to the Old Country by all
Lines. Take any Steamer from
Prince Rupert.
ROGERS STEAMSHIP AGENCY
Phone 110 Second Ave
Prince Rupert, B.C.
HIGH WATER
LOW WATER
DATE AND DAY
Time!  Ht. Time   Ht      Time;  Ht   Tiniej  Ht
3
4
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
Tuesday ... .1 6:13 16.5 18:38 1S.0
Wednesday . . .1 7:26 16.2 19:38 17.4
Thursday   .    .    .    .    8:44 14.6 20:30 17.1
Friday   .    .
Saturday   .
Sunday   .    .
i.Monday    .
Tuesday    .
I Wednesday
Thursday   .
Friday    .    .
Saturday  .
Sunday
.10:04 14.6 21:33jl
11:12 16.0 22:32 17.7
|l2:00 16.0 23:21 18.3
|  ..,'12:89 16.8
| 0:01[19.l;13:14 17.5
I 0:39119.7|13:45!18.0
| 1:15 20.2 14:18 18.61
I 1:62 20.5 14:40 18.9
i 2:2*9 20.6 16:08 19.2
I 3:07|20.2|l5:88|19.4|
e.ionday |  3:45119.7 16:11119.
Tuesday
Wednesday .   .   .   .|  5
Thursday   .    .    .    .6
Friday I  I
Saturday   .    .    .    .19
Sunday 110
Monday |11
Tuesday  .   .   .   .
We&nesday .  .  .  .   0
Thursday   ...     |  1
Friday   .    .    . - .    . j  1
Saturday   .    .    .   .2
iStinday 13
'Monday I  4
Tuesday    .    .    .    .14
Wednesday
Thursday
18.7 16:48)19.5
13117.6 17:34 19.3,1
14 16.3 18:82!18.9||
46 15.6 19:46 18.8
18-16.C 21:04 19.2
35 16.6 22:18 20.0N
4017.J 23:21 21.1
...... 12:30 19.2
16122.0 13:12 20.3
06122.5 13:61 21.0
5H22.5 14:29 21.2
39121.9 U:06 21.2
22 21.0 15:43 20.7
0o|l-j.7 16:20 20.0
49li8.2|16:68 19.2
5:37116.617:38 18.2
6:3515.2 18:26 17.3
0:11
l:04j
2:27|
3:40
4:44
5:34
6:12'
6:46
/:18:
7:49
S:19
8:49
9:20'
9:551
10:34
11:17
0:14;
1:28
i:52
4:06;
5:08
6:02
6:50
7:33;
8:14
8:52,
9:28
10:03
10:40
11:201
0:24
6.S 12:13
; 7.5
7.3113:08
I   9.1
7.414:06110.3
7.015:2010.7
6.3 16:2810.6
5.4 17:22
10.1
4.618:04
9.3
3.8 18:41
8.5
3.3 19:16
7.6
2.9 19:."ed
0.8
2.8120:25
6.1
2.9 21:01
5.6
3.3121:40
5.3
4.1122:25
6.2
5.1 23:16
6.6
6.4;	
5.8 12:11
7.7
5.9 13:20
8.9
5.4 14:40
9.3 '
4.216:00
8.8
2.917:12
7.6
1.718:09
6.3
0.9 18:68
5.1
0.719:45
4.2
1.1 20:30
3.7
2.0 21:14
.'}. e
3.3'21:57
4.1
4.9 22:41
4.9
6.6 23:28
5.9
S.4!	
6.9 12:06
9.9
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY CO.
B. C. Const S. S. Service
#
Famous
Princess
Line
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The Time used is Paciric Standard, for Ihe 120th Meridian west. It Is
counted 0 to 24 hours, from midnight to midnight.
The Height is In feet and tenths of a loot, above the Low Water datum
adopted for the Chart. The Hafbor Datum, as established by the G. T. P.
Railway, Is one foot lower.
Princess Beatrice
Wednesday, Aug 9, 9 a. m.
SOUTHBOUND FOR
Vancouver, Victoria,
AND
Seattle
J. G. McNAB,
General Agent.
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Prince Rupert
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ROGERS & BLACK
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BUILDING  MATERIAL,    CEMENT,
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y
J PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Friday, August 11, 1911.
m
I
AUGUST : FURNITURE : SALE
If You have not visited our store it will PAY YOU TO DO SO NOW.   Since lowering to street grade, we have our immense
stock in shape for your inspection and convincing SALE PRICES in all grades of FURNISHINGS.   Have you stopped to consider
the Savings of $ $ $ on the House Furnishing you require?
FOR  CASH        20 and 25 per cent. Discount       pQR  CASH
Music and Parlor Cabinets
DINING TABLES, BUFFETS,
CHINA CABINETS, CH1FF0N'-
NIERS, LARGE EASY CHAIRS,
Leather Covered; PARLOR TABLES
and  COUCHES
Iron Beds
Regular   Value   of   IRON   BEDS,
$5.00.    Sale Price, any size  ,,#8.50
This same reduction given  to all
Iron Beds in pur large assortment.
20 Different Designs BRASS EXTENSION RODS, at Cut in Two
Prices.
DRAPERIES
Ten Thousand Yards — MADRAS,
MUSLINS, CRETONNES, SATEENS,
NETTINGS for your window treatment to be offered at this Daring
35  %   Discount.
Dressers and Stands
DRESSERS and STANDS, Surfaced
Oak. Rregular Value, $18.50. Special Sale Price $14.50
15 other different designs to receive this  reduction.
DRESSERS,     So'id,     Quarter-Cut
Oak,   Golden   Mahogany   and   Early,
English receive our Special 20% Re-
dne tion.
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Regular $13.50 and $12.50 Collapse-
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OFFICE DESKS
A Full Line of OFFICE DESKS—
Roll Tops, Flat Tops and Type Writing  Desks.
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GEO. D. TITE
Complete House Furnisher
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LIGHT ON CIPHER
Biblical Antiquities are Unearthed as a
Result of Recent Finding in
Jerusalem.
Hiding   Place   of   Treasures   Is   Referred  to in  the  Discovery
.Made   by   Syndicate
Further light has been shed on
the secret cipher that is supposed
to have led the English syndicate,
under Captain Parker, to begin its
excavations underneath the MosQue
of Omar at Jerusalem, a labor that
resulted recently in the unearthing
of valuable Biblical antiquities. The
details given below are believed to
be   authentic.
Dr, Walter II. Juvellus of llcls-
lngfors, Finland, in the course of his
Biblical studies, found traces of what
he believed to be a very complicated
cipher which was In part used in
the Hebrew texts. He then turned
his attention to the Talmud and
found there, in the Book of Mischna,
an Indication that, hidden in the
Book of Ezekiel and in certain of
eMoses' Books were valuable sacred
secrets which could be declared to
no one. Jn his continued research
he found In the Book of Ezeklel, in
cipher, :i description of a secret hiding place in Jerusalem. In order to
check this Infornu tlon, Dr. Juvellus
then turned bis atti tlon tee the
lieeok of Moses, as a consequence of
the him in tbe Talmud that these
books also contained valuable in-
feeriiialiien in the same cipher, and
bearing mi the location of tin- hiding
place, in the Hook of Deuteronomy
the doctor found further descriptions
e.:' Hie hiding place, and still further
proof is alleged to have been found
in i lie fragment known as the Book
oi Jesu ben Syrak.
The information conveyed in the
cipher was:
1. That there was a secret hiding
place in the rayon of Mount Orphel,
certainly containing the Tables of
Hie Law, the Temple Archives and
ihe Temple Treasures.
2. That this biding place was con-
nected with the blood canal used for
the carrying off of the blood of the
sacrificed offerings In the Temple.
3. That this hiding place was In
connection   also   with   David's  City.
It is not stated in the cipher that
the Blood Canal and David's City
were in direct communication,
though this is probable.
4. That David's City was on Mt.
Orphel.
5. That the immediate entrance to
the treasure chamber was through a
cleft deep down in the rock, which
was filled up at the time of the
hiding of the treasures, and must
consequently first be cleared out by
any explorers.
6. That the Blood Canal stood in
connection with the Temple water
system.
7. That there were three approaches to the water system, and
tlience to the Blood Canal. One of
these was through the Temple Itself,
now the Mosque of Omar, and another near to the Virgin's Well (discovered by Sir Charles Warren). The
third approach was at a considerable
distance and in these days unavailable.
That the Blood Canal was of considerable size may be gathered from
the fact that at the consecration of
the Temple twenty-two thousand
oxen and eighteen hundred sheep
were slaughtered as sacrifices by
King Solomon.
So much for the origin and contents of the cipher.
That the effort to discover the hiding place was worth making Dr. Javelins declared to be certain. Any exact description of the supposed con-
tents e>f the secret chamber would
be Impossible, but it was understood
that the treasure alone to be found
lliere would be worth several millions of pounds. Jesu ben Syralt's
book slates very dfintely that the
contents of the hiding place certainly
Include the Table of the Laws, hidden
there until the coining of Ihe Messiah. In addition, it is practically
certain, according to the cipher, that
Ihe secret place contains treasures of
almost incalculable worth, as well
as manuscripts and archives of the
very highest scientific value. Included in Ihe cipher is a curse, "sixty
and sixty fold," on any unauthorized
persons who may attempt to disclose
the secret chamber.
In August, 1909, the first excavations were begun in the greatest
secrecy and under various subterfuges as to the real object of the
expedition. The work has been continued since, but with certain necessary interruptions.
Despatches   received   from   Jersu-
lem last May set forth that the excavators had found and carried away
certain treasures hidden from the
Romans when they sacked Jerusalem
in A.D. 70, including Solomon's
crown, sword and ring, and that with
this plunder they were on a yacht
headed for England.
Captain Parker said later in an
interview that all the antiquities discovered by the Britisii syndicate had
been left in the hands of the Turkish government. Just what treasures
the explorers discovered has not yet
been made known.
"I wonder if Mabel takes anything
for her lovely complexion."
"No. 1 believe she gives something for  it."
Skeena Land District — District of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that W. G. McMorris ol' the City of Vancouver in
Hie Province of Britisii Columbia,
occupation, bro&er, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted on an. island
in Skidegate Inlet about 500 yards
east from the mouth of Slate Chuck
Creek, separated from the mainland
of Graham Island at high tide;
thence south three chains; thence
east ten chains; thence north tliree
chSlns; thence west ten chains to
point of commencement, containing
two acres, more or less.
VV, G.  Mi'.MOIlRIS,
Haled July 29, 191. Locater.
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Cassis t*
TAKE NOTICE tht.t Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for a
license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land:—
Commencing at a post planted about
8 miles N. E. of the mouth of the
White River and the junction of the
Naas, marked Chas. J. Gillingham's
S. E. Corner; thence 80 chains
North; thence 80 chains West;
thence 80 chains South; thence SO
chains East to point of commencement and containing 640 acres more
or less.
CHARLES  J.   GILLINGHAM.
Charles M. Huff, Agent.
Dated March 6th, 1911. 4-18
Skeena Land District.—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Merton A.
Merrill, of Masset, B. C„ occupation
prospector, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted at the S. W. corner of
T. L. 40787; tlience north 80 chains;
thence west SO chains; thence south
SO chains, more or less, to the shore
of Masset Inlet; thence easterly along
the shore back to the place of commencement, containing 640 acres,
more or less.
MERTON A. MERRILL.
Dated Nov. 25, 1910.
Prince Rupert  Private
Agency
Detective
N. McDonald, Manager
All kinds of legitimate detective work
handled for companies and  Individuals.    Business strictly confidential.
P. O. Box 803 — Phone 210
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
SIR EDMUND WALKER, C.V.O., LL.D., D.C.L., President
ALEXANDER LAIRD. General Manager
CAPITAL, - $10,000,000 REST, - $7,000,000
DRAFTS ON FOREIGN COUNTRIES
' Every branch of The Canadian Bank of Commerce is equipped to issue draft* on
the principal cities in the following' countries without delay :
Africa Crete
Arabia Cuba
Argentine Republic Denmark
Australia Egypt
Austria-Hungary Faroe Islandi
Belgium Finland
Brazil Formosa
Bulgaria France
Ceylon Fr'ch Cochin Chi
Chili Germany
China Great Britain
it
. {;
ina «
Greece
Holland
Iceland
India
Ireland
Italy
'apan
ava
elalta
Manchuria
Mexico
New Zealand
Norway
Panama
Persia
Peru
Siberia
Soudan
South Africa
Spain
Straits Settlement*
Philippine lalanda Sweden
Portugal Switzerland
K.teeeeeeinea Turkey
Russia United Statu
Servia Uruguay
Siam West Indies, etc.
The amount of these drafts is stated in the money of the country where they are payable j that is they are drawn in sterling-, francs, marks, lire, kronen, florins, yen,
tacls, roubles, etc., as the case may be. This ensures that the payee abroad will
receive the actual amount intended. 233
J. M. CHRISTIE, Manager, Prince Itupert Branch
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Allan Orr, of
Massett, B. C, occupation carpenter,
intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post plant-
ed on the shore of Masset Inlet two
miles west of the S. W. coruer of T.
L. 40787; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence south
80 chains, more or less, to the shore
of Masset Inlet; thence westerly
along the shore back to the place of
commencement, containing 640 acres,
more or less.
ALLAN   ORR.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 25, 1910.
Skeena    Land    District—District   of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that Freadrick
Madden, of Seattle, Wash., occupation laborer, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the follpwlng
described land:—Commencing at a
post planted about two hundred feet
east of mile 77 on the south side of
G. T. P. Right-of-way; thence west
40 chains following the said Right-
of-way; thence south to bank of
Skeena River; thence east following
the sinuosities of said river until
due south of said post; thence north
to point of commencement, containing 130 acres more or less.
FREADRICK MADDEN.
Thos. L. Fay, Agent.
Dated April 27, 1911.
5-16
Skeent Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Clara Orr, of
Masset, B C., occupation spinster,
Intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described
lands;.—Commencing at a post planted about 40 chains south and 80
chains east of the N. E. corner of
Lot 35; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence north
80 chains; thence east 80 chains, containing 640 acres.
CLARA ORR.'
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 25, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Robert Cross,
of Masset, B. C, occupation farmer,
Intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described
lands*—Commencing at a post planted on the east shore of Tsu Skundale
Lake; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains, to or near to the
S. E. corner of Lot 35; thence west
40 chains, more or less; thence
soutli 40 chains, more or less; thence
west 40 chains more or less, following the southern boundaries of Lot
35; thence soutli to the shore; thence
southerly along the shore back to the
place of commencement, containing
500 acres, more or less.
ROBERT CROSS.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 28, 1910.
Skeena   Land    District—District   of
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, Intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land:—
Commencing at a post planted about
8 miles N. E. of the mouth of White
River and the junction of the Naaa
River, marked Chas. J. Gillingham's
S. E. Corner; thence 80 ehains
North; thence 80 chains West;
tlience 80 chains South; thence 89
chains East to point of commencement and containing 640 acres more
or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles M. Huff, Agent.
Dated March 6th, 1911. 4-18
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Uillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, Intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Commencing at a post planted about
8 miles N. E. of tin mouth of White
River and the junction of the Naas
River, marked Chas. J. Gillingham's
S. E. Corner; thence 80 chains
North; thence 80 chains West;
tlience 80 chains South; thence 80
chains East io point of commencement and containing 640 acres mo: 3
or less
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles M. Huff, Agent.
Dated March 6th, 1911. 4-18
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gilllngham, of Prince Rupert, B. C.,
occupation contractor, Intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for a
licenso to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Commencing at a post planted about
8 miles N. E. of the mouth of the
White River aud the junction of the
Naas, marked Chas. J. Gillingham's
S. E. Corner; thence 80 chains
North; thence 80 chains West;
thence 80 chains South; thence SO
chains East to point of commencement and containing 640 acres more
or leBSi
CHARLES  J.   GILLINGHAM.
Charles M. Huff, Agent.
Dated March 6th, 1911. 4-18
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Carl Nelson,
of Chicago, 111., U. S. A., occupation
draughtsman, Intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 80 chains east
and 120 chains north of N. E. corner of Lot 35; thence south 80
chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence west
80 chains, containing 640 acres.
CARL NELSON.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated, Nov. 26, 1910. 1
Friday, August 11, 1911.
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
•••••••••••••••••A**********************************
* *
I Premier McBride's Views |
••*•••••••••••*•••*•••••*•••***-*•**••*••*****•••••••
Premier McBride was given a very
hearty reception on his arrival home
from the coronation. The prime minister's party had been joined at Van
couver by Mrs. McBride, his mother,
and hy Hon. Mr. Ross. At the Victoria dock the leader was met and
welcomed as he crossed the gangplank by lion. Dr. young, who has
been acting head or the government
during the chieftain's absence; Hon.
Mr. Ellison, Leonard Tail, president
of the local Conservative Association; Ernest McGaffey of the Vancouver Island Development League,
Mrs. Hasell I who, on behalf of the
Alexandra Club, presented Mrs. lie-
Bride with a beautiful bouquet of
typical Victoria flowers) and a number of others.
A   Graceful   Speech
At the Belleville street entrance
to the docks the crowd had massed
solidly and Hon. Mr. McBride's appearance was the signal for round
after round of cheers given with a
right good will. The premier was
escorted to an open carriage and,
preceded by a mounted police escort
and the pipers' band, and driven to
the doors of llie Parliament Building, wliere an improvised platform
had been arranged, and from this
Mr. Tait voiced Victoria's welcome.
The premier responded in an address which was characteristically
direct and informal and In which he
expressed his appreciation, both for
Mrs. McBride and himself. He
sketched deftly the outstanding features of the great ceremonial from
which he had just returned, made
due acknowledgment of his recognition of the excellent work his colleagues In the cabinet have been
accomplishing in his absence, referred to the splendid position
which British Columbia at present
holds In the heart of the Empire, and
assured his fellow-Victorians that he
had come back to I hem with enhanced pride ill this splendid province and a stronger Briton and British Columbian than ever.
Gives   His   Views
"We had a most enjoyable and
profitable trip," said Mr. McBride,
"and thanks to the kindness and
courtesy of our official hosts, we
did not pass a dull moment from the
time we landed until the date of our
departure. The coronation was a
most magnificent spectacle, which
aroused to the highest pitch everyone's patriotism and loyalty and
made one feel proud of being one of
his  gracious  majesty's  subjects."
Regarding the rumor whicfi has
been current for the past few days
that he would enter into federal politics, Mr. McBride said: "I cannot
say at this moment what I shall do,
for in the first place I have not been
advised officially that my services
are desired as a member of the federal parliament, but I will say that
if such an offer should be made
to me i should consider it very seriously before announcing my decision.
"It is true that I had a long conference with R. L. Borden while in
Ottawa, and whi'e I am not at liberty to divulge the nature of the
subjects on that occasion, 1 will say,
however, that I have promised the
leader of our party to do as usual
my share in behalf of my party during the campaign and shall most
likely address meetings in Britisii
Columbia and Alberta.
What IS. C. Will Do
"There is no doubt about what
British Columbia will do in the coming election. Seven for the Conservatives and a solid front will be
the answer of the coast province to
Sir Wilfrid Laurier's appeal to the
country in September. The feeling
is very strong, not only against reciprocity, but against the entire policy
of the Laurier government. From
Mr. Borden down, the feeling of confidence In the ultimate result of the
election is the same. One and all
are going into the fight, which, I
believe, will be one of the most bitter In the political history of Canada, with unlimited optimism as to
the final result. As the result of
Mr. Borden's trip to the prairie provinces the Liberals may experience a
few startling surprises in that territory when all the votes are in. The
Liberals' majority will find deep Inroads even in Quebec, Sir Wilfrid's
particular stronghold, and the Conservatives and Nationalists, each
party in its own way, is gaining a
greater foothold everywhere. The
very fact that the Laurier government dissolved so unceremoniously
and in such apparent haste, might
serve as an indication of the Liberal party's unrest, and prospects
were never brighter for a Conservative victory than  now.
"Regarding the reciprocity question, I am, if anything, more strongly than ever opposed  to  it.    While
Britain's leading financiers on the
subject, and I cannot recall one single man in favor of it. Speeches
made recently hy members of the
United States Congress, and even by
President Taft, shed a most peculiar
light upon this proposed treaty and
the very tenor of them would life
the subject out of realm of finance
into a sphere of politics that must
ultimately affect most vitally Canada's economic and social welfare.
"Canada has not yet reached the
zenith of her wonderful possibilities,
and we cannot afford to sell our
birthright for a mess or pottage.
This country, which has reached a
most marvelous state of development
and progress, has attained its magnificence through the energy,ingenuity and sagacity of its citizens and
it cannot afford to barter Its future
happiness and tbe welfare of coming
generations upon the dictates of
vain-glorious politicians. Canada's
citizens will never permit their
staunch loyalty to the Mother Country to be dimmed by the shadow of
an alliance which arouses the suspicion of all loyal subjects of the
Britisii Empire.
Canada's Expansion
"There are billions, not millions,
of British capital ready to pour into
British Columbia, for never before
in her history has this province stood
so well in the eyes of British capital
as now, and this is particularly due
to our railroad policy, which offers
a most desirable assurance to prospective investors of the solidity of
our present and future. Canadian
railway lines have ordered so far
345,000 tons of steel rails; most of
these will be in Western Canada,
and our trade for the first two
months of the current year totalled
$112,170,119, an increase of $7,000,-
000 over the same period last year.
All these figures cannot help but
have a most favorable impression.
"Our timber is millions and millions of acres in extent, and in quality it is the very best that can bo
had any very natrally this part of
our natural resources is particularly
tempting to investors. But I feel
that we must exercise, the greatest
caution in the manner in which we
go about trying to Interest capital
in that direction. I feel that we all
regard our province as a sacred trust
for Canada and the Empire, and we
want our brethren and friends in
Great Britain who do business with
us to have a legitimate return for
every dollar, and the same applies
to the lands, the fisheries, the mines
and other industries of Britisii Columbia. But anxious as we may be
to see that our foreign Investors
should  have a profit,  I  believe that
1 am speaking for all patriotic and
loyal Britisii Columbians when I say
that we would perfer that they
should not pui a dollar into British
Columbia unless they do it with their
eyes open and unless it is sound business."
 o —
TREAT? DIM NOT PLEASE
Japanese  Newspapers  Comment Adversely on Changes in the Alnglo-
Jnpaiiesc Alliance
According to advices, the revision
of the alliance between England and
Japan has stirred the Japanese papers into an angry mood. The Hochi
declares at the outset that the. warning which it has repeatedly sounded
that there were prospects of a change
In the Anglo-Japanese alliance has
at last assumed a definite form, a
change which may cause great alteration in the Japanes programme of
national defence and which may put
the country In a decided hut notbrll-
liant Isolation.
In the next place, the Tokio paper
pronounces the opinion that the new
development of affairs is something
very far removed from the existing
treaty of alliance. Great Britain,
says the Hochl.'has nothing to fear
about the Russian Invasion of India.
And yet naval competition with Germany has driven our allies to join
hands with the American nation. The
arbitration treaty is aimed at Germany in Europe and Japan in Asia,
as the signatories to the treaty profess that the identity of interest and
circumstances between both of them
make It a thing of necessity.
As regards the theory that Japan
must hold steadfast to the Anglo-
Japanese alliance at all costs, the
Hochi thinks the alliance will be discarded when the arbitration treaty
is brought into being, because the
latter's real Intention is to isolate
Japan, politically speaking, Irom the
rest of the world. When, It is continued, the Russo-Japanese convention was made it was regarded by
some as somewhat neutralising the
benefits England derived  out of the
B
THE JOURNAL
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ment is, in the paper's eyes, exactly
coincident with this view.
In conclusion, the Hochi says that
the proposed arbitration treaty shows
Japan that she is to drink the bitter cup to the dregs and that self-
reliance is of the first importance.
And to be self-reliant the nation
must have a large navy.
The Mainichi declares as follows:
Now an arbitration treaty is on the
point of signature, the Times- proposes the revision of the Angli-.Iap-
anese alliance. Although nothing
dpfinite is yet obtainable, Japan has
a perfect right to refuse to act in
accordance with the treaty of alliance, if the proposed arbitration neutralises England in case a war between Japan and America. If the
protection Japan derives from the
alliance in case of war Is to be taken
away, what remains?
Yosobaro Takekoshl, one of the
leading Selyukal members, writing
In the Nippon, says that there must
be many Japanese whose anticipation
of the consequences of the Anglo-
American treaty has hit the mark
when they read the views expressed
by the Times. After saying that
Japan has never truly looked up
to England for assistance In case of
war with America, Mr. Takekoshl
says the new treaty between Great
Britain and America will prove an
agent to weaken the Anglo-Japanese
alliance, and should be food for contemplation  for the Japanese people.
Although, says he, America has
failed in the attempt at the neutralization of Manchurian railways, she
achieved a signal success in floating
the loan and stipulating the arbitration treaty. Indeed, she has admirably accomplished the isolation of
Japan.
ROYAL VISIT TO INDIA
Arrangements   in   Connection   Witli
Delhi Durbar anil Programme
ut. Itoiiilmy
in  England  I  talked  with  many of alliance.     The   subsequent   develop
The Journal (twice a week), only
$2.00 a year.
It Is officially announced that the
king and queen will reside on board
ship during their stay in Bombay
and that their programme will be:
Formal reception in Bombay and a
drive through the city on December
2; luncheon at Government House
on December 3; visit to Blephanta
Caves on December 4; and school-
children's function on December 6,
on the night of their majestices' departure for Delhi.
It has been defintely settled that
there will be no elephant procession
at the Delhi Durbar.
The prospectus has been Issued of
a point-to-point race meeting leu- at'
fleers of the civil and military ser
vices, which Is to be held at Delhi
during the Coronation Durbar. The
king and queen will present the cups
for the events, of wbi.b there are
five on the card. Neither betting
nor totallsator will be allowed on
the course, nor will lotteries be permitted.
Intending visitors to the Durbar
may naturally have some anxiety as
to the means of locomotion in the
large area covered by the various
camps. People who can afford the
luxury of motor cars will not trouble themselves In the matter, bul
there will be hundreds of others to
whom the expense of vehicles will
be a esrious consideration. The railways under construction will, however, provide a ready means ol
movement from point to point. To
the north will be the "army camps"
station In the middle of the Infantry
divisions; while west of the review
ground will be another station In
the cavalry camp. In the area allotted to the provincial camps soutli
eel' Azadpnr a third station will be
provided. The central station of all
—known   as   the   "Kingsway"— will
be on the Alipore road, and its position has been admirably chosen.
The lines linking tlie points mentioned will be on the broad gauge,
while a ssytem of circular light railways will give other connections.
Visitors will find all these lines a
great convenience and the prices
charged for tickets will be kept low.
The highest rate of charges for visitors to the Durbar is $40 per day,
with a minimum of twenty days' contract. The applications are already
sufficiently numerous to fully justify
the fixing of tlie rate by Ihe Durbar
committee, and more will probably
be received. Visitors who pay their
$40 per day, will get full value for
their money, the arrangements made
for them being complete In every
way. They will be In buildings and
not under canvas, and In matter of
personal comfort they will beaa well
of as the English officials who are
the guests of the government.
WATER NOTICE.
NOTICE Is hereby given that an
application will be made under Part
V. of the "Water Act, la09," to obtain a licence In the Queen Charlotte Islands Division of Skeena District.
(a) The name, address and occupation of the applicant—Merton A.
Merrill, Masset, Q. C. I., B. C,
Prospector.
(If for mining purposes) Free
Miner's Certificate No	
(b) The name of the lake,
stream, or source (If unnamed, the
description Is)—I-In-tsua Lake, Tsu-
Skundale Lake and Ain River.
(c) The point of diversion—At T
near the outlet of Tsu-Skundale
Lake  Into Ain  River.
(d) The quantity of water applied for (In cubic f<;et per second)
—1,000.
(e) The character of the proposed works—Power Plant, Dam,
Flumes, etc
If) The premises on which the
water Is to be used (describe same)'
—At or near the mouth of the Ain
River.
(g) The purposes for which the
water Is to be used—Generating
power.
(h) If for irrigation, describe
the land intended to be irrigated,
giving acreage	
(I) If the water Is to be used for
power or mining purposes, describe
tha place wliere the water is to be
returned to some natural channel,
and the difference in altitude between point of diversion and point
of return—At or near the mouth of
the Ain River, about 100 feet below
point of diversion.
(j) Area of Crown land intended to be occupied by the proposed
works—10 acres more or less.
(k) This notice was posted on
the 28th day of November, 1910,
and application will be made to the
Commissioner on the 1st day of
June, 1911.
(1) Give the names and addresses of any riparian proprietors or
licensees who or whose lands are
likely lo be affected by the proposed works, either above or below
the outlet—Don't know of any.
(Signature)
MERTON  A.  MERRILL,
(P. O. Address)   Masset,  B. C.
NOTE.—One cubic loot per second is equivalent lo 35.71 miner's
inches.
J. L. PARKER
MIXING KXfilXEFH
Prince Rupert, B. C.
Open for Consultation and Mine
Examination
Temporary Address: —
Prince Rupert Inn
FREDERICK PETERS, K. C.
Barrister, Solicitor and Notary Public
Office in
EXCHANGE  BLOCK
WM. S. HAl,L, L. D. S. D. D. S.
:-:   DENTIST   :-:    __.<*(*■*-!
■''>.'(»*».               '*i-,.
Crown and Bridge Work a specialty.
All dental operations skillfully
treated. Gas and local anaesthetics
administered for the painless extraction of teeth. Consultation free.
Offices, Helgerson 3k., Prince Rupert
NICKERSON-ROERIG COMPANY
—o—
CUSTOMS AND MERCHANDISE
—o—
Brokers, Forwarding Agents,
Storage,  etc.
J.  W.  POTTER
ARCHITECT    AND     STRUCTURAL
ENGINEER
Re-inforced Concrete a Specialty
—o—
Law-Butler Building - Prince Rupert
HAYXOR   UROS.
FUNERAL   DIRECTORS
and
PROFESSIONAL   EMBALMERS
MR.  W. B.  CLAVTOX
DENTIST
—o—
Office   In    the    Westenhaver   Block,
Over  Orme's   Drug    Store.
Prince Rupert
 LADYSMITH	
COAL
ROCHESTER & MONROE, Phone 115
Corner Eighth and Fraser Street*
Clinton Rooms
Newly remodelled and furnished.
Board and lodging. Home cooking
a specialty. Mrs. Anderson, Prop.
Rooms, $3 Per Week
New Knox Hotel
ARTAUD & BESNER
Proprietors
The New Knox Hotel Is run on tha
European plan. FlrBt-clas service.
All the latest modern Improvements
THE BAR keeps only the best
brands of liquors and  cigars.
THE CAFE Is open from 6.30 a.m.
to 8 p.m. Excellent cuisine; first-
class service.
Hum el, $1 a May — Beds, 50c and np
First Avenu<*   Prince Rupert
Hamblin's Bakery
Just Re-opened
Sale    counter    in    MERRYFIELD'S
STORE, Third Ave. and Fifth St.
Family trade catered to.   Will supply restaurants and steamers.
Cakes and Confectioner; of nil
kinds
THE WESTHOLME LUMBER CO.
LIMITED
We handle all kinds of
Building Supplies
First Avenue Telephone 180 PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Friday, August 11, Mil.
HIGHER EDUCATION
Anglican Synod Approves of Move for
Affiliation With Provincial
University.
Report  ol   the   Bishops  on  the  Subject Is Endoirsed by
Diocese
The Anglican Synod, at its meeting here this week, heartily endorsed
the proposal of the bishops of the
province with respect to higher education. This provided that the
Church should provide for a theological college in affiliation with the
provincial university, to be built by
the government.
Another course of action endorsed
by the synod was with respect to
the formation of an ecclesiastical
province. It was resolved that in
the event of an ecclesiastical province being formed in British Columbia, this synod recommends that in
the constitution of the proposed provincial synod, while provision should
be made for two houses, the bishops
constituting the upper house, and
the clergy and laity the lower house,
both houses should as a rule sit together, though each house should
vote separately, the exception to the
rule being when the upper house
intimates its wish to sit separately.
In this connection it was resolved
also to recommend that in case the
ecclesiastical province were formed
the title of arrhibshop should not
be assumed until at least five bishoprics  had  been   formed.
 o	
NEW   OLD   XEWS
Interesting  Story  of  Klondike  Dis-
covei*}*  Received  by  Paper
Afte rLong Delay
The newest bit of old news probably that ever reached a newspaper
office was received by a Seattle
newspaper office last week. The
"news" in question was received in
a letter sent to the paper from the
first settlement on the Yukon River,
early in the spring of 1897, and
reported in detail the discovery of
the Klondike gold fields.        »
The correspondent himself was a
prospector in the expedition that
first saw gold in the Yukon and Its
tributaries, and entrusted the news
letter to a river boatman who was
bound down the river to the pre*
eat city of Nome,
The boatman was to deliver the
letters to Hie steamship Northwestern, due to land at Nome Camp late
In the fall. The boatman never
reached Nome, but was taken ill 400
miles from the mouth of the Yukon and died. Before becoming too
ill he cached his gold pouch, letters
and other personal effects, all sealed
in a two quart fruit jar in the earth
or floor of a trapper's log cabin in
which he died.
Last spring prospectors stumbled
on to his log cabin, and seeing the
top of a fruit can sticking up out
of the ground, dug it up and found
the letters, gold and valuables. The
news letters, yellow from their underground sleep of years, were forwarded by registered mail to the
Seattle paper and reached there last
week.
The letters, had they reached Seattle when due, would have given the
paper a chance to "scoop" its rivals.
The letters will be preserved. The
contents will go into a special edition planned by the paper for a future date.
SPORTS
CAN'T CLAIM  TITLE
Billy Papke, weighing 165 pounds,
in the "pink" of condition and sign-
in ghimself "champion middleweight
of the world," is out with a challenge to all contenders. Nothing
could be more ridiculous, according
to Ad  Wolgast.
"In the first place Papke isn't and
never again will be a real middleweight," said tht champion. "He has
not taken care of himself any too
well, and can't even make 160 now
without hurting himself. He is getting a little too old to reduce too
much, and It hurts an old man to
take off fat.
"Papke, it seems to me, is really
a fighter without a class In which
to fight. He can t go into the light-
heavyweight division because he
hasn't the strength, and he can't
fight middlewelghts, if they Insist
on his making the legitimate weight.
"There is at least one man who
can beat him if he gets down to
the legitimate 158, and that man is
Frank Klaus. Klaus is the best middleweight in the ring today by all
odds. He can easily make the
weight; in fact, he is always a little
below the limit. Then, too, he has
the speed, something which Papke
can't boast of now that he has taken
on weight.
"Klaus and Papke met once in a
six round affair in Pittsburg. The
fight was of the no-decision order,
but fro mthose at the ringside I
heard later that Klaus really had a
shade on the 'Illinois Thunderbolt'
in  clverness.
"What right Papke had to the
title any more than the rest of them,
I can't see. He claims that because
he has defeated contenders in America, England and Australia he is entitled to the honor, but he is silent
when the defeat he suffered at the
hands of Johnny Thompson is thrown
into nis face.
WRESTLING   CHAMPIONS
George Hackenschmidt, the Russian wrestler, who is matched to
meet Champion Frank Gotch in Chicago on Labor Day, has made elaborate preparations to keep up his
training. In a letter to his manager,
Jack Curley, Hackenschmidt outlined his plans. He will sail from
Southampton for the United States
August 9, and will bring with him
ten cases of a special mineral water
obtained in France. In the Hackenschmidt party will be Dr. F. B.
Roller, chief trainer; Johann Koch,
German athlete; Masseur Coleman,
and a German chef who will prepare
all the food. At New. York the wrestler will pick up Tom Jenkins, who
will accompany him to Cnicago.
CORINTHIAN PLAYERS
In view of the visit to the Coast
of the Corinthian footbali team, the
following "thumb-nail" sketches
of the touring cracks will be of Interest:
G. G. Newman—Charter House
and Oxford. A reliable goalkeeper,
who has played some great games
for his university, and the old Carthusians. Is the latest recruit for
the Corinthians, and, like his predecessors   has a safe pair of hands.
W. Timmis—Honorary secretary
of the club. A vigorous worker,
both as an official and a player.
Charter House and Oxford. Never
been known to have an off day.
R.   L.   Braddell — Charter  House
and Oxford. A powerful back and
splendid kick, who despizes weight
and size; can move fast and tackle
well. Another P. M. Walters of
memorable fame. Holder of an amateur international cap against
France. He is a double Blue, having also played in the last two varsity cricket matches.
F. N. Tuff—Malvern and Oxford.
A good all-round man who can play
either back or forward. He Is a
double Blue at Oxford, and so plays
cricket for Kent county.
I. E. Snell—Charter House and
Oxford. One of the best men on
the team; occupies with distinction
any position in the field, being more
conspicuous, however, at full or
halfback, wliere his great height and
heading powers are available. Was
a blue at Oxford and obtained his
International cap against France. Is
a barrister of the Inner temple.
R. G. Thompson—Malvern and
Cambridge. A fullback of considerable promise who has not yet realized the limits of his powers. Is
fast, a powerful kick and stubborn.
P. Sargeant—Cambridge. An old
public school boy, who never knows
when he is done. He is a great
tackier and an indefatigable halfback. He is the mainstay of the
Surrey  county  football   team.
R. M. Weeks—Charter House and
Cambridge. One of the younger generation who, from being a forward
at Charter House, developed into a
halfback and obtained his Blue for
his consistent play in this position.
Just the man for a long tour,
M. Morgan-Owen — Shrewsbury
and Oxford. A name to conjure
with. He is a Welsh international
of worldwide-reputation. A brilliant and determined centre half who
disp'ays splendid headwork, and a
pattern half back to watch in making openings for and feeding his forwards. He is now a shcoolmaster at
Repton.    The captain of the team.
L. A. Vidal—Malvern and Oxford.
He is a very useful half and can
also play forward. He is a player
of the vigorous type and can more
than hold his own in the hottest
scrum. A demon for work, and so
say his scholars at Radley College.
J. B. BIckersteth — Malvern and
Oxford. Captain of the Oxford team
which secured such a well deserved
victory over Cambridge this year.
Has been educated for the church,
getting experience in Canadian mission work near Edmonton. He is a
pretty half back player.
B. O. Corbett—Thame county
school and Oxford. In an international and one of the veterans of
the team but still retains his form.
He is seen to the best advantage
at outside left, where his great pace
and cleverness are of grat assistance to his side." He is head schoolmaster.
A. L. Corbett—Thame and Oxford.
Brother of the more famous B. 0.,
but Is also an Oxford Blue and has
been a very valuable member of the
Corinthian team for some years. He
is a master at Brighton College. He
is a  clever and  fast forward.
R. C. Maples—Sheffield and Oxford. A sound player In the forward line and very clever with the
hall. Had a large share in the victory of Oxford over Cambridge in
February  last.
Howard Henry—Partner to R. C.
Maples in the last varsity match, his
clever work being much admired.
Learned his football with the Manitoba Football Association, secured a
Rhodes scholarship, and has just
come from Oxford and starting life
as a barrister In Winnipeg.
S. H. Day — Malvern and Cambridge.    Is the greatest exponent of
Inside play In Great Britain today.
He possesses an unerring judgment
and wonderful control of the ball.
He is an international, and also a
double Blue. Is a popular member
of the Kent county cricket team. Is
now a master at Westminster school.
H. G. Bach—Cambridge. A fine
all-round athlete, who, although recently down for his university, has
played for the A. F. A. against Bohemia, Wales and France. One of
the surest goal getters in the team,
being very clever at getting openings. Is a lawn tennis player of distinction and plays occasionally for
Worcester cricket eleven.
G. C. Vassall—Vice captain. Char-
lei' House and Oxford. A hounsehold
name. Now one of the old brigade
who distinguished himself at Oxford
by obtaining a double Blue, and
jumping 23 feet against Yale and
Harvord, which Is a record for the
event. He is an international, possessing weight and pace, and is a
terror to all opposing goalkeepers.
The strength of his shooting is most
remarkable.
C. Wreford-Brown—President of
the Corinthian Club, is one of the
most wonderful players of modern
times. What Wreford does not
know In football can never be learned. He is an ideal captain of the
Corinthians for many years. He Is
a centre half back, and though a
veteran, is always ready to don the
white shirt.
 o	
P. Brown, who represents Radiger
& Janion, wholesale liquor dealers
of Victoria and Vancouver, spent a
few days in the city this week. He
left this morning for the south. Mr.
Brown is a brother of Austin Brown
of this city.
[£
TENDERS   WANTED
TENDERS will be received by the
undersigned up to Tuesday, August
15, for Plumbing (sewer and water)
in the old school building on Second
avenue. Plans and specifications
may be seen at the City Engineer's
office.
W. D. VANCE,    '
Aug. 11-15    Secretary School Board.
TENDERS  AVANTED
TENDERS will be received by the
undersigned up to Tuesday, August
15, for the painting of a room in
the old school building on Second
avenue. Specifications may be seen
at the City Engineer's office.
W. D. VANCE,
Aug. 11-15    Secretary School Board.
TO  WATER  TAKERS
On account of scarcity of water
the supply will be cut off between
the hours of 9 p. m. and 5 a. m.
during the dry weather.
WM.   MAHLON  DAVIS,
tf Supt. of Water Works.
**************************
l   FOR RENT   t
* *
* Store     building     on     Second *
%  Avenue    at    Seventh    Street. *
* Low   Rent. f
| JEREMIAH H. KUGLER, LTD. |
* *
**************************
**************************
1 75 x 100 Feet I
|    ASK    For Lease on Third *
* UNCLE     Avenue at Ninth     J
* JERRY Street *
| JEREMIAH H. KUGLER, LTD. |
**************************
To the Ladies of Prince Rupert
Did you ever stop to think how much easier it would be for you,
If at the end of each month, you could pay all household bills
by check? We solicit your account and have special facilities
for handling it. Private writing rooms are provided for the use
of customers and individual attention is given each depositor.
We allow 4 %  on Deposits and the use of checks.
The Continental Trust Company, Limited
 SECOND AVENUE	
IHItaiHIHlSlHlHlHlHlHlHlalHlHlBlHlHlHlBlBlH'SlHlHlHlS
HOTEL .
ENAMELWARE
HAVE JUST RECEIVED A SMALL SHIPMENT OF HOTEL
ENAMELWARE ESPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR USE IN
HOTELS, RESTAURANTS AND CAMPS. WE GUARANTEE
THEM TO LAST' TWICE AS LONG AS ORDINARY ENAMEL
WARE. /
A CALL IS SOLICITED
Prince Rupert Hardware & Supply
Company, Ltd.
THIRD AVENUE
PHONE 120
aiSlHIHIHIBIBIHIBIHIHIHIHiBIHIHIHimlBIHIBIBIHlHlHIH
FOR SALE
Lot 56, Blk. 34, Sec. 1, $5,000; 1-3 cash, bal. 6 and 12 months.
Lots 33 and 34, Blk 5, Sec. 1,   $4,000; half cash.
FOR RENT
STORES, OFFICES AND DWELLINGS
FIRE INSURANCE in old English, Canadian and American
companies, at tariff rates. Policies good as collateral at All Banks,
and all written in our own office. PLATE GLASS, ACCIDENT
and MARINE INSURANCE
MM. Stephens & Co. Ld.
REAL ESTATE
Phone 222
LOANS       INSURANCE
Office: Third Avenue
INVESTMENTS
P. O. Box 275
Ue.*Suy S&Usf&ctory'Ringt
Good, Sound Reasons for
MONARCH Economy
Monarch Ranges are built so that they can
never have "air leaks"— ■
For around every opening Into the body there
Is a   Malleable   Iron frame to which the
steel is riveted.
No putty is needed in such joints.    They are
air tight when new and stay air tight.
If these other ranges were built In this way
they might be economical too.
Investigate this matter of rivet construction
versus stove  bolts and  stove putty.    It's
important to every  one using or buying
a range.
SOLD AND GUARANTEED BY THE
Kaien Hardware Co.
Telephone 3
Third Avenue
We beg to announce to the public that we are going to
remain at the same old stand cor. 6th St. and 2nd Ave.
GRAND 15 DAY SALE
The Big
Furniture
Store
We are using the entire
lliii't Block for 15 Days—
A     Grand     15     Day     Sale.
Sole Agents for the
Ostermoor
Mattresses
We are using the entire
Hart Block for 15 Days—
A    Grand    15    Day    Sale.
* *
u
ft
ti
**
x*
* *
* *
**
FURNITURE, STOVES, LINOLEUM, CARPETS, FLOOR COVER-
INGS, REED AND RATTAN FURNITURE, BLINDS, CURTAINS, QUILTS,
COMFORTS, BLANKETS, SHEETS, PILLOWS, MATTRESSES, SPRINGS,
IRON AND BRASS BEDS. BEST LINES OF UPHOLSTERED COUCHES,
ARM CHAIRS, PARLOR SUITES, ENAMELWARE, CROCKERY, GLASSWARE, LAMPS, TABLE CUTLERY, SCREENS, PICTURES, MIRRORS,
WASHING MACHINES, BASKETS, FRUIT JARS, HAMMOCKS, SEWING
MACHINES, BABY CARRIAGES.
WE ARE CLOSING OUT THE
STOVE DEPARTMENT.
IF  YOU   ARE INTERESTED
CALL AND GET OUR PRICES
F. W. HART
Cor 6th Street & 2nd Ave
Phone 62      P.O. Box 230
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦
■♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ ♦-»-■» + + + ** + + *. + ***** + ** + + + *■ + + ***■**»+,

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