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Prince Rupert Journal Jul 19, 1910

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Array l_£
Subscription
During July
$1.50 a Year
Ptinu ftopett fantnal
High-Class
Job Printing
In all Lines
VOLUME  1
Published Twice a Week
PRINCE RUPBRT, Bl C, TUESDAY, .11'!.V 10. 1910.
Price, Five Cents
NO.  10.
PUBLIC   RECEPTION
City Council Taken Initiative in According a Welcome to Sir Wilfrid
Laurier.
Committees Will Arrange tin  Detail
Connected Willi the Distinguished
Statesman's Visit  Here
Sir Wilfrid Laurler on his .-Isil to
Prince Ruperl is to be given a public
reception.. In connection with this
move the city council will take* the
Initiative. This move will, II is believed, meet with general approval
and is in line with what lias been
advocated by The Journal. Sir Wilfrid comes to the city as more than
the leader of one of the great parties
in the Dominion, lie comes as the
first citiezn in this country and is
worthy of all the ho'nor thai can be
bestowed upon him. His visit to the
west at this time as announced in the
letter received by Mayor Stork since
time ago, is one of duty as well as of
pleasure. He is studying the needs
of the west in order to better understand what is required.
Al Saturday evening's meeting of
the city council, Mayor Stork introduced the subject of a reception to
the Premier. His Worship thought it
would be better in every way for the
city council to lake steps and provide
a suitable reception. A committee
could be apointed out of the council
to be known as the striking committee, which would drafl the other
necessary citizen's committees.
Aid. Mclntyre was pleased to know
thai this would not take a political
complexion, As s Conservative, he
would be glad to welcome Sir Wilfrid
as a distinguished statesman. In doing honor to Sir Wilfrid citizens were
doing honor to Prince Rupert, as it
was due to his genius that this city
was on the map.
Aid. Barrow, while not owing allegiance to Sir Wilfrid's party or any
other political party, thought steps
should be taken to Welcome Sir Wilfrid.
Aid. Naden was glad to own allegiance to the party of which Sir
Wilfrid was the leader. He believed
all parties would be glad to join
hands in welcoming Sir Wilfrid here.
He agreed with the mayor's suggestion.
Aid. Mobley was pleased always to
do anything to advance the interests
of Sir Wilfrid Laurier. (Laughter.)
He thought a genuine reception
should  lie Riven  him.
Aid. Pattullo thoughl thai if any
place in Canada should do honor to
Sir Wilfrid it was Prince Rupert.
The city council might well take the
initiative In this.
Aid. Hilditch while nol affiliated
Willi the party of Sir Wilfrid, was
prepared to assist in welcoming liini
to the city. He believed the Liberal
Association would claim the privilege
of entertaining Sir Wilfrid. He
thoughl the council should work
along lines laid down by the Liberal
Association.
Aid. Mobley did not agree with
Aid. Hilditch', If he were a member
of the Liberal Association he would
feel it a compliment lo have the council representing all parties offer to
take the matter up.
■Aid. Naden referred to the fact
that when the Premier of the province came here he was given a general reception. He had felt proud to
do his pari In that.
Aid. Lynch wanted to see a reception given in keeping wltn what
belonged lo the great, good man who
had given his talents to this country.
His Worship said the Liberal Association would not feel hurl In the
least, lo have the council take this
up.
On mot ion of Aid. Mobley, seconded by Aid. Pattullo, Ills Worship was
authorized to name a committee to
deal with this.
His Worship accordingly appointed Aldermen Naden, Pattullo and
Mobley a committee to report to the
council.
At last evening's meeting of the
council the committee reported on
the various committees, and tne report was adopted. The report was
as follows: —
Your committee appointed to
strike the various committees for Ihe
reception to be tended lite Right
Honorable Sir Wilfrid Laurier on his
visit here, herewith recommend the
following:
Reception committee — His Worship (he Mayor, and the City Council,
His Honor Judge    Young,    William
.Manson,  M.P.P.,   Bishop  Du   Vernet,
■iii i lartman, Rev. A. M. Ross,
K iv, C R. Sing, Rev, .1. W. Litch,
Com. Agent .1. II. .McMullin, W. C.
llehan, President and Secretary of
the Board of Trade, S. M. Newton,
U. I!. T. Saw.le and 0. II. Nelson.
Entet lainmi nl commit I ee Mayor
Stork, William Manson, M.P.P., A. J.
Morris, Win. M. Law, 1). Sigouin, D.
(i. Stuart, a. M. Manson, A. W. Ag-
new, Thus. Dunn, Thos. Trotiei', Fred
Dawson, and  Col.  Davis.
finance committee—Aid. Mobley,
Aid. Pattullo, M. M. Stephens, and
Olier Besmer.
Transpoi tntion committee — Aid.
Naden, I.. W, Patmore and ,1. Kirk-
pal rick.
Vour committee further recom-
mi nd il!,'i the entertainment committee shall have power to appoinl
a sub-committee out of their own
number or outside for a decoration
i ommittee.
 o	
MM    DU   IX   CANADA
Dr.
Crippen,   ii   is
at  5!"
lieli
d,   Landed!
i-nl
RESCUE  STATIONS
II. C, Governnicnl
Apparatus  Im
Places Orders For
i   Coal   .Mines
Victoria, July 111.—The British
Columbia government has placed orders in Pittsburg for complete apparatus for three mine rescue stations in the principal coal mining
as of British Columbia. One will
ho established in the Crow's Nest
Pass and two on Vancouver island.
 o	
TO IMPROVE EIGHTH
Plank Roadway Will be Laid From Beyond Hays Creek to Seal
Cove.
Residents Are Anxious to Have Work
Carried Out Ami Council Accede to Request
FISHING INDUSTRY TO
BE FULLY DEVELOPED
(Spi cial to  the Journal)
Monl real,  .1 tl;    l D,     \   pa
Work  in  Progress for Cold Storage Plant at Seal Harbor—Spur of ,.in,; .    ,,,■ ,,,
Railway Line Under Construction to New Works—Immense cripnen, wanted  in  London on  mur-
PERMANENT  SUPPLY
City Engineer flakes Start on Securing
Wa'er lu Meet Needs of
City.
Possibilities of the Trade at This  Port—Company Will Construct Great Curing Quarters and Afford Ready Market Here.
In answer to a request from the
property owners a sixteen-foot plank
roadway is to be laid from Hays Cove
avi-iin in MLlflh Eighth avenue to
Kelliher.—This will include the lowering of the grade to the proper
limit near Seal Cove.
When tite matter first came up
Aid. Lynch explained that while the
cost was put by the engineer at $11,-
(iuo, there would be an additional
cos! of over $20,000 if the cut was
to be made near Seal Cove.
Aid. Hildltch did not approve of
having the street ending against a
blank wall of rock as would be ihe
case  If the ctil   were nol   made.
Aid. Pattullo, in view of this proposed thai the facts should be communicated to the residents concerned.
Aid. Hilditch said thai section one
had been made a section for local
improvement. Why should not section seven also be so constituted?
The council had a right to assume
some responsibility.
Aid. Lynch did not believe thai
section one would have been considered as an area for local improvement had it not been proposed that
every streel in thai pari was lo be
graded. If section seven was thus
to be Improved every streel would
have to be graded. It was nol so proposed, however.
Aid. I'altuiio then moved that it he
inferred to the streets committee for
a report.
This motion carried and last  night
It is acknowledged by those in a
post ion to know thai Prl Ruperl
will become in the next few years
in,' greatest   fishing centre nol   only
on  tiie Pacific I cnl.-l, lull  in  tne world
What this wiil mean to the city from
i he standpoint of commerce is a dif-
Uctlll thing io estimate. -Men like
il:-. Starrett, who was formed) me
active head ol' the New blnglund Fish
Company,  and   .Mr.   Wallace,   a   mosl
consei valive   c  man,   plat ■    the
population thai the fishing Industry
will maintain in this city at 25,000
at a low i si un.le.
Win n i; is taki a into account that
this Industry is bul one ol those upon
which tiie i'nii will depend tor business, tiie future of Prince Rupert is
i ei talnly a . osj one.    Ind pend (
ij.o fishing industry altogether, the
city will have an immense population
to look alter the trade that is to develop. Add to that population over
25,000 dependent upon the harvest ot
tiie sea and the outlook is enough to
inspire all residents of the place with
the most optimistic feelings.
Prince Rupert is not to wait for
the development of the fishing industry. Already a start lias been made
on what will, when completed, be
undoubtedly the largest tish curing
plant in the world. The Canadian
Pish & Cold Storage Company is not
an organization that is seeking advertising. It is backed up by large
capital and its plans for the future
are all complete. It has but to systematically proceed with the work so
as to be In shape to begin operations
as soon as the G. T. P. is completed
to the coast. Already the first contingent representing the work of construction is busy on the site of
the curing works and cold storage
which is to be located near Seal
Cove.
Xot Experimental
The works are not to be of the
experimental type. Those interested
have gone fully into the whole question and laid their plans in accordance with the experience of the men
best qualified to judge of the needs
of the industry. In .Mr. Starrett,
who,  as  the  head  of  the New  Eng
land Fish company,   developed    the
halibut   fishing on    this    coasl     and
made    a   mosl   minute study of  the
;   hing  Indu'f i i-.v, ihe companj
ha best   available  advice.     .Mr.
itari ill   haie  th" active   man
gc e ■    I  of ihe concern and till  who
IcnoV  Mai   gentleman   will  acknowl-
der  chart   .reach   I on     tiie
Megantic Sunday from Li\ erpool, The
passenger in question was accompanied by a woman and took a cab.
nol bee i. ;< n since.
Dr. Crippen is an American den-
11st, n bile Mrs. I Irippen was rot it t i
a nol it Polish singer. The police are
baffled in the Bean Ii for i hose con-
••■ in   :.     I;;' companion  ;   i        £ to
IV.  Agi
Party
nv  Will   Tate   n  Survey
lo   Lake   Woodivoi'lh
This  Week
'      tl tl   ihe affairs are in  capable  be with Crippen is Mile Ethel Leneve.
and careful hands.    Associated  with
.Mr. Starretl are financial men whose
tianii s    are   known   throughout   the
whole or Canada.    The directors ol
■• ■ ■. any are .v. c. Collins, of '' "n "
Vane,,, ir, who is at present in the
city taking active charge m' lite operations Unit are being done on ihe
wear!' ai the works; James Carruth-
ers of Montreal, the well known
grain dealer and general financier,
and Al/. Kelly, ol' Winnipeg, another
eminently successful financier, who is
prominently Identified with the milling Interests on the prairies. These
are ill practical business men, which
Is a sufficient assurance that the af-j
lairs of the concern will be conduced "in av manner to ensure success.
Xc-i being concerned in the selling
sfj'ck   the  directors of  the  com-
The lias i     le a  -'an   on   ihe
a ot i. oi obtaining a pernianc tit w ater
supply following tbe gnui   bj    the
Provincial Government  ot' thi   application  oi' ill" city for 3i ches at
Woodwortli  Lake       Col.   Davis,  the
eer,   lias  gone   ,,.. er     the
ground  ami  is delighted   with   Lake
Woodwortli as a snare,   i.r    supply.
A dres maker has in en to n d  Ai... The Sjvatei  is pure an.:  tl   n        little
I     ■■■  that    hot  Iv afler  February or no danger ol contaml      ion.
■ nay en  Willi      il I   Mi's. I le   lias   1 n  appoint   I ialen-
Mlh    Lev a il- til   of   water   works    i :               . online! d   «oi k ..a   tin         .cue.
'.. have ihe dresses altered. The Al Saturday i Ing ot
Ing has been identified as Unit the council the city engineer presenter Mrs. * fii ■■ ". According lo ih" ed a report stating that ii" had visit-
seamstress, the young woman said ed Lake Woodworth with A. W. Ag-
-.;<■ Intended marrying Dr. Crippen new and found ii satisfactory in
■in: ih.- gown- had le "ii hi! io ev.ry way as a source of supply. He
Ii r by an aunt. Mile Leneve called advised that a Burvej i en-
iiiid tool: away ihe dresses on ihe gaged i.i make n reconnaissance sur-
i y before she and Dr. Crippen are icy, making Mr. Agnevi chief of the
alleged to have I party al  $20C a month, and  to give
 o  ail his line   in the city.
Aid.   Lynch   moved   thai   the   city
D.   D.     MAM     UffllNG Mglneer be iasl™^ <" Proceed a',
once witli the work,    lie would give
  tin. engineer a free hand to engage
panyV not anxious  to   advertise I It is Expected Tnat He Will Be a Pas- s""h ",'',l ',:" were '»""^'->-
what they are doing or  what   their j senger  on  the  Prince s"'(l   ,hi"   tWs
plans are. They are business men,
proceeding along business lines in
connection with the undertaking. The
initial cost of tlie work is put al over
half a million dollars. From this as
a beginning the company wi,. ,.,„
ceed to enlarge almost as soon as
the original works are constructed
and in running order.
Putting in Wharf
At the present time Mr. Collins
has a force of men at work putting
in th lrst section of the wharf that
will be used. This is necessary so
that the supplies to be used in the
rest of the work may be landed
right on the ground where it is needed without extra handling. The
wharf is a very substantial one and
will remain a part of the permanent
wharf that is to serve the company's
needs. It will have, at the present,
about 100 feet of frontage on deep
(Continued  on  Page  Five)
Rupert.
Rnllwny  .Magnate  Is On  His  Way  (o
Stewart   to   Look   Into   His
Interests There
I be referred to the water committee
so thai a report mighl be obtained as
to the cost. The question of cost bad
to he considered, lie would second
the  mot ion  il' this were added.
His Worship said that time was
valuable. This work lead io be done
no matter what the cost, lie thought
the engineer should start at work at
once.
Aid. I'altuiio did not think that
Ills   proposal   would   delay   matters.
D. D. Mann is expected to arrive on
the steamship Prince Rupert tomorrow. He is on his way to inspect his
interests  at  Stewant.
He Is heavily interested in miningOv<M'(fllp'te'1"  atari  Monday  morning.
properties at the Stewart camp and
has the control of the Portland Canal
Short Line, which is being now built.
His trip to the north is directly
connected with these properties, hut
he has long manifested a disposition
io want to visit Northern British
Columbia, and will likely take advantage of the opportunity to study conditions here.
government p.ws
HEAVY LOSS BY FIRE MONTREAL DEFEATED
Alberta Has lo Meet Interest Due on
Hallway Guarantee by Legislature
Five Men Lose Lives in. Interior of Prov- New Westminster Show That They Can
ince   Towns Are
Threatened
Lardo   and   New    Denver   Ace
populated as Precautionary
Measure
De-
(Special 10 The Journal)
.Nelson, July 19.—Five men ' are
dead as a result of forest fires in
ibis section. They took refuge from
the flames in the Lucky Jim mine
near Kaslo and were smothered in
one of the tunnels,
Women   and   children   have   been
removed from Lardo to New Denver
Defend Minto Cup Against
All Comers.
First Game   of   Series   Won  by tin
Famous Players of tbe Pacific
Coasl
The Minto Cup, according to indications, wili slay on the Pacific
Coasl. Saturday afternoon the New
Westminster lacrosse team met the
Montreal players in the first of the
pi ■ s. in series ami i ompletely demolished Ihe Visitors by a score of
lu   to   1.
About    20, i     people    witnessed
i io. game.   Th" match was no exhibition  ot easy  lacrosse,    (in  the con-
Edmonton, July 19.—Premier Sif-
ton has issued an order-in-council for
the payment ol' $185,000, the first
Instalment of interesl due on the Alberta and Great Waterways' railroad
bond of $740,000. The company de-
I'auldod in payment and the government has to assume the liabilities.
The bonds are five per cent, while
the government only receives Hire.,
and one-half per cent from the banks
(or the money, which was paid to
Hi"   Morgan   house   in   London.
He thoughl reports should come in to
the council in proper shape. II that
were not clone lie lid not feel like
taking (lie responsibility for the
work.
The communication of the city engineer was referred lo Hie water and
light  committee.
Ai lasi night'! meeting of the
council ihe report was presented, and
the cost was set forth. This was as
follows: —
Building coffer dam, Including weir
which will be later used In our
permanent construction, $1,250;
i. lit miles preliminary sun ey and
location, $1)110.25; board, etc., for full
party, $54(1.    Total, $2,75,0.25.
The   report   was  ado  ted   and
work will proceed with all haste
igm -'.   wit h   a   pat I)   of   sever
elghl     men    expi .i.-  to  he    on
ground  in i wo or three days.
■   "
.Mr.
or
the
the mailer again came up when  Ihe as a precautionary measure,    A large  It try the sticks of the players were
-i i. .as committee reported  thai  the
an
work  fixed
it I.   ai     '.''
iicns!   II
■ neer s report
' he   whole cost   of
600.
Aid. Pattullo f
heavy a charge a
concet tied.
Aid.   Hildltch,   however
hi.  had asked  ihe residents affected
and  I hey all favored  the work.
In view of lliis is was decided to
recommend that the work be undertaken as a work of local Improvement,    charging    the    whole    cosl   'Ire-fighting army,
was  io..
in operty
laid   thai
lighting   (lie  "■'"''   "''"'   telling  effect   throughout
ed   ii   was  only  by  the  most   watchful attention on the part of referees
1 l")i"1   W.   Iv   DItchburn   and   Lionel   Vorke
miles south of Movie and a point   Lbs    Ihe game was kepi  in order.
■  -  mile    south is a seething mass of      The  Westminsters showed  marked
i umber   of   men   are
I'larrtes in ihe district.
The entire forest   between
flames.  ■ Ail   the  employees  cm   the
afternoon   shifl   at   the   St.   Eugene
i    ...   Saturday were liberated for
ability in handling the ball and were
too S| ly for the easterners.
A.  Hamilton, of   Hie    Shamrocks,
id  his shoulder injured  by  rushing
of  fighting  tin.  names. 4„,„  ,!l(.  ,,.,      The  8i,0ulder   wn
■">   '" ' " w "r ""■ B nne in road   previously dislocated in Ihe east.
'    ■"  .   tig are members of the 0	
I,
SURPRISE PARTY
Methodist   Congregation   Make   Presentation to Ii. A. Woods
A pleasant surprise was sprung upon B. A. Woods and .Mrs. Woods cm
Ih Iday night as they were preparing
to attend i he weekly prari Ice of the
Methodist church choir, where .Mr.
Woods is ih.. organist, Th.' pastor
ami ;i number of the members of I lie
congregt at rii ed i t 1
look   possession   of   the   home      Tbe
congn ■   ' :"i' : ■ (1 '                        i ■ lie
n i unity of pn  ei   I       ■'       ' I
INCREASED WINNINGS
t Special to The Journal i
Bisley,   July    to.     The    total
winnings of Hie ('ai ■ .    i
this  year  was   £890,  as   compared   with   csao   I..-1   j■ at:
KAItLY  I'll
Talbot   House   Was
('oul'liiirriitfou
Tin
'hi-
■nteiied   Will
Morning
A   lit
ike oc  ,i;  an  early  hour
this   no.i ning   in   tic  Talbot   Ho
«hlch ■ .1    witli     very
slight loss.   The loss was mostly con-
l!(ll   IS TO CLOSK
against the properly fronting on  the       Forest fires have wrought Immense
improved street.
PHENOMENAL RUN
.1. P. Babcock on Hi
(Ions in Tills Section
damage to the districts surrounding Famous .Mine ul  liossliind Will  Distil,   Airmv Lakes.    Two million feel continue Operations
of  logs ai   Galena   Bay,  a   few  miles
'..nil of Halcyon have been destroy Rossland,   .Inly   19.    Managemenl
Fishing Condi-  ed,  a.-   w. II   as  the  camp  and   oilier ot'   the   well-Known   Le   Roi   mine  of
property  of  the  Arrowhead   Lumber Rossland has decided  to discontinue
Company, which is also the owner of operations     Indefinitely.     The  mine
win,   a   music  cnbinel   in   i ,'"",i  '" '">"   '°°'u.   although    some
in n   ognitlon ol          al       le '           'as don    in the garret  also,
and   occasion   was   taken   of  the   op- One   theory  of   ihe   fire   is   thai   it
portunlty .,    welcoming  Mrs.   A'oods darted m tin   garret.    An Invcsiiga-
to   ihe   city.     Mr.   ami   Mrs.   Woods linn Ii   being  made to ascertain  bow
w. I.. completely surprised.    A   thor- tbe lire originated,
ot    il)  enjoyabl g           pent The proprietor of the house has a
Wnong     those   present    were;    Wm fire fighting apparatus thai  is equal
o an) carried in the clt) by a private
uilding.
(Special to The Journal)
Victoria, July 19.—J, P. Babcock,
deputy fishery commissioner, is back
from the north. He says the salmon
tun in tite north is something
phenomenal. On the Skeena it is
greater than any of the old cannery
managers can  remember.
i lie Iocs thai  were burned.
Tic , ompaii) s loss will he % 1,000 -
io.ci ai least. While 'hi., is ihe largest
loss   susiiiiui.il   ther  are .Qjh_er__flr.es.
.   i       lliliel elll . ecl lotlS,        pail ii'lll.l! |)
around Burlon, so that the total loss
will be very heavy, especially if rain
does  not   come scion.
was dosed last year for a few
months, bul additional capital was
obtained and developmenl was recommenced,    Specimens of ore have
-ince heejl taken, bill the rosulls Wele
not  up to expectations and  Hie mine
Mar on, M.P.P., ami Mis. Manson, C.
it     Black     ami      .Mrs.   Black,   .1    Ca
mlchael,  !•'.   it.   Handsaker ami   Mrs ,,
Handsaker, i\ Button ami Mr-. But- The city council has endorsed tho
ton, Mrs. Dillman, Mrs. Proctor, Mrs recommendation of the fire and water
Rolnet,   J.   K.   Davey,  choir  master,  ,■ nltfec    thai   an   automobile  reel
'lev. ('.  C.  Perry, of Metlakatla,  II. and chemical engine combined should '
Berry,  \. !•'. Rowe, II. Clnperton and |)e  purchased  for the departmenl  at
Rev.  Chas.   R,  Sing,   pastor   of   the ■   of   ■''."      This    form     of
church. i rnenl   has   been   recommended,
 „ Thomas   Deasy  urging  ii   before   ho
C,    II.   Orme   lias   gone   east   on   a left  as the most suitable form of ap-
will be closed again in the course of  business trip, lie will be absent prob-   paratus   for   the   use   of   Prince   Ru-
the next few days. ably sis weeks. pert. THE   PRINCE  RUPERT   JOURNAL
Tuesday, July 19, 1910.
MANN GOES TO LAW
Process For Refining Ores Gives Trouble
Between Inventor and Railway
Man.
PEACE RIVER LANDS
Hudson's Hay Company Official Puts
It As  Richest i"  Canada
Works  Were to   Have   Been   Established at Portland Canal in Connection Willi Smelting Device
D. I>. .Mann, of Toronto, has begun
action to restrain the Island Smelting
and Refining company from disposing of processes or apparatus for the
reduction of mineral ores. The action is directed against lir. J. S.
Island, inventor of the process; W. A.
Brodie, W. P. Green, of Toronto, and
R. E. Southbick, of Port Hope, the
majority shareholders. It is said
Mr. Mann secured an option on the
process in May for $2,000,000.
Tills information has additional interest to residents of this section of
the country Inasmuch as the process
was intended to be applied to the
treatment of the ores of the Portland
Canal district.
For some time it has been known
that Mr. Mann had experiments In
progress in Toronto looking to the
ehiep treatment of ores such as are
found on his properties at Stewart
it was reported that the experiments
had been eminently successful up to
one ton lots and that now the inventors of the process were at work on
five ton lots.
The cost of treatment was, accord
Ing to report, to be reduced to about
$1 a ton, and Mr. Mann had In view
works at or near Stewart.
The announcement that trouble has
broken out may alter the arrangements.
 o	
IMPORTS EGGS
W. .1. McLean, who landed in York
Factory from Scotland, as an employee of the Hudson's Bay Company
in 1840, and who, with his family,
remained a prisoner in the hands of
Big Bear and his braves for over two
months during the Kiel rebellion, is
visiiing friends in the east.
.Mr. McLean says that between
Churchill and Nelson as a Hudson
j Bay port there can be no possible
hesitation in the choice of the former. Me has been at both places,
and declares that while there is
splendid water at Churchill, and
wharves can be constructed against
the solid rock, they will have to go
out twenty miles before deep water
can be obtained at Nelson. He has
been all over the route of the proposed railway from The Pas to
Churchill, and says that there are no
natural obstacles of any account in
the way of building the road.
As for the feasibility of navigating
the bay during four and a half
months of the year, there is, he
claims, no possible doubt. While ships
have been lost navigating those
waters, wrecks have also occurred in
the St. Lawrence.
Mr. McLean's opinion of the Peace
River country, a greater part of
which he has explored, is that it will
be the greatest mixed farming domain in all the Dominion.
 o	
RETIRES FROM ORSERVATORY
Canada Brings in More Than She Exports to Foreign Lands
According to Vice Consul General
P. Gorman, of Montreal, last year
the Dominion of Canada exported
552,850 dozen eggs, while there were
imported from the United States
Russia, China and Japan 1,136,120
dozen. It is estimated that with an
average of 76 birds per farm, or
60,000,000 for the whole of Canada
there would be a profit of $60,000,-
000 a year, which shows the great
importance of this industry. At pres
ent there are said to be less than
25,000,000 fowls in the country. In
fact, wheat and cheese appear to be
driving meat produce off the farms
PASSED  ENTRANCE
Successful Candidates at Examination
II. hi Here for High School Work
The result of the high school entrance examinations in what are
classified as rural schools has beei
announced at Victoria. Of a total of
321 candidates who wrote In these
eentres 156 were sucecssful. Margaret Gladys Wilson, of Belmont
3chool in the lower mainland, ranked
highest, obtaining 773 marks out ot
a possible 1,100.
The results for the Prince Rupert
centre were as follows: —
City of Prince Rupert
Number of candidates, seven;
passed, three.
Mary F. Currie, 651.
George A. Hunter,  641.
Muriel F.  Strathy,  62 8.
Non-municipal   Schools
Essington—Number of candidates,
six;   passed,  none.
The great glacier in Rainy Hollow,
near Haines, Alaska, is moving at
the rate of twelve feet a day. Huge
masses of Ice are falling with a
thunderous noise over the precipices
at Whose brink tbe glacier discharges.
TAXING LAND VALUES
Vernon City is Moving in Direction of
Exempting Improvements in
Levying Rates.
Arguments    Introduced    by    Mayor
Husband, of the Interior Centre,
In  Favor  of  Move-
Sir William Christie Severs Connec
tlon With Greenwich
There was an unwonted air of ex>
citement and bustle about the little
cluster of gardens and quaint old
courtyards and mosque-like cupolas
that crown Greenwich Hill, says a
London despatch. In general, the
famous observatory—the inside of
it at any rate—is about the most
peaceful self-contained spot to be
found within twenty miles of London. Strange though it may seem,
the Greenwich "observers" who hold
the world's pulse and time its heart
beats, are not even on the telephone!
On Saturday, however, there was a
great difference. In the first place it
was Visitation Day, when all sorts
of scientific, and not a few unscientific, people make an inspection of
the observatory. As always while
the official folk were listening in
solemn conclave to the astronomer
royal's report, the others drank
chocolate and munched biscuits, and
pretended to understand the astro-
graphic telescopes and other instruments, and really enjoyed the mere
toys like the wind-vanes and raln-
guages and mirror where one could
watch the clouds and see how fast
they went.
But this time there was a special
undercurrent of interest, for it was
Sir William Christie's farewell "at
home' 'as astronomer royal, this being his last year of office. After
thirty years of labor at Greenwich,
with his little band of over-worked
and tinder-paid assistants, Sir William is retiring in accordance with
regulations, at the age of 60.
To be sure he still seemed as vigorous to a press representative who
had a chat with him, as if he were
ten years younger at least. For
Greenwich breezes are nothing if not
healthy, and a hale old age has been
the unfailing lot of the eight astronomers royal since the Merry
Monarch established it in 1675.
Still, with science as with the episcopate, youth is the present-day
watchword, and on Saturday Sir
William rendered an account of his
stewardship. Both in his report and
in his talk, Sir William paid touching tribute to the "zeal and devotion"
of his distinguished staff, and their
"loyal co-operation in carrying on
and extending the work of the observatory.
At a recent meeting of the city
council of Vernon, Mayor Husband
left the chair and moved the following resolution: "That in the opinion
of this council, improvements should
be exempt from taxation, and that
taxes should be levied on land values
only, and that imemdiate steps be
taken to secure the opinion of the
ratepayers on the subject."
His worship In his argument in
favor of thlB principle made some
points that may be of special Interest In Prince Rupert at the present
time.    He said:
I wish at the outset to dissociate
myself from the theory of single tax
as regards national and provincial
taxation. I am not a follower of
Henry George His proposition was
that all taxes should be on land only,
while I think this is a right policy as
far as civic government is concerned, I do not think it should apply
beyond it.
I would lay it down as a principle
of municipal government that taxation should be as far as possible in
return for benefits conferred.
Now let us apply this principle to
the question of vacant and improved
property. Take two lots side by side
on the same street. One has a building on it; the other has not. Under
our present system one must "ay
a tax of say $100; the other $150.
Yet we have to make and keep in
repair the same amount of road past
each lot. We have to build and
maintain the same amount of sidewalk for each. We have to provide
the same amount of street lighting,
and not only this, but we have to lay
a water pipe at a certain price per
foot past this vacant lot which contributes no revenue to our water system to reach the lot with the building' on it.
The only possible exception for
which Improved property might be
called on to pay taxes which the vacant lot did not would be for fire
protection.
We have lately introduced into this
city what Is known as the local Improvement plan in connection with
our sewerage system and cement side
walks. In building our walks we
have arranged that each lot-owner
shall contribute according to the
amount of his frontage. He pays in
proportion for what he gets, no more
and no less, whether his land is vacant or improved. Now if this local
improvement plan is right, if Its
principle is just, so then is my plan
of equal taxation for improved and
unimproved property also just; for
the principle is identically the same.
Take another side of this question.
Our present system is a direct discouragement to the home maker. If
a man owns a vacant lot we only
tax him a certain amount, but as
soon as he shows a little enterprise
and helps to build up the city—and
the business of every merchant, mechanic and laborer in the city—by
building himself a home, we reward
him by taxing him extra for his enterprise. Not only does it discourage
home building in this direct way
but it discourages it in an Indirect
way in that by allowing the speculator or absentee owner to get off
lightly in the way of taxes ft encourages them to hold their land at
too high a price for the would-be
home builder to buy It.
Now let us look at the practical
effect,  it  would  have  in  Vernon.     It
would lessen the taxes on every im
proved lot in the city and increase
on every vacant lot. Leaving out
improvements our land assessment
this year is $1,082,950. It is calculated that a tax rate of 27 mills
will be necessary this year if levied
on the old plan and this will pro
duce about $39,000. To raise the
same amount on land only would require a rate of 37 or 38 mills. Now
this sounds very high, but it is only
sound and should frighten nobody.
Let us take our examples again. Two
lots on the same street each worth
$500 but one vacant, the other having a house worth a thousand dollars on It. The taxes for each would
he: Vacant lot, $19; improved lot,
$19; thus It will be seen the vacant
lot would pay about $5.50 more in
taxes and the improved lot would pay
$8 less as compared with the present
system.
An objection that has been urged
against this plan is that it would effect our borrowing powers. There
is nothing in this objection.
I think I have shown that it is the
only just and equitable method of
civic taxation. There is nothing in
it to alarm either us or the ratepayers, and all I ask is that after
having the matter properly placed
before them they be given a chance
to express an opinion on it.
All the other aldermen took part
in the discussion which ensued and
the matter was laid over to be reconsidered.
PROLONGED SALE
Rook Collection is Being Disposed of
At a Very Slow  Rate
An auction sale which has already
lasted nearly a quarter of a century
is still far from finished at Messrs.
Sotherby's, London.
. It is the sale of the most extensive
collection of ancient manuscripts in
the world—the "Bibliotheca Phll-
liplca"—to which Sir Thomas Phillips, who died forty pears ago, devoted a long life and a fortune of
$500,000.
The disposal of his vast library,
which packed bis country mansion,
Thirlestalne House, Cheltenham,
from the basement to attic, began In
1S86, and the sales will continue at
least another generation. Already
thirteen separate sales totalling nearly 16,000 lots have realized $225,-
000, and there have been several
sales by private treaty as well.
The French and German governments have brought in many national mantiscrips which Sir Thomas
Phillips acquired while ransacking
Europe for his unmatched collection.
Anything written on vellum, whatever its nature, was purchased by
this ececntrlc collector, who described himself as "a vello-maniac," and
gave any price that was asked for
old manuscripts. The account books
of kings and queens, the early records of ancient monastries, long-forgotten treaties between nations, and
the autograph poems of fourteenth
century bards were all eagerly
nought by him.
 o	
RETIRING  FROM HOUSE
Henniker  Heaton   Will    Not   Again
Contest Sent
iiiaiiiiniaiiiiiiiiiiiwiHiiiniiinniiHiniiniiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiMHinniniiHinaiBiiiiii^
HAYNOR BROS.      I
House Furnishers.
Located temporarily, since the Arc,  !
in Duneilin Block, corner of Second  I
      Avenue  and  Eighth  Street, at
Some snaps in slightly damaged   goods   which   we  want  to   clear  ■
out before moving into new quarters in Manson Blk., Third Ave.   g
FUNERAL  FURNISHERS
i
■9
Grand Trunk Pacific  Steamships
for VANCOUVER, VICTORIA, SEATTLE.
Connecting   with   Eastbound   Trains
"Prince Rupert" sails every Thursday, 8.30 p.m., and after July 25
"Prince   George"   sails   every Monday 8.30 p.m.
FOR STEWART:
"Prince Rupert" sails Wednesdays 8 p.m., and commencing July 24
"Prince  George"  sails  Sundays at 8 p.m.
Steamer for Port Simpson, Kincolith, and Masset, Sundays, 3 p.m.
For  Skldegate,  Queen Charlotte City,   and   other   Moresby Island
points, Wednesdays at 1 p.m.
Tickets, reservations and information   from
A. E. McMASTER
Freight and Passenger Agent, G. T. P. Wharf.
»♦»♦♦»♦♦■»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦■»♦♦
Henniker Heaton, M.P., the "unofficial postmaster-general," has announced that he will not offer himself for re-election when the present
parliament expires. Mr. Henniker
Heaton who has done so much In
the cause of cheap postage, has been
a member of parliament for twenty-
five years, and has arranged to celebrate his twenty-fifth year as M.P.
by continuing his subscription of
$125 for Christmas dinners for the
poor children of Canterbury forever,
or, in the terms of the deed, "while
the world lasts or the law allows."
t t
|   Skidegate News   |
i;» <j* ^. .j. «j. .j. .$. »;..*..;*.;*>;..£•.;.•;« .j..;. »;..*..;••*. .;.«g. »?.»;.*;.
(Special Correspondence to Journal)
Several refreshing showers have
fallen during the last few days.
Good progress is being made by
the gangs working on government
roads. Mr. Jennings, the man in
charge, is making a good showing.
Miss Hudson, principal of, and
Miss Deacon, teacher in Crosby Girls'
Home, Port Simpson, have been
spending a few days here with Mrs.
(Dr.)  Spencer.
Mr. Spreadborough, at present engaged in collecting specimens for the
Dominion museum, has already a fine
collection.
Rev. A. Caley lately arrived to take
charge of the work of the Methodist
church on the south end of Graham
Island.
The Gospel ship Homespun, Capt.
Oliver in charge, and Mr. Gibson,
evangelist, made her appearance a
week ago Friday. They spent Saturday and Sunday on the Inlet, then
proceeded south to all ports along
the east coast of Moresby and other
islands in the Queen Charlotte group,
after which they will proceed to the
mainland at Prince Rupert.
Mr. P. R. Kelly, who has had
charge of the Indian day school, has
been appointed missionary at Hartley
Bay, and will spend the fishing season at Rivers Inlet.
Several well known mining men
are here investigating mineral claims
in the vicinity of Skldegate.
Report says a wireless station will
soon be erected at or near Lawn
Hill, which will be much appreciated
by the public.
Mr. Haney, a prominent Vancouver
lawyer with Mrs. Haney are spending
holidays at Skidegate. People desiring a nice quiet place to spend a
short vacation will find it at Skidegate. Mr. Smith is an ideal landlord
and makes his guests very comfortable.
 o	
GONE TO  INTERIOR
LAND PURCHASE  NOTICES
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Violet Geiger,
of Victoria, B. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kltwancool or Chean Weln Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. W. corner and about 23% miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence south 80 chains, thence
east 40 chains, thence north 40
chains, thence east 40 chains, thence
north 40 chains, thence west 80
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 480 acres, more or
less. VIOLET GEIGER.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 7th,  1910. Jy8
Coast Land District—District of
Skeena.
TAKE NOTICE that Elijah
Rounds, of Victoria, B.C., occupation
Stewart, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted one-half mile north,
and one-half mile east, of Nettle A.
Lairds N. E. corner of application to
purchase, and 300 feet east of Ana-
ham Lake trail, marked E. R.'s
south-west corner, thence 40 chains
east, thence 40 chains north, thence
40 chains west, thence 40 chains
south to point of commencement,
and containing 160 acres, more or
less. ELIJAH  ROUNDS.
Vincent M.  Schibner, Agent.
Dated May 25, 1910. Jn2t
LAND   LEASE   NOTICE
Harry Howson Left by  Inlander on
Visit to Telkwa Coal Fields
Among those who made the trip
up the Skeena by the Inlander which
left Wednesday afternoon was Harry
Howson, the pioneer mining man In
the Telkwa district. He spent several
days in Prince Rupert before leaving for the interior.
Of this city and its future Mr.
Howson has no doubt.    He   Is    the
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that The Canadian
Fish & Cold Storage Company Ltd.,
of Vancouver, occupation Mercantile
and Manufacturing, intends to apply
for permission to lease the following described land:—Commencing at
a post planted at high water mark
on the westerly side of Prince Rupert Harbor and distant about 110
chains from the north-east corner of
Lot 443, thence west 20 chains,
thence south 20 chains, thence east
5 chains, more or less to high water
mark, thence following along the
high water mark to the point of commencement and containing 20 acres
more or less.
The Canadian Fish  and Cold
Storage Company, Limited,
J. H. Pillsbury, Agent.
Dated June 20th, 1910. Jyl2
kind who backs up his opinions in a
a practical way. He has invested In
Prince Rupert property to quite a
heavy extent and expects to reap
good returns from his investment.
At the present time Mr. Howson
will not remain long In the Interior.
He is going right through to Telkwa
where he has business to transact in
connection with coal claims. He will
return as quickly as possible and
will then proceed to Stewart where
he has made investments.
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«•
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<•
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'™r* 2nd Avenue and 6th Street Corner 2nd Avenue and 6th Street Corner 2nd Avenue and 6th Street Corner 2nd Avenue and 6th Street     t
We Are Busy Arranging Our 5c and 10c Tables
We have sold the bulk of some patterns of Dirmor Sets, and we are almost giving the rest away.      Just selling an article for 5c or 10c that may be worth as much as 40c or 50c.
"  IF YOU ARE SHORT OF ANYTHING IN THIS LINE IT WILL PAY YOU TO STOCK UP	
Bric-a-Brac
This is where we shine. There are Figures of many kinds. Vases,
in variety, I r cdiscent Glass Trays, Cups .Mugs, all of which we are
marking down.
REMEMBER
WE   ARti
COMPLETE   HOUSE   FURNISHERS
Glassware
We arc cuttlng^these on some lines  we  don't  intend  to  carry  and t
some broken sets. *
*
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+
*
There are WATER SETS and GOBLETS, and about 20 kinds of TUMBLERS.     We carry so many and sell them so cheap that you can't help but buy when you see them.
WE ARE CUTTING THE CUT GLASS DEPARTMENT.  —  WE OFFER CUT GLASS AT CUT PRICES
Opposite the Theatre   THE BIG FURNITURE STORE    Opposite the Theatre
. .> *;. .*« .;• •> .> »> »> * .> *j« »> -j. ■>> •> .;•.;. <■*■> .;. »;* <« »;* »> *♦< *** •*« •> *>.;..;«»;. ••*»:
:* * * •$• * ♦ * •:* ♦ * ♦ •> ♦ *> * * * * ♦ ♦♦♦ * * * * * * <">* ♦ * »> * * * *> *> ♦> * * * * * * * ** 4 4* * * * * * * »> * •> * * * * * * * * * * * * ♦ * * ♦ * * *' ♦* * * ♦ * * ♦ ♦ ♦ * * * * # *** * * * ♦ ♦ $ <• * $ * # Tuesday, July 12. 1910
PRINCE  RUPERT JOURNAL
LAND PURCHASE NOTICES
CiAXD  PURCHASE  NOTIOI
Skeena Laud District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Ethel Welsh,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation mar
ried woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
south-east corner and about 10 miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north SO chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence south 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to
point of commencement and containing 640 acres, more or less.
ETHEL WELSH.
James W. Smith, Agent
Dated June 1st, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Henry Welsh,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
printer, intends to apply foi permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Weln Valley.—
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. E. corner and 11 miles distant
in a north-westerly direction from
the north end of Kitwancool Lake,
thence north 80 chains, thence west
80 chains, thence south 80 chains,
thence east SO chains to point of
commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
HENRY  WELSH.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 2, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Frederick
Welsh, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation clerk, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-east corner about 11 miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence south 80 chains, thence
west 40 chains, thence north 80
chains, thence east 40 chains to
point of commencement, and containing 320 acres, more or less.
FREDERICK. WELSH.
James W. Smith, Agent
Dated June 2, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiai.
TAKE NOTICE that James Welsh,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation machinist, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. W. corner and about 12 miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the nortk end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence south 80 chains, thence
east 20 chains, thence north 80
chains, thence west 20 chains to the
point of commencement and containing 160 acres, more or less.
JAMES  WELSH.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated  June  2,   1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Marguerette
Burns, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission ..o purchase the
following described lands In the vicinity of Kltwancool or Chean Wein
Valley:-—Commencing at a post
planted at the N. E. corner and distant about 12 miles in a northwesterly direction from the north
end of Kitwancool Lake; thence
south 80 chains, thence west 20
chains, thence north 80 chains,
thence east 20 chains to point of
commencement, and containing 160
acres, more or less.
MARGUERETTE   BURNS.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 2, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Charles F.
Burns, of Moncton, New Brunswick,
occupation auditor, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Weln
Valley: — Commencing at a post
planted at the south-west corner and
about 12 miles distant in a northwesterly direction from the north
end of Kitwancool Lake; thence
north 80 chains, thence east 80
chains, thence south 80 chains,
thence west 80 chains to point of
commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
CHARLES  F.   BURNS.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated   June   2,   1910 Jy8
Skesna Lr.nd District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that John Cherry,
of Victoria, B. C, occupation mattress maker, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kit-
wancocl or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-east corner and about 14 miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence west 80 chains, thence
south 80 chains, thence east 80
chains, thence north 80 chains to
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
JOHN CHERRY.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 3,  1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
CcB-cSsi&r.
TAKE NOTICE that Brenton
Brown, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation insurance agent, intends to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands In ihe Vl-
vinity of the Kitwancool or Chean
Wein Valley:—Commencing at a
post planted at the north-east corner and about ten miles distant in
a north-westerly direction from the
north end of Kitwancool Lake,
thence south 80 chains, thence east
80 chains, thence north 80 chains,
thence west 80 chains to point ot
commencement, and containing 64 0
acres, more or less.
BRENTON BROWN.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 1,  1910. JyS
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Jessie Stead-
man, of Victoria, B. C, occupation
married woman, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following described lands, in the vicinity of
Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-east corner and about fi'A
miles distant in a north-westerly direction from the north end of Kitwancool Lake, thence south 80
chains; thence west 80 chains, thence
north SO chains, thence east 80
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 640 acres, more or
less. JESSIE STEADMAN.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated May  31,  1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassia
TAKE NOTICE that Bruce Older-
shaw, of Victoria, B. C, occupation
jeweller, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of the
Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at
the north-west corner and about 7 %
miles distant in a north-westerly direction from the north end of Kitwancool Lake; thence south 80
chains, thence east 40 chains, thence
north 80 chains, thence west 40
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 320 acres, more or
less. BRUCE OLDERSHAW.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated May  31,  1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Echo Dudgeon, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
assistant dentist, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of the
Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-east corner and about 7 %
miles distant in a north-westerly direction from the north end of Kitwancool Lake, thence south 80
chains, thence north 80 chains,
thence east SO chains to point of
commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
ECHO DUDGEON,
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated May 31, 1910. JyS
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that James Jar-
dine, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
merchant, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands In the vicinity of Kltwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. W. corner and about 13 miles distant In a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence south SO chains, thence
east 80 chains thence north 80
chains, thence west 80 chains to
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
JAMES JARDINE.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 2, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that John McDIar-
mld, of Lucknow, Ont., occupation
farmer, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands In the vicinity of the
Kltwancool or Chean Weln Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. W. corner and about 13 miles distant In a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kltwancool
Lake; thence north 80 chains, thence
east 40 chains, thence south 80
chains; thence west 40 chains to
point of commencement, and containing 320 acres.
JOHN   McDIARMID.
Skeena Land District—District of
Oct SSI 3,1*
TAKE NOTICE that William
Simpson, of Lindsay, Ont., occupation hotel-keeper, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of the Kitwancool or Chean Wein
Valley:—Commencing at a post
planted at the south-east corner and
about 7 % miles distant in a north
westerly direction from the north
end of Kitwancool Lake, thence
north 80 chains, thence west 80
chains, thence south SO chains,
thence east SO chains to point of
commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
WILLIAM SIMPSON.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated  May  31,  1910. JyS
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that George Ttitt,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation den-
ist, intends to apply for permission
o purchase the following described
lands in the vicinity of the Kltwancool or Cheiin Wein Valley:—Commencing at a post planted at the
north-east corner and about 8 %
miles distant in a north-westerly direction from the north end of Kitwancool Lake, thence south 40
chains, thence west 40 chains, thence
north 40 chains, thence east 40
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 640 acres, more or
less. GEORGE TUTT.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June  1,  1910. Jy8
LAND PURCHASE NOTICES
LAND PURCHASE NOTICES
,.\Mi PURCHASE  NOTICES
LAND
PURCHASE NOTICES
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that. Sarah Ward,
of Victoria, B. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. E. corner and about 22 miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north 80 chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence south 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or .ess.
SARAH WARD.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 6th, 1910 Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that George Mc-
Bain, of Vancouver, B. C., occupation
merchant, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands In the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. W. corner and about 26% miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kltwancool
Lake, thence north 80 chains, thence
east 80 chains, thence south 80
chains, thence west SO chains' to j
point of commencement, and contain-
tag 640 acres, more or less.
GEORGE McBAIN.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 8th, 1910. JyS
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Frederick
Tint, of Selkirk, Manitoba, occupation merchant, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
K. W. corner about 14 % miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north 4 0 chains, thence
east 40 chains, thence south 40
chains, thence west 40 chains to
point of commencement, and containing 160 acres, more or less.
FREDERICK   TUTT.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 3, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Pearl Caspell
of  Cayley,  Alberta,  occupation   married woman, intends to apply for per-
Skec na Land District—District of
CaBsiar.
TAKE NOTICE that John Grieve,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
agent, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following de-'mission lo purchase the folh n'lng described hinds In the vicinity of Kit- scribed lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wien Valley:— wancool or Chean Wein /alley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the Commencing at a post planted at the
S. E. corner and about 20 miles dis- ! X. E. corner and about 15% miles
tant in a north-westerly direction | distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool j from tbe north end of Kltwancool
Lake, thence north SO chains, thence Lake, thence south SO chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence south 80'west 40 chains, thence north 40
chains, thence east 80 chains to ichains, thence west 40 chains, thence
point of comemncement, and contain-,north 40 chains, thence east 80
ing 640 acres, more or less. [chains  to  point  of     commencement,
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Catherine
Welsh, of Vancouve., B. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein
Valley:—Commencing at a post
planted at the S. E. corner and about
17% miles distant in a north-westerly direction from the north end of
Kitwancool Lake, thence north 80
chains, thence west 80 chains, thence
south 80 chains, thence east 80
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 640 acres, more or
less. CATHERINE  WELSH.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 4, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
il Aflft 1 fl V
TAKE NOTICE that Henry Van
Wyck, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation hotel keeper, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Weln
Valley: — Commencing at a post
planted at the north-east corner and
about 20 miles distant in a northwesterly direction from the north end
of Kitwancool Lake, thence south 80
chains, thence west 80 chains, thence
north 80 chains, thence east 80
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 640 acres, more or
less. HENRY VAN WYCK.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated  June   6th,   1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Minnie Clarke
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
X. W. corner and about 28% miles
distant and in a north-westerly direction from the north end of Kitwancool Lake, thence south 40 chains
thence east 80 chains, thence north
4 0 chains, thence west 80 chains to
point of commencement and containing 320 acres, more or less.
MINNIE  CLARKE.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June  8th,  1910. Jy8
-District of
Skeena Land liistric-t
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that John Hender-
ofjson, of Vancouver, B.  C, occupation
agent,  intends  to  apply  for  permis-
Commencing at a post planted at the [s'on   to  purchase  the  following  de-
S.  E.  corner  and  about  15%   miles j scribed lands In  the vicinity of Kit-
m
¥2>
JOB PRINTING
LETTER HEADS ENVELOPES
BUSINESS CARDS
VISITING CARDS      STATEMENTS
m
Prince Rupert Journal
w
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Edward Cas
pell, of Cayley, Alberta, occupation
merchant, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of the
Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. W. corner and distant about 15%
miles in a north-westerly direction
from the .north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence south SO chains, thence
east 80 chains, thence north 80
chains, thence west 80 chains to
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
EDWARD CASPELL.
James W.  Smith, Agent.
Dated June 3, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Lome Thompson, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
dentist, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of the
Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:
Commencing at a post planted at the
south-west corner and about 8 %
miles distant in a north-westerly direction from the north end of Kitwancool Lake, thence north 80
chains, thence east 40 chains, thence
south 80 chains, thence west 40
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 320 acres, more or
less. LORNE THOMPSON.
., .  . a  u'. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 1,  1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles Gei-
ger, of Victoria, b. C, occupation
clerk, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Comemncing at a post planted at the
S. E. corner and about 19 miles distant In a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north 80 chains, thence
west  SO   chains,   thence    south     80
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Samuel John
McDiarmid, of Monarch, Alberta, oc
cupation farmer, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following described lands in the Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—Commencing at a post planted at the N.
E. corner and about 4% miles in a
north-westerly direction from the
north end of Kitwancool Lake,
thence south 80 chains, thence west
80 chains, thence north 80 chains,
thence east 80 chains to point of
commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
SAMUEL JOHN McDIARMID.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated May 31st, 1910. Jy8
JOHN GRIEVE.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 6th, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Leihi Cherry,
of Victoria, B. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of Kit
wancool
and  containing  480   acres,  more  or
less. PEARL CASPELL.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 3, 1910. jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Mary Brown,
of Vancouver, B.C., occupation married woman, Intends to apply for
permission to purchase the follow-
or Chean Wein Valley:—ling described lands in the vicinity ol
Commencing at a post planted at the j the Kitwancool or Chean Wein Val-
S. E. corner and about 21 miles dis- ley:—Commencing at a post planted
tant in a north-westerly direction at the North-east corner and about
from the north end of Kitwancool'ten miles distant in a north-westerly
Lake, thence north SO chains, thence j direction from the north end of tha
west SO  chains,    thence    south    80 ; Kitwancool  lake,   thence    south     80
chains, thence east SO chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 040 acres, more or less.
LE11II  CHERRY.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 6th, 1910. Jy8
-District of
Skeena Land District-
Cassiar.
TAKE    NOTICE    mat   Alfred   E.
Parkirigton, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation broke!', intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described   lands   in   the   vicinity
Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley
chains, thence west 4u chains, thenca
north to chains, thence west 4 0
chains, thence north 4 0 chains
thence east SO chains to point ol
commencement, and containing 480
acres, more or less.
MARY   BROWN.
James w. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 1,  1910. JyS
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north 80 chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence south 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
ALFRED E.  PARK1NGTON.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 3, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that George Williams, of Winnipeg, man., occupation
clerk, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool
or Chean Wein Valley:—Commencing at a post planted at the S. W.
corner and about 16% miles distant
in a north-westerly direction from
the north end of Kitwancool Lake,
thence north 40 chains, thence
east 40 chains, thence south 40
chains, thence west 40 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 160 acres, more or less.
GEORGE WILLIAMS.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 4,  1910. Jy8
wancool or Chean Wein Valley:
Commencing at a posl planted at the
S. .W corner and about 25 miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north SO chains, thence
east 40 chains, thence south 80
chains, thence west 80 chains to
point of commencement and containing 320 acres, more or less.
JOHN   HENDERSON.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 7th, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that John Reid,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
broker, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. W. corner and about 15% miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north 40 chains, thence
east 40 chains, thence south 40
chains, thence west 40 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 160 acres, more or less.
JOHN  REID.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated  June  3,   1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Laura Gordon
of Victoria, B. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—-
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. E. corner and about 18 miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence south 40 chains, thence
west 40 chains, thence north 40
chains, thence east 40 chains to tha
point of commencement, and containing 160 acres, more or less.
LAURA GORDON.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated  June   4,   1910. jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassia,.
TALE NOTICE that Thomas Sills,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation machinist, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Weln Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at tbe
N. W. corner and about 26% miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kltwancool
Lake, thence south 80 chains, thence
east    80    chains,    thence  north   80
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Grace Cess-
ford, of Victoria, B. C, occupation
married woman, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Walter Marke
of Toronto, Ont., occupation traveller, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool
or Chean Wein Valley:—Commencing at a post planted at the N. E.
corner and about 27% miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of kitwancool
Lake, thence south 80 chains, thence
west SO chains, thence north SO
chains, thence east 80 chains to the
point of commencement and containing 640 acres, more or less.
WALTER  MARKE.
James   M .  Smith,  Agent
Dated June 8th, 1910. Jy8
chains, thence east 80 chains to the  chains, thence west SO chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
CHARLES GIEGER.
James W.  Smith, Agent.
Dated June 4th, 1910. JyS
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
'I'A Kb: NOTICE that Sarah Cox,
of Monarch, Alberta, occupation married woman, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands in the Kltwancool or
Chean Wien Valley:—Commencing at
a post planted at the N. W. corner
and about 4 % miles distant In a
north-westerly direction from the
north end of Kltwancool Lake, theme
south 80 chains, thence east 80
chains, thence north 80 chains,
thence west 80 chains to point of
commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
SARAH COX.
James W. Smith, Agent
Dated May 31st, 1910.
Coast Land District—District of
Skeena.
TAKE NOTICE that I, George A.
Poole, of Prince Rupert, occupation
printer, intend to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted on the north-east shore
line of Smith Island, distant about
one mile south-east from Lot 38, and
marked "G. A. P.'s North-west Corner Post," thence 2 0 chains south,
thence 80 chains east, thence north
to shore line, thence following shore
line to point of commencement, con-
lining 160 acres, more or less.
GEORGE  ARTHUR  POOLE.
Dated Saturday, July 2, 1910.
(First Insertion July 3.)
oint of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
THOMAS SILLS.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 8th, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land  District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that William Wallace, of Toronto, Ont., occupation
insurance agent, intends to apply for
permission to purchase tin following
inscribed lands In Ihe vie.' lity of Kitwancool or Chean Welti Valley: —
Comencing at a post planted at the
N. E. corner and about 26% miles
distant in a north-westerly direct on
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence south 80 chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence north SO
chains, thence east 80 chains to the
point of commencement, containing
640 acres,  more or less.
WILLIAM  WALLACE.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated   June  Sth,   1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Richard
Howie, or Vancouver, 13. C, occupation.dentist, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described   lands   in   the   vicinity   of
N. E. corner and about 23 miles dis- j Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley: -
tant in a north-westerly direction Commencing at a post planted at the
from the north end of Kitwancool N. E. corner and about 24% miles
Lake, thence south 80 chains, thence j distant in a north-westerly    direction
from   the  north   end   of   Kitwancool
described   lands   in   the   vicinity   of
Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley
Commencing at a post planted at the
west 80 chains, thence north 80
chains, thence east SO chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres,  more or less.
GRACE CESSFORD.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 6th, 1910. JyS
-District of
Skeena Land  District-
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Henry  Hemming, of Victoria,  B.  C, occupation
hotel   keeper,   intends   lo   apply   for
permission to purchase tl.
Lake, thence south so chains, thenc.
west SO chains, thence north 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 040 acres, more or less.
RICHARD HOWIE.
James   W.   Smith,  Agent.
Dated  June  7th,   1910. JyS
Skeena Land  District-   District of
Cassiar.
TAKE     NOTICE     that    Saiidford
following   Burton,   of   Vancouver,   U.   C,   •jeeu-
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Annie Gowan,
of Victoria, B. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of Kltwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencng at a post planted at the
N. W. corner and about 23 miles distant In a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kltwancool
Lake; thence south 80 chains, thence
east 80 chains, thence north 80
chains, thence west 80 chains lo the
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
ANNIE GO WAX.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 7th, 1910. JyS
described lands in the vicinity of Kit- patlon mining engineer, intends t->
wancool or Chean Weln Valley:— apply for permission to purchase the
Commencing at a post planted at the following described lands in the vi-
N. E. corner and about 21 miles dis- ,clnlty of Kltwancool or Chean Wein
tant, in a north-westerly direction Valley:—Commencing at a post
from the north end or Kitwancool planted at tho N. e. corner and
Lake, thence south SO chains, thence 'about 23% miles distant In a northwest Su chains,    thence    north    80 ; westerly  direction  from   the    north
chains, thenc ast  so chains lo the  end of Kitwancool Lake, thence south
point of commencement, and contain- 80   chains,  thence   west   80   chains
ing 640 acres, more or less, thence north  SO chains, thence east
HENRY-   HEMMING.       80 chains to point of commencement
James W. Smith, Agent, j and   containing   640   acres,   more   or
Dated June 6th, 1910.
JyS
Skeena Land  District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE      NOTICE      that      Nelson
Gowen,  of   Victoria,   B.   C,   occupation mining engineer,  intends to ap
p'ly  for
less. SANDFORD  BURTON.
James W. Smith, Agent
Dated Juue 7th, 1910. Jy8
District of
Skeena Land  Dlstrict-
Casslar.
TAKE NOTICE that Norman Cle-
permission to purchase the'land, of Vancouver, B. C, occupa-
following described lands in the vi- tion printer, intends to apply for per-
cinity of Kitwancool or Chean Weln; mission to purchase the "following
Valley:—Commencing at a post |described lands In Hie vicinity of Kit-
planted at the N. E. corner and about wancool   or  Chean   Wein   Valley	
19 miles distant in the north-west- |Comencing at a post planted at the
erly direction from the north end of'S. E. corner and about 26% miles
Kitwancool Lake thence south 80 I distant in a north-westerly direction
chains, thence west 40 chains, thence from the north end of Kltwancool
north 4d chains, thence west 40 (Lake, thence north 80 chains, thence
chains, thence north -to chains, west 80 chains, thence south 80
thence enst 80 chains to point of chains, thence east Su chains to the
commencement, and containing 4^0 point of commencement, and contaiti-
acres, more or less. ing  610 acres,  more or less
NELSON   GOWEN. NORMAN   OLELAND
Jiinies W. Smith, Agent. James W. Smith
Dated June 4th,  1910. JyS       Dated June 8th,  1910.
Agent.
•.;-.;./,  -.M  ■:■■<    ---'"
'--■ PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Tuesday, July 19, i9i(J.
prince ttupcrt journal
«.
BROCK'S OPINION
Published t wice a week mi Tuesdays
and Fridays from tl dice of publication, Third Avenue near McBride Si.
Suliscription   i
ate    lei   am    point   in
i  i-    la. •--'. i \
of Canada, §3.00
ear; 1 ■» points outside
i year.
Adverl i-.i 11 u- ra
t- furnished on uppli-
oat inn.
i
i.  II.  NKLoON,
. UTI ut.
'i nesdaj.
lul:   r.i,   1910.
WISI
\ii\ k i;
Speaks in  Highest  Terms of Mineral
Indication   al   Stewart
The opinion of \V. II. Brock, director   (if   the   ge llOglCal   sill". . ;■   .1'   (' .:>
, - . , lative tci Stewart us a mining
centre Is regarded us an indication
thai there is assurance of a rich
camp.
Likening the re cenl gold dit
il   SI   van,  in   norl hern   British  Columbia, in un immense deposit of low
grade gold-bearing    ore    which  has
,   ule l In   'ii ead     II mine laska
onym   for  steady   pro    cti
Mr.   Brcck   has   gh en   the   ]
.' ue ei ' ah tilat id to offset
tatet    n Slewat t
-   ■ ion    which    had   b
Lilted io him.
Mr. Brock says that his official
"pinion of the dlstriel is shown by
the fad thai this spring he dispatcln d
u strong party, including two geologists of the regular staff of the
investors gel sound Investments and geological survey to study this parti-
fair returns for their money. Too cular country. He adds: "In fact, I
much optimism lends to wilclcal think it safe to say that while ii is
schemes, ending in loss. For iliis nol yel a proven or established mining camp,  it   is the most   promising
c-lWBMKBfflwrTrTiwqi^^  ||| |||||| |||||| |||      |   ||||B|ffl||f™^<»««WB^n»Kg,
II. A. Richardson, general manager " ' Bank ol No\ a Scot ia, t\ io
paid u -, isii in i in coasl a fi w daj a
ago, gave some sound advice while
in Vancouver relal lv< to the Intro-
duct Ion of foreign capital.
A point that Mr. Richardson emphasized was that, when foreign capital is broughl Into the country It is
the business man's duly  to see that
reason Mr, Richardson would like to
see the great amount of English
capital that is pouring into the country given the safest investments even
though the ret urns may be more
moderate.
Mr. Richardson considers that optimism is an admirable quality, but
it needs lo be backed up by enterprise and hard work. in a young
country possessing the unbounded
natural resources of British Colum-
bit it is hard work and not speculating and dreaming that is necessary
to produce results which bring to
to the individual and to the community alike the prosperity that is to be
had for the effort.
A lealure of Mr. Richardson's talk
in Vancouver was thai although it is
nearly twelve years since he was here
before he saw such marvellous
changes in the southern seaport. At
thai time Granville street was an
open thoroughfare on both sides and
the only buildings worth mentioning
were  on   Hustings  street.
It is acknowledged that the de-
velopmenl of Prince Ruperl niusi be
much faster than that of Vancouver
was for the earlier of those twelve
veins. What a change ten or twelve
ycuis will, therefore, make here!
Such an interview as that of Mr.
Richardson is calculated to awaken
residents of a city like Prince Ru-
pet i to tin vasl task : hal lies before
them io prepare the place for the
rush thai niusi come with a very few
years.
TREATY   WITH   JAPAN
dlstriel opened up In Hi ifish Columbia since tlio boom of n decad ago
in the southern part of the province.
Those, wlio came from England on
recent cable news and go up to
Stewarl will And, If nol a mountain
of gold, a disirict that is very attractive to the prospector, one in
which a number of promising properties are being vigorously developed
by modern machinery and one that
deserves thorough investigation.
"Strong intersts acting on expert
advice have invested large sums in
mining properties and arc building
a railroad from tidewater to their
prospects. The promising ground for
prospecting is not confined to the immediate neighborhood of Stewart,
bul extends north and south along
the inland border of the coast range
granite, furnishing still an ample
territory for extensive prospecting.
If close to transportation unci with
other .favorable conditions for cheap
mining such as are present along the
coast district, large low-grade ore
bodies may develop into very big and
Important mines.
"For instance, the Treadwell in
Alaska is a great mine, yel its ore
runs less than $2  per Ion and  forty
" c nl of iis gold is held in pyrite.
If a few Tr.eadwells can be developed
along inland border of coast range
granite, the most healthy mining
men will be able to survive disappointment and shock of explosion of
'mountain of gold' idea.''
Published  Twice a  Week
Third Avenue and McBride St.
In the development of a city or a district the newspaper plays a most important part. The Journal is prepared to take its full share in building up Prince Rupert
and giving publicity to the resources and riches of the country which is being opened
up by the G. T. I'., and of which the city must be the greal distributing centre. As a
means to litis end a special offer is made :
Advertisers
will find the Journal
the best publicity medium in the new B. C.
All eyes arc tit present
turned towards litis
part of the Province.
Keep your business before the public by advertising in the Journal. It will bring you
quick returns
Per     Year
You Can Aid
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some friends informed
us to the development
of Pri n ce Ruperl ?
Place their names on
the mailing list of the
Journal at the low subscription rate and keep
them interested i n
Canada's greatest port
on the Pacific,
During July a special rate of $1.50 for the year will be charged for the Journal.
Subscriptions must be received at the office of publication before July 30, in order that
advantage may be taken of this offer. This rate is applicable to subscribers outside
of Prince Rupert as well as residents of  the city.    Remember this is only  for July.
Subscribe early and take advantage of the low rate.
German  Says  Mikado  Will  Conclude
Alliance  With   Other  Countries
Professor Albrechl W'irtlit one of
the most prominent of Pan-German
politicians unci writers, is authority
for Ihe statement thai Japan will nol
renew her alliance with Britain when
the presenl treaty expires, but prob-I
ably will come Into the triple alliance
with  Get many. Austria and  Italy.
In discussion the matter, Professor
VVIrth said "Japan will not renew
her alliance with Britain. England
knows tin's anil is taking the necessary precautions to strengthen her
posil Ion in the Far East, She is enlarging and modernizing her Singapore fortifications.
"Japan is seeking other alliances
and has offered to come into the
triple alliance with Germany, Austria
unci Italy. She has also offered to
conclude a defensive and offeni Ive alliance with Turkey, and has suggested a quintuple league with Germany,
A ii -i i in, Italy, Turkey and hot. elf as
members.
'To prevent Germany's entrance
Into any sort of alliance with Japan,
Britain Is trying her best to patch
up all past differences with Germany."
Ii is an open secret thai utterances
on tin- part of Professor Wlrtb on
matters political are inspired by officials high in governmental service,
and on this accounl his words are
looked  upon as authoritative.
According to Prof, wirth, Japan's
Offers thus far have been tentative,
bul have been made officially, nevertheless. He declared Hun the negotiators    have    been    Vested    Willi    full
authority to conclude such an agreement.
 o	
Sir John   Murray,
MASONIC  OFFICERS
Tim
-   Elected
at Grand
to   Various   Posil1
Lodge ot   II.  !'.
At the meeting of the Grand
Lodge of British Columbia, A. l-\ &
A. M., he-id at Cranbrook, the following officers   vere elected:
Grand master B. Ii. Pan Victoria; deputy grand master, F. .1.
Burde, Vancouver; grand senior
warden, A. !!. Skey, Kamloops:
grand, junior warden, .1. M. Ruld,
Nanaimo; grand chaplain, U'-v II.
H. Fiennes-Cliuton, Vancouver; R. E.
Brett, re-elected grand secretary,
and ll. II. Watson, grand treasurer,
'ihe appointed stand lodge officers
mt Dlstriel deputy g-witi masters:
\'u I. A. H. Peterson; Mo 2, I. A
Lea; N'ci. 3, \Y. II. Ilayden; Xo. 4,
P F. McGregor: Xo. !i P. F. Mc-
Phee; No. tl, .1 Anderson. Xo T, It.
l: Plowman; No 8, M A Beale,
Xo. 9, G. L. lOas ■'brook- No. 10, A,
ii   Taylor.
Grand historian, W, A. i). Smith,
O. S. II., L. .1. Motid; (i .1. I)., I). M,
Manuel; C. D. of ('., \V"> Artley; O.
S of \V., II. Mc.'-ilium; ') M., R.obOl'1
iui,He, G, S. II.. H. .1. Ii- Forest; G.
I' . M. lliirr; <;. S„ A. F. Forbes, VV.
\V, Burke, J. Stewart, \V. V. Leonard, T. Henderson, L, T. Pollock;
G, T., T.  Marshall, Sr.
Eliza, the widow of Jack llaverly,
in his day chief <>f nil the minstrels,
died a few days ago in a Xew York
sanitarium, Eig!,; iveeks ago she
underwent an operation from which
she inner recovered. In a little uptown sion- where she sold materials
used by actors, Mrs. Haverly had
fought for an existence with a smiling persistence since her husband'!
a  distinguished death six years ago.    The actor folk
Scottish naturalist, has been in Ottawa atid has brought to the attention cd' the government tin- desirability of making a physical and
biological survey of the Great Lakes.
It is possible that he wil be asked
to do the work. Sir John will be
remembered as the naturalist on II.
lei.ic-d Colonel Haverly, and they
had two benefits for the widow, one
in ihis city and one in Chicago. At
one time Col. Jack owned fourteen
theatres and twenty-three road com.
panies and started on their careers
such men as Daniel Frohman, George
Evans  and   Primrose  and   West,  but
H. S. Challenger on Its world-famous those  were  palmy   days,  and   when
cruise of exploration of the physical the colonel died his wife and datigh-
and biological conditions of the great ter  found   they   had  to  make  their
ocean basins which lasted from  1872 own living.    Mrs.   Haverly was sixty
to 1 s71;.    nis home is in Edinburgh, years of age.
The New Viceroy
Sir Charles Hardinge, who has recently-been appointed viceroy of India in succession to Lord Minto, who
resigns next November, furnishes an
example of rapid promotion in the
diplomatic service seldom attained.
He arrives at the pinacle of diplomatic ambition at the age of 52, a record beaten only once before by Lord
Curzon, who became viceroy at 40.
But Sir Charles has spent many
years in the diplomatic service, having entered it at 22, when lie went
to Constantinople as attache, and
was lucky enough to come under the
notice of Lord Dulferin, then ambassador, who made him li is private secretary. Since then his promotion has
been rapid, and he has served in
nearly every capital of Europe and
Asia. From Constantinople he went
to Berlin and from there to Washington, where he received promotion
and became second secretary, and
acted us charge d'affaires for some
time. After Washington he returned to the near-east, serving at Solla
and Bucharest; went into the Far
East at Teheran for a while, and then
to St. Petersburg as secretary to the
embassy, lie also served a short
period as assistant under-secretary
of state at. the Foreign Office in London.
His brilliant abilities and the hard
work he put in at these various
places had already attracted the attention of his superiors, for the
young diploma! was one who was
never content with the mere perfunctory discharge of his duties, but took
every opportunity that came in his
way to get thoroughly acquainted
with the language, the manners and
customs, and the national problems
Of I lie people among whom lie lived.
In this way he became fluent in Turkish and Persian. To these accomplishments, he added Ihe attraction
of ii distinguished appearance and
ihe most' charming manners, and il
was chiefly owing to this art of being able to make himself pleasant
that the late king chose him to accompany him on Ills lour of the European cities which he made shortly
after his coronation with the object
■ lilishing a friendly fooling
with other nations. These experiences Sir Charles has published in a
book on King Edward's continental
tours.
His next appointment afforded him
an opportunity of displaying his powers, lie was sent back to St. Petersburg as ambassador, and whilst he
was there the famous Dogger bank
incident took place, when the Rus-
slon fleet on  Us way out to Japan
Bred on some English Ashing vessels
in the night, mistaking them, ii is
supposed for Japanese torpedo boats.
Excitement rau high at ihe time and
a difficult delicate task lay" before
the young ambassador. He not only
succeeded in relieving the strained
relations between tiie two nations,
but laid the foundations of an enduring friendship with Russia by assisting in the drafting and signing of the
subsequent Anglo-Russian agreement. It is these experiences both in
Persia and Russia and the advantages he has talctn of them that
make him peculiarly capable for his
new post, for they brought him In
contact with the weightiest issues
upon which the external politics of
India depend.
He was recalled from St. Petersburg In IDOfi, and was appointed
Permanent Under-Secretary for Foreign Affairs, the position lie now
holds. It is interesting to note that
his grandfather was Viceroy of India
from 1S44-47, after having served In
the Peninsular War. Another ancestor of his, the first Lord Hardinge
was thanked by Parliament' for his
services in India, and was granted
a pension of $16,000 a year.
Sir Charles Hardinge married in
1S90, the Hon. Winifred Sturt and
has two sons and a daughter who
has the curious first name of Diamond. Lady Hardinge, who was
Woman of the Bedchamber to Queen
Alexandria, is very beauliftil and a
line violinist; among her most treasured possessions is a Strad valued at
$4,000. She is an intimate rriend of
Queen Mary. One of her sons was
page of honor to King Edward, who
was his godfather and lie was chosen
as one of the playmates of the children of the present king.
 o	
In the far East the influence of
Rome has been little felt-—thai is, the
Influence of ancient Rome. There is a
desire among the cultured classes of
Japan to Introduce a new alphabet,
and lo abandon the difficult and ancient form of national writing.
Many literary men in Tokio have
formed a society with this intent.
The organ of the society Is known
as "The New Japanese School," and
It Is proposed to borrow twenty-four
letters of the Roman alphabet, to
which will he joined forty-seven simple signs and twenty-five accentuated. It is said that the proposed new
system has been very favorably received both by the learned and commercial world.
The elaborate funeral given King
Edward cost the nation $202,500, as
shown In the supplementary financial
estimates Issued today.
Parliament of Empire.
There was more than a spice of
constructive imperialism in m. address recently delivered by E. .1.
Duveen at Ihe Hampstead Conservatoire, says the Montreal Witness. He
touched on the dangers of imperial
disintegration which would result if
certain present tendencies continued unchecked, and expressed the belief that a solution of the difficulties would be found in the creation
of a dominating parliament of the
empire. He suggested that this imperial parliament might be composed
of members selected by each of the
parliaments of the self-governing
states, and would represent the different parties In each, India, the
crown colonies and the various dependencies would also be represented. The parliament would meet In
annual session In London. Its scope
would be limited to Imperial matters, such as naval and military and
foreign affairs, so far as they concerned the empire. Among other
(Itiestions which he considered could
be dealt with by Ibis imperial parliament would he (1) the commercial relations of Ihe empire to foreign countries; (2) treaty making
powers; (3) patent and copyright
legislation; (4) coinage and currency; (5) mail service; (II) fisheries; (7) bureau of trade statistics;
(S) naturaliaztion, and (9) emigration. Others besides Mr. Duveen hold
that some such Imperial federation
is the logical outcome of our empire's existence, and that as a side-
issue it would go far to solving t ho
vexed question of Irish home rule.
That the present imperial parliament is overburdened with work all
agree, and there is little doubt  thai
a  asure of local government  will
lie granted to Ireland, sooner or
later, either by a Unionist or a
Liberal government. Bul it is still
considered by many thai it would be
anomalous to grant such self-government to one member of the United
Kingdom without granting il lo
others. An imperial parlhimen1
however, would have to deal with
questions affecting our Hindoo fellow subjects, and our own flesh and
blood from the British Isles, not only
as they affected Canada, but as they
affected the empire. Tbe objections,
to that naval ideal of one fleet under
one flag, would also be necessarily
overruled, for questions of peace or
war would then be decided by the
voice of the empire speaking by its
chosen body of representatives. Such
an Imperial federation, say its
spokesmen, would, moreover, have a
great  Influence  In   maintaining  the
peace of the world, and could take
up many social questions thai can
only be adequately dealt with by a
broad  world-wide outlook.
Bul Mr. Duveen did not stop even
here. He proceeds to tack provisions
and qualifications on to his fine vision
which go fa-' to nullify its purpose
and to render it a poor, chattering
absurdity. Such an imperial parliament as lie suggests could, he says,
only proceed from an alliance based
on preferential agreements. "lie
ridiculed the suggestion: 'We are told
that the empire must not be saved
because preference, which is the only
means for bringing about this result, involved the abandonment of
free trade.' If free trade were incon-
slstent with closer imperial relations,
then away with free trade." As a
matter of fact, it is not Ihe free trade
of the Mother Country, but the exclu-
siveness of ihe unlilial daughter nations that hinder closer Imperial relal ions. Our mother's house has always been open to us, but the lease
move toward more hospitality to her
down by the party among us that
makes its boast of loyalty. Little
Colonials of one stripe or another,
and not Little Hnglanders, are the
real weakness of the empire—sacrl-
lic-e and service, and not selfishness,
has ever been the cement that has
knit ii together. We know the corruption and other evils engendered
by a protective tariff. We see it at
Its best or worst across the line.
Such a measure adopted by the Old
Country would cripple her foreign
trade, on which she ultimately depends, would inevitably plunge thousands over the border line of want
Into Hie pit of destitution, and
would postpone, perhaps forever, any
real measure of organized Imperial
unity,
SCHWENGERS MAT GO EAST
II. P. Schwengers, of Victoria, winner of the international championship at the recent Spokane tennis
tournament, has practically decided
to make a bid for the Middle West
and Western championship at the
forthcoming Chicago series. While
playing ai Spokane those who saw
him in action are said to have been
so favorably Impressed that they importuned him to try his luck In the
larger field, where he would have to
test his mettle against some real
stars. They encouraged him to believe that lie has the style and form
necessary for success. Schwengers
has almost made up his mind to take
this advice. If he goes he will leave
in a few days and will participate in
Chicago's tourney as the acknowledged representative of the Pacific
Northwest. !•'-**■■ nBWMMJ MMM »W«*K
1
Tuesday, July 19, 1910.
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Atlantic Steamship
 Agency	
Through tickets and excursion
rates to
England, France, Germany,
and all
Scandinavian Ports.
Call or write for rates to any
part  of   the  world.    I   am also
agent fop nil A rican steamers
to and from Prince Rupert;
Northern Pacific Railway; Alaska Pacific Express.
J. H. ROGERS
Genera] Steamship and Railway
Agent, Prince Rupert, B.C.
Canadian Pacific  R'y
Steamers leave Prince Rupert for Vuncouver,
Victoria, Scuttle
Princess Beatrice, every Monday at 1 p.m.
Princess May or Princess Royal
every Saturday morning.
Steamers leave Vancouver
Princess Beatrice every Thursday night.
Princess May or Princess Royal
every Saturday night tit 11
o'clock.
Fred Stork
General Hardware
...< Jomplete Line of...
VALVES
Pipe and Pipe Fittings
-Ik
Washington Cafe
A PLACE TO EAT
Seats For Ladies
Every tiling Clean and Tasty
Prices Reasonable
W. P. CARPENTER, PROPRIETOR
Second Avenue, near Seventh Street
Union Steamship Co'y
of B.C. Ltd.
The new Steel Passenger Steamer
"Camosun"
PRINCE RUPERT every Sunday ;it '.i a.m. for Vancouver,
arriving .Monday afternoon.
For Stewart City on arrival from
Vancouver Friday night.
Northbound, lca\'cs Vancouver
Wednesdays al 9 p.m.
Steerage Fare $5.00
The "Camosun" is the only steamer
on the run having water-tight bulkheads nnd double bottom, thus ensuring safety of passengers in case- of
collission or wreck.
J. H. ROGERS,   Ticket  Agent
HAYNOR   BROS.
FUNERAL   DIRECTORS
and
PROFESSIONAL  EM BALMERS
DR.  W.   II.  CLAYTON
DENTIST
—o—
Office   in    the    Westenhaver   Block,
Over  Orme's  Drug    Store.
Prince Rupert
W.M. S. IIA..L, L. D. S. D. D. S.
:-:    DENTIST   :-:
Crown and Bridge Work a specialty.
All dental operations skillfully
treated. Gas and local anaesthetics
administered for the painless extraction of teelb. Consultation free.
Offices: Rooms 10 and 20, Alder
Block, Prince Rupert.
.1. H. I'lLLSISl HY
CIVIL     E N G 1 N E E R
Surveying,   Designs,   Estimates,   etc.
Room   7,   Exchange   Block,
Corner  Third   Ave  and   Sixth   Street
Prince Rupert
G. W. NICKERSOX & CO.
—o—
CUSTOMS AMI MERCHANDISE
i—o—
Brokers, Forwarding Agents,
Storage,  etc.
.1.  W.  POTTER
ARCHITECT    AND    STRUCTURAL
ENGINEER
ite-inforcecl Concrete a Specially
—o—
Law-Butler Building - Prince Rupert
GRAHAM ISLAND — "Tbe surest
sign of the progress of a town or
district is its newspaper—live, active, bustling." "The Masset Review," Masset, Q.C.I.
♦ ♦♦■»■
;;The Thompson
;:Hardware Co.::
- Second Avenue-
Paints. General Hardware,
Oils, Stoves and Ranges.
Some Rock
Bottom
Prices
See Us For Investment
Rupert City Realty & Information Bureau, Ltd.
PRINCE RUPERT.
B.C.
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE
NOTICE is hereby given that the
reserve existing on Crown lands in
the vicinity of Babine Lake, situate
in Range 5, Coast District, notice of
which was published in the British
c olumbia Gazette, 'dated December
17, 190S, is cancelled In so far as
said reserve relates to lots numbered 1511), 1518, 1517, 1516, 1515,
1510, 1507, 150G, 1506A, 1503 1501,
1502, 1512, 1511, 1505, 1504, 1513,
1514, 1.509, 150S, 1530, 1527, 1528,
152!), 1531, 1532, 1533, 1534, 1535,
1537, 1539, 1536, 1538, 1540, 1541,
1544, 1543, 1545, 1546, 1542, 1547,
1548, 1549, 1550, 1520, 1521, 1522,
1523, 1524, 1525, 1526, and 1551.
ROBERT A. RENWICK,
Deputy Commissioner of Lands.
Lands Department,
Victoria, B. C, June 16th, 1910.
(First insertion July 5.)
FISHING   INDUSTRY
lContinued fioni Page One)
DISSOLUTION   OF   PARTNERSHIP
TAKE NOTICE thai the verbal
partnership heretofore subsisting between the undersigned, Arthur F.
Rowe who was to furnish the
Planer, and F. E. Cowcll who was to
furnish the Power, at the site of the
P>. C. Tie & Timber Company's saw
mill at Seal Cove, In the town of
Prince Rupert, B.C., has this day
been mutually dissolved, A. F. Rowe
collecting all accounts and paying
only expense of labor since installation  of   plant.
Dated this ninth day of July, 1910.
ARTHUR F. ROWE
FRED E.  COWELL.
Clarmont Rooms
Sixth Avenue near Pulton Street
Comfortable, Homelike Rooms; Newly Furnished Throughout; Bath
Rooms   with   Hoi   and
Cold Water
Rates, $3.00 a Week   anil   Upwards
ACCEPTS  SECRETARYSHIP
(buries Hnlsey Will Act us Manager
For  l-'ii-si   Exhibition   Here
Tin■ committee appointed to select
a permanent secretary for the fall
fair to be held here lias made choice
of Chas. iials.-.c. The duties connected witli the office were such that
Mr. Ilalsey had no desire to accept.
The committee, however, fell thai he
was the most suitable person and
persuaded him to take tbe office, lie
will give ln's whole time to Hie wo lit
for three months. Bis dulies will
practically be that of manager of
the show.
It has been decided to open the fair
which will be held tinder the Skeena
District Agricultural ft Industrial Association on September 20. It will
remain open  until September 22.
The exhibits will be forwarded as
far as that is possible to New Westminster  after  the  close  of  the  fair
ere.
 o	
Complete returns from all Manitoba constituencies show that tbe
government carried twenty-seven
seats and the opposition fourteen, a
gain of one seat for the Liberals.
water on the north-eastern section
of the peninsula which separates
Seal Cove from the main part of the
harbor.. The piles used are all gold
treated so as to ensure them against
the ravages of the toredo.
Extending westward from this
wharf on a solid rock foundation the
main building is to be erected. This
will be of reinforced concrete and
will be carried up at the start to a
height of four stories, li will be 145
feel in length extend Ing along the
wafer from and running back to a
de jit It of So feet.
Eventually the company intend to
extend  the wharfage facilities along
i lie full length of the works.
linilwny Spur
The tl. T. P. is fully alive to Hie
importance of the undertaking and
have already at work upon the site a
force of men clearing the riglit of
way for a spur tine directly in rear
of the site of Ihe building. This will
allow the transfer of the output
1 loin Hie cold storage directly to the
cars, thus doing away with all unnecessary handling.
While the company intend to do a
general cold storage business, accepting all lines of custom work, the
great work of the Institution will be
in connect ion with the fishing industry. According to the plans there
will be a capacity for the freezing of
about one hundred tons a day, while
the storage capacity will be about
6,000,000 pounds.
The intention is to utilize all the
fish taken and all the by products.
The company will have a limited
number of trawlers of their own engaged in the business, but they look
to fostering individual enterprise, and
will be prepared to lake care of all
the fish offered. In this way a large
Ashing community will spring up.
These men will own their own gear
and equipment and will at the
wharves of the cold storage company
receive returns for all tbe lisli they
have to offer.
The company will purchase these
and put them up In shape to meet
I lie demands of the market, and the
money paid for this will be put in
circulation In the city through the
medium of the fishermen.
Across the harbor a site will be
obtained where the company will establish a fertilizer plant for the nlt.il
ization of the fisn that are not food
fish. In tliis way all that can be
brought In will be taken care of. The
fertilizer plant will be built on the
most improved methods so'that there
will be no objectionable features to
it, tiiiil no nuisance will be created.
Through   Mr,   Starrett  and  others
the company lias the fullest Informa
Hon relative to the fisheries and the
•possibilities  of  develbpmenl   In  this
line that is obtainable!   The directors
are In no wise going in tbe dark.   I
is   years   ago   since   the   proposition
was taken up by those interested and
it was only after the very  fullest in
vestigations and the most careful nil
culations thai the plans as now under
way were agreed upon,
Unlimited Supply
The halibut hanks tributary to tin's
port are looked upon as Hie greatesl
in  the  world.    These have  I n  to
some extent exploited but with facilities for handling the product here at
the very centre of the trade the development slum Id be wonderful.
There are herring grounds in the vicinity of Prince Ruperl equal to (hose
found anywhere else in the world and
producing a lisli thai is fur superior
to the oilier herring found on tin's
coast. The cod fisheries are practically undeveloped and are said to
be probably the richest branch of the
Industry thai the north lias to offer.
The gray cod will be treated in the
usual ways known to the trade, bill
in addition to ibis there is the black
cod which so far lias been neglected
by Hie trade because the iiesi method
of treating ii   was    known.    The
black cod is pronounced to be a delicious lisli in a class all by llself and
the company is prepared to bundle II
catering m a high class market. It
is capable of mild curing and is sure
to find a ready market. The salmon
Industry is another source of rich
revenue. There is a large run of
spring salmon in these1 waters and by
the modern method of mild curing
the spring salmon is coining Into general  favor.
These are but sonic of the more
plentiful varieties of fisli in the
northern waters and when the company gels iii full running order they
will turn out an endless variety of
prepared lisli foods ready lo meet, any
and every demand of the market. The
cheaper varieties will be shipped to
the Orient while care will be taken
to cater to the most fastidious
of the trade.
Additions Already Planned
Later the company will put in
smoke houses of  Hie most approved
type and other equipment for the
curing of lisli.
The engine room of the plant  will
have two engines of 250 horse wer
each, so thai when in full working
order they will in- capable of generating 500 horse power. This will
give th.- necessary power for the
freezing and oilier processes required. 'I i - i , obability i.- thai oil « ill
be used as fuel.
The ing  will  be done on  the
first  if---  of the building, and  then T;"'n' W,U 1Ikely '"' """>r shlp ,iis
a sj   em oi elevators the p oducl   of   H"s   Erom   ""''   '!"""n   Charlottes
will  In   carried  to the high--.    1 e  later'
where i: will be maintained al whatever  temperature Is desired.
Tho plant, thai the companj In
stalling will be a greal cent I Ing
factor  In  the city.    It will  b a
. .> »> ♦;• •!•.;. »> •> *> <• *:- »:* »>
Marine News  of the Coast f
BROUGHT  TIES
The Bruno on her last trip from
.Masset last Saturday night, brought
alioni    8,000   li'-s   for   the   (1.   T.    P.
IIKXHIETTE  SAILS
vasl po] illation of Ashing full; who
will make their homes here. - , nlng
their li i iii,onii from the harvesl that
Hie waters of the sea within a wide
radius if this city lias to offer. The
investment Independent of the cold
storage pit hat is being Installed will lie a very heavy  i and the
revenues thai will be derived will
materially add to the city's wealth.
The industry in itself is one that
would support a flourishing city.
The work of installing the plant
and putting up the necessary buildings will cover a period of probably I
nearly two years. At present but a
small .staff is at work, but this will
be increased from time lo time as the
work progresses. The directors of
the company have the most unbound-
ing faith in the future of Prince Rupert as a fishing .centre, and have
their plans prepared for enlarging
what^ will in itself be an Immense
industry on the start.
Tin G, T. P. freighti r Het
('apt. Buckholtz, has gone south
again to take on hea\ j - at go for this
port. Tiie Henriette will reliei e the
Prince Ruperl and the Prince George
in  tlie  carrying  trade,
'.Il
OF   SCOTLAND   HERE
not  more  than   about
ibis port ai a  time.
three  day.-   in
TO ENFORCE LAWS
The sienni freighter Belie of Scotland, Capt. Nunman, reached port
last Friday afternoon from Sydney.
Cape lireton. She is now unloading
her cargo of steel rails and accessories for Hie C. T.  I'. at   ihe wharf.
The steamer brought 6,500 tons of
rails of which about 2,000 tons will
be- transferred later to the hulk Ivy
io be towed to Stewart for Mann's
short line.
The trip from Sydney was an uneventful one. Reaching this coast
she made her way up the outside passage to Hie north end of Vancouver
Island, when she headed for Hecate
Straits and  thus readied port.
LETTERS TO COUNCIL
Dr.  Spencer Did Not  Intend to (Jive
Oll'euci—Dr. .McNeill's Application
I'ili:   HENRIETTA   IS   BACK
The officers of the department of
marine and fisheries at Ottawa state
that tin- inn:- governing motor I iats
and other small crafl an- to be i Igidly
enforced. The law has been i In ro
Inn iln-n i ai in- ii little nei i . slty for
rigid enforcement, in Hie past
proprietors of yachts and other pleasure crafl haie been for He- most
part experienced sailors "j whom Hie
rules governing lakes, river and sea
-Me:', vessels have hec-n familiar, but
with tiie increase in tin- number of
unskilled nnd ignorant motor ' >at
owners, there is today mi 'be waters
of Canada a constant menaie to life
and property.
News is to hand thai i'. different
parts of the country n otor boat
owners have been taken into the
courts and fined for not obeying the
laws iii ihe matter of lights, foghorns, life-sa\ ing appliances, etc., and
several have been fined for speeding
on the canals and other narrow
waterways which the act governs in
this respect.
It is hoped by tin- department that
this section will lessen the number of
disasters which have been swelling
the death roll of late years.
 o	
LAWN  HILL WIRELESS
is I
P.
The  steamer  Henriette,   which
to do Hie freighting for the (I. T.
between    the   southern    poinis   i
this   port     arrived    here    again   on
Friday    afternoon    under    Hie   command   of   Captain   Otto   Buckholtz.
The   Henriette  lias been  thoroughly
overhauled and looks like a new ship.
She brought from the south about
S50 toils of general cargo for Prince
Rupert. As soon as she has dis-
charged the cargo here sin- will return to Vancouver and Victoria and
again take on heavy freight for here.
This is the trade in which she is to
be kept, thus relieving the passenger
siciunors Prince Ruperl anil Prince
George of the carrying of it. The
big steamers will carry only that
freight which requires quick discharge and is easily handled. I communication
The Henriette will probably spend ! world.
At the Saturday evening meeting
of the city council Dr. Spencer, superintendent of tite Local Option Campaign in British Columbia, wrote relative to the reported objection raised by Aid. Hildltch to Hie language
used in his letter to Hie council. Dr.
Silencer explained that no such moaning as had been ascribed to him had
been   in  his  thoughts.
The letter was received and  tiled.
Dr. McNeill wrote calling attention
to the fact that he had applied for
the position of medical health officer
some time ago and had expected his
application to have come before the
council when ihe mailer wan considered.
Aid. Naden said that when .Mr. McNeill filed his application it was In
reply to the advertisement when a
salary'of $150 a month was expected I Good Work by Department Prevents
Work will lie started this month
on the wireless station at Lawn Hill,
nd near Queen Charlootte City, Graham
island. The material for the work
has already been ordered ami Hie
work will be in charge of C. M. Mclntyre, construction engineer. It
Will probably take two mpntbs to
have tiie station in operation.
While Ibis station will in- usi ul
for shipping purposes it is being built
Chiefly for Hie purpose of linking up
thai part of the island with Hie rest'
of civilization. Ii is understood that
a telephone is to lie built to be operated in connection wiib ii. This will
do away with the Isolation which in
the past lias been the- chief drawback to life on the Queen Charlottes.
it will bring the settlers into direct
witli     the     oulside
'
FIRE   IN   BUSINESS   SECTION
to be paid. In view of the fact that
no application was put in later, he
did not understand that he was an
applicant.
It was decided so to Inform Or, .McNeill.
TIIE NEW OOINAG1
Head of King Will Look in Different
Direction From That on Old Coins
When the new coinage bearing the
head of King George conies to be
minted—it will not lie for some six
months yet—it will be found that
the head looks in a different direction
from that of tbei head of King Edward  on tiie coins now in  use.
This is in pursuance of a custom
which dales back lo the Stuarts. The
head of the sovereign, which all our
coins bear, is altered in position at
the beginning of every new reign. The
coin of Queen Victoria presented her
majesty's face as turned to the left.
I'be coins of tin- last reign presented
Hie right side of King Edward's face.
Those of King George will in turn
present  the left  side.
A notable tradition in connection
witli the coinage is that none Inn,
freshly minted money shall pass
through  the sovereign's hand.   This
a tradition nol always observed,
lint it is Interesting to record that
losts of King Edward al whose
louses be was in Ihe habit of playing a friendly game of bridge for
mall slakes always had a supply of
newly-mluted money for circulation
:i  'fie      eigc table,
 o	
Another .representative of Speyer
Bros., the well known bankers, has
been in Canada Inspecting the properties of the Dominion Steel Corporation. The inspection is understood
io have been highly satisfactory. As
tiie Spey.ers recently successfully
placed a large; issue of Dominion
Steel bonds among British Investors,
and In-fore doing so made an ex-
liausliee study of Hie plant, II is presumed that the latest investigation
means that tbe house contemplates
increasing its interest in the property, but nothing definitely is known.
In Ihe City police court this morii-
ng   Delmonte   Genlll    unci     George
Spread of Flames to other Parts
Local News
Early Monday morning the fire department was called upon lo liglii a
conflagration on Second avenue, The
lire was of such a character that the
department had little or no chance to
do anything but save surrounding
property.
The loss was fortunately inn  very as unlit  for food
heavy, being confined to three build
The expenditure up to June 30 on
the local telephone system has been
$22,939.76.
Dr. Reddle, the new medical health
officer of tiie city, began his work by
condemning 200 pounds of turkey received from Victoria to i«- destroyed
ings, the Scotch Bakery, valued ai
$2,000; Stockholm Hotel, valued
witli  contents at  over   $8,000,    and
A   moonlight  excursion   under  the
auspices of Class Xo.  7 of tin-  Presbyterian Sunday school  was given cm
Heiney's theatre under construction,  Friday night, the trip bi Ing made by
valued at $2,000. the steamer Hazelton.    Quite a num-
The  fire  broke    out    about     five  ber   l,,ok   advantage   of   the   oppor-
o'cloclt ,when  II. Hamblln, proprietorjtuulty   for  an   outing  which   proved
of the Scotch bakery was starting up  v,,''-v  enjoyable.     The  stet r   wenl
bis  work.     A   gasoline    pipe     burst   '"   Zanardi   Rapids  and   then   on   to
Inverness  Cannery,
stop was made.
spreading the flames rapidly in all
directions and severely burning .Mr.
I lainlilin.
lie gave the alarm, however, and
tiie department arrived early mi the
scene.
'I'be bakery was aflame before the
department reached tin- place, nnd
wiih tin- intense heal tin- Stockholm
quickly Ignited.
Several places near by   took    tire.
bin     by   judicious  work   Hie   flames  ferred     in   the
wen- confined almost  totally to the commit
three buildings, which reflects credil
upon   Hie  clepal tlllellt.
where   a     Bhor!
Tiie citizens committee which had
had charge of Hie sewer work on the
streets, has asked that tic- city take
over Hie work. API MclntJ re. who
was a  member of mtbal  committee,
explained ai the council n ting that
sn-ps bad b en taken to gel tle- sanction of tiie go\ eminent to i his.   After
.some discussion  tin- matter  was  re-
treets   and   property
Personals
Mis
Wynian,     of     Seattle,    w.-ll
Aid. Hildltch last night called the
attention of the council to th.- fact
that be bad been asked ley different
inrbiii ■ ■     ivhal   had  been  dune w It li
i '   i"  He-  city  hall   plans.     His
Worship said this hinged on the ques-
n'on of the -in . lie Inul expected an
answer from I Ion. W. .1   Bowser « hli
Ayers were each found guilty of selling liquor without licenses and fined
50.
known as Ho- lady who managed her reaped in the Market Place site bo-
own mines in Alaska, is paying a fore this. Aid. Barrow Miuu-Mnl
'.isii  io Prince Rupert. thai Hi.- plans would be suitable for
any site.    Aid   Mobley did  not  think
Miss Du Vernet, who has been on a thai there should be any ureal baste
visit  in  ihe East, has returned.    She in ihe matter, and Ihe math r was al-
is  accompanied   by   .Miss   Ruby  Sey- lowed  to stand,
iniiiii-,   who   will   spend   a   few   weeks o	
wiib  her here and   Miss Jennings  "I PROVINCE WINS TROPHY
Toronto,  who  will  be  Mi
net's guest   for some linn
Du
■r-
An
enjoyable dance was given  in of
A  despatch  from  Vienna, Austria,
tere Warburton  Pike is  in charge
iln-  provincial  government's  dis-
Mclntyre Hall last  week  in  honor of play  or  game,  etc-.,  says    two     gold
Miss   Seymour,    Miss   Jennings,   and medals   bave   been   awarded    to   the
.Miss  Du   Vernet,  by   their    friends. Canadian  Pacific   Railway for a cari-
Abotil     forty   couples wen-  present, lion  trophy  from  Cassiar,   B.C., and
Kaufman's   orchastra   furnished   ex- to the- British Columbia government
cellent   music and  the  floor  was in tor   the   best   collection   of  sporting
splendid  condition, trophies. PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Tuesday, July 12, 1910
THE SAILOR KING OF ENGLAND
"I feel when 1 go to a party as if I
was quite 'out of it.'. I know hardly
anyone." The speaker was Prince
George of Wales a few months before
his wedding. He had been so much
out of England, and had served so
thorough an apprenticeship to the sea
that he was almost a stranger in London society. Since then, however,
the Prince has had to remain hostly
at home, with all manner of duties
to discharge as Prince of Wales. And
yet, though he has taken up the burden, he has never real.y enjoyed social festivities, says the Winnipeg
Free Press.
When he was in Scotland, two or
three seasons ago, shooting and fishing to his heart's content, he said to
a friend: "This is what I like—this
grand heather, and a day in the open
air with a gun or a rod." King
confession. And yet, with the hereditary sense of duty strong in him,
he will put aside personal perferences
for a quiet country life, and will, I
prophesy, fulfil conscientiously and
with dignity the full round of a
Sovereign's heavy day's work.
King George has always been very
handy with the boxing gloves. When
he was a youngster he began to practise fisticuffs. A solemn member of
the House of Lords will remember a
hot fight In which the young Prince
was victorious. The peer, who was
rather older than King Edward's two
sons, was asked to spend the afternoon with the Princes. They played
at hiding in out-of-the-way parts of
the park. But the princes, in those
days, wanted always to win the game,
no matter what it was, and at last
Prince George challenged the young
nobleman to a match with fists. The
latter did his best, but Prince George
gave him a drubbing which has not
been forgotten to this day.
In the shooting lodge on the Balmoral estate there used to be kept
some pairs of boxing-gloves, and
King George enjoyed veiy much a
good stiff bout with some member
of his party.
Collects Stamps
Every stamp collector who call
himself proudly a philatelist knows
of the unique collection of stamps
which King George possesses. Of
course, he has had exceptional opportunities of getting stamps of
great rarity.
Here is a story which came under
my own observation, showing now
astute the King has been in adding
to his collection. A young clerk in
the city, becoming desirous of turning his stamps into money, advertised them for sale. He said they might
be examined at his lodgings. One
Saturday the clerk arrived to find a
gentleman waiting to see his collection. He showed them, and the gentleman chose several rare specimens,
and asked for a price. The clerk
agreed to a certain sum, which was
paid. The dull afternoon had not
revealed the purchaser; but as he
left the house the clerk was astonished to recognize the Prince of
Wales—our present King! The
Prince believes In doing things himself, and he had therefore come personally to inspect and buy these rare
postage stamps.
King George has always been impulsive, and this quality—not always a virtue in a ruler—has helped
him in his naval life. From boyhood he was intrepid, and this was
emphasized by the physical timidity
of his brother, the late Duke of
Clarence. One who knew them both
well says that Prince George was
always the first to leap off the ship
into the water, and often It was not
until Prince George was swimming In
the sea and chaffing his brother that
the latter would follow his example
and take the plunge. When the two
Princes were following the hounds
it was Prince George' pony that led
the way, and so it was with everything else. The King takes quick
decisions; makes rapid preferences,
and is still "the first to leap." Now
with added responsibilities, he will
probably be more cautious, though
his nature Is to act on impulse.
After  Dinner  Speech
King George, though he Is a capital talker on subjects which Interest
him, finds it far from easy lo speak
in public. When he was asked to
preside at a public dinner on behalf
of a hospital he was very anxious as
to his speech. He asked the Duke of
Cambridge how he managed, and the
old Duke—an experienced postprandial speaker.—said: "I have my
speech typewritten, hold it in my
hand, and refer to it when the moment comes." That did not appeal
to the Prince and to the amazement
of the Duke of Cambridge, who sat
near him at the dinner, the Prince
began his speech without any obvious
notes. The Duke bad a disconcerting
habit of Interjecting comments, and
soon they began. "Cone-cited boy!"
"Why didn't be do what I told him?"
"Self-sufficiency!" "Absurd!" "He'll
break down!" These and other far
from complimentary exclamations
were ejaculated by the veteran Duke.
Hut the Prince held on his way, and
his speech was quite a success. It
had been memorized, and was delivered without hesitation. The result of the dinner was a very large
list of donations. The Duke drove
off with the news to King Edward,
and told him how the Prince had
defied his advice. All three had a
hearty laugh about the affair.
I am able to give an interesting
incident with regard to the lamous
speech at the Guildhall by the P/ince
of Wales after his return  fioin his
tirement on the previous nigh'. Often he has accepted quite gaily the
appointment of leaving Waterloo or
Paddington by 7.30 a.m., and some
months ago 1 saw him flash by in a
special train which had left London
as early as half-past six o'clock. He
Is a martinet for punctuality, and
his subjects will not run any risk
of being kept waiting beyond the
time fixed for his public appearances.
Circle of Friends
King George has never had a large
circle of friends of his own age. His
life at sea prevented this, and after
his brother's death his public engagements were so heavy that he had little opportunity for cultivating many
plenty of literature on that difficult
problem. But he Is like King Edward in preferring to talk about
questions, or to hear them discussed in debate, rather than wade
through dull volumes or Blue Books.
In his boyhood he was taught to admire the genius of Mr. Gladstone and
the solid statesmanship of Lord
Salisbury. In his later years he has
studied at first hand the ideas of Mr.
Balfour, Mr. Asquith, Mr. Chamberlain, and the late Sir Henry Camp-
bell-Bannerman. His position as
Prince of Wales did not alotgether
prevent his expressiong—sometimes
in rather emphatic terms—his sympathies on certain questions.    Naval
In His Home
What a man is at home is a good
Index to his true character. King
George is happiest when, free from
State duties, he can have a merry
game with his lively little sons. The
Princess Royal is rather "grown-up"
and can be sarcastic about her
brother'n pranks. But all the King's
family are united in enjoying a
frolic. They can behave very gracefully in public, as visitors to Marlborough House garden-parties can
testify, but they like a game In the
garden better than such solemn
functions. In his boyhood King
George was a source of much
anxiety to his mother because of his
LAND PURCHASE NOTICES
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Phillip Williams, of Sydney, Nova Scotia, occupation accountant, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein
ley:—Commencing at a post planted
at the S. E. corner and about 16 Va
miles distant in a north-westerly direction from the north end of Kitwancool Lake, thence north 80
chains, thence west SO chains, thence
south 80 chains, thence east 80
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 640 acres, more or
less. PHILLIP WILLIAMS.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 4, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Annie Grieve,
of Victoria, B. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following, described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. W. corner, and about 17% miles
distant In a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence south 4 0 chains, thence
east 40 chains, thence south 40
chains, thence east 40 chains, thence
north 80 chains, thence west 80
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 4S0 acres, more or
less. ANNIE GRIEVE.
James W. Smith, Agent*
Dated June 4, 1910. Jy8
tour. The speech goes down to history by the phrase "Wake up, England!" which was the keynote of the
1'rlnce's oration. Halfway t'irough
the speech a telephone message was
sent to King Edward, by his special
desire, stating what a splendid reception had been accorded to the
Prince and Princess and how admirably he was speaking. The King
bad a paternal pride, which found
expression in this anxiety to know
how things were progressing at the
Guildhall.
King George retains from his
naval experiences a belief in early
rising. He finds it no hardship to
be up and about by half-past six in
Hie  morning,  even  after  a late  re-
friendships. He likes to talk to elderly men, by choice men who have
been in the Navy or Army. Famous
politicians interest him, but their
long speeches bore him sometimes,
and he has a sailor's dislike of round-
abount dialectics. "Why doesn't the
man say what he means and sit
down?" the King has been heard to
remark after a weary speech in Parliament.
During the last five years the King
has made a fairly close study of political questions of the day. He read
Mr. Sydney Buxton's excellent handbook giving in a clear fashion the arguments for and against most of the
debatable question. Tariff Reform
has interested him, and he has read
affairs in Parliament have always
been watched very closely by him,
and the "Little England" ideas of a
reduced Navy have been characterized in very strong terms by him at
private dinner-parties and elsewhere.
"I heard one day the most scorching criticism of a certain Peer's
speech," said a journalist in the
House of Lords to me. "I turned
round, wondering who on earth
would be saying such severe things,
and lo, it was the Prince of Wales!"
And that he Is King, we may be
quite sure that he will hold the
scales evenly between all politicians,
and that any personal predilections
will be kept in abeyance.
lively liking for pranks. He would
pinch one of his sisters when she
was sitting listening to some solemn
mayor at a foundation stone ceremony. And this habit of fun has descended to two of his sons, who have
great difficulty in controlling their
high spirits.
Some years ago the King taught
one of his sons a lesson in this way:
He was disobedient, and his father
said that, as a punishment, no salute
would be given to the Prince when
he went out. Now all King George's
sons love to acknowledge the salute,
and this was a terrible blow to the
young Prince's pride. He could hardly believe that his father meant It.
But, true enough, when he next quitted Marlborough House no salute was
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Reginald
Davey, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation machinist, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands, in the vicinity of
Kitwancool or Chean Weln Valley.—
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-west corner and about 6 M
miles distant in a north-westerly direction from the north end of Kitwancool Lake, thence south 80
chains, thence east SO chains, thence
north 40 chains, thence west 40
chains, thence north 40 chains,
chains, thence west 40 chains to a
point of commencement, and containing 480 acres  (more or less).
REGINALD   DAVEY.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated  May  30,  1910.     . Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
f^r\ nci o t*
TAKE NOTICE that John Cox, of
Monarch, Alberta, occupation farmer, Intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described
lands, situated in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Comencing at a post planted at the
north-west corner and about five and
one-quarter miles distant in a northwesterly direction from the north end
of Kitwancool Lake, thence 80
chainB south, thence 80 chains east,
thence 80 chains north, thence 80
chains west to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres,
more or less.
JOHN COX.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated  May 30,  1910. Jy5
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that James Alexander McDonald, of Monarch, Alberta, occupation farmer, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands, situated in
the Kitwancool or Chein Weln Valley:—Commencing at a post planted
at the N. E. corner about five and
one quarter miles distant in a northwesterly direction from the north
end of Kitwancool Lake, thence south
SO chains, thence west 80 chains,
thence north 80 chains, thence east
80 chains to point of commencement,
and containing 640 acres, more or
' ;ss.
JAMES ALEXANDER McDONALD
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated May 30, 1910. Jy5
accorded to him. His repentance
was very rapid, and then the salute
was resumed. It was exactly the
right way in which to affect the
youngster.
In the last few years King George
has done his best to relieve his father
of some of the heavy burdens of
State. He has gone hither and
thither, opening bridges, docks and
town halls, and all that was possible
in the way of Royalty's work. Though
no great lover of the turf, the King
has paid a few visits to race-meetings. Football he enjoys, so he has
often witnessed great matches.
Cricket, too, is interesting to him,
and to his sons, so he has often been
seen at Lord's and the Oval. His
correspondence has been very heavy
of late, but it has been dealt with
with a most business-like promptitude. The dinner-parties at Marlborough House have been pleasant
functions, for both host and hostess
are good conversationalists. Usually
the guests Included explorers, scientists, or artists, in addition to politicians. King George and Queen Mary
have been kind patrons of several
younger artists, sometimes sending
for their pictures when they have
been unable to visit galleries.
In conclusion, let me quote the
words of one who knows our King
and Queen well: "They will make a
fine pair." The prestige of the
Throne Is higher since King Edward
reigned—higher even than when
Queen Victoria was alive. The devout wish of every British subject is
that King George and his wife may
have a fair voyage in the ship of
State, and that the Empire's prosperity and happiness may be sustained In dignity and peace.
God Save the King! ii lunimiwmKmnafTMinTWWn-
Tuesday, July 19, 1916.
THE   PRINCE  RUPERT  JOURNAL
NEWS OF THE PROVINCE
Items of General Interest From Centres in British Columbia.
Recapture Convicts
New Westminster.—Both convicts
who recently escaped from tbe rro-
vincial penitentiary at New Westminster, are now back behind the
bars. The second of the men lost
his liberty when recaptured by Detectives O'Grady and Jewitt of the
Vancouver city police force at Hastings. Although the man had been
five days free, it was believed that
he had not yet dared to come to
Vancouver and was lurking In the
bush. The two detectives located
him In the neighborhood of the exhibition grounds, although he had
obtained a change of clothing from
some unknown source. The original
getaway was made while working in
the potato field of the penitentiary
grounds, but the first man was soon
caught.
The Clam Diggers
Vancouver.—"The Clam Diggers,"
is the name selected for a new organization to be composed of newspaper men, magazine writers, advertising writers, and all those connected in any way with the literary end
of journalism In Vancouver. Manager Rowe of the Tourist Association has had the matter under consideration for some time, believing
that a social club of this kind will
prove of great benefit, not only I
exploiting the opportunities of the
city and the whole of British Columbia, but be of material benefit to the
members in their daily routine work,
and in providing entertainment for
prominent journalists visiting Vancouver.
Quesnel.—The new road providing
through connection between Quesnel
and Fort George will be completed
this season, which will meet all actual demands as the river route
would in any case be utilized during
the summer for economic reasons.
John A. Fraser, M.P.P., says: "Road
gangs are working from both ends
on the Blackwater road. Five miles
at this end are completed. I am unable to say how much from the other
end has been finished but presume
about the same."
About thirty-five miles in all are
required to complete the connection.
The work Is in charge of Road Superintendent Malcolm McNiven, who in
view of the increased demand for
traffic facilities, deserted his other
work of supervision, laid out the
route personally and personally is
seeing that construction is rushed,
in execution of emphatic directions
from the minister.
m., in the court house. Word to this
effect has been received at the city
hall, and information was also given
out relative to the matters to come
before the commissioners for adjudication. All of these affect questions In dispute in and about Vancouver.
Fight Pictures
Vancouver.— A special meeting of
the police commissioners considered
the question of prohibiting the display of the Jeffries-Johnson fight
moving pictures. At the request of
the mayor and Commisisoners White
and Von Cramer, Mr. G. H. Cowan,
city solicitor, was on hand. After
consulting with the solicitor, the
commissioners concluded that they
had no jurisdiction to prevent the exhibition of the fight pictures, even if
they wished to do so. It was pointed
out that the city council issued licenses to the theatres and they might
possibly be dealt with in that way
or by a bylaw, but while the police
had power to see that the regulations
of the council were carried out, the
commissioners had no right in themselves to legislate against any particular class of moving pictures not
already pronounced upon by law. In
view of this the commissioners decided that they would take no action
in one way or another, and it now
seems to be left to the city council
to deal with.
Rig Scheme Planned
Kamloops.—After inspecting the
gypsum deposits at Grand Prairie,
Henry Pearce, who was accompanied
by Mr. Rear, of Vancouver on the
trip, returned from that section
thoroughly convinced that he has got
hold of the biggest gypsum deposit
In the world, one that will be able to
supplant all other other competing
sources for the manufacture of Portland cement.
This is Mr. Pearce's first visit to
British Columbia and he is amazed
at the potentialities of this section
of the province and has formulated
plans for the carryiing into effect of
several large projects, among which
are the opening of the gypsum deposits and the building of an electric railway f''nni Kamloops to Grand
Prairie, then to Vernon, down
Okanagan Lake, bringing this city
into direct touch with the extensive
rfuit growing areas of that district.
Serving as he did for some time
under the late Cecil Rhodes, he has
imbibed some of his grasp of great
possibilities and in this portion of
the province he sees scope for enterprises on a large scale that cannot
but when completed increase its population and wealth producing capabilities.
In his electric railway project, Mr.
Pearce sees a factor that will operate
as a feeder to both the Canadian
Northern and Canadian Pacific railways and the building by the former
of a railway to Okanagan lake from
this point will in no wise Interfere
with or militate against the plans he
has conceived.
Mr. Pearce has in view the harnessing of water power for the generation of electricity for the proposed
railway and for pumping water for
irrigation. "I saw lands that should
support hundreds where there are
only dozens. Thousands of acres of
land are crying for water. It can be
got and we propose to supply it."
Railway Commission
Vancouver.—The board of railway
commissioners will hold a sitting in
Vancouver on September 5, at 10 a.
Convent and Church Burned
Nanaimo.—The Roman Catholic
church and St. Ann's convent were
completely destroyed by fire, which
started in the wash room of the convent shortly after 5 o'clock on Monday of last week. The loss is $25,000.
There was only $3,000 insurance.
The flames were fanned by a strong
breeze. The water pressure being
lamentably weak, the firemen were
helpless. Forty orphans in the convent were rescued, though all their
belongings were destroyed.
Vancouver.—One of the most important seizures of opium made in the
port of Vancouver has just occurred
In the baggage shed on the C.P.R.
dock,. and the customs authorities
and the C.P.R. are working on the
case which opens up an entirely new
theory as to how opium is smuggled
into this country. Matters came to
head a few days ago when
Colonel Worsnop, surveyor of customs, and Mr. G. E. Graham, superintendent of the C. P. R. In Vancouver, were in conference. The seizure
consists of 140 cans, which are
valued at $2,800, and Customs Officer Cosgrove was the man who discovered them.
Last week a transfer rig took to
the baggage shed a Chinese camphor-
wood chest and the Celestial who accompanied it had It checked to Victoria. The check was issued, but
later Customs Officer Cosgrove decided to look through the box as the
rattle of cans could be heard when
it was moved. On opening the chest
a white sweater, the owner of which,
it is claimed, Is known, was found
wrapped around some cans and a
number of pillow slips marked "Em-
pres of Japan" contained the remainder of the opium which was in flve-
tael cans, valued at $20 each.
Customs officers have for a long
time been of the opinion that opium
which got past the watchmen on vessels was smuggled ashore in safety
owing to confederates on the deck
who knew the routine, and from this
seizure interesting resultB are expected. The opium found was to have
been sold in Victoria, but the methods employed in getting it to the capital were crude because any customs
officer would know that a camphor-
wook chest must have come off an
Orient steamer, and his official instincts being aroused a Bearch would
follow.
Change Office
Queen Charlotte City.—The office
of gold commissioner and mining
recorder hitherto maintained at Jed-
way, Moresby Island, and of which
Mr. Sandilands Is in charge, has by
a recent decision of the government
been transferred to Queen Charlotte
City, Skidegate district, Graham
Islands, Mr. Sandilands will remove
to the latter centre of official action
in the near future. In order that
mining men of the southern island
shall not be needlessly inconvenienced, Jedway remains a provincial police port, and Constable Walter Pres-
cott is also commissioned as deputy
mining recorder at that point. The
date for the opening of the gold commissioner's and mining recorder's offices at Stewart, which had been set
for July 15, has been postponed un
til August 1, in consequence of the
government agent, Mr. Conway, being on holiday terminable at the later date.
New Mining District
Victoria.—The provincial mineralogist, W. Fleet Robertson has left on
an important summer expedition
afield, his immediate destination being Tatlayoco Lake, at the northwestern corner of the Chilcotin country. At present this lake, lying a
little to the west of Chilco Lake, is
reached by a long detour westerly
through North Chilcotin from the old
Cariboo road. It is one object of the
mineralogist's trip to investigate the
feasibility and the desirability of having a shorter and better route provided by the construction of a road
direct from the head of Bute Inlet.
Clergy Protest
Vancouver.— Rev. Father Che-
rousse of Mission City, and Rev.
Father LeChesne, representing the
Roman Catholic clergy, have made
representation with reference to the
proposed gathering of Indians from
all parts of the province in Vancouver
during the approaching visit of Sir
Wilfrid Laurier. They request that
the civic authorities forbid the Indians to take any part in the reception if it was their intention to appear in native holiday costume of
furs, etc. The visitors said their
church had been endeavoring to free
the Indians from every trait of their
uncivilized days and their appearance on the occasion of the Premier's
visit in native holiday attire would
do much to undo this work.
When Earl Grey visited the city
some years ago Chief Joe Capllano
arranged for a gathering to greet the
Governor General here. Protest was
then made against the braves appearing In their "devil clothes," but
the civic authorities declined to in
terfere.
Smuggling Opium
Illegal Rebates
New Westminster. — Remarkable
disclosures have been made to the
city council by M. B. Cotsworth, city
auditor. Deficits to the amount of
$55,257 made up as follows: "City
taxes, $14,327"; "Lighting, $16,-
115"; "Water, $25,815," were
found. These are the amounts of
illegal rebates allowed and cover a
period of six years. Certain privi
leged parties would pay their taxes
six months, and sometimes a year;
after due, but would receive the cash
discount rebate. One instance of this
is when Messrs. Lewis & Fader were
allowed a rebate of $128 as though
they had paid $640 cash in August
1909, whereas the city did not receive
the money till December, 1909. During the year 1909 there were many
cases where receipts had been dated
August 18, whereas the money had
not been paid till months later. The
late treasurer will also be billed for
about $50 or $60 arrears on his own
electric light bill. There were many
instances of electric light bills being allowed to run for years where
the parties had a friend in the city
hall. There were also many cases,
says the auditor, where cheques were
handed in in payment of taxes so as
to secure the rebate, hut through
favoritism these were held for some
time, the city thus losing the interest
on them. Another matter brought
up by the auditor was the treasury
as a source of free loans, no less than
$1,333 being outstanding against
civic employees. The city has lost
in the neighborhood of $30,000 in
the last two years through tax sales
improperly conducted. Bills will be
made out and collected where possible for all Illegal rebates during
the past six years.
Fell Into Furnace
Grand Forks.—To fall into one of
the large furnaces at. the Granby
smelter, to be enveloped for an Instant by blue flames and sulphurous
fumes, and to emerge alive and practically uninjured, was the thrilling
experience of Jack Fealt, one of the
oldest furnacemen on the works. A
couple of severe burns on his wrists
and badly shattered nerves are tho
only evidences of his miraculous escape from  instant death.
Feak was working In front of his
furnace, when one of the electric
charge cars came along with a lnnd
of coke. Feak gave the signal to the
motorman to stop, and resumed his
work. The motorman, however, did
not see the signal, as the trolley ot
his car had pumped from the wire,
and at the time it was given he was
engaged in replacing the trolley. The
instant the trolley touched the wire
the car rushed into the furnace, carrying Feak before it. There were
several workmen around the furnace
when this exciting scene was being
enacted, and to their coolness and
rare presence of mind Feak un
doubtedly owes his life. The motor-
man, whe he realized what had occurred, reversed the lever, and before
the car had entered half way Into
the furnace, it shot out again with
lightning  speed.    Someone shut,  off
F.B. Deacon
Real Estate
WE ARE OFFERING SOME
SPECIAL SNAPS ON 8th
AVE, SECTION 5, ALSO IN
SECTION 7 AND 8.
INSURANCE
Life. Accident, Health and  Fire
See Us For Rates.
F. B. DEACON
OPEN EVENINGS
Centra Street
the blast of the furnace. The unfortunate Feak made a quick jump
and caught one of the rails on which
the car enters the furnace. As he
did so Bill Emard, who was standing by the side of the furnace, caught
hold of the man's arm, and with the
aid of another workman he was instantly pulled out of the furnace. All
these events happened in a second,
but when Feak landed on the feed
floor his hair was singed and his
clothes were ablaze. While in the
furnace he refrained from breathing.
Had he done so, the sulphurous
fumes would certainly have choked
him. With the exception of the burns
on his wrists, Feak suffered no bodily
injuries.
SCOn ACT CAMPAIGN
Views Differ as to Advisability of Move
in Introducing it Into
Province.
—THE—
Correspondent of Montreal Star Presents Case From Standpoint of
Opposition to Move
A special representative of the
Montreal Star sends to that independent and influential Canadian
journal an interesting analytical
reference to the recently inaugurated
campaign in this province for "local
option" in liquor traffic matters un
der the so-called "Scott Act," the
article In question containing food
for reflection by British Columbians
as well as touching upon certain
phases of the situation here which
have not heretofore invited public
comment.
"The Local Option League," says
the correspondence In question,
"now that the 'Canada Temperance
(Scott) Act' has quietly been so
amended at Ottawa by a classifying
of the British Columbia 'counties'
deflnition as to make It possible for
anti-liquor extremists to invoke it in
this Pacific province—has recently
inaugurated a campaign in direct antagonism to the adopted liquor traffic policy of the McBride Provincial
Government, and with such special
energy as to suggest to many, an
anti-Conservative partizan inspiration
back of this Scott Act movement.
"It will he recalleu that incidental
to the last provincial general elections, a plebiscite was taken to test
the feeling of British Columbia as a
whole as to the expediency of the
suggested adoption In and for this
province of the Local Option plan.
The Local Optlonists now say that
they desired no such plebiscite, but
rather desired the Government to
adopt the Local Option principle
without reference to the sovereign
people; and that they held as distinctly unfair the plebiscite condition, which was that more than fifty
per cent of the recorded poll for parliamentary members should also be
cast for Local Option to justify the
Government in abandonment of the
principles underlying the present
system.
"Be this contention as It may, the
Local Option League worked strenuously for a victory In and through
the plebiscite In question, pressed
constantly and keenly for every possible advantage in the count and recount, and then admitted in their
own published statements a defeat
by something between five hundred
and six hundred votes—with not unusual recriminations nnd charges of
unfairness in the rules under which
their battle had been fought and
lost.
"The growth of prohibition senti
ment throughout the country, as Indicated In the substantial closeness
of the plebiscite vote, was voluntarily accepted by the Government as
justification for the enactment of
much more rigorous iaw and regulations concerning, the liquor traffic;
and as a consequence, and after very
comprehensive study by the Attorney General (Hon W. J. Bowser) of
the contrasted liquor traffic laws
and systems throughout the civilized
world, an act was passed last session
which is perhaps the most practical,
and certainly the most drastic, on
any statute book In the British Empire. This will become a law of
British Columbia and strictly enforced from the 1st of August next.
Its sweeping provisions were received with amaze and consternation
by the trade—with corresponding
jubilation and approbation by practical and temperate reformers.
"Even Rev. Dr. Spencer, the leader
of the Local Optionists, felt constrained to write to Attorney General
Bowser congratulating him upon his
measure. It, therefore, has been a
general and almost complete surprise to find that the militant Pro
diibitionists in British Columbia
have not, as it had been expected
they would, been content In common
fairness to give the drastic new act
a working trial, but they have moved
meanwhile, without the knowledge
of the provincial authorities or of
the vast majority of British Columbians, to invoke the much-talked-of
Scott Act, concerning the practicability as well as the principle and
the expediency of which there certainly exist grave differences of opinion even among the most sincere and
active of Canadian temperance workers.
"At present the indications are
that action will soon be taken toward forcing a vote for and against
the Scott Act in such localities as in
the plebiscite vote displayed strong
prohibition-ward. To those who can
and do regard the matter dispassionately and fairly this is particularly to be regretted, primarily because
the principle of tair play suggests
that the new provincial act, should
be given an honest trial, and secondarily because in thus forcing a campaign against a distinct and long-
considered feature of Governmental
public policy, the Local Optionists
sink the humanitarian and benevolent characteristics of their propaganda by making the temperance
movement a distinctly partizan Issue in Provincial politics, from which
it lias heretofore been kept desirably
separate and distinct.
"There are other sound reasons
for general regret that the Local Optionists have been so ill advised to
adopt their present course—one being that the very first suggestion of
sin -cess which they may secure in the
new policy they have seen lit to
adopt, will mean destruction of uniformity and solidarity (and therefore of effectiveness for good) in
provincial control of the liquor traffic."
Oliver
Typewriter
—Fon—
Seventeen Cents a Day
Please read the headline over
again. Then its tremendous significance will dawn  upon you.
An Oliver Typewriter—the standard visible writer—the most highly
perfected typewriter on the market
—yours for 17  cents a day!
The typewriter whose conquest of
the commercial world is a matter of
business history—yours for 17 cents
a day!
The typewriter that is equipped
with scores of such conveniences as
"The Balance Shift"—"The Ruling
Device"—"The Double Release"—
"The Locomotive Base"—"The Automatic Spacer"—"The Automatic Tabulator"—"The Disappearing Indicator"—"The Adjustable Paper Fingers"—"The Scientific Condensed
Keyboard"—all
Yours For 17 Cents a Day
We announced this new sales plan
recently, just to feel the pulse of the
people. Simply a small cash payment—then 17 cents a day. That
is the plan in a nutshell.
The result has been such a deluge of applications for machines
that we are simply astounded.
The demand comes from people of
all classes, all ages, all occupations.
The majority of inquiries has
come from people of known financial
standing who were attracted by the
novelty of the proposition. An impressive demonstration of the Immense popularity of the Oliver Typewriter.
A startling confirmation of our belief that the Era of Universal Typewriting is at hand.
A Quarter o! a Million People are
Making Money With
Tljc.
DIVIDES  AGENCY
Owing to the opening of the country and the great extent of Babine
agency, for which R. E. Lorlng Is
agent, with headquarters at Hazelton, the territory has been divided
and a new agency created with headquarters at Fraser Lake. The change
will relieve Mr. Lorlng of about half
of his district and leave him the
watershed of the Skeena from Kitselas up, with the exception of the
southern end of Babine lake, the divisional point coming at Old Fort
about midway on the lake.
OLIVER
Typewriter
The Standard  Visible  Writer
The Oliver Typewriter Is a moneymaker, right from the word "go!" So
easy to run that beginners soon get
in the "expert" class. Earn as you
learn. Let the machine pay the 17
cents a day—and all above that Is
yours.
Wherever you are, there's work to
be done and money to be made by
using the Oliver. The business world
is calling for Oliver operators. There
are not enough to supply the demand.
Their salaries are considerably above
those of many classes of workers.
"An Oliver Typewriter in
Every  Home!"
That Is our battle cry today. We
have made the Oliver supreme In
usefulness and absolutely indispensable In business. Now comes the
conquest of tbe home.
The simplicity and strength of the
Oliver fit It for family use. It is becoming an important factor In Hie
home training of young people. An
educator as well as a money maker.
Our new selling plan puts the
Oliver on the threshold of every
home In America. Will you close
the door of your home or office on
this  remarkable  Oliver  opportunity?
Write for further details of our
easy offer and a free copy of the new
Oliver  catalogue.     Address;
R. C. BEAN
Prince Rupert Agent
General   Offices:    Oliver   Typewriter
Building,  Chicago, 111.
CANCELLATION  OF  RESERVE
NOTICE Is hereby given that the
reserve existing on Crown lands In
the vicinity of Babine Lake, and
situate in Cassiar District, notice of
which bearing date June 30th, 1009,
was published in the British Columbia Gazette, dated July 2nd, 1908, Is
cancelled,
ROBERT A. RENWICK,
Deputy Commissioner of Lands.
Lands Department,
Victoria, B. C, June 16th, 1910.
(First Insertion July 5.) THE PRINCE RUPERT journal
Tuesday, July 19, 1910.
THE RA TE IS FIXED
A T FIFTEEN MILLS
City Council Fully Discuss the Whole Question of Taxation and
Decide   to  Adopt  the  Report of the  Finance
Committee—How Money will be Spent.
c !oni ingencies
Light   and   Telephone
Supplying  temporary  lighting
sen Ice    •.-	
faking over 'phone system. .
Schools
city council has fixed the rate  Board  of prisoners   	
ition this year al  fifteen  mills  i niforms,      revolvers,       and
01 c   ill ir.   This is in accord with      equlpmenl    	
Hi-   -   poi    of the finance committee  Printing   	
whb h, after a full elisc-n-si. u  l>>   the
council in comml - of I in- wl in
S:.: urdaj i Iglt was endot sed by i he
m Drlt; ul the i nine ii. Aid. Smith
was i he only absent! ei i roi t the
in- i Ing. The main opposition
from Aid. N'aden, who favored lopping oil' all that could possil ly hi
take ii from the estimates and - -
iiu; - low ii o th low-
ile point.    Two large Items Salaries of teachers	
In the estimates met with his strenu-   'anitor   	
ens opposition.    These were the rote  '' "-'l   	
of $23, I for the city hall, and $25,- Secretary	
000 which stood In the name of the  i-1"11'   	
telephone.     The   latter   was   altc 	
from   the  telephone   to  general   con- singing   	
tingencies during the evening, it  be-  ' itting  up  hasemem  as gym
ing unlikely thai  tl j y will be      naslum and preparing play
required leu- telephone uses now that       ground   	
the petition of tin- necessary number ' !" !lli,al apparatus  	
or   ratepayers  has.been   filed.     The Contingencies  	
members of the finance committee
were of the; opinion that there would
be ii surplus carried over lor Hie next
council. It was argued also that
there were extraordinary expenditures [his year, Inasmuch us a good
300
! 50
500
$822
.;   5 0 0 U
2t	
$3 '"
1720
600
540
!HI
■ in
300
150
1500
IlMlll
{8010
Total    *l-ly^7o
in   the   foregoing  estimates   your
immlttee would  draw  Hie attention
part of the expenditure this year was of  the  council   io   the  difficulty  of
for  permanent   work  that  would relieve the council of next year.
Th.- estimates upon which t.he
commit i- c-   liased   iis   rate-   was   c-on-
tai 1  in a  re port   from  i he finance
committee, which read as follows: —
Gentlemen:—Your committee on
finance and assessmenl lugs to submit its estimate ol expenses leu- the
current  year, as follows: —
Finance and  Assessment
City  clerk anil  treasurer.
Assessor   	
Two stenographers        11
Accountant            7
Fuel and liglu	
Stationery    	
Rent of hall  	
Postage  	
Office furniture  	
Two typewriters	
Sal.-  	
Filing Cabinet   	
Opening books 	
Audil ing  hooks   	
Contingencies   	
City solicitor	
Contingencies, law dept. .
Salary,  mayor   	
Salary,  eight aldermen.,.
Interest  and  sinking  fund
$1050
S30
7 50
150
100
7 00
12 5
200
275
3 5 0
40
250
2 00
1000
1600
250
2000
3200
6500
20695
Street-. Works and Property
1500
1500
 10
Mainienanee of Sewers  	
Maiiilenaui     of  streets	
, i i    ueers  and  assist's
Supi l'- -   ..ml    equlpmenl   for
engim er 9  office   	
City  hall       23000
Building in- 11 ctor's salary. . .      1000
Conllngench -      1000
1600
arriving ai a very exact estimate in
any departmenl at this time. Inn ii is
He- opinion ol' your committee that
the estimates submitted cumin to be
available to meet Hie necessarily
heavy requirements of the city for
■ he year. To pun ide for these expenses your committee lias carefully
gone into the  matter of assessment.
The total  asi   ss in  on  land  in  the
city Is $ l 2,223,0 11, ami Hie total assessment on buildings is $497,965.
Your committee recommends thai an
a in.-in he levied em Hie land only
ut  the rate of fifteen  mills, withoul
any   add al   rate   for   schools   or
hospital purposes.
'I'lie  estimated   revenue    for     the
year is .made up as follows:
Fifteen mills on assess't. $183,345.61
Less rebate 1-0         30,557.60
Less rebate  Prov.  Govt.     10,000.00
$142,788.01
Estimate revenue water
rates, licenses, fines,
etc	
10,000.00
Estimated total revenue. 5152,788.01
Recapitulation
Total estimated receipts. $152,788.01
Tota] estimated expend..   148,870.00
Estimated surplus  ...$    3.91S.01
Going into committee of the whole
Fin
$49100
ami  Water
Water
Waterworks shop    $1000
Tools ami - quipment         300
Me ers            300
Salary, waterworks supt      1050
One- man at sun per month. . 840
One man al -> 105 per month. 735
El     neers,  ml iry and  wages
Stst ml  pipes   	
Co  ■ Ingencies	
Fire
Combination  hose and chemical   11       ■ 	
1 1 fi ■     hos -	
Ii ...   I,,,,  ii;in   	
- :'. 7 months. . .
-lei month .
! :-    -ai $25 month. . .
Fuel  and 	
Fuel   and   upkeep  auto
Chemicals   	
• lals   	
on Saturday night, Aid. Pattullo
moved Hint the report of the committee be adopted and a rate of lif-
teen mills on tbe dollar be struck as
the rate for the year.
His Worship seconded this motion.
Aid. Naden Opposes
Aid. Naden said that before the
motion was put an opportunity should
be allowed to go through the report
and If deemed necessary strike out
certain clauses.
This was agreed to, and Aid. Naden
took exception to $23,000 being allowed to stand for a city hall. He
did not think that this should be
taken out of current revenue. He
had made some investigations relative to Vancouver. In 1900 in that
city with the real property assessed
at $12,826,905, the net rate was 16 V2
mills. Vancouver had then a population   of  24,750.
The urea of the site in Prince Ruperl   was about   three  Square   miles.
while in Vancouver, while he did not
know   exactly   what   is   then   was,   ii
now was 21  square miles.    In  1900
1050   Vancouver   was  assessed     for     real
150   propertj  $ 18,000,000, with a net rati
150 of    20   mills,  the  population   being
50   1 00,     The fixing of the rale here
1000  at   15  mills would  lead  to the view
heing taken  that  the city was going
6000
moo
2000
$13225
!	
1100
:	
1050
L080
$15130  the pace a little too fast. He thought
Health,  Itellef and  License they   might   gei  easier.       There  was
M.H.O    salary    s    275  never in  the history of tie   world  a
Sanilarj   insp ctor's salary. .
Ri lief of indlgenl sick	
Ral exterm ins! or	
Cemetery	
Conl ingencies	
Police Departmenl
1'i'lii •■   magistrate    i
lat 1 of chief, seven months
Sain ry of four patrolmen and
jailer   	
Transportation of prist rs to
New   Westminster   	
Contingency,   acconnl   special
policemen   	
560   city starting at  such a rate.     He fell
Linn  'ley were going too fast and lie wisii-
250   ed   le  protest.     He  gave an   instance
600  of a city wilii which lie bad been i-nn-
I.". 1 led as an alderman.    By a policy
el  economy   thai   council   purchased
$4485   $20,000   worth   of  debentures  at   75
and   sold   them   again   in     a     year's
7011  Hiiie ai 96,    Everything unneci    .. .<
1050 should he cut out, he felt.   They were
spending  nearly  a   year's  revenue   in
2975   less than  half a  year,     lie  fell   thai
He-  financial   men   would  he  frlght-
750  c-ned  if they did  nut  proceed slowly.
1 le proposed, therefore, to si rike   \; I
lOOfi   Hi.- item of $23,00 for the city hall.
A Remarkable < ity
Aid.   Pattullo said  that   while  the
estimate was   mosl remarkable in
Hie history of 1 he wot Id, yel the sal
held in Vancouver was the most  remarkable in He- hls'ory of 1 he wot; '
He  pointed  out   1 hal   in   the  figure -
■ii  d   wiiii   re sped   :.i   Vancoui   -
wo nd P.- found 1 ".11 '■- hilo 1 he
c-ial burden was greater according to
populal "in. j el Hie calue pf the  pro
erty   in   Prince   Unpen   was  just   as
high as ii  was in  Vancouver at Hint
inn-.    Tin- borrowing of money might
in-   more  difficult   next   year  than   11
would   lie  this year.     While  the  city
council  had  nut   been   iii  office  long
yel   it  had to provide  I'm- 1 be Inco
ing council.    He did not  believe Hie
j taxation would lie found let week :::
hardship.
Aid. .Mobley called am miem in the
I'ae-i  that  (be net rate in  Prince '.'■
pert as  proposed   would  only  in-   12
mills   as   compared   with   16%   mills
which   was   cited   in   Vancouver   In
i 900,    1 ;,.  co 'in ii Has starting « lie
untiling this year.    There  was  -
ing u> go cm wlf ii.    Next year's
eil would mii have this to face,    li-
had tun found anywhere in the province  wlnre the rate was lower.
Maj or Stork pointed out tha; .-. i
the council acted I'm' only n pari of
He- year, Hie city had to refund
money to Victoria so thai in reality
the expenditure represented the
whole years expenditure. Tin- city
started off wii h the absolute exemi
Hem of improvements. The conditions here were extraordinary, a
rate of fifteen mills was phenonn :. ii
Vancouver was -O'j mills. The nut-
side pui,lie- expected something of Hie
kind.
Aid. Mclntyre felt that in view of
everything tin- rate was reasonable.
While till unnecessary expense should
be em down, lie would rather tun:
nvei- a surplus to Hie new council
than a deficit. Willi respect in the
comparison witli Vancouver, which
Aid. Naden made, it must be remembered that about that time what was
now valuable property in that city
was sold for taxes. He did not believe that. Hie assessment was too
high in any case.
Tin'   Year's   Rate
Aid. Barrow wanted to know what
the rate would be if the sums which
might be charged to capital account
were excluded.
Aid. Pattullo thought it would be
about ten mills.
Aid. Lynch felt that the money
lender upon going into the whole sit-
imtion woind find nothing to alarm
him. He did not think it would
alarm the capitalist if he found that
It was proposed to build a city hall
and pay for it out of the revenue of
the year, or to buy a telephone system in the same way. He felt it was
better to get the money while the
money market was in a suitable state.
Aid. Naden said if this included interest and sinking fund which it was
proposed to expend the rate was low.
But this was not the condition. Prince
Rupert was building on tiie future.
The actual value was not here. He
could not see why capital expenditure should be paid out of current
revenue. He doubled the right of the
city to pay for capital expenditure
out of current revenue. A city hall
did not need to be built out of cur-
re.111 revenue. He would rather have
a deficit than a surplus. It was human nature to spend freely as long
as the money was available. Many
cities in the interior were bankrupt
really because they had gone ahead
and spent too lavishly at the start.
He was not opposed to the expendi-
lure if it represented interest and
sinking fund. He was opposed to expending that $150,000 on current account. Money that had to he raised
lor water and telephone should not
be paid for out of current revenue.
He alluded to the fact that it seemed
likely that it seemed likely that the
fines imposed by the police magistrate for violation of the liquor act
promised to amount to as much as
Hie licenses would  have brought in.
Aid. Hilditch pointed out that in
i:inii Vancouver was far smaller in
area than it was at present, it was
therefore far less .nan twenty-one
square miles. He believed thai feu
square miles would cover the area.
Liquor lines Small
Aid. Mobley wished to correct an
Impression conveyed by Aid. Naden,
There had not been very large returns from these men fined for selling liquor, he said. The men escaped
or did not pay their fines.
Aid. Pattullo discovered that in
the case of Vancouver, while $160,-
000 was raised on Hie 16% mill rate,
there was, he found, $485,000 raised,
so Hint there must have been other
sources of revenue from local improvements and other sources.
Aid. Pattullo did not believe In
treating a council as a kindergarten
and allow for expending simply be-
cause there was money on hand.
Aid. Lynch pointed nut that while
,,,!s late provided for a considerable
sum, nil of it would not he expended
on current account really. Included In
it was the refund to the Victoria
Government, (he cost of fire equip-
.. etc. Next year there would
P.. the local Improvement rates coming in.
Ud. Xaelen's pioposal to strike out
   $23,000  for a city  ball  was  d0-
id, only Aid. Naden ami Aid. Barrow vming for Hie motion,
The Telephone Item
Aid. N'aden then proposed to strike
- 't     the    vote    of $25,000  for the
:  : -phone system.       The  people did j
•nit  want to pay for it out of current'
revenue, In- said.    It  should  he  paid
nut  of capital account.
Aid. Mobley said no member of ihe
board  expected  to  pay  for  this  out !
n  current  ic\ i-niie.     Ii  was a  handy
sum  to have in  the estimates,  however.    There was no reason why this
Oiould  te so expended.    There were
oilier ways in which money would lie
tequlred which had not been provided 1
let-,     if the sum was needed  it could 1
I .- expended, but il it were not need-
- 1 it would no! lie expended,
Aid. Pattullo was nut afraid of
'.living a surplus of $50,000. This
v 1 - .1 Inner year m raise the money
in   than  nexl  year would  1 e,
i< id.   Naden  saicl   thai   l "   Eel    1 hat
S50,000 more than  was needed  was
being  laisecl  by this rate.
Suggested 1 liniiue
Aid. Lynch did not qu'te li-te to
see this item in the estimates He
would rather see it nut even if the
rate was kept the same,
Aid. Mobley did not believe it
could In' -aid that tin- necessity had
passcvl for this under Hie head it appeared. It might look hener under
ihe head of contingency.
Aid.   Pattullo   Was   agreeable     to
changing Hie item lo c-onte under the|
betid of general contingency ami telephone  fund  raiher   than   telephone
fund.
The change was made:.
Aid. Naden proposed to strike out
Hie- item of  $1,000  for building  In-
<■•<«:.     He   thought   that   the   fire
chief  could  well  perform  the  duties
of that office as well as his own.
Aid. Pattullo recalled thai lie had
early proposed to join the duties of
lire chief and building inspector. That
was not acted upon. It was pointed
out that tiie building inspector could
do other duties in connection with
the work on the streets. This might
be found practical.
Building Inspector
Aid. Hilditch said that since the
appointment of the building inspector, that official bad done all the repairing on the streets. He did not
think that the fire chief could do the
Work satisfactory.
Aid. Naden wanted to know if $150
u month was not a high rate to pay a
man  for repairing streets.
Aid. Hilditch admitted it was, but
he said that soon there would be
plenty of other duties for him.
Aid. Naden said that this but bore
out what he said—the council had
gone too fast and the public- would
say so.
Tite proposal of Aid. Naden to
strike out the $1,000 for building inspector was lost.
The matter of the .police expenditure was introduced.
Aid. Mobley argued that tbe policemen were working longer hours than
they were required to work. There
were none to many policemen. Five
men were too few.
Aid. Naden argued that he had
shown where fifty per cent of the
proposed expenditures could be cut
off in reply to a statement of Aid.
Pattullo that this was the time to
show- where expenditure could be
saved.
Aid. Pattullo, in closing the debate
on the estimates in committee, paid
a compliment to Aid. Naden for the
valuable assistance he had given.
The committee thereupon adopted
tbe estimates and reported to the
council.
I
An inspection ol' our stuck
of I [ouse Furnishing'S will
convince you. For quality nnd
economy you will leave us a
satisfied customer.
Dining Room Furniture, Sideboards,
Buffets, Dining Tables, 6ft.
v and 8ft. Extension
rilling Room Chairs, Ouartered Oak with
Leather Seals, Golden or Early English
finish.  Prices ranging from
i
i
i
i
I
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
e
i
i
i
i
i
i
$22.50 to $50   £
Just Received a
SSlaof   Wicker Chairs and Rockers
I
Iron Deds, Springs and
Mattresses, all sizes
WINDOW BLINDS
Manufactured here to lit any
window   up   in  10  feel   wide.
Tapestry and Lace Curtains,
Poles and Trimmings
Special orders for Upholstering
of any kind.
fe   it""
\>iA.. '     -   '
GEO. D. TITE,
3rd Ave,
1
I
I
| SHERWIN& WILLIAMS
m
1
M COVER THE EARTH.
ipj WE   ABE   SOLI-:   AGENTS
0 CARLOAD JUST ARRIVED
0
0 Ready Mixed Paints,
| Paints Ground in Oil,
0 Paints Ground in Japan,
[§ Varnishes, Shellac, etc.
Water Stains
and
Decotint
IX ALL COLORS
M  Prince Rupert Hardware & Supply  j§
0        Company, Ltd.   ™os. dunn, m*.
H
00000000000000000000000!^
 0	
WILL  STAND TRIAL
Core
tier's. Jury   Find  That  .Tnpane
Acted  in  Self-defence
The Westholme i
Lumber Company, Ld. b
We carry the largest stools of tg^?
Building Supplies in the North. [es£
Quotations given on short notice in all lines. [g&
Rough and Dressed Lumber B
Shingles and Lath g
Mouldings and Cases ||
Doors and Windows ||
We handle Plaster and Lime at reasonable prices
Gel our quotations Cor alijjclasses of buildings.
OFFICE AND
WAEEHOUSES
Wadakabl, the Japanese who stabbed a fellow countryman, K'inasalcl,
at .ledway, has been taken south to
stand bis trial. He went in charge of
Chief Provincial Constable Campbell
of Vancouver, who was taking sonic
other prisoners south.
The result of the inquest held by
.1. 11. McMullin ni Jedway on Friday
was the bringing in of a verdict by
lie coroner's jury that while the
death of Kawasaki was at the hands
of Wadakabl, yet the latter was justified, having acted in self-defence.
The evidence went to show that
Kawaski was Intoxicated, lie went
to the Japanese camp with on ax
looking for trouble. Wadakabl was
pulled out of bis bunk and struck.
A light ensued and Wadakabl used a
knife. There were; several small
wounds about the abdomen ami one
in the back which caused death, the
left lung having been punctured.
FIRST AVENUE
«ilHliPfe;
"The Lake of Blood," the Unfit
sea near Lucerne, lias assumed Its
sanguinary color this season, after
many years, owing to the presence of
a seaweed, which is rarely found in
the Alps. Tbe peasants will not visit
the lake and have ordered their
children not to look al It, as they
believe misfortune Is sure to follow
Whenever this lake becomes red, it
is said, it is predicted that before
the end of this year a war will break
out somewhere in the world.
—^LADYSMITH—
COAL
H. B. ROCHESTER,   -   Centre Street
LAND PURCHASE XOTICKS
Skeena I.and District—Dlstriel of
Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that The Canadian
Pish and Cold Storage Company, ot
Vancouver, it. C, occupation mercantile and manufacturing, intends
to apply Cor permission to purchase
lite following described lands: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-east corner of lot 34, Range 5,
Const District, thence south 20
chains, thence east 40 chains, thence
north 25 chains more or less to the
shore line, thence following along
the shore line to tbe point of commencement and containing 90 acres,
more or less.
The  Canadian   Pish   &  Cold
Storage Company Limited.
J. 11. Plllsbury, Agent.
Dated July 14, 1910. Jyl9

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