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Prince Rupert Journal May 2, 1911

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 New Wellin|ton
Coal
is the best
SOGERS & BUCK
Sole Agents
Prince ftopj^i
/U
High Class
Job Printing
in ail Lines
VOLUME 1
Published Twice a Week.
PRINCE  RUPERT,  B.  C, TUESDAY, MAY  2,  1911.
Price,  Five  Cents.
No.  92.
THE WEARING DOWN
PROCESS IN HOUSE
Liberal Supporters of the Government at Ottawa Will
Cut off Speech Making on Reciprocity and Pursue
a Policy of Allowing Opposition to do
all the Talking.
(Special to The Journal)
OTTAWA, May 2.—Whatever
may be the outcome of the political
ituation, theres was nothing In the
house proceedings yesterday to indicate the eventual attitude of the two
parties. The debate on the reciprocity pact was resumed in the afternoon by Mr, Nantel, Nationalist, who
spoke in opposition to the agreement.
He was followed by  Mr. Turriff,
on the other side, nad the third and
last speech of the sitting was by
Mr. Sharpe, of Lisgar, Manitoba,
who replied with a contradiction to
Mr. Turriff's assertion that the
western provinces were overwhelmingly in favor of reciprocity.
Alphonse Verville (Labor Liberal)  endorsed the agreement.
It is said that, after one more Liberal has spoken the government will
allow the opposition to carry on the
discussion unopposed and that then
the wearing down process will begin.
POLICE    BARTERS
New Temporary Building Will Be Erected
on Government Grounds to Serve
Immediate Needs.
Place  Used at Present us Station Is
Inadequate und Will lie
Vacated
EXTEND RAILWAYS
Ottawa Government  Will  Proceed  at
Once With Hudson Bay
Road.
Intercolonial   Is  Also  to Be Carried
Further Through New Brunswick oiul Nova Scotia
(Special to The Journal)
OTTAWA, May 2.—The Liberal
caucus yesterday decided to proceed
immediately with the construction ot
the Hudson's Bay railway and like-
wlse adopt a progressive policy with
regard to the extension of the Intercolonial Railway in the Maritime
provinces by the purchase and construction of additional branch lines
to the system in New Brunswick
and by the construction of two lines
in Nova Scotia.
Details will be announced by the
department of railways shortly.
ON SUSPENDED SENTENCE
Woman  Convicted  of  Opium  Being
Used in Her Rooms, Allowed
to Go on Good Itehaviour
Gypsy Hamilton was convicted
this morning of keeping a resort
where opium was used and fined
$10 and cost and sentenced to 30
days in jail, sentence being suspended on her maintaining good behaviour. The evidence of the woman in
defence, given yesterday, was that
she did not own an opium pipe.
She maintained that Mae Adams
brought the pipe in from her place.
She denied that she was a user of
opium or allowed lis use in her place
habitually.
 o	
The assessor having asked for a
definition as to what constitutes a
cabin in collecting water rents, the
streets committee of the city council have had the question referred to
them.
 o	
A. D. Macfarlane', student-at-law,
who has been In L. W. Patmore's
offic for some time, left on Sunday
morning for the soutli. He will continue his studies In either Victoria
or Vancouver in preparation for hla
final examination next year.
ELECTION DAY FIXED
Aid.  Pattullo's Resignation  Has Been
Accepted by the City
Council.
W. 3. Alder Is to Re Asked by Citizens to Allow His Name to Go
into Nomination
The resignation of Aid. Pattullo
was accepted at a meting of the city
council last night. The election i>f
a new alderman for Ward 2 will bo
held next week. Nomination is set
for May 8 with election, if necessary,
on May 11.
A petition is being circulated asking W. J. Alder to allow his name
to go in nomination.
Mr. Alder has resided here a considerable time. He has large interests and has time to devote to the
affairs of the city. The petition is
being largely signed.
PREPARATORY  DRILL
Coronation Contingent Will Concentrate  for  Training  Before
Leaving for London
A militia order issued from headquarters at Ottawa, announces that
the coronation contingent will concentrate for eleven days' drill and
instructions at a depot of the arm
of the service to which they belong
and for three days at Quebec prior
to embarkation for England, as follows:
Calgary, including corps of Guides
from Winnipeg and all points west
thereof, at Winnipeg, commencing
May 20.
From Western Ontario and all
points In the immediate vicinity of
Toronto, at Toronto, commencing
May  22.
From points east of Toronto, at
St. Jean, Que., commencing May 22.
Artillery horse, at Kingston, commencing May 22.
Artillery field, at Kingston, com
mencing May 22.
Artillery garrison, at Quebec, commencing May 23.
Infantry, and all other dismount
ed branches of the service at Que;
bee, commencing May 23.'
CHANGES IN STAFF
Messrs. Clements and looker are Retiring
From the City Engineering
Force.
Col,  Davis Makes  Recommendations
As to the Filling of Vacancies and Promotions
At the meeting of the city council
last night the resignation of F. S.
Clements, first assistant engineer on
Hie city staff, and G. Tooker, also of
the staff, were received through the
engineer, Colonel Davis.
The recommendations of Colonel
Davis wer that A. S. B. Lucas, chief
draughtsman, be made principal assistant engineer with a salary of
$175 a month or an Increase of $25;
that H. Simpson, draughtsman, be
made chief draughlsman at $108.33,
an Increase of $8.33; (hat 0. T.
Howard be second assistant engineer
ut $125, an Increase of $25; thai
A. E. Oakley be construction engineer at $150 Instead of $125; that
J. A. Miller, transltnian, be Increased
from $100 to $125; that C. II. P.
Newcombe, transltnian, be Increased
from $100 to $108.33; that A. w.
McKnlght be draughtsman nnd assistant on construction, at $100 Instead of $90; that an expert municipal engineer be engaged to succeed
Mr. Tooker at asalary not to exceed
$100.
The resignations were accepted
and the matter of filling vacancies
and altering salaries left to be dealt
with later.
 o	
C.   B.   Clayton,  who   left   here' it
few weeks  ago  for Vancouver,  has
now gone on to Fort George, wliere
he will spend some months at least.
 o	
Jarvis McLeod, of the customs department here, left for the south ou
Sunday, being called away by the
serious Illness of Mrs. McLeod.
The police commissioners met yes-
terda yafternoon when the question
of increased accommodation for police headquarters was taken up ou
the suggestion of Chief Vickers.
The police have been occupying
temporary quarters in the little
shack about 10 .eet by 12 feet on the
government reserve. The building is
inadequate and but poorly adapted
in any way for a police station.
Police court has to be held there
and so unstable is the building that
the magistrate has to cease writing
whenever anyone walks across the
room. The chief has no private
quarters whatever and must answer
the phone during the progress of
court from the same table that the
magistrate is using.
The chief in calling attention to
the inadequacy of the quarters, yesterday did not complain nor did he
mention these iacts. He simply
stated that the quarters were very
small and rendered it difficult to
carry on the work properly.
Suggestions were made by the
commissioners as to how the matter
could be overcome and finally after
visiting the place it was decided to
put up a cheap temporary building
at the corner of Fourth street and
Third avenue on the government reserve.
When the matter came up before
the commissioners Aid. Kirkpatrick
favored building a small unpreten
tious building as a temporary quarters. This would be cheaper than
paying rent.
The shack now used was costing
$15 a month. The premises vacated
by the Bank of Montreal would cost
at least $40.
It was decided to give notice that
the present building would be vacated, at the end of the month and
the commissioners proceeded then to
visit the location with the object of
seeing' if something else could not
be done to meet the immedia* >
needs.
M. M. Stephens suggested building in rear of the electric light
building with access to the jail and
court house through the alley in
rear of the  lots.
The building to be erected will bo
about 20 feet by 30 feet and will not
cost much.
The remaining business before the
commissioners did not require very
much attention. Accounts were
passed for the month. These were
larger than usual owing to the fact
that a number of specials had to bo
employed during the time of tho labor trouble. There was probably
nearly $1,000 extra expense Involved on that account.
The chief reported on the cases
coming up during the month. Ha
outlined the action of the police with
respect to the labor troubles. He
also reported that several vagrants
had been ordered out upon arrival
In the city.
His Worship said he felt that tho
chief was to be complimented upon
the way In which he had conducted
the police affftlrs during rather
troublesome limes.
CITY WILL DO WORK
Decision Reached to  Carry on  Street
Improvements Under That
System.
it Is Contended by the Council That
Kelly & Mclmiis Have Not Contract for Retaining Wall
DISTRICT MEETING
Methodist   Delegates  to   Gathering
Here Will Discuss Church
Union  Tonight
The district meeting of the Methodist church is being held here this
week. This evening the first meeting of the session will be held with
Rev. G. Raley, chairman of the district, presiding. Supper is to be
served the delegates in the church
at 6 o'clock. At 8 o'clock a public
session will be held when the question of the church union will be discussed.
This comes up as a reference from
the conference to be discussed preparatory to being dealt with by recommendation at conference. The
proposition is that of a union of the
Methodist church with the Presbyterians and the Congregationalists.
The different branches of the
churches are favorably Inclined to
the union.
The city council last evening
herd a number of applications in
connection with the street work in
the corporation. A report from the
streets committee was received dealing with the question of the retaining wall on First avenue where
Kelly & Mclnnis have a contract.
The contractors had written stating
that their contract called for the
building of the wall which was being
done by the city. The report of the
engineer was that there was no misunderstanding that they were to be
awarded Ihe contract for the wall
and he did not think they had such
in their"'contract. The committee
reported in compliance with the engineer's statement that the work be
continued by the city.
Aid. Kerr said he did not believe
that Kelly & Mclnnis ever intended
to build a retaining wall. It cost
the city over $1,000 to remove the
rock  dumped   there.
Denton and Williams having given up their contract on Seventh avenue from Fuiton to Dunsmuir
streets, the street committee recommended that a new contract be called
for. A suggestion was made that it
might be done by'day labor or by
staion work.
Aid. Morrissey thought this
should be undertaken by contract.
Aid. Newton favored the work being done by day labor.
Aid. Clayton thought the public
works department could carry this
e*.e. ' This .wat. ordinary work and
he thought it could be done this
way.
Aid. Morrissey, while a supporter
of the day labor system if properly
carried out. Information was not
available as to what tlie work being
done by. the ctiy was costing. Until
this information was available he
did not feel like having more done
under the day labor system.
Aid. Kerr said the information as
Jie retaining walls    on    Fraser
street, showed that it cost only $1.55
a yard, which was far cheaper than
any contractor offered to do it for.
It was decided to have the work
done by the public works department of the city.       '
Aid. Kerr asked if a city contractor could compel employees to
board at his boarding house where
Chinese wer employed.
His Worship said that it was not
legally possible to force any workman to board at a particular place.
Aid. Morrissey suggested that it
there was any contractor employing
Chinese labor he should have his attention called to the fact that It wns
not to be tolerated.
It was decided to refer this to the
streets committee for report.
E. Rosang asked an extension of
time for the completion of his contract. He complained that (here
had been unavoidable delay. This
was referred to the committee for
report.
O. Head offered to accept the position of rat catcher at $00 a month
or 5 cents a nil.
The Daughters of the Umpire of
Victoria asked tno city to InKe part
in a coronation display lo he hold In
thai city,
A petition was received asking
permission lo erect a sidewalk on
the west side of Second avenue between Seventh and Eighth streets
and that permission be allowed to
use the plank taken from the roadway.
This was referred (o the streets
committee.
Tenders for scavenger work and
for supplying cans were opened and
having been read were referred to
the streets committee.
TO RUSH WORK IN
OPENING UP COUNTRY
Trails to be Cut Through the Skeena and Naas Valley
at Early Date This Summer—Efforts Will be Made
to Open Up the District Which is to Act
as Feeder to City.
R. O. Jennings, road superintendent, has returned to the city aft^r
making a trip of exploration from
the Skeena to Stewart preparatory
to starting a busy season on the
trails in the district. The trip, taken
at the season he did it, was a trying
one. He had to walk from mUe 142
on the Skeena to mile 168. Then
from Kilmangar he made his way
overland to Stewart, covering 160
miles of the way on snow shoe;.
His route took him through the
Kitmancool Valley and by way of
Cranberry River. Mr. Jennings as
road superintendent, is concerned
mostly in the matter of finding a
way for roads to,open up the *est
territory und does not care to express an opinion on the character of
the country. He, however, is satisfied that there is a vast area of land
there which will become settled up
quickly. The clearing in many parts
will not be a heavy task.
In addition to the 100-mile trail
which is to be hurried to completion
as soon as possible, theie will be a
100-mile branch built from Kitsuni-
kalum to conect with this main one..
There will be another branch from
Alice Arm to connect with the main
way, so that easy accese from four
points may be given with the interior, from Stewart, from Alice Arm,
from Kitsumkalum and from Kit-
mangar.
ELECTRIC SIGN
Permission to Erect One in the City
Is Asked by Phoenix
Theatre
SEEKING A SEWER
Yesterday being May Day, a large
number of labor men observed the
time-honored custom of hold'ng a
parade and delivering speeches in
public in the cause of labor. Thej
parade was held in the evening, the
speaking place being on the reserve
at the end of Fifth street. Several
speeches were made in favor of the
cause of trades unionism. Red
badges were worn by those taking
part.
The management of the Phoenix
Theatre asked the privilege of the
city council last night to erect an
eelctric sign in front of their place.
The question of the regulations of
last year then came up in connection
with it.
Aid. Clayton said he had been
forced to remove a sign that projected over a street. He had i > objection to these illuminated signs,
however. It, would mean the selling
of power by the city, would give additional light to the street and
would encourage an industry in the
city.
Aid. Morrissey thought the bylaw
would likely have to be amended before anything could  be done.
It was finally decided to refer Ihis
to the streets committee, who will
inspect the place and report back to
the council, which is given power to
grant permission under tlie bylaw.
Borden Street Residents Want to Have
Work Done Under Local Improvement Plan.
Committee Will Consider the Proposition  and   Report  Hack
lo Council
TO AVOID ACCIDENTS
City Council Has  to  Deal With  the
Question of Street
Traffic.
Runaway on  Street Results in  Loss I
of Horse Belonging to Transfer Company
Yesterday afternoon a runaway
took place on Third avenue, which
resulted In one of u team of hoivc.-e
belonging to the Union Transfer be-
ing killed. The team ran from the
top of the hill on Third to McBride.
Falling to make the turn there they
dashed into tlie rock embankment,
where one horse became badly torn |
anil broken so that It was necessnn |
to  despatch   it.
Lasl night the subject enme be I
fore the city council, a communication was rend from the Union Transfer Company, In which attention j
was called to the accident due to a
automobile and asking for actio '>c j
Ing Inken to regulate the travel >f|
mil us on the streets and avoid future '
accidents.
His Worship suggested this be re
Ferred lo the chief of police..
Aid. Morrissey thought thiB
should be given attention. He Instanced cases where ladies had to
get off the plank way out of the wav
of fast drivers and runaways.
Aid. Smith explained that tha
auto in this instance was half a
block away from the team that ran
away. No one was holding tlie team.
He thought as much blame attached
to Hie driver. He was not trying to
defend the auto driver. All he
wanted to call attention to was the
fact that there was also some blame
attaching to the drivers of horses.
It was decided to refer the communication to the chief of police
with a request that he take steps to
have the danger of accidents overcome.
The- residents of Borden street
wish to hive a sewer installed on
thai avenue as a work of local improvement. T< j street is quite well
built up and the . led of a sewer is
'elt. At the council meeting last
n'ght a delegation appeared asking
for this work. Several of the delegation could not attend and W. E.
Williams and Thos McClymont re.i-
resentcd the property owners.
W. E. Williams, speaking for the
delegation, said the residents felt
that it would be cheaper to pay for
the sewer under the local improvement plan rather than by using the
ga.'bag-; system. He though! it
could be connected with the Fraser
street sewer.
Thos. McClymont supported tho
contention of Mr. Wi! ii ms.
His Worship asked Mr. Williams
ir he had °ny idea as to what. it.
voulri , ..)„•
Mr. Williams said lie did not
know.
His Worship pointed out that the
council, with a large water proposition with which to grapple, was re-
lue'tant to undertake anything that
would run into a large expenditure
mid that would affect the credit of
the city.
Aid. Morrissey askel If this was.
the sewerage system which it was'
estimated would cost $198,000,
Aid. Kerr said that this « ..- not
the case. The cost could not h, very
great.
The matter was referred to iho
strecis committee for report.
DENIES THE CHARGES
Ho*
F luk Oliver Will A iswer Insinuates Made Against H in tr
Telegram.
He  Says  There  lias  Been  no  Graft
in   Handling   Funds as Slated
by  Dim McGIIlicuddy
(Special to The Journal)
OTTAWA. May 2.—In the House
of Commons on Monday, Hon. Frank
On r promised to make a statement in Hie house Tuesday regarding the insinuation of graft preferred
in a veiled way against him in the
Toronto Telegram last week and
sponsored by Dan McGIIlicuddy, ex-
editor of the Calgary News. Mr.
Oliver denies any dishonesty or graft
ol any kind in handling funds re-
ferred to In the charge.
t m PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Tuesday,  May  2,  1911
THE NEW WOMAN
The Question of the Pacific Slope Developing a Peculiar Type is
Discussed.
Writer  in  News-Advertiser  Believes
Tliat This  Will
Follow
Will the Pacific slope of Canada
develop a type of woman peculiar *o
Itself? The question has occurred 10
me frequently, and the more 1 consider it the more I am Inclined to
thing il should lie answered In the
affirmative, wrlteB Josephine, In tlie
News-Advertiser.
My reason for thinking so?
Well, even before I came to the
coast, it had often occurred to me
when, in the capacity of exchange
editor, 1 was compelled to read
rather closely the news of east and
west, that Hie western women were
of a rather progressive type, and I
have even been guilty sometimes of
holding them up as an example to
their, in my opinion, slower eastern
sisters. And now that I see them
at closer range I am still more confirmed In the Impression formed at
a distance. Haven't they women's
clubs of all kinds that discuss everything in the world, and a whole lot
more besides, as Paddy said, an active Local Council of Women that
keeps a sharp lookout on Ihe civic
and social life of the city; several
educational clubs that discuss all
manner of profound subjects; half a
dozen societies that busy themselves
chiefly in inculcating patriotism,
another body with the "Made
Canada Fair" in hand which is going
tc make the world sit up and take
notice that there is such a place as
British Columbia, and which is going to he one of the biggest advertising features that has been pulled
off for some time; and isn't there a
Political Equality League quietly
and unostentatiously spreading the
doctrine that women, if they lay
their heads to It, can use the ballot
quite as wisely as the hordes of naturalized citizens who make up a
large proportion of our population
nnd last of all, haven't the women
been busy all winter studying parlia
mentary proceedings so that they
can conduct meetings according to
Hoyle I Mr. Bourinol) without all
talking at once, or getting huffy and
not speaking to one another?
But you are jesting, some of my
readers may hint.
Indeed. I'm not. I never was
more serious in my life. 1 am quite
sure that I never ran across women
wemen anywhere, except possibly
tiie Australians (who had the franchise for some years, and, on ac-
ccunt of the responsibility which
this privlege imposes, have learned
to discuss large public questions in
the most, matler of fact way imaginable, just as if women were supposed to understand such things,
and who yet seem to have lost none
of their old relish for mere chiffons), who can handle a business
proposition or acquit themselves
gracefully at a pink tea Hie way
Vancouver women can. Why Ihe
v. ay some women I know here dabble in slocks and shares and bonils,
and dismiss In the most well-
irformed manner good and bad
buys in real estate is enough lo
make an old country or an eastern
woman, who depends on some male
relative to supply both Intellect and
pocket money, gasp. And not only
do these women dabble in bonds
and discuss real estate, (hey make
money oul of these' commodities,
Inn Indeed, I know some who are
building up nice little fortunes nut
of them, girls who in (lino past came
w('>i tee :i Ihirty-dollar-ii-iiiiiiilh position, caught the "western spirit"
and forthwith Bel themselves to
build up a competence tor themselves.
And it. is nol that these western
wemen love the foibles of life less,
bm they love practical things more.
In gaining a wider grasp of business
and public affairs they seem to be
parting with none of their femininity. They pay as much attention to
riiess as ever, indeed, some aver that
they pay more (using "pay" in all
senses), and it is claimed that nowhere in Canada, or anywhere else
for that matter, considering the size
of the place, do the women dress so
well. Nor do they neglect the social
amenities of life. The western woman differs from others In that,
she mixes the grave and gay in just
proportion. She is like one of those
confections with a frothy meringue
oi. top and a good deal of satisfying
cvstard beneath, or like a glass of
good champagne (does champagne
foam?) a good deal of refreshment
capped with a covering of attractive
foam.    Thus many of these western
women devote the morning to a wise
administration of their homes, the
afternoon to social frivolities, and
in the evening their day is not complete until they have digested the
daily newspapers, editorials and all,
for it is necessary to keep pace with
the march of affairs, to see how the
government's manipulation of crown
lands will affect their holdings, or
the carpenters' strike their building
operations.
It seemed to me I caught a
glimpse of what the modern woman
ol the west will be, the other evening, when at King Edward school I
heard those little slips of high
school girls delivering themselves in
essays and speeches in such a masterly fashion. Apparently the thirty
odd years during which women have
enjoyed lhe> privilege of higher edu-
ii'tlon have not been without their
effect, and whatever may have been
the intellectual disabilities of our
grandmothers, the young girl of the
prsent day displays an ability to
grasp ideas, to reason for herself,
yea, and to express herself, in no
way inferior to that possessed by
her brother. And yet if we are to
judge by the attitude of that clear-
eyed girl who pleaded so earnestly
lor the maintenance of the sanctity
nf the home, the modern woman will
lose none of her womanliness and
will be a better and more intelligent
wife and mother for her broader
and   more  intellectual   training.
Nor will she be less lovable or less
desirable socially. Of that I am sure,
for as I stood waiting for the car
the night of the oratorical contest
a group of little girls beside me
were bubbling over with enthusiasm, hugging themselves with delight over the success of their comrades, and incidentally making copious comparisons between the dispositions of the different girls. All
were just as lovable as they were
clever, except one. She was just
too clever. "Nobody liked her;" in
other words, she wasn't clever
enough to wear her cleverness
gracefully; and should she read
these lines I would strongly recommend her to overcome the disagreeable tendency as soon as possible.
But that is not what I was talking
about. What I really wished to say
was that the new woman's cleverness will not detract from her attractiveness.
Summing' up, shortly then, I
would say that I believe the west
will develop a type of woman of
its own; that she will be strong,
sweet and lovable; and that while
she rules her own house well she
will be capable of reaching out and
taking an active interest in wider
public affairs as well. Indeed I am
glad that there is sucli a tendency
evinced already to study politics and
political affairs, for I shouldn't
wonder a bit if when they get
things out. Both parties are short
on statesmen, and the stuff from
which great leaders are made; and,
as, judging from the results of the
contest the other evening, the orators of the future are to be women,
I shouldn't wonder a bit if the ranks
of the new woman of the west would
be appealed to for "cabinet timber,"
and she with her good sense, her
savoir (aire and her sense of humor
(I have not time to explain why, but
I notice that is to be another of her
strong characteristics) be invited to
come down there to help clean out
the Augean stables and straighten
oul the nation's badly-tangled affairs.
THE  WHITE   ENSIGN
Admiral  Kingsmill  Hopes  to See the
Flag of British Navy Fly on
Canadian Ships.
He  Does  Not Want  to   See   Other
Than One Emblem Used in
Empire
To have themselves publicly
called out of a crowded place of entertainment on the pretense that
they are wanted by importunate patients Is supposed to be one of the
stock methods of advertising resorted (o by doctors who wish to
build up n practice.
A young physician tried the dodge
with disappointing results not long
back, lie instructed his man servant tei come to the stage door of
the theatre and say that a patient
of bis was in urgent need of attention.
"Itlght you are, sir," said the
siTvnnt, with a solemn wink. "You
leave It to me. I'll manage It all
right."
But. apparently the manservant
exceeded instruction in his zeal, for
when, at the end of the second act,
the manager came before the curtain  what he said  was:
"If Dr. B  is in the audience
I am requested to tell him that he
is wanted at once, as the poor fellow
he gave physic to this afternoon has
been having fits ever since."
 o	
Mr. Sopht: I see some fellah has
an article In the papah entitled
"Have we two bwalns or one." What
do you think cf the question, Miss
Fligh?
Miss High: Well, really between
you and me, I think we have only
one.
Notable utterances were made by
Rear-Admiral Kingsmill, Colonel
Denlsoin of the Royal Canadian
Regiment, and Captain Macdonald
of II. M. S. Niobe, at the dinner of
St. George's Society In Halifax, recently in reference to the flag that
they believe should be flown by
ships of the Canadian navy. There
has been some talk of a change In
the white ensign for the Canadian
navy, but these officers are against
any change. They all spoke in favor of retaining the white ensign of
England and against any changes in
etnbellishniet or mutilations in it
whatever.
"Today we have in the harbor,"
said Admiral Kingsmill, "the Niobe
flying the white ensign. I hope it
will always remain so flying." It
did not seem creditable to him, he
said, that that flag should ever be
done away with in any manner or
changed in any form, if we are to
have a great navy or be a part of
the Britisii navy.
He did not know that anything of
the kind was being considered by
the authorities here or in Great
Britain, but he believed it had been
considered in Australia. He sincerely hoped it would not be in
Canada. If such a change were to
become effective it would be the end
of our navy.
Colonel Denison dwelt particularly on the fact that our army and
navy as expressed on the toast list
were Imperial, not local or auxiliary.
Captain Macdonald, the commander of the Niobe, said he was
pleased that his ship was filled with
men who are a credit to any nation.
Many of them were French-Canadians and none of them did themselves or their nationality more honor as sailors than they.
 o	
Landlady—You've either got to
pay your rent or leave.
DeadbroKe—Oh, thanks. At the
last place they made me do both.
Hamblin's Bakery
Just Re-opened
Sale    counter    in    MERRYFIELD'S
STORE, Third Ave. and Fifth St.
Family trade catered to.  Will supply restaurants and steamers.
Cukes and Confectionery of all
kinds
New Knox Hotel
ARTAUD & BESNER
Proprietors
The New Knox Hotel Is run on the
European plan. First-clas service.
All the latest modern Improvements.
THE BAR keeps only the best
brands of liquors and cigars.
THE CAFE is open from 6.30 a.m.
to 8 p.m. Excellent cuisine; first-
class service.
Board, $1 a Dny — Beds, 50c nnd np
First Avenue.  Prince Rupert
GRAND HOTEL
WORKINGMAN'S HOME
Spring Beds, Clean QC-
White Sheets    -    -    ^j«JC
Rooms 50 Cents
Best in Town for the Money
FIRST: AVE. AND SEVENTH ST.
J. Goodman, Proprietor
THE WESTHOLME LUMBER GO.
LIMITED
We handle all kinds of
Building Supplies
First Avenue Telephone 180
Corner Eighth and Fraser Streets
Clinton Rooms
Newly   remodelled   and   furnished.
Board   and   lodging.   Home cooking
a specialty.    Mrs.  Anderson,  Prop.
Rooms, $8 Per Week
Skeena  |Land   District—District   of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that William H.
Hargrave, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation banker, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lanas:—Commencing at a post planted on the west
shore of Lakelse Lake, and about
1V<2 miles distant and In a southwesterly direction from the S. W.
corner of Lot 3982, Skeena Land
District, District of Coast, Range V;
thence west 40 chains; thence south
80 chains, more or less, to the shore
of Lakelse Lake; thence following
the shore of said lake to point of
commencement, containing 160
acres more or less.
WILLIAM H.  HARGRAVE.
Mancell Clark, Agent.
Dated  20th March,  1911.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlote Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Wirt A. Stevens, of Chicago, 111., U. S. A., occupation civil engineer. Intends to
apply for permission to purchase
the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on
the shore of Masset Inlet about one
mile northeast of the mouth of the
Ain River; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 40 chains more or lesB
to the eastern boundary of T. L.
35413; tlience south along the
boundary of T. L. 35413 and
T. L. 35414, a distance of 80 chains;
thence east 40 chains, more or less,
to point of commencement, containing  320  acres more or less.
WIRT   A.   STEVENS.
G. S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated Feb.  24th,  1911.
Skeena Land District—-District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that James Mul-
lin, of Murdo, So. Dakota, U. S. A.,
occupation farmer, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands: ■— Commencing at a post planted on the
shore of Masset Inlet, about one
mile northeast of the mouth of the
Ain River; thence west 40 chains,
more or less, to the eastern boundary of T. L. 35414; thence south
00 chains, more or less to the shore
of Masset Inlet; thence northeasterly along the shore to point of
commencement, containing 60 acres
more or less.
JAMES   MULLIN.
G. S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated  Feb.  24 th,  1911.
Skeena  Land  District—District
of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that Victor H.
Reynolds, of Hull, Massachusetts, occupation chauffeur, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described land:-—Commencing at a post planted at high water
mark on the northerly side of the
entrance to a small unnamed cove on
the west coast of Pitt Island, about
one-quarter mile south of the entrance to Kitkatla summer village;
thence east forty chains; thence
south twenty chains; thence west
forty chains; thence north ten
chains more or less to high water
mark; thence following along high
water mark around the head of the
cove back to the commencement, and
containing sixty (60) acres more or
VICTOR H. REYNOLDS.
J. H. Plllsbury, Agent.
Dated Feb. 18th, 1911.
Skeena Land District—District
of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that F. C. Plllsbury, of Boston, Mass., occupation
civil engineer, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—beginning at a
post planted at high water mark on
the northerly end of Pitt Island, on
Ogden Channel, and about 2 miles
southwesterly from Swede Pt; thence
east 60 chains thence south 40
chains; thence west 50 chains more
or less to high water mark; thence
following along the high water mark
back to the point of commencement,
and containing 240 acres more or
less.
F. C. PILLSBURY,
J. H. Plllsbury, Agent
Dated Feb. 19, 1911.
Prince Rupert Land District—
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that P. McLachlan,
of Prince Rupert, occupation broker,
intends to apply for permission to
lease the following described land:
—Commencing at a post planted
one-third of a mile northerly from
head of Alice Arm, on its Easterly
Side; thence 40 chains northerly;
Ihence 40 chains easterly; thence 40
cliains southerly; thence 40 chains
westerly to place of commencement.
PETER  McLACHLAN.
Thos. L. Fny. Agent.
Dated 2nd Feb., 1911.
Skeena   Land  |Distrlct—District   of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that Alice Munro,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
married woman, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted or. the west
shore of Lakelse Lake, and about
1% miles distant and In a southwesterly direction from the S. W.
corner of Lot 39S2, Skeena Land
District, District of Coast, Range V;
thence west 40 chains; thence north
40 chains; thence east 60 chains,
more or less, to the shore of Lakelse
Lake; thence following shore of
said lake to point of commencement,
containing 200 acres, more or less.
ALICE MUNRO.
Mancell Clark, Agent.
Dated  20th March,  1911.
For Sale
155% Acres good land, on South
Bank of Skeena River, 85 miles East
of Prince Rupert by G. T. P. Ry.,
with buildings erected thereon, containing dwelling, store and post
office.
P. McIiAeCHLAN.
Box 324.
For Sale
160 Acres Alberta land for sale
at {15.00 per acre, or Exchange for
Prince Rupert property; fenced; 40
acres broken; small house; 2 miles
from P. O., being southwest quarter
section 6, township 63, range 9.
P.  McLACHLAN,
P. O, Box 324     Prince Rupert, B. C.
Wanted
A live, active Real Estate Partner,
with some capital, to take half-
interest In company handling Real
Estate, Insurance and Manufacturing Agencies. Party to take full
charge of office in Prince Rupert, as
I am soon to leave for the Interior
for the summer. Apply to
G. W. ARNOTT
Drawer 1539 Prince Rupert
The Thompson
: Hardware Co.
—Second Avenue-
	
e.
< >   Paints. General Hardware,
''     Oils, Stoves and Ranges.
Prince Rupert  Private
  Agency —
Detective
N. McDonald, Manager
All kinds of legitimate detective work
handled for companies and individuals.    Business strictly confidential.
P. O. Box 803 — Phone 210
WM. S. HALL, L. D. S. D. D. S.
:-:   DENTIST   :-:
Crown and Bridge Work a specialty.
All dental operations skillfully
treated. Gas and local anaesthetics
administered for the painless extraction of teeth. Consultation free.
Offices, Helgerson 3k., Prince Rupert
NIOKERSON-ROERIG COMPANY
CUSTOMS AND MERCHANDISE
Brokers, Forwarding Agents,
Storage, etc.
J. W. POTTER
ARCHITECT    AND    STRUCTURAL
ENGINEER
Re-inforced Concrete a Specialty
—o—
Law-Butler Building - Prince Rupert
HAYNOR  BROS.
FUNERAL  DIRECTORS
and
PROFESSIONAL  EMBALMERS
DR.  W.  B. CLAYTON
DENTIST
—O—
Office  in    the    Westenhaver   Block.
Over  Orme's Drug   Store.
Prince Rupert
GRAHAM ISLAND — "The surest
sign of the progress of a town or
district Is Its newspaper—live, active, hustling." "The Masset Review," Masset, Q.O.I
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast—Rang.} V.
TAKE NOTICE, that I, Minnie
Meredith, of Victoria, B. C, occupation a married woman, intend to
apply for permission to purchase the
following desoribed lands:—Commencing at a post planted about 40
chains distant and in a South direction from the Southeast corner of
Lot 1733; thence east 40 chains;
theuce south 40 chains; thenco west
4 0 chains; theuce north 40 chains
13 point of commencement, containing 160 acres more or less.
MINNIE   MEREDITH.
John Klrkaldy,
Agent.
Dated  February  20th,  1911.
Skeena Land  District—District
of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that Joseph Edward Merryfield, of Prince Rupert,
occupation merchant, Intends to apply for permission to lease tho following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about 10 chains
north from the northou it corner of
Lot 33; thence west 1500 font, to
shore of Smith's Island; thenco following shore In a southerly (Jlrootlori
1200 feet; thenco east to shoro of
De Horsey Island; thenco following
shore in a northerly direction to
point of commencement.
JOSEPH EDWARD MBRRYPIBLD,
E. Spro, Agent.
Dated April 4, 1911. 4-7
NOTICE.
Tenders will be received by the
undersigned up to the 22nd day of
April, 1911, at 5 p. m„ for the purchase of Block 27, Subdivision of
Lot No. 541, Group 1, New Westminster District, situated in the City
of Vancouver, and being the site of
the old Provincial Court Houses.
Each tender must be enclosed in a
registered letter and must be addressed to the under Igned, and
plalnlv marked " 'ender for old
Vapio-iv9r Court House Site," and
must be accompanied by an accepted
cheque for ten per cent of the first
payment of the purchase money.
Payment for the property will be
accepted In Instalments of one-
quarter of the purchase money.
The first of such instalments to be
paid within thirty days after the acceptance of the tender, and the other
three annually thereafter, with interest at tho rate of 6% per annum.
In the event of the person whose
tender Is accepted failing to complete the first instalment within
thirty days of the notice of such acceptance the sale to him will be
cancelled and his ten per cent deposit forfeited. The cheques of unsuccessful tenderers will be returned. The highest or any tender
will not necessarily be accepted. No
commissions of any kind will be allowed.
WM. R. ROSS.
Minister of Lands.
Department of Lands,
Victoria,  B.   C.
March 7th,  1911.
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE.
Notice is hereby given the the
reserve existing by reason of the
notice published in the British Columbia Gazette of the 27th December, 1907, over lands on Graham Island, formerly covered by Timber
Licences Nos. Nos. 37055, 37056 and
37057, which expired on the Oth day
of November, 1909, and the lands
embraced within Timber Licence No.
37059, which expired on the 25th
day of January, 1909, is cancelled,
and that the said lands will be open
for pre-emption only under the provisions of Section 7 of the "Land
Act" after midnight on June 16th,
1911.
ROBERT A.  RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Lands Department,
Victoria, B. C,
9th March, 1911,
NOTICE
TENDERS for the installation at
the Prince Rupert School of twelve
(12) Red Cross Sanitary Closets,
furnished by the Government, will
be received by the undersigned up to
noon on Wednesday, March 22nd,
1911, for transmission to the Public
Works Department. The successful
tenderer will be called upon to furnish a bond in two sureties in a
sum equal to 50 per cent of the contract price. Specifications can be
seen at the Government Agent's Office, Prince Rupert. The lowest or
any tender not necessarily accepted.
J. H. McMULLIN,
Government Agent.
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast
TAKE NOTICE that F. T. Saunders, of Vancouver, occupation master
mariner, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands:-— Commencing at a
post planted about 6 miles northwest of Love Inlet on the north
east shore of Pitt iBland; thence
south 20 chains; thence west 40
chains; thence north to shore;
theice following shore in a south-
easterl-- direction to point of com-
menceiu .nt , containing 80 acres
more or less.
FRANK TAUNTON SAUNDERS,
Locator.
W. Hamilton, Agent.
Staked 17th, Feb.,  1911.
Skeena Liand District—District »f
Queen Charlotte Island.
TAKE NOTICE that Robert Fraser Og'.lvle, of Vancouver, occupation banker, Intends to apply for
permission to purchase the folowlng
described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 2 miles west ot
tho southwest corner of A. P. 12-
037; thonce cost 30 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains to
point of commencement, containing
640 aorejs.
ROBERT FRASER OGILVIE.
Arthur  Robertson,  Agent.
Dated Dec. 9, 1910.
NOTICE.
A book is kept In the City Clerk's
Office in which to enter the names
and addresses, etc. of citizens of
I'rlnco Rupert doBlrlng employment
on City work. All desiring employment should register nt once.
WRNISBT A. WOODS,
City Clerk.
Fm Neat Job Printing
nee the Journal Man
Tel. 100
■
|>\ Tuesday, May 2, 1911
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
1
^WKawwKawww!
WWWttlKiJ.WIfflKI,k
I GRAND TRUNK PACIFIC
w
n
TOWNSITE
ELLISON
The only Nain Line Town-
site in British Columbia in
which the Grand Trunk
Pacific Railway Company
has announced its joint
ownership.
ELLISON
SEE THE OFFICIAL MAP.—The
first glance will show you that
ELLISON is located at the junction
of the Skeena River and the Bulk-
ley Valley. The Grand Trunk
Pacific has announced that they are
joint owners in the townsite of Ellison. Now, my dear reader, you must
remember that up to date the Grand
Trunk Pacific has not announced
that it has any interest in any other
main line towsite in Britisii Columbia. Does that start you thinking?
 o	
STUDY THE MAP and you will
find Ellison is where the railway tracks leave navigation. That
fact is a very important one for conservative investors to think over.
What is known as the Hazelton district covers a territory many miles
in extent in every direction radiating from the townsite of Ellison.
Mining machinery, ore shipments,
smelters, reduction plants and all
sorts of mining operations starting
up in this rich mineral region, must
necessarily have a metropolis, a
HUB, a headquarters. If- any sane,
conservative man can figure out any
other spot except Ellison for the hub
of the great commerce of this district, his plan should be very inter
esting to the Grand Trunk Pacific
officials. It does seem as though
these officials, after several years of
investigation and engineering,
would know just what they were doing when they put their official
stamp on Ellison.
 o	
STUDY THAT MAP.—I desire to
say to all parties who are talking townsites in the vicinity of Skeena River and the Bulkley Valley
that there will no doubt be several
small towns, just the same as one
always finds in a mining district.
There will be towns in tlie vicinity
of Ellison along branch railways,
piobahly towns at the ends of branch
lines made to serve the mines and
the collieries, but it will be history
repeating itself in regard to the
building up of every metropolis.
Ellison has every natural advantage,
has every earmark of being the future mercantile and financial center of the Skeena River mining district and the entrance to the Bulk-
ley Valley.
STUDY THAT MAP and you will
find that all of the mining
towns and railroad towns around
there just beginning to    be    talked
about, will only be feeders to the
city and port of ELLISON. The
Grand Trunk Pacific has put Its
official stamp on Ellison. Do you
believe the company will do as much
for townsites owned by individuals
as it will for one in which its stockholders are joint owners? If you
do, don't buy any lots in Ellison. If
you desire to make a permanent investment, or merely to make a little
quick money, you must decide for
yourself right now. Do you propose
to follow the individual townsite
promoters or the Grand Trunk Pacific  Railway Company.
 0	
STUDY THAT MAP.—If you desire to put your money into a
real estate promoter's townsite you
will have many, many opportunities
this summer. The average promoter
is full of hurrah and red fire. He
must enthuse investors of the mail
order class with his wares. ELLISON is in the Missouri class. Therefore, I am not telling any fairy
tales about it. I am making statements that can be readily verified.
 . o	
STUDY     THAT      MAP.—If      you
want to join that great army of
investors-at-long-range,     then     you
should put your money into promoters' townsites. If you want a perfectly safe and sound investment,
certain to bring you large profits,
then put your money where the
Grand Trunk Pacific, after years of
careful investigation, have put their
money.
STUDY THAT MAP.—It is not
likely the Grand Trunk Pacific
will have any other townsite in British Columbia for sale this year. The
officials of the company state that
the company is not interested in any
townsite in the Hazelton district
with the exception  of ELLISON.
ELLISON is on the bank of the
Skeena at its confluence with
the Bulkley. You may change railway surveys; you may change the
location of towns along the line of
road, but you cannot change the
geography of the country through
which the railway passes. The head
of navigation necessarily means an
important townsite. Ellison will
not only be at the head of navigation but the center of a mining district wonderful in its resources that
is   now   being   opened   up,   and   for
which Ellison will be the shipping
point both by rail and water. The
fact that trains may change engines
up or down the line or in the suburbs of the town of Ellison does not
amount to shucks in building up a
town when such places are compared witli a town located where
rails and navigation meet.
STUDY THAT MAP.—You will
find on the official plan of Ellison that a large part of the town-
site has been reserved for future
sales, the same as the company has
done with certain sections of Prince
Rupert townsite. There are, therefore, at this time, comparatively
few lots on the market. You must
hurry if you want one.
 o	
STUDY THAT MAP.—ROGERS'
ADDITION to Ellison, only a
small parcel of land, lies within
eight blocks of the site of the railway station. Lots in this are being
offered. I am advising my clients
to buy Rogers Addition lots at $150
for inside lots and t-50 for corners.
Terms—10 per cent discount for
cash, or 10 per cent down and the
balance on easy terms;  no interest.
LOTS IN ELLISON TOWNSITE AND ROGERS ADDITION FOR SALE
PRINCE RUPERT
British Columbia
^IWRflWWWWWW!
JEREMIAH H. KUGLER
Offices—2nd Avenue
Facing Grand Trunk Terminal
w
ra
IWWWWWWWWI^
SWISS   VILLAGES
C.P.R. Has Laid Out Picturesque Centres
Along Line of Railway.
Mountain Guides Will Muke  Homes
There—Will Re in View of
Travellers
Switzerland is not in America, but
htose on this continent, who wish
to have a glimpse of Swiss life in
Swiss settings, after a few months,
will not have to cross the Atlantic
to obtain it. The little European
republic is not to be moved bodily
from where it is—though room in
plenty could be found for a score
or more of Switzerlands in the Canadian Rockies—but a typical Swiss
village is to be created that will
give visitors to that wonderful sea
of mountains a very comprehensive
idea of the home, the habits and the
customs of the hardy mountaineers
from across thej sea.
A permanent home for the corps
of Swiss guides win, are annually
brought over by the Canadian Pacific Railway Company to assist
mountain climbers in their ascents
is being established in a part of the
Rockies lhat will suit their native
characteristics and afford them during months of otherwise comparative Idleness ample opportunities for
further development of strenuous
outside athletic Bports. It will give
them and their families a new home
in this new land, and, while commenced on an unpretentious scale,
doubtless develop Into a large settlement, peopled by a hardy class of
self-reliant, adventurous men who
know the ways to the summits of
untrod peaks as the average man
knows the highways and byways of
his native city. It will add to the
picturesqueness of the surroundings,
and furnish a pleasing and interesting sight tow the great brotherhood
of nomads who are continually
passing through the mountains on
Canada's pioneer transcontinental
road. It will be a development of
great interest, this growth of new
Switzerland in Canada.
The site which has been  chosen
for the future Swiss villages of Canada lies in this province on the
north side of the main line of the
Canadian Pacific Railway, and the
first village will be situated at the
first western milestone adjoining the
quaint Canadian village of Golden
which embraces within its borders
the point of union of the Kicking
Horse and the Columbia Rivers.
Here the latter, brown, slow and
solemn, finds its pulses quickened,
the volume of its flow increased and
a change of due given to the color
of its waters by the tempestuous entrance of the glacial flood of the
Kicking Horse as it speeds on its
way from the Great Divide of the
Rockies. On every side of the site
mountains of varying contour rise
above the small plateaus. To the
east are the steep, sun-kissed, bald
peaks of the Rocky Mountain range,
to the west and to the south are
seen the more gradual and well-
wooded slopes of the Selklrks, which
rise in undulating benches to majestic heights, while coursing across
it in three different directions are
the waters of the two rivers.
Within close range of the western
readies of the Selklrks on the north
bank of the Columbia River lies,
sloping to the south, the old farmstead on which the romance-pictured Swiss cottages are to be erected. Along Its eastern side foams
Hospital Creek, while through the
centre trickles a small stream fed
by limpid surlngs from the foothills.
The wooded mountains to tlie soutli
are favorite haunts of deer and bear.
The Columbia River teems with fish
Which are good for eating; the high
rocky peaks to the north, which for
nearly ever ymonth In the year are
snow-capped, are famous as the
home of the mountain goat. A movement is on foot to try the introduction of chamois into the mountainous sportsman's appetite. In the
nearby mountain fastnesses in every
direction there are splendid chances
for easy hunting during the proper
seaso, and for snowshoeing, ski-ing,
and tobogganing, while skating and
curling are already popular pastimes
at Golden during the months of
snow. Further afield are high virgin peaks yet uncllmbed and unnamed which offer great temptation
to the experienced Alpinist.
The new village is to be    called
"Edelweiss"—the bridal flower of
the Swiss—and its location is on a
plateau which rises two hundred
feet from the bottom lands, and
within unobstructed view of the
passing trains. The spot is a most
picturesque one. The plateau and
the hillsides are dotted with clumps
of poplar, whose light greenish
leaves pleasingly contrast with the
darker shades of fir and spruce,
these combining to form an unusually pretty picture. The cottages—
half a dozen to start with—will
naturally be distinctively Swiss in
architectural design, construction
and surroundings; in fact, they will
breathe the Swiss atmosphere. In
the rich alluvial soil the dwellers
will find opportunities galore for
gardening in the small individual
holdings which are attached to the
cottages, and these will contribute
materially towards the upkeep of
the households, and doubtless will
eventually expand into sources of
supply for the profitable markets.
The Columbia River, which flows
from Lake Windermere and other
mother lakes about 100 miles soutli
of Golden, is one of the most tortuous waterways in the world. Its
course is northwest  lo a point past
1836 1911
The Bank of
British North America
A Strong British Bank, with
Connection! Throughout the
World.
Foreign Drafts
Agents in Canada for the Colonial Bank, London and West
Indies. We have special facilities
for handling business with Great
Britain and foreign countries.
Drafts on France, Germany,
South Africa, Australia, New
Zealand, India, China, Japan and
West Indies bought and sold.
Prlaca Rupert Branch—
F. S. LONG, Muster.
Golden called Boat Encampment,
where it makes what is called the
Big Bend, and turns south again,
crissing under the Canadian Pacific
Railway tracks at Revelstoke, the
railway having cut across the mountain range to meet it. From here
it flows on into the Arrow Lakes
and into United States territory,
finally emptying into the Pacific
Ocean in Oregon, nearly 2,000 miles
distant by its meanderings from its
source. Between Golden and Winde-
mere there are splendid roads, now
much used by motors, and these will
be extended to Banff and Calgary
on the main line of the Canadian
Pacific Railway, and to Fort Steele
and Crow's Nest Pass branch of the
railway on the south. They will be
the great automobile highways for
motorists through a region that may
well be termed the playground of
the world, not the least interesting
feature of which will be the new
"Edelweiss" and its people.
 o	
WF.ALTH  OF  NATIONS
Hank Roll of Four Principal Powers
Reaches  tlie  Sum  of
9800,028,000,000
The wealth of the four principal
nations stood as follows at the latest
dates: United States, 1910, $125,-
000,000,000; Great Britain, 1908,
$88,725,000,000; France, 11100,
(83,000,000,000; Germany, 1909,
$88,500,000,000; grand total, $360,-
000,226,000,000; adding Great Britain's known foreign investments, It
is 1860,925,000,000,
Annual accretion at present in
the four countries is approximately
as follows: United States, 8V6 per
cent; Great Britain, 2% per cent;
France, 2 per cent; Germany, 2 per
cent.
These rates of interest, when
compounded, double capital in 20V4,
28 and 35 years respectively; so
that, should progress continue at the
same rate until 1950, the wealth of
the United States would exceed that
of all the others combined. That is
not likely. Before that date our 3 %
per cent rate will most likely fall to
3 per cent, perhaps even to 2% per
cent, or the rates current in Europe.
The community of interests, the exploitation of natural resources, the
leveling tendencies of commerce and
the adoption of a common medium
of value (gold metal) render this
consummation   almost   inevitable.
So long as capital, barring wars,
accidents, expenses and risks, can
earn 3 % per cent, a 3 or 2% per
cent long bond cannot be worth par.
If capital, as shown by the rate of
increase of national wealth in Europe, cannot earn more than 2 or:
2 Vz per cent, the position is reversed; a long bond at these rates
would represent the highest class of
security, and in continental markets
would inevitably command par.
Breat Britain's peculiar situation
may offer some exception to the
comparative growth of national
wealth. Accnrding to computation,
based largely upon the income tax,
average returns upon £2,700,000,-
000 ($13,500,000,000) of Britisii
capital invested outside the Kingdom is £140,000,000,. or nearly 5.2
per cent; and as this sum is largely
invested over and over again in col
onies and foreign countries, it does
not appear in summation of national
wealth. Great Britan is annually
earning not merely 2 M, per cent,
but something between that rate
and 5.2 per cent, possibly as much
or more than the United States;
only it makes no showing in the
computed account of stock.
Considerations of like character
must also find room in meausuring
growth of wealth in France and
Germany. Both, especially the former, embrace profitable colonial
possessions in which vast sums of
home capital are being continually
invested and reinvested; and both
also hold large investments in foreign countries, only a portion of the
usufruct adding to the stock ot
wealth at home.
For Job Printing of all kinds see
The Journal man.
TIDES AT PRINCE RUPERT, MAY, 1911
I      HIGH WATER      ||        LOW WATER _
DATE  AND  DAY       | Timo| Ht | Tlme| lit || Time| Ht | Time| Ht
1 !   .Monday |  2:31 22.li 15:32,10.<i!'  11:07;   1.4121:09|  6.9
2 Tuesday   ....   8:14 22.0|16:26|18.6    9:66   2.2121:58   S.l
3 j Wednesday .   .   . 4:02 20.ajl7:26 17.7 10:52   3.3|22:69   9.8
4 | Thursday  ,   .   .   . 4:68 19.6|18:40|17.0   11:68   4.6 l	
5 i Friday ' 0:09 18.1 20:00 16.9 0:16 10.2 18:18   6,6
0 ; Saturday   .... 7:44 17.8j21:14|17.4 0:46|10.2 14:82   6.6
7,| Sunday  .   .   .   .   ,: 8:08 17.8j22:08|18,2 8:08   9.2 15:38   6,1
8 Monday 10:16 17.7|22:62|19.1    4:16   7.6 18:82   6.1
9 ; Tuesday 11:10 18.8|*8:29|19.S    6:06   6.1 17:16   6.1
10 I  Wednesday  .   .   .11:56 18.8      6:60   4.7 17:63   0.2
11 Thursday  .   .   .   .   0:02 20.5112:86119.0    6:28   B.7 18:28   0.4
12 ' Friday | 0:33 20.9jl8:18 19.1 7:03 3.1  18:68   6.8
18 | Saturday       .   .   , 1:03 21.1  13:50(19.0 7:87 2.8 19:80   7.2
14 Siinilav    .... 1:3321.1  11:27 l.v? S:10 2.8(20:02'  7.8
16 ; Monday | 2:04120.9 16:06|1«.3 8:44 3.120:::.".   8.4
16 e  Tuesday   .    .    .    .'  2:37 20.6 15:15 1 7.S     9:19    3.6 21:10   B.O
17 Wednosday   . . ,\ 3:13 19!9 16:30 17.2    9:57   4.4 21:52   9,6
18 Thursday   .   . . .1 3:54 19.0 17:21 10.01110:41'  5.2 22:43 10.2
19 Friday.         . . . 4:43 18.0118:17(18.2   11:32'  6.023:46 10.5
20 Saturday  .   . . . 6:48 17.1|19:20|16.8|| |....|12:31   0.7
21 I  Sunday I  6:56116.4 20:23:10.7:    1:02 10.4 1S:87|  6.9
22 |  Monday I  8:18 16.4)21:20 17.6,   2:211  9.5 14:401  6.9
23 Tuesday   .    .    .    .;  9:30117.0 22:08 IS.7 i  8:29   8.0 15:86   6.6
24 .   Wednesday   .   .   , 10:34117.8J22:61)19.9 j   4:22)  6.116:26   6.2
25 '  Thursday  .   .   .   .11:26 18.7|28:31I21.2     6:11   4.3117:13,  5.8
26 Friday | | 12:13 19.6    5:68   2.6il7:58| 5.6
27 I Saturday   .   .   .   . 0:10 22.2'13:00 19.9 6:44' 1.3J18:42t  5.7
28 | Sunday j 0:50 22.9 18:47 20.2 7:29 0.6 19:27   6.0
29 I Monday : 1:83 28.2 14:36 20.0 8:15' 0.8 20:14   6.6
30 I Tuesday  2:18 22.9 16:28|19.7 9:02; 0.7 21:04   7.3
31 j Wednesday   .   .   ,| 3:0622.1 I6:24|19.l|| 9:511 1.4121:59   S.l
The Time used is Pacific Standard, for the 120th Meridian west. It
Is counted from  0 to 24 hours, from midnight to midnight.
The Height is In feet and tenths of a foot, above the Low Water datum
adopted for the Chart. The Harbor datum, as established by the Grand
Trunk   Pacific   Railway,   Is   one   fool lower. mmoammmmimmm wimuimwrna/i
J
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Tuesday, May 2, 1911
#rmce Eupert journal
Telephone  138
Published twice a week on Tuesdays and Fridays from the office of
publication, Third Avenue, near
McBride Street.
Subscription rate to any point in
Canada, $2.00 a year; to points outside of Canada, $3.00 a year.
Advertising rates furnished on
application.
0. H. NELSON,
Editor.
Tuesday, May  2,  1911
OPENING IP COUNTRY
The announcement that the provincial government road superintendent, It. O. Jennings, intends to
have a trail open from the Skeena
River at Kitinangar to Stewart
before the present season has closed,
will be welcome news to :ili
who are interested in northern British Columbia, it is to be hoped that
tlie superintendent will not be frustrated in his designs but that ho
may have the way open by the tinio
desired.
The intention of the government
this season is to have main trails
put through tho territory between
the Skeena, the Naas and the country nortli of it, so that the pioneers
of this new land may exploit the
territory. This is exactly what is required. The future is assured but
what residents here require is the
expedition of the work. It is the
shortening of the time when the
country will be productive and yielding its share in the trade and commerce of the north, that is of importance.
The report of the superintendent
is that tiie country is a rich one. Settlement is beginning in that country
this year. The government is going
to assist in the opening of trails and
in the providing of the means for
experimenting in fruit growing. The
.government is alive to the needs of
the country and is showing a disposition to give it an early start in the
way of opening up settlement.
CHURCH   UNION
The meeting of the Methodist
district meeting here this week, with
the discussion this evening of the
question of union among the Methodists, tlie Presbyterians and the
Congregationalists in Canada, introduces a subject that is of pressing
importance to church people In a
place like this. The question of
union in an embryo city like Prince
Rupert, must appeal very strongly
to members arid supporters of the
different churches.
We have the spectacle here of
four, five or six church congregations struggling to perpetuate the
several branches of the Christian
Church which represent the different
schools of theological thought of
several centuries ago.
The position does seem Illogical to
the mind trained in a secular way.
While the various churches recognize that here is a duty put upon
them to bear a part in the evangelizing of the world they continue to
maintain separate congregations in
Christian centres, thus expending
large sums that would not be required  under  a  united  system.
In a place like Prince Rupert
there is surely small reason for a
continuation of the divided
churches. The laity of the different
branches are little concerned over
ihe smaller differences which may
exist in a theological sense. In actual practice they see alike. The
burden of erecting one or two
cnurches and maintaining them
properly would he- much more easily
borne than is the case where four,
live or six churches arc maintained.
A new city's needs are much more
easily filled in u church way hy Et
union. Church workers in such
places may well be expected to favor
the drawing together.
ALDERMAN WANTED
A number of citizens are circulating a petition to ask W. J. Alder to
accept nomination as alderman for
Ward 2 at the election to be held
next week. If iMr. Alder will accept
the duties It is more than probab'e
that he will be elected by acclamation as there is said to be very general favor expressed that he should
accept.
Mr. Alder has large interests her.'.
He has lived in Prince Rupert ever
since it started almost and should
know Its needs. Above all he 's
looked upon as an eminently safe
man to represent the people which
Is a strong point in his favor.
It Is to be hoped there will be
no election required now with its
disturbing tendencies. If Mr. Alder
will accept office he should be returned   by   acclamation.
THE ORIENTAL RACES
Church    Official    Drawing    Lessons
from Experience Believes Hope
in Evangelizing Yellow Races
Rev. T. Egerton Shore, general
secretary of the Methodist Missionary Society, speaking in Edmonton
on the problem before the mission
aries now at work in China and
Japan, expressed the opinion that
the destiny of the' world's civilization lies in the hands of the four
nations in possession of tlie territory
hounding the Pacific Ocean—Great
Britain, the United States, China
and Japan.
"Western nations can no longer
teach Japan anything about modern
methods of commerce or warfare,"
lie said. "Chia is in Hie midst of
a great awakening and is rapidly
approaching the point when she will
demand the same treatment for her
citizens in American and Canadian
ports as is accorded people from
European nations. It is impossible
to keep Hie Orientals out of America
in spite of tho laws restricting immigration of this class. The races on
tlie eastern and the western shores
of tlie Pacific are bound to mingle
with one another, and either those
on a Higher moral and spiritual
plane will be dram down to the
level of the other nations or those
who are now without Christianity
will be lifted up,
"If the latter condition is to bo
be brought about the Christian nations must assume an aggressive
attitude. They must furnish the
means and the men to carry the elevating influences of the Gospel into
China and Japan. This only will
prevent the flooding of America
with an eastern element that will
drag the morals of western people
down to the standard of those of
the lowest classes in Oriental countries today."
Mr. Shore spoke at length upon
the work that is being done by the
missionaries in West China, where
the Methodist church has been given
control of a territory with a population of 14,000,000. A university
under the joint control of all the
Protestant denominations at work in
West China is now being established
in one of the principal cities.
Mr. Shore is touring the west in
the interests of missionary work in
the Methodist church. One year ago
he returned to Canada after a thirteen months' trip through foreign
mission fields, during which time he
devoted particular attention to the
work in China and Japan.
****** * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * •*•
9 *
t     News of the Province      J
* i
{. .;• * * .*« * * * *** * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
SELECT CANDIDATE
NEW WESTMINSTER—At the
district Liberal convention held in
New Westminster, Reeve J. W.
Weart, of Btirnaby, was selected as
the Liberal candidate for the next
Dominion election. The names of
John Oliver, Delta; George Kennedy, New" Westminster; Robert Jardine, New Westminster, and J. W.
Weart, Burnaby, were placed in
nomination, All withdrew but
Messrs. Weart and Kennedy and the
former was selected candidate by 44
votes to Mr. Kennedy's 33. Reeve
Weart was opposed to nominating a
candidate at tnis meeting, but was
overruled. John Dick acted as chairman of the meeting, with Ed. Goulet
as secretary.
VICTORIA—The city's credit was
demonstrated to be in good condition at a meeting of the city council
when J. L. Rayinur reported that,
under the recent, local improvement
bylaws, debentures to the amount
of about $350,000 have been sold to
the Canadian Securities Company at
the rate of 96.26. This figure is a
slight advance upon thai received
fur the last batch of similar debentures, the' rate then being 96.25. On
that occasion the debentures* were
disposed of to a Toronto company.
The debentures carry Interest at the
rate of  4   per cent.
**************************
* "i
|     Size of Battleships     *
* *
* * * * eff * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
At the spring meeting of the Institution of Naval Architects at the
Hall of the Royal Society of Arts,
Adelphia, London, Professor J. J.
Welch read a paper on "The Problem of Size in Battleships." Within
the last ten years British battleships
had increased 60 per cent in displacement, 35 per cent in -length
and about 17 per cent In breadth;
the speed had been increased by
over two knots, while the weight of
metal discharged per broadside had
risen from  4,000  pounds to  12,500
The British Columbia Company
LIMITED.
AUTHORIZED CAPITAL $100,000.::  PAH) UP CAPITAL $41,500
DIRECTORS:—Reginald C. Brown, President; J. C. Maclure, Vice-
President; H. E. Marks, Managing Director; Capt. E. Nash, William
' McNair, R. A. Bevan, and F. C.  Williams, Secretary.      :-:      :-:
INTEREST 4 PER CENT. DEPOSITS
This Company acts as Executors, Administrators, Transferees and
Secretaries to Public Companies.   Commercial, Industrial and other
business propositions underwritten.    Issues  made  on  the
London and New York Stock Exchanges.
TIMBER, COAL, LANDS, and
COMPANY ORGANIZATION
Heud Office for Canada, 203, 208, 210, 215 Carter-Cotton Building,
VANCOUVER, B.C.
DURESCO
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The King of Water Paints
FIRST IN THE FIELDEEEEF0RE1ST EVER SINCE
:SOLE AGENTS IN WESTERN CANADA:
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Replenish
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EVERYTHING CLEAN AND FRESH
Goods for the Table to Suit the Most
Fastidious Housewife
! MERRYFIELD'S i
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Splendid Accommodations
Newly Furnished
Hot baths;  r.ght down town;   good
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RATES, FIFTY CENTS AND HP
LINDSAY'S CARTAGE & STORAGE
G. T. P. CARTAGE AGENTS
Office at H. B. Rochester, Centre St.
LADYSMITH COAL
is handled by us.  All orders receive
prompt attention. Phone No. 68.
pounds, an increase or over 200 per
cent. The new type of cruiser-battleship, too, had developed, until it
now Included the Lion and Princess
Royal, vessels of 26,350 tons displacement, each having a length of
660 feet between perpendiculars,
and a speed of 2S knots.
The same tendency was strongly
marked in other navies. In the
United States, for example, the displacement of battleships hud been
more than doubled within the last
ten years, the speed had been' Increased by three knots, and the
weight of metal thrown per broadside—taking the latest available
Information—had been increased
practically 225 per cent. In the
German navy the displacement of
the battleship had been about doubled within the period under review,
and the weight of metal discharged
per broadside had increased by about
260 per cent.
Professor Welch went Into detail
on the question of protection and
equipment, and remarked that the
contention that large dimensions exposed a greater target at attack
must now be expanded to Include the
additional menace of missiles from
dirigbles and aeroplanes. Assuming the attack to be delivered from a
height of one mile, a hollow bomb
carrying 100 pounds of explosive
would take about 20 seconds to
reach the water level, and would
then have a striking    velocity    ap
proaching 550 feet per second. The
difficulties associated with correctly
judging speeds of battleships from
the height named, and making proper allowance for cross wind currents,
etc., continued to render a hit very
uncertain if a single missile only
was employed. It was stated, however, that arrangements were being
made tor dropping a number of such
missiles from a single dirigible, irt
which case that form ot attack
would beconio a serious menace. It
seemed reasonable to suppose that
the best protection against attack
from aerial craft would be found
in counter-attack by the same type
of airship, associated with guii3 of
the attacked vessel specially arranged for high angle fire. Taht defence would be analogous to that
adopted against torpedo boats and
torpedo boat destroyers. With those
considerations in view, the menace
from the air might be expected to
have no greater effect on limitation
of size of ships than that, resulting
from the introduction of the torpedo.
In tbe course of the discussion on
the paper, Professor Biles, Clasgow
University, thought that there was
much greater value in the large ship
than in the small ship.
 o	
We trust the movement for honest
weights and measures will not result in increasing the size of a peck
of trouble.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * ***
*
*
*
I Remember
V T
* |
That we j
Import    j
! Our Wines 1
direct from Europe; and that
no house in Prince Rupert can
equal them for quality. No
better can be bought anywhere
in the Province. We make a
specialty  of
Family Trade
and guarantee satisfaction
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE.
NOTICE Is hereby given that the
reserve of a parcel of land situated
on Graham Island, notice of which
appeared In the British Columbia
Gazette on the 25th of February,
1909, being dated 23rd February,
1909, is cancelled to permit of the
lands being acquired by pre-emption
only and for no other purpose
ROBT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Department of Lands,
Victoria, B. C, April 5th, 1911.
4-14-17-5
RESERVE
NOTICE is hereby given that all
vacant Crown lands not already under reserve, situated within the
boundaries of the Land Recording
Districts of Cariboo and Lillooet,
and the Kamloops Division of Yale
Land Recording District, are reserved from any alienation under
the "Land Act" except by pre-emption.
ROBT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy  Minister of Lands.
Department of Lands,
Victoria, B. C, April 3rd, 1911.
4-14—lm
SKEENA DISTItlCT.
WHARF, PRINCE RUPERT.
* We   also  carry  a  complete *
* *
* stock of other *
Liquors
Try a glass of
Cascade
Beer
* t
f The best local beer on the J
* market. 9,
* *
*	
! CLARKE BROS.
*
%.      Christiansen & Brandt Bid.
*   Telephone 80       Third Avenne *
u« »>.;,.:,.$..:.*<■> »>*•:.*:.#.:.»:.•:.•>•:•*.>.:..>**> •>»:•
IN THE COUNTY COURT OF ATLIN,
holden at Prince Rupert.
In the Matter of the "Official Administrators Act," and In the
Matter of the Estate of L. Buto-
vitch, deceased intestate:
TAKE NOTICE that by order of
His Honour Judge Young, made the
28th day of April, 1911, I was appointed Administrator of the estate
and effects of L. Butovltch, deceased
intestate. All parties having claims
against the said estate are hereby
required to forward, same properly
verified to me on or before the 15th
day of May, 1911, nnd all parties Indebted to the said estate are required to pay the amount of their
indebtedness to me forthwith.
Dated  this  1st day of May, 1911.
J.  H.  McMULLIN,
Official Administrator.
5-2-5
TRUST COMPANIES.
EVERY COMPANY receiving deposits of money or carrying on business in the Province of British Columbia as a Trust Company, as defined In the "Trust Companies Regulation Act, 1911," is requested to
furnish particulars as to the corporate name of the company, and tbe
name and address of its managing
director to the Inspector of Trust
Companies, Victoria, in order to receive a supply of forms to be used
in making the return as provided in
section 4 of said Act.
W. U. RUNNALS,
Inspector of Trust Companies.
4-18—lm '
In the Matter of Chapter 115, "Navigable Waters  Protection  Act,"
R. S. C, 190o.
NOTICE is hereby given that
drawings and .description of the site
of a proposed wharf at Prince Rupert,. B. C, have been deposited
with the Minister of Public Wgrks,
Ottawa, and duplicates thereof with
the Registrar of Deeds at Prince
Rupert, B. C, and that thirty days
after date the Honourable the Minister of Public Works and the Government of British Columbia will
apply to the Governor-General in
Council for approval thereof.
J. E. GRIFFITH,
Public  Works Engineer.
Department of Public Works,
Victoria, B. C, 5th April, 1911.
4-14—lm
NOTICE.
PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given
that, under the authority contained
in section 131 of the "Land Act," a
regulation has been approved by the
Lieutenant-Governor in Council fixing the minimum sale prices of first
and second-class lands at $10 and $5
per acre, respectively.
This regulation further provides
that the prices fixed therein Bhall
apply to all lands with respect to
which the application to purchase Is
given favourable consideration after
this date, notwithstanding the date
of such application or any delay that
may have occurred in the consideration of the same.
Further notice is hereby given
that all persons who have pending
applications to purchase lands under
the provisions of sections 34 or 36
of the "Land Act" and who are not
willing to complete such purchases
under the prices fixed by the aforesaid regulation shall be at liberty to
withdraw such applications and receive a refund of the moneys deposited on account of such applications.
WILLIAM R. ROSS,
Minister of Lands.
Department of Lands,
Victoria, B. C, April 3rd, 1911.
4-11—6-11.
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS
STEWART SCHOOL.
SEALED TENDERS, superscribed
"Tender for Stewr.rt School," will
be received by the Honourable the
Minister of Public Works up to noon
of Monday, the 1st day of May,
1911, for the erection and completion of a two-room frame school
with basement, etc., t.t Stewart,
B. C, in the Skeena Electoral District.
Plans, specifications, contract,
and forms of lender may be seen on
and after the 7th day of April, 1911,
at the offices of J. H. Smith, Esq.,
Secretary to the School Board, Stew-
aro, B. C.; the Government Agent,
Prince Rupert; and the Department
of Public Works, Victoria.
Each proposal must be accompanied by an accepted bank cheque or
certificate of deposit on a chartered
bank of Canada, made payable to
the Honourable the Minister of Public Works, for the sum of $250
which shall be forfeited if the party
tendering decline to enter into contract when called upon to do so, or
if he fall to complete the work contracted for. The cheques or certificates of deposit of unsuccessful tenderers will be returned to them
upon the execution of the contract
Tenders will not be considered
unless made out on the forms supplied, signed with the actual signature of the tenderer, and enclosed
in the envelopes furnished.
The lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted.
J. E. GRIFFITH,
Public Works Engineer.
Department of Public Works,
Victoria, B. C, 3rd April, 1911.
4-14—5-2
4m M
Tuesday, May 2, 1911
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
PRINCE RUPERT AS SHIPPING CENTRE
NEVER in the history of port
cities has there been such
a sudden development of
a great shipping trade as has
characterized the short life of
Prince Rupert. Although it Is
by months that the city's history
can be traced, there is a volume of
shipping in connection with the port
that would do credit to a city of
many times its size| It has become
the great entreport for the whole
of northern Britisii Columbia.
The opening of the spring here
has been followed by an unprecedented rush Into the various parts
of the province within reach of this
port. Transportation companies
which are always the first to come
In touch with the development of
trade and who are able to judge Hid
needs to a very    large extent, have
to navigation has been attended this
year with far more interest than
ever before. With warehouses
stacked with freight, the seven
steamers on that run have pulled
out, each carrying its full limit of
freight and passengers for points
along the Skeena. The steamers will
be taxed to their utmost this summer to cope with the demands which
will be made upon them. Merchants from up river points, knowing the demands that are to be put
upon them, have come down to
Prince Rupert in crowds and are
personally superintending the despatch of goods to their headquarters.
The past two weeks have been
days of unrest for the wholesalers o(
this city. With merchants up river
clamoring for goods and with the
river  steamers  loaded    to capacity,
KOSMOS LINES PROFIT
According to the report of the directors of the Kosmos line, operating between Hamburg, the west
coast and Puget Sound and owned
by the Deutshce Dampfschiffahts-
Gesellschaft, 1510 was a much more
profitable year than 1909, the gross
earnings amounting to 4,146,649
marks, or an increase of 700,000
marks over 1909 when they were
3,456,629 mark's. Copies of the
report were received in Victoria
Despite the gross gains, the writeoff, the report indicates, was sonm-
what smaller than in 1909,'although
In relation to the book value of the
fleet, it was greater, two of the
steamers formerly owned by the
company  having been  disposed    of.
River steamer making u rail on the Skeena on the way from here to   Hazelton,
made arrangements for a very busy
season,
The coastwise shipping brings
stamers of many lines here. The
Grand Trunk Pacific is prepared to
cope with a very large tourist and
general travel and with a heavy
freighting business. Its two floating palaces, the Prince Rupert and
the Prince George, have each entered
upo na regular weekly service between here and the ports of the
south, so that that line can give a
twice a week service by these vessels
with Victoria, Vancouver and Seattle.
But the Grand Trunk Pacific has
found that it must provide additional accommodation on this route, particularly In the way of freight. The
Henrietta has been put into that
trade and as soon as the Prince
John, which is to serve the shorter
routes out of Prince Rupert, arrives
the Prince Albert will be put on the
freight and passenger trade with the
south.
The Canadian Pacific Railway,
ever alive to the needs of trade, has
likewise provided for a service far
in excess of anything they have ever
given to the north before. The
Princess May, the Princess Beatrice
and the Princess Royal will, after
June 1, all be put on the run to here,
the May and Royal continuing to
Skagway while the Beatrice will go
to Queen Charlotte Island points. In
addition to this the Princess Enn
will be on the route as a freight carrier only. The service thus provided
will give the Canadian Pacific Railway a steamer into Prince Rupert
about every third or fourth day each
way.
The Alaska Steamship Company
and other United States lines are
also prepared for a very full service
north this year, and as the most of
these vessels call here both ways.
Union Steamship Company and the
Northern Company also have spleu-
did service to this port from the
south. The Camosun, the reliable
steamer of the urst named company,
wnich has for so many years been
arriving so regularly that one can
almost set his watch by it, is in
shape for handling a large share of
business.
It will be seen by the coastwise
shipping that Prince Rupert will thi3
summer have practically a daily
steamship service with the southern
ports which will be a great advantage to shippers.
The opening of the Skeena River)
they have found themselves helpless to satisfy tne demands. Being
on the ground they have had advantages over outside shippers, however, and have been able to get partial  shipments  made.
The situation indicates that similar conditions are to prevail all
i summer and there is to be a continued rush up the river all season.
The railway line will relieve the
situation, it is expected, in a few
days, as soon as the snow is melted
from the points where the company
found it impossible to get the snow
sheds erected last season before winter set in. Superintendent Meehan
will, when the line is fully open, be
able to provide a good service and
in that way an immense saving in
time will be effected in getting supplies up river. The steamers will
then be relieveo of the necessity "if
coming farther down than below the
canyon, the freight being then transferred from the rails to the steamers.
Ihe net profit realized admitted of
the dividend being doubled when
compared to 1909 amounting to 10
per cent, as opposed to 5 per cent a
year ago.
The report states that the traffic
last year on all the Kosmos lines
was, for the first time since the depression which set in in 1907, most
satisfactory, especially the outward
trade to Chili. Business with Peru
was very slack at the beginning of
the ye ar, but increased as the
months passed. In the meantime
contracts for railroad construction
on a large scale in both Chili and
Peru have been concluded, the report says, and the Kosmos line will
to a very large extent participate in
carrying the materials for these
roads. The report adds that in tho
traffic with Central America and tlie
west, coast of North America, especially as regards the transportation
of coffee from Central America to
Europe, the competition of railroads
opened in  recent years to ports on
The Mount  Royal,  which wns lost in the Skeena Canyon n few years ago  and   which   has   been   made   the
type of steamer for river navigation.
the districts in question lias been
somewhat less profitable. The favorable condition of the freight market,
the report says, rendered it possible
to charter some of the steamers to
outsiders, the case of the German
steamer Serak, which was chartered
while in Tacoma harbor to carry
wheat to the United Kingdom for
Balfour, Guthrie e& Co., being cited
as an example. Charters on the outside were taken, however, only when
the steamers could be spared from
their regular usages. The insurance
reserve of the company shows a
large increase which the report explains by the fact that no losses nor
serious casualties were sustaine;d
ltsa year.
masts 1*1!. mm\ Mmmrnmmm
New Twin Screw Steamer
Prince George
TRANS-PACIFIC SCHEDULE
Very shortly the summer schedule of the Canadian Pacific Railway
trans-Pacific liners will be inaugu
rated and the steamships will not
be allowed such long stays at Van
couver as they have had during the
winter months. The last of the ves
sels to leave here on the old time
table Was the Empress of Japan,
which sailed last week, and the new
schedule commences with the Empress of China, wnich is due to arrive from the Orient on Friday.
The Empress of China will remain
in Vancouver for twelve days, but
the vessel which follows her will
only be given ten days in which to
prepare for the next outbound passage. During the winter the steamships remain at the Terminal City
for nineteen days, as it is not a
paying scheme to dispatch vessels so
often as in the summer.
There will be the same four liners
plying across the Pacific in tlie service of the Canadian  Pacific Railway
For Vancouver, Victoria and Sjattl;
 H Mondays at 8 a.  in.
S. S. "PRINCE GEORGE" sails for  Stewart,  Sundays,  8:00  a.  in.
Vancouver,   Victoria,   Seattle, Mondays,  8:00  a.  m,
S. S. "PRINCE ALBERT" for Port Simpson,    Naas    mver   Points,
Massett,  Naden Hcrbor, every Wednesday, 1:00 p. m.
and for
Refuge  Bay, Skidegate, Queen  Charlotte City, Lockepurt,  Pa-
cofi, Jedway, Ikeda Bay, Rose  Harbor and return    via Queen
Charlotte  City, e.'ei-y  Saturday,  1:00 p. in.
THE GRAND TRUNK RAi.. ,VAY SYSTEM, connecting with
trains from tho Pacific Coast, operates a frequent and convenient
service of luxurious trains over its DOUBLE TRACK route between
Chicago, Toronto, Montreal, Quebec, Halifax, Portland, Uoston,
New York and Philadelphia.
Information and tickets obtainable from the office hereunder
mentioned. Trans-Atlantic steamship bookings by all lines arranged
A. E. McMASTER
Freight and Pasenger Agent, G. T. P. Wharf.
mmjmmsammmmmmmammm
Skeena    Land    District—District   of
, Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that I, Roy,
Chrlsman, of Port Esslngton, B. C
occupation prospector, intend to apply for permission to lease the following described land:—Commencing at a post planted about five
miles distant and In a southwesterly
direction from the point at the entrance to Captain Cove, Petrel
Channel, and on the northeast sido
of McCauley Island; thence west 20
chains; thence south 40 chains,
thence east about 20 chains to shore
of Petrel Channel; thence northerly
along shore line of Petrel Channel
to point of commencement and containing eighty acres more or less.
ROY CHR1SMAN.
Dated April  11, 1911. 4-25
Tlie steamship Prince Rupert, one of tlie palatial vessels that the Gnui <1 Trunk Pacific has put on the const
service out of here.
This season will see Prince Rupert one of the busiest ports on the
Pacific. The tonnage of coasting
shipping to enter here will compare
most favorably with the more populous centres, while the volume of
trade done from here will be very-
heavy.
 o	
The Port Simpson sailed today for
up river.
the east coast makes itself more and
more felt.
These railroads, the report says,
are now endeavoring to secure the
conveyance of the products of the
west coast for their lines, but the
Kosmos line has taken corresponding measures for the protection of
its Interests. In the face of this competition, the report says, traffic with
this year as last, but by next year
it is expected that the two new
steamships, for which the contracts
will bze let very shortly, will have a
speed of 18 knots, they will undoubtedly secure the bulk of the silk
trade, which the various lines are
now trying hard to secure a firm
hold  on.
With the new vessels on  the run
the    Canadian   Pacific    will also be
Skeena    Land    District—District    of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that W. H. Ferguson, of Prince Rupert, B. C, occupation civil engineer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about one
mile southerly, following tlie sinuosities of the shore line from the
southwest corner, of Lot 104, Range
V; thence 20 chains west; tlience 20
chains south; thence 20 chains west,
tlience 20 cliains south; thence 20
eleulns west; tlience about 40 chains
south; thence along shore northerly
t:i point of commencement.
W. II. FERGUSON,
0,  Hanson, Agent.
Dated April 22nd,  1911. 4-25
Skeena Land District—District of
Const Range V.
TAKE NOTICE thai W. II. Ferguson of Prince Rupert, n. 0., occupation civil engineer, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about onj mile
southerly following tlie sinuosities
of the shore line from the southwest
corner of Lot 104, Range V; thenco
20 cliains west; thence 20 chains
south; thence 20 chains went; thence
20 chains south; thence 20 chains
west; thence about 40 chains south;
thence along shore northerly to
point of commencement.
W. H. FERGUSON.
G. Hansen, Agent.
Dated April 22nd,  1911. 4-25
ROGERS STEAMSHIP AGENCY
Through tickets to all points In the
United States and Canada by
The Northern Pacific Railway
The finest train across the continent.
Connecting at NEW YORK, BOSTON
PORTLAND and HALIFAX with ATLANTIC STEAMERS for all points in
ENGLAND, SCOTLAND, GERMANY,
FRANCE, ITALY, NORWAY and
SWEDEN, by WHITE STAR RED
STAR, AMERICAN - DOMINION,
WHITE STAR DOMINION, CUNARD
FRENCH LINE, NORTH GERMAN
LLOYD, HAMBURG AMERICAN and
CANADIAN NORTHERN Steamships.
For all information write me, or
call at office:
J. H. ROGERS
General Railway & Steamship Agent
Prince Rupert, B.C.
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAW CO.
II. C. Coast S. S. Service
#
strong bidders for the passenger
travel and freight, which is carried
to and from Oriental ports. A rumor was afloat a few days ago,
which stated that another of the
Atlantic vessels, a sister eSlip to the
Monteagle, was to be traneferred to
this coast, but this has been discovered to be unfiunded, the company
having no Intention of doing this.
FAMOUS
Princess  Line
Princess
May
FOR
Vancouver, Victoria,
AND
Seattle
MONDAY, MAY 1, at 6
 p.m.
J. G. McNAB,
General Agent.
If yon want tlie honey
That comes from tlie hive
Take up the phone and
Coll one, double five.
The Journal (twice a week), only
$2.00 a year.
i    .*
V PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Tuesday, May 2, 1911
i.<.*.n.*+4.++4.<.+++++*+*4.<.<.<.*<.***+**<.+,>.:..:.^^..>.:..j***.j. *******
j     AMONG THE NINES     !
* el|      *
ft****************************************************
PROPERTIES  BONDED
Half
a Million Dollars Have Been Invested About Hazelton.
A Few of the Properties in the District Thai  Have Itun into
Largest Figures
60,000
45,000
Below is a list of tlie mining
properties in Hazelton camp which
have been sold on bond for sums of
$10,000 or more, according to figures obtained by the Omineca Herald. No note has been made of many
minor transactions, a majority of
which were lor speculative purposes. In the other camps of the
uistriet a large number of sales
have been made, but we are unable
at this  time  to  "ublish  a  complete
list of transactions:
On Nine Mile Mountain
Silver Cup, half interest of
H.  A.  Harris    in     four
claims $20,000
Sunrise     group     of     four
claims,      Rosenthal      &
Harris  to    J.  Frederick
Ritchie  and  others   ....
Silver   Pick,   three    claims,
Dutch    Kline    to   T.   L.
Carr	
Silver Bell, three    claims,
S.  B. Slinger and others
to H. A. Hanson      15,000
McBean     &     Long,     four
claims,   to     Stewart     &
McHugh      35,000
McBean,   Long   it   Latham,
six claims, to Dan McLeod     50,000
Dawson      Fraction,      one
claim, James Latham to
C. L.  Hanson         10,000
On Four Mile Hill-
Erie,   on e claim,   Edward
Atridge to E. L. Kinman 25,000
Dyer  -   Stephenson,       five
claims,    J. Dyer and T.
Stephenson     to     G.   L.
Falkner and others . . . 45,000
Iron   Mask,  three    claims,
D. L. Purvis, J. Dyer and
T. Stephenson to G. L.
Falkner and others   ....
On   Rouchcr  de  ltoule
Mountain—
Group  of seven  claims  on
east   side     of     Juniper
creek, Sargent and Alon-
roe to R. P. Trimble  . . .     25,000
MINEItAL  STRIKE
A new and important discovery of mineral is reported to
have been made on the railway
line eight miles east of Haze'-
ton. The news has caused considerable excitement, and resulted in an increased demand
for free miners' certificates,
many making for the new discovery. Quite a number ot
claims have been staked.
50,000
Total   amount     $420,000
MINING  RAILWAY
Kaslo &  Siocan  Railway Has Been
Purchased by Syndicate Interested in Mines
At a public meeting called by the
Board of Trade at Kaslo, definite
plans for repairing and reopening
the Kaslo & Siocan Railway were
announced by a syndicate of mine
operators and others. The line has
been out or use since the brush fires
of last summer and has seriously
handicapped the mining industry of
the Siocan country.
Twenty-five thousand dollars was
subscribed at the meeting and a
sinking fund of $13,000 was also
subscribed by .1. L. Trallack and as-
soe-lates. The provincial government
will guarantee a loan of $200,000
for three years without interest. The
syndicate will at once exercise its
option of purchase and a company
will be formed to operate the line.
It will be repaired and put in first-
idass condition as far as McGuignn.
It will be equipped with steel salf-
duiiiplng ore cars and new motive
power. Ore bins and car slips will
be built and a car barge and powerful tug will be purchased for service
on Kootenay Lake, thus connecting
either with the Great Northern or
Canadian  Paeitlo Railways.
A short time ago the Canadian
Pacific Railway was offered the line
and equipment for $200,000. The
Great Northern now is selling the
line alone to the Kaslo syndicate for
$25,000.
ASHESTOS OF CANADA
Supplies    Eighty-two    Per   Cent    of
World's Consumption Every
Year
Canada produces 82 per cent of
the world's supply of asbestos. The
companies operating asbestos quarries and factories in the Dominion
are capitalized at. $24,290,000. In
1880 only 380 tons of asbestos were
produced, valued at $24,700; whereas in 1909, the production amounted
to 63,300 tons, valued at $2,300,000.
In 1909, 3,000 men were employed
in the asbestos industry, and received wages amounting to $1,350,-
000. These facts and much valuable
technical information of practical
value to the general public, are contained in a volume of 316 pages,
just issued by the Mines Branch of
the Depai'tment 9? Mines at Ottawa.
This valuable addition to the series
of monographs being issued under
the direction of Dr. Haanel, was
written by Fritz Clrkel, M, E., and
treats the subject of asbestos from
every viewpoint: histology, geology,
peculiarities of Canadian occurrences, quarrying and milling, together with statistics, cost of extraction, its occurrence in foreign countries, and its practical application in
the arts and manufactures.
The work is fully interesting. To
give an idea of the enormous reserves in some of the asbestos deposits, Mr. Cirkel mentions the case of
one, the Black Lake quarries, Quebec, where there are some 45,000,-
000 tons of asbestos rock iu sight
The author goes fully into the discussion of foreign asbestos occurrences, and considers Russia the
only real rival as regards the extent
of asbestos resources. But inasmuch
as the Russians are heavily handicapped by the excessive cost of
transportation—$35 to $40 per ton
to London—serious competition is
not feared in the leading markets
of the world.
bONG   FLORAL  GAIIDEN
Canadian    Pacific   Rnilway   Sending
Out 100,01)0 Packages
of Seeds
Over 100,000 packages of flower
seeds are being sent out this spring
by the Canadian Pacific Railway
Company's f'oral department to the
agents, section men and other employees of the company.
After nearly twenty years' existence, this department of the railway
has colossal proportions, and as the
thirty-six different varieties of flower seeds are brought from the four
quarters of the globe, their purity
and quality are the best procurable.
The steady expansion of this department is owing to tlie love of cultur-
ing flowers, and the keen desire to
beautify their surroundings which
lias been inculcated into the Canadian Pacific employees by this opportunity for indulging in them, and
the result has been most gratifying.
Prizes were given for the best
flower gardens last year, and the
competition was very close. This
additional incentive will be continued this year, and prizes will also
be given for the best photographs
of gardens along the line of railway.
The irrigation and forestry departments of the company in the
west are taking warm interest in
the work, and in addition to growing flowers, many western agents
raise vegetables and have practically craeted miniature experimental
farms of their own.
The effective work of the Canadian Pacific Ruilway floral depar. ■
ment has had wide-reach ing bene
ficlal effect and not only in encouraging a love of flowers amongst its
army of employees, and in beautifying Its long lines of rails, which is
highly appreciated by those who
travel by the company's trains, but
in showing the world that all corporations are not exclusively after
the almighty dolfar always.
He was an old merchant who had
built up a big business by advertising.
"John," said his wife, "what do
you want on your tombstone?"
"Oh," he answered, "it isn't important what the text is so long as
it gets good space and is well displayed."
 o .
A prominent physician was recently called to his telephone by a
colored woman formerly in the
service of his wife. In great agitation the woman told the physician
that her youngest child was in a had
way.
"What seems to be the trouble?"
asked the doctor.
"Doc, she swallowed a bottle of
ink:"
"I'll be over there in a short while
to see her," said the doctor. "Have
you done anything for her?"
"1 gave her three pieces of blot-
tin' paper, Doc," said the colored
woman doubtfully.
PUBI/IC NOTICE
Tenders will be received by tbe
undersigned up to Thursday, June
1st, 1911, at five o'clock in the afternoon for the purchase of Lot 541,
Range 5, Coast District, situated In
the vicinity of the City of Prince Rupert and containing 19.7 acres.
An upset price of one hundred
dollars per dcre has been fixed upon
the lands embraced in said lot.
Each tender must be enclosed in
an envelope securely sealed and
marked "Tender for Lot 541, Range
5, Coast District," and must be accompanied by an accepted cheque
for twenty-five per cent of the
amount set out in such tender.
Payment for the lot will be accepted in instalments, one-quarter
cash and the balance in three equal
annual payments with interest on
deferred payments at the rate of six
pel i ?nt per annum.
The cheques of all unsuccessful
tenderers will be returned to them.
The highest or any tender will
not necessarily be accepted.
Field Notes of the survey of the
said Lot 541, Range 5, Coast District, may be seen at the office of
the undersigned.
No commissions of any kind will
be allowed.
J. H. McMULLEN,
Government Agent.
Government Agent's Office,
Prince Rupert, B.  C,
April 27th, 1911. 6-1
IN THE COUNTY COURT OF ATLIN,
Holden  at Prince Rupert..
In the Matter of Lazar Milovich, Deceased,
and
In  the Matter  of the "Official Administrators' Act."
Dated   13th   day   of   April,   A.   D.
1911.
Upon reading the affidavits of
Micho Luke Kosich, Mike Wusovich,
Nike Gurvich, John Hugh McMullen,
C. V. Bennett and a further affidavit of J. H. McMullen, it is ordered,
that John Hugh McMullin, Official
Administrator for part of the County
Court District of Atlin, embraced
within the Skeena and Queen Charlotte Islands Mining Division,
shall be Administrator of all
and singular the estate and effects
of Lazar Milosevich, deceased, Intestate, and that this Order is published in the Prince Rupert "Journal" for two issues.
(Signed)      F. McB. YOUNG,
5-2 Judge.
LAND   ACT
A favorite spring exercise this
year is to run down and look at the
Canal. It does the liver-saddened
winter-workers good to inspect an
honest job. Tnree hundred and
sixty millions is all that Colonel
Goethals intends to spend on that
canal, and he asks for only about
three years' more time to build it In.
Go early while the cuts are still
a-cutting and the dams a-building.
The show is not going to open much
longer!
I, John Kirkaldy, of Lakelse Valley, by occupation a farmer, do solemnly declare:—
1. I, John Klrkaldy Intend to
apply for permission to purchase six
hundred and forty acres of unoccupied and unreserved Crown lands
(not being part of an Indian Settle-
met), situate in the vicinity of Lakelse Valley.
2. I, on the 11th day of April,
1911, did locate the said land by
planting at the N. E. corner thereof
a post at least four inches square
and standing not less than four feet
above the surface of the ground.
3. The said post is about 120
chains distant, and In a southerly
direction from Herman Lake.
4. I, on the same day did inscribe
on tlie said post tlie name John Kirkaldy, and the letters N. E. corner.
5. 1, on the same day, did affix
lo the said post a notice with the
fo.lowing words written thereon:—
Sixty days from date I intend to apply to the Commissioner of Lands
tor permission to purchase the following described lands: Commencing at this post; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains;
tht-nce east 80 chains; thence north
SO chains, containing 640 acres more
or less.
6. The purpose for which the
land is required is agriculture.
7. That I am not disqualified to
make this application by the provisions of sub-section (11) of section
34 of the "Land Act."
And I make this solemn declaration, conscientiously believing it to
be true, and knowing that It is of
the same force and effect as if made
under oath and by virtue of the
"Canada Evidence Act."
JOHN KIRKALDY,
Signature  of  Declarant.
Declared and signed by John Kirkaldy, on the 18th day of April,
A. D. 1911 before me at Kltsumka-
lum.
E. EBY,
(Notarial Seal) N. P.
4-28
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Typewriter
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Please read tbe headline over
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The typewriter whose conquest of
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LAND PURCHASE NOTICE.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICEttlat J. K. Anderson, of Masset, B. C, occupation farmer, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted on the shore of Masset Inlet,
about two miles west of the S. W.
corner of T. L. 40787, thence north
80 chains; thence west 40 chains;
thence south 80 chains more or less
to the shore of Masset Inlet; thence
easterly along the shore back to the
place of commencement, containing
320 acres, more or less.
J. K. ANDERSON.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 25, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Frank Nelson,
of Chicago, 111., U. S. A,, occupation
clerk, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about one mile north of
N. W, corner of Application to Purchase 6953; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence north
80 chains; thence east 80 chains, containing 640 acres.
FRANK NELSON.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 25, 1910.
We announced this new sales plan
recently, just to feel the pulse of the
people. Simply a small cash payment—then 17 cents a day. That
is the plan in a nutshell.
The result has been such a deluge of applications for machine*
that we are simply astounded.
The demand comes from people ol
all classes, all ages, all occupations.
The majority of inquiries has
come from people of known financial
standing who were attracted by the
novelty of the proposition. An Impressive demonstration of the immense popularity of the Oliver Typewriter.
A startling confirmation of our belief that the Era of Unlyersal Typewriting Is at hand.
A Quarter of a Million People are
Making Money With
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The Oliver Typewriter Is a moneymaker, right from the word "go!" So
easy to run that beginners soon get
in the "expert" class. Earn as you
learn. Let the machine pay the 17
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yours.
Wherever you are, there's work to
be done and money to be made by
using the Oliver. The business world
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are not enough to supply the demand.
Their salaries are considerably above
those of many classes of workers.
"An Oliver Typewriter in
Every Home!"
That is our battle cry today. We
have made the Oliver supreme in
usefulness and absolutely indispensable .in business. Now comes the
conquest of the home.
The simplicity and strength of the
Oliver fit It for family use. It Is becoming an Important factor in the
home training of young people. An
educator as well as a money maker.
Our new selling plan puts tbe
Oliver on the threshold of every
home in America. Will you close
the door of your home or office on
this remarkable Oliver opportunity?
Write for further details of our
easy offer and a free copy of the new
Oliver catalogue.    Address:
R. C. BEAN
Prince Rupert Agent
General   Offices:   Oliver  Typewriter
Building, Chicago, 111.
-LADYSMITH-
COAL
ROCHESTER & MONROE, Phone 116
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Fred. A. De
Lisle, of Masset, B. C, occupation
farmer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 40 chains south
and 120 chains east of the S. E. corner of Lot 35; thence north 80
chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains, containing 640 acres.
FRED. A. DE  LISLE.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 25, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that George Stanley Mayer, of Masset, B. C, occupation farmer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:-—Commencing at a
post planted on the east shore of
Tsu Skundale Lake; thence east 80
chains; thence south 40 chains, more
or less, to the north boundary of
T. L. 35413; thence west and south
along the boundaries of T. L. 35413,
to the shore of the Ain River; thence
northerly, along the shore, back to
the place of commencement, containing 500 acres, more or less.
GEORGE STANLEY MAYER.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 28, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Robert Cross,
of Masset, B. C, occupation farmer,
Intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted on the east shore of Tsu Skundale
Lake; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains, to or near to the
S. E. corner of Lot 35; thence west
40 chains, more or less; thence
south 40 chains, more or less; thence
west 40 chains more or less, following the southern boundaries of Lot
35; thence south to the shore; thence
southerly along the shore back to the
place of commencement, containing
500 acres, more or less.
ROBERT  CROSS.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 28, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Christina Orr,
of lasset, B. C, occupation married,
Intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described
lands: —Commencing at a post planted about 40 chains south and 3 miles
east of the N. E. corner of Lot 35;
thence eouth 40 chains; thence west
80 chains; thence north 40 chains;
thence east 80 chains, containing 320
acres.
CHRISTINA ORR.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 25, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Clara Orr, of
Masset, B C., occupation spinster,
Intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted about 40 chains south and 80
chains east of the N. E. corner of
Lot 35; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence north
80 chains; thence east 80 chains, containing 640 acres.
CLARA ORR.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 25, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Wesley Singer, of Masset, B. C, occupation farmer, Intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted about 4 miles north of the N. W.
corner of T. L. 40859; thence south
80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence east
80 chains, containing 640 acreB.
WESLEY SINGER.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 27, 1910.
LAND PURCHASE NOTICE.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Alice Millard,
of Masset, B. C, occupation married
woman, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:— Commencing at a
post planted about 80 chains east
and 120 chains north of the N. E.
corner of Lot 35; thence north 80
chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains, containing 640 acres.
ALICE MILLARD.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 25, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Merton A.
Merrill, of Masset, B. C, occupation
prospector, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted at the S. W. corner of
T. L. 40787; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south
80 chains, more or less, to the shore
of Masset Inlet; thence easterly along
the shore back to the place of commencement, containing 640 acres,,
more or less. 1
MERTON A. MERRILL.      j
Dated Nov. 25, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that A. Walter De
Lisle, ot Masset, B. c, occupation
farmer, intends to apply for permis-
sionu to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 40 chains south
and 120 chains east of the S. E. corner ot Lot 35; thence south 80
chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence east
80 chains, containing 640 acres.
A. WALTER DE LISLE.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 25, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Carl Nelson,
of Chicago, 111., U. S. A., occupation
draughtsman, Intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 80 chains east
and 120 chains north of N. E. corner of Lot 35; thence south 80
chains; thence' east 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence west
80 chains, containing 640 acres.
CARL NELSON.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated, Nov. 26, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Arthur W.
Nelson, of Chicago, 111., U. S. A., occupation clerk, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing
at a post planted about 4% miles
north of the S. E. corner of T. L.
40859; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence south
80 chains; thence west 80 chains,
containing 640 acres.
ARTHUR W. NELSON.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 27, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Allan Orr, of
Massett, B. C, occupation carpenter,
intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted on the shore of Masset Inlet two
miles west of the S. W. corner of T.
L. 40787; thence north 80 chains;
thence east SO chains; thence south
80 chains, more or less, to the shore
of Masset Inlet; thence westerly
along the shore back to the place of
commencement, containing 64 0 acres,
more or less.
ALLAN   ORR.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 25, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Flora Orr, of
Masset, B. C, occupation spinster, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:
—Commencing at a post planted
about 40 chains south and 80 chains
east of the N. E. corner of Lot 35;
thence north 80 chains; thence west
80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains, containing 640
acres.
FLORA  ORR.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated November 25, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Arthur Ives,
Sr., of Masset, B. C, occupation hotel
keeper, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:— Commencing at a
post planted about 40 chains south
and 120 chains east of the S. E.
corner of Lot 35; thence south 80
chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence nortli 80 chains; thence west
80 chains, containing 640 acres.
ARTHUR IVES, Sr.
M. A.. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 25, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Lynn Sutherland, of El Paso, Texas, U. S. A., occupation auditor, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 40 chains south
and 120 chains east of the S. E. corner of Lot 35; thence north 80
chains; thence east 80 chalnB; tlience
south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains, containing 640 acreB.
LYNN SUTHERLAND.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 25, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Orland P.
Merrill, of Chicago, 111., U. S. A., occupation coal operator,, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about 80
chains east and 40 chains south of
the N. E. corner of Lot 35; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains, containing 640
acres.
ORLAND P. MERRILL.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 25, 1910.
MISS HENNY WENNERSliieX
SWEDISH SPECIALIST
Electric, i aclal and Scalp treatment;
Scientific Massage treatment for
rheumatism, nervousness and poor
circulation. Manicuring also Chiropody work.
ROOM NO. 4, EXCHANGE BLOCK
—*iw^—'■' " '■ ■* Tuesday, May  2,  1911
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
**************************
| How to Cook Fish   !
|    and Care for Fish {
**************************
Writing in the News-Advertiser,
on the cooking of fish, Miss Kathleen Ferguson, principal of the Van
couver School of Cookery, says of
the preparing of fish:
Fish Cooking
This week I have to draw my
readers' attention to one of the
foods which they have at their very
doors in the greatest abundance,
and that is fish. We have quantity
and quality and cheapness as well.
How much we would be envied by
man, at being able to get all the
year round delicious salmon at a
moderate price. We have also halibut in abundance, smelts, trout,
skate, sole, sturgeon, oolachans, cod
and  herring.
In London, England, salmon must
be at present, very nearly $1 per
pound; here we get the best for 20
cents; two pounds of halibut, which
equals the English turbot, 25 cents;
sturgeon, 20 cents, which in England may only be caught once in
the year, and then the price is so
high only the wealthy can afford
even a little; trout, which are larger
and more delicate than old country
haddock, and oolachans and smelts,
which equal almost whitebait in delicacy of flavor. We are indeed
lucky in Vancouver, but like many
other things in nature, what we
have In abundance we undervalue.
Many householders would do well,
both from an economical and a
health standpoint, to have one meal
of fish each day, or a couple of fish
dinners in the week, as there is no
doubt we all eat too much flesh
meat. I will give some general
rules as to the cooking of fish and
then some simple recipes.
To boil fish you must remember
that all salt fish is to be put into
cold water and then the water is allowed to come to the .boil, and the
fish must be boiled very slowly.
Fresh fish is mostly put into
warm water and then the water
brought to the boll, With the exception of salmon, which must be put
into boiling water to preserve the
color.
Halibut is better put Into cold
water and the water brought to the
boil. This method preserves the flavor.
Always put some salt, vinegar
and lemon juice into the water in
which fish is to be boiled. This
improves the flavor and keeps the
fish firm. It is a very good plan to
soak fresh fish in salt and water for
one or two hours before boiling. All
these little points improve the flavor
of the fish so much if attended to
To grill or broil fish it is well to
rub it over for some hours with oil
and vinegar or a little butter and
salt before cooking it. This prevents it getting tough and dry in
the cooking.
To fry fish always have the dripping very hot before putting in the
fish, and if the fish is brushed over
with egg and brushed over with
crumbs it is greatly improved.
Fish baked and stuffed is one of
the best ways of cooking it, as you
lcse none of the good of the fish
by this method.
Shell fish, such as crabs and lobsters, must be put into boiling water, as these fish are always cooked
alive and must be killed in the
water instantly; put plenty of salt
in the water.
Oysters must never be overcooked
—they at once become like butter;
they must be blanched, that is, put.
into cold water with lemon juice in
it. the water just brought to a boil
and then instantly taken up, but no
further cooking must be given to
them.
To know if fish Is fresh, the eyes
must be bright, the gills red, and,
an unfailing test, the flesh firm; if
the finger, when pressed ou the fish,
leaves a mark, the fish is not fresh.
Never eat fish not perfectly fresh;
it is a most dangerous food. Mackerel, after 24 hours are not fit for
food; in fact, careful people only
eat them a few hours after they
have been caught.
Never buy shellfish unless you see
il alive. If not sure about a lobster punch the eyes with the finger;
if alive the claws will move. If in
any doubt, reject the fish.
Salt fish is not at all fully appreciated. If very dry steep it for some
hours in water before using It and
cook it in milk and water with a
little butter in it. Stewing it very
slowly it is delicious.
Ling, dried haddock or mackerel
cooked in this way and mixed with
potatoes and mint sauce made from
the liquid it was cooked in makes a
delicious pie. Put it into the oven
with a few bits of butter on top and
brown well.
Many   people  do   not  know   that
the most perfect way to boil salmon
is to boil it in thick rings, not whole,
as in this way the boiling water
cooks the curd and keeps it In the
fish. Salmon is crimped for the reason, that is, cut half way through
and where appearance has to be
thought of, it is a good plan, but
where the salmon is to be put on the
table it will taste far better if sliced.
Salmon Cutlets
Get a thick cut of calmon, rub it
over with oil and vinigar an hour or
two before using it. Heat the griller
and lay the salmon on it and grill
for ten or fifteen minutes, turning
oce from one side to the other side.
Serve with ay sauce liked. Serve
also slices of cucumbers and lemon.
Halibut cutlet is cooked in the
very same way. These cutlets may
be cut hinner, brushed over on both
sides with egg, tossed in crumbs and
fried in hot fat.
Cod Cutlets
(Fresh.) Done In this manner are
very specially good, above all if
plenty of pepper, salt, dried herbs
and chopped ham is mixed with the
bread crumbs.
Tomato Sauce
Put 4 tablespoonfuls of tinned tomato or a couple of fresh tomatoes
sliced into a pan, add one ounce of
butter and a very little chopped
onion, If liked. Cook all slowly for
15 minutes, rub through a strainer,
add one tablespoonful of corbn
starch blended and one-quarter pint
of cold water. Boil all up, season
■with pepper and salt, serve hot or
cold. If iced, this sauce is very good
with hot fish.
Fish Cakes
Take the remains of any cooked
fish, hot or cold. Chop it as fine
as possible, add to it an equal quantity of mashed potato, a little pepper
and salt, and some beaten egg to
make all into a paste. Roll into
balls. Having floured the hands,
flatten into cakes, egg and crumb
and fry in hot fat. These are delicious for breakfast. Fry In clean
hot fat and keep the cakes a golden
brown color.
Haked Tront
Clean the truo.t removing all under the gills and from the underneath scale. Wash and dry well,
remove eyes, cut off fins and tail.
Make a mixture of bread crumbs,
chopped parsley, a teaspoonful of
dried herbs, pepper, salt, and wet
all with melted butter or dripping,
or better still, a little egg if you
have any left over.   Put the stuffing
into the body of the trout, sew up
and place in a hot oven for about
15 or 20 minutes, or longer according to size, basting with hot dripping as meat is basted. Serve with
drawn butter put in a saucepan,
brought to the boil and strained, and
served very hot in a small jug.
Haddock, mackerel or any round
fish can be baked in this manner.
Smelts and Oolachans
Trim all the fins with a pair of
scissors, wipe carefully in a clean
cloth and season with salt and pepper, roll lightly in flour and then dip
them in beaten up eggs and roll In
freshly made white crumbs. Roll
them with the hand on a table or
slab to make the bread crumbs appear quite smooth. Put them In
clean boiling fat, fry five or six
minutes. When perfectly crisp and
a pretty golden brown color, take up
and drain and dish on a dish-paper
and garnish with very crisply fried
parsley, little thin slices of freshly-
cut lemon and cucumbers. Serve
with anchovy, cucumber or tartare
sauce.
Whiting
Dressed in the same manner, can
be used for dinner or luncheon, and
served for breakfast without sauce.
Cucumber  Sauce
Peel one large cucumber and take
out the seeds. Put tbe cucumber,
sliced, in a pan with one ounce of
butter; let them stem slowly till
tender, add a few drops of lemon
juice, one-quarter pint of thick
white sauce and a very little green
coloring. Season with salt and pepper, rub through a strainer or sieve
or straining cloth, heat up if wanted
hot, lay on ice if wanted cold.
Sturgeon
In England this fish is considered
a royal dish and is very scarce. It
is easy to obtain here. To cook it
to perfection cut It In slices, lay it
in a baking pan, pour some sherrry
over It and cover it with little lumps
of butter. Bake It for 15 or 20
minutes, serve hot and strain the
sauce around It.
Sole or any delicate flat fish
ccoked in this way is delicious. If
sherry is objected to use a , little
vinegar, water and lemon juice.
Lobster sauce or oyster sauce
served hot with halibut or any white
fish is excellent.
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101-107 WATER STREET
Local Agent—F. M. DAVIS
The Best
Publicity O$2.00f
Channel
Subscription
a Year
THE JOURNAL
Is the best Advertising
Medium in the City
of Prince Rupert
*****************************************************
FOLLOW THE TREND OF THE CITY'S
PROGRESS BY SUBSCRIBING
FOR THE PAPER
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The Journal aims at keeping Prince Rupert
and new B.C. ever before the public eye. Send
it to your friends and any whom you wish to
interest in the coming Metropolis of the North.
VANCOUVER, B. 0.
- PRINCE RUPERT
COAL MINES ACT
Skeena    Land    District—District   of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over G40 acres of land: —
Commencing at post planted 6%
miles N. E. of the mouth of the
White River and the junction of the
Naas, marked Chas. J. Gillingham's
S. E. Corner; thence 80 chains
North; thence 80 chains West;
thence 80 chains South; thence 80
chains East to point of commencement and containing 640 acres more
or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles M. Huff, Agent.
Dated March 4, 1911. 4-18
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
TAKJ NOTICE that Charles J.
Gilllngham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Conienclng at a post planted 7 miles
N. E. of the mouth of the' White
River and the junction of the Naas,
marked Chas. J. Gillingham's S. E.
Corner; thence 80 chains North;
thence 80 cliains West; thence 80
chains South; thence 80 chains East
to point of commencement and containing 640 acres more or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles M.  Huff, Agent.
Dated  March 5th,  1911. 4-18
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Commencing at a post planted 7%
miles N. E. of the mouth of the
White River and the junction of the
Naas and marked Chas. J-. Gillingham's S. E. Corner; thence 80
chains North; theuce SO chains
West; thence 80 chains South;
thence 80 cliains East to point of
commencement and containing 640
acres more or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles M.  Huff, Agent.
Dated March 5th, 1911. 4-18
thence 80 chains Nortli; thence 80
cliains West; thence 80 cliains
South; tlience 80 cliains East to
point of commencement and containing 640 acres more or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles M.  Huff,  Agent.
Dated March 4th, 1911. 4-18
Skeena    Land    District—District    of
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. O,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Commencing at a post planted about
8 miles N. E. of the mouth of White
River and the junction of the Naas
River, marked Chas. J. Gillingham's
S. E. Corner; thence 80 chains
North; thence 80 chains West;
thence 80 cliains South; thence 80
chains East to point of commencement and containing 640 acres more
or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles M. Huff, Agent
Dated March 6th, 1911. 4-18
Skeena   Land    District—District   of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 6 40 acres of land: —
Commencing at a post planted about
8 miles N. E. of tha mouth of White
River and the junction of the Naas
River, marked Chas. J. Gillingham's
S. E. Corner; thence SO chains
North; thence 80 chains West;
thence SO chains South; tlience 80
cliains East io point of commencement and containing 040 acres mou
or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles M.  Huff, Agent.
Dated March 6th, 1911. 4-18
Skeena    Land    District.—District    ot
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Commencing at a post planted 7 %
miles N. E. of the mouth of the
White River and the junction of the
Naas, marked Chas. J. Gillingham's
S. E. Corner; thence 80 chains
North; thence 80 chains West
thence 80 chains South; tlience 80
chains East to point of commencement and containing 640 acres more
or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles M. .Huff, Agent
Dated March  5th, 1911. 4-18
Skeena   Land    District—District   of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for a
license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Commencing at a post planted about
S miles N. E. of the mouth of the
White River and the junction of the
Naas, marked Chas. J. Gillingham's
S. E. Corner; tlience 80 chains
North; tlience 80 chains West;
thence 80 chains South; thence 80
chains East to point of commencement and containing 640 acres more
or less.
CHARLES   J.   GILLINGHAM.
Charles M. Huff, Agent.
Dated March  6th,  1911. 4-18
Skeena   Land    District—District   of
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum .over 640 acres of land: —
Commencing at a post planted 6'/4
miles N. E. of the mouth of the
White River and the junction of the
Naas, and marked Chas. J. Gillingham's S. E. Corner; thence 80
chains Nortn; thence 80 cuains
West; thence SO chains South;
thence 80 chains East to point of
commencement and containing 640
acres more or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles M.  Huff, Agent.
Dated March 4th, 1911. 4-1S
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gilllngham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Commencing at a post planted about
8 miles N. E. of the mouth of White
River and the junction of the Naas
River, marked Charles J. Gillingham's S. E. Corner; thence 80
chains North; tlience 80 chains
West; thence 80 chains South;
thence 80 chains Bast to point of
commencement ami containing 640
acres more or less.
CHARLES .1. GILLINGHAM.
Charles  M.  Huff,  Agent.
Dated March 5th, 1911. 4-18
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Casslnr.
TAKE     NOTICE  that  Charles  .1.
Gilllngham, of Prince Rupert, It. 0.,
occupation   contractor,   intends   to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Commencing at a post planted 6%
miles N. E. of the mouth of White
River and the junction of the Naas,
marked Chas. J. Gillingham's S. E.
Corner; thence 80 chains North;
thence 80 chains West; thence 80
chains South; thence 80 chains East
to point of commencement and containing 640 acres more or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles  M.  Huff, Agent.
Dated March  ith,  1911. 4-18
Skeena   Land    District—District   of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE thfct Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for a
license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Commencing at a post planted about
8 miles N. E. of the mouth of the
White River and the junction of the
Naas, marked Chas. J. Gillingham's
S. E. Corner; theuce 80 ' chains
North; thence 80 chains West;
thence 80 chains South; thence 80
chains East to point of commencement and containing 640 acres more
or less.
CHARLES   J.   GILLINGHAM.
Charles M.  Huff, Agent.
Dated  March  6th,  1911. 4-18
WATER NOTICE.
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gilllngham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Commencing at a post planted six
miles N. E. of the mouth of White
River and the junction of the Naas
River on Canyon Creek, marked
Chas. J. Gillingham's S. E. Corner;
NOTICE is hereby given that an
application will be made under Part
V. of the "Water Aot, 1»09," to obtain a licence in the Queen Charlotte Islands Division of Skeena District.
(a) The name, address and  oc-
upation of the applicant—Merton A.
Merrill, Masset, Q. C. I., B. C.
Prospector.
(If for mining purposes) Free
Miner's Certificate No	
(b) The name of the lake,
stream, or source (if unnamed, the
description is)—I-in-tsua Lake, Tsu-
Skundale Lake and Ain River.
(c) The point of diversion—At >r
near the outlet of Tsu-Skundale
Lake into Ain  River.
(d) The quantity of water applied for (in cubic feet per second)
—1,000.
(e) The character of the proposed works—Power Plant, Dam,
Flumes, etc.
(f) The premises on which the
water is to be used (describe same)
Kt or near tlie mouth of the Ain
River.
(g) The purposes for which the
water Is lo be used—Generating
power.
(h) If for Irrigation, describe
the  land   Intended   to     lee  Irrigated,
giving acreage	
(i)    If the water Is to be used for
power or mining purposes, describe
I he place where the water Is to be
returned to some natural channel,
and tlie difference In altitude between point of diversion nnd point
of return—At or near the mouth of
the Ain River, about 100 feet below
point of diversion.
(j) Area of Crown land intended to be occupied by the proposed
works—10 acres more or less.
(k) This notice was posted on
the 28th day of November, 1910,
and application will be made to the
Commissioner on the 1st day of
June,  1911.
(1) Give the names and addresses of any riparian proprietors or
licensees who or whose lands are
likely to be affected by the proposed works, either above or below
the outlet—Don't know of any.
(Signature)
MERTON  A.   MERRILL,
(P.  O. Address)   Massel,  B. C.
NOTE.—One cubic loot per second is equivalent to 35.71 miner's
inches.
Job Printing of all kinds neatly
executed at the Journal Office. PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Tuesday, May 2, 1911
MADE HEROlt FIGHT
Mounted Police Patrol Lost in North
Had Trying Experience
on March.
Diary   of   Party   Now   Made   I'lililic
Tells of Privations Endured
by Them
Some light em the fate of the
mounted police patrol found frozen
on the trail at roc! River, was
tnrown by the discoverey of a diary
of one of the party.
An entry made January 17 i<\iei>
"Carter is utterly bewildered ami
does not know one river from another. My lasl hope gone. Reluctantly shnli have to return to
Peel River. We have now ten pounds
of flour and eight pounds of bacon
and some dried fish for the djg=.''
Rev. C. E. Whittaker. ChurcJi of
England missionary at Dawson, who
read the funeral service ovei t'.ie
bodies of the victims, writes to
Bishbp Stringer at Dawson as follows: "Three days later (January
20) the food was exhausted. The
men began killing the dogs and trying to feed the meal to the dogs that
were left, but they would not eat
it, so the men ate the dogflesh and
fed the dry fish to the dogs. They
were hindered by open water, by
' weather sixty degrees below zero
and by fierce winds. They made
their way back slowly, their old trail
being drifted  full.'
About February 1, when the party was on Long Portage, above Co-
lins Place, an "entry in the diary
reads: "We have travelled about
200 miles on dog meat and tea and
have about 100 miles yet, but expect we shall be able to make it, but
shall have onl ythree or four dogs
left. We have killed eight dogs and
have eaten most of the meat."
Three or four days later, says
Mr. Whittaker, the diary ceases.
The party was then a few miles from
Trail Creek, about thirty-four miles
above Colins' Place. It Is probable
that they survived five to seven days
after that, and perhaps more, judging from evidence found and tracks
about the camps.
Some of them were badly footsore
and it is thought that this will account in some measure for tneir in
ability to get through. All the members were so changed as hardly to
be known. They were just famished
and their skin had peeled off.
Some money was raised at Fort
MacPherson and sent to Bishop
Stringer with which to secure a
tablet to be erected at the MacPherson church in honor of the party.
It is believed that the men were
poisoned by eating dogs' livers, and
that it was this that made it impossible for them to travel fast. Their
feet, also, were very sore. All died
natural deaths, save possibly Taylor,
whoe head was missing. He had his
rifle in his hand, and it was apparently a case of suicide. Possibly lie
shot himself in delirium after awakening from sleep nad seeing Kinney
dead beside him. Every praise is
accorded the whole party here for
their most determined fight. Inspector Fitzgerald and Constable
Carter, who made the last attempt
to finish t)ie dash to Fort MacPherson, 35 miles, covered only ten.
They had left all their robes and
supplies with Kinney and Taylor,
taking only two little blankets with
which to face the Arctic nights in
their last struggle.
The Dawson News editorially
praises the party for having
achieved one of the greatest feats in
the history of Canada and the British Empire's Arctic zone, declaring
it worthy of a notable monument or
:e table! drawing tlie atentlon of future generations to Ihe great fortitude shown In a remarkable struggle against  awful odds.
 o	
EMPIRE  DAI  CONCERT
Fancy Groceries
Family Groceries
Fresh Groceries
Green Vegetables
Fresh Fruits
Special Attention Given to Family Trade.
Yod Will Find Our Prices RIGHT.
iSTALKER & WELLS
Ui Auri'e & P (Eiide J*
SPORTS
Overseas club  will Celebrate May
■_'i   with  Entertainment in
Empress Theatre
On the evening of May 24 the
Overseas Club will give a grand concert in the Empress Theatre. The
programme is being arranged at
present and will be of a high order.
In the afternoon there will be an
Indian band competition for the
prize offered by J. S. Gray. Under
these circumstances Prince Rupert
will be a musical place on May 24.
Mr. Browning, repesenting the
Seagrave Company, through whom
the chemical engine was purchased
for here, is expected In the city in
a few days, when an official test
will be made of it.
RACE  FROM AEROPLANES
Six aeroplanes flew over the
course of the boat race on Saturday,
and one airman followed the race
almost from start to finish, sweeping to and fro across the river to
keep level with the crews, says the
London Daily Mail. The machines
were welcomed with great enthusiasm by the crowds. The race, as
seen from above for the first time,
is described below. All the machines
returned safely to the starting
p'aces.
The airmen were Mr. Graham Gil-
mour, who came from Brooklands in
a Bristol biplane with the Gnome engines, and five others, who came
from the Hendon aerodrome—Mr.
Graham White (military Farman
machine), M. Hubert (ordinary Far-
man), and Mr. Gustave Hamel, Mr.
Gresweli and M. Prier, who used
Blerlot machines. Mr. Graham-
White took Mr. C. Compton Pater-
son up with him. He and his four
companions descended at Ranelagii,
all eventually flying back safely to
Hendon, Mr. Hamel making an
aerial excursion to Brooklands for
tea.
Mr, Graham Gilmour gives the
following account of his flight and
of how he saw the race.
"I left Brooklands at 1:55 p. m
in a military type Bristol biplane
and followed the river until I
reached Putney bridge. I arrived
at the starting point of the race just
before the pistol was fired.
The spectacle below me was most
interesting. I could see the crews
quite distinctly. From my aerial
point of view they had rather the
appearance of files skimming over a
pond in summer. I could distinguish perfectly well between the two
crews by the color of their oars, and
it was quite apparent to me from
above that Oxford was the better
crew of the two.
"Indeed, criticizing the race from
an aerial standpoint—the first time
that such a view has been obtained
—I could see that Cambridge had a
hopeless task, because every time
Oxford was pressed the crew responded at once, and the boat forged
ahead again.
"I was just above the crews in the
air, and quite near to them more
than once, and was very interested
to see whether they would look up
it me at all. I could watch them
quite distinctly, and I kept a close
eye upon them, but not one man, In
either boat, ever look his eyes off
his work.
"1 was greatly Impressed by the
■rowd of people lining Ihe banks In
dense mnsses. When I shout off my
engines to come down nearer the
river I could hear a great roar of
voices come up to me. The excitement of the people seemed to be intense, and I could see them waving
handkerchiefs and flags, and everybody's arms seemed to be moving
as the boats passed.
"After flying over the winning
post I landed in a little field, having
run out of petrol. A motorist very
kindly gave me four gallons from
nts supply and ' again filled up my
tank.
"Of course, I missed my mechan-
cs, and there appeared to be some
difficulty about starting, but I got
a man from the crowd to help me.
I gave him a lesson in starting the
engine. Other people held the machine and I started quite successfully. I covered the distance, about
eighteen miles, to Brooklands, with
a fine wind  behind me,    In    about
twenty minutes. Before I left the
tennis ground Graham-Wnite flew
over me. Hamel also passed in a
Bleriot, and Hubert also flew by.
V\e afterward^ met at Brookfields
and discussed our experiences."'
 o	
AGAIN NEGRO SETTLERS
Edmonton   Takes  Action  to  Try   to
Stop Incoming of Colored
Population
The immigration of negroes to
western Canada from the United
States was the subject of a resolution passed at a special meeting of
the board of trade of Edmonton, in
which the sentiment was almost
unanimous in opposition to allowing
them to come into the country under
any consideration. The resolution
received the votes of all but one or
two members of the board present,
and it will be sent to all the organizations in the city and the boards of
trade throughout Alberta and Saskatchewan for endorsement. A copy
of the resolution will also be sent to
the Dominion government, in the
hope that it will move those in authority to take immediate steps to
stop the influx of the colored people
from across the border.
The resolution points out the fact
that the immigration of colored people is keeping white settlers of a desirable class from entering the country, and it calls for some action on
the part of the government that will
effectively stop the movement of negroes into western-Canada.
TO   PROLONG   LIFE
Happy  Marriage,   Daily   Bath,   Ccr
tain Foods,  Rest,  Fresh Air
To prevent old age coming on
too soon, the first condition necessary is the possession of healthy
glands (chief among them being
the throid, the adrenals, the pancreas and the liver), and this depends upon heredity, says the British Medical Journal.
Marriage is an invaluable aid in
the struggle against old age. If
married life is one of the best means
of resisting the approach of old age,
on the other hand, it is positively
certain that unhappy marriages are
the surest means of hastening its
oncoming.
To avoid premature old age and
early death we have to follow these
rules:
Wear loose collars, because a
tight collar prevents obstacles to the
free circulation of the blood through
the thyroid.
Do not take too much meat, because abundance of meat alters the
di.etless glands.
Take large quantities of milk,
this being the extract of various
glands, and especially that of the
thyroid.
Be as much as possible in the
open air, and especially in the sunshine, and take plenty of exercise,
taking care to breahe deeply and
regularly.
Take a bath daily, and in addition, once a week or every two
weeks take a Turkish or vapor
bath.
Wear porous ■ clothing, light hat,
and low shoes.
Go early to bed and rise early.
Sleep in a dark, very quiet room,
and with a window open; and do
not sleep less than six or more than
seven and a ha'f hours.
Have one complete daq's rest in
each week, without even reading or
writing.
Avoid mental disturbances or
worries.
Municipal Notice
NOMINATION   NOTICE.
Public notice is hereby given to
the electors of the municipality o!'
Prince Rupert, that I require the
presence of the sad electors at the
City Hall on the 8th day of May,
1911, at 12 o'clock noon, for the
purpose of electing .an Alderman to
fill the vancancy caused by the resignation of Aid. T. D. Pattullo as
Alderman for Ward 2 in the Municipal Council.
The mode of nomination of the
candidate shall be as follows:
The candidate shall be nominated
in writing; the writing shall be subscribed by two voters of the municipality as proposer and seconder, and
shall be delivered to the Returning
Officer at any time between the date
of the notice and 2 p. m. of the day
of the nomination, and in the event
of a poll being necessary, such poll
will be opened on the 11th day of
May, 1911, at the City Hall, of
which every person is hereby required to take notice and govern
himself accordingly.
Qualification foe Aldermen
Persons qualified to be nominate-]
for and elected as an Alderma'i
shall be male British subjects of the
full age of 21 years, who have been
for the 6 months next preceding the
day of nomination, the holder of an
e'quity or equities in real property
in the City of Prince Rupert, whoso
name appears upon the last Municipal Assessment Roll as such owner,
and of the assessed value of $500.00
or more.
Given under my hand at Prince
Rupert, B. C, the 2nd day of May,
1911.
ERNEST A. WOODS,
Returning  Officer.
NOTICE
"CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF
    PRINCE RUPERT   	
Notice is hereby given that a sitting of the Court of Revision for the
Corporation of the City of Prince
Rupert, B. C, will be held in the
City Hall, Prince Rupert, B. C, on
Monday, June 5th, 1911, at 10
o'clock a. m. for the purpose of haer-
ing complaints against the Assessments as made for the year 1911.
Any person desiring to make complaint against the said Assessments
must give notice in writing, stating
cause of complaint to the Assessor,
at least ten days previous to the sitting of the said Court.
Dated at Prince Rupert, B. C,
May 1st, 1911.
j. c. Mclennan,
5-9-30 Assessor."
Free Employment
Office
For all kinds of help. Cooks, waiters, dishwashers, hotel porters, all
kinds of laborers or mechanics, call
up 178 or call at the
FREE EMPLOYMENT OFFICE
GRAND HOTEL
Headquarters for Cooks and Waiters
ROGERS & BLACK
Wholesale Dealers In
BUILDING MATERIAL,    CEMENT,
LIME, HAIR-FIBRE PLASTER
COKE, BLACKSMITH COAL,
COMMON BRICK, PRESSED BRICK
SHINGLES AND LATH
NEW  WELLINGTON  COAL
All  orders  promptly  filled—see   us
for prices.
PHONE 1J0 PHONE 110
Be temperate In the use of alcohol and also In the use of coffee and
tea.
Avoid places thai are overheated,
especially by steam, and badly ventilated.
Replace or reinforce the functions
of the organs which may have become changed by age or disease, by
means of the extracts from the corresponding organs of healthy animals. But, of course, the applica-
t'on of this precept must always be
adapted to the individual case.
 o	
Mrs. Cass, who is mentally ds-
ranged, has been sent to New Westminster to the asylum. Mrs. Hoy, of
the Salvation Army, accompanied
her as attendant.
Tramp—Kin I get a bite to eat
here?
Lady—Yes, if you'll saw that pile
of wood.
Tramp (sizing up the Job)—I
ain't askin' for no $10-a-plate banquet,  lady.
SHERWIN & WILLIAMS
-PAINT:
COVER THE EARTH.
WE   ARE   .SOLE   AGENTS
CARLOAD JUST ARRIVED
Ready Nixed Paints,
Paints Ground in Oil,
Paints Ground in Japan,
Varnishes, Shellac, etc.
Water Stains
and
Decotint
IN ALL COLONS
Prince Rupert Hardware & Supply
Company, Ltd. thos. dunn, Mg.
^0[§000000[g0000000000000[§@
We Require Listings of Inside Business Property
Also Residence Property at Right Prices
M.M. Stephens & Co. Ld.
Real Estate, Insurance and Investments,
Notaries, Nines, Timber
Box 275
PHONE 222
PRINCE RUPERT, B.C.
OFFICE  THIRD  AVE.
You Can Avoid This
by sending your Clothes to the
PIONEER   STEAM  LAUNDRY
There are Many
Reasons Why
IT   IS   TO   YOUR   INTEREST
We do first-class work and
are careful with your Garments. We can do your work
and return it within 48 hours
if necessary. We call for your
uaundry and return it to you.
Should anything be lost or misplaced we will make It satisfactory.
When your Laundry goes to the Chinks there are many drawbacks. When you send It to us your money helps pay WHITE
LABOR.
PIONEER STEAM LAUNDRY
FOR   SALE
SECTION ONE
LOTS BLOCK
19 ..
BLOCK
11    1-2-3-4-5-6
11 9-10
12    22
13 21-22
18    1-2
SECTION FIVE
9    22-23
18 22-23
LOTS
 3-4
19 16-16
20 19-20
34    36-37-38
34    42
27    #    9-10
27 ' 42-43
SECTION SIX
'8 7-8-9-10
W     ^      /"? /T A/^eO XT    The Atlantic Realto and Improvement
VV.    \J.    MJL-ilV\JKJiV     Company Ltd.        -        P.O. Bo, 51
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast Range 5.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles
James Gilllngham, of Prince Rupert,
(Occupation contractor, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the
followdng described lands:—Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner of Lot 992 and
marked C. J. Gillingham's N. B.
Corner Application for Purohase; I,
C. J. Gillingham, intend to apply
for permission to purchase 320 acres
of land bounded as follows:—Commencing at this post; thence 80
chains south; thence 40 ohains west;
thence 80 chains north; thence 40
chadns oast to place of commencement.
CuARLES JAMES GILLINGHAM.
Robert Osborn Jennings, Agent.
Dated January 5, 1911.
BOARD WANTED
Gentleman desires board and room
In private family; $10 tr $15 per
week. State conveniences. Address
R. A. M., "Journal."
WANTED
WANTED—An assistant in the furniture business. Apply to J. F.
MacDonald, Second avenue.
NOTICE   OF   DISSOLUTION
TAKE NOTICE that the partnership heretofore existing between
Joseph E. Merryfield, Prince Rupert, B. C, and Joseph E. McEwen,
of Kitselas, B. C, has this day been
dissolved by mutual consent, and
that Joseph E. Merryfield will carry on the grocery business heretofore
carried on by the firm at Prince Rupert, B. C, under the name of "J. E.
Merryfield," and will collect all
debts due to and pay all debts owing
by the said firm, and that Joseph E.
McEwen will carry on the business
of the partnership heretofore conducted at Kitselas, B. 0„ under the
firm name of "Merryfield & McEwen," and will collect all debts due to
and pay all debts owing by the said
firm at Kitselas, B. C.
Dated   at   Prince  Rupert,   B.   C,
this 21st day of April, A. D. 1911.
J. E.  MERRYFIELD,
J.  E.   McEWEN.
Witness:
M. M. STEPHENS. 5-12

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