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Prince Rupert Journal Jul 12, 1910

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Array pHF
■!^»»»*
Subscription
During July
$1.S0 a Year
ffrtee Uttpcert frntnai
High-Class
Job Printing
In all Lines
VOLUME   1
Published Twice a Week
PRIXCE RUPERT, B.  C, TUESDAY,  JULY   12,  1910.
Price, Five Cents
xo. s.
WILL SOON COMMENCE
Grading  in  Business  Section of
Estimated to Cost About
$340,000.
City
City Engineer AVI II Prepare « Report
At Once so us to Allow the
Work to ISrgin
The city council has the proposition for rough grading all of section one, which comprises the business portion of the city, well advanced. The city engineer has been
asked to prepare a detailed report
after which the bylaw will be prepared and promulgated. The policy
of the council is to have no unnecessary delay hut to commence work
just as soon as it can be got In shape,
it will be possible to have gangs
working in different parts of the city
and a large force will thus be employed.
Last evening the streets committee of the council presented its final
report on the proposition, which was
as follows:—
"In the matter of the grading of
streets In Section one:
"Your committee beg to report
that in looking into the matter we
find it advisable to proceed with this
improvement as soon as possible. The
cost of having the work done in the
immediate future will be much less
than it will be if postponed to some
late date. The entire district is of
sufficient value to justify the necessary expenditure.
"We would recommend that in addition to the work of grading the
streets that has been considered in
, the engineer's report, that tho coun-
fcil also include in this work of local
improvement the grading of Oren-
ville Court for its entire length, and
Biggar Place from ils intersection
with Third avenue to the eastern corner of lot 1, block 30, and to the
western comer of lot 55, block 29.
We believe that the council should
provide the funds necessary to defray the cost of this work by the is-
buo and sale of local improvement
debentures which should mature in
twenty years.
"We recommend that one half of
the cost of this work be assessed
and levied upon all lots or lands
fronting or abutting on any street
in section one, except lot 1 and lots 3
to 20 Inclusive In block 15, and that
the proportion of said one half of
the cost of this improvement which
shall be assessed and levied upon
each lot or parcel of land shall be
determined by the proportion that
the multiple of the frontage of said
lot or parcel of land and the width
of the strict shall bear to the sum
of all such multiples In the district
assessed for the improvement.
"Provided that the width of the
street in Biggar Place shall be calculated as 72 feet and that the width
, of any other street or place shall be
j calculated as not more than 94 feet.
'(That in case of any corner lot abutting on two streets that they shall
only be assessed for one-half of their
frontage on each street; and that the
remaining fifty per cent of the cost
of the work of local improvement
shall be assessed on all the lots and
parcels of land in the district improved except such portions of block
15 as have been heretofore exempted,
In the proportion of their relative
assessed value.
"We estimate that the cost of this
improvement at $340,000."
Aid. Pattullo introduced the subject of proceedure referring to the
bylaw of the city.
Aid. Lynch said the committee had
taken it for granted from what was
said at the last meeting that there
was haste required and had accordingly brought tills report in.
Aid. Pattullo thought the engineer's report should always come before the council. He thought the engineer should make a report along
the line of this report.
Aid. Lynch agreed that this would
have to go before the engineer.
On motion of Aid. Pattullo, tbe engineer was instructed to prepare a
report upon the cost of the work of
improvements proposed in section 2.
In the Majestic Theatre at present
a very interesting set of films is being displayed which should be witnessed by everyone. It is the series
showing the funeral of the late King
Edward. The pictures are good and
the historic Interest surrounding the
event makes them doubly Interesting.
Personals
J. Fred Ritchie has gone to Stewart on business.
* *     *
Aid. Naden returned on Sunday
morning from a trip to Stewart.
$      jk       *
Henry Doyle, the canneryman of
Mill Bay, Is In the city.
* *     *
Judge Young has returned from
Atlin Where he transacted judical
business.
* *     *
Post Office Inspector Fletcher, of
Victoria, was a passenger on the
Princess Royal last evening. He went
on to Skagway.
* * *
J. A. McMaster and 1-1. A. McMas-
ter, brothers of the popular local
agent of the G.T.P., have arrived in
the city. Mr. J. A. McMaster will
join the city hall staff as stenographer.
J. H. BACON WEDS
Well Known Resident of This City is
Married  in  Philadelphia
The announcement is made of the
marriage of Mr. James H Bacon,
formerly G. T. P. ii'arbor engineer,
and Miss Bessie Tysen, of Jacksonville, Fla. The ceremony took place
in Philadelphia on June 29, only the
most intimate friends of the bride
and groom were present.
Mr. and Mrs. Bacon are expected
here in a few days, and will take up
their residence in this city .
Mr. Bacon has been prominently
identified with Prince Rupert's development. As harbor engineer of
the 6. T. P. he bad to do with the
selection of this as the terminal, and
ever since he has been a frequent
visitor In an official way lo the port.
When he resigned his position r.
short time ago it was not known to
many of his friends that he Intended
to wed and make his permanent homo
Here, lie has a wide circle of friends
in tho city that will be happy to wel-
corno him back here. That Mr. Bacon
should decide to live here is another
assurance by one who Is in a position to judge of the future of the city
that Prince Rupert is to be a most
Important port.
 o—■— ■
ENGINEER AT WORK
Col. Davis Arrived Last Night and Today
Is Sizing Up the Local
Situation.
He Is Ready to Deal With Conditions
As He Finds Them on Townsite
—Praises the Harbor
Col. W. M. Davis, the new city engineer, is in the city and already actively engaged sizing up the propositions which he has to face. He
reached Prince Rupert on the Princess Royal last evening, and was met
at the wharf by Mayor Stork, who
escorted him to his hotel and then
brought him to the City Hall where
the council had assembled and where
the engineer had an opportunity of
meeting the aldermen and civic officials.
Today Col. Davis is covering a part
of the city in company with A. W.
Agnew, C.E. The new engineer has
little to say yet of conditions. He
has not had time to cover the city and
take In the whole situation, but sees
nothing In the situation to dismay
any one.
As he looked over the site to the
harbor beyond, he remarked to a representative of The Journal, who interviewed him this morning: "Every
place hasn't got that." The future,
he thinks, must be portentous for the
city and he is prepared to grapple
with all engineering questions that
arise.
It is his first visit to the Pacific
coast although he has had experience
in the prairies.
Mrs. Davis and the family have remained behind in Berlin, Ont., for
the  meantime.
Thomas F. Burra, representing the
old established firm of the Henderson Directories, with headquarters
in Vancouver and Winnipeg, Is in
the city. He is preparing a directory
of Prince Rupert and Stewart that
is to be ready In a couple of months.
James Henderson is known all over
the west from Winnipeg to the coast
in connection with his directories,
and the fact that he is to handle
the local one ensures its success.
LICENSES LAID OVER
Commissioners   Cannot Legally Act In
Natter Until September
Meeting.
Opinions    of    Legal    Firms    Were
Sought For the Guidance of
the  Hoard
There are to be no liquor licenses
issued in Prince Rupert until the
next regular sitting of the Licensing
Hoard, which takes place in September. The vexed question was decided
by the commission at its sitting on
Saturday afternoon, the advice of
three law firms being sought before
a decision was reached. Commissioners Smith and Merryfield were
convinced that the Board had no
legal rights to issue licenses, while
Mayor Stork was decidedly in favor
of going ahead and granting licenses
Before a final decision was reached
hot words passed at the Board.
The question of law involved was
quite fully gone into at the meeting.
The principle upon which licensing
commissioners do business is that the
statute requires sittings quarterly at
which new licenses can be granted.
June 8 was the statutory date for sitting. Two questions of legal interpretation arose. First, were the commissioners appointed legally and in
a position to sit on June 8, or did
their appointment date from June 9
when the order in council was passed
at Victoria; second, even if the commissioners could sit as a legally constituted court on June 8, could they
deal with applications at an adjourned meeting that was not legally in
order on June 8.
On opening, Commisisoner Smith
submitted corespondence dating from
a message sent, by William Manson.
early in Juno to the Government,
asking if the commissioners had
been appointed. The correspondence
was self explanatory and Commissioner Smith asked that it bo read.
It was as follows:—
Victoria, B.C., Juno 9, 1910.
Wni. Manson,
Prince Rupert, B.C.
Smith and Merryfield will be appointed  today.
W. J. EOWSER,
Atty.  Gen.
July 4, 1910
W. J. Bowser,^B	
Attorney General,
Victoria, B.C.
Please wire me date my appointment License Commissioner.
V. W. SMITH.
Victoria, B.C., July 4, 1910.
V.  W.  Smith, Prince Rupert.
Your   appointment    dated    ninth
June, ultimo.        H. A. MACLEAN,
Deputy Atty. Gen.
\V. J. Bowser, July 5,  1910.
Attorney General,
Victoria.
Please wire on what date council
meeting was held, at which Smith
and Merryfield were appolntedLlcense
Commissioners. Will it be in order
to issue licenses before September?
V.   W.   SMITH.
Victoria, B.C., July 7, 1910
V.  W.  Smith,  Prince Rupert.
Order in council appointing Smith
and Merryfield passed Council 7th
Tune, approved by Lieutenant Governor 9th June.
H.    A.    MACLEAN.
Prince Rupert, July 8, 1910.
I. E. Merryfield, Esq.,
City.
Dear Sir:—With regard lo the
question you have submitted to us
of the possibility of the License
Hoard granting license at the meeting
tomorrow, we would say that we
have looked carefully into the Q, C.
reports, and we have not been able
to find any decision on the question
for this Province upon the point.
We had not before us a copy of the
rules of precedents governing appointments to office in Eritlsh Columbia, as we were not ablo to obtain the same; but we would say that
the proceedings in the Province are
to the effect that officials act from
the moment of appointment by the
Executive Council simply by Irstruc-
tion by wire and prior to gazetting.
The occasions as far as we know
where officials have acted under
these circumstances have never been
questioned, and as the case in point
is identically similar, we presume
that the same statement of facts
would apply.
TO ADVERTISE NORTH
Fall Fair Is Taken Hold of With Enthusiasm by Citizens of
New B.C.
Outside Points Will Co-operate With
Citizens of Prince Rupert to
Pust It
(Continued on  Page Eight)
Prince Rupert will, according lo
all Indications have an exhibition
this fall that will do an inestimable
service In advertising the whole of
Northern British Columbia to the
world. The question of a Fair has
been taken hold of heartily and the
arrangements are well  In  hand.   It
probable   that  it  will  be  held  in
one of the buildings on the wharf or
in case that is not possible a suitable location in the city will be found.
Enthusiasm Prevails
At the meeting held on Friday
night when the members of the committee having in charge the arrangements for the fair discussed plans,
the greatest enthusiasm prevailed.
It. was felt that with the short
time at the disposal of the committee
it would be useless to attempt to
obtain permanent quarters this year
and erect buildings. It was thought
more advisable to get a temporary
location this year and then make an
early move towards a permanent
place a little later. The main object
of the meeting was to discuss with
William Mmson, M.P.P., the question
of aid from the provincial government.
In reply to questions, Mr. Manson
bought It quite likely that the government would do something. Usually the applications were in earlier
and therefore the grant might all
be provided for. He was willing,
however, to take the matter up and
press strongly for a grant.
Tho question of a name was discussed, when Mr. Manson advised
that the word agricultural he introduced into it. as the government
grant io i..u,'-...itions was intended for
agricultural societies more particularly. Accordingly on motion of W.
M. Law, the name was made "The
Skeena District Agricultural and Industrial Exhibition."
Is  Well Received
G. W. Nlchersoii read most en
couraging letters from C. Hicks-
Beach of Hazelton. Rev. T. J. Marsh
of Kitsumkalum and James Martin
of Masset, all of whom were willing
to do whatever they could to aid the
fair and making timely suggestions.
The chairman, F. W. Dawson, reported that he had seen Mr. Frlzzell
of Port Essington, and he took up the
question most enthusiastically. Already Mr. Frizzell had seen the can-
nerymen on the Skeucia and had been
promised special displays of canned
goods, while Mr. Wallace agreed to
send different varieties of fish in
blocks of ice.
Added to Committee
It was deemed wise to add a number of new members to the committee from outside points as well as In
the city, and the following, on motion of David H. Hays, were appointed additional members u. ..j.-, Mjm-
mittee: ,
Thomas A. Aitkin, S. Huckley, Al-
dermere post office;   R. Grant, Bella
Coola;    G.   B.    Olsen,     lligginsville,
Bella  Coola  district;   B.   R.   Morton,
Swanson   Bay;   Peter  White,  Alder-
more;     Chas  Morris,     H.   B.  Jones,
Glentenna;     G.    Williams,    Telkwa;
Charles   Barrett,   Hazelton;   E.   Eby,
Kitsumkalum; J. Wlshart, Klncolith;
George   Little,   Kitsumkalum;    Harvey Creech,    Copper    City;     II.  0.
Hrcckcnridge, B, Breckenridge, Chas.
Harrison, Masset;  E.  M. Sandilands,
ledway;      II.     Edenshuw,     .Masset;
Chief Diuloward, Port Simpson; Geo.
Rudge,  Port  Simpson;   Rev.  George j
Haley,  Charles  Perry,  Metlakatlah; !
Rev. Mr. Hogan, Masset; J. F. Bray,
Graham   Island;   John   Flewln,   Port;
Simpson;     Mr.    McEwan,    Kitselas; :
John  Boyd,  Hazelton;     R.    S.    Sar-j
geant, Hazelton; Thomas Sutherland,!
Prince  Rupert;     Joseph   A.   Brown,
Port Essington; I). S. Southern, Port
Essington;  Mr. Chandler, Prince Rupert;   Harry   Doyle,   Graham   Chambers,    Naas River;     J.  M.  Colllson,
John Wallace, Arrandale; Peter Wallace, Claxton;   Rev.  J.  B.  and  Mrs.
McCullough,  Arrandale.
Council's Crunl
Following the request of the committee that the council should aid
the exhibition, tMe finance committee reported on Saturday nighl mi
tin .subject that ihe city sho.ilrl con-
tvibille $260  to tie Fair.
In support of 'ie grant, Aid,  P'l-
Local News
FINANCIAL  POSITION
K. Fredrickson, a laborer engaged
in railway construction at McHugh'3
camp on the Skeena, was accidentally
drowned on Friday evening.
XJ '!< *
W. C. C. Mehan, superintendent of
the G. T. P., is taking up his residence In the company's residence,
formerly occupied by J. II. Pillsbury.
* *     *
The bylaw relative to licenses
other than liquor licenses in the city
will likely come up at a meeting of
the council at an early date. Aid.
.N'aden and Aid. Barrow are not in
favor of the wholesale slaughter of
the original  bylaw.
* *     *
In the police court this morning
John Home, H. Clancy and Jerry
Murphy, all charged with selling
liquor illegally, failed to appear.
Warrants were issued for their arrest. Jack Griffith, whose case had
been called the day before, failed to
appear. He was found guilty and a
fine of $700 levied. A warrant was
issued for his  arrest.
 o	
DROWNED IN RAPIDS
Sad Accident Occurred Yesterday When
Bridge Carpenter Loses His
Life.
William   E.   Gilroy   Fell  From  Pier
Into the Swift Current
Below
Finance Committee of City Council Will
Go Into Question of
Debentures.
Water Supply Wanted on Ninth Ave.
—Deadlock on Selection of Medical Health Officer
A sad accident occurred at Zanardi
Rapids yesterday morning. William
E. Gilroy, who was engaged in the
work on the bridge being constructed there for the G. T. P., fell from a
pier into tho swift waters below and
was drowned.
He had been engaged on tho work
for about three months, and was regarded as a splendid workman. He
mis friends living in Sault Ste Marie,
Michigan.
The unfortunate man was in the
act of relaslng a rail that had caught
on the top of the pier. Losing his
balance he fell off his stand. In spite
of the fact that a rope was thrown
to him from a 8.ow, he did not grasp
it, although within reach. It is,
therefore, believed he must have
struck his head somewhere In the
fall and become dazed. He rose a
second time, but although efforts
were made to reach him they were
without success. A search was Instituted for hours but without any
result.
. o	
IN THE COURTS
Plant  Fine $50  For Assaulting   Fellow Teamster
At last evening's council meeting
a number of matters came up for consideration outside of what has of
late been the general order of business, viz., the consideration of bylaws.
The Union Transfer Company asked to be allowed to tender on the
hauling of the one million feet of
lumber purchased from the Westholme Lumber Company.
Aid. Lynch thought It was only
fair to call for tenders under the circumstances. The conditions should
be set forth.
It was decided to call for the tenders.
Aid. Hilditch wanted to know If
anything was being done to provide
water on Ninth avenue. Water was
being used from a pool that was not.
fit to drink from. A stand pipe
should be  pro.ided.
Aid. Mobley said the proposition
had been turned down. It had been
estimated that $2,400 would be
necessary to put In tbe pipe. These
people had the right to have the pipe
put in at their own expense. It had
been deemed wise to leave the matter over until the permanent engineer came.
Aid. Hilditch said all that was required was a temporary pipe that
would not cost more than $30.
Aid. Mobley said no such proposal
as this was made. The residents
asked for water and the cost was
put by the engineer at about $1,800.
After fuller discussion, is was decided to refer the matter of a temporary water supply on Ninth avenue
to the water committee.
Tiie Finance committee was authorized to go into the whole question of tho city debentures, Including the placing of these, the best
means of floating them on the
money market and all other related
points. Aid. Pattullo, the chairman
of tho committee, said he thought he
could have the report ready for the
next night.
Applications for medical health
officer were received from Dr. J. P.
Cade, Dr. J. O. Reddle and Dr. C. A.
Eggert.
The first ballot gave Dr. Eggert
three votes, Dr. Reddle two and Dr.
Cade two. A discussion followed as
to whether the vote to be decisive
should ho a majority vote of all the
ballots or simply the highest number
of votes cast. Tbe question was referred to the city solicitor, but no
definite decision obtained from him.
It was then suggested that as the
Mayor had not voted being under
the Impression that he did not have
a vote, a second ballot be taken. The
situation proved to have been completely changed In the interval and
the ballot stood, Dr. Reddle 4, Dr.
Eggert 2, and  Dr. Cade 2.
It was decided to adjourn the balloting until the next  meeting.
Tenders for the city advertising
were opened and the lender of The
Journal being the lowest was accepted,
Judge Young is holding a sitting
of his court here, disposing of business that has accumulated since he
left for Atlin. Upon completing the
hearing here he will go to Hazelton
where a long list of cases await
hearing.
Frank Plant, who was charged
with assaulting Thomas Williams at
Kitselas was fined $50 or sixty days
in jail as a result of trouble in the
stables of the railway contractors. It
was brought out In evidence that
there had been considerable drinking going on the night before and the
following morning Plant showed a
disposition to make things uncomfortable for all who crossed him. He
knocked Paddy, a teamster, down ami
r I a < -11 used a pitchfork on Williams,  —
In an action brought by Miss Lewis| Wrong  Directions  Pi-events Officials
POSTPONES   l\\ RSTIGATION
against the n. C. Real Estate Syndicate over a salary in which was involved the question of whether tin'
plaintiff was discharged from or lefl
the employment of the defendant
company, judgment was given for $6
In favor of the plaintiff.
Reaching Scene of Murder
tullo said that it was felt that this
was all thai could be reasonably expected from the city.
Alii. Mobley said this might seem
rather a small donation, but every
dollar was needed at. this time. It
was not as much as the city would
like to give, but It was all that they
could afford.
Aid. Pattullo pointed out that
$.10,000 would be needed to reimburse (lie government. There would
also be $25,000 required fur tiie
telephone,
His Worship said he was heartily
in support of the movement, The
iicv would  have  to  cut   iis garment
,';i-c-ic!-clillL;   Id   ils   cloth
The Japanese murder case on
Queen Charlotte Islands has not been
investigated owing lo the fact that
the government agent here, Mr. McMullin and Chief Wynn, of the provincial police force, were Improperly
advised as to the place where the
body was to bo found.
As coroner, Mr. McMullin accompanied by Constable Wynn, went to
Jelway only to find that Rose Spit
was tho scene of the alleged murder
and that the body of the victim had
been hurried. As it was Impossible
io connect with Rose Harbor, the officials returned and will proceed to
the scene on  the Amur.
As far as could be learned the ac-
cused is named Wadakabl, who Is
held In custody. Kawasaki, who met
Ills dentil, had been crazed with drink
mid threatened all kinds of trouble.
The details of tho mlx-up were not
obtainable. THE  PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Tuesday, J'u'fy 12, 1910
IMPRESSED MINISTER
Hon. Thomas Taylor Sees a Great Future
For Northern  British
Columbia.
Interview  Willi  Member of Government in South on Prospects
or This   Port
On his return to Vancouver, Hon.
Thos. Taylor was Interviewed as to
the country tributary to Prince Rupert, which In- recently visited. The
Pirn Ince says in part:
It wus .Mr. Taylor's first visit to tin-
New North section sloping to the Pacific seaboard, and he can scarcely
say too much as to its promise as a
first-class farming and fruit growing
district. Coal mining also promises
to play an important part in its industrial history, while as to its
wealth of metalliferous minerals the
world already knov^s something. In
its adaptability for mixed farming,
vegetable cultivation, dairying and
cattle ranching, and the growth of
the hardier fruits, Mr. Taylor believes the valleys of the North are
destined to achieve wide and enduring fame. As to the fruit, it is, of
course, highly desirable that the settlers should start right—planting
only such varieties as are suited to
the climate and conditions of the
country—and in this connection he
hopes to see one or more of the government demonstration orchards established in this Northern territory.
He would even go so far as to recommend to the executive that the government adopt an even more paternal
policy than that decided upon for
more settled portions of the province,
and set out experimental orchards
as well as supervise their care and
development.
Referring to the trip to the interior, Mr. Taylor in his interview
says relative to Kitselas that there is
much mining development in the
tributary district, discoveries on
Gold Creek creating considerable excitement and with apparent justification. The ores are gold, silver and
copper, the gold values, however,
chiefly commanding attention,
At Aldermere there is a very extensive valley of exceptionally fine
agricultural land, hay, grain, and
vegetables being grown extensively.
The pea-vine stood as high as a
man's head, and the timothy would
compare with any the continent over.
As yet no effort has been made toward fruit cultivation, but it is thought
that the country hereabouts is well
adapted to this specialty branch of
farming. Unquestionably for the production of hay, grains and vegetables the valley is one that it would
be hard to equal.
From Aldermere the minister and
his party continued by road for a
distance of about forty miles
through the valley (which has an
approximate length of fifty miles and
width of twenty, of uniformly good
land) into what is known as the
Pleasant Valley, says tbe Province.
Here another fine section opens up,
extending along both sides of the
Bulkley River. The government
wagon road in here being extended
a distance of about twenty miles in
order to permit settlers and others in
the South Bulkley and Francois Lake
sections to get in their farm machinery and supplies. The agricultural
country continues all the way to
Fraser Lake.
Having a day available upon the
return to Aldermere, the minister
took advantage of the opoprtunity to
look over the Grand Trunk Pacific
coal mines at .Mud Creek. These are
as yet in the prospect stage, but several open cuts have been run and
shafts sunk showing at all points
good  ouf-croppings on   from  five to
nine-foot   ledges  of   fine   bituminous
coal.
On the Telkwa, which runs into
the Bulkley at Aldermere, there is
also coal mining in the preliminary
stage. A trail has been constructed
up the Telkwa to lue Grand Trunk
Pacific coal areas, which are the
scene of much prospecting and expert
investigation. The Morrice River,
also, claims wide attention in con-
sequence of its apparent extensi-.e
and valuable coal ...-.is. Frank
Dockril] and his associates are just
now operating drills for the purpose
of thoroughly testing tie- coal values
md it was arranged to allow an . d-
ditlonal $2,000 from the public purse
fur the completion of this trail. Oil' -
works in this neighborhood wl let
were found to he important in rela
Hon to the development of rnlr.tri,
and agricultural districts In the way
of trails, roads, etc., were also authorized.
Returning down river a well-attended public meeting was held at
Hazelton, and the minister and his
party went ashore at Copper City,
back of which point the famous
Lakelse Valley extends, which is
estimated to contain upwards ot
200,000 acres of good farming land.
C.P.R. MOVING HERE
Reports That Old Transportation Company is Preparing to Follow
G.T.P in Trade.
Surveyors Are in  Field  in   Direction
of Tele .Inline Cache Looking For
Route Aci'oss Province
There was a time when the ports
Of Seattle and Vancouver set pace for
the various transportation companies
operating on iliis coast. No undertaking by these companies would be
considered except from Its relation
to one or both of these ports. That
day has passed. Today there .'an
he no move on the part ot one of
the companies without the consideration of Prince Rupoi. na a factor in
the enterprise.
It Is safe to say that at the present time there is not a single railway or steamship company which
operates anywhere in the Canadian
West as on the Pacific ocean but
what considers this port In Its future
plans.     Within   the  next   few  years
4IIIIM
HAYNOR BROS.
|  if p •   i Located temporarily, since the lire,
B  llOUSe    rUmiSnerS.    i„  |>„„ediii .Block, corner of Second
1 -     Avenue  ami   Eighth   Street.
Seventeen Cents a Day
BUYS AN
i   Some simps in slightly damaged   goods  which   we  want   to   clear
1  out  before  moving into new quarters in Manson 151k., Third Ave.
S FUNERAL  FURNISHERS
puny have not had much to say regarding these vessels, but il is believed now that at least one of them
will be adapted to the trade among
the three ports of Victoria, Vancouver and Seattle.
This route Is now covered by the
Princess Victoria and the Princess
Charlotte. The latter vessel is
adapted In her design for a different
trade to- that in which she is engaged. She has provision for fitting up
second class accommodation and at
the time of her arrival on the coast
it was generally remarked that she
was adapted for a different trade to
that in which she entered.
Now it is said the C. P. R. will put
FORGET JUNE SHARES
Owners of stock in  Rossland Properties runout  be Found
The old Rossland mining boom
days were recalled In a curious application in the supreme court chambers at Vancouver by Mr. J. L. G.
Abbott on behalf of the liquidator ot
the War Eagle Consolidated Mining
Company and the Centre Star Mining Company. There are 4,000 and
7,000 shares respectively in those
companies, the owners of which cannot be found owing to the lapse of
years and the transfers of the stock,
and though they are not worth the
<>
•>
The Princess Victoria, the Steamer That Serves as the Type for the C.P.R. Vessels in Coasting Trade
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Settlers are here coming in very
rapidly and appear to be men of the
right class to achieve success.
Kitsumkalum valley also offers exceptional advantages in agricultural
and fruit lands, and the areas available are being rapidly taken up by
actual settlers.
Recently a party of tourists were
visiting the Louvre. By mistake one
of the tired number carried a catalogue of the Luxembourg. Upon being confronted by a fantastically
modern nude study with a black cat
in the background, she turned to the
corresponding liuniuei- and complc*
cently announced to the astonished
listeners: "This is Whistler's
.Mother."
The London Law Times points out
that 'the silk gown of the bench and
bar was originally adopted as a form
of mourning at the death of an English sovereign. On the death of
Queen Mary in 1694 the silk gown
was introduced as mourning, and,
having been found more convenient
and less troublesome than the regular
dress then worn, has since been continued. The late Sir Frederick Pollock Is said to have expressed an
opinion in reference to the ordinary
costume of the bar that the bench
and bar went into mourning at the
death of Queen Anne and have so
remained ever since.
there will, it is safe to prophesy, be
more attention directed to this port
than there will be to any other harbor on the Pacific coast.
Anyone who has followed at all
the trend of transportation affairs
cannot help Deing struck by the
jealous attention with which one of
the large companies ever watches the
others. Every movu on the part of
G. T. P.. Is regarded with the most
careful attention by all the other
transportation companies, although
officials of the lines would at once
deny it If asked the question point
blank.
From sources elosely In touch
with transportation affairs on tho
coast, it is learned turn the C. P.R .
realizing that the G. T. P. In its quick
move in the way of putting the most
up-to-date steamers on the coast to
ply out of here, has gained a decided advantage over the other company, has determine... upon making
an attempt to rehabilitate itself in
public favor..
Tho result, it is announced, will b3
a strong fight for the northern trade
on this const. The C. P. R. realizes
that it should have acted quicker in
the matter of fast steamers. Not
having done so that company is now
preparing to retrieve its lost honor.
The two new steamers building in
the Old Country will be rushed forward as soon as possible and will be
Of a better type than has hitherto
been supposed.    Officials of the com-
the Charlotte on the run to here,
probably supplementing her with
another of the steamers, nossibly the
Princess May, that may be overhauled to increase her speed somewhat. This move cannot be made
now until the new steamers reach
the coast.
But what is still more important
to Prince Rupert and its future is the
report that already the C. P. R. is
seeking a route for. a second line
across the province to reach the Pacific coast at a point north of the
north end of Vancouver Island. Survey parties have already entered
upon their work in the direction of
Tete Jaune Cache and it is reported
they have been ordered to proceed
with all expedition. Following the
well established principle that the
great corporations alt sooner or later
centralize at certain stategic shipping points, it is: prophesized that
Prince Rupert will be the objective
point of that company and that
shortly after the G. T. P. reaches this
port the C. P. R. will be preparing
the way to making its entrance also.
The fight which the latter company is preparing to put up for the
coasting trade here is held to be but
an evidence of Its Intention to move
in the land  transportation end  also.
Mrs. Newbrlde—"Booboo! Harry
threw a cake at me. One that I made
myself, too.'" Mother—"The monster!   He might have killed you."
soaring prices of the boom days,
there is still a very comfortable interest attaching to them. The application was for the order of the
court allowing the sale- of these
shares and the deposit of the cash
in the bank to await claimants.
The circumstances attaohihg to the
application are thai tyie War Eagle
company sold its shares to the Centre Star company for certain shares
in that company. Subsequently the
Centre Star company sold all its
sharea to the Consolidated Mining &
Smelting Company of Canada, operating throughout the Kootenays. As
these transfers were both made in
consideration of shares in the companies purchasing, the ultimate result, is that the original shareholders
In the War Eagle and Centre Star
are entitled to certain shares in the
Consolidated Mining and Smelting
Company.
The application to sell these shares
was adjourned for the production of
further material, Mr.. Justice Murphy
puinting out that serious consideva
lion was needed on an application of
this sort.
 o-	
"The editor was dying, says an exchange, but when the doctor hent
over, placed his ear on his breast,
and said, 'Poor man! cirulatlon almost gone!' the dying editor sat up
and shouted: 'You're a liar; we have
the largest circulation in the country'."
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CARPETS
If your floor needs covering
here's your chance, save money:
times are quiet and you must.
Carpets, Rugs, Hemp, China,
Japanese Matting, Door Rugs
and Mats.
Hart's
Big Furniture Store
Don't Tread on Me! But Let Us See!
WHAT IS HONE without a Floor Covering ?       A  house without a Rug or Carpet is like a
matinee without candy.    And why be without them when here  is an opportunity to buy cheap.
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F. W. HART, Corner 2nd Ave and 6th St.
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Funeral Directors
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.1-    .   -v.
K^t.l
Tuesday, July 12, 1910
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
^♦♦•H-*************.:
I Immigration Problems Discussed at Gathering in  London
.;..;..;. ^ .;..•.,;..;,,;.,;,,;..;,,;, .;,.:,,j,;,,j, ,.,,»,.;,,;,,;,,..,., ,...j
One of the most representative
conferences that have ever met to
consider the subject of emigration
was that arranged by the Royal
Colonial Institute and held in the
Whitehall Rooms of the Hotel Metro-
pole, London. No fewer than 48 dif-
erent organizations concerned with
emigration were represented, the
delegates and others attending numbering some 150. Lieutenant-Gen-
eral Sir J. Bevan Edwards, K.C.M.
G., C.B., chairman of the emigration
committee of the Institute, presided,
while Mr. James R. Boose, its secretary, acted as secretary to the conference,  says  "Canada."
At the morning session on Monday, the methods of the various societies and the question of the desirability or possibility of some measure of co-operation were discussed.
In opening the discussion, the Earl
of Dundonald, C.B., K.C.V.O., said
that he was one of those who thought
the emigration question was best to
be solved by our centres of population acquiring fertile estates distributed throughout our Colonial Empire, to which they could in times
of depression send out those who
could not get work in the Mother
Country. He believed, such an investment would pay a hundredfold.
In support of his contention that
present-day education in the Mother
Country was not such as fitted the
people to take part in the development of the soil and in the production of the elements of life, Lord
Dundonald said in his various tours
of inspection throughout Canada he
was deeply impressed with the lack,
on the part of public school men, of
that knowledge which fitted them to
develop the soil. Those who came
from a lower station in life were far
more fitted for that than those who
ought to be the leaders in the development of our Empire.
Most of the speakers expressed
the willingness and even anxiety of
their societies to co-operate with
others. Mr. F. Morris, of the Charity
Organization Society, said it would in
particular be of immense service if
they arranged by means of co-operation to have all over Canada capable
people, not only to give advice as
to where settlers should go, but also
to supervise them when they were
sent.
Mr. W. F. Hamilton, K.C., who
represented the Church Army, urged
that agents should be stationed in
the neighborhood of farms; and he
incidentally remarked that the more
stringent the immigration regulation were made the more satisfactory
in a sense, was it for the immigration
societies, who were responsible for
those they sent out for three years.
Miss Taylor, of the Victoria League,
reported that the welcome extended
to settlers through the agency of that
body had appealed most strongly to
them.
The Rev. R. L. Gwynne, of the
Kent Colonizing Association, urged
the co-ordination of the vast mass
of private adventure in Great Britain, and advocated the formation of
an organization for training elementary school boys over thirteen In
work on the land.
Child  Emigration
The subject of child emigration
was introduced by Mr. Kingsley
Fairbridge, Oxford, secretary of the
newly formed Society for the Furtherance of Child Emigration to the
Colonies. He dwelt on the necessity for a basis of special agricultural
training, maintaining that the ordinary Canadian school did not. equip
a boy for farming, nor did life on his
father's farm alone do so. Mr. William Baker, Dr. Barnardo's Homes,
gave a cheering account of the splendid success which had attended their
experience of emigration. Of the
thousands of boys they had sent out
to Canada only two per cent had been
failures, and 80 per cent were farmers. As showing how their children
got on, he mentioned that the
mayoress of one of the principal
towns of Canada was an old Barnardo
girl. Their children were boarded
out with farmers there just as at
Home, and thus they learned to do
things in Canadian style, and started
work on the right lines when the
time came for them to do so. They
had in Canada twelve men and six
women constantly going round visiting.
Lady Knightley of Fawsley, who
represented the British Women's
Emigration Association, said In five
years they had emigrated about 10,-
000 women, with a very small percentage of failures. The new Canadian restrictions, Lady Knightley remarked, pressed rather heavily upon
them, and as there was a demand in
the Dominion for girls like factory
workers, it would be very hard to
keep them out.
The Rev. E. de M. Rudolf, of the
Church of England Incorporated Society for Waifs and Strays, said for
such, properly trained, the life in
Canada afforded the very best opportunity. Colonel Lamb, of the Salvation Army, explained how in Canada they had a chain of officers entirely set apart for the reception of
the emigrants selected in Britain.
Inspection System
Mr. F. Butler, chairman of the
managing committee of the Emigrants' Information Office, at the
suggestion of one of the earlier
speakers dealt with the system of inspection of children in Canada on
the part of both the emigration societies and the Dominion authorities, and stated that the conclusion
he arrived at, after personal examination of the records at Ottawa, was
that it was about as complete and
sure as any system of that kino
could be. Mr. Francis Deverell, of
the British Empire Agency, Ltd.,
spoke especially of the necessity for
giving full information and advice
as to settlement in particular parts
of the Empire.
The first part of the proceedings
terminated with the adoption of the
following resolution, moved by Lord
Brassey, and seconded by Sir Frederick Young, K.C.M. G., "That the
Council of the Royal Colonial Institute be asked to appoint a representative standing committee to
whom the recommendations of the
conference should be referred for
such further action as may be
deemed advisable." Lord Brassey
said it was certain that they were not
spending unduly in connection with
emigration on salaries to those who
did the work. He doubted if any
branch of home endeavor had received "in proportion to its expenditure
more splendid voluntary work than
had been given to the cause of emigration. It seemed to him that what
they suffered from was not overlapping, but rather a want of adequate
co-operation and he suggested that
the Emigrants' Information Office
might be used to a greater extent
in  this connection.
Canadian   Regulation   Criticised
The discussion on the emigration
work of the government agencies of
the Oversea Dominions and Its relation to public and philanthropic
effort was opened by Mr. Baker, who,
while acknowledging the courtesy
shown by the agencies in helping
them, said he should like them to
help further by giving more specific
information as to just the sort of
people they wanted and where they
wanted to put them. A similar tribute to the agents was paid by most
of the subsequent speakers, Mr. Obed
Smith (who had had to go to Denmark) being personally referred to
in particularly flattering terms,
which were striking in view of the
strong criticism to which the regulations he has to administer were subjected.
Sir Clement Kinloch Cooke, M.P.
for Devonport, the chairman of the
Central Emigration Board, urged the
desirability of more co-operation between the agencies of the Oversea
Dominions. Referring to the latest
Canadian regulation relating to assisted passages, he said they did not
want to send all their best farm
laborers out to Canada, but there
were a great many people who would
make excellent settlers and were anxious to go to Canada whom the
regulations would not let in. It
seemed to him a most outrageous
condition that was # being imposed.
They were told that the new regulation did nothing new, but If that
were so why was it passed at all-? If
things were just as they were some
months ago, what was its object?
What they wanted was some absolute
and final statement of what sort of
people Canada wanted. They did
not desire to see regulations formulated time and again which upset, all their arrangements, created
great hardship for the people being
emigrated, did no good to the cause
of emigration generally, and certainly did not make Canada popular
with the working clasess of the
Mother Country.
Colonel Lamb said personally he
never experienced very much difficulty with the Canadian authorities,
always finding them on the whole
obliging and reasonable. The cause
of the restrictions, he pointed out,
was that at one time there was not
the care and discrimination showi
in the selection of emigrants that
there might have been. The colonies
wanted people, but the surplus population the Mother Country wanted to
get rid of was not the class the
colonies wanted. The colonies,
again, could not be run without
British capital. These were the conflicting interests which would have
to be merged.
Want Xo Loafers
The Rev. M. Maclean Goldie, special commissioner for Nova Scotia,
said a good deal had been said about
the Englishman not being required
in Canada, but is was not the .Englishman, but the loafer, who wa« not
required. Any man who was willing
to work could find a situation In
Canada, and they would be only too
willing to get him. He mentioned
that within the past eleven months
they had sent out to Nova Scotia
1,14 6 emigrants, and every one had
been suitably placed, and they had
not had a single complaint.
Mr. E. C. Gates, secretary of the
Self-Help Emigration Society, said
some were not quite lair to the governments In the Oversea Dominions.
They did not always recognize that
the King's ministers In Canada were
responsible to the people of Canada,
and not to the people of Great Britain. They had to look at the interests of Canada, and, not at those of
Great Britain, whero they differed.
Besides, it was a perfectly good argument to say that if the emigrants'
friends were doing well enough to
support them in Canada, then they
ought to be able to pay the cost of
taking them out. Mr. Gates thought
there was some misunderstanding
between the two orders in council of
last year and this year. The regulations were said to be the same, and
he believed that was perfectly correct, but that it was the exceptions
that varied. "Vexatious," on the
other hand, was the term applied by
Mr. D. Richardson, of the Kent
Colonizing Association, who urged
that they should seek as a body of
emigration societies to get them removed.
The Rev. Cuthbert W. H. Whalley,
referring to the Society for the Furtherance of Child Emigration as a
co-ordinating agency, mentioned that
the Premier of Newfoundland had
made an offer of 50,000 acres free
of taxation and in addition a government grant for school buildings and
teachers' salaries.
Mr. J. M. Aikin, K. C, of Winnipeg, who made a stirring patriotic
speech, said if' Canada aspired to be
the heart of the British Empire it
was very necessary that she should
be British in her leanings, and that
her population should, us far as
possible, come from the British Empire. They were willing that Canada should be thrown open to the
right class of people, but they must
be the right class. He was not,
however, in sympathy with the regulation which required for a capable
Britisher that he should be able to
show that he was worth $50 when he
landed. That was an artificial regulation, and was no test of the proper
description and character of the emigrant they expected, and should
have, in Canada. They wanted good
health, good character, energy, and
industry. He knew dozens of men
who, when they went out twenty-five
years ago, had not $50 In their pockets, who were today the best and
most prominent citizens of the Dominion. Mr. Aikin suggested the
arranging of a conference with the
Canadian government as a means of
removing any existing hardships.
Before the discussion closed, Sir
C. Kinloch Cooke referred to a letter, addressed to Lady Falmouth by
Mrs. Crear, Dunelin, Hamilton, Ont.,
and published in the Times, in which
the writer said: "At present, among
the great, stream of English people
whom your agencies are sending to
us are many who are the off-scour-
ings from London streets—the hangers on to cnurch charitable organizations—the type of men who demand
work, but that is the last thing that
they really desire." Speaking emphatically, Sir Clement said he had
no hestitation in saying that there
was no emigration society of any importance in the country which sent
out to Canada or anywnere else the
scourings of the streets of London;
and what was more, it would be quite
impossible ror them to obtain entrance into Canada.
Plan of Imperial Government
Second day discussion centred upon the position of the Imperial government with regard to emigration,
the utilization of the labor exchanges
and the holding of a subsidiary conference with a view to the formulation of proposals  for submission to
the Imperial conference In 1911. The
subject was introduced by Mr. Walter  Hazell,  J.P.,   chairman    of    the
Central  Unemployed   Body  for  London. The government, he pointed out,
had  done something  in  the way of
aiding   emigration,   notably   by  the
Unemployed Workmen Act.   He be-j
lieved that it was possible under the
existing Act of Parliament to extend
their work  through  the channel  of t
the Labor Exchanges, and that if this
were done with  painstaidng care a I
great deal of good might be accom- j
plished.    Nothing,  of  course, could i
be  done  by  the     home  government
without the co-operation of the Oversea governments,  and  it should  be
arranged that the latter should have
the last word with regard to me selection of the people to be sent out.
lie suggested  that  they  might  also,
by means of earmarking kages, collect     the   loans  advanced  In  Great
Britain,
Mr. C. S. Goldman, M. P. for Pen-
ryn and Falmouth, advocated a
scheme of extended co-operation between the governments of the Empire and the organization of a central
uody in Great Britain, connected
with the local committees in every
part of the country and In the receiving countries, and also In touch
with the labor bureaus and other
organizations. The solution of the
financial problem, he said, must ultimately lie in an arrangement between the government, comprehending such bodies as the friendly societies, etc.
Mr. Richard Jebb favored the suggestion to ask tne government to
convene a subsidiary Imperial conference, at which the provincial and
state governments should be represented,  to  discuss  the  problems  of
government. A limited number of
selected pioneers might be sent out
in July next, and after working during the harvest should, about November 1, be assisted to build a sod
shack on their homesteads. The
wives and children should be provided with maintenance at home
from July to December, and in the
springtime they should be sent out to
the Canadian West. Advances for
travelling expenses should be made,
and the men should be given cash or
credit to the amount of £65, w»n«
life, fidelity, fire and stock insurance
policies should be taken out. Repayment of tbe loans should be
spread over five years at seven per
cent  Interest.
Powers of i ncitiploycd Act
Official opinion was represented by
Mr. F. Butler, of the'Emigrants' In-
emigration, citing Mr. John Burn'B! formation Office (who emphasized
views on child emigration as an in- j the fact that that office was devoting
dication that the government was not  attention   to   the   encouragement   of
emigration within the hounds of the
Empire), and Colonel Murray, of the
Labor Exchanges central office. The
averse from considering such a question, and pointing out that the forthcoming revision of the poor law system in Great Britain made this a
particularly appropriate time for action. Mr. Jebb moved a resolution
to this effect, which was afterwards
agreed to.
.Minister Advocated
The Hon. Alexander Wilmot, M.
L.A., Cape Colony, advocated the appointment of a minister of the Imperial Crown for emigration, or at
least that one of the ministers should
in his portfolio include doing everything in his power to co-operate with
the emigration societies.
Mr. L. S. Amery emphasized the
importance of the question of emigration from an Imperial point of
view, pointing out that it was the
foundation of the whole question of
Imperial defence and Imperial union.
That two days' discussion had indicated that the question of emigration
was approaching something like a
deadlock, or at any rate there was
an amount of waste "and confusion
which was wholly unnecessary.
Neither the uominion nor the Mother
Country seemed to know what they
were driving at, and the efforts of
the emigration societies and individuals were often wasted in trying to
help the wrong people out, and then
sudednly finding that some government on the other side issued an
edict which threw mat work into
confusion. These things came from
misunderstanding, and the only way
to clear up such a misunderstanding
was to get responsible people to meet
together and decide on a common
policy as to the class of emigrants
they wished to encourage, and how
to encourage it.
Colonel Lamb favored the appointment of commissioners to give grants
where required, rather than that the
Government should undertake the
work itself. If a fund of £10,000,000
were established it would be more
in keeping with the magnitude of
the  task  they had  to  undertake.   If
latter stated that there was no doubt
that the powers under the Unemployed Act of advancing loans for
travelling expenses etxended to the
colonies, and intimated that the share
which the Labor Exchanges would
take In assisting the emigration societies, etc., was under the consideration of the Board of Trade at the
present moment, as well as the Allan
scheme, which was very much on the
lines of the old crofting colonies
scheme, which was in the main undoubtedly a success.
Mr. A. J. Dawson declared that it
was a preposterous thing that while
there were government departments
of practically every kind, there was
no department for the regulation of
the most important and most vital of
all interests, man power. Mr. A. A.
Pearson, C.B., C.M.G., said as a result of a tour last, year through Australia with Sir Charles Lucas he had
arrived at the conclusion that tbe
time had come when it was necessary that the government should take
up the general control of emigration
in co-operation with the emigration
societies. Thai would secure cooperation among the latter, be of
great value in tlua solution of such
difficulties as that of the Canadian
regulations, and also help to fum's'i
the money. He hoped the first thing
that would result from that would
be to make the Labor Exchanges
thoroughly available for eoiigriiion
purposes. Sir Philip Hutchins, K.C.
S:L, for the League of the Empire,
also cordially supported the proposal
to invoke official assistance In this
matter.
Sir Frederick Young opened the
final discussion, which was mainly an
exposition of individual schemes. On
the motion of Mr. P. H. Kerr, secretary of the Self-Help Emigration Society, seconded by Mr. Amery, it was
agreed that the schemes which had
been brought before the conference,
they were to deal with  the redistrl-  should   he  referred
tuition o tfhe people they must do
so in a proper and scientific manner.
Lord Brassey, on the other hand,
viewed witl. considerable doubt the
proposal to make a large grant from
(he public purse for this purpose.
He thought a good deal could be
done with a modest beginning, and
sugegsted that an annual grant, not
exceeding £10,000, should be administered under the auspices of the
Emigration Committee of the Colonial Office In grants to existing emigration societies.
Mr. R. C. Scolt of the Allan Line,
who have now been carrying passengers lo Canada for about eighty-
eight yenrs, gave details of a scheme
drawn  up  by the managers of that
to  the  standing
committee for further consideration,
and for such action as might be
deemed advisable, and that it be a
recommendation to the committee to
consider a scheme for the permanent
organization of the conference as an
annual institution.
The chairman, in closing the proceedings, joined with several previous speakers In commenting on the
absence of the High Commissioners
and Agents-Genera] for the Dominions over the seas, all of whom were
invited and several of whom had accepted the invitation, As to the conference, he felt sure it would have
an Important result, and he assured
them (hat the Council of the In-
Btltute would do all It could to sarry
line which had been placed before oul the views and resolutions which
the labor exchangea, „^u would pre-'had been passed and bring them be-
scntly be submitted to the Canadian fore the government.
The Liverpool Y. M. C. A. Monthly
Journal In a recent Issue publishes
an interesting account of a lecture
given by Agnes Deans Cameron, the
well known British Columbia writer
and lecturer.    The Journal  says: —
In the Y. M. C. A. Hall, Liverpool,
an unusual address was delivered on
April 2 by Miss Agnes Deans Cameron, the Canadian explorer and writer.
Some illuminating facts were presented to the audience, who, by the
way, formed a capacity house.
The listeners learned that Western
Canada is today the goal of the greatest economic trek this world has
even kndwn: 100,000 people from
the United States entered the great
wheat belt of Canada last year to
make homes in that urai-rle land, and
there was an equal immigration from
the Mother land and the hardy nations of Northern Europe. The great
lure Is, of course, the free farms of
160   acres   each  which   the   govern-
ADVERTISING  THE PROVINCE
ment of Canada is giving to each man
who will undertake to till a farm.
South of the Sasl itcbewan, i.e., in
the land of present settlements
served by the railways, last year between 200,000,000 and 300,000,000
bushels of grain were gathered, and
as yet in this section only one-twentieth of the arable land has been
brought under the plough.
The speaker estimates, basing her
conclusions on close personal observation, that north of the Saskatchewan, in the great hinterland beyond the end of steel, Canada holds
in waiting another 100,000,000 acres
of land capable of growing No. 1 hard
wheat. Eighteen months ago Miss
Cameron, with one white companion,
made a record journey from Chicago
due  north-west   across     the    whole
width of Canada to the edge of the
Arctic Ocean, following tbe great,
waterways of the Athabasca River,
Athabasca Lake, Great Slave Lake,
and the mighty Mackenzie to the
point where the latter stream disembogues into the Polar Ocean. A collection of flora verj valuable to British science was brought out as one
result of this journey. This histoids herbarium Is full of surprises:
among other things it shows the delicate blue flowers of the wild flax
gathered at a point well within the
arctic circle.
From the Arctic Ocean the audience was carried along a six weeks'
journey, with the traveller, against
the current up the bosom of the
mighty Peace River. They stopped
to marvel at the flour mill and fields
of grain white for the harvest at
Vermlllon-on-the-Peace in latitude
58 deg. 30 min. north, 500 miles due
north of any present Canadian railway line.
Over 100 distinct stereopticon
views illuminated this lecture; they
were all from the speaker's own
camera, and for the most pari
marked out "a route unspoiled of
Cook's."
Coming out from the Peace River
country to Edmonton on the Saskatchewan, an illuminating journey was
taken from that point westward, following the construction line of the
Grand Trunk Pacific Railway to its
Pacific terminus, Prince Rupert. This
new highway, which Is in name respects a Government line of road,
limls  a   very  easy   gradient  through
Un- Rocky Mountains al the Yellow-
head Pass, iiiui Immediately enters
upon one of the richest mesas in tIn-
world—a groat natural prairie
where the grass, pea-vine, and rank
herbage grow so high as in many
cases io reach the waist of a man
riding on horseback.
Fori George, midway between Edmonton and Prince Ruperl, is without iloulit the coming metropolis of
the Interim- of British Columbia.
This city will be the centre of u vast
agrarian country admirably suited
for grazing, farming, and fruit culture. Views of tiie big game, majestic scenery and marvellous fruit
of interior British Columbia proved
:i revelation t" the audience, and
called forth round after round of
applause,    it  was pointed  out  thai
Fori George is in equal latitude with
Liverpool,   I   thai   tin- completion
'if ii»- Grand Trunk Pacific railway
will lessen the trade route between
Liverpool and Yokohama by fully
three days.
All the rich gold wealth of the
Yukon, the timber of British Columbia, and the marvellous ffsh products
of   the   Pacific   will   souk   (be   flrand
|Trunk     Pacific     line   as  their  easy
egress, and  on  the streets of  Prince
j Rupert     the   wares of Occident and
Orient will meet.
 o——	
(dines  lulu  Prominence
Pentlcton,—J. J. Warren says that
Pentlcton will be the principal divisional point on the Kettle Valley railway. A wharf will be built, 900 feet
long, at a cos! of $50,000. The
Pentlcton payroll will probably
amounl lo jco.ooo.
t
4V-
l
r
\
J PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Tuesday, July 12, 1910
prince Kupert journal
Published twice a week on Tuesdays
and Fridays from the otlice of publication, Third Avenue near McBride St.
Subscription rate to any point in
Canada, $2.00 a year: to points outside
of Canada. 93.00 a year.
Advertising rate furnished on application.
(>. II. NELoON,
Editor.
Tuesday, July 12, 1910
A  GOOD COUNSEI/LOR
ing in religious colloges ran too much
into scientific and theoretical the-
ogy, and paid too little attention to
the teaching of the golden rule.
Such statements as those of The
Globe and Rev. Dr. Chown are significant of a changed attitude of mind
that is becoming more general as the
years pass. The non-essential features of religious life are being gradually thrust aside. There is also
i less emphasis upon religion related
I to the next world and more upon
i hut which fits a man for a right life
in the world of today.
EDITORIAL NOTES
The granting of 300 inches of
water to the city at Woodwortli Lake
by the Provincial Government, is a
happy culmination of a question that
has agitated the city for a long time.
While he will probably ask no bouquets in connection with the matter,
being satisfied like the majority of
the citizens that results have been
so advantageous to the city's interests, William Manson, M.P.P., Is to
be congratulated upon the persistency
with which he has pressed that the
city should push its claim for this
record.
During the last civic election campaign and later he persistently advocated a move in the direction which
has turned out so successfully. The
result has shown that Mr. Manson is
a safe counsellor who is not to be
easily thrown into a panic.
The ensuring of a supply such as
this to the city clears the situation
and allows an early start to be made
by the council on an adequate water
supply for the city.
A DISTINGUISHED GUEST
Next month Prince Rupert will be
honored by a visit from the Rt. Hon.
Sir Wilfrid Laurier, Prime Minister
of Canada. The visit of this distinguished statesman to the city
should be made an occasion of very
special prominence. We do not believe there are any in the city, no
matter to what political party they
may belong, who are not willing to
unite in making the event one long to
be remembered. It is an occasion
when all can unite to do honor to
our distinguished fellow countryman.
Sir Wilfrid's name is peculiarly
identified with Prince Rupert. The
carrying out of his great .c'lway
policy made this a port which is an
additional-reason why there should
be a united hearty reception to him.
For this reason It Is fitting that the
cordiality of the welcome accorded In
Prince Rupert should be more striking than it will he in any other place
in the Pacific province.
An early start should be made to
prepare for the event In which the
city council might well join hands
with the citizens as a whole so that it
may be demonstrated that the residents of Prince Rupert are large
enough in their conception of public
matters to be able to sink all petty
feeling and party differences and do
honor to one whose name is so favorably known throughout the whole
British Empire.
XEEI) OP THK PULPIT
The lack of young men to fill the
growing demands of the churches
today is agitating the leaders in the
different denominations. Some good
wholesome criticism is as a result
being directed to the subject of the
ministry and its needs. The Toronto
Globe, alluding to the fact that all
the churches are in need of more
men for the ministry, declared that
merely to offer higher salaries would
not solve the problem, even If it did
secure a larger number of candidates.
The real problem, it says, is not
merely one of more men, but of better men, and the attraction for the
latter is no money but an opportunity for real service. The Globe
charges that there are too many
petty (unctions—features connected
with tin- ministry, and Hint these do
not appeal to men of real power. Tho
Globe further charges Unit (he curriculum in most colleges is antiquated
ami outgrown, hopelessly out of
touch with Canadian life, and not at
all fitted to train men to be leaders
of men In Christian service.     It says:
"Scholars the colleges must produce, but scholarship touched with
emotion and inspired to service. Let
the churches and their colleges revise their Ideals or the ministry and
the call for men will not be In vain."
Rev. Dr. Chown, of Toronto, at
the conference last week of Canadian
Charities and Correction declared
that ministers needed to come down
from the high flights of theology and
learn first hand by personal contact
and observation the conditions that
exist In the world, as what they needed most was a better acquaintance
with the woes of the world and less
of the mysteries of higher criticism.
The minister should be sent out to
work as a man amongst men."
Dr. Chown charged that the teach-
We believe the time is not ripe for
the taking over of the scavenging by
the city council. The police should
be instructed to see that the regulations are enforced and through the
health officer, stringent compliance
with the rules made obligatory. To
add a new department, however, to
the city hall staff in the way of a
scavenging equipment would be reckless.
 o	
IRON ORE IN SIGHT
Estimate Made That Supply in Sight
Would Last Sixty Years
In preparation for the eleventh
international geological congress, to
be held In Stockholm this summer,
a most comprehensive survey, in two
bulky volumes, has been compiled,
containing reports from most of the
world's iron producing countries.
Professor T. G. Anderson, the general secretary of the congress, has
edited this massive work.
According to the summary given,
the world's visible supplies of iron
ore now being worked amount to
22,408,000,000 tons, representing
10,192,000,000 tons of metallic iron.
The present annual production ot
iron, based on last year's figures, is
about 60,000,000 tons. In the year
1800 the world's production of iron
amounted to only 800,000 tons, in
1891 it had reached 26,200,000 tons
and In 1901 41,200,000 tons.
Should the consumption go on increasing at the same rate the visible
supplies of iron ore will only last
some sixty years, but the potential
supplies will long before then have
been available through the development of communication, so they can
be reckoned practically in the former class.
In addition to this it must not be
overlooked that in spite of energetic
research in many directions, knowledge as to the world's iron ore deposits is still very incomplete, especially in Asia and Africa. In the
American continent, too, there are
believed to be vast iron ore deposits
yet undiscovered.
The actual iron ore supplies in
Europe amount to 12,031,900,000
tons, representing 4,732,800,000 tons
of metallic iron, besides 41,028,700,-
000 tons of unworked supplies, representing 12,084,0u0,000 tons of
metallic iron.
Germany heads the list with
3,607,700,000 tons oi ore; France
comes next with 3,300,000,000 tons.
Great Britain figures third, her deposit of iron ore being estimated at
1,153,000,000 tons, but the percentage of Iron is low so that quantity
of ore only produces 455,000,000
tons; whilst Sweden, with a similar
quantity of ore, is reckoned to produce 740,000,000 tons of iron.
Russia has deposits calculated at
864,600,000 tons of ore, Spain 711,-
000,000 tons, Norway 367,000,000
tons, Austria 250,000,000 tons,
Luxerburg 270,000,000 tons, and
other European countries have a
total of less than 100,000,000 tons.
The American continent is calculated to contain an aggregate of
9,855,000,000 tons of iron ore, representing 5,154,000,000 tons of iron
belongl . (o the United States, and
3,635,000,001 tons of ore and
1,'.Hi 1,0110,000 ,ons of Iron to Newfoundland.
Algeria contains Iron ore deposits
amounting lo not less than 65,000,-
ooo tons.
Published Twice a Week
Third Avenue and McBride St.
In the development of a city or a district the newspaper plays a most important part. The Journal is prepared to take its full share in building up Prince Rupert
and giving publicity to the resources and riches of the country which is being opened
up by the G. T. P., and of which the city must be the great distributing centre. As a
means to this end a special offer is made :
Prince Rupert
.. Journal..
Advertisers
will find the Journal
the best publicity medium in the new B. C.
All eyes are at present
turned towards this
part of the Province.
Keep your business before the public by advertising in the Journal. It will bring you
quick returns
$1.50
Per     Year
You Can Aid
Do you wish to keep
some friends informed
as to the development
of, Prince Rupert ?
Place their names on
the mailing list of the
Journal at the low subscription rate and keep
them interested in
Canada's greatest port
on the Pacific.
During July a special rate of $1.50 for the year will be charged for the Journal.
Subscriptions must be received at the office of publication before July 30, in order that
advantage may be taken of this offer. This rate is applicable to subscribers outside
of Prince Rupert as well as residents of the city.   Remember this is only for June.
Subscribe early and take advantage of the low rate.
estate, builds hotels, and is more or
less interested in the manufacturing
propositions along its lines. A case
in point is the Canadian Pacific ownership of the Trail smelter. It purchased that smelter from Heinze
thirteen years ago for $1,500,000,
which purchase eliminated Mr.
Heinze from British Columbia and
gave the Canadian Pacific additional
railroad mileage and large land ownership, and the smelter is today contributing $800,000 per annum in
freight traffic for the Canadian Pacific.
Furthermore, the company's
steamship business is assuming large
proportions, and today the Canadian
Pacific has more boats on the ocean
than the Cunard line, and, contrary
to the experience of the United States
railroads on the Pacific, the Canadian
Pacific is making money in its Oriental trade, largely because It is able
to use Oriental seamen, while the
United StateB companies are not.
James J. Hill lost $250,000 on his
Pacific boats last year as against the
profitable operation on the part of
the Canadian Pacific.
CARRYING OUT AGREEMENT
Contract Let For Construction Work
on Kettle Valley Road
LARGE PROFITS
*'.  I*.  II.  Makes Money Out  of Subsidiary lluslness
It is estimated that the Canadian
Pacific will have a surplus of $20,-
000,000 above its dividend requirements this year, and with 200,000,-
000 bushels of wheat to move, It will
have the best year In Its history in
almost every particular, says the
Montreal Star.
The company has about $75,000,-
000 In its treasury for Its construction needs, and Its hidden assets are
almost beyond conception.
The policy of the management of
the Canadian Pacific Is to enter outside business whenever such business
can be of benefit to the road In the
way of traffic, which It might not.
get otherwise.    It buys and sells real
A contract for the construction of
the first section of the Kettle River
Valley Railway, the road which will
link Vancouver with the Kootenays,
has been awarded to tbe engineering
.mil contracting firm of Macdonell,
Gzowskl & Company of Vancouver.
The work awarded covers that portion of the line lying between Mer-
rltt, a station on the Spences Brldge-
Nlcola railway, and the headwaters
of the Coldwater river, a distance of
thirty miles.
The Kettle River Valley railway,
which Is in receipt of a subsidy from
the province of British Columbia of
$5,000 a mile for 150 miles of Its
route, Is under agreement to start
construction on or before July 10.
Before that date Macdonald, Gzowskl
& Company will have their equipment and working forces on the
ground, and the first sod of the grade
will be turned before the day agreed
upon to mark the commencement of
operations. The contractors are
now hurrying their plant to Merrltt.
Construction will be carried on entirely from the Merrltt end of the
section owing to the ease with which
material and supplies can be laid
down at that point and forwarded
along the line of the work.
With the completion of the railway from Merrltt to the headwaters
of the Coldwater river the line will
be practically on the divide between
that stream and the Coquhalla river,
that flows Into the Fraser. From
the headwaters of the Coldwater the
railway route will swing eastward in
the direction of Pentlcton and either
the main line or a branch will reach
the town of Princeton. From Pentlcton the railway will run to Midway
Ten miles northeast of the latter
point the route will converge with
that of the old Midway & Vernon
railway project and the Kettle Valley road will utilize the grade
which the Midway & Vernon company built between Rock Creek and
Midway.
 ,—o	
SOUTH  AFRICA
Zululand, 95,440 white and 1,072,-
000 colored; Transvaal, 325,250
white, and 1,024,200 colored; Orange
River Colony, 157,200 white, and-
289,000 colored.
 o	
NEW IMMIGRATION LAW
It Will He Liberally Interpreted  So
As Not to Work Any Hardships
Facts Concerning  Newest Dominion
of British Empire
In view of the fact that the Do
minion of South Africa has just entered upon its history as a federation, the following facts concerning
it will be of interest. The Dominion
of South Africa is comprised as follows:—
Traansvaal—Area, 112,139 square
miles; native population 1,024,200
Chief product, gold. Output in sterling from Rand and outside districts
for June, 1909, £2,521,818. Immense numbers of sheep and cattle
reared, wool and hides exported.
Orange Free State—Area, 48,300
square miles; native population,
289,900. Chief product, wool, principal article of export; diamonds and
other precious stones and gold found.
Zululand—Area, 10,450 square
miles. Large crops of maize and
Kaffir corn raised around the neighborhood of kraals. Oxen and maize
are the chief articles of trade.
Natal—Area, 15,750 square miles.
Chief exports, wool, gold, sugar, coal,
rum, skins and bides. Kaffir industry, pastoral. Coffee, tea, tobacco,
wheat, barley, oats and Kaffir corn
grown everywhere.
Cape Colony — Area, 280,000
square miles; native population,
1,896,820. Chief products, diamonds
from Kimberley, copper from Little
Namaqualand. Sheep, goats, cattle,
and horses reared. Wool, mohair,
skins and hides exported. Wheat
and grapes cultivated.
The total area of tne union is 666,-
629 square miles.
The number of members In the
first union house of assembly is as
follows: Cape of Good Hope, 51;
Natal, 17; Transvaal, 36; Orange
Free State, 17.
There are 5,471,490 persons in the
South African states. Of these
1,188,570 are white and 4,282,920
are colored. They are distributed
thus: The Cape, 610,680 white, and
I,-  6,820  colored;   Natal,  Including
So numerous are the complaints
that are reaching Ottawa regarding
the new immigration regulations, and
of such real significance are many
of them that the authorities are constrained to admit something will
have to be done to-save the situation.
The chief difficulty is that under the
regulations a man who comes out to
Canada to work for an employer who
has engaged him, can not enter the
country unless he can show himself
to be the possessor of $25 in cash.
An English worklngman, after pay
Ing the fares of himself and his
family, will usually find It hard to
show that sum when he arrives on
this side of the Atlantic. If these
people had plenty of money there
would be no necessity for their leaving England at all. Just why they
should be required to possess $25
after they have paid their way to the
points where work awaits them is the
question put to the immigration department these days. It is safe to
say that some arrangement will be
made to meet such ..naes which, it
is admitted, are a real hardship .
The Canadian immigration regulations are regarded by both political
parties as in the main satisfactory,
but, as is ever the case, no regulation that can be framed Is sufficiently responsive to meet the requirements of every human need. Interpreted with sympathy, and with provision of expectations for individual
cases, they ought to protect Canada
sufficiently and yet allow all freedom
to men attempting to better their
conditions by moving to more congenial surroundings.
 o	
HUDSON'S BAT PROFITS
Annual  Meeting  of  Proprietors   Decide Upon Dividend to be Paid
The governor and committee of
the Hudson's Bay Company submitted to the annual meeting of the
proprietors held on July 4, their
yearly report which stated that the
profit of the trade for the year ending May 31, 1910, amounts to £166,-
156, and the amount to the credit
of the land account for the year ending March 31, 1910, Is £240,045, a
total of £406,201.
From the proceeds of the land an
interim  dividend  of  15s  per  share,
amounting to £75,000, was paid to
proprietors on January 18 last. The
balance at the credit of the land account after payment of the interim
dividend of £75,000 is £165,045, and
out of this a further distribution of
£1 13s per share ts recommended,
which will absorb £165,000, making
a total distribution from lands sales
of £2 8s per share, amounting for
the year to £240,000, and carrying
forward the sum of £45 to the next
land account.
This distribution is made free of
income tax. The question whether
the proceeds of the sale of the company's land was chargeable to income tax has been the subject ot
litigation for some time past. The
commissioners for income tax for the
city of London, to whom the company appealed on June 22, 1905,
from assessment on the company,
which included such proceeds, decided after hearing the evidence that
these proceeds were not chargeable
and reduced the assessment to the
amount of the profits made by the
company from their trading operations. The question came before
Mr'. Justice Channell by way of an
appeal from the commissioners and
he gave judgment adverse to the
company on February 19, 1909. On
the advice of Sir Robert Finlay, K
C, the company appealed to the lord
justices of appeal, who unanimously
upheld the contention of the company.
From the profit of trade, £166,156,
the payment of a dividend of £1 12s
per share free of Income tax la
recommended, amounting to £160,-
000. There will remain £6,156,
which, added to the amount of £105,-
764 brought forward from last year,
will make a total of £111,921 to be
carried forward. The total distribution from trade and land for the
whole year amounts to £400,000, or
four pounds per share.
The quantity of fur offered for
sale this spring was smaller than
usual, but prices generally showed a
considerable advance, and as regards
the prospectB for the coming year,
advices so far received indicate that
it will be an average season.
At every coronation a pair of
golden spurs is carried by an official
and placed on the altar. During the
ceremony the King's heels are touched with them, as they are the emblems of knighthood.
"Jabez Is gettin' used to public
speakin', ain't he? " "Oh, yes. I
remember when you could hardly
get him to stand up, an' now you
can hardly get him to sit down." PWP***W>i«--*- ti
■■■■MnM
•"-,s
Tuesday, July 12, 1910
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Atlantic Steamship
 Agency	
Through tickets and excursion
rates to
England, France, Germany,
and all
Scandinavian Ports.
Call or write for rates to any
part of the world. I am also
agent for all American steamers
to and from Prince Rupert;
Northern Pacific Railway; Alaska Pacific Express,
J. H. ROGERS
General Steamship and Railway
Agent, Prince Rupert, B.C.
Canadian Pacific  R'y
Steamers leave Prince Rupert for Vancouver,
Victoria, Seattle
Princess Beatrice, every Monday at 1 p.m.
Princess May or Princess Royal
every Saturday morning.
Steamers leave Vancouver
Princess Beatrice every Thursday night.
Princess May or Princess Royal
every Saturday night at 11
o'clock.
Union Steamship Co'y
of B.C. Ltd.
The new Steel Passenger Steamer
"Camosun"
PRTNCE RUPERT every Sunday at 9 a.m. for Vancouver,
arriving Monday afternoon.
For Stewart City on arrival from
Vancouver Friday night.
Northbound, leaves Vancouver
Wednesdays at 9 p.m.
Steerage Fare $5.00
The "Camosun" is the only steamer
on tbe run having water-tig'ht bulkheads and double liottom, thus ensuring safety of passengers in case of
collission or wreck.
J. H. ROGERS,   Ticket Agent
HAYNOR  BROS.
FUNERAL  DIRECTORS
and
PROFESSIONAL  EMBALMERS
DR. W.  B.  CLAYTON
DENTIST
Office  in    the    Westenhaver   Block
Over Orme's  Drug   Store.
Prince Rupert
WM. S. HAuL, L. D. S. D. D. S.
:-:   DKNTIST   :-:
Crown and Bridge Work a specialty.
All dental operations skillfully
treated. Gas and local anaesthetics
administered for the painless extraction of teeth. Consultation free.
Offices: Rooms 19 and 20, Alder
Block, Prince Rupert.
J. H. PILLSIH'HY
CIVIL     ENGINEER
Surveying,   Designs,   Estimates,   etc.
Room   7,   Exchange. Block,
Corner Third Ave and Sixth  Street
Prince Rupert
G. W. NICKERSON & CO.
—o—
CUSTOMS AND MERCHANDISE
Brokers, Forwarding Agents,
Storage, etc.
.1. W. POTTER
ARCHITECT     AND     STRUCTURAL
ENGINEER
Re-inforced Concrete a Specialty
—o—
Law-Butler Building - Prince Rupert
GRAHAM ISLAND — "The surest
sign of the progress of a town or
district is its newspaper—live, active, hustling." "The Masset Review," Masset, Q.C.I.
♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦
j The Thompson
Hardware Co.
—Second Avenue-
,,   Paints General Hardware,    < >
Oils, Stoves and Ranges.
CANCELLATION  OP RESERVE
NOTICE is hereby given that the
reserve existing on Crown lands in
the vicinity of Babine Lake, and
situate in Cassiar District, notice of
which bearing date June 30th, 1909,
was published in the British Columbia Gazette, dated July 2nd, 1908, is
cancelled.
ROBERT A. RENWICK,
Deputy Commissioner of Lands.
Lands Department,
Victoria, B. C., June 16th, 1910.
(First insertion July 5.)
CANCELLATION  OF  RESERVE
NOTICE is hereby given that the
reserve existing on Crown lands in
the vicinity of Babine Lake, situate
in Range 5, Coast District, notice of
which was published in the British
Columbia Gazette, dated December
17, 1908, is cancelled in so far as
said reserve relates to lots numbered 1519, 1518, 1517, 1516, 1515,
1510, 1507, 1506, 1506A, 1503 1501,
1502, 1512, 1511, 1505, 1504, 1513,
1514, 1509, 1508, 1530, 1527, 1528,
1529, 1531, 1532, 1533, 1534, 1535,
1537, 1539, 1536, 1538, 1540, 1541,
1544, 1543, 1545, 1546, 1542, 1547,
1548, 1549, 1650, 1520, 1521, 1522,
1523, 1524, 1525, 1526, and 1551.
ROBERT A. RENWICK,
Deputy Commissioner of Lands.
Lands Department,
Victoria, B. O, June 16th, 1910.
(First Insertion July 5.)
NOTICE   OP   DISSOLUTION
TAKE NOTICE that the partnership heretofore subsisting between
the undersigned, as Clarke & Ives
In the town of Prince Rupert has this
day been dissolved by mutual consent and the business is being carried on by H. S. Ives. All debts
owing to the said partnership are
to be paid to H. S. Ives at the premises formerly occupied by Clarke
& Ives on Third avenue, and all
claims against the said partnership
are to be presented to the said H. S.
Ives, by whom the same will be settled.
Dated this 27th day of June, 1910.
HARRY S. IVES,
HARRY  H.  CLARKE.
DISSOLUTION   OP   PARTNERSHIP
TAKE NOTICE that the verbal
partnership heretofore subsisting between the undersigned, Arthur F.
Rowe who was to furnish the
Planer, and F. E. Cowell who was to
furnish the Power, at the site of the
B. C. Tie & Timber Company's saw
mill at Seal Cove, In the town of
Prince Rupert, B.C., has this day
been mutually dissolved, A. F. Rowe
collecting all accounts and paying
only expense of labor since installation  of plant.
Dated this ninth day of July, 1910.
ARTHUR F. ROWE
FRED E. COWELL.
WORK OF SCHOOLS
Dr. Harris Deals With Question of What
United States is Doing in
That Field.
Sducator   Alludes   to   Alaskan   Progress  as  Result  of Training
That is Given
Fred Stork
General Hardware
...Complete Line of.:.
VALVES
Pipe and Pipe Fittings
The
Washington Cafe
A PLACE TO EAT
Seats For Ladies
Everything Clean and Tasty
Prices Reasonable
W. P. CARPENTER, PROPRIETOR
Second Avenue, near Seventh Street
Some Rock
Bottom
Prices
See Da For Investment
Rupert City Realty & Information Bureau, Ltd.
PRINCE RUPERT,
B.C.
Indian Monument
North Vancouver.—The mausoleum which Chief Matthias Is erecting in memory of his father, the late
Chief Joe, is expected to be ready
next month, and will cost about $10,-
000. Chief Matthias expects- to
have a great gathering of British
Columbia Indians on the occasion of
the opening ceremonies.
A brief outline of the course that
will be pursued by the United States
Bureau of Education in its efforts to
promote education during the coming
year, and a tribute to the achievements of the ltte Dr. William Terrey
Harris, formerly In charge of thai
work, were the principal features of
an address by Dr. Elmer E. Brown,
the present commissioner of education, before the National Education
Association in Boston recently. The
address furnishes a rich field for
thought among those who are interested in the BUbject of education
and Its present trend.
"It was an extraordinary legacy
that was left to the uuieau of education by Commissioner William Terrey Harris," declared Dr. Brown.
"The present administration of that
office has no finer nor higher responsibility than that of maintaining
at Its best the spirit, and that tradition which constitute that legacy."
Dr. Brown referred to the institution of a new division for the promotion of methods of school administration, and also of the use of specialists
for improving the work of the land
grant colleges as additions that had
been made to the activities of the
service under him. He pictured the
educational work being carried on In
Alaska as the most extensive experiment of that kind in the world.
"Such a practice ocnool presents
the white man's burden in Its most
concrete form, with all of the difficulties and all of the inspiring opportunities presented by this world education movement of our time," he
added. "There in Alaska the school
physician and the school nurse are
now going up and down, helping the
people in their sickness and teaching
them how to live clean and wholesome lives. The girls are learning to
cook and to sew, and to make good
homes. The boys are learning to
earn an honest livelihood under their
new conditions by new industrial
pursuits, by the raising of reindeer,
by improved fishing, gardening and
the use of common tools. They are
learning something of the white
man's wisdom and the white man's
better aims In life, which shall help
them In their new relations with the
white man as their neighbor and fellow laborer."
To extend the influence of the bureau and to strengthen it, Dr. Brown
said close co-operation had been arranged with the Library of Congress
and with the Bureau of the Census
The latter bureau, he said, is endeavoring to obtain more nearly
uniform and comparable statistics
concerning state and city systems of
education.
"We have now more reason than
ever before to hope that the reproach
which has lain against our school reports, that they do not tell an intelligible tale, is soon to be a thing of
the past,"  declared  Dr.  Brown.
Speaking of the function of his
bureau, Dr. Brown continued: —
"The improvement of school attendance must go hand In hand with
the abatement of child labor and
numerous other undertakings for the
general welfare of childhood. It Is
the business of a central office to call
repeated attention to three relationships and to help those who are at
work In neighboring fields to work
together for their common ends.
"We need to press home such Information as will lead to the Improvement of school buildings. In a
country which is spending $73,000,-
000 for the construction, equipment |
and repair of its buildings for school
purposes, such Information as would
lead to the saving of only one per
cent on this expenditure would cause
an aggregate annual saving of $730,-
000 and the saving ui the health of
pupils which can be accomplished
through more hygvalc construction
is an incomparably greater concern.
"In a thousand ways the Improvement of health through education is
now under way. An agency vitiich,
through the gentle torce of clear information can bring these ways Into
unison and prevent the waste of misdirected efforts will prove Itself a national benefit.
"Industrial education, In its three
main forms of trade schools, schools
of housekeeping and school for rural
life, In every way raising more questions than anyone yet can answer. It
is the business of >.„eh an office as
the Bureau of Education to overlook
this whole field and keep incessant
enquiries under way, with a view to
finding the best answers to the most
F.B. Deacon
Real Estate
WE ARE OFFERING SOME
SPECIAL SNAPS ON 8th
AVE, SECTION 5. ALSO IN
SECTION 7 AND 8.
INSURANCE
Life. Accident, Health and  Fire
See Us For Rates.
F. B. DEACON
OPEN EVENINGS
Centre Street
urgent of these questions so fast as
those answers become available in
any part of the world. But here,
again, it is not information alone that
is needed. Our new efforts at industrial education are pulled this way
and that by inharmonious aims and
conflicting interests. A national offlea
concerned with these things, must
make the constant endeavor to per-
Buade those discordant forces into
unity of aim, and that effectiveness
which comes with unity."
The supervision of rural schools,
improvements in the training of
teachers, the relations of secondary
schools to colleges and universities
were referred to by Dr. Brown, who
declared that there was never a time
when a mediating agency was more
needed in this field. Institutional
isolation, he said, was being recognized everywhere as a mistake, and
the need of bringing all such institutions into closer relationship was being realized by all classes of educa
tors.
In connection with these needs, he
said, the near future would bring up
questions relating to the reorganiza
tion of the whole educational activity
of the federal government. Prominent among these questions would be
those relating to the need for a national department of education, a national university at Washington and
the extension of federal aid to edu
cation in the States, especially con
cerning Industrial  education."
, ,0	
MOUNT TATLOW
Amount  Paid  by Dominion  Govern-
ment Upon Canadian Ore
Name of Late Minister of Province is
to be Perpetuated
As a monument to British Colum
bla's late minister of finance and agriculture, who lost his life under
tragic corcumstances three months
ago, the hitherto unchristened culminating peak of the Cascade mountains, rising to a height of 10,000
feet immediately to the south of the
LEAD BOUNTY
SIR WILFRID'S VISIT
Itinerary of Premier of Dominion During
His Trip to the Pacific
Coast.
He Will Reach Here Saturday, Aug.
20, Leaving Late Monday or
Early on Tuesday
A federal bounty, .. ion amounts
to $15 a ton is allowed upon lead
ore delivered at Canadian smelters
for treatment. This bounty was paid
during the fiscal year ended March
31, 1910, upon a production of 45,-
467,545 pounds, and amounted to
$340,542. The bounty paid In 1909
was $307,432 upon 42,533,287
pounds of ore.
For many years the output of the
Kootenay mines, in British Columbia,
whence comes practically all the lead
produced in Canada mines, was shipped to smelters on the American
side. Thus in 1901 there was exported to the United States 57,952,-
613 pounds of ore, valued at $2,272,-
830, out of a total export that year
of 65,602,388 pounds, valued at $2,-
517,084.
The bounty system since established has resulted in the ore being
smelted In Canada and to a large extent used in this country In the manufacture of white lead products. The
total export of lead ure In 1909
amounted to only 12,032,364 pounds,
valued at $380,381. To the United
States the export fell to the insignificant quantity of 171,873 pounds
worth $5,422.
NEW   LAWYERS
Those Who Have Passed Recent Tests
Set By the Benchers
Eleven new lawyers were admitted
to practice as barristers and solicitors
In British Columbia by the benchers
of the Law Society at their regular
quarterly meeting at Victoria. Two
more men were admitted as solicitors
only.
The names of the successful candidates follow: E. N. Brown, I-I. C. N,
McKim, A. G. Harvey, G. L. Tasch-
ereau, J. H. Claughton, F. A. McDiar-
mid, A. W. Cameron, J. A. Haviland,
C. V. Buddie, V. II. Shaw and L. C,
Ford, admitted as barlsters and solicitors; A. Alexander and A. F. R.
Mcintosh admitted as solicitors.
After appearing before the benchers and being formally called, they
were presented by C. E. Pooley, K.C.,
to Mr. Justice Clement, before whom
they signed the barristers' and solicitors' rolls and took the oath of office. Mr. Pooley, who Is the oldest
member of the bar in British Colnm-
blt, was assisted by 11. I). Helmcken,
K.C., another of the benchers.
The official itinerary of Sir Wilfrid
Lauder's visit to this province has
been definitely approved of at Ottawa, and Is as follows: —
Leave Banff 9.20 a.m. Monday,
Aug. 15, by C. P. R. special.
Arrive Golden, 13.00 p.m. Monday,
Aug. 15.
Leave Golden 14 p.m., Monday,
Aug.   15.
Arrive Vancouver 12 noon, Tuesday, Aug. 16.
Meeting at Vancouver, Tuesday,
night, Aug.  16.
Leave Vancouver 13 p.m., Wednesday, Aug. 17, C.P.R. steamer.
Arrive Victoria, 19 p.m. Wednesday, Aug.  17.
Meeting at Victoria, Thursday
night, Aug. 18.
Leave Victoria about 11 p.m.
Thursday, Aug. 18, steamer Prince
George or Prince Rupert.
Arrive at Prince Rupert about
noon, Saturday, Aug. 20.
Leave Prince Rupert Monday night
Aug. 22, or Tuesday morning, Aug.
23.
Arrive Vancouver 8.30 a.m. Thursday, Aug. 24.
Leave Vancouver 8.30 a.m. Thursday, Aug. 25 by C. P. R.
Arrive Kamloops 18 p.m., Thursday, Aug.  25.
Meeting at Kamloops Friday, Aug.
26.
Leave Kamloops 2.30 a.m. Saturday, Aug. 27, by C. P. R.
Arrive Revelstoke, 7.40 a.m., Saturday, Aug. 27.
Leave Revelstoke 7.45 a.m., Saturday, Aug.  27.
Arrive Arrowhead 9.05 a.m., Saturday, Aug.  27.
Leave Arrowhead 11.10 a.m., Saturday, Aug. 27, by C. P. R. steamer.
Arrive West Robson 21.40 p.m.,
Saturday, Aug. 27.
Leave West Robson 22.00 p.m.,
Saturday, Aug. 27.
Arrive Nelson 23.10 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 27.
Leave Nelson 6 a.m., Tuesday,
Aug. 30, by C. P. R. steamer.
The proposed reception by the
government of British Columbia at
the Parliament buildings will probably take place on the evening of
Sir Wilfrid's arrival at the capital.
A political meeting as been arranged
for the following week.
A trip up the Skeena in one of the
river steamers which will give the
party an opportunity of looking over
the G. T. P. construction, will be a
feature of the visit to this city.
 —o	
LONG   ADJOURNMENT
Imperial  Members   n HI  Take  Vacation—Better Outlook  in Trade
THE LATE HON. R. G. TATLOW
After whom a mountain is
to be mimed
Nemiah Valley, has been named
Mount Tatlow, at the suggestion of
Mr. Sidney Williams, of the British
Columbia government's field survey
staff. The name has to he submitted for ratification to the Board of
Geographical Names. Mount Tatlow
is a peak of exceptional dignity and
beauty, rising solitarily about eight
miles east of Cliilco Lake. Its exact
geographical position is Latitude 61
deg. 22 mln, north, Longitude 123
deg., 52 mln., west. Mountaineers
will attempt a lirst ascent of Mount
Tatlow next montu.
Hon. R. G. Tatlow was immensely
popular In British Columbia, and bis
untimely dead, a few months ago
was lamented by all.
Mr.   McDlarmld   is  Victoria's  new!
solicitor   who  came    irum     i.indsay,
Ont.
six additional candidates were successful In (heir final examinations
and will be admitted to practice when
their time of service lias expired.!
They arc D. W, F. McDonald, R. W.
Ellis, C. J. Ladner, F. A. Jackson, C.
L, Fillmore and A. S. Jackson, tha j
first live being from Vancouver and
the last one from New Westminster. I
Six out of ten candidates passed!
the examination for admission as
students-at-law. Their names are:
E. B. Irving, R. A. Braden, W. B.
Burnslde, C. W. Cottingham, W, J
Bowser, Jr., and G.  M.  Whlttlngton |
All the students who wrote on the \
intermediate examinations were sue-1
cessful.    G. W. McKeen, A. D.  Mac-
Farlane, W. O. Fulton, Charles Saint,'
I). G. Campbell   and    E. A.  Burnett j
passed   the   first  intermediate.     Th*,
second Intermediate examination was t
successfully contested by G. E. Hous-
ser, G. L. Cassldy, T. Todrlck, G. R.
McQueen,  I).  S.  Montgomery, A.  W.
Milligan,  A.  E.  McColl,  It.  G.  Lock-!
wood and  John  Stafford.
In the House of Commons, Mr.
isquith has announced that the government proposed to adjourn Parliament at the end of July, and that It
will reassemble  in  November.
Chancellor Lloyd-ueorge In Introducing the budget was ihe >red
when he stated that he had already
wiped out tiie deficit, and that everything pointed to a better outlook in
trade. The total under this heading
amounted   to   £40,000,000.
The chancellor ..nnonnced that
there would be no reductions in the
whisky tax despite a decrease in
revenue from this source of £1,400,-
000. The decreaseu consumption of
10,000,000 gallons ot whisky, he said
conduced to the well-being of the
people.
Drunkenness In Ireland and Scotland had decreased Immediately to
a great extent after the Increase In
tax, and the chancelolr said whoever
would reduce the tax would be guilty
of a crime against  the stale.
The chancellor calculated on a
total revenue of £199,791,000, leading a surplus of £681,000. No novelties In the way of tavatlon were Introduced.
Canadian trade figures are becoming so big that it is difficult for the
lay mind to grasp them. However,
the latest trade statements show
Canada Is drawing very near to the
billion mark. It does not seem so
long ago that the hundred-million
mark was passed. During the first
wto months of the current fiscal year
the total trade of Canada was over
106 millions, an increase of $25,250,-
000 as compared with the same period last year. At the present rate
of increase the billion-dollar mark
will be reached within two years.
Today Canada's trade Is more than
half that of France, and Is three
times that of Spain.
—
MHI
Hi : -— "i--*-—fnimifM
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Tuesday, July 12, 1910
%        Diving Experiences        %
*     .    'j
After a record career of over forty-
five years there has just retired on a
Well-earned pension die doyen of
deep-sea divers. This is William
Mitchell, of Tilbury, England—still,
In this, his sixty-seventh 'year, as
hale and hearty an old fellow as one
could wish to meet, and merry as a
cricket.
Well-nigh half a century of about
the most dangerous and difficult
Work that land or sea affords has not
shattered his nerve or dulled his
spirit. Only the other day, "just to
show them he could do it," he donned
the helmet and dress for the last
time, and put in some excellent work
far down beneath the muddy waters
of the Thames at the new J. P. O.
power station at  Blackfriars.
Besides his exploits as a diver, Mr.
Mitchell has the added distinction of
having been trained as a seaman-
gunner on 11. M. S. Warrior, the first
Iron-clad that was ever built. His
instructor there was a certain Lieut.
"Jackie" Fisher, now known to fame
as Lord Fisher of Kiverstone. He
was also in tbe crew that escorted
Queen Alexandra over the North Sea
to be King Edward's bride. He was
on 11. M. S. Bellerophon al the opening of the Suez canal. In short, he
had been pretty well everywhere, and
seen almost everything before he had
rally begun what was to be his life's
work.
"Still," he said to a reporter lately,
"it is diving that interests me most
of all, and fascinates me even after forty-five years. I began when
I was on board H. M. S. Excellent,
volunteering for the work more out
of rivalry of the other young sailors
than anything else. Well do I remember the first time I put on tin
helmet, and felt the air pressing
and drumming on my ears and bubbling in my blood, and went down
alone into the dark world beneath
the ship's bottom! Even in those
days we were trained to go down to
twenty fathoms—or 120 feet.
"Since then it has been sheer love
of the work that has kept me at it.
It is not so much the danger and excitement that makes it fascinating.
One soon gets used to that. One's
mind is concentrated on one's work
and one doesn't worry about anything else so long as one hears the
throb of the pump going up above.
"It is rather the fact that the diver
has to put his brains into his work,
and to rely perpetually upon his own
resourcefulness. Only the diver
knows his own difficulties. The engineer may make his plans, the men
at the top may work their pumps
and signals, but only the diver knows
what it is like down there.
"To begin with, oi course, there is
the darkness. It is only in shallow or
very clear water that one can see.
Deep down one has just to grope in
the dark and think things out. Then
there are tides and currents that
sweep one off one's feet. One's balance Is always precarious, and very
often a signal from the men at the
top will pull one over, and the
clumsiness and weight of the dress
are a continual hindrance.
"As for adventures and hairbreadth escapes, I suppose I have had
my share, but they have all been In
the day's work, and I've never troubled much about them. I am glad to
be able to say this, too—that never
once in all my career have I known
any neglect or carelessness on the
part of comrades above.
"Curiously enough, the worst time
1 ever had was not through the cutting off of the air supply, but
through getting too much. It happened at Malta, when I was cleaning
a ship's bottom, and had to lie on my
back to the work. Somehow or other
as I lay working there, the skull-cap
Inside the helmet got shifted, and
blocked up the waste-valve that lets
out Hi'- air thai has been breathed.
"Tin- result was that, without any
vent, the whole dress soon got pumped out like a pneumatic tyre, and Ihe
Bleeves struck out Btralgnl on either
side, so that I couldn't bend or move
my arms an Inch, and felt every moment  that the affair  would  burst.
"Yet worse remained behind, for
when my comrades signalled and got
no answer—I being helpless—they
immediately rushed to the conclusion that I wanted more air, and
went on pumping for all they were
worth. Happily, just as I thought
my end was come, I felt myself beginning to move, although I was
pretty well wedged under the ship.
When once I was clear, of course,
thanks to the extra air, I went like
an  arrow  to the top.
"Another time I had an awkward
hour in the cabin of a wreck near
Hull, when a change of tide drifted
a mass of spars and rigging on top
of me, making me a complete prisoner. The longest time I have ever
stayed under water at a stretch was
also at Hull, when I worked once for
six and a half hours continuously
over a new wooden dam. The work—
like nearly all diver's work—had
to be done in a hurry, to avoid the
silt from the river filling the
greeves before the beams could be
got in. I managed the business just
in time, with the help of a fire-hose
with which I blew the silt out. The
lire-hole was my own idea, and I was
rather proud of it.
"You must not believe, by the way,
quite all the yarns you hear of divers
adventures. Never once, for instance,
have i bad a fight with a shark,
though I have dived pretty often in
waters infested by them. The truth
is that you have only to arrange for
something in the way of an explosion before you go down and they
won't come near you for the rest of
the day."
For the last thirty years, Mr. Mitchell has been working mostly at
Hall and Tilbury, where be was the
last person to tread dryfoot in the
new dock before the water was let
in. Of his early days in the navy,
however, he has many stories to tell.
As a matter of fact he was a special
protege of the then Lieut. Fisher,
who does not forget the old seaman
even  now.
"I remember him well," said Mr.
Mitchell, "when he first came aboard
the Warrior. He had just come from
the China station where he served on
the Highflyer, and was already a
marked man. Indeed, that was why
he was commissioned to the Warrior.
As being the first ironclad, it was
to the people of those days very much
what the Dreadnought is now. When
ever we were in harbor we used
always to have hosts of visitors inspecting the ship.
"Well, the Lieut. 'Jackie' Fisher
that I knew then was a splendid
young officer, full of life, and devil
ment, and as keen as mustard. He
used to keep us at it, and no mistake,
when we were at drill, but he was
never harsh, and used often to shut
his eyes to any little harmless pranks
that the men might get up to in their
spare time. He was up to a good
many himself in „„ose days—I've
known him black his face in the
ward-room—and if there was any
fun going on among the officers "lie
was generally at the heart of it.
"With it all, he took a personal
interest in his men, and used to give
me many a piece of sound advice in
my work. He has not forgotten
those days on the Warrior. When he
got the Order of Merit, I made bold
to write him my congratulations, and
he sent me a letter In his own handwriting addressed 'Dear Mitchell,'
and signed 'Yours, J. A. Fisher,' telling me that he appreciated my remembrances very deeply. Again
when I was superannuated he wrote
me another letter recalling our years
together and wishing me a long life
to enjoy my pension.
"On the whole," added Mr. Mitchell, "I think the life on board the
old sailing ships—for steam was only
'auxiliary' when I joined—was breezier and livelier than it is now. The
bluejacket nowadays has more book
learning, but he hasn't quite the active open-air life that we had. I
always think that It was the pulling
and hauling at the ropes and sails,
and going over the mast-head every
morning that gave me the health that
has carried me through forty-five
years of diving.
"On the other hand, in my own
department I can see the real advance that has been made. In the old
days we divers knew nothing about
the real facts of our Job—how the
blood gets permeated with air like
the soda-water In a syphon, and so
on. The result was that we didn't
know what to do when anything happened to us, and we just died.
"Nowadays the whole thing has
been gone into scientifically, and
there are lectures and experiments
In compressed air tanks; we understand matters ourselves, and the loss
of life Isn't nearly so great as It used
to be in the happy-go-lucky days.
All through the service, too, tbe food
Is better, Jinny's the time 1 have
nearly fainted with hunger after 1.
morning's work on dry biscuit. The
battleship of today is like a hotel
compared with the old-fashioned
style. So everything lias it compensations."
II, may be mentioned that Mr.
Mitchell Is not the only diver of his
family. His daughter and two
daughters-in-law were the first ladies
ever to go down to the sea-depths in
diver's costume.
One of the young ladies confided
her experiences. She was not a bit
frightened, she said, for she "knew
father was on toil." She went down
thirty-four feet, but saw nothing
save dim white shapes of Utile fishes
skimming by. The worst part of it
all was getting into the dress on land
for it was live or six times heavier
then, and the pressure on the ears
was almost Intolerable until tin- air
got into the blood to resist it. Nothing, loo, was quite like ihe sense ut'
lonellnesB when first she was locked
In the helmet and the outer world
shut off.
Then there was a strange feeling
of effervescence all over when she
came out and the blood was clearing
itself of the air.
"But in the main," she said,
"there is no real reason, except the
need for mechanical knowledge and
experience, why ladies should not
dive just as well as men."
 o	
DEVELOPING COUNTRY
Farm Machinery is Pouring Into Dis.
tricts Tributary to This City
Farm machinery of all descriptions
destined for points as far away as
Findlay river and including Babine
lake, Stuart lake, Francois lake and
Bulkley valley Is now piled up In the
Hudson's Bay Company's yards and
is being shipped out dally to the
places of consignment, says the Omi-
neca Herald of Hazelton. Three
times as much farm machinery has
arrived this year as in any previous
season. There are now in the yard
twenty mowers, twelve rakes, one
tender, a fanning mill, threshing machine, besides wagons, plows, barrows, cultivators and a general assortment of every thing that goes
toward equipping a farm.
The mowers and other things going to Findlay River will be nearly
all summer in transit and the freight
will cost much moie than the original price of the machine. They
will be packed on horses backs to
Babine Lake, down the lake on a
scow, hauled by wagon to Stuart
lake, packed again to Fort McLeod
on the Parsnip river and thence by
canoe to Fort Graham on the Findlay river.
 o	
ACTIVITY  IN  MINES
LAND PURCHASE NOTICES
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Violet Geiger,
of Victoria, B. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—-
Commencing at a post planted at the
X. W. corner and about 23% miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence south 80 chains, thence
east 40 chains, thence north 40
chains, thence east 40 chains, thence
north 40 chains, thence west 80
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 480 acres, more or
less. VIOLET GEIGER.
James W. S'nith, Agent.
Dated  June  7th,  1910. Jy8
LAND PURCHASE NOTICES
Hazelton District is Attracting Large
Share of Attention
Mining along the Skeena and its
tributaries is very aci.ive and were
it. not for the greater interest attaching to Stewart there is little
doubt that there would be a decided
rush into the districts which have
their centres along the river and its
tributaries. Recent arrivals from the
districts testify to the excellent ?now-
ings that are being made.
B. L. Kinman after having assays
made on ore taken from two claims
on Four Mile Hill, out of Hazelton,
has made the first payment. Sinking is in progress and it is understood to be Mr. Kinman's intention
to keep a gang of men working until
the property is fully opened up. The
ore Is nearly if not quite the full
width of the shaft, but it is in a
streak of about eighteen inches on
the hanging wall where the values
chiefly lie.
Attridge gave samples of this ore
to W. W. Leach, the representative
of the Dominion Geological Survey,
last fall, when Mr. Leach was leaving the district. The ore was assayed at the government laboratory at
Ottawa, returning 356 ounces In
silver, besides values in gold, lead
and copper amounting to a good
many dollars more. Several other
metals were also found to be present.
Amos Godfrey, representing Vancouver people, recently purchased
for cash Hugh McKay's claim on
Nine Mile mountain near Hazelton.
Mr. Godfrey visited the property a
few days ago, before completing the
deal. This gives the purchasing syndicate six claims on Nine Mile mountain.
C. B. North, M.E., of Vancouver,
accompanied by Harry Tanner of
Seattle, arrived last Saturday and
will inspect the Rand group of claims
west of Telkwa. i nls group Is a
copper proposition and was staked
four years ago by Tanner and Dutch
Kline. At present C. D. Rand, of
Vancouver, is largely interested.
Large bodies of copper ore have been
found and the showing has made a
favorable Impression on men who
have been over the property.
(1. T. Galloway, a mining export,
recently visited the Buckskin group
of claims on Bear rwer and upon his
report plans for the future development of Hip property will be determined. It has already been decided
lo put up cabins for winter quarters and work on these will commence in a few days.
 o	
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Phillip Williams, of Sydney, Nova Scotia, occupation accountant, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein
ley:—Commencing at a post planted
at the S. E. corner and about 16%
miles distant in a north-westerly direction from the north end of Kltwancool Lake, thence north 80
chains, thence west 80 chains, thence
south 80 chains, thence east 80
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 640 acres, more or
less. PHILLIP  WILLIAMS.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 4, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Annie Grieve,
of Victoria, B. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. W. corner, and about 17% miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence south 40 chains, thence
east 40 chains, thence south 40
chains, thence east 40 chains, thence
north 80 chains, thence west 80
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 480 acres, more or
less. ANNIE GRIEVE.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 4,  1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Pearl Caspell
of Cayley, Alberta, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—■
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. E. corner and about 15% miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence south SO chains, thence
west 40 chains, thence north 40
chains, thence west 40 chains, thence
north 40 chains, thence east 80
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 480 acres, more or
less. PEARL CASPELL.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 3, 1910. jy8
Skeena Land  District—District of
Oh RfiifLi1
TAKE NOTICE that Mary Brown,
of Vancouver, B.C., occupation married woman, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of
the Kitwancool or Chean Weln Valley:—Commencing at a post planted
at the North-east corner and about
ten miles distant in a north-westerly
direction from the north end of the
Kitwancool lake, thence south 80
chains, thence west 40 chains, thenca
north 40 chains, thence west 40
chains, thence north 40 chains
thence east 80 chains to point ol
commencement, and containing 480
acres, more or less.
MARY  BROWN.
James W. Smith, Agent.
•Dated June  1,  1910. JyS
LAND PURCHASE NOTICES
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Ethel Welsh,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted al the
south-east corner and about 10 miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool ,
Lake, thence north 80 chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence south 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to
point of commencement and containing 640 acres, more or less.
ETHEL WELSH.
James W. Smith, Agent
Dated June 1st, 1910. JyS
Skeena Land District—District of
Oh.ssih.1*
TAKE NOTICE that Reginald
Davey, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation machinist, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands, in the vicinity of
Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-west corner and about 6\i
miles distant in a north-westerly direction from the north end of Kitwancool Lake, thence south SO
chains, thence east SO chains, thence
north 40 chains, thence west 40
chains, thence north 40 chains,
chains, thence west 40 chains to a
point of commencement, and containing 480 acres (more or less).
REGINALD   DAVEY.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated  May  30,  1910. JyS
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that John Henderson, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
agent, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands In the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—■
Commencing at a post planted at' the
S. .W corner and about 25 miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north 80 chains, thence
east 40 chains, thence south 80
chains, thence west 80 chains to
point of commencement and containing 320 acres, more or less.
JOHN   HENDERSON.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 7th, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Henry Welsh,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
printer, intends to apply foi permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. E. corner and 11 miles distant
in a north-westerly direction from
the north end of Kitwancool Lake,
thence north 80 chains, thence west
80 chains, thence south 80 chains,
thence east SO chains to point of
commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
HENRY WELSH.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 2, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Frederick
Welsh, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation clerk, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-east corner about 11 miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence south 80 chains, thence
west 40 chains, thence north SO
chains, thence east 40 chains to
point of commencement, and containing 320 acres, more or less.
FREDERICK  WELSH.
James W. Smith, Agent
Dated June 2, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Laura Gordon
of Victoria, B. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lauds in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—■
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. E. corner and about 18 miles distant In a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
| Lake, thence south 40 chains, thence
west 40 chains, thence north 40
chains, thence east 40 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 160 acres, more or less.
LAURA GORDON.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated  June   1,   1910. jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
C J1S si ELF
TAKE NOTICE that John Cox, of
Monarch, Alberta, occupation farmer, Intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described
lands, situated in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Comencing at a post planted at the
north-west corner and about five and
one-quarter miles distant In a northwesterly direction from the north end
of Kitwancool Lake, thence 80
chains south, thence 80 chains east,
thence 80 chains north, thence 80
chains'west to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres,
more or less.
JOHN COX.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated  May 30, 1910. JyS
-Distiict of
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that James Alexander McDonald, of Monarch, Alberta, occupation farmer, Intends to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands, situated in
the Kitwancool or Chein Weln Valley:—Commencing at a post planted
at the N.  ~
Skeena Land District
Oh *^si *i v
TAKE NOTICE that Walter Marke
of  Toronto,  Ont.,  occupation  traveller,  intends  to apply  for permission  «initv ,<< icti,,-.,,,      ,        ,,, ,    "
to purchase  the  following  described Val,e°   Pr^T               C'>ean Weln
lands  in  the  vicinity  of Kitwancool ^nted"!   >Z £   ,'."g     at    'a    post
planted at the N. E. corner and dis-
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassia,.
TAKE NOTICE that James Welsh,
of Vancouver, B. C., occupation machinist, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool   or   Chean   Wein   Valley:	
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. W. corner and about 12 miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence south 80 chains, thence
east 20 chains, thence north SO
chains, thence west 2 0 chains to the
point of commencement and containing 160 acres, more or less.
JAMES  WELSH.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated  June  2,  1910. JyS
Skeena Land District—District of_
Cassi,
TAKE NOTICE that Marguerette
Burns, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission ,o purchase the
following described  lands in  the vl-
vicinity of Kitwancool
or Chean Wein Valley:—Commencing at a post planted at the N. E.
corner and about 27 % miles distant In a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence south 80 chains, thence
west SO chains, thence north 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to the
point of commencement and containing 640 acres, more or less.
WALTER MARKE.
James W. Smith, Agent
Dated June 8th, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Richard
Howie, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation dentist, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of
Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—•
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. E. corner and about 24% miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from  the  north  end  of  Kitwancool
E.  corner about five and  Lake, thence south 80 chains, thence
one quarter miles distant in a north
westerly direction from the north
end of Kltwancool Lake, thence south
80 chains, thence west 80 chains,
thence north 80 chains, thence east
80 chains to point of commencement,
and containing 640 acres, more or
less.
JAMES ALEXANDER McDONALD
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated  May 30,  1910. Jy5
G.T.P. Progress
Vancouver.—The Grand Trunk Pacific railway does not intend to do
things in a halfway manner In Vancouver, if present Indications are to
he considered. The company has
leased the entire building at 527 to
83 Granville street, In which the
ticket office is now located, and will
lit up what is claimed will be the
finest office quarters in the city In
point of fixtures and furnishings. The
ticket office will be removed from Its
presenl location to .".27 in the same
building, which will be ready for oc-
cupancy about September 1.
Coast Land District—District of
Skeena.
TAKE NOTICE that Elijah
Rounds, of Victoria, B.C., occupation
Stewart, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:-—Commencing at a
post planted one-half mile north,
and one-half mile east, of Nettie A.
Lairds N. E. corner of application to
purchase, and 300 feet east of Ana-
ham Lake trail, marked E. R.'s
south-west corner, thence 40 chains
east, thence 40 chains north, thence
40 chains west, thence 40 chains
south to point of commencement,
and containing 160 acres, more or
less. ELIJAH  ROUNDS.
Vincent M.  Schibner,  Agent.
Dated May 25, 1910. jn2i
west 80 chains, thence north 80
chains, thence east 80 chainB to the
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
RICHARD HOWIE.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated  June  7th,  1910. Jy8
Eight gangs of men are now at
work on roads, trails and bridges in
Ihe district about Hazelton, and the
total number of men employed Is
119. The largest gang Is that under Wm. Carr, engaged in repairing
the wagon road between Hazelton
and Aldermere.
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Sandford
Burton, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation mining engineer, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands In the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein
Valley:—Commencing at a post
planted at the N. E. corner and
about 23% miles distant In a northwesterly direction from the north
end of Kitwancool Lake, thence south
80 chains, thence west 80 chains,
thence north 80 chains, thence east
SO chains to point of commencement
and containing 640 acres, more or
less. SANDFORD BURTON.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 7th, 1910. Jy8
tant about 12 miles in a northwesterly direction from the north
end(,of Kitwancool Lake; thence
south 80 chains, thence west ''0
chains, thence north 80 chains
thence east 20 chains to point of
commencement, and containing 160
acres, more or less.
MARGUERETTE   BURNS.
James W. Smith, Agent
June 2, 1910. jyg
Dated
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles F.
Burns, of Moncton, New Brunswick
occupation auditor, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the fol-
owing described lands In the vicinity of Kltwancool or Chean Wein
Valley:—Commencing at a post
planted at the south-west corner and
about 12 miles distant in a northwesterly directlcm from the north
end of Kitwancool Lake; thence
north 80 chains, thence east 80
chains, thence south 80 chains
thence west SO chains to point of
commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
CHARLES  F.   BURNS
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated  June   2,   1910 jyg
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Norman Cle-
land, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation printer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Comencing at a post planted at the
S. E. corner and about 26% miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kltwancool
Lake, thence north 80 chains, thence
west SO chains, thence south 80
chains, thence east SO chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
NORMAN   CLELAND.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 8th, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that James Jar-
dine, of Vancouver, II. C, occupation
merchant, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands In the vicinity of Kltwancool or Chean   Wein    Valley:	
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. W. corner and about 13 miles distant In a north-westerly dlle ,
from the north end of ''• ■• '■'.,->j
Lake, thence south ,"i "'•-!■
east 80 chains thence north 80
chains, thence west 80 chains to
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
JAMES JARDINE.
James W. Smith, Agent
Dated June 2, 1910. jys
-District of
Skeena Land Dlstrlet-
Casslar.
TAKE NOTICE that John McDIar-
mid, of Lucknow, Ont., occupation
farmer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands In the vicinity of the
Kitwancool or Chean Weln Valley:	
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. W. corner and about 13 miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake; thence north 80 chains, thence
east 40 chains, thence south 80
chains; thence west 40 chains to
point of commencement, and containing 320 acres.
JOHN  McDIARMID.
James W. Smith, A
Dated June 2, I :i I u. j,-> Tuesday, July 12, 1910
>     ,  	
THE   PRINCE   RUPERT   JOURNAL
NEWS OFJTHEJPROVINCE
Items of General Interest From Centres in British Columbia.
Acquire Highland Aline
.Nelson.—The famous old Highland
mine at Alnsworth, which during the
year .1904 paid the government $27,-
000 in lead bounties, has been acquired by Vancouver capitalists, who
have formed a company with a capital of $2,000,000, and the work of
development, which was stopped last
January by the old owners, will be
proceeded with at once, The purchase price has not been given out,
but it is a large figure.
The equipment of the mine includes a 200-ton mill, operated by water
power, a 5,500 foot aerial tram, compressor, boarding houses, assay office
and the usual features. The mill
will be at once overhauled and additional machinery installed, which
will increase the amount of recovery twenty per cent.
The officers of the Kootenay
Silver-Lead Mines, Ltd., which has
secured control of the property, are:
Major Chas. McMillan, president;
A. E. Duchesnay, vice-president;
James S. B. O'Brien, secretary and
treasurer of the Vancouver Fnan-
■cial Corporation.
Good   Fruit   Crop
New Westminster. — Everything
points to a splendid fruit crop this
year, according to W. J. Brandrith,
assistant exhibition commissioner of
British Columbia, who has made an
extended trip through the upper
country in the interests of the exhibits the provincial government will
have at the leading exhibitions
throughout the Dominion this summer and fall. There are many things
that may still throw the fruit crop
back this year, but at the present
time Mr. Brantlith says there is every
prospect of a good crop.
Vernon's Building
Vernon.—Work haB seen started
on the new Dominion government
building here. Contractor Cryder-
man has a number of men and teams
at work with scrapers and the work
of excavating for the foundation is
already well advanced. The building
will be 40 feet wide and 80 feet deep
and will consist of three storeys and
a basement. The basement will be
of concrete and the foundation walls
which show above the ground level
will be of granite. There will be
a full basement 9 feet 3 inches deep.
The walls of the structure will be of
pressed brick, and the facings around
the windows, cornices and doors will
be of rock faced stone.
The first floor is to be maple, with
the lobbies and entrances elegantly
tiled. The finishings and stall cases
will be of mahogany. The upper
floors will be In fir. Tct, main part
of the ground floor will be used for
the post office, with the usual
wickets and boxes. The back wing
will be used as a bonding warehouse
for the customs and inland revenue
departments.
On the second floor will be found
the customs and inland revenue offices, and one room is to be reserved for the new Indian officer.
The upper flat will be fitted up in
first class style for the use of the
janitor, every convenience to be provided. The roof will be slated and
the tower and dormer windows will
be covered with copper. In the
tower it is proposed to eventually
instal an up-to-date clock.
The contractor for the building is
W. A. Cryderman and the completed
structure will cost in the neighborhood of $50,000. The new building is
expected to be ready In the course
of a year.
found that the bottom of the vein
had not been reached when the work
was abandoned. Now, again, it has
been unwatered and Mr. Sullivan expects that active operations will begin soon. Perhaps these modern men
may realize that for which their
shadowy predecessors sought with
such singular silence.
Kennel Show
Vancouver.—According to a prospectus issued by E. C. Powell, secretary of the Canadian Kennel club,
Vanconuver will have a large dog
show during exhibition week. The
show will be held upon the exhibition grounds. A special building for
that purpose is now being erected.
The show will be held on Thursday,
Friday and Saturday, Aug. 18, 19
and 20.
Indian Greeting
Vancouver.—Whei Sir Wilfrid
Laurler visits the coast this fall it is
probable he will be greeted by representatives of all the tribes of Indians in the province. Chief Matthias
of North Vancouver is arranging for
the convention, the plans contemplating a big pow-wow at the North Vancouver mission, the chiefs coming
over to Vancouver to formally meet
the Dominion Premier. Chief Matthias states that the preliminaries
have already been informally discussed on the several reserves, and the
idea has been strongly favored. It
is expected the gathering will be the
largest assemblage of Indians ever
held in British Columbia. Arrangements will probably be made in the
official reception in Vancouver for
the Indian chiefs to take part.
Halibut Trade
Victoria.-—In an effort to win from
the Americans an industry which
they at present practically monopolize, the Pacific Whaling Company,
with headquarters here, will enter
the halibut deep-sea fishing next
winter. All five whaiers will be employed in the trade from the five stations.
■  o	
FLOATING   CHURCH
LAND  PURCHASE  NOTICE
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that John Cherry,
of Victoria, B. C, occupation mattress maker, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean \Vein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-east corner and about 14 miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence west 80 chains, thence
south SO chains, thence east 80
halns, thence north 8 0 chains to
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
JOHN CHERRY.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 3, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Brenton
Brown, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation insurance agent, intends to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands in the vi-
vinity of the Kitwancool or Chean
Wein Valley;—Commencing at a
post planted at the north-east corner and about ten miles distant In
a north-westerly direction from the
north end of Kitwancool Lake,
thence south 80 chains, thence east
80 chains, thence north 80 chains,
thence west 80 chains to point of
commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
BRENTON BROWN.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 1, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Jessie Stead-
man, of Victoria, B. C, occupation
married woman, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following described lands, in the vicinity of
Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-east corner and about 6%
miles distant in a north-westerly direction from the north end of Kitwancool Lake, thence south 80
chains; thence west 80 chains, thence
north 80 chains, thence east 80
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 640 acres, more or
less. JESSIE STEADMAN.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated May 31, 1910. Jy8
Haptists Have Mission Boat Put on
Arrow  Lake
To Work Old Shaft
Skldegate.—The Old Shaft copper
mine of Copper Bay, liueen Charlotte Islands, Is at last to be worked
according to R. F. Sullivan, a well-
known miner and prospector.
Around this mine mere hangs an
air of romance—the romance of mystery. That men could go to this
spot, sink Into the earth a shaft. 200
feet In depth and go forth again into
the world of their fellows, leaving
no record in the minds of men, or
even upon the retentive memories of
savages (who must have seen them)
of whence they came, when they,
came or whither they went, under
what circumstances they worked,
with what sucecss or with what
failure, here, indeed, is something of
more than common interest. It Is
generally conjectured that the unknown miners did their work about
35 years ago, the supposition being
based upon the age of trees which
were found growing over the mouth
of the shaft, the latter having been
carefully covered over by the men
who dug it. At the time of Its discovery some four years ago, the shaft
was unwatered, at which time It was
The many residents of the Arrow
Lake district from Robson to Arrow
Head will be afforded opportunity
for worship upon a floating, self-
propelled church structure. A boat
launched on Monday at the yards ot
the Kootenay Motor Boat Company
and especially built and fitted for the
purpose will hereafter ply the lake
as the official mission boat of the
mission board of the Baptist Church
of British Columbia. It will be in
charge of Rev. D. M. Thompson, of
Robson, formerly of Nelson, Who is
especially qualified not alone as an
ordained minister of the gospel, but
who also Is a machinist, musician
and singer.
The boat will later have a regular
itinerary which will be announced
Its capacity is thirty. It is fitted with
an eleven horsepower gasoline engine
of the Smalley type, is twenty-six
feet long, has table, oefl, lockers and
cushions.
A legacy of £100 sterling by Miss
Annie uane of England some two
years ago made possible the present
accomplishment. This contribution
was, however, added to materially by
others in Toronto which brought the
fund to a total of $1,400. As the boat
cost $1,059, a balance remains for
field work.
Dedicatory services were held at
Robson on the boat moored at the
C. P. R. dock. Addresses were delivered by Dr. N. Wolverton of Nelson, Rev. Dr. McDermld of Brandon,
Rev. A. N. Frith of Nelson, Rev. D
M. Thompson of Robson, and Dr.
Savage of Nelson. Rev. J. W. Williamson sang two solos, and J. Lang
Stocks acted as chairman.
LAND   LEASE   NOTICE
Skeena Land  District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that The Canadian
Fish & Cold Storage Company Ltd.,
of Vancouver, occupation Mercantile
and Manufacturing, Intends to apply
for permission to lease the following described land:—Commencing at
a post planted at high water mark
on the westerly side of Prince Rupert Harbor and distant about 110
chains from the north-east corner of
Lot 443, thence west 20 chains,
thence south 2 0 chains, thence east
5 chains, more or less to high water
mark, thence following along the
high water mark to the point of commencement and containing 20 acres
more or less.
The Canadian  Fish and  Cold
Storage  Company, Limited,
J.  H.   Plllsbury, Agent.
Dated June 20th, 1910. ,Iyl2
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassia
TAKE NOTICE that Bruce Older-
shaw, of Victoria, B. C, occupation
jeweller, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of the
Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at
the north-west corner and about 7 %
miles distant in a north-westerly direction from the north end of Kltwancool Lake; thence south 80
chains, thence east 40 chains, thence
north 80 chains, thence west 40
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 320 acres, more or
less. BRUCE OLDERSHAW.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated May 31, 1910. Jy8
LAND PURCHASE NOTICES
Skeena Land District—District of
0*1 ^sifli*
TAKE NOTICE that Sarah Ward,
of Victoria, B. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. E. corner and about 22 miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north 80 chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence south 80
chains, thence east SO chains to the
po^nt of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or :ess.
SARAVI WAR!).
James W. Smith, Agen!.
Dated June  6th,  1910 JyS
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that George Mc-
Bain, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
merchant, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands In the vicinity of Kltwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. W. corner and about 26% miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north 80 chains, thence
east 80 chains, thence south 80
chains, thence west 80 chains to
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
GEORGE  McBAIN.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 8th, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Pa agin t"
TAKE NOTICE that Catherine
Welsh, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands in the vi-
vlnity of Kltwancool or Chean Wein
Valley:—Commencing at a post
planted at the S. E. corner and about
17% miles distant in a north-westerly direction from the north end of
Kitwancool Lake, thence north 80
chains, thence west 80 chains, thence
south 80 chains, thence east SO
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 640 acres, more or
less. CATHERINE   WELSH.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 4, 1910. Jy8
LAND PURCHASE NOTICES
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Frederick
Tutt, of Selkirk, Manitoba, occupation merchant, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. W. corner about 14% miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north 40 chains, thence
east 40 chains, thence south 40
chains, thence west 4 0 chains to
point of commencement, and containing 160 acres, more or less.
FREDERICK   TUTT.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 3, 1910. JyS
LAND PURCHASE NOTICES
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE  NOTICE that John Grieve,
of  Vancouver,     B.     C,     occupation
agent,  intends  to  apply  for  permission   to   purchase  the  following  described  lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool   or   Chean   Wien   Valley:—-
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. E. corner and about  20 miles il is—
jtant   in   a   north-westerly   direction
j from   the  north  end  of  Kitwancool
iLake, thence north 80 chains, thence
west   80    chains,    thence south    SO
1 chains,   thence  east   80     chains     io
point of comeinncement, and containing 640  acres, more or less.
JOHN' GRIEVE.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 6th, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Henry Van
Wyck, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation hotel keeper, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Weln
Valley:—Commencing at a post
planted at the north-east corner and
about 20 miles distant in a northwesterly direction from the north end
of Kltwancool Lake, thence south 80
chains, thence west 80 chains, thence
north 80 chains, thence east 80
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 640 acres, more or
less. HENRY VAN WYCK.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated  June  6th,   1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Minnie Clarke
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. W. corner and about 28% miles
distant and in a north-westerly direction from the north end of Kitwancool Lake, thence south 40 chains
thence east 80 chains, thence north
40 chains, thence west 80 chains to
point of commencement and containing 320 acres, more or less.
MINNIE   CLARKE.
James \V. Smith, Agent.
Dated  June  Sth,   1910. Jy8
m
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Leihl Cherry,
of Victoria, B. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. E. corner and about 21 miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north 80 chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence south 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, mo-e or less.
LEIH1   CHERRY.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 6th, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE uiat Alfred E.
Parkington, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation broker, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands In the vicinity of
Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. E. corner and about 15% miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north 80 chains, thence
west 8 0 chains, thence south 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
ALFRED E. PARKINGTON,
James \V. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 3, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Echo Dudgeon, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
assistant dentist, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of the
Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-east corner and about 7%
miles distant in a north-westerly direction from the north end of Kitwancool Lake, thence south 80
chains, thence north 80 chains,
thence east 80 chains to point of
commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
ECHO DUDGEON,
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated May 31, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that William
Simpson, of Lindsay, Ont., occupation hotel-keeper, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of the Kitwancool or Chean Wein
Valley:—Commencing at a post
planted at the south-east comer and
about 7 % miles distant in a north
westerly direction from the north
end of Kltwancool Lake, thence
north 80 chains, thence west 80
chains, thence south 80 chains,
thence east SO chains to point of
commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
WILLIAM SIMPSON.
James W. Smith, Agent.
.Dated May 31,  1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that George Tutt,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation den-
1st, intends to apply for permission
o purchase the following described
lands in the vicinity of the Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—Commencing al a post planted at the
north-east corner and about 8%
miles distant in a north-westerly direction from the north end of Kitwancool Lake, thence south 40
chains, thence west 40 chains, thence
north 40 chains, thence east 40
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 640 acres, more or
less. GEORGE TUTT.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 1, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
OflRRlfl f
TAKE NOTICE that Lome Thompson, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
dentist, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands In the vicinity of the1
Kitwancool or Chean Weln Valley:
Commencing at a post planted at the
south-west corner and about 8%
miles distant In a north-westerly direction from the north end of kitwancool Lake, thence north SO
chains, thence east 40 chains, thence
south SO chains, thence west 40
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 320 acres, more or
less. LORN'E THOMPSON.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 1,  1910. Jy8
JOBPRINTING**
i!   LETTER HEADS ENVELOPES   i
BUSINESS CARDS
!!   VISITING CARDS       STATEMENTS   j!
Prince Rupert Journal
m
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Edward Cas-
pell, of Cayley, Alberta, occupation
merchant, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of the
Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. W. corner and distant about 15%
miles in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence south 80 chains, thence
east 80 chains, thence north 80
chains, thence west 80 chains to
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
EDWARD CASPELL.
James W.  Smith, Agent.
Dated June 3, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles Gei-
ger, of Victoria, L. C, occupation
clerk, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Comemncing at a post planted at the
S. E. corner and about 19 miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north 80 chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence south 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
CHARLES GIEGER.
James W.  Smith, Agent.
Dated June 4th, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Sarah Cox,
of Monarch, Alberta, occupation marled woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands in Ihe Kitwancool or
Chean Wien Valley:—Commencing at
a post planted at the N. W. corner
:ind about 4% miles distant In a
north-westerly direction from the
north end of Kitwancool Lake, thence
south 80 chains, thence east 80
chains, thence north 80 chains,
thence west 80 chains to point of
commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
SARAH COX.
James W. Smith, Agent
Dated May 31st, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
C&ssitLi'
TAKE NOTICE that Samuel John
McDiarmid, of Monarch, Alberta, occupation farmer, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following described lands in the Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—Commencing at a post planted at the N.
E. corner and about 4 % miles In a
north-westerly direction from the
north end of Kitwancool Lake,
thence south 80 chains, thence west
80 chains, thence north 80 chains,
thence east 80 chains to point of
commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
SAMUEL JOHN McDIARMID.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated May 31st, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District  of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that George Williams, of Winnipeg, .Man., occupation
clerk, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands in I lie vicinity of Kitwancool
or Chean Wein Valley:—Commencing at a posl planted at the ti. W.
corner and about 10% miles distant
in a north-westerly direction from
the north end of Kitwancool Lake,
thence north 40 chains, thence
east 40 chains, thence south 40
chains, thence west 40 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 160 acres, more or less.
GEORGE WILLIAMS.
James  W.  Smith,  Agent.
Dated June 4, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that John Reid,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
broker, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. W. corner and about 15% miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north 40 chains, thence
east 40 chains, thence south 40
chains, thence west 40 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing  160  acres,  more or less.
JOHN  REID.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated  June  3,  1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE tliat. Thomas Sills,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation machinist, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands In the vicinity of Kltwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. W. comer and about 26% miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kltwancool
Lake, thence south 80 chains, thence
east SO chains, thence north SO
chains, thence west 80 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
THOMAS  SILLS,
.lames W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June Sth, 1910. Jy8
Coast Land District—District of
Skeena.
TAKE NOTICE that I, George A.
.oole, of Prince Rupert, occupation
printer, intend to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted on the north-east shore
line of Smith Island, distant about
one mile south-east from Lot 38, and
marked "G. A. P.'s North-west Corner Post," thence 20 chains south,
(hence 80 chains east, thence north
to shove line, thence following shore
line to point of commencement, containing 160 acres, more or less.
GEORGE  ARTHUR  POOLE.
Dated Saturday, July 2, 1910.
(First insertion  July  5.)
Skeena  Land  District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE thai William Wallace, of Toronto, Onl., occupation
Insurance agent, intends to apply for
permission to pun-base tin following
inscribed lands in Hie vie' ilty of Kitwancool or Chean Worn Valley:—
Comencing at a posl planted at the
N.   E.   corner  and   about   26%   miles
distant in a north-westerly dlroci on I
from the north end of Kltwancool
Lake, thence south so chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence north 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to the
point of commencement, containing
640 acres,  more or  less.
WILLIAM   WALLACE.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated   June   Sth,   1910. JyS
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Annie Gowan,
of Victoria, B. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of Kltwancool or Chean Wein Valley:-—
Commencng at a post planted at the
N. W. corner and about 23 miles distant In a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake; thence south SO chains, thence
easl SO chains, thence north 80
i chains, thence west SO chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres ire or less.
ANNIE  CO WAN.
.lames W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 7th, 1910. JyS
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Grace Cess-
ford, of Victoria, B. C, occupation
married woman, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of
Kilwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—•
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. E. corner and about 23 miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from ihe north end of Kilwancool
Lake, thence south SO chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence north 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing  64 0 acres, more or less.
GRACE CESSEORD.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 6th, 1910. JyS
Skeena Lund District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Henry Hemming, ill Victoria, B. c, occupation
hotel keeper, intends to apply for
permission to purchase ihe following
described lands in the vicinity of Kltwancool or Chean Weill Valley: —
Commencing at a poet planted at the
N l-:. corner anil aboul 21 miles distant,   in  a  north-westerly  direction
from the north end ol' Kilwancool
Lake, thence south SO chains, thence
west Sit chains, thence north 80
chains, thence east SO chains lo the
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
HENRY   HEMMING.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 6th, 1910. jy8
Skeena Land District—District ot
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Nelson
Gowen, of Victoria, B. C, occupation mining engineer, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Weln
Valley: — Commencing at a post
plained at the N. E. comer and about
19 miles distant In the north-westerly direction from the north end of
Kitwancool Lake thence south 80
chains, thence west 40 chains, thence
north -I" chains, thence west 40
chains, thence north 40 chains,
thence east so chains to point of
commencement, and containing 4S0
acres, more or less,
NELSON   GOWEN.
.I»mes W. Smith', Agent.
Dated   June   4th,    1910. JyS
■MMMMM    .     •.*-
M THE   PRINCE   RUPERT   JOURNAL
Tuesday, July 12. 1910
IS NOT  SCAVENGER
Aid. Fattullo Draws   the   Sharp
Beyond Which He Will Not
Pass.
Line
He is Opposed to City Taking  Over
Work Done Now By Private
People
Aid. Pattullo, while he is ready to
admit that being an alderman of the
city of Prince Rupert is "not all beer
and skittles," draws the line at undertaking the duties of scavenger
His pronounced views on that subject led to hot words for a few minutes at Saturday evening's council
meeting, between himself and Aid
Hilditch.
Aid. Hilditch, reporting for the
health committee, recommended an
appropriation for scavenger work.
Aid. Pattullo was astonished at
this recommendation and on inquiry
as to what it meant was informed by
Aid. Hilditch that on the recom
mendatlon of the sanitary officer "we
would have to do the scavenger
work" if the work was to be done
properly.
A hot discussion followed, during
which it was explained that "we" did
not mean that Aid. Pattullo and Aid.
Hilditch would have to look after the
work, but the council would have to
have the scavenging done directly
under its own officers to ensure its
being carried out. But this did not
satisfy Aid. Pattullo in the least. He
protested against the city taking up
any such work. It had plenty to do
now.
Aid. Hilditch said the sanitary officer announced that It was impossible to have the city's health properly
ensured unless it took charge of the
scavenging which was now imperfectly done.
Aid. Mohley did not approve of the
city taking over this work at present.
Other aldermen disapproved of it,
nlso, and thought tbe sanitary officer could see that the rules laid
down were enforced.
Accordingly the recommendation
did not find favor.
 o	
Licenses Laid Over
(Co. t nued from Fage One)
The particular point involved in
this case was submitted to the Attorney General by His Worship the
Mayor when in Victoria, and it was
pointed out to him that the Board In
anticipation of the appointment sat
upon the 8th and adjourned. The
Attorney General with the facts before him was of the opinion (hat tbe
Commissioners would be "absolutely
In order" in granting licenses. As
many cases of this description must
have come to the attention of the
Attorney General on previous occasions, we think that the Board Is
quite safe in relying upon his statement. Incidentally it should be
noticed that the License Department
Is a branch of the Attorney General's
and we think that he is in a position
to speak, and further we would say
that It is our opinion that no personal liability will be incurred by the
Commisioners if they see fit to' take
steps towards granting licenses.
Should your board desire it, we
shall at once communicate with Victoria with a view to obtaining the
regulations governing appointments
to office, In order that we may be in
a better position to know the exact
status of appointees.    Yours truly,
WILLIAM'S  &  MANSON.
V. W. Smith, Esq., July 9, 1910
City.
Re Board of License Commissioners.
Dear Sir: — 1 have your letter requesting ti legal opinion as to whether you were appointed as a License
Commissioner cm tin- 7th or 9th of
June, A. H. 1910: tin- racta being as
s'-t out in the following telegram:
"Victoria, B.C., Tib .Inly, 1910.
"V. W. Smith, Prince Rupert, B.C.
"Order in Council appointing
Smith and Merryfield passed Coun-
cll 7th June, approved by Lieutenant
Governor 9th June.   H. A. Maclean."
The Municipal Clauses Act says
the two members of the Board
other than the Mayor) are to be appointed by the Lieutenant Governor
in Council. This means by Ihe Lieutenant Governor acting by and with
the advice of the Executive Council-
Interpretation Act, Sec. 10, S. S. 7.—■
and ns the Lieutenant Governor did
not act in this matter until the 9tli
of June, I am Irresistibly led to the
conclusion that you were not appoint'
'il until that date and that consequently you could not legally sit as
a   Licensing Court until  the second
Wednesday in September of this year
Yours Truly,       L. W. PATMORE.
July   9,   1910.
J.  E.  .Merryfield,  Esq.,
-Member   of   License   Board,
Prince Rupert, B. C.
Dear Sir:—In reply to your inquiry as to whether or not the Board
of License Commisisonei's have any
power to grant licenses before September, I may say that I have given
the matter my attention and beg to
submit my opinion on  the question.
I have come to the conclusion that
the board have not the power to
grant any license until September
and may give my reasons for this
opinion as follows: —
Under sub-section "C" of section
182 of the "Municipal Clauses Act,"
the sittings of the Board are a statutory fixture, viz., on the second Wednesday In March, June, September
and December and these dates cannot
be altered or varied, and the Board
have no right to sit and hear any
applications except on those dates
other than on days to which they
have adjourned from the legal day
and then only to hear applications
which were in order on the legal day
from which they adjourned.
It is shown In the Gazette that the
appointment of the Board of Commissioners was made on the 9th of June
this being the day after the legal
day fixed for the sittings—therefore
they canot legally sit and hear any
application until the second Wednesday in September. There seems to
be some question as to whether or
not the appointments were made on
the 7th of June, but I am strongly of
the opinion that they were not. The
Council evidently sat on the 7th and
recommended the appointment of
yourself and Mr. Smith and the Governor assented to this apointment on
the 9th, when the said appointment
was Gazetted. This is evidenced by
tbe telegram Mr. Smith holds saying
that "the appointment will be made
today," this telegram being dated
the 9th.
I might also refer you to Section
10, Chap. 71 of the "Evidence Act,"
which says that the evidence of any
appointment should he given by production of tho official Gazette containing a copy of said appointment.
You will see, therefore, that if a
license was granted and application
was made to set it aside on tho
grounds that tho Commissioners had
no jurisdiction, the only evidence
necessary to show the date of the appointment, would be the production
of the Gazette showing the appointment to be of tho 9th June, and
there is no question that the Commissioners having sat on the Sth, that
any application would be Illegal.
Another point 1 might mention Is
that, taking for the sake of argument
the Commissioners were rightly appointed on the Sth June, I may say
that no applications were In order on
that date, not having been sufficiently advertised, and the fact that the
meeting of the Board adjourned from
the Sth to some subsequent date In
order to let the advertisement run
Its full time, could not put the application in order, for a matter out
of order on the day It Is heard Is
still out of order on the adjourned
date, and It Is only these matters
which are legally before the Commissioners, that can be adjourned and
dealt with at subsequent meetings.
On these two points, therefore, I
say that it is not legal to rant any
licenses until September.
Yours truly,
W.  B.  FISHER.
j Marine News of the Coast f
;•**•:••:« •:•*•
HIE HALIBUT TRADE
His' Worship the Mayor, upon the
presentation of the correspondence,
at once took issue. He did not see
why opinions outside of the regularly
appointed city solicitors had been
sought. The opinions given by
Messrs. Patmore and Fisher he considered out of order at this meeting.
Commissioner Merryfield at once
replied that be had sought Mr. Fisher's opinion because he failed to get
an opinion on the points from the
city solicitors.
Solicitor Manson, who was present
said they had bis opinion, and he was
prepared to stand by it.
Commissioner Merryfield retorted
that there was nothing to stand by
in that opinion.
Commissioner Smith said that he
sought a legal opinion from Mr. Patmore in the hope of serving as a
guide to the board. He proposed,
in view of the opinions given by the
solicitors, to lay over the granting
of licenses until September.
Mayor Stork then repeated the
conversations he had had with the
Provincial Secretary and the Attorney General in Victoria relative to
the appointments. He felt that the
Board could proceed with the granting of licenses and was prepared to
do it.
Commissioner Smith said thai
while he was prepared to giant li-
censes if it could be done legally, he
felt that tbe position  was such  thai
The Pacific Whaling Company, as
has been previously announced, is
making preparations to enter the
halibut fishing industry in connection
with the whaling, and du 'ing tbe
winter season their steam whalers
will operate at fishing. For some
time past the heads of the company
have been trying to arrange not to
have the steamers lie off during the
winter, but without any success. The
fishing, however, can be carried on,
and, as the boats will have the advantage of being able to enter British Harbors and secure bait there,
they will undoubtedly make a success of it.
Freezing plants will be established at Kyuquot, Sechart and Rose
Harbor, and from these ports it will
be possible to handle the fish quickly and ship in the very best of condition.
Steam whaler Germania, the latest acquisition of the Whaling company, has been reported at San Diego,
and is expected in about ten days,
when she will at once come north to
the Rose Harbor station. The William Grant, which has been hunting on the west coast, will also come
to the new station. The steamers
to be operated in the halibut fishing
will be the Orion, St. Lawrence, William Grant, Sebastian and Germania.
I'mbrina for the same trade more
than a year ago, but could not make
suitable arrangements with Captain
Peppett.
The Glory is now sailing under the
flag of Uruguay.
LARGEST LIGHT
Triangle    Island    Will    Have    Most
Powerful Aid on This Coast
GLORY OF THE SEAS
Ship Glory of the Seas, formerly
owned, operated and commanded by
Captain Freeman, of Victoria, and the
clipper of the coast, is loading coal
at Ladysmith for Unalaska. She was
purchased in the spring by Captain I
McDonell for a syndicate to engage
in the hardwood trade with the
South Sea Islands. She is taking
the cargo of coal to Alasa rst and
will later outfit for the south.
Tho present owners of the Glory
of the Seas tried to buy the schooner
"The new lighthouse which will
be erected on the top of Triangle
Island will be the largest on the
coast," says Colonel Anderson, chief
engineer of the marine and fisheries
department of the Dominion government who Is now on the coast. "The
site is not in every way ideal, as it
is at times obscured, but the top of
the island is the only place from
which it may be seen in every direction. During clear weather it is expected that the light will be seen one
hundred miles from the island, which
will be a great convenience to mariners. It will be a higher-power light
than Pachena or any of the others nt
present on the coast."
Colonel Anderson is here on one
of his periodic tours of inspection,
especially in connection with the installation of the substation of the department at Prince Rupert. He will
go up the west coast and inspect all
the new work which has been done,
or which is being planned. While in
the north he will visit Queen Charlotte Islands arid other points.
IN GOOD SHAPE
When the Henrietta was hauled
out on the ways at Victoria to undergo her overhaul, a minute Inspection
of her hull was made when it was
found that she was in first class condition in every respect. The wood
work was as sound as when first
put in place and the vessel is good
for many years service.
PROVINCIAL  CHAMPION
Pat Rnftory and Rod Stnnden to Do:
Pifteen-rour.d Rout at Nanaimo
Rod Standen, tho professional
lightweight champion ot the province
and Pat Raftery, the amateur champion, will hook up in a fifte-u-round
boxing contest at Nanaimo on July
16, when they will decide the championship of British Columbia. Articles were signed for the bout recently. Both boxers will do their
training at Vancouver.   Standen Is In
MISS  JEANNE   RUSSELL
Lending  Woman   with   the   Brandon
Players at the Empress Theatre
All   This   Week
fairly good shape already while
Raftery has been training right along
In the expectation of getting a bout
with Pete McVeight of Seattle, whom
he beat when both were amateurs
last winter.
MOTOR BOAT RACE
Provided Ihe motor boat race from
Alaska lo Puget Sound waters, which
is due to take place next month,
finishes at Vancouver instead of Seattle, Dr. A.  R.  Baker of Vancouver
they could not grant them. He,
therefore, moved that all applications
lie laid over until the September
meeting.
This motion was seconded by Commissioner .Merryfield and carried, the
meeting  then   adjourning.
has undertaken to secure tho sum of
$1,000 for prize money.
On Dr. Baker making his offer to
ex-Eccrctary Foulser of (lie P. I. P.
B. A., the latter arranged for tho
finish to take placo r.t Vancouver an
far as it was possible in tho last
few days, and yesterday he said it
was a practical certainty that tho
terminus of the race next month
would be shifted from Seattle to
Vancouver.
Heretofore the race has been
started at Ketchikan and the boats
have raced down the coast to Seattle,
but as Seattle is to be cut out this
year, a new starting place will have
to be determined upon, and it is
probable that some of the northern
cities between Vancouver and Nome
will be given an opportunity to have
the race start in their harbor.
Stewart or Prince Rupert are likely places to make a bid for the race
this summer, and from whichever of
these places the race starts the boats
will go north to Ketchikan and then
return south to Vancouver. The
probable date of the start of the long
distance race Is August 15th.
There are likely to be as many as
ten entries in the race this year, five
or six of these having definitely arranged for the trip. They are: the
Chaos, the Wanderer, the Limit; Dr.
A. R. Baker has promised that he
will have a new 60-footer built for
this race which will be fitted with
a specially built Brooks engine; the
Marana II, B. F. Jacobs of Tacoma,
which is a 45-foot riplica of ihe Ilys,
designed by Bowes & Watts and one
of the champion boats of the eastern coast. Probable entries expected
although not definitely determined
yet, are the Easthope, now known as
the Konomlc, tbe Sumner, the Soya
and perhaps Simpson & Greenwood's
Jessie.
W. E. Boeing Is contemplating
entering In this race a magnificent
new 100-foot cruiser, designed by
Henry Gielow of New York City, with
200 horse-power Eastern Standard
engines. If there Is any boat in
sight for the race that could give
the big 100-footer a race tbe new
craft will be entered.
NEW FIGURE AT BISLEY
A slim, khaki-clad figure lay for
hours in the long grass of the Blsley
ranges recently striving hard to understand the vagaries of the English
winds It was Tan Cheow Kim, the
first Chinaman to shoot at Bisley and
a member of the Singapore team,
who have travelled many thousands
of miles to take part In the contests.
Nine years ago, when the first battalion of Singapore native volunteers
was enrolled, Cheow Kim, then a
youth of seventeen, was the first to
•WHERE  QUALITY IS  KING."
GEO. D. TITE
Furniture Dealer
3rd. Avenue
Prince Rupert
An inspection of our stock
of House Furnishings will
convince you. For quality and
economy you will leave us a
satisfied customer.
Dining Room Furniture, Sideboards,
Bulfetf, Dining Tibia, 6ft.
and 8ft. Extension
Dining Room Chain, Quartered Oak with
Leather Seats, Golden or Eady English
finish. Prices ranging from
Just Received a
Handsome Line of ^^^^^
Iron Beds, Springs and
Mattresses, all sizes
WINDOW BLINDS
Manufactured here  to lit any
window up  to 10  feet wide.
Tapestry and Lace Curtains,
Poles and Trimmings
Special orders for Upholstering
of any kind.
$22.50 to $50
Wicker Chairs and Rockers
GEO. D. TITE,
3rd Ave.
SHERWIN& WILLIAMS
®
m
i
i
i
m
on
0
COVER THE EARTH.
we Anr. sou': agents
CAELbAD JUST ARRIVED
Ready Mixed Paints,
Paints Ground in Oil,
Paints Ground in Japan,
Varnishes, Shellac, etc.
Water Stains
and
Decotint
IN ALL COLORS
Prince Rupert Hardware & Supply
Company, Ltd.  thos. dunn, Mir.
□llDllDllalLDllpJlpllDiir^ir^^ir^ipjiajtpllDlirjiinllDiiDllDllDlinllallalln
The Westholme
Lumber Company, Ld.
We carry the largest stock of
Building Supplies in the North.
Quotations given on short notice in all lines.
Rough and Dressed Lumber
Shingles and Lath
Mouldings and Cases
Doors and Windows
We handle Plaster and Lime at reasonable prices
Get our quotations for alljclasses of buildings.
FIRST AVENUE
OFFICE AND
WAREHOUSES
enlist. His enthusiasm carried him
far, for today he holds the rank of
sergeant, and has won the reputation of being one of the finest Chinese shots In Asia.
"It Is very difficult to shoot iu
England, so varying are the wind",
so peculiar the vision," he said.
"There is much work to do, and afterwards I shall play." He promptly
followed these remarks by scoring
four bulleyes.
What little of England he has seen
Cheow Kim likes exceedingl5'. "Out
in Singapore," he said, "we think cf
England as a little island with a big
heart, and the heart Is London. For
years I have dreamed of it, wondering about its immensity. Always r.iy
thoughts rave been too small.
Another interesting figure at Bisley
this year is Sergeant Bogh Singh, a
member of the Malay States Guides
team.
 o	
When the sun is pouring down its
rays upon the ocean at noonday none
of them penetrate to a depth of over
200 feet. Could a diver descend to
that depth he would find himself
shrouded in darkness as profound as
though he were Immersed In a sea
of ink.
—LADYSMITH	
COAL
H. B. ROCHESTER,  -   Centre Street

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