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Prince Rupert Journal Aug 2, 1910

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 New WaUlmtoii
Coal
is the best
ROGERS & BUCK
Sole Agents
Prince ftojiert journal
High-Class
Job Printing
In all Lines
VOLUME  1
Published Twice a Week
PRINCE RUPERT, B.  C, TUESDAY, AUGUST  2,  1910.
Price, Five Cents
NO. 14.
CENTRE  FOR   STEEL
Junes A. Moore of Seattle is Developing
Cod Fields on Queen Charlotte Islands.
Ho Has in View Works in British Columbia And Might be Induced
to Lorn to Here
James A. Moore, of Seattle, president of the Western Steel Corporation, is having his recently acquired
coal measures on Queen Charlotte
Islands thoroughly looked Into with
the object in view of utilizing it In
the making of coke for steel works
which hi. plans to locate somewhere
in the province.
Mr. Moore has been working on
the steel proposition for many years.
He acquired iron properties on the
west coast of Vancouver Island and
on Texada Island, and more recently
coal measures on the Queen Charlotte
Islands. At first all his energies were
devoted to the building up of the
steel works which he has In view at
Seattle with the iron smelter at Iron-
dale near Port Townsend as a feeder
for It. The smelter Is at the present
time turning out about eighty tons
a day, but the capacity, according to
Mr. Moore is to be increased at once
to about 300 tons a day.
The acquisition of added capital
a few years ago and the development
of the demand for steel and iron in
this country led him some months
ago to turn his attention to the question of erecting works on this side
of the line as auxilliary to those In
the State of Washington.
With the rapid development In
Northern British olumbla and with
the facilities that exist here for the
shipping of the finished product, the
port of Prince Rupert should appeal
to the head of the Western Steel Corporation. With the coal and coke
supply which he expects to get so
close to this city and the presence of
large deposits of iron ore within easy
reach, there is no reason why this
port should not be considered among
the centres where iron works could
with advantage be located.
Not many years ago experts rep:
resenting capital went into the subject of the available Iron supply within easy reach of Prince Rupert with
the object in view of introducing
capital to erect works here. The situation was then regarded as a result
of the investigations as exceedingly
bright for such an enterprise. The
project has never been wholly dropped, and as Mr. Moore has not definitely settled upon the location of the
Iron works In this province, there
might be something done to bring
about a union of the Interests.
Mr. Moore was a Canadian before
he became a citizen of the United
States, and is a man of wonderful
energy.
 o	
WANT  PUBLIC LINE
RECEPTION PLANS
Arrangements for the Coming of Canada's
Prime Minister to This
City.
Sir Wilfrid Lnurier Will Be Given a
Most Hearty Welcome by all
Residents of City
The reception of Sir Wilfrid
Laurier in this city on August 20,
while not carried out on as elaborate
a scale as some that he will receive
on his western tour, will be none the
less hearty. Nowhere will he be
given a more united reception. Party
is being dropped entirely on
this occasion and all will unite to
give to the prime minister the reception he deserves.
The Prince George is to be placed
at his disposal for the trip from Victoria. With the party that accompanies him he will reach here about
noon Saturday, August 20.
As far as the committees have so
*   *   *   *
*     LOOKING TO SETTLEMENT     *
(Special to The Journal)
Toronto, Aug. 2—Conferences
between the Grand Trunk officials, representatives of the
Railway Brotherhoods and W.
L. Mackenzie King, -minister
of labor, continues. No statements are made regarding the
progress * f the negotiations.
Canadian Northern Officials Would Like
to Secure Intercolonial
Railway.
William Mackenzie Makes Announcement That This is Ambition of
His Company
William Mackenzie, president of
the Canadian Northern Railway announced In Montreal a few days ago
probably for the first time for publication, that the Canadian Northern
railway wanted to get possession of
the Intercolonial railway from Montreal to Halifax and Sydney.
"During four and a half years,"
Mr. Mackenzie said, "the Canadian
Northern had done nothing in the
way of construction on the main line,
but during that time they had built
no less than 1,200 miles of branches.
"To this policy of keeping the
branch lines well along was due the
success attending the Canadian
Northern as freight carriers on the
plains and from Lake Superior westward."
Being asked what his company intended doing in the east, Mr. Mackenzie said: "We want the Intercolonial, which will be the natural
extension of the Canadian Northern
from here to the Atlantic seaboard."
"Are you not afraid some of the
other fellows will get It away from
you?" the president was asked.
"There's not the slightest danger
ot that," said he.
far been able to arrange matters, the
reception will consist of the presentation of addresses at the wharf in
which the civic address will be supplemented by others from the residents of the city who are of French
extraction and possibly by the Indians of the district.
A band will be present'and the
school children will be placed in a
position to welcome the Premier,
singing patriotic songs.
Mayor Stork specially desires all
who attend, even if it is raining, to
provide to protect themselves by
other means than by umbrellas. The
use of umbrellas would shut out the
view of many, and ladies as well as
men are to be asked to leave them at
home.
On Saturday night there will be
a monster banquet to Sir Wilfrid.
Sunday will be spent quietly, and
on Monday the Prime Minister and
party will probably be taken out over
the line of the G. T. P., and brought
back, If possible, by steamer, so as
to allow a call at a cannery.
About three o'clock there will be
a great out door meeting at a place
to be decided upon. At this gathering there will be ample accommodation reserved for ladies and children.
It will possibly be at the corner of
Second avenue and Sixth street.
Monday night there will be a
smoker in the opera house. That
night the party will leave again for
the south.
The G. T. P. has arranged to give
return trips from all near-by points
including  Stewart  and    the    Queen
WILL SERVE PUBLIC
Captain Nicholson Alters Schedules to
Better Meet Demands of
Shipping Hen.
Prince Albert Goes Direct to Masset
From  Here—Double  Call  at
Queen Charlotte City
MILITIA  UTILIZED
(Special to The Journal)
Fore Erie, Aug. 2.—Two companies of the 44th militia regiment, 23 members of the Canadian Regiment of Infantry,
f-ad 27 members of the Royal
Canadian nragoons are here.
The authorities have asked
military assistance, fearing
trouble over the Grand Trunk
strike. The closing of the race
track left a number of hangers-on from whom violence
was apprehended.
Charlottes to Prince Rupert at single
fare rates at the time of Sir Wilfrid's
visit. This will induce a large attendance here from the outside.
 o	
GOOD  SALMON  RUN '
Capt. Nicholson, superintendent of
the. G.T.P. coast steamship service,
after spending a week in this city and
the surrounding district has left 'for
the south again. Not an idle moment
was put in here by the captain. He
was ever on the move arranging for
improving the service which the company has recently inaugurated out of
the city and which requires from
time to time considerable adjusting
in order to serve the public better.
Two changes have been made in connection with the Queen Charlotte
Island services that will improve it
considerably. The steamer Prince
Albert on leaving here after the arrival of the Prince George on Sunday
will go direct to Masset. Returning
the Naas, Port Simpson and other
mainland points will be taken in.
This will give a very direct service
with Masset. ,
The other change is in connection
with the southern trip. Leaving here
after the Prince Rupert arrives, the
first port of call on the Queen Charlottes will be Queen Charlotte City.
The remaining ports will be covered
and then on the way back Queen
Charlotte City will again be made a
port of call. This change will be a
welcome to the travelling public. As
now arranged travellers can go to
Queen Charlotte City do business and
get back on the same steamer.
The change is made as a result of
Capt. Nicholson's investigations. With
the government offices located at
Queen Charlotte City, that point has
become the Important business centre
on the island. Skidegate is within
such easy reach also of that port that
travellers can make the return trip
to Queen Charlotte City from Skidegate in time to catch the steamer.
Speaking of the service, Capt.
Nicholson said he was prepared to
re-arrange it on half an hour's notice
following the need of any change.
The situation in a new country like
this was ever changing and the company was prepared to do the best it
could for the public.
Capt. Nicholson was well pleased
with the apparent development on
the islands. He thinks there is promise of a bright future before that
part of the province. There is considerable development going on and
much more to be done.
Capt. Nicholson made the trip to
Stewart and then continued south by
the Prince George, accompanied by
Mrs. Nicholson and his son.
R. L. Newman, the designer of the
G. T. P. vessels, also made the trip
with Capt. Nicholson, and was pleased with the prospects on the Queen
Charlottes.
 o	
FIRES   IN   INTERIOR
(Special to The Journal)
Ottawa, AugU3t 2.—The question
of the jurisdiction between British
Columbia and the Dominion government as regards the fisheries, is to be
settled by an appeal to the supreme
court of Canada. The province claims
the right of issue exclusive fishing
licenses in waters within the railway
belt territory and in tidal and navigable waters, and also to issue li-
of the coast.
censes to fish within a marine league
The Dominion  claims that the Is-
FISHERIES DISPUTE
Supreme Court of Canada is to Decide
Between Dominion and
Province.
Stated Case Will Be Argued to Arrive
at Decision as to Governments' Powers
HON. W. J. BOWSER
Thomas Jefferson's Coal Drilling Camp
at Morice River Suffers
Serious Loss.
Diamond  Drills   Were   Put   Out
Business For Time Owing to
Forest Conflagration
of
Catch in Traps Near Victoria Largely
Increased Over Former Years
(Special to The Journal)
Victoria,    Aug.     2.—The    salmon
catch this season In the traps In the
Straits of Juan de Fuca will be four
times as large as four years ago.
Southern British Columbia was
not the only part of the province to
suffer from forest fires this summer.
In the Telkwa district there was also
damage done. Harry Howson, the
well known mining, man, reached the
city a day or two ago from the Telkwa, where he has heavy interests and
brought the news that about two
weeks ago the coal drilling operations
on Morice River, being carried on
under Thomas Jefferson, representing New York capital, had been stop-
lied by a forest fire that swept down
on the camp and put the diamond
drills that were at work out of business.
There was no heavy loss otherwise
except to the timber in the district.
Two drills were at work when the
fire struck the camp. It was impossible to combat the flames. One drill
was  not  so  badly  damaged  as  the
suing of licenses falls within the jurisdiction of the Dominion fisheries
department.
The supreme court has been asked
by the federal government to answer
a list of questions in a stated case involving the constitutional issue.
This dispute as to the province's
rights has been brought to an Issue
largely through the instrumentality
of Hon. W. J. Bowser, Attorney Gen
eral and Commissioner of
in the provincial government. He
took a decided stand on the question
and failing an amicable settlement
between the governments, took the
aggressive and put in force regulations based upon the contentions of
the local government. This decided
action on his part has apparently
brought about this appeal to the
courts.
 o .—
Special evangelistic meetings are
being held all this week in the Baptist church, at the head of Sixth
street, by the Rev. J. W. Litch, pastor. This evening Mr. W. Dawes Gil-
more will sing a solo.
 o	
PLATE FOR CRUISER
PURCHASED    MINES
Pacific Netals Company of Victoria Buy
Red Jacket Group From
J. McGrath
Second Payment Male by That Organization on Properties Near
Ketchikan
There arrived in the city a few
days ago, William M. Brewer, president of the Pacific Metals Company
of Victoria. Here Mr. Brewer joined
C. L. Parker, manager of the same
company, and last evening they proceeded to Ketchikan by the steamer
Princess May.
The object of their trip is for the
purpose of making the second payment on the Dean Group of seven
claims there. This was taken over
by the company last May, when the
first payment was made. A force
of men was started at work on the
property which gives excellent indications.
While here the officials of the Pacific Metals Company made the first
payment on the properties taken over
by them at Goose Bay, Observatory
Inlet. These were purchased from
Joseph McGrath of this city, who has
covered a large part of the mineral
section on Portland Canal and Observatory Inlet.
The claims taken over from Mr.
McGrath are the Red Jacket and the
Red Wing. Some time ago these
came under the notice of Messrs.
Brewer and Parker, two of the most
conservative mining engineers on the
coast. They have personally examined the claims and are well satisfied
with the outlook.
These properties are in the vicinity
of the mine being developed by M. K.
Rodgers and his associates for which
$1,500,000 was refused recently.
The Pacific Metals Company will
develop both these groups mentioned
to a considerable extent before deciding what shall be done with them.
 o	
BREAK WITH VATICAN
BODY IS RECOVERED
Fisherman Lost Near Port Essington is
Picked Up by
Japanese.
No   Inquest   Was   Deemed   Necessary
by the Provincial  Police
Authorities
The body of Charles Neal has been
found near Port Essington. Chief
Constable Wynn of the provincial
force went over on receiving word
that a body had been found and bad
little trouble In Identifying the remains as those of Charles Xeul, who
was lost about July 11, No Inquest
will be necessary.
Neal had been fishing with a companion named Jackson. At night
Jackson had taken his turn at sleeping and on waking found that Neal,
who was on watch, had disappeared.
He had apparently accidentally fallen
overboard in some way during the
night.
The body was found by some Japanese fishermen on Sunday entangled in their nets.
The funeral is being held todaj
in Port Essington.
CRIPPEN TO RETURN
Alleged Murderer Will Not Fight Extradition From
Canada.
Capt.
Kendall   of  Montrose
Wonderful   Ability  as
Detective
Showed
a
Ambassador of Spain Has Left Rome
As Result of the Trouble
British Columbia Government Will Make
Presentation to the
Government.
•'list Cruiser For Pacific Const to be
Given Silverware in
London
The Government of lion. Richard
McBride has cabled directions to Mr.
.1. II. Turner, the agent-general in
London of the province of British
Columbia, to subscribe a sum of £100
to the purchase of a suitable piece
of plate for presentation to H. M. S.
Rainbow, the first of the new Canadian cruisers.
The Rainbow is shortly to leave the
homeland for Esquimau, nnd the
graceful courtesy of the provincial
government will no doubt be almost
as much apreciated by the premier
and the government of Canada as by
the officers of the pioneer cruiser In
Pacific waters of the new Dominion
navy.  '"
(Special to The Journal)
Rome, Aug. 2.—Marqu.. « OJeda,
Spanish ambassador  to the Vatican
left Rome Monday.
Mgr. Veltco, still remains in Madrid as papal nuncio.
This action on the part of Rome
results from the decree of June 11
permitting non-Catholic societies to
display the insignia of public worship. The Vatican declared that unless this were withdrawn, negotiations looking to the revision of the
concordat would discontinue. The
government took the ground that it
would tolerate no imposition.
The government will immediately
proceed with its measures of reform,
including the restriction of religious
orders, and the regulation of education and the general relations of the
church and state.
As a measure of precaution all religious demonstrations arranged for
Sunday were prohibited.
Premier's Stand
Madrid, Aug. 2.—Premier Canale-
jas says the war talk of the clerical
press is absurd. He declares the people support the cabinet.,, ,,r.u
against the Vatican, and also that he
will continue the course outlined by
himself.
Vatican  Wavering
Madrid, Aug.  2.—Indications    are
in evidence that the Vatican is waver-
PIRES l\ WESTERN STATES •
(Special to The Journal) *
Kallspell,    Mont.,    Aug.    2.— »
The lire situation in Hie Flat- *
head valley  is again serious. »
Numerous  fires   are   beyond •
control. *
COMING   HOME
(Special to The Journal)
Victoria,   Aug.   2.—The   G.   T.
ing in its hitherto firm attitude
against Alfonzo and the cabinet regarding the religious affairs in Spain.
TIMELY RAINS
Crops Benefitted in Manitoba As Result   of   Downfall
other and was very soon after got j steamer Prince  Rupert   left    today
working order.     The  other  drill, with a large number of passengers,'
lias  to await  the  shipment  of parts  the majority of whom are for Prince
(Special to The Journal)
Quebec, Aug. 2.—It will probably
be August 18 before Dr. Crippen and
Mile. Leneve are taken on a liner
for England to stand trial, jointly
accused of murdering the woman believed to have been Mrs. Crippen.
Dr. Crippen will not fight extradition.
Dr. Crippen and Mile Leneve were
arrested the moment the steamer
Montrose arrived yesterday. The
couple were formally arraigned at
Justice Anger's court, Dr. Crippen
.being charged with murder, and Mile.
Leneve with being an accessory before the fact. Both protested their
innocence.
In the doctor's pocket there was
found a white powder believed to be
poison. At the time of the arres* on
hoard the steamer the girl wa<i seen
to throw something into the water.
Only ten dollars the powder and a
vial aiipcst empty were found on Dr.
Crippen.
Efforts have been made, it Is reported to induce the girl to urn
kings evidence but. so far Without
effect.
AjlOf.s the Atlan-ic the two truel-
led as Mr. Robinson and son, and
although not aware that they were
being watched, were carefully kept
under view by Capt. Kendall, who
has proved himself the best detective
that   was on  the  trail.
Captain Kendall, ol' the Montrose,
first became suspicious of the Robinson pair while they were at lunch
the first day out. Their huts were
[hanging outside the dining saloon
and tin- captain examined them. He
found thai the hoys ..... several
sizes I.in large and the band stuffed
with paper to make it m properly.
Later cm |n the day lie- saw young
Robinson in his shirt sleeves. his
coal and waistcoat off. lie noticed Im-
 I lately thai  his trousers hung in
a peculiar manner and thai they were
held mi ai the waist with safety pins.
Captain Kendall says he did not
place the pair under arrest because
he was absolutely certain that they
had no Idea that he suspected them
tend be knew that if he left them
alone and tried to ingratiate himself
with them he would probably get information which would be invaluable
later on.
Before the captain had looked at
his passengers' hats he had watched
"'  closely, standing on the upper
deck. The boy squeezed his father's
hand affectionately and this did not
to the knowing sea-
Kendall   din   not  say
; seem
I dog.
natural
Captain
(Special to The Journal)
Wlninpeg, Aug. 2.—Splendid rains anything of his suspicions at firstTo
throughout the most of Manitoba on j tiny one, but later took the first mate
Saturday has done an Immense deal I Into his confidence.    He Immeiilatali
from the coast before it will be ready   Rupert.    Included  among  them  are of good and the prospects for the crop  came to the same conclusion        .'7
to be put into use again, | .1. H. Bacon and wife. j is materially increased. captain. ""
71
U
I THE   PRINCE   RUPERT   JOURNAL
Tuesday, August 2, 1910.
NEWS OF THE PROVINCE
Items of General Interest From Centres in British Columbia.
TRADES CONGRESS
HUDSON BAY RIGHTS
Canadian Northern Ferry jand westerly toward Foe-; St.
Vancouver.—Survey parties engaged at English Bluff give strength to
the well established opinion on the
lower mainland that the Canadian
Northern intend to proceed with the
least possible delay in developing the
fast, ferry as well as the railway portion of their construction pro-
gramme. English Bluff is the point
on the mainland where the ferry to
Victoria is to rind its starting point.
Game Trophies
Vancouver.—In the city of Berlin,
Germany, every year there is held
what is known as a Sportsman's
show, in which a magnificent exhibit
of hunting trophies, gathered from
all parts of the world, constitute a
remarkable feature of the collection.
Of recent years rBitish Columbia has
ciontributed to this exhibit in the
heart of the Gorman empire, and the
man who collected these trophies,
Herr Von Bergen, a wealthy estate
owner who resides in the country, beyond the suburbs of Berlin, is now
in Vancouver preparing to again prosecute the chase in the northern wilds
of America.
Her Von Bergen has been a follower of the chase from his early youth.
Favored by fortune with the privilege
nf c?xercising a hobby which fitted
in with his own bent of mind he had
explored the forests of his native
eountry before he was 1!) years of
age, and bad bunted and killed the
bear, extinct In his own land, in the
more distant forests of the Tyrol. In
later years he extended his hunting
pilgrimages to Turkestan and Persia,
and some six years ago or more was
attracted to the natural preserves of
tfie continent. His collection already
includes some fine specimens of the
grizzly and black bears, mountain
sheep, cougar, grey and black wolf
and other animals taken in British
Columbia, as well as heads of caribou
«nd moose killed on the McMillan
river in Alaska. He lias also taken
Jiome with him specimens of the
ooyotte, antelope, elk, muie deer, etc.
taken in Wyoming, as well as black-
tailed deer from Vancouver Island.
He is particularly proud of his British Columbia trophies and says that
tlhey have taken several medals at
the exhibition held annually In Berlin.
"I am," said Herr Von Bergen,
"endeavoring to make my collection
representative of all the big game in
America, and only need the brown
sheep and the musk ox to complete It.
1 am also desirous of getting a specimen of the Kadiah bear—a large animal found In Alaska—and wll try
for this next year. On my present
trip, which will be started when the
season permits, about August 25th, I
■ill go Into the Kootenay country
for sheep, where I have hunted before."
John.
While the provincial holdings are not
as a rule adapted to agriculture, consisting of vast elevated plateaus, witli
good general farming lain, at intervals along the river flats, the district
generally presents exceptional facilities as a stock ranging country.
Horses run out all the lear round,
hut cattle raising on a large scale,
to be entirely successful would have
to be undertaken with due provision
tor winter feeding and shelter The
former nature has provided for, as
all parts of the territory may be
utilized  for the growth o' hay.
The great resource of the British
Columbia Peace River country, in
Mr. Campbell's opinion, is its coal.
No practical demonstration by diamond drill or other scientific testing
has been possible, but ther'i is float
coal, and  there are natural signs of
Business to Conic Before Next Meeting  of  Body
The executive of the Trades and
Labor Congress of Canada has issued
a latter to unionists of the Dominion directing their especial attention to the approach of the twenty-
sixth annual session of the congress
to open at Fort Willian on September 12 and to conclude at Port Arthur. The open letter to unionists
reads in part: —
"The bill-of-fare to be presented
is on that will require the very best
intelligence of the delegates. The past
ten years have been replete with matters of vital interest to the workers,
and the opponents of organized labor
are still very active as will appear
from the systematic endeavor being
made in Canada and in Great Britain
to weake n immigration regulations
that were imposed for the protection
of the working classes.
"Among other matters calling for
immediate attention are the following:—
"1.   The immigration laws.
'2.   The Belcotirt bill   to   destroy
Canada Has Diverse Claims to Waters
of Great Inland
Sea.
United States Whalers Contention is
Met by Strong Case on Behalf of
the Dominion
strong  coal  measures airiest   every
where.    The outcrop is  •jl'uminous, |international trade unlonism, whlch
of  the  highest  quality   (ft>»  surface ' be b        ht tonvard agajn  next
coal)  and of excellent cookir.g quail- -    ■„•,.„
'3.   The  eight   hour  bill  and   its
HAYNOR BROS.
_ .|
tlUUoC    1 Ul lllSllCI A.    j,, Dunedin Block, corner of Second  g
Avenue   and   Eighth   Street.
g   Some snaps in slightly damaged  goods  which   we  want  to  clear
| out before moving into new quarters in Manson Blk., Third Ave.
| FUNERAL  FURNISHERS
S..i.l.,.l.i.i.i._,.i.,.i.i.i.«i...i.HMWHwiiwiiiiiiiHiiai«niniiiH«iiWHniniin>"H
ties. The field, Mr. Campbell thinks,
will probably rival that of the Crow's
isest Pass, when once the country
obtains facilities for railway transport. It will also be available for
smelter operation as the Oniincca district is opened up. The fields are
about 150 miles from Fort George,
on an up-grade. A railway is projected to run from Fort George via
the Pine River Pass, southeasterly to
h'dmonton.
Seeking a Visit
New Westminster.—A meeting of
Lhe Liberal club was held in the club
rooms recently when the' omission
of this city from the schedule of
Premier Laurier's stopping places in
British Columbia was adversely commented upon. It was decided to use
every influence to induce the veterati
leader to arrange for a meeting here,
n committee being named to wait upon Sir Wilfrid in Vancouver and
urge him to visit Westminster.
Magnetic Iron
Vancouver.—Mr. Fred W. Sharp,
of Vancouver, an experienced prospector and miner, returned from the
Thompson river country a few days
ago, where he located a group of
magnetic iron ore claims which he
believes will prove of considerable
value. An assay of t,he mineral by
the government assay office shows
that the ore carries 61 per cent pure
Iron. Mr. John P. McConnell, of the
Sunset Publishing Company, and
several other gentlemen In that city
are interested with Mr. Sharp in the
group, and arrangements are being
made to form a company to begin
development work at an early date.
The group Is located seven miles east
of Lytton and about 150 miles from
Vancouver on the north shore of the
Thompson river, and on the line of
the Canadian Northern railway.
Pence  River Coal
Victoria.—F. C. Campbell, who
Du been in the Peace Rive.- country
for the past fourteen months, is back
in the. city, lie made his headquarters at Fort St. John, on the Peace
river, In the centre of the block held
iy the Dominion government. He
explored (he country for over one
hundred miles around and has acquired a vast amount of information
as lo general conditions in that portion of the province.
Mr. Campbell considers that si-Clement, of the agricultural areas of the
Peace River district will natural,}' he
from Alberta side, as the frontiers
are pushed steadily backward, There
«.re already settlements in the vicinity
jf Rear lake and Beaver Lo.lg; river,
INCREASED   EXPORTS
l'. S. Hnve Sent More Manufactured
Goods  to Canada During Year
present position. Determined opposition has been made to this bill, and
labor must keep alive to secure its
passage.
"4. The act respecting co-operation.
"5. Effect of the amendments to
the industrial disputes and investigation act.
"6. The Technical Education commission.
"7. The Anti-Combines bill in its
relation to the trades union movement.
"8. Proposed amendments to the
elections act,  to make election  day
public holiday, etc.
"9. Payment of wages on railways fortnightly, and many other
features.
"Never more than now has there
been necessity for vigilance in safeguarding the rights of labor. Organized bodies on every hand are
combining for their own protection,
and in this regard labor no longer
has the field itself. "
ANCIENT TORTOISES
Two Very Old Ones Have Been Placed
in London Zoological Gardens
Two of the largest elephantine
tortoises ever seen in England have
arrived at the zoological gardens in
London with three smaller companions.
Their weight is measured in hundred weights, and their age in centuries.    If the estimate of the  250
The recent announcement from
Ottawa that Hon. J. G. Patterson has
been appointed commissioner to enquire into Canada's titles to northern
lands, and that he would accompany
Captain Berniur on this year's cruise
in the Dominion government steamer
Arctic, followed by the announcement that the United States government had notified American whalers
that they need not pay license fees to
the Canadian authorities In Hudson
Bay as Canada's claim of sovereignty
over that region was no longer recognized, raises a new and vitally important issue in Anglo-American
relations, and one fraught with pos-
sibiltiesv of much contention that
will probably require an arbitral
tribunal to dispose of.
This question is really not new,
but has merely taken on a new phase
because of recent American action.
In 1903 the Dominion government
sent Prof. A. P. Low to Hudson Bay
in the steamer Neptune, of St. John's
to asesrt Canadian authority there
and re-annex the lands north of that
inlet, and followed that in 1904, with
the steamer Arctic (formerly the German South Polar expeditionary ship
Gauss), conveying Major J. D.
Hoodie with authority as governor
of Hudson Bay and instructions to
establish permanent posts and enforce Canadian laws there. -
Ground for Whalers
United States whalers voyage from
New Bedford into Hudson Bay, and
from San Francisco into Beauford,
round the north coast of Alaska, and
both penetrate to the very confines of
the Arctic zone itself. Until recently
their operations in these regions were
not challenged but now after they
have prosecuted this industry in
Hudson Bay for over half a century,
and In Beaufort Sea for a generation,
Canada has latterly determined upon
asserting her authority in both areas.
When Canada began this policy
seven years back It was predicted that
the United States, however slight the
claim its subjects might have to ply
their calling in these remote seas,
would not quietly submit to their exclusion from waters they had resorted for so long a perfod, especially in
view of the success the United States
had secured in the Behring Sea dispute, the Alaska boundary dispute,
and the other Issues arising between
Grand Trunk Pacific  Steamships
For VANCOUVER, VICTORIA, SEATTLE.
Connecting   with   Eastbound   Trains
"Prince Rupert" sails every Thursday, 8.30 p.m.
"Prince   George"   sails   every Monday 8.30 p.m.
FOR STEWART:
"Prince Rupert" sails Wednesdays 8 p.m.
"Prince George"  sails Sundays at 8 p.m.
Steamer for Masset, Kincolith.Naas  Bay  and   Port  Simpson,  Sundays, I p.m.
For Skldegate,  Queen Charlotte City,   and   other   Moresby Island
points, Wednesday, 1 p.m., returning via Queen Charlotte City.
Tickets, reservations and information    from
. 1-      g A. E. McMASTER^jr/,^	
jTrelgnt' and  Passenger""Agent',-G~T.~P. Wharf. ~"~
years which were allotted  to their- herself and Canada at various times
The United States bureau of statistics report that during the fiscal year
ending June 30, 1910, the United
States exported manufactured goods
to the value of $768,000,000, by far
the greatest amount on record.
Figures for each ten years beginning with 1880 show the Increase of
exported goods to be enormous. In
1880, according lo the bureau, the
value of the exported manufactures
was $122,000,000; in 1890, $179,-
000,000, and in 1900, $485,000,000.
During  the  past  year  exports  to
and the advance  will  he  northerly j Canada have increased 82 per cent.
predecessor, Methusaleh, was correct,
the giant brethren which have just
been placed In the tortoise paddock
must have seen three hundred summers at least.
Shakespeare and Sir Walter Raleigh were living when these two
relics first broke their shells in Alda-
bra—the island In the Seychelles
group of the Indian ocean—from
which they are now unwilling emigrants.
A feature of thfs wonderful pair
is the perfection of their shells.
Methusaleh's carapace was rubbed
almost smooth when he arrived, but
the newcomers' embossed armor is in
a beautiful state of preservation—
the assumption being that their lives
have been cast in more peaceful circumstances.
 , o  .
The Man—I wish you would endeavor to show me a little more affection. You never even call me
"dear," as other men's wives do.
The Woman — Do other men's
wives  call  you   "dear"?
In justice to Canada, however, It
should be explained that she denies
that the American whalers have a
shadow of right to enter Hudson Bay,
contending that they are poachers,
carrying away the products of an exclusively Canadian fishery, and utterly disregardful of the sovereign
rights of the power which owns the
region.
Hudson Bay was discovered by
Henry Hudson in 1610, and sixty
years later the Hudson's Bay company was formed and gfven a charter
by the British King, granting it possession of the bay itself and all of the
watershed that drains into it, this
vast territory embracing virtually the
whole of what is konwn as Western
Canada today.
The French disputed this sovereignty some time afterwards and
overran the bay, capturing the fur
company's forts there, and sinking
its fleets, but by the treaty of 1713
British sovereignly was admitted and
France surrendered up all she had
gained  there.    The  British  title  to
the region was never again disputed,
and in 1818, when the fishery treaty
was drafted which is now under arbitration at the Hague, a clause was
inserted providing that the rights
hitherto enjoyed by Americans on
Labrador and northward indefinitely
were "without prejudice to the rights
of the Hudson Bay Company."
Fifty years ago, the company's rule
over its western territories having
provoked a revolt against the Inhabitants of what is now Manitoba, Canada purchased from the company all
its territorial and sovereign rights,
just as the East India Company's
similar rights we're taken over by the
British crown after the Indian
Mutiny. j
Basis of Claims
Canad would seem to have an un
answerable claim to the sovereignty
of- the entire region. She defines that
from the entrance to Hudson Strait
by a line drawn from Cape Chidley
the northern projection of Labrador,
the Resolution Island, the southern
extremity of Baffin Land, all tho
waters and lands to the west, including the numerous islands of Arctic
America, are her exclusive possession
by rights of:
1. Discovery (the waters, coast
land and hinterland having been ex
plored and charted by British ex
plorers.)
Occupation (the region having
been occupied only by the Hudson's
Bay Company.)
3. Treary cession (the British
rights to the region have been ad-
mitted by the French In 1713).
4. Acquiesence (the United States
having acqnlwledged the Hudson's
Bay Company's rights in 1818.)
5. Purchase (Canada having
bought out the company in 1870).
American Objection
But Americans are indisposed to
asquiesce in any such conclusion as
regards the waters of the bay. They
contend that the British had originally no rights beyond the three-mile
limit, that the French In 1713 could
cede them no more, and that the
American concurrence in 1818 could
only apply to the same territorial
waters. In other words, they questioned the right of the British monarch to grant such a charter.
The Americans maintain as a usual
thing, that the boundary should follow the windings of the coastline, and
extend only three miles outward, but
the commissioners in 1888 were
obliged to consent to a wider interpretation of the matter and to subscribe to the principle of "sovereignty
over the bays lying within the jaws
of the land," because it was pointed
out to them that by their contention
they denied to Britain what they
claimed  upon   their  own  coasts  for
themselves, Inasmuch as the entrance
to Chesapeake Bay is at least ten
miles wide, that lo Delaware Bay
eighteen miles, and that to Cape Cod
Bay thirty-two miles, over all of
which waters the United States
claims  territorial  jurisdiction.
Discussing this subject, the late
Hon. David Mills, minister of justice
of Canada declared that, although the
entrance to a bay may be fifteen or
twenty miles wide, it is not the less
within the exclusive jurisdiction of
the state into whose territory it
stretches, and this right originated in
the right of contiguity and in the
right of self-existence. This Is the
most important question, in the controversy between the two countries,
and to yield to the United States contention in respect to the large bays
upon our coast, within our borders,
would be to make a cession of territory which is absolutely and exclusively ours."
 o	
The civil service commissioners at
Ottawa are advertising for surgeons
three at first, for the Canadian navy.
Surgeons will be entered for a period
of three years, which may be extended to five years, at the end of
which terms there will be gratuities
of $1,000 and $1,500, according to
length of service. Candidates must
not be over thirty years of age and
must be graduates of a Canadian
Medical college or of Canadian birth.
Surgeons will rank with lieutenants
and pay for three years will be $4
per day and after three years $5 per
day.
The  Perfect Man
"There was one man whose life
was perfect," said the Sunday school
teacher. "What one of you can tell
me who he was?" Little Mary Jane's
hand went up, and the teacher nodded to her. "He was mamma's first
husband,"   she   said.
LAND   LEASE   NOTICE
Skeena Land  District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that The Canadian
Fish & Cold Storage Company Ltd.,
of Vancouver, occupation Mercantile
and Manufacturing, Intends to apply
for permission to lease the following described land:—Commencing at
a post planted at high water mark
on the westerly side of Prince Rupert Harbor and distant about 110
chains from the north-east corner of
Lot 443, thence west 20 chains,
thence south 20 chains, thence east
5 chains, more or less to high water
mark, thence following along the
high water mark to the point of commencement and containing 20 acres
more or less.
The Canadian Fish and Cold
Storage Company, Limited,
J.  H.  Pillsbury, Agent.
Dated June 20th, 1910. Jyl2
t       Corner 2nd Avenue and 6th Street Corner 2nd Avenue and 6th Street
*> »> * *> *> ♦> *J« •> $ .J. *|| ••« ♦;„ |)t ,£« ag, ♦*« ,♦, ♦$, ,J, .g, ,*„ »J, »J, »J« ,J« ,J, .•« aj. •*« <{• ►*', ■>*« •> »*4 «Jt .$> <« $ ■»
Corner 2nd Avenue and 6th Street
* <• ♦ * •> •:• >:• ♦ * •:• * * * •;• •;> ♦ •> •;• * •;<
•:<
Corner 2nd Avenue and 6th Street
We Are Busy Arranging Our 5c and 10c Tables
We have sold the bulk of some patterns of Dinner Sots, and wo are almost giving the rest away.      Just selling an article for 5c or 10c that may be worth as much as 40c or 50c.
  IF YOU ARE SHORT OF ANYTHING IN THIS LINE IT WILL PAY YOU TO STOCK UP	
Bric-a-Brac
This  Is  where  we  shine.    There are Figures of many kinds, Vases,
in variety, lr cdiscent fJluss Trays, Cups  Mugs,   all   of   which   we are
marking down.
REMEMBER
we ana
COMPLETE   HOUSE   FURNISHERS
Glassware
We areccuttiiig these on some lines  we  don't  intend  to  carry  and f
some broken sets. *
*
% There are WATER SETS and GOBLETS, and about 26 kinds of TUMBLERS.      We carry so many and sell them so cheap that you can't help but buy when you see them. |
♦      WE ARE CUTTING THE CUT GLASS DEPARTMENT.  _ WE OFFER CUT GLASS AT CUT PRICES %
Opposite the Theatre    THE BIG FURNITURE STORE    Opposite the Theatre f
t * .^aaMSHHBBHHPH^p,
'.
Tuesday, August 2, 1910.
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
* *
I Some Features of .   *
% House of Lords $
* *
Without entering too minutely into
he somewhat uncertain genealogies
of the Scottish and Irish peerages, or
seeking for some of the English peers
a common ancestor In too remote a
period of history, we may take it in
round numbers that there are about
seventy families each holding, mostly la direct male descent, two peerages of England, Scotland, or Ireland,
not always, however, carrying witli
them seats in the second chamber,
writes Mr. J. K. Lamont, in the London Graphic. There are also at least
six families holding three peerages
each, seven holding four each, while
lihe Howards, through the Inflaence
•of heirs-female, hold seven different
ipeerages among them.
By a peerage family we understand
■one whose members, claiming common descent from a not too remote
ancestor, hold among them more
than on barony or higher hereditary
honor. Unconsciously we think of
all bearers of the same name as being members of one family descended from a common ancestor—some
more or less mythical Romulus. IWth:
the peers, three-fourths off whom hide
their family name under a territorial
designation, it would peem at -first
sight otherwise. Had it become a
uniform custom in the early days of
parliament when a wrti of summons
was issued to each baron by name,
for peers on creation to retata 'the
patronymiv in their title, It would in
time have led to perpetual confusion,
as was apparent in a slight iflegree
when Mr. Mrorley retained hie name
on being created a viscount, there
being already a Parker, Earl tff Mor-
ley, and a Ponsonby, Baron tff "Mauley. As it as, the trtDe of a pasr, and
In many cases the Burname he bears,
covers a multitude of surprisingly
contradictor facts.
To most people .alterations of surnames seems unmeaning antl often
ridiculous; but these changes have
their foundation 'in a passion'for historical family continuity, be it in
the male or even in the femsile'line.
One representative of an old family
who elided a vowefl in the spilling ot
his name, defended St on the ground
that he hotped ny that meant! to distinguish all his direct descendants in
the next world.
If In the Bfpper'hanBe'SomeSfarhtlles
seem to be over-represented, -others
are as undoahtedrj nnder-represent-
ed. Of the family" peerages under
consideration, about (two-thirds were
bestowed for counsp'rcuous services
rendered to King and country, while
the remaining (third may be -attributed to Bodsll and territorial influences. We eouild at tedious length
lay our finger .cm the 'specific mason
that prompted the creation of every
peerage that exists; but evet today
;a list of new honours excites only the
mildest interest, as anyone conversant with the publfc and social life-ot
the times can foretell what peerages
■will be bestowed and why. The reasons of today were the reasons cdf
•yesterday and tht flay befon.
Had all peerages descended in
strictly made line and been Wholly
granted for purely individual merit,
a olose study of peerage families
would repay the student of eugenics.
Unfortunately for that purpose the
strict law of remainder to heirs-male
only in comparatively of too modern
a growth to be confidently relied on.
Peers and their younger sons, more-
cover, have always shown a wonderful
.aptitude for allying themselves with
heiresses, thus bringing into their
families, with no great intellectual
exertion on their part, baronies by
•writ in abeyance, and the hope of reviving recently extinct titles in themselves or in the next generation. Any
data gathered, therefore, can scarcely
be taken as sufficiently trust-worthy
for criticising the statement hecently
made In the Times by Sir Francis
Gallon, that among the sons of fleers
the "eldest-uorn are, as a rule, inferior in natural gifts to the younger-
born in a small but significant degree."
Naturally this hypothesis would
suggest that ultimately the mental
capacity of eldest sons would be reduced to the vanishing point. To
compensate that trend, however, we
find that opportunely the eldest line
of the first peer in the majority of
cases has failed, yielding place to the
second or the younger branches. The
present Marquess of Lansdowne, for
instance, is the eldest son of the
second son of the Second son of the
first marquesB. The third Earl of
Bedford was the only son of a third
son; the fourth earl was cousin to
the third; while the third and fourth
dukes were brothers, as were the
fifth and sixth, and the tenth and the
eleventh.
As a matter of practical family history, howover, disappointing it may
be to the popular imagination, II Is
the exception, in the ..   —,.: ...
for a peerage to descend from father
to eldest son In three au^vefltng
generations, The whole matter, accordingly, as put by Sir Francis Gal-
ton, would seem rather to resolve Itself Into a question not of the pos-'
session of "natural gifts" but the use
of them. A younger Son has generally
to make his own position, though we
find him very comfortably situated
as his mother's heir.' For the eldest-
born, generally, the lines, to quote
the psalmist, are fallen to him in
pleasant places; he has a goodly heritage. He Is heir of the possessions
and the traditions of his house, while
the younger .members are driven to
emulate the fortunes of the founder
of the family. If there,is any truth
In necessity making opportunity, it
is a little difficult to gauge the difference in "natural gifts" between
the eWest-bom in his daily round of
unostentatious country work and a
younger son ostensibly engaged in
puWic life for his own good. Among
prime ministers since 1785 there
hawe been younger sons in the persons of Pitt, RIpon, Wellington, Melbourne, Lord John Russell and the
late Marquess of Salisbury.
To counterbalance them we have
also as premiers, eldest-born sons in
Liverpool, Grey, Derby, Palmeraton,
and Lord Rosebery; and he would be
a bold critic who would presume to
sit in judgment on the "natural gifts"
of these tow sets of 'iirst ministers.
Lord Stanley of Prest'on, the well-
known cabinet minister, was second
son of the Premier tori of Derby. Of
the late Duke of Rutland f n second
son who afterwards (succeeded to the
family honors) Mr. Justin McCarthy
lias remarked that "no Conservative
government could be supposed to get
on without Lord John .'Manners."
The first Earll Granville, secretary for
war In 1907; the Earl of'Ellesmere,
secretary for war twenty years later;
Lord Herbert of Lea, war secretary
In three ministries, and the Hon. Edward Stanhope, secretary for the
same department in Lord Salisbury's
second government, are all peers'
younger sons. In all other departments of public life fhe younger sons
during the later Victorian days upheld their traditions.
LAND  PURCHASE  NOTICE
Skeena Land District—District of
Pfl^Rlfl Y
TAKE NOTICE that John Cherry,
of Victoria, B. C, occupation mattress maker, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-east corner and about 14 miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence west 80 chains, thence
south 80 chains, thence east 80
chains, thence north 80 chains to
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
JOHN CHERRY.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 3, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
PfiRfilflr
TAKE NOTICE that Sarah Ward,
of Victoria, B. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands In the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
E. corner and about 22 mllec distant In a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north 80 chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence south 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or .ess.
SARAH WARD.
.Tames W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 6th, 1910 Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Brenton
Brown, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation Insurance agent, intends to apply for permission to purchase the
■following described lands in the vi-
vlnity of the Kitwancool or Chean
Wein Valley:—Commencing at a
post planted at the north-east corner and about ten miles distant in
a north-westerly direction from the
north end of Kitwancool Lake,
thence south 80 chains, thence east
80 chains, thence north 80 chains,
thence west 80 chains to point of
commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
BRENTON BROWN.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 1, 1910. JyS
LAND PURCHASE "NOTICES
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Reginald
Davey, of Vancouver, "B. C, occupation machinist, intends to apply, for
permission to purchase the following
described lands, in the vicinity of
Kitwancool or 'Chean 'Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-west comer anil about 6%
miles distant In a northwesterly direction from the north end of Kitwancool Lalae, thence south 80
chains, thence isast 80 chains, thence
north 40 chains, thence west 40
chains, thence north '40 chains,
chains, thenoe west 40 Chains to a
point of commencement, and containing 480 acres (more or doss).
REGINALD   DAVEY.
James W. 'Smith, Agent.
Dated May 30, 1910. Jy8
Coast Land District—District of
Skeena.
TAKE NOTICE that Elijah
Rounds, of Victoria, B.C., occupation
Stewart, Intends to apply for permls-
sidn to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted one-half mile north,
and one-half mile east, of Nettie A.
Lairds N. E. cornei- of application to
purchase, and 300 feet east of Ana-
ham Lake trail, marked E. R.'s
south-west corner, thence 4-0 chains
east, thence 40 chains north, thence
40 xhalns west, thence 46 chains
south to point of .commencement,
and containing 160 acres, more or
less. ELIJAH  ROUNDS.
Vincent M.  Schitmer, Agent.
Dated May 25, 1910. 4d21
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Jessie Stead-
man, of Victoria, B. C, occupation
married woman, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the follow
ing described Jands, in the vicinity of
Kitwancool or Chean Weln Valley:
Commencing art a post planted at the
north-ceast (corner and about 6 !4
miles distant in a north-westerly direction from the north end of Kitwancool Lafce, (thence south 8'0
chains; thenee west 80 chains, thence
north 80 chains, thence east 80
chains to junint of commencemOTt,
and .containing 640 acres, more or
less. JESSIE STEADMAN.
Uames. W. Smith, Agent.
Batted .May 311, 1910. -3y8
LAND PURCHASE NOTICES
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that George Mc-
Baln, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
merchant, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Weln Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. W. corner and about 261£ miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from tbe north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north 80 chains, thence
east £0 chains, thence south 80
chains, thence west 80 chains to
point of commencement, and containing 610 acres, more or less.
GEORGE  McBAIN.
-flames W. Smith, Agent.
Dated Ju»e 8th, 1910. ,Ty8
LAN!) PURCHASE NOTICES
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Frederick
Tutt, of Selkirk, Manitoba, occupation merchant, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. W. corner about 14% miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north 40 chains, thence
east 40 chains, thence south 40
chains, thence west 4 0 chains to
point of commencement, and containing 160 acres, more or less.
FREDERICK   TUTT.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 3, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Henry Van
Wyck, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation hotel keeper, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein
Valley:—Commencing at a post
planted at the north-east corner and
about 20 miles distant In a northwesterly direction from the north end
LAM) PURCHASE NOTICES
Skeena Land District—District ol
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that John Grieve,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
agent, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands In the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wien Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. E. corner and about 20 miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north 80 chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence south 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to
point of comemncement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
JOHN GRIEVE.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 6th, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Leihi Cherry,
of Victoria, B. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of Kltwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at tne
S. E. corner and about 21 miles di»-
tant in a north-westerly direction
from   the  north   end   of  Kitwancool
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Catherine
Welsh, oi Vancouve., tt. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands in the vi-
vinity al Kitwancool or Chean Wein
Valley:-—Commencing at a post
planted at the S. E. corner and about
17 % miles distant in a north-westerly direction from the north end of
Kitwancool Lake, theo'te north 80
chains,, thenee west 80 chains, thence
south 80 chains, thence east' 80
chains to point of commencement,
and 'containing 640 acres, more or
less. CATHERINE  WELSH.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 4, 191(». Jy8
of Kitwancool Lake, thence south 80  Lake, thence north 80 chains, thence
chains, thence west SO chains, thence
north 80 chains, thence east 80
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 640 acres, more or
less. HENRY VAN WYCK.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated  June  6th,   1910. JyS
west 80 chains, thence south 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 64 0 acres, more or less.
LEIHI   CHERRY.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 6th, 1910. Jy8
Stoeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Bruce OJder-
shaw, of Victoria, B. C, occupation
jeweller,, iintends'to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of the
iitwancool or (Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing  at  a  post  planted   at
he montlHWfiat c corner and about 7%
mites distant In a north-westerly direction from the north end of Kit-
wanoool Lake; thence south 8 0 j
chains, ttbence neast 40 chains, thence
north 80 chains, thence west 40
chains to point of commencement,
and ^containing '320 acres, more or
less. BRUCE OLDERSHAW.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Darted May 901, 1910. JyS
Skeena Land District—District of
t3assiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Echo Dud-j
geon, ctf Vancouver, B. C, occn-paitionj
assistant dentist, intends to apply far
permission to purchase the following
described lands ;in the vicinity of the
KitwanoDtil or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted Xt the
north-east corner and about 7%;
miles distant In a north-westerly direction ffirom the morth end off Eit-
wancodl 'Lake, thence south 80;
chains,   (thence    north    SO    chains,
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Minnie Clarke
of Vancouver, B. C, occupatiou married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. W. corner and about 28% miles
distant and in a north-westerly direction from the north end of Kitwancool Lake, thence south 40 chains
thence east 80 chains, thence north
40 chains, thence west 80 chains to
point of commencement and containing 320 acres, more or less.
MINNIE  CLARKE.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June  8th,   1910. Jy8
JOB PRINTING
LETTER HEADS ENVELOPES
BUSINESS CARDS
VISITING CARDS      STATEMENTS
Prince Rupert Journal
V'Si
Skeena Land District.—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE mat Alfred E.
Parkington, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation broker, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of
Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. E. corner and about 15% miles
distant in a north-westerly directlo*
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north 80 chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence south SO
cnains, thence east 80 .chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
ALFRED E.  PARKINGTON.
James W. Smith, Agent-
Dated June 3, 1910. JyS
Skeena Land Distr'iat—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Edward Cas-
•pell, of Cayley, Alberta, occupation
merchant, intends tto apply for permission to purchase tthe following described lands in tine vicinity of the
Kitwancool or Cheain Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. W. corner and distant about 15%
miles In a north-westerly direction
,, ,„.,-, .ijfrom   the  north  end   of   Kitwancool
£3£! H ?    lnB , ipfn* Jtotlience so"* '*0 chains.taence
commencement, and  containing  640,, agt '„„  chai        thence    n0'tb    g0
aems, mQEB or leESS.Ho dudge(jNi    1^    theDce    „t SO cha.M to
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated may 31, W10.
Jy8
LAND PURCHASE NOTICES
Skeena Land District—District «f
Cassiar.
TAKE    NOTICE      that    William
Hume Grant, of Stewart, B.C., occupation engineer, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following!
described  lands:—Commencing at  ajj
post marked W.H.G.'s S.W. Cor., and j
planted   adjoining   Alfred   .Manson'sj
corner post, thence SO chains north,
along VV. N.  Harrison's   west    line, |
tliense east  SO  chains,  thenoe south
80 chains, thence west 80 chains, following Alfred Manson's north line to
point  of  commencement,   and     containing 610 acres, more or less.
WILLIAM HUME GRANT.
Frank R. Strtilm, Agent.
Dated July 2, 1910. Jy22
Skeena Land Districts-District of
Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that The Canadian
Fish and Cold Storage Company, of
Vancouver, B. C, occupation mercantile and manufacturing, intends
to apply for permission to purchase
the following described lands: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-east corner of lot 34, Range 5,
Coast District, thence south 20
chains, thence east 40 chains, thence
north 25 chains more or less to the
shore line, thence following along
the shore line to the point of commencement and containing 90 acres,
more or less.
The  Canadian  Fish  &  Cold
Storage? Company Limited.
J. H. Plllsbury, Agent.
Dated July 14, 1910. Jyl9
Skeena Land District—District of
C^ A. RR1 AT
TAKE .'NOTICE (that William
Simpson, of Lindsay, Ont, occupation hoteWceeper, Intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following' described lands in the vicinity of ihe Kitwancool or Chean Wein
Valley:—Commencing at a post
planted at the south-east corner and
about ,7% miles distant in a north
westerly direction from the north
end of Kitwancool Laibe, thence
north 8(6 chains, thence west 80
chains, thence south to chains,
thence eaet 80 chains itao point of
commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or lens.
WILLIAM SIMPFON.
Jamei VV. Smith., Agent.
Dated May 31, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that George Tutt,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupatiou den-
ist, intends to apply for permission
o purchase the following described
iinds in the vicinity of the Kitwancool or Chean Weln Valley:—Commencing at a pout, planted at the
north-east corner and about 8%
miles distant in a north-westerly direction from the north end of Kitwancool Lake, thence south 40
chains, thence west 40 chains, thence
north 40 chains, thence east 40
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 640 acres, more or
less. GEORGE TUTT.
James VV. Smith, Agent.
Dated June  1,  1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Lome Thompson, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
dentist, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands In the vicinity of the
Kitwancool or Chean Weln Valley:
Commencing at a post planted at the
south-west corner and about 8%
miles distant in a north-westerly direction from the north end of Kltwancool Lake, thence north 80
chains, thence east 40 chains, thence
south 80' chains, thenee west 40
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 320 acres, more or
less. LORNE THOMPSON.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 1,  1910. Jy8
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
EDWARD CASPELL.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 3, 19Ml. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
C\q GRl fll*
TAKE NOTICE that Charles Gei-
•ger, of Victoria, b. TJ., occupation
clerk, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kit-
wstncool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Comemncing at a post planted at the
S. E. corner and about 19 miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north SO chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence south 80
chain*, thence east 80 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing C40 acres, more or less.
CHARLES GIEGER.
James W.  Smith, Agent.
Dated i ine 4th, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Samuel John
fflcDlarmld, of Monarch, Alberta, occupation farmer, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following described lands in the Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—Commencing at a post planted at the N.
E. corner and about 4% miles In a
north-westerly direction from the
north end of Kitwancool Lake,
thence south 80 chains, thence west
80 chains, thence north 80 chains,
thence east 80 chains to point of
commencement, and containing 640
a«res, more or less.
SAMUEL JOHN McDIARMID.
James VV. Smith, Agent.
Dated May 31st, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
C^7\ R Rl t\. V
TAKE NOTICE that George Williams, of Winnipeg, Man., occupation
clerk, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands In the vicinity of Kitwancool
or Chean Wein Valley:—Commencing at a post planted at the S. W.
corner and about 16% miles distant
in a north-westerly direction from
the north end of Kltwancool Lake,
thence north 40 chains, thance
east 40 chains, thence south 40
chains, thence west 40 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 160 acres, more or less.
GEORGE WILLIAMS.
James W.  Smith, Agent
Dated June 4, 191A. J.yg
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassia..
TAKE NOTICE that Thomas Sills,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation machinist, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. W. corner and about 26% miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence south SO chains, thence
east 80 chains, thence north 80
chains, thence west 80 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
THOMAS SILLS.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 8th, 1910. JyS
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that John Reid,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
broker, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley.—
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. VV. corner and about 16% miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancood
Lake, thence north 40 chains, thence
east 40 -chains, thence south 40
chains, thence west 40 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing  160  acres,  more  or  less.
JOHN REID.
James VV. Smith, Agent
Dated  June 3,  1910. jy8
I   Skeena Land DiiiTlct—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that William Wallace,  of Toronto,   Ont.,    occupation
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE   NOTICE   that   Sarah   Cox,
of Monarch, Alberta, occupation married woman, intends to apply for per- Insurance agent, Intends to apply for    ,p;s
mission to purchase   the    following 5?j*.m,ffsl°n_t0, PPJ"0.^86.1^. following |*a"
described lands In the Kitwancool or
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Grace Cess-
ford, of Victoria, B. C, occupation
married woman, intends to apply for
permission to purchase tbe following
described   lands   in   the   vicinity   of
Kitwancool or Chean Weln Valley:	
Commencing at a post planted at tbe
N. E. corner and about 23 miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence south 80 chains, (hence
west 80 chains, thence north 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to tire
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
GRACE CESSFORD.
James W. Smith. Agent.
Dated June 6th, 1910. Jyj
Skeena Land District   -District of
Cassinr.
TAKE NOTICE  that  Henry  Hemming,  of Victoria,  B.  C,  occupation
hotel   keeper,   Intends  to  ennly  for
rmlsslon to purchase the following
Chean Wien Valley:—Commencing at
a post planted at the N. VV. corner
and about 4% miles distant In a
north-westerly direction from the
north end of Kilwancool Lake, thence
south 80 chains, thence east 80
chains, thence north 80 chains,
thence  west  80  chains  to  point  of|''lial"
commencement, and containing 640 J.'?'nt   of  commencement,  containing
described lands in the vicinity of Kit-
no]   or Chean   Wein   Valley:—
dlscribed lands in tbe trial lit,,- of Kit-1Commencing at a post planted nt the
wancool   or  Chean   VV'.;m   Valley: r"'' ''"  corner and aboul 21  miles dis-
Comencfng at a post planted at the ''""• in « north-westerly directloi
X. E. corner and about 26% miles \lrom ,ll(' north c-ncl of Kitwancool
distant In a north-westerly dlroeron Lake' 'hence south 80 chains, thenco
from the north cud of kitwancool ! w,''sl Sl) chains, thence north 80
Lake, thence south su chains, thence cnfllns, thence cist so chains to the
west so chains, thence north 80 no,nt of commencement, and contain-
thenoe cast so chains to the lng ''''" tt0re8i m'"'c or less.
acres, more or less.
SARAH COX.
James W. Smith, Agent
Dated May 31st, 1910.
Coast Land District—District of
Skeena.
TAKE NOTICE that I, George A.
Poole, of Prince Rupert, occupation
printer, intend to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted on the north-east shore
line of Smith Island, distant about
one mile south-east from Lot 38, and
marked "G. A. P.'s North-west Corner Post," thence 20 chains south,
thence SO chains cast, thence north
to shore line, thence following shore
line to point of commencement, containing 1(10 acres, more or less.
GEORGE ARTHUR   POOLE.
Dated Saturday, July 2, 1910.
(First Insertion July 5.)
HENRY  HEMMING,
James VV. Smith, Agent
Dated June 6th, 1910. Jy8
-District of
6 40 acres, more or loss
WILLIAM  WALLACE.
James w. Smith, Agent,
lulled   June   sth,   1 :■ 1 n. jy8
Sk e e iTa~La ihT Dis triet—DTs U'TctTo f ~"
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Annie Gowan,
or Victoria, B. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of Klt-
wancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
f'oniniencng at a post planted at the
X. VV. corner and about 23 miles distant   In   a   north-westerly     direction ' Kilwancool
from the north end of Kltwancool j chains, thence west 40 chains r,,,,
Lake; thence south 80 chains, thence north 40 chains, thence west 4n
east 80 chains, thence north Sdlchains, thence north 40 ohainV
chains, thence west SO chains to the  thence  east   80   chains   to   point   of
commencement, and containing 480
Skeena Land  District-
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Nelson
Gowen, of Victoria, B. C, occupation mining engineer, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands in the vicinity of Kltwancool or Chean Weln
Valley:—Commencing at a post
plained at the N, E. corner and about
19 miles distant In the north-westerly direction from the north end of
Lake    thence   south   80
point  of commencement,   and
tainlng 640 acres, more or less.
AXXIE GOWAN.
.lames VV. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 7th, 1910. Jy8
'-   1
acres, more or less.
NELSON   GOWEN.
Jjnios VV. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 4th,  1910. Jyg PRINCE RL-PEI'.T JOURNAL
Tuesday, August 2, 1910.
prince Hupctt journalBire lo ralBe at the nexl imi)erial con-
ference, and it lias therefore nol been
NOISE PROOF ROOM
Published twice a week on Tuesdays
and Fridays from the office of publication, Thii-d Avenue near McBride St.
Subscription rate to any point in
Canada, $2.00 a vein-: to points outside
of Canada, 83.00 a year.
Advertising rate furnished on application.
O. H. NELcsON,
Editor..
Tuesday, August 2, 1910.
KITTING RECEPTION
The citizens of Prince Rupert In
common with those of other cities in
British Columbia, have shown commendable spirit in the way they have
united to tender Sir Wilfrid Laurler
a reception. The visit of a Premier
of the Dominion to the parts of the
country most distant from the capital
must Of necessity be very infrequent.
It is, therefore, fitting that when
these visits are made there should
be wiped, as far as possible, all party
feeling. The public men of the country represent the supporters of the
Opposition just as much as the supporters of the party in power. The
reception here will not be marred
iy any party feeling.
 o	
TO  PROTECT PUR  DEALERS
The Secret Has Been Solved In Dutch
Town  of  Utrecht
possible  so  far  io  settle   the    programme of agenda.    On    February
li,   1909,  the secretary  of state  invited the governments of the Domin-      Utrecht  is a  quiet enough  Dutch I
ions  to take  into  consideration  the country  town,   where  the  plaint  of I
^tffltffltffltffltffltfflifflaMtffltffl.^
,.'..;..;..;. .j,,;..;.,;. # .;,,;, ,j, ►;, „;,,;.,;, ,5, ,j, ,5, ,*, ,j. .j, ,j,,;, ,5, ,3,,;. ,5, .j, ^ ...,., „,, j. <
*
Move is Made to Save the Trade for
British   Columbia
To induce the British Columbia
government to levy a prohibitive export tax on fur securing in this province is the object of an agitation inspired by a number of the western
Canadian dealers. They have been
led to make this proposal because of
the exceptional conditions disclosed
during the past few months. It appears that the American wholesalers
of Seattle, Tacoma and other Washington State centres hav& practically
secured all the raw fur trapped during the winter of 1909-10. This has
placed the traders of Vancouver,
Victoria and other provincial citieu
in the position of having to attenl
She auction sales of the American
cities in order to replenish their
stocks. "It is absurd," exclaimed
a Victoria merchant, in discussing the
situation, "it isn't long ago that this
business, aggregated hundreds of
thousands of dollars every year, most
of which passed through Victoria.
Now it has dwindled to nothing and
we are in the position of having to
80 to a foreign port to re-purchase
furs obtained in our own country.
The time has arrived for drastic governmental action."
A party of Canadian fur dealers,
from Vancouver and Victoria, have
Just returned from a big auction sale
conducted by the West Coast Grocer
Company, of Tacoma, says the Colonist. The amount of fur which changed hands on this occasion, it is believed, would reach the $20,000
mark. There were a few silver fox,
«ne of which was a splendid specimen. It sold for $500. Some white
!ox also brought excellent prices. The
skins most in demand were mink,
lynx, marten and fox. The average
price obtained for mink was $7; f 0 ■
Symx, $30; for marten, $10; and for
fox, $9. Besides there were quantities of bear, muskrat, otter and
beaver.
A noteworthy fact in connef tion
with this year's supply of" fur from
the North American wilderness is
lhat the mink, the previous season
not over plentiful, is much in evidence. Comparatively speaking, this
3kth, the traders have found, Is
plentiful. In all the sales which have
been held in tbe north Pacific since
the trappers have arrived and placed
their takings on the market, the
mink has been found in goodly quantities, The lynx, last year not par-
tlcMiVarly scarce, is found wanting.
Tiie same may he said of ermine.
Usually a large number of these
ikins are brought into the Atlin and
xljoining northern British Columbia
lamps in the early spring. .Neither
trappers nor Indians appeared with
jnore than a handful at Atlin when
the snow began to disappear, and the
rame lias been reported from other
joints.
 0	
COLONIA I. CONFERENCE
question of the business which might
usefully be discussed at the next conference, with a view to the suggestion of any subjects which in their
opinion should in the interests of the
Empire at large engage its.attention.
The only answers received were from
three of the South African governments, indicating that the question
of proposing any subjects for discussion must be left to the Union Government about to be established.
"On March 9, 1910, the attention
of the other governments was again
drawn to the question by telegraph
So far as his Majesty's government
is concerned, correspondence has
been proceeding with the various departments as to subjects suitable to
be proposed for discussion."
Referring to the approaching imperial conference, the right hon, gentleman later In committee of supply
detailed the steps which had been
taken to establish an Imperial secretariat, and stated that all that was
decided upon at the last Colonial
conference had been carried out.
Sir Clement Kinloch-Cook (C,
Devonport) asked whether the conference of 1907 was to be described
as a Colonial or as an Imperial Conference. The reason he asked was, in
a paper recently published by the
Colonial Office, it was described as
a Colonial Conference, but the righ*
hon. gentleman spoke of it as an Imperial Conference, he should like
to know which was correct.
Colonel Seely: It doesn't matter
what word we use so long as everybody knows what we mean and it
gives offence to no one.
Sir Charles Dilke (L, Forest of
Dean) objected to the view that the
Imperial Secreariat of the Colonial
conference should be run on the lines
of water-tight compartments, believing that the association of the Imperial idea with the white races only
would ultimately be a destructive one
for an Empire rested on countless
millions of colored people.
Mr. A. Lyttelton (C, St. George's,
Hanover-square) with reference to
Colonial conference urged the necessity of a full and detailed agenda
being prepared beforehand.
 o	
INTERESTING ANNIVERSARY
Church  of  England  Will   Celebrate
Beginning of Work in Canada
Scope of Next Gathering In  London
Has Not Yet Been Decided Upon
Colonel Seeley, under secretary for
the Colonies, in reply to a question
to the Imperial House of Commons,
jaid that the date of the next Colonial
Conference had not yet been fixed,
and would not be decided upon until
the date of the Coronation had been
Bttled.
In a further reply to Mr. Macklnd-
ir (C, Glasgow, Camlaehle), Colonel
feefy said:
The Church of England will in September next celebrate the two hundredth anniversary of the beginning
of Its ministry in Canada. In 1710
there were no Anglicans in the regions now comprising Ontario and
Quebec. But Acadia was ceded to
Great Britain in that year. The British had taken possassion more than
once before but had given the country back to France. The cession of
1710 was final so far as Nova Scotia
proper was concerned, and that year
regular services of the Church of
England began at Port Royal, now
Annapolis.
Roman Catholic worship had been
conducted at Port Royal for a century before that time. Thus it happens that two memorial festivals will
take place in Eastern Canada almost
simultaneously, one celebrating the
completion of the second century of
Anglican worship and one the completion of the third century since the
first Catholic baptism.
More than seventy years passed
after the beginning of Protestant
worship before the first diocese in
what is now Canada was established
and the first bishop consecrated. This
was after the American revolution,
and was one of the results of that
separation. The first bishop, nearly
all his clergy and the great part ot
their congregations were Loyalists
The diocese of Nova Scotia is the
oldest colonial diocese in the British
Empire. The whole of British Amer-
ice, as far west as Lake Superior,
appears to have been under the jurisdiction of Bilisop Inglis. A part of
the bicentennial celebration will be
the opening of the new All Saints'
Cathedral at Halifax. The diocese or
Nova Scotia is the mother of several
others which have stately cathedrals.
But there has been none in Halifax
until now.
 0	
A young woman of a Western town
desired to show some kindness to a
young officer of the militia to whom
she had taken a fancy. She therefore despatched this note: "Mrs.
Smythe requests the pleasure of Capt.
White's company at a reception on
Friday evening. A prompt reply
came which read: "With the exception of three men who are sick, Capt.
White's  company  accept  your  kind
"The Governments of the self-gov-j invitation and will come with pleas-
truing   Dominions   have   not   as   yet
indicated the subjects which they de-
ure  to  your  reception   Friday
ning."
the anti-noise leagues is never heard.
This situation, curiously enough, does
not prevent Utrecht from possessing
the only absolutely noiseproof room
in the world.
Heretofore it was Prof. Wilhelm
Wundt, of the Vsychological Laboratory of Leipzig who had come nearest
to the scientific elimination of all
sound from an enclosed space, but
Prof. Zwaardemaker, of Utrecht University, has gone one step further,
and he has communicated details of
his achievement to the Amsterdam
Royal Academy of Science.
For an absolutely noiseproof room
it is essential not only that no sound
shall penetrate It from without, but
also that it shall resist sound. propagation, reflection and refraotlou
within. The first problem is comparatively easy to solve.
The walls of Prof. Zwaardemaker's
room consists of six layers, alternately of wood, cork and sand. There
are two spaces, one between the second and the third layer, and one
between the fourth and the fifth,
from which the air has been extracted. The inner walls are of porous
stone covered with a kind of horsehair cloth, known as trichopiese, a
Belgian invention, which is sound resisting and is widely used in Belgium
in telephone booths. The walls are
pieroed by acoustically Isolated leadr
ed rods. ' <
The roof is composed of layers oi
lead, wood, asphalt paper, seagrasa
and^cork. The floor is of marble apd,
is covered with a thickly wover
Smyrna carpet.
A tomblike silence forever reigns
In this elaborate construction, and
it will be used for clinical studies
only.
 SL_0	
•>•:■•:.>:<•:.•:.•:..:.•:..:..:":•.>.:..:..:..:..:..:..:..:..:..:..:..:..:.
►j. •&
* Japanese Exclusion       %
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.n..:..j.:..:..:..:..:.^..:.^.>:.^.^..;..;..:..:.4.v-:..:..:..:..:.
The government of Japan is today and has been for some time past,
enforcing an American exclusion act
which is more thorough than any
that the congress of the United
States would pass, and which is at
the same time free from any of the
many unpleasant possibilities, If not
probabilities, which such ' an act
would create.
It will readily be appreciated that
the Japanese people will submit*to
any regulations which their own government impose upon them, but these
same people would resent an exclusion act if passed by congress.
For some time past no new emigrants have been permitted ■■ to leave
for the United States. An Immense
amount of work has been thrust upon
the foreign office in thorough and
searching investigations as regards
each and every passport issued.
- Some of the cases of refusals which
one hears of almost daily are such
as would make interesting reading.
Students, which no Immigration law
would exclude, can only obtain a
passport when a guarantee is deposited covering the full course of study
In the United States.
The  Issuing of passports for  the
1 !   THE JOURNAL   i 1
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Is the Official Advertising
Medium for the City
of Prince Rupert
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FOLLOW THE TREND OF THE CITY'S
PROGRESS BY SUBSCRIBING
FOR THE PAPER
The Journal aims at keeping Prince Rupert
and new B.C. ever before the public eye. Send
it to your friends and any whom you wish to
interest in the coming Metropolis of the North.
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WARSHIP'S  BRIEF  LIFE
United States is now restricted to
four offices—Yokohama, Kobe, Naga-
sake, and the foreign office. Further
than this, no passports are allowed
to be finally granted at Yokohama,
Nagasaki or Kobe, without having
been presented to the foreign office
and received special sanction after
the most searching investigation.
Passports are only issued to emigrants under two conditions:—
First—Returning emigrants. (The
department divides these into two
classes—laborers and agriculturists
—but the same conditions apply.) By
these is 'meant those who emigrated
to the United States in the past and
have returned home on ti visit and
whose return to the United States
must be made within a period of six
months.
Second—Relatives of emigrants already In America, and whose support;
is satisfactorily assured the authorities before passports are issued.
Following are the official statistics
issued by the foreign office for the
six months, September 1st, 1909, to
March 1st, 1910, of Japanese emigrants to the United States and
Hawaii, and of emigrants returning
to Japan from these places. As to
the United States the figures for the
six months show as follows: Japanese
emigrants returned from the United
States, 2,503; representing 2,197
males, the rest females. Japanese
entering the United States for the
same period numbered 221, composed of (1) returning emigrants, 75,
12) relatives of emigrants already in
the United States, 146, of which 27
were males, 119 femaleB.
The brief life of a warship is illustrated by the sale of a job lot of condemned ships at Portsmouth in the
last few days says the News-Advertiser. Among the offerings were the
battleships Centurion and Barfleur.
These ships are just fourteen years
older than the Dreadnought. They
were built in 1892 and were, of
course, quite up-to-date then as flrst-
ciassbattleships. Probably they are aB
good fighting machines as they ever
were, but inventions and improvements have made them obsolete.
Junk dealers bought them for the
value of the metal in them. Yet the
Centurion was the flagship of Admiral Seymour at the time of the
Boxer rebellion. She Is only three
years older than the Majestic, which
just the other day was supposed to
represent the most powerful class of
shlpB. in: the world. The same age
as the Majestic are the armored
cruisers Powerful and Terrible,
which, remembering the Boer war,
one is shocked to think of as approaching the junk pile. On this
basis, we may expect the auction sale
of the Dreadnought in about fifteen
years. This is what makes the creation and maintenance of a navy so
terribly costly. If a Dreadnought
could be counted to be of service so
long as she could be kept as good as
new there would be some hope that
the burden would grow lighter. But
a nation spends $15,000,000 on the
latest type of warship with the prospect that in ten years, at most, she
will no longer be fit for the line of
battle, and in twenty years she will
be sold for scrap. This Is calculated
to strengthen the desire for an international compact limiting naval
construction. When the British
fought with wooden ships, vessels
thirty, forty and fifty years old were
found in the navy. One famous wooden craft served through seven ol
eight reigns and was never sold for
junk.
Canada will send a minister of the
crown to the opening of the first parliament of United South Africa In
November. The name of the cabinet
minister who will be deputed to represent Canada will not be announced
until Sir Wilfrid Laurier's return to
the capital next month.
King Alfonso has entered his second son, the Infanta Jaime as a common soldier in the lists of the 4th
Artillery Regiment. The commanding officer of this regiment, Colonel
La Sota, was received in audience,
and handed the King the uniform for
his second son, who was born on
June 23rd, 1908, and is, therefore,
two years of age, and the youngest
soldier in the world.
Of two hundred babies that died
in Ottawa last year, ninety-seven
died during August alone. The
cause of death, says the city health
officer, was chiefly owing to difficulty In preparing and keeping ordinary milk In the homes. To combat this, the city has decided to have
milk prepared In several different
strengths and puf up in bottlea, one
for each feeding. The milk will
be prepared in the most hygienic
manner.
That Canada will yet be the centre
of the world's steel industry is the
opinion expressed by Mr. A. R. Whtt-
tall, of London, Eng., a prominent
iron and steel manufacturer, who is
now on the coast for the purpose of
investigating the iron and fuel resources of British Columbia. Mr.
Whittall has stayed at different points
in the eastern provinces on his journey through, and says that so far
as he can learn the country is underlaid with fuel and ore, and with
Canada's splendid transportation facilities he sees no reason why this
country should not in the future
easily surpass the United States In
the production of iron and steel.
*.>.:..>.:.*:. *.;. .> ,♦,,;, ,5,,;,,;.,;. ,j, ,j,......,.,,♦. ,5, ,*, ,j, „*, ,j,
* e
I      Paris Fashion Notes      %
*******+#+t*****cJl+<Mj.#<.+<,<,^,
The effect of English court mourning is apparent in the prevalence of
black costumes this summer in Paris,
and the craze for black and white
combinations. They may be said to
be almost the keynote of this summer's dressing.
At all the dressmaking houses, at
tins 5 o'clock -teas, at the promenade
In the Bols, and wherever fashionables gather, the black, and white
gown, or the white gown worn with
black hat, indicate how far the Parisian fashionable world endeavors, in
its own way, which, of course, can
only be the way of the world of pleasure^—to Indicate its sense of the loss
of its friend, King Edward, the best
friend of the French the English nation has produced In centuries..
—0—
Extremely chic is the soft black
twilled satin coat anjl skirt, with a
fine  white  plaited  chemisette     and
wide jabot, a big black hat trimmed
with a twist of white valvet, ending
with two tassels on the brim. Or,
again, a black and white striped muslin over a plain white silk skirt, with
a white capeline and slack taffeta
ribbon loops covering the crown.
A combination worn by a beautiful
English woman In one of the famous
cafes consisted of white embroidered
dress with a thin overdress of plain
black voile nlnon. With this was
worn a black hat and white scarf and
muff.
Speaking of all-white gowns it is
not a fact that a more or less expensive gown can be produced in black
or white than in colors. Black and
white require costlier material than
colors and far richer material to be
successfully worn. Wherein the economy lies; which we all feel can be
found in the two extremes, is that
the black gown or the white gown
never labels itself as the same gown
as do gowns of colors, and can be
remade to look like new. Also there
are few occasions on which black and
w"hite—either one or the other—cannot be worn.
—0—
Not for many years has there been
such interest displayed  in lace  and
nets of all descriptions.
The pattern robes of lace are in
great variety and of many different
prices, while never were there such
exquisite Imitations at comparatively
small cost. As may readily be credited, there are most elaborate lace
gowns, but some are charmingly simple.
The model that can be fashioned
of one wide or two medium-width
flounces Is invariably becoming. The
fullness, only a small amount, is
gathered into the belt. The waist is
like a belted jacket, but If preferred
there need not be the skirts to th
jacket—just the waist, with its draped fichu crossed and fashioned at the
left side, with bow of silk or satin
or spray of artificial flowers.
A wide folded girdle of taffeta
comes high on the waist under the
flshu and it drawn tight around the
figure, making it slender. A band of
silk or satin to match the belt finishes the skirt at»the foot and makes
the lace hang over better. This
model can be copied in black or
white lace or net and be made over a
colored  lining.
First Darling—I hope you never
nag your husband. Second Darling
—Only when he's beating the rugs.
When thoroughly irritated he
makes a much better Job. WBL-~»*«i
M ;..,'■.
■J»r-
Tuesday, August 2, 1910.
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
-THE—
Oliver
Typewriter
—FOR—
Seventeen Cents a Day
Please read the headline over
again. Then its tremendous significance will dawn upon you.
An Oliver Typewriter—the standard visible writer—the most highly
perfected typewriter on the market
—yours for 17 cents a day!
The typewriter whose conquest of
the commercial world is a matter of
business history—yours for 17 cents
a day!
The typewriter that is equipped
with scores of such conveniences as
"The Balance Shift"—"The Ruling
Device"—"The Double Release"—
"The Locomotive Base"—"The Automatic Spacer"—"The Automatic Tabulator"—"The Disappearing Indicator"—"The Adjustable Paper Fingers"—"The Scientific Condensed
Keyboard"—all
Yours For 17 Cents a Day
We announced this new sales plan
recently, just to feel the pnlse of the
people. Simply a small cash payment—then 17 centB a day. That
is the plan In a nutshell.
The result has been such a deluge of applications for machines
that we are simply astounded.
The demand comes from people of
all classes, all ages, all occupations.
The majority of Inquiries has
come from people of known financial
standing who were attracted by the
novelty of the proposition. An impressive demonstration of the immense popularity of the Oliver Typewriter.
A startling confirmation of our belief that the Era of Universal Typewriting is at hand.
A Quarter of a Million People are
Making Money With
The "home-coming" reception of
Jack Johnson, following his defeat
of James J. Jeffries at Reno, was responsible for the filing or u suit for
$48.80 in the municipal court of
Chicago against Robert Motts by
Benjamin Chule.
According to Attorney W. S. New-
berger, Motts Immediately following
Johnson's victory engaged Chule to
decorate Johnson's residence in preparation of the pugilist's home-coming reception. The attorney said that
120 colored horns, flags and flowers
were used to decorate the interior of
the Johnson home.
When the reception was over,
Cuhle went to Motts and asked the
latter to settle for the work. Cuhle,
Attorney Newberger asserts, was
told that Johnson would foot the bill.
The lawyer declares that when Cuhle
later asked Johnson to pay for the
decorations the colored prize fighter
refused, declaring that he was not
going to pay for his own reception.
NEW BILLIARD LEAGUE
Johnny Kling, catcher of the Chicago Cubs, has perfected the organization of the National Amateur
Three Cushion League, which will
take its place In the billiard world
next November. The new league's
circuit will Include eight cities—Kansas City, Chicago, St. Louis and Pittsburg in the west, and New York,
Brooklyn, Boston and Philadelphia
in the east. Kling has been working
for such an association ever since
he joined the Chicago club this
spring. While in the east on the
Cubs' last trip he rounded up the
fohr cities from this section of the
country, then succeeded in interesting Pittsburg. Last week he secured
the promise of St. Louis bllliardlsts
to go into the organization. A meeting will be held at the close of the
baseball season, when officers will
be elected. Kling already has made
out a schedule which probably will be
followed. The season will open the
first day of November and colse on
April 16. Four teams will be engaged in the opening series, Kansas
City playing at Pittsburg and Boston
at New York.
clip he breasted the cord at the finish five yards ahead of the university man, in the remarkable time of 4
i.iinutes 45 seconds.
It was a thrilling race. The crowd
yelled itself hoarse as Sweeney took
tbe lead and cheered him as he passed the grand stand on his way to
the dressing-room. The result settles the doubt as to which of these
inilers is the best. Several times
sporting men have tried to match
them but have failed. Sweeney is
now the undisputed champion miler
of British Columbia and it will take
a speedy man to take the title away
from him.
BURNS IN LACROSSE
Tommy Burns, the world's heavyweight prize fighter champion a few
years ago^has been in Vancouver and
took a hand in his old game of lacrosse. Years ago Burns was a member of the Hanover lacrosse team;.'in
Ontario. He graduated from that
field into the boxing arena. After
being signed on the team in Vanjjou-
ver in order that the organization
might have the honor of his name
on the roll of its players, Burns .put
in a hour's hard work on the field.
Burns has what looks like a good
money-making scheme in view—a
scheme engendered by his previous
lacrosse experience in the east and
on the Seattle team of seven years
ago. He is quietly planning to take
a team of Canadian Indians on a tour
of Australia, playing all tbe Australian and New Zealand teamB. Lacrosse is becoming very popularthere
and with such a novelty, together
with his own personality as a draw
Ing card, he is confident the venture
would be a financial success.
But before he undertakes th's lacrosse venture, Tommy intends mak-1
nig a hard try for a return match'
with Jack Johnson.    He Is really Inj Jgjs* champion   of  the  Japanese  ten
earnest about this matter and was*
quite disappointed when he heard
that Johnson had announced th4.
other day that he would not fight
again for a year at least.
"Johnson went back on his promise to me when he said that," said
Tommy, "for just after he defeated
Jeffries at Reno, he promised me
that he would give me a return match
within six months."
Tommy is as fond of lacrosse as
ever.
Trje.
OLIVER
T^peWri-ter
The Standard Visible Writer
The Oliver Typewriter is a moneymaker, right from the word "go!" So
easy to run that beginners soon get
in the "expert" class. Earn as you
learn. Let the machine pay the 17
cents a day—and all above that Is
yours.
Wherever you are, there's work to
be done and money to be made by
using the Oliver. The business world
is calling for Oliver operators. There
are not enough to supply the demand.
Their salaries are considerably above
those of many classes of workers.
"An Oliver Typewriter in
Every Home!"
That is our battle cry today. We
have made the Oliver supreme in
usefulness and absolutely Indispensable in business. Now comes the
conquest of the home.
The simplicity and strength of the
Oliver fit it for family use. It is becoming an important factor in the
home training of young people. An
educator as well as a money maker.
Our new selling plan puts the
Oliver on the threshold of every
home In America. Will you close
the door of your home or office on
this remarkable Oliver opportunity?
Write for further details of our
easy offer and a free copy of the new
Oliver catalogue.    Address:
R. C. BEAN
Prince Rupert Agent
General   Offices:   Oliver   Typewriter
Building, Chicago, 111.
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE
NOTICE is hereby given that the
reserve existing on Crown lands in
the vicinity of Babine Lake, and
situate in Cassiar District, notice of
which bearing date June 30th, 1909,
was published in the British Columbia Gazette, dated July 2nd, 1908, Is
cancelled.
ROBERT A. RENWICK,
Deputy Commissioner-of Lands.
Lands Department,
Victoria, B. C, June 16th, 1910.
(First Insertion July 5.)
PROVINCIAL CHAMPION
John Sweeney, of Victoria, holder
of the provincial championship for
one mile, was successful recently In
defeating Andy Davidson, the speedy
miler from the University of California, over the distance at which both
have won fame.
Sweeney led for the first lap, but
then dropped back to the rear and
Davidson set the pace, whlflch was
very fast. The final lap was the ex-.
citing one. About 440 yards from
the finish Davidson opened out and
tried hard to outdistance Sweeney,
but his efforts were fruitless, Sweeney
sticking right behind. Running at a
terrific pace the Victoria boy passed
Davidson about 220 yards from the
tape,  and  by  keeping  up  this  fast
Hear
•vJ,!C
Truth
There's nothing about a set of
harness that requires such careful
attention, in both leather and workmanship, as traces and collars, there's
where the strain lies, there's where
we excel, though we are just as
watchful as to every other detail of
a complete set of harness, be It for
heavy or light work.
6. C. Saddlery Company
Limited
MANUFACTURERS OF  SADDLERY
Jobbers of Leather, Harness, Saddles, Whips, Trunks and Valises,
Pads, Blankets, Rugs; Harness Soaps
and Dressings.
5110 YATES STREET
VICTORIA, B.C.
INDIAN WRESTLER
Alhambra tournament. I also offered to stake £100 that Gama would
throw the last mentioned four times
in one hour.
"All my efforts, however, have not
resulted in even a single reply. I
must confess I am disgusted. Now,
I am going to play my last card.
Here I am in your office, by the advice of a member of the John Bull
League. I've got nothing but praise
for the Sporting Life. They've done
all they can do to help both my men
and myself. The cash I deposited
with them will still remain there.
That will app-al to the purely sporting public. I now come to John Bull
to appeal to the masses.
"jp deposit with you the sum of
£10^ and throw out the following
challenges:
"4f Ijot accepted, the public will,
I hope, draw their own conclusions,
and the next time the self-styled
champions appear will give them a
reception not to their liking.
In case any one of the challenges
is icegpted, John Bull to arrange all
detail* as regards  time,  place,  etc.
Gainja is prepared to meet Zybsco
in/London''and throw him three times
in> one"'hour for £100 to £200 a side.
Gama to Gotch—Match £250 a
side.   Match to take place in London.
Gama will wrestle any man In the
world from £100 to £500 a side.
Match to take place in London.
Gama Is prepared to throw every
one of the thirty Japanese wrestlers
now showing at the exhibition in one
hour—actual wrestling time.
Gama will guarantee to carry out
the contract, the only stipulation being that the men stand five yards
apart, and as1 soon as the signal is
given to start they approach one another and begin wrestling. Ten minutes' rest to be allowed after Gama
throws'the first fifteen; £100 a side,
ama  is  also  prepared  to  throw
Personals
Mrs. C. V. Bennett entertained at
ner home on Fifth avenue, Friday
last.
* *     *
Mrs. J. H. Rogers, accompanied by
her two daughters and a son, arrived
in the city last evening on the Princess May. They will spend a few
weeks in the city, visiting with
friends and relations.
* *    *
R. C. Bean, who has been connected with the office of Foley, Welch &
Stewart for some time, has resigned
his position. His health Is such that
he has been obliged to give up his
place.
* *    *
Mr. T. A. Brough, the principal of
the East End high school of Vancouver, was In the city for a few days,
the guest of W. E. Williams, city
solicitor. He returned to Vancouver
on the Princess Beatrice Monday
morning.
* *    *
J. M. Rosevear, auditor of the G.
T. P. and other related companies, is
in the district on duties connected
with his office. He is visiting the
various points that are served out of
this port and also Inspected the local
offices.
* *    »
Collingwood Schrelber, representing the Dominion government, is
making one of his regular inspections
of the G. T. P. construction. He
reached here on Sunday by the Prince
George with his secretary, S. R.
Loftus. He proceeded to work at
once on Monday, going over the line
of track laid.
PAID SHORT VISIT
John Bull, a well known London
sporting paper, says:—
Three months ago there arrived in
this country from India four British
subjects named Gama, Imam Bux,
Ahmud Buksh and Gamu. They are
the champion Indian wrestlers.
The reason they are here is best
told by R. Benjamin, their business
manager;        • •  -
"I know something about wrestling, and when I saw the four men
I have here in London wrestle In India, I knew at once I had In one of
them the champion of the world.
"The next thing was how to get
them to London. Money alone Would
not do it, for these men are all of
high caste. Moreover, they are favor
ites of well-known Rajahs, who delight In the sport of wrestling, and
constantly pit their men one against
another.
"Having set my mind upon bringing them to London, however,-1 first
of all approached different Rajahs.
"I can't say they were particularly
struck with the idea, but when I. put
it to them that iii the interest of
sport it would be Instructive to gee
how their countrymen fared when
pitted against white men who called
themselves champions of the world,
they began to consider the question.
At last everything was satisfactorily
arranged, and we sailed.
"On the voyage I had considerable
trouble with my men because they
are not good sailors. However, I
managed to land them in fairly good
condition.
"Then I sent them Into the country to train, while I ran up to London to get, If possible, a match.
"With W. H. Wieland I called at
he office of the Sporting Life and
made a deposit of £25 towards a
match between Gama and any so-called champion. No notice whatever
being taken of this challenge, I called
at the office of the Sporting Life
again on June 2nd. This time I deposited £100, with a challenge to
Gotch on behalf of Gama for £250 a
side. This challenge duly appeared In
the Sporting Life on June 3rd. Again
no notice was taken, and my men are
beginning to form a very bad idea of
our so-called sport. I dare not tell
them what I know. That would be
humiliating to my race. These men
play fair. At the moment, no money
would buy them. Of course, they may
adopt western methods some day, and
when they do, It may be bad for us.
"Next, the Sporting Life very kindly published a letter from me challenging Hackenschmldt, Mahmout
and  Cherplllod,  the  winner  of  the
times in thirty minutes for £100 a
Han.
, We gladly come to the aid of our
India subjects. For some time past
there have been suspicions that most
of these wrestling matches have been
simply a question of £ s d; and that
there has been no sport in-them, the
winner having been decided upon before entering the. ring. Of these
things we personally know nothing
hut we are told that these Indian
wrestlers could have had scores of
matches and made a pile of money
had they only fallen into line and
wrestled to order. This they refused
to do. Their reply has always been,
"We have to go back to India.' They
wish to return victors. The matter should be cleared up.
If the stake is not big enough foi
the "champion" white wrestlers to
compete for, we have no doubt a
larger sum could be put up. In any
case, our services are at the disposal
of both sides. So let them come to
business.
After this challenge, something
must be done.
Hon. Frank Oliver Arrived in Port on
the Steamer Princess
Royal.
ARMY OFFICER SHOT
Capt. Elliston of Work Point Barracks
Killed by Private in the
Force.
Well Known Member of Permanent
Staff at  Victoria  Comes  to
Tragic End
After Arduous Cross Country Trip to
Dawson He is Returning to His
Duties at Ottawa
GRAHAM ISLAND RAILWAY
Local Government Sent Engineer to
Enquire   Into   Proposals
C. L. McCammon, a well known
engineer, has returned to Victoria
from an extended tour through Graham Island of the Queen Charlotte
group, upon which he left some
weeks ago under special instructions
from the Provincial Government, for
the purpose of reporting upon certain proposals that have been advanced relative to comprehensive
railway construction In that part of
the province.
No public announcement as to the
contents of Mr. McCammon's report
has been made.
A good deal of speculation has
been rife as to the interests that are
back of the projected railway from
Queen Charlotte City to Masset. Recent visitors to the Islands say It Is
commonly believed there (hat the C.
P.  R. is back  of  the project.
 o	
Aeroplane   Aclcdent
Hon. Frank Oliver, minister of the
interior in the Ottawa government,
paid a short visit to Prince Rupert
on Saturday, coming In unexpectedly
by the steamer Princess Royal, and
after a brief stay here passing on
south. In the cabinet of Sir Wilfrid
Laurier there is no less unassuming
member than Hon. Mr. Oliver. He is
essentially a working member with
no place in his make-up for anything
that savors of "side." He is a
diamond in the rough.
After a trip, which has before
been described In these columns, taking him within the Arctic circle north
from Edmonton, and then across to
Dawson, the minister looked exceedingly well on arrival here. He was
pleased with the trip and the opportunity it gave him to study the im:
mense country with which his department has so much to do.
In Prince Rupert he paid a hurried
visit about the place, being well satisfied with the conditions as they presented themselves. Mr. Oliver is of
the west and knows all about new
townsites so that there was not the
novelty attaching to Prince Rupert
for him that there is for some others
of those who come here.
 o	
(Special to The Journal)
Victoria, Aug. 2.—Capt. P. Ellis-
ton, R.C.A., was fatally shot at Work
Point Barracks yesterday morning by
one of the members of the force.
Capt. Elliston was formerly identified with the artillery corps of the
Imperial army stationed at Work
Point Barracks. Before the regiment
left for England on the taking over
of the station by the Canadian government a few years ago, an opopr-
tunity was given to the officers and
men who wished to transfer to the
Canadian service to do so. Capt. Elliston was one of the first to avail
himself of the opportunity. He was
in command of the artillery branch
of the service at Work Point and
adjutant for the district under the
D.O.C., Col. Peters.
Capt. Eliston was very deeply interested In fruit growing and gave all
his spart time to the work. He invested about $2n,000 in orchards
close to Victoria and was very successful in this line of work, being
recognized as one of the authorities
on fruit growing In the province. He
intended eventually to retire from the
service and make his home on the
fruit farm he possessed and which
was planted by him just outside the
city limits.
Two years ago Mrs. Elliston, whose
family belonged to Halifax, died.
The officer was quite popular outside of military circles, especially
among the fruit farmers of the province. He took a deep interest in target shooting and was a good shot
himself. He was a man who was
very unassuming in manner, carrying this lack of ostentation to th6
point of being sometimes criticized aa
being unmilitary in his manner.
The funeral of Capt. Elliston will
be a military one. The Fifth Regiment, R.C.G.A., of Victoria, will attend in a body.
SKATING  CARNIVAL
First   Masquernde    Was
Success
a   Decided
The city council sitting last night
transacted considerable routine busl
ness,    advancing    bylaws    different I ana   tne   -jockey   girl"   and
The first masquerade carnival held
by the roller rink on Saturday evening was a grand success. There
was a large attendance and thirty
or forty patronizers of the rink came
in varied masked costume. Some of
the costumes were very unique and
were well received by the crowd of
spectators, who took as much delight
in the performance as the skaters
themselves. The management of the
rink decided to give three prizes for
the costumes; one for the best original make-up, one for the burlesque,
and one for the best comic. Mrs.
Humble, who was dressed as the
"Empire" girl, took the prize for the
best original costume. The representation of Halley's comet by Harrison Rogers was one of the most Interesting costumes on the floor, and
was an easy winner in the burlesque
class. C. Rogers, who was dressed as
a clown, took the prize for the best
comic costume. Many other persons
deserve special mention for the manner in which they were dressed; Mrs.
Merryfield looked very charming in
a yellow dress, representing a flower;
folly"
stages.
On and after September 1  we sill
for CASH ONLY.    Watch our ad. foi
specials.    J. E. Merryfield.
*     *     *
Charles Cullin, well known In this
City, has been appointed by the provincial government to a position In
connection with the work of super
vising the expenditures on roads and
(Special to The Journal) trails In the district.    He will act In
London, Aug. 2.—Mrs. Francke, , conjunction with Superintendent Jen-
flying In an aeroplane, was severely ''.Ings. Mr. Cullin has already en
injured and a boy watching the flight j tered upon his duties, making his
was killed near Sunderland, One o|; headquarters In this city. He has
the planes fouled a flagstaff. The j Bone to Stewart this week In connec-
machlne turned turtle and fell on tlon with his work,
the boy.
were  very  well  represented  by  Miss
Lockhart and   Miss  Calkins.
The music, which was better than
the  average,  was  furnished   by  the
Indian  band.     Messrs.  Chas.   Wilson
land  H. M.  Lever acted as judges.
Local News
MIbs Rose, of Dryden, Ont, after
a pleasant   visit   in   Prince Rupert,
left    on    Saturday   evening by the
Princess Royal  for her home.
 o	
G. T. Williams will take his trial
before Judge Young on Thursday.
On Saturday afternoon he was
brought before the judge on the return of the latter from Hazelton anil
was given an opportunity to elect.
He chose a speedy trial on the
charge of arson, which Is laid against
him, and Judge Young fixed the date
of hearing for Thursday.
.C. D. NEWTON
Real Estate
Money to Loan
Notary Public
Exchange Block
Corner 3rd Avenue and 6th Street
P.O. Box 226   Tel. 226
The Majestic theatre is showing a
magnificent line of films this week,
Including the "Man From Texas,"
"Chysanthemums," and other good
ones.
* *    *
The marriage of Frederick Daniels
and Miss Katie Waddell, both of
Nelson, B.C., was celebrated on Friday, the 29th, at the Methodist parsonage, Sixth avenue, by the Rev.
Chas. R. Sing, B.D. The happy
couple expect to take tip (heir residence In Prince Rupert.
* *     ♦
At the close of his great farewell
lecture upon matrimony this evening
at the Methodist church, Prof. Mac-
donald will mate six couples phreno-
loglcally adapted. All will enjoy the
big wedding. Admission 25c. See
him now at (he Annex Hotel and get
his advice regarding sucecss. This
is the last chance. PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Tuesday, August 2, 1910.
'5*c{»^..i.^.^.^.^»^«^i*ii^'*J.^.^»4,'5"i.4"3»^.^*^^».3»»5»'{.^"t-"{.^.^.»J"5.^*'J.»I.»I.^'^.4.'J.»3^*J..I|
*
LURE OF THE WEST   1
*
months. These men are nearly al)
farmers and are from nearly every
state in the union. Very few of them
have remained in the cities at all, but
have gone Into the country, where
they are now located on farms. Besides actual cash they brought with
them stock and chattels amounting In
value to many thousands or several
millions of dollars.
Of all the European and British
immigrants arriving in western aCn-
ada during the year, over 90 per cent
have entered through Canadian ports
and the other 10 per cent cams
through the United States. The tide
of immigration, according to the officials, is changing from the United
States through Canadian ports.
*
*
*
*
+
•S"5» <5» »2"> •>♦*>♦;• *>
In the months of March, April, May
and June of this year enough Immi
grants arrived in western Canada
from Great Britain to populate four
cities equal in size to Brandon, Sas
katoon, Prince Albert and Medicine
Hat. These were British immigrants
alone and besides there there were
over ten thousand arrivals from Eu
rope In the same period and forty-six
and a half thousand Americans.
Figures have been compiled up to
date by Mr. J. Bruce Walker, com'
missioner of immigration, which
shows in striking manner the enormous growth in population of the
west since the year ending March 31
1910. Since that date 208,794 lm
migrants have arrived in western
Canada. This number Is made up ol
59,790 from the rBitish Isles, 45,206
who came from the various countries
of Europe and 103,798 arrivals from
the United States, the latter being
nearly all wealthy farmers.
At the lowest estimate, each one oi
these immigrants averaged in actual
cash $1,000, and some carried with
them sums ranging from $25,000 to
$50,000. Between the first day oi
March of this year and the first day
of the present month, there detrained
at Winnipeg no less than !-.,«»,i
souls. Of that number 35,000 were
British, 10,900 Europeans, and 46,'
500 from the United States. Those
from Europe consist chiefly of Scandinavians, Germans, Austrians and
Russians.
The 46,500 Americans who lefl
homes in the country on the othei
side of the border came through the
ports of Winipeg, Emerson, Gretna,
Portal, and Kingsgate. A great percentage of these were very well-to-dd
and the lowest estimate that could
be placed on the money brought into
the country by them would be approximately    $50,000,000   in    foui
SV.W ANIMAL
Tracks Found in New Guinea Indicate
Creature of Prehistoric Type
Living beasts similar to those of
prehistoric ages are reported to have
been located by explorers engaged
in New Guinea, according to advices
received by the steamer Makura on
her last trip from Australia. The
tracks of a nototherium, a wombatlike small elephant, were found on
the top of a plateau, 8,000 feet above
the sea level. Some years ago a
skeleton of a similar animal
discovered in Australia.
*
+
t
Imperial Post Office
*
♦
♦
*
(••;..}..:• •:••{• •;••!"!' <•*•:••:•♦ •> •:••:••:••!••:•'><'»:••:• >;••:•
Mr. Herbert Samuel, in presenting
the post office estimated to the British House of Commons, said the
amount, now £20,000,000, had doubled in the last fifteen years. Every
day 15,000,000 letters and postal
packets, 250,000 telegrams and
£250,000 in postal orders were dealt
with. At the end of next year the
vast enterprise of the National Telephone Company would be taken over.
Arrangements were being rapidly
pushed forward, and he anticipated
that the transfer would be effected
with the utmost smoothness. The
system of wireless telegraphy showed very rapid expansion, and the general telegraph system, after some
years of decline, was recovering. The
post office had spent £2,000,000 on
underground cables in various parts
of the country to protect the service from interruption by storms. An
interesting experiment was to be
tried in connection with the savings
bank. Money boxes were to be Issued to the public for accumulating
their small savings. The post office
would keep the keys and so save the
holders from the temptation to open
the boxes. .More than half the letters that leave this country every
year-go to countries with which we
have the penny postage rate. The
extension of penny postage to France
alone, as suggested, was not practicable. To include other countries
would bring up the loss to £400,000.
Concessions to the staff and the public during the past five years had
reduced the post office payment to
the exchequer by very nearly a million a year.
Subsequently Mr. Samuel discussed the unsatisfactory position of the
post office- in regard to boy messengers. Three out of four are discharged without any training filling
them to secure skilled or permanent
employment, He hoped, by economizing boy labor to reduce the number
of boy messengers by 1,000, and also
to gel  the war office and admiralty
Municipal Notice
TAKE NOTICE that the Municipal
Council of the City of Prince Rupert
has fixed Monday, the 8th day of
August, 1910, at the City Hall, Prince
Rupert, as the time and place for
taking the vote of the electors on a
by-law of the City of Prince Rupert
to create a debt of $40,000 by the issue of debentures for the purpose of
providing money to take over and
carry on the plant, pole lines, equipment, and entire assets of the Prince
Rupert Telephone Company, Limited.
AND FURTHER TAKE NOTICE
that the poll shall be taken by ballot, and that the poll booths shall be
kept open on the 8th days of
August, 1910, from the hour of 9
o'clock a.m. to the hour of 7 o'clock
p.m.
AND FURTHER TAKE NOTICE
that Ernest A. Woods has been appointed Returning Officer to take
charge of said poll.
Dated at Prince Rupert, this 21st
day of July, 1910.
ERNEST A. WOODS,
City Clerk.
BY-LAW NO. 11.
A By-law of the City of Prince Rupert to create a debt of $40,000
by the issue of Debentures for the
purpose of providing money to
take over and carry on the plant,
pole lines, equipment and entire
assets of the Prince Rupert Telephone Company, Limited.
WHEREAS, by Section 27 of the
City of Prince Rupert Incorporation
Act, 1910 , the City of Prince Rupert is empowered to construct, erect,
operate and maintain a telephone system, and to pass by-laws dealing with
the same;
AND WHEREAS, It is deemed expedient and advisable to take over
from the Prince Rupert Telephone
Company, Limited, all their plant,
pole lines, equipment, fixtures, and
other assets;
AND WHEREAS, the said Prince
Rupert Telephone Company, Limited,
is willing to convey and transfer all
its said assets to the said city;
AND WHEREAS, a petition has
been duly signed by the property
owners of the said city, requesting
them to Introduce a by-law to take
over the said assets of the said Telephone Company;
AND WHEREAS, to complete the
purchase of the said assets of the said
Telephone Company, and to carry on
the same, it is necessary that the sum
of Forty Thousand Dollars ($40,000)
should be borrowed upon the credit
of the city by the issue and sale of
debentures therefor, and that the proceeds of such debentures should be
applied  for  the  purposes  aforesaid.
AND WHEREAS, it is intended to
issue debentures by the sale of which
to realize the moneys necessary for
snid purposes, making the said debentures extend over a period of
twenty years from the issue of the
same;
AND WHEREAS, II will be necessary lo raise by special rate In each
year, for the period of twenty years,
beginning with  the year  1910, and
to take some hundreds of boys forjending with the year 1930, die sum I ,'■",' r<"   ;,;'„  ......... ...
the raj al engineers, nnd for operating of      Eighteen     Hundred       Dollars I^^i0?.^? SttiZSZOStW ™.y
Dollars and Forty-five Cents
($3,214.45);
AND WHEREAS, the amount >of
the whole ratable land and improvements of the Municipality, according
to the last revised assessment roll
thereof, being that of the year 1910,
is Twelve Million Seven Hundred and
Twenty-one Thousand and Six Dollars   ($12,721,006);
AND WHEREAS, the amount of
the existing debenture debt of the
City of Prince Rupert, inclusive of
local improvement debts, and school
debts, is nil, and does not exceed
twenty per cent of the assessed value
of the land and Improvements of the
Alunicipality of the City of Prince
Rupert, according to the last revised
assessment roll;
NOW THEREFORE, THE COUNCIL OF THE MUNICIPALITY OF
THE CITY OF PRINCE RUPERT
ENACTS AS FOLLOWS:—
1. This by-law shall take effect
on the 12th day of August, 1910.
2. The debt hereby created and intended to be created, namely, the
sum of Forty Thousand Dollars
($40,000) shall be payable In twenty years from the 12th day of August,
1910, namely, on the 12th day of
August, 1930.
3. There shall be Issued any number of debentures to be made for
such sums of money as may be required for the purposes aforesaid,
either in currency or sterling money,
payable in gold coin for not less than
$100 currency or £20 sterling each,
and not'exceeding in the whole the
said sum of Forty Thousand Dollars
($40,000), and the said debentures
shall be duly prepared, executed
and sold for the purposes aforesaid.
4. The said debentures stall be
deemed to have been properly executed by being signed by the Mayor,
and Treasurer of the said city, and
shall be sealed with its corporate
Feal.
The said deoentures shall bear
date the  12th  day of August,  1910,
was .being the date on whicb this bylaw
, takes  effect,    and    shall   contain   a
___|promise to pay the principal of said
debentures and also the interest
thereon at the said rate of four and
a half (4%) per centum per annum,
and shall have attached to them coupons for the payment of said interest,
and the said coupons shall be for an
amount equivalent to one-half year's
interest at the said rate of
four and a half (4%) per
centum per annum upon the amount
of the debentures to which they shall
be respectively attached, one coupon
being made payable each six months
from and after the date of the said
debentures.
6. The said coupons shall be
deemed to have been properly executed by each one having written,
stamped, printed, or lithographed
thereon, the names of the Mayor,
and Treasurer of the city. Each coupon shall be numbered with the
number of the debenture to which it
is attached.
7. The said debentures shall be
made payable at the chief offices of
the Canadian Bank of Commerce in
the City of Prince Rupert, or the
City of Montreal, Canada, or the City
of London, England, or the City of
New York, U. S. A.
8. The amount of the said coupons,
namely, the Interest, shall be payable
at any of the chief agencies of the
said Canadian Bank of Commerce in
the following cities, namely: Prince
Rupert, B.C.; London, England;
New York; Montreal; Toronto; Winnipeg, and Vancouver, B.C.
9. There shall be raised in each
year during the said period of twenty
years, beginning with the year 1910,
and ending with the year 1930, by
special rate sufficient therefor, on
all the ratable land of the City of
Prince Rupert, the following sums
respectively, namely: the sum of
Eighteen Hundred Dollars ($1,800)
to pay the interest of the said debt
at the rate of four and a half (4%)
per centum per annum during the
currency of the said debentures, and
the sum of Fourteen Hundred
and Fourteen Dollars and Forty-
five Cents ($1,414.45) for the
forming of a sinking fund for the
payment of the said debt, the computation for the reinvestment of the
said sum by way of sinking fund being based upon an interet percentage of three and a half (3%) per
centum per annum during the currency of the said debentures as aforesaid, the said two sums making in
all the total of Thirty-two Hundred
and Fourteen Dollars and Forty-five
Cents ($3,214.45) to be raised annually as aforesaid.
10. The total of the said two sums
for the payment of Interest and debt
as aforesaid shall be raised and
levied in each year during the said
period of twenty years and currency
of said debentures as aforesaid by
special rate sufficient therefor, on
all the ratable land in the City of
Prince Rupert, as provided for In the
next preceding section.
11. The said debentures when so
issued and sold, and the said coupons
attached thereto when the debentures aforesaid have been issued and
sold, shall be deemed a valid and
binding charge upon tlie City of
Prince Rupert.
12. The amount of the debt au-
tlioriozd by this by-law Is subject to
LAND PURCHASE NOTICES
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Phillip Williams, of Sydney, Nova Scot.a, occupation accountant, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands In the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein
ley:—Commencing at a post planted
at the S. E. corner'and about 16%
miles distant in a north-westerly direction from the north end of Kitwancool Lake, thence north 80
chains, thence west 80 chains, thence
south 80 chains, thence east 80
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 640 acres, more or
less. PHILLIP WILLIAMS.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 4, 1910. Jy8
LAND PURCHASE NOTICES
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Annie Grieve,
of Victoria, B. C, occupation married woman, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kltwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. W. corner, and about 17% miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kltwancool
Lake, thence south 40 chains, thence
east 40 chains, thence south 40
chains, thence east 40 chains, thence
north 80 chains, thence west 80
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 480 acres, more or
less. ANNIE GRIEVE.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 4, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Pfl^ifir
TAKE NOTICE that James Alexander McDonald, of Monarch, Alberta, occupation farmer, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands, situated in
the Kitwancool or Chein Wein Valley:—Commencing at a post planted
at the N. E. corner about five and
one quarter miles distant in a northwesterly direction from the north
end of Kltwancool Lake, thence south
80 chains, thence west 80 chains,
thence north 80 chains, thence east
80 chains to point of commencement,
and containing 640 acres, more or
less.
JAMES ALEXANDER McDONALD
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated May 30, 1910. Jy6
Coast Land District—District of
Skeena.
TAKE NOTICE that I, Ernestine
A. Roney, of Prince Rupert, occupation married woman, intend to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted on the north
bank of the Skeena River about half
a mile south of Geo. T. Church's preemption, thence west 10 chains,
thence north 40 chains, thence east
to the Skeena River; thence southwest following the bank of the
Skeena River to the place of beginning, and containing about 80
acres.
ERNESTINE A. RONEY, Locator.
W. A. Roney, Agent.
Dated July 7th, 1910. Jy22
wireless telegraphy mi our ships, lu-
stltutes were also being established
of a recreative and educational cnar-
acter, for hoy messengers, and on
these lines he hoped more and more
would be done to fit boys for outside
employment.
Mr. Henniker Heaton, who has
done so much to stimulate post office reforms, criticised the postmaster-general's . statement, especially
in regard to the possibility of a penny
post with France. He announced that
after twenty-five years in Parliament he was about to retire. Rather
ignoring tbe reforms he has helped
to secure he declared that the pnstls,lnlR so  required   to
office department was jus. as parocb, nUaU£ ^ ^M TiU tot paying the
1 ' now debt and  interest make a total
lal  ns  it   was  twenty-flve  years  ago.  of Thirty-two Hundred and Fourteen
($1,800.00)  for the purpose of pay-;
Ing  interest  upon  the said  debt at
the rate of four and a half  (4V*.)
per centum per annum;
AND WHEREAS, it will be necessary to raise annually by special rale
for paying the new debt, namely, tho
said sum of Forty Thousand Dollars
I $40,000), during such period of
twenty years, beginning with the
year 1910, and ending with the year
1930, the sum of Fourteen Hundred
and Fourteen Dollars and Forty-five
Cents ($1,414.45), the computation
for the reinvestment of the said sum
by way of sinking fund, being based
upon an Interest percentage of three
and a half (3%) per centum per
annum;
AND  WHEREAS,   the   said     two
be   raised   an
other debt to be authorized by any
! ot her by-law or by-laws of the said
city passed for the Issue and snle of
debentures, and notwithstanding anything herein contained authorizing
and directing the issue and stile of
debentures for the payment of the
debt thereby created, the City of
Prince Rupert consolidated stock
may be Issued in the place and stead
of debentures to the amount of such
debt. This section shall apply only
Insofar as the city may be empowered
by law so to do.
TAKE NOTICE that the above Is
a true copy of the proposed by-law
on which the vote of the Municipality
will be taken at the City Hall, at
Prince Rupert, on Monday, the 8th
day of August, 1910, from the hours
of 9 o'clock a.m. until 7 o'clock p.m.
ERNEST A. WOODS,
City Chirk.
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that John Cox, of
Monarch, Alberta, occupation farmer, intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described
lands, situated in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Comencing at a post planted at the
north-west corner and about five and
one-quarter miles distant in a northwesterly direction from the north end
of Kltwancool Lake, thence 80
chains south, thence 80 chains east,
thence SO chains north, thence SO
chains west to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres,
more or less.
JOHN COX.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated May  30,  1910. Jy5
Skeena Land District—District of
Prl^fiifl Y
TAKE NOTICE that Pearl Caspeli
of Cayley, Alberta, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. E. corner and about 15% miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence south 80 chains, thence
west 40 chains, thence north 40
chains, thence west 40 chains, thence
north 40 chains, thence east 80
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 480 acres, more or
less. PEARL CASPELL.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 3, 1910. •       jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Mary Brown,
of Vancouver, B.C., occupation married woman, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of
the Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—Commencing at a post planted
at the North-east corner and about
ten miles distant in a north-westerly
direction from the north end of the
Kitwancool lake, thence south 80
chains, thence west 40 chains, thence
north 40 chains, thence west 40
chains, thence north 40 chains
thence east 80 chains to point ol
commencement, and containing 4S0
acres, more or less.
MARY BROWN.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 1,  1910. Jy8
LAND PURCHASE NOTICES
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Ethel Welsh,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
south-east corner and about 10 miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north 80 chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence south 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to-
point of commencement and containing 640 acres, more or less.
ETHEL WELSH.
James W. Smith, Agent
Dated June 1st, 1910. Jy8
Coast Land District—District of
Skeena.
TAKE NOTICE that I, J. Adolpb
Perry, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation
book-keeper, intend to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted on the north bank of the
Skeena River, about a mile west of
Lot 31, thence north 40 chains,
thence east 8'0 chains to lot .31,
thence south 40 chains to bank of
Skeena River, thence west about 80
chains following north bank of
Skeena River to point of commencement, and containing about 320
acres.
J. ADOLPH PERRY, Locator.
Wm. A. Roney, Agent.
Dated July 16th, 1910. Jy22
Coast Land District—District of
Skeena.
TAKE NOTICE that I, Mary M.
Roney, of Stillwater, Minnesota, U.
S.A., occupation married woman, intend to apply for permission to purchase'the following described lands.
Commencing at a post planted on the
north bank of the Skeena River at
the south-east corner of Geo. T.
Church's pre-emption, thence north
40 chains, thenco east 40 chains,
thence south to the bank of the
Skeena River, thence south-west following the Skeena River to the place
of beginning and containing about
120 acres.
MARY M. ROENY, Locator.
W.  A.  Roney,  Agent.
Dated July 8th, 1910. Jy22
Skeena Land District—District of
f fl RQifl Y
TAKE NOTICE that Violet Gelger,
of Victoria, B. C, occupation married woman, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. W. corner and about 23% miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence south 80 chains, thence
east 40 chains, thence north 40
chains, thence east 40 chains, thence
north 40 chains, thence west 80
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 4.80 acres, more or
less. VIOLET GEIGER.
James W. S'.nlth, Agent.
Dated June 7th,  19".0. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that John Henderson, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
agent, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. ,W corner and about 25 miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north 80 chains, thence
east 40 chains, thence south 80
chains, thence west 80 chains to
point of commencement and containing 320 acres, more or less.
JOHN   HENDERSON.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 7th, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Laura Gordon
of Victoria, B. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of Kltwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. E. corner and about 18 miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence south 40 chains, thence
west 40 chains, thence north 40
chains, thence east 40 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 160 acres, more or less.
LAURA GORDON.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 4,  1910. jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Walter Marke
of Toronto, Ont, occupation traveller. Intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands in the vicinity of Kltwancool
or Chean Wein Valley:—Commencing at a post planted at the N. E.
corner and about 27% miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence south 80 chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence north 80
chains, thence east SO chains to the
point of commencement and containing 640 acres, more or less.
WALTER MARKE.
James VV. Smith, Agent
Dated June 8th, 1910. JyS
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Richard
Howie, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation dentist, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands In the vicinity of
Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—■
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. E. corner and about 24% miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kltwancool
Lake, thence south 80 chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence north 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
RICHARD HOWIE.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June  7th,  1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District-—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Sandford
Burton, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation mining engineer, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands In the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Woln
Valley:—Commencing at a post
planted at the N. E. corner and
about 23% miles distant In a northwesterly direction from the north
end of Kltwancool Lake, thence south
80 chains, thence west 80 chains,
thence north 80 chains, thence east
SO chains to point of commencement
and containing 640 acres, more or
less. SANDFCID BURTON.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 7th, 1910.    , Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE^that Norman Cle-
land, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation printer, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands In the vicinity of Kltwancool or Chean Weln Valley:—
Comencing at a post planted at the
S. E. corner and about 26% miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kltwancool
Lake, thence north 80 chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence south 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
NORMAN  CLELAND.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 8th, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Cfl ssisr
TAKE NOTICE that Henry Welsh,
of Vancouver, B.' C, occupation
printer, intends to apply foi permission to purchase the following described lands In the vicinity of Kltwancool or Chean Weln Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. E. corner and 11 miles distant
in a north-westerly direction from
the north end of Kitwancool Lake,
thence north SO chains, thence west
SO chains, thence south 80 chains,
thence east So chains to point of
commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
HENRY WELSH.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 2, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Frederick
Welsh, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation clerk, intends lo apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Oilman Wein Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-east corner about 11 miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence south SO chains, thence
west 40 chains, thence north SO
chains, thence east 40 chains to
point of commencement, and containing 320 acres, more or less.
FREDERICK WELSH.
James W. Smith, Agent
Dated June 2, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassia,.
TAKE NOTICE that James Welsh,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation machinist, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicjnity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. W. corner and about 12 miles distant In a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence south 80 chains, thence
east 20 chains, thence north 80
chains, thence west 20 chains to the
point of commencement and containing 160 acres, more or less.
JAMES WELSH.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated  June  2,  1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassii
TAKE NOTICE that Marguerette
Burns, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands In the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Weln
Valley:—Commencing at a post
planted at the N. E. corner and distant about 12 miles in a northwesterly direction from the north
end of Kltwancool Lake; thence
south 80 chains, thence west 20
chains, thence north 80 chains,
thence east 20 chains to point of
commencement, and containing 160
acres, more or less,
MARGUERETTE  BURNS.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 2, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Ofl^fiiii r
TAKE NOTICE that Charles F.
Burns, of Moncton, New Brunswick,
occupation auditor, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein
Valley:—Commencing at a post
planted at the south-west corner and
about 12 miles distant in a. northwesterly direction from the north
end of Kitwancool Lake; thence
north 80 chains, thence east SO
chains, thence south 80 chains,
thence west 80 chains to point of
commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
CHARLES F.   BURNS.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated   June   2,   1910 Jv8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that James Jar-
dine, of Vancouver, B, C, occupation
merchant, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands In the vicinity of Kltwancool  or Chean   Weln    Valley:	
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. W. corner and about 18 miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence south so chains, thence
east, so chains thence north ku
chains, thence west 80 chains to
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
JAMES JARDINE.
James VV. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 2,  1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that John McDiar-
mid, of Lucknow, Ont., occupation
farmer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of the
Kltwancool or Chean Weln Valley:	
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. W. corner and about 13 miles distant In a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kltwancool
Lake; thence north 80 chains, thence
east 40 chains, thence south 80
chains; thence west 40 chains to
point of commencement, and contaln-
in|   320 acres.
JOHN McDIARMID.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 2, 1910. Jy8 ,.    ■■■   '.
Tuesday, August 2, 1910.
THE   PRINCE   RUPERT   JOURNAL
EVOLUTION OF THE DREADNAUGHT TYPE OF BATTLESHIP
It was fine to bullet and bite and
clapperclaw each other, rolling in
slime or leaping from forest bough to
hongh, until low cunning discovered
that skulls may be cracked at a distance by rocks hurled through the
air. It was not bad to light with
stones attached to strings, and with
clubs and prongs, till a terrible invention of bent wood and twisted gut
urove a feathered stick from behind
a bush through the cow hide over
one's heart. It was a great occasion,
when the Marquis of Toledo went to
lils renowned workers In steel and
ordered new suits of armor on his
own design. "All the parts," he said
■must be made of solid plates, overlapping at the joints. The polished
ureastplate must project so that the
arrows. Impinging upon it at an angle, may glace harmlessly off. The
whole of my body that is exposed so
long as I am mounted must be armored, and so must my horse. Narrow slits may be let in the helmet
for sighting the enemy, but my nose
must be protected by an extra bar,
and in front of the horse's forehead
you must contrive a long spike to act
as a ram. Shorter spikes must project from the main joints of my own
armor also, and the side-lates of the
horse must hang round him like a
skirt or net to counter insidious attacks from below. Add what embellishment of inlaid gold arabesque you
please, but not too much; for I want
eight suits and am very impatient,
seeing that the Marquis of Carcassonne has ordered four."
So, one glitter of steei from head
to foot, the Marquis of Toledo rode
out to battle, sweating, but safj—
safe as milk In a kettle is against
the cat—until someone approached
with a new-fangled blowpipe, and,
having kindled a mixture of saltpetre, charcoal, and sulphur at one
end, discharged through it, with horrible noise, a small cube of iron,
which, striking that polished breastplate at an angle, never glanced off
as was expected, but went right
through. Whereon a riderless horse
was seen flouncing about the field,
and eight exquisitely wrought suits
of armor (one slightly damaged)
have ever since hung in the Royal
Museum at Madrid.
It is always so. Men have spent
more time and thought on devising
means of killing each other than on
any other subject, except food, and
their admirable ingenuity in trying
to avoid being killed is continually
defeated by fresh development of ingenuity in killing. Cowhide, armor
castle wall, and heart of oak—one
after another they have rotted Into
archaeology, or serve for picnics and
tourist emptied our purses upon
them, hardy change succeeds change;
the defences of the South African war
are already Victorian, and battleships
fall obsolete before they swim. Who
said "Dreadnoughts?" Hardly have
we emptied our purses upon them,
hardly have we poured income tax,
land tax, supertax, and death duties
into the ravening gulf they have
made, hardly have we drained our
country dry to order the eight for
which we clamored, when still, small
voices here and there arise, wondering, questioning, doubting, whether
"Dreadnoughts" are of much more
service now than the Marquis of
Toledo's armor.
Year by year we have piled up the
increase of battleships in size and
price—per- "Dreadnoughts," "Dreadnoughts" super. "Dreadnoughts"—
so they go. In twenty years the displacement has risen from the 11,000
tons of the Triumph, to the 26,000
tons of the Conqueror, that will be
completed two years from now. At
least four ships will then have surpassed the Dreadnought herself by
8,000 tons, and already vessels to
which these will seem hardly bigger
than King Edwards seemed to them
are being ordered for the United
Elates, and devised for our own admiralty. Step by step the correspond
ing price is mounting up; three-
quarters of a million, one million, one
and a half, two millions—even two
and a half and three millions—are
now coming well in sight. But what
is the good of it all? ask those questioning voices. What was the good
of the steel breastplate with arabesque embellishments when gunpowder was kindled at the end of a
tube? What Is the good of super-
Dreadnoughts when the narrow seas
are quick with mines, torpedoes and
submarines?
The voices are many. Mr. Wells
has raised his warning .prophecy;
Colonel Repington speaks In Black-
morrow. The North Sea in time of
war will be a desert of waters, insecure to both sides, open to neither,
commanded by none."
What an appalling shock sentences
like these will give the panic-mongers of the last two years! If one
thing is more certain than another, It
is that the Dreadnoughts have been
built, and are being built, to act in
the North Sea. Either Dreadnoughts
or conscription, we are told. "We
dare not sleep In our beds till we
have two keels to one," shrieked the
terrified descendants of Drake and
Frobisher. But hardly have they
settled down to the slumber of se-
Germany there could at first be no
better positions for our battle fleets
than Scapa Flow and Dover, sealing
up both entrances to the sea and
ruining the enemy's sea-borne trade,
while the flotillas, In which we possess an immense advantage om numbers and skill, would act like cavalry,
scouring the water, scouting, destroying the enemy's flotillas and mines;
that the aim of torpedoes is very uncertain, and- grows more uncertain
as we build our battleship cruisers
with continually Increasing speed, so
that the new Dreadnoughts will command a speed on any sea such as no
destroyer can equal, except at dead
aeroplanes, peering down into the
depths of ocean for submarines. As
when, upon- Afric's golden sand, the
dragon crocodile basks secure, watched by attendant birds, who stand
beside him or hover above his head.
They, at the sight of danger, rouse
him with piercing cries, and he,
grateful for their ministry, arches
his monstrous back and slides Into
the safety of the water, fearing
alone the one wild beast that, from
invisible distance and with Imperceptible bullet, can pierce the Joints
of his overlapping mall, and paralyze
the sections of his water-tight compartments.
■^99999999999
999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999i
Atlantic Steamship
 —Agency	
Through tickets and excursion
rates to
England, France, Germane,
and all
Scandinavian Ports.
Call or write for rates to any
part of the world. I am also
agent for all American steamers
to and from Prince Rupert;
Northern Pacific Railway; A1-.
aska Pacific Express.
J. H. ROGERS
General Steamship and Railway
Agent, Prince Rupert, B.C.
Canadian Pacific  R'y
Steamers leave Prince Rupert for Vancouver,
Victoria, Seattle
Princess Beatrice, every Monday at 1 p.m.
Princess May or Princess Royal
every Saturday morning.
Steamers leave Vanoouver
Princess Beatrice every Thursday night.
Princess May or Princess Royal
every Saturday night at 11
o'clock.
Union Steamship Co'y
of B.C. Ltd.
TYPE OF MODERN BATTLESHIP REPRESENTING THE TREND OP PRESENT   DAY   EXPENDITURE   ON FIGHTING VESSELS.
■^.j. .;,$•> .■H>*'>'>**'M,*,M«,X*'K"J**^
wood; Mr. Arnold White asks his
searching questions, and Mr. Arnold
White was among the first advocates
of the Dreadnought type. Other
voices are heard, the more significant
because nameless. "In case of war,"
says one, "the first thing we should
do would be to withdraw, the Dreadnoughts from danger." "In the North
Sea," says another, "nothing could
venture out but destroyers and submarines." But a destroyer is to a
Dreadnought about as cheap and
lightly covered as a naked man to
the Marquis of Toledo in his armor.
As gunpowder brought all fighting
men on land back to nakedness and
a cloth, will torpedoes cut down our
giant ships to little boats not much
thicker than a biscuit? Let us hear
what Colonel Repington, himself a
diligent student of all warfare, has
to say:
"I think," he writes, "that the
North Sea falls within the category of
narrow waters which eventually must
by a process of evolution which is
taking place under our eyes, become
practically closed on the outbreak of
war, and possibly throughout the
war, to the operations of seagoing
fleets and cruisers. I think that the
great ships to which we devote so
much money every year—though
they have been, are, and may for a
few years more be necessary—will
within a limited period of time become useless for most operations of
which the North Sea and the Channel
will be the theatre."
Or, again:
"Our great and costly battleships
and cruisers must (in time of war)
be stowed away safely In some distant
safe nnd secluded anchorage—Scapa
Flow and Portsmouth today, Bere-
haven and Lough Swilly perhaps to-
curity when they are roused by the
cry that all the Dreadnoughts Un
creation could in case of war only
be stowed away In some safe, distant and secluded anchorage. The
path for Invasion is left open—insecure, but open. The North Sea is
bare or a desert, commanded by none.
What was the good of all that shouting, all that spending which so much
upset the city and the House of
Lords? We must have conscription,
after all; we must go and get drilled;
we must sign the people's petition to
be turned into soldiers. We cannot
sleep another minute, for there is
nothing on the sea between us and
Germany now, and al the Dreadnoughts might as well be scrapped,
or converted Into health resorts for
trips to the midnight sun. Alas! for
the  vanity of human  wishes!
There is no one so ludicrous as
people who live in fear and we cannot but smile at this new line of
panic—this new attempt to bring us
all under the drill sergeant. But
in so far as it is simply a matter of
naval tactics depending on armament
the main paint must be considered
and answered. We do not mean that
the admiralty have not considered It;
of course, since the refusal of the
Hague conference to prohibit the use
of marine mines, it has been one of
their chief concerns. Add the great
development of the submarine, the
torpedo, and the airship, and It is
obvious that when Dreadnoughts put
out Into a narrow sea, the life on
board will correspond to the prayer
"to live each day as 'twere the last."
We Imagine the admiralty might reply that the North Sea is not really
narrow, but a very large area that
cannot become a lake; that In case
of the Incredible  folly of war with
calm; that, if it comes to the worst,
the Dreadnoughts are more immune
against mines and torpedoes than any
battleship yet constructed, and would
probably keep afloat after the most
terrible blow; and, finally, that there
are new methods of guarding against
torpedo, and even submarine attack
We cannot say. We only ask notice
for the landsmen's view, for clear
sighted prophets, though landsmen
are often right when experts are
blinded by habit. But, if Dreadnoughts are maintained for ten years
more, and that increditable war
should come to pass, we have a
strange vision of them as they put to
sea for the second or third stages
of the warfare. Around each vast
monster flits a multitude 'of destroyers and rapid automobiles, firing at
every float, testing almost every wave
while  over her  head  hover several
Fred Stork
General Hardware
...Complete Line of...
VALVES
Pipe and Pipe Fittings
The
The new Steel Passenger Steamer
"Camosun"
PRINCE RUPERT every Sunday at 9 a.m. for Vancouver,
arriving Monday afternoon.
For Stewart City on arrival from
Vancouver Friday night.
Northbound, leaves Vancouver
Wednesdays at 9 p.in.
Steerage Fare $5.00
The "Camosun" is the only steamer
on the run having water-tight bulkheads and double bottom, thus ensuring safety of passengers in case of
collission or wreck.
J. H. ROGERS,   Ticket Agent
HAYNOR   BROS.
FUNERAL   DIRECTORS
and
PROFESSIONAL  EMBALMERS
THE WORLD'S GOLD
Recent publications of the National
Monetary Commission of the United
Slates make available some interesting particulars of the part which the
Bank of France plays in the international money market. The gold
reserve of the Bank of France has
been allowed to increase until it
amounts to about $700,000,000, and
is the largest stock held in any bank
in the world. Even the advance in
the rate of discount which Is occasionally made, is not for the purpose
of safeguarding the reserve, but to
avoid the decrease of the money in
circulation which would result from
the tempting and persistent offers
from aboard where discount rates
rule much higher. With these great
resources at its command, the Bank
of France has, In the opinion of M.
Patron, whose book on "The Bank of
France in Its Relation to National
and International Credit," has now
been translated, become practically
the reserve reservoir of gold for the
financial world.
In summing up the present position of the Bank of France, with its
reserve towering above that of any
other great bank, M. Patron concludes that this reserve, admirably
managed as It Is, affords not only an
insurance against crisis, but also the
surest guaranty against the recurrence of great wars. Upon this
point he concludes thus:
"We have shown that the fighting
power of a nation has now no limit
other than the financial effort of
which it is capable. It Is not going
too far to state that the formidable
cost which a war would Involve has
more than once caused our possible
enemies to recoil and that in the
set I lenient of political or diplomatic
questions the nation which Is richest
in gold is always the one which commands tiie most respect."
For Diamonds,
Wedding Rings, Wedding
Presents, High-Class
Jewelry, and all makes
of High Grade Watches, go to
C. B. WARK
The Reliable Jeweler.
Watch Repairing a Specialty
Washington Cafe
A PLACE TO EAT
Seats For Ladles
Everything Clean and Tasty
Prices Reasonable
DR.  W.  B.  CLAYTON
DENTIST
Office  in    the    Westenhaver   Block,
Over  Orn^e's  Drug   Store.
Prince Rupert
W.  F.  CARPENTER,  PROPRIETOR
.Second Avenue, near Seventh Street
WM. S. HAi^L, L. D. S. D. D. S.
:-: DENTIST :-:
Crown and Bridge Work a specialty.
All dental operations skillfully
treated. Gas and local anaesthetics
administered for the painless extraction of teeth. Consultation free.
Offices: Rooms 19 and 20, Alder
Block, Prince Rupert.
J. H. PILLSBURY
CIVIL     ENGINEER
Surveying,   Designs,   Estimates,   etc.
Clarmont Rooms
Sixth Avenue near Fulton street
Comfortable, Homelike Rooms; Newly Furnished Throughout;  Bath
Rooms  with   Hot  and
Cold Water
Rates, $3.00 a Week   and   Upwards
Mrs.   Annie  .llcGrnth,   Proprietoress
Some Rock
Bottom
Prices
Set Us For Investment
Rupert City Realty & Information Bureau, Ltd.
PRINCE RUPERT,
B.C.
Room   7,   Exchange   Block,
Corner  Third  Ave  and   Sixth   Street
Prince Rupert
G. \V. NICKERSON & CO.
—o—
CUSTOMS AND MERCHANDISE
ci
Brokers, Forwarding Agents,
Storage,  etc.
CANCELLATION  OF  RESERVE
The Roland Rooms
Splendid Accommodations
Newly Furnished
Hot  baths;   right  down   town;   good
table board all  round
RATES, FIFTY CENTS .AND IP
 LADYSMITH
COAL
H. B. ROCHESTER,   -   Centre Streel
NOTICE is hereby given that the
reserve existing on Crown lands In
the vicinity of Babine Lake, situate
in Range 5, Coast District, notice of
which was published In the British
uolumbia Gazette, dated December
17, 1908, Is cancelled in so far as
said reserve relates to lots numbered 1519, 1518, 1517, 1516, 1515,
1510, 1507, 150G, 1500A, 1503 1501,
1502, 1512, 1511, 1505, 1504, 1513,
1514, 1509, 1508, .1530, 1527, 1528,
1529, 1531, 1532, 1533, 1534, 1535,
1537, 1539, 1536, 1538, 1540, 1541,
1544, 1543, 1545, 154G, 1542, 1547,
1548, 1549, 1550, 1520, 1521, 1522,
1523, 1524, 1525, 1526, and 1551.
ROBERT A. RENWICK,
Deputy Commissioner of Lands.
I.nnds Department,
Victoria, B. C, June 16th, 1910.
I First insertion .Inly 5.)
.1.  W.  POTTER
ARCHITECT     AND     STRCCTl'RAL
ENGINEER
Ro-inforced Concrete a Specialty
—o—
Law-Butler Building - Prince Rupert
GRAHAM ISLAND— The surest
sign of the progress of a town or
district is Its newspaper—live, active, hustling." "The Masset Review,"  Masset,  Q.C.I.
The Thompson
Hardware Co.:
—Second Aventte—
i    Paints. General Hardware,
T     Oils, Stoves and Ranges.
■»->♦- THE   PRINCE  RUPERT  JOURNAL
Tuesday, August 2, 1910.
MARINE NEWS OF THE COAST
HENRIETTE IN POUT
The G. T. P. freighter, Henriette,
reached port on Saturday night from
the south with a very heavy cargo of
general freight for this port. Her
cargo was of a very diversified character representing all lines of trade
that is carried on here. She will return south as soon as she discharges
her freight here. On her way down
the Henriette towed the North Bend.
LILLOOET COMES IN
The Dominion Government steamer
Lillooet, engaged in hydrographlc
survey work on this coast, came into
port on Saturday evening and yesterday took on coal for the coming
month. Among the callers whom
Capt. Musgrave had during his stay
in port was R. L. Newman, the designer of the steamer.
POWDER  CRAFT
The new boat now being built at
the Vancouver shipyards for the
Hamilton Powder company is a craft
46 feet long with a beam of ten feet,
and Is fitted with a 24 horsepower
four-cylinder Buffalo engine, capable
of making a speed of about nine
miles an hour. She has a small
cabin forward, and a hold amidships
for carrying explosives, if necessary.
It is probable, however, that she will
be principally engaged in towing
scows of explosives between the various powder stations. A peculiarity
of her construction is that the wheel
and the engines are both operated
from the pilot house. She has not
been named. It is expected that she
will  be launched  In about a  week.
THE FUNNEL TEST
The peoples of the Persian Gulf
and its neighborhood judge not only
the ship but the nation that owns it
by the number of smokestacks sported. They had a belief in the might
of Britain until a German warship
came along with three funnels to our
one, says the Pall Mall Gazette. Then
they believed in Germany, but we regained our lost prestige by sending
the four-funnelled Powerful and Terrible around and have kept our posl
Hon ever since.
Now when our multlfunneled
sleeping volcanoes are anywhere in
the neighborhood their standing orders are to show themselves to the
people, however much they may have
to go off their course In so doing
Germany may get ahead of us yet by
sending down a ship with six fun-
iels, and a building duel may arise
between the two nations, ending in a
parade in the east of warships with
lines of chimneys from stem to stern.
NEW LINE OF BOATS
The Balcom steamship line is the
latest to enter the northern British
Columbia trade. At "present it has
one smalj freighter under charter,
the J L. Card, which has returned
from Stewart on its initial trip, but
Capt. W. J. Balcom, of the Balcom
company, who came south on the
steamer, states that he Is now
negotiating for another freighter, and
by next spring expects to have one,
probably two, steamers of the type of
the Cetriana out from England for
the northern trade.
The J. L. Card took a full cargo Of
building material to Stewart for the
constructor of the residence of
Stewart Bros., and brought a general
cargo south. On her run from the
north she nicked up the yacht Shamrock, which was found disabled off
Beaver Cove, and towed her to Vancouver, where the Shamrock is owned
by Percy Williams,
BRITAIN'S  SHIPPING
The statistical tables in the new issue of Lloyd's register recently published, gives the total commercial
tonnage owned in the world, exclusive of vessels of less than 100 tons,
as $41,915,000. This is the twenty-
fifth year of the publication of these
tables, and a comparison of the first
and last tables shows the vast Increase that has been made in that
time
At the same time the sailing tonnage has decreased to a marked degree, for while the steam tonnage of
the world has Increased 397 per cent,
in twenty-five years, the sail tonnage
has decreased 51 per cent.
The past twenty-five years have also shown a sweeping change in the
construction of vessels. In the building of sailing craft, wood still heads
the list, but in steamships practically
no wooden hulls are built- A quarter
of a century ago nearly half of the
steamships were constructed of wood.
The table shows that the vessels
flying the British flag have a total
tonnage exceeding by a,bout 3,500,-
000 tons, all the other eleven principal maritime countries combined,
but this is exclusive of the American tonnage on the Great Lakes,
which comprises about 2,225,000
tons.
CAPT. BERNIER'S PLANS
Baulked of his life-long ambition
to make a voyage to the North Pole,
Capt. Bernier, of the Dominion government seamer Arctic, has evidently
been pleased with a commission from
the Canadian government to essay
the Northwest Passage. An official
memorandum from the marine department states that a letter has been
received from Capt. Bernier, dated
Chateau Bay, July 12th.
To this letter, it is stated, Capt.
Bernier has attached the following
programme of his intended voyage.
From Cheateu Bay he proposes to
sail for Albert Harbor, Ponds Inlet.
From there he proceeds to Beechy
Island. The next place of call will
be Dealy Island, next Winter Harbor.
Thence he will go to Herschel Island.
"Capt. Bernier Intimates," continues the departmental memorandum, "that If he reaches the latter
place without any accident he will
proceed direct from theer to Victoria,
B.C."
The route thus indicated would
carry Capt. Bernier's expedition
through the North-west Passage
sought by the early Arctic navigators,
Ross, Parry and Franklin. They
failed in their quest owing to the
heavy Arctic ice, which forms a
seemingly perpetual barrier across
McClure's Strait, between Melville
Island and Banks Island. Winter
Harbor is the point at which Perry,
In 1819, wintered the ships Hecla and
Grither, and from whence In the following spring an Ineffectual attempt
was made to cross this" barrier.
The Northwest Passage made by
Capt. Amundsen three years ago, follows a much more southerly course
and the grounding of his little vessel
several times during the voyage
demonstrated the impracticability of
the channels for anything like ordinary purposes of navigation.
Capt. Bernier's ambition is evidently to force the more northerly passage, which baffled the early British
explorers. At Herschel Island, near
the mouth of the Mackenzie river,
should he succeed In reaching that
point, Capt. Bernier will be In communication with civilization for at
that place, which is the winter nead-
quarters   for  the   American
ing the trip from Nome to Kotzebue
Sound, when ordinarily it can be
made in thirty hours. From July
2 to July 13 she was entirely surrounded by Ice, which in some places
was piled to the 'height of eighty
feet. On the southward trip, however, the way was comparatively
clear.
The Mackinaw also brought Information that the United States revenue cutter Bear was instrumental
in saving the gasoline cargo of the
trading schooner Joe Matthews from
being lost In the Ice near Golovin.
The Matthews left Nome June 18
with passengers and freight for
Golovin. On arriving at Golovin bay
she was blocked in with ice, and the
passengers walked ashore. Later the
vessel was crushed and the crew had
to abandon her.
The Bear, whoch was at Nome,
was notified of the occurrence, and
succeeded in locating the camp of
the outcast mariners. The Matthews
was pulled clear of the heavy ice and
was lashed to the Bear. Proceeding
to Swedish Mission, the cargo of the
stricken  craft was salved.
YACHT BROCGHT BY RAIL
, Th« cruising yacht Honey Boy
has arrived at Seattle after a trip
across the continent by rail, and has
gone to. Port Madison, where he»
owner, Mr. N. H. Latimer, has his
summer home.
The yacht was built in Boston by
Messrs. Murray & Tregurtha, and although her dimensions are small, her
timbers are heavy enough to weather
a deep sea trip. Her length is 55
feet, and her beam 10% feet, and her
woods are ot the finest and hardest
that can be had. She is propelled
oy a four cylinder gasoline engine.
Her interior is lighted ana ner
searchlight operated with a Holtzer-
Cabot dynamo and storage battery
outfit. The main cabin Is fitted with
two folding berths and two Pullman
berths, and she is fitted throughout
with every obtainable modern convenience and luxury. Two tenders
go with her, one a mahogany rowboat
and the other a dory.
The Honey Boy is registered with
the Seattle Yacht club, and will be
used by her owner for cruises along
the coast, and to Alaska and the
Hawaiian  Islands.
BEHRING SEA CRUISE
Leaving for her annual cruise in
northern British Columbia waters
and incidentally to patrol the seal
fisheries, H. M. S. Algerlne, Captain
Jones has sailed from Esquimalt.
The Japanese fleet In Behring Sea
is larger than ever this year, consisting of about thirty-eight vessels,
whereas there are only' seven Victoria schooners operating in these
waters.
Two of the Japanese poachers were
recently chased by the United States
steamer Talioma one being eventually
captured, while the other succeeded
in getting away in the heavy fog
which prevailed at the time.
MARINE  NOTES
The Camosun on her return trip
from Stewart was several hours behind her usual time reaching port
here on Sunday afternoon Instead of
In the morning.
The Amur was delayed somewhat
at the Queen Charlottes and did not
reach this port on her way to the
south until Sunday.
The Cottage City, when she called
here on Saturday night, was obliged
Arctic to dock at Foley, Welch & Stewart's
WIRELESS MESSAGES
The advantages of the wireless
telegraph system as un aid to navigation on this const has lic-cn proved
and ii could not well be dispensed
with   now. •
A long distance wireless message
was received from the steamer .Mamma on Thursday at midnight the station at Vancouver . A call from clown
In the neighborhood of the equator
was heard and on answering tbe informal ion received word that all was
wel laboard the steamer Marama
bound to Sydney. She was 2,038
miles away at the time she was
speaking. She further reported that
the temperature was 64, and gave the
distance she had travelled since leav-l  1—
ing. According to reports from Behring
While this may not be a record In \ sea, brought by the steamer Mac-
wireless It certainly Is good talking. ■ klnaw, which arrived at Seattle with
The steamer had the new aparatUS In-; $200,000 in gold bullion, the Ice floes
stalled while she was In Vancouver.; in the north are the worst that have
and it is said to be one of the finest been encountered for seventeen years,
ship  stations afloat. The Mackinaw was twelve clays mak-
sealing fleet, the Dominion govern- wharf  as  all   the   other  space   was
ment maintains a Northwest Mount- taken up.   The shipping at this point
ed Police post, which keeps in touch is increasing at such a rate that ln-
with settlement both by the Macken- creased accommodation is Imperative.
zie  river  and  the  Porcupine-Yukon The  Princess  Beatrice this  week,
route,    recently    traversed  by Hon. as usual, was right   on   time    both
Frank   Oliver,   the  minister  of  the ways.    Among the pnfsengers on her
interior. jwns Rev.  Mr.  Morgan,   a    returned
Whether or not Capt. Bernier sue- missionary from Chinn, who made the
needs In  forcing the Northwest  Pas- ro"'<' tr'P'
sage, his instructions are lo plant the The nellp '■'' Scotland will get away
British flag and assert British sovereignty over the Arcllc lands which
he may visit In the course of his expedition. He is also commissioned
to investigate and have a reliable report made upon the coal measures
which are known to exist on the
shores of Lancaster Sound and Barrow Strait. For the present cruise
Capt. Bernier's vessel is amply provisioned for two years.
ICE  IN  THE  NORTH
shortly.    She goes south to take on
a cargo of lumber for the Orient.
The steamer Princess May arrived
late last night from the south on her
way to Skagway.
The Humbodlt arrived In port this
morning on her way to Skagway, and
brought many tourists who were well
pleased with the progress Of the city.
 . o—	
SHIPPING GUIDE
To Arrive
Wednesday, Aug. 3—Prince Rupert
from Seattle, Victoria and Vancouver.
City of Seattle from Skagway.
Venture from Vancouver.
Thursday,   August   4,- -Cottage   City
from Seattle.
Venture from Stewart.
Friday,  August   5.—Camosun    from
Vancouver.
Saturday, August 6.—Humboldt from
Skagway.
Princess Beatrice from Vancouver.
Princess May from Skagway.
Prince Albert from Skigedate, etc.
Sunday,  August  7.—Camosun  from
Stewart.
Prince George from  Seattle, Victoria and Vancouver.
Monday,    August    8.—Cottage    City
from Skagway.
Princess Beatrice from Stewart.
Prince George from Stewart.
Princess Royal from Vancouver.
Tuesday, August 9.—City of Seattle
from Seattle.
Prince  Albert from  Masset,  Port
Simpson, etc.
To Depart
Wednesday,   August   3—Prince Rupert for Stewart.
Prince Albert for Skidegate, etc.
City of Seattle for Seattle.
Venture  for  Stewart,  Naas  River.
Prince Albert for Skidegate, etc.
Thursday,   August   4.—Cottage   City
for   Skagway.
Venture  for  Vancouver  and  Victoria.
Friday,    August    5.—Camosun    for
Stewart.
Saturday,  August  6.—Humboldt  for
Seattle.
Princess Beatrice for Stewart.
Princess  May for Vancouver.
Sunday,   August    7.-—Camosun    for
Vancouver.
PrinCe George for Stewart.
Prince   Albert    for    Masset,   Kin-
eolith, Port Simpson, etc.
Monday, August 8.—Cottage City for
Seattle.
Princess Beatrice for Vancouver.
Prince George for Vancouver.
■   Princess Royal for Skagway.
Tuesday, August 9.—City of Seattle
for Skagway.
 o	
RAPIDS ARE BRIDGED
Trains Can Now Proceed  From Headquarters Here Direct to End
of Track.
Expeditions Work Done by Superintendent Young of the Construction Company
No longer has the construction
gangs engaged In laying the tracks
of the G. T. P. out of Prince Rupert
in the direction of Hazelton to convey
materials by ferry to the mainland.
The bridge across Zanardi Rapids is
now completed and rails; etc., are
being carried by train from the depot
of supplies here right to the point
where the work is In progress.
The work was completed on Sunday, several days earlier than was expected. For this, Superintendent
Young, of the Bridge company, Is to
be congratulated as It was through
his expeditious work that this was
made; possible.
Superintendent Mehan, of the G.
T. P., is naturally highly pleased with
the changed conditions as it means
much less delay in getting suplies
of material to the rapidly advancing
eastern terminus which changes
about a mile each day.
The tug Escort, under Capt. English, left last night for Vancouver
to bring up a further supply of rolling stock that awaits shipment there.
Until the big gravel pit, about
ninety miles from here, 1b reached,
the ballasting of the line will have
to remain In rather a rough condition. The road is laid for nearly all
the way on rock so that It Is in good
substantial shape in spite of the fact
that the fine ballasting has not been
put In place.
The Zanardi bridge is a magnificent
piece of work. The upper works are
of steel with cement and stone substructure. The swift current at this
point hindered the work considerably.
On Saturday Mayor Stork and
members of the city council accompanied by City Engineer Davis, visited the water power of the Georgetown sawmill, which has been offered
to the city.
 ( o	
| Port Essington News f
(Special Correspondence to Journal)
The funeral of the late John Morrison, whose - . was recovered from
the Skeena river July 29, was held
Saturday afternoon from the government office, Rev. Fainer Rushbrook
officiating. The deceased was to start
'fishing at the North Pacific cannery,
and left Essington July 9 alone In a
fishing boat,, his partner, Mr. Anthony
Ctisick remaining In- Essington
Nothing further was heard of him
until his body was found. A certificate showing that he was a member
r
■
■
■
3rd. Avenue
WHERE QUALITY IS KING."
D. TITE
Furniture Dealer
Prince Rupert
An inspection of our stock
of House Furnishings will
convince you. For quality and
economy you will leave us a
satisfied customer.
Dinlnj Room Furniture, Sidebmrds,
Bnfltti, Dlninc Tibia, 8ft.
ul 8ft. Eiteiulon
Dinlnt Room Choirs, dun-tend Oik with
Luther Suti, Golden or Early Enfllih
finish. Prlcei ringlnf from
Just Received a
Handsome Line of
Iron Beds, Springs and
Mattresses, all sizes
WINDOW BLINDS
Manufactured here to lit any
window  up  to 10 feet wide.
Tapestry and Lace Curtains,.
Poles and Trimmings
Special orders for Upholstering
of any kind.
$22.50 to $50
Wicker Chairs and Rockers
GEO. D. TITE,
3rd Ave.
SHERWIN & WILLIAMS
-PAINTS-
COVER THE EARTH.
WE   ARE   SOLE   AGENTS
CARLOAD JUST ARRIVED
Ready Nixed Paints,
Paints Ground in Oil,
Paints Ground in Japan,
Varnishes, Shellac, etc.
Water Stains
and
Decotint
IN ALL COLORS
Prince Rupert Hardware & Supply
Company, Ltd.  thos. dunn, m*.
^^^^^^^m^M^^M^M^^.
The Westholme
Lumber Company, Ld.
We carry the largest stock of
Building Supplies in the North.
Quotations given on short notice in all lines.
Rough and Dressed Lumber
Shingles and Lath
Mouldings and Cases
Doors and Windows
We handle Plaster and Lime at reasonable prices
Get our quotations for alljclasses of buildings.
FIRST AVENUE
OFFICE AND
WAREHOUSES
w
of the "Rising Men of America," was
found in his clothing.
* *    *
L. Mortimer Slocum and Walter
Shaw closed a successful engagement
on Saturday night at the Cunningham hall after playing to good houses
during the week. As shows are somewhat scarce in this part, Esslng-
tonlans are looking forward to an
early return.
* #    *
Postmaster W. C. Cameron and
daughter, Phyllis, returned last Monday from a six weeks' visit to relatives In Montreal and other eastern
points.
* #    *
Chief  Constable  T.  G.   Wynn,  ot
Prince  Rupert,  paid a visit  to Port
Essington this week.
* *    ^
William Whitley, of Prince Rupert,
has been appointed to act as a provincial constable stationed at Port Es-
ider   Constable Neil  McDonald.
* *    *
Mrs. J. J. Sloan, of Prince Rupert,
is visiting Mrs. Harry Berryman here.
* *    »
Mrs. Robert Donaldson and family
have returned from a summer outing
at Aberdeen.
After a man has been married
about a year he has almost as many
buttons off his garments as his
wife has pins in hers.
-cof

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