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Prince Rupert Journal Aug 8, 1911

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 _i\l
i/s
*y
C
Kew WtUtaftn
Coal
is the best
ROGERS & BUCK
Sole Agents
Ptimt .Hupert
£$\    Mw-IJSv
VOLUME  II.
Published  Twice  a  Week.
PRINCE  RUPERT,   B.   C.   TUESDAY, AUGUST 8, 1911.
High Class
Job Printing
in all Lines
Price,  Five Cents;
NO.l.'e.
COUNCIL   QUESTIONS
Much Time Occupied by Aldermen Discussing Subjects so Introduced.
The   "Street   Talk"    Feature   Made
Proniient nt Lust Night's
Sitting
The city council met last night,
with Aid. J. A. Kirkpatrick as acting mayor in the absence of Mayor
Manson. A good part of the evening was given over to questions and
answers, in which Aid. Newton played
a leading part. This proceeding was
started by Aid. Newton asking a
question as to why the city was filling in John Goodman's lots. He
gave as his reason later on for asking
the questions the somewhat stereotyped one that people on the streets
were asking the questions and he
wanted an answer. Later in the
evening Aid. Hllditch took a similar
course and on the strength of the
street reports asked as to the placing of insurance, which was explained by Aid. Newton. The two questions
took up about half the time of the
sitting.
Aid. Newton wanted to know why
the city had filled in John Goodman's lots. He had been asked the
question and did not know how to
answer it.
Aid. Hilditch explained that the
worlf was done as an accommodation
to the city. The arrangement was
made with Mr. Benson of the Atlantic Realty Company and had been
fully gone into earlier in the year.
By the arrangement the city was excused from building a high retaining
wall.
Aid. Douglas said he would explain. He had gone to Aid. Hilditch
and got one explanation. Mr. Benson gave another explanation, and
Aid. Kirkpatrick gave another.
Certain Aldermen
Aid. Hilditch, in making a further
IN   FEDERAL   POLITICS
he wanted to know why the insurance was taken from Aid. Pattullo,
who had been one to put up his good
money without interest in order to
buy the telephone for the city. He
wished to have it made clear what
the reasons were.
Aid. Newton said it would afford
him pleasure to deal with it. He
took full responsibility for the action. He moved that the insurance
go to Law & Butler and thhe Continental Trust Company. On looking into the insurance in the city
it was found that ex-Aid. Pattullo
and ex-Aid. Naden had a large share
of the insurance. Some other firms,
like M. M. Stephens and Peck &
Moore, had got some after new insurance was placed this year. The
two ex-aldermen seemed to have got
a very large slice of last year's insurance. He therefore had moved
to place it as indicated.
Aid. Hilditch thought Law & Butler had half the insurance on the
telephone building before. He did
not know that this firm took the
rest of the insurance. He would
like to hear just how the insurance
was placed.
The city clerk explained that the
insurance had been distributed by
giving Law & Butler the same as the
year before, and the rest had gone
to Mr. Deacon and the Continental
Trust Company.
It was finally decided to have a
report prepared showing how the city
insurance was divided.
 o	
Good  Company
The Cleveland Opera Company at
the Empress theatre is playing to
packed houses. The company Is an
excellent one with good voices and
in spite of the disadvantages of having rather too small stage room and
dressing room the choruses are well
put on. "The Honeymoon Trail" on
Saturday night was excellent and
won them the highest praise from
all attending.
 o	
A petition from George Leek and
others waB presented at the council
last night asking for water connection with their places from Second
avenue..
 o	
GOVERNMENT   WINS
CONVENTIONS TO BE
HELD IN NANAIMO
Conservatives Will Meet There Next Wednesday and
Decide Upon a Candidate for the Comox-
Atlin Riding—Liberals to Convene
Few Days Later.
(Special to The Journal) *
Winnipeg,     Aug.     8.—Three *
members of the Alberta legisla- *
ture   resigned   on   Saturday   to *
run for the House of Commons. *
They are R. B. Bennett of Cal- *
gary, W. A. Buchanan of Leth- *
bridge  and  Dr.  D.  Warnock  of *
Plncher Creek.    The former op- *
poses    recopricity.       The    two *
others favor it. *
British House of Commons Refuses to
Censure Action Relative to
Peers.    •
Premier Asquith Contends That the
Course Pursued Was a Constitutional One
explanation of the matter, made reference to "certain aldermen who did
not know" and the amount of time
consumed in explaining these things.
Aid. Newton said that that was
the trouble, aldermen did not know.
He asked the question for this reason.
Aid. Hilditch explained the course
of the negotiations that had been
carried out and stated that all this
information could be obtained without coming to the council and taking
up time getting it.
Aid. Newton objected to these insinuations of Aid. Hllditch. He
further stated that if Hilditch only
knew half of what was being said
he would be glad of an opportunity
to explain  these matters.
The original agreement was finally
read, when Aid. Newton said he did
not quite understand it, but there
was a "deal of talk" about this. He
would like to know if the arrangement was to the advantage of the
city. It was not to bother Aid. Hllditch that he asked these questions.
Aid. Kirkpatrick said the arrangement was certainly to the advantage
of the city.
Aid. Hilditch thought that if any
man, or even a child, were to go
down Eighth street he could see the
advantage of this. It was saving the
city thousands of dollars.
Aid. Smith pointed out that the
year before the lot was bought by
the city for the very purpose it was
being used.
Questioner Questioned
With the settlement of this question Aid. Hilditch introduced another
with reference to the placing of insurance. He wanted to know why
a certain property owner in the city
had been cut out from insurance by
the finance committee. The Insurance which he referred to was on
the telephone plant. There was talk
on the street and, like Aid. Newton,
he liked to he able to give an answer
to   theBe.     in   this   particular   case
(Special to The Journal)
London, Aug. 8.—The vote of censure of the government for having
obtained from the king a pledge to
create, if necessary, sufficient peers
by A. ,1. Balfour.
Premier Asquith showed the ministers had pursued an entirely proper constitutional course.
After the premier's speech the debate on the Unionist side virtually
collapsed.
HOSPITAL FEES
Question  Raised of Collecting From
City Employees for
Hospital Dues
The question of deducting $1 a
month from the men working on city
works and the turning of the proceeds over to the hospital to assure
all of these men hospital treatment
In case of sickness was brought up
by Aid. Hilditch last evening. Aid.
Hilditch favored some such move, as
it would ensure the men and save
the hospital and Indirectly the city
from loss. It would allow the men
affected a chance to have some funds
when they came out of the hospital
to be used during the convalescing
period instead of taking all that is
coming under the insurance system
to pay hospital fees.
Aid. Douglas thought this should
first be referred to the men.
The city solicitor pointed out difficulties in the way of doing as suggested unless the men were agreeable.
Aid. Hilditch thought it might he
incorporated in new contracts.
The matter was referred to the
city solicitor.
In connection with the same subject a report was presented during
the evening showing the standing of
the insurance on the city workmen.
There had been paid in by the city
$710.20. There had been paid out
on account of claims $461.14 and
there were claims for $200 more now
held.
The conventions to nominate candidates for the coming election In
Comox-Atlin district will be held In
Nanaimo. The Conservatives have
called their convention for next Wednesday, August 16..
The local delegates expect to leave
for the south by the G. T. P. steamer
on Monday morning, reaching Nanaimo on Tuesday afternoon, which
Will allow them an opportunity to
attend the convention and, If necessary, get back to Prince Rupert on
the same steamer.
Premier McBride is to be present
at the convention in Nanaimo and
will undoubtedly address the gather
ing. It is practically settled that he
will not accept nomination for Comox-Atlin. It la, moreover, very unlikely that he will retire from provincial politics at present. While
there has been strong pressure
brought to bear upon him to enter
federal politics thel'e has likewise
been an attempt made to induce him
to continue to administer affairs in
the province where he has been so
eminently successful and where it Is
felt his guiding hand is still required.
The Liberals of Comox-Atlin have
likewise selected Nanaimo as a meeting place, taking as the date
August  19.
AWAIT NEW VESSEL
LAUNDRY DISTRICT
Prince John of the G.T.P. Service is Bylaw Will be Introduced to Eliminate
Expected to Reach Here Chinese Washhouses in Resi-
Today.
.Steamer  Will  He Put Into Commission ut Once on the Queen
Charlotte Run
The G. T. P.'s new steamer the
Prince John is expected in port this
afternoon. She is bringing a mixed
cargo and will, after discharging, enter upon her duties in the regular
service between here and the Queen
Charlotte   Islands.
The acquisition of the new vessel
has enabled the G. T, P. to promote
several officers. Captain Wearmouth
who has been master of the Prince
Albert ever since she was put on
the northern route, has gained much
experience in navigating the difficult waters between Queen Charlotte
City and Prince Rupert and will be
in charge of the Prince John, being
suceeded on the Prince Albert by
Captain Duncan McKenzie, formerly
of the Rupert City. The following
are the officers of the Prince John:
Chief officer, H. McClelland, formerly first officer on the Prince Rupert;
first officer, Mr. Griffiths, formerly
first officer on the Prince Albert;
second officer, Mr. McKernan, who
is the only officer to remain on the
vessel of those who came out on
her; purser and wireless operator,
J. S. Durage; chief engineer, T. Anderson, formerly in the same position on the Henrietta; chief steward, J. W. Shiel, ex-Prince Albert.
Mr. McKenzie will suceed Mr. McClelland as first officer on the
Prince Rupert.
dential Quarters.
In  Future They  Will  Be Compelled
to  Locate on  Comox  Avenue
Within  Two Blocks
FERTILE SOIL
Grass From Lakelse Attains a Height
of Seven Foet and a
Half
TO RUSH THE WORK
C.T.P.
SYNOD MEETING
Anglican     Clergy    From     Different
Parts   of   the   Diocese  Gather
in the City
The Anglican Synod is meeting in
the city this week. Today at noon
Bishop Du Vernet delivered his
charge to delegates to the gathering.
The clergy present are: Archdeacon Colllson of Kincolith, Rev. T. J.
.Marsh of Kltsumkalum, Rev, W. Ho-
gan of Masset, Rev. A. K. Price of
Gitwanger, Skeena River, Rev, R, W.
Gurd of Claxton, Canon Keene of
Metlakatla.
Several local laymen are acting as
the representatives of outside points.
Mrs. J. H. Hilditch is giving an
"at home" this afternoon In honor
of Mrs. D. McCall Stitt, Mrs. C.
Sleetler and Mrs. White, who are
visiting   in   the  city.
Excursion  to Metlakatla
The Ladies' Aid of the Methodist
Church will have an excursion fo
Metlakatla on Thursday, August 10.
The first boat will leave Davis'
wharf at 1:30 p. m.j second boat
at 6 p. m. Fare and supper Included
will be 75 cents. Ice cream sold by
the ladles. The public Is invited.
Plenty of room for everyone. Come!
Thursday afternoon, this enjoyable
outing!
A laundry and wash-house bylaw
is to be introduced into the city
council by Aid. Hilditch. It will be
prepared by the city solicitor along
the line of those adopted in other
citieB having for its object the forcing of Chinese who open wash-houses
to keep their places clean and conform more to the rules observed in
white laundries. It Is proposed also
to limit the location of laundries and
wash-houses in the future. A decision last night was reached to make
blocks 41 and 42 section 5, the location. This Is close to the restricted
area on Comox avenue. The rule
will not apply to places already doing
business.
Aid. Hilditch in his notice of motion last night designated blocks 41
to 4 6, section a, as the location for
laundries and wash-houses.
Aid. Smith wanted to know if this
would  apply  to  steam  laundries.     •
Aid. Hilditch said it would apply
to any built in future. It would not
apply to those now in existence.
Aid. Douglas objected to making
that a laundry district.
Aid. Hilditch said he did not care
where it went. If there was any
other site more suitable he would
accept the suggestion. He explained
that his action was taken now because there was an application in for
permission to build a Chinese wash-
house on Fifth avenue where one had
burned down before. The bylaw was
introduced to prevent the erection
of Chinese wash-houses in the residential  quarters.
A reference to the map of the city
resulted in the selection of the site
suggested, but with the creation of
a smaller district; namely, two blocks
instead  of six.
It was suggested by the solicitor
that the bylaw should he made comprehensive and cover the buildings
us well, reference being made to
floors, etc., and the disposal of
water.
This was agreed to and will he
included in the bylaw.
F. E. Cowell, who has valuable
holdings in the Lakelse Valley, has
arrived in the city with a practical
demonstration of what the Lakelse
will produce. He has several stalks
of wl'd grass which were growing in
a wild state in the rich bottom lands
in the val'ey. The grass brought to
the city by Mr. Cowell showed a
height of seven  feet  six inches.
While Mr. Cowell does not pretend that this seven foot grass is
the ordinary growth in the valley yet
it grows so luxuriantly that a man
is hidden among it. Occasional
shoots are found equal to or nearly
approaching the ones he cut.
The grass is a wonderful advertisement as to the productiveness of
that part of the province. Any land
that will produce such a rrowth of
vegetation is certainly among the
favored  spots  of  the  earth.
 o	
Advanced  Pay
On the report of the finance committee it was decided last evening
to increase the pay of the sanitary
inspector, who has many other duties to perform, to $90 from January
1 and to $100 from July 1.
 o	
Oppose Reciprocity
Among the visitors to Prince Rupert this week was John L. Beek-
with, a Victoria traveller. Mr. Beck-
with has just returned from a trip
to the east and says that there is
a remarkably strong feeling there
against reciprocity. Even on the
prairies there is a strong wave opposed to the pact proposed to be
entered into. The Liberals havf
tried in various ways to overcome
the feeling against the move in Its
own party. D. C. Cameron if Winnipeg, one of the most pronounced
opponents, is now made lieutenant
governor of the province in succession to Sir Danied McMillan in order,
it is fully believed, to keep down his
active opposition.
 o	
MINISTER TO RETIRE'
Will Let Last Portion of Railway Within Short
Time.
There Is Little  Doubt  Now hut  Road
Will   lie  Completed
in   1018
From all information available, it
appears that the G. T. P. is to lose
no time in completing the final gap
between Burns Lake, to which point
the contract for construction has
been let from this end, to Tete Jaune
Cache. An announcement has been
made from Montreal, though unofficially, that Foley, Welch & Stewart
will be awarded the contract for the
distance from Bums Lake to Tete
Jaune  Cache.
The Information sent out is to the
effect that it is understood that the
G. T. P. railway is to award to
Messrs. Foley, Welch & Stewart a
contract for the const ruction of the
uncompleted gap in" British Columbia extending from Tete Jaune Cache,
fifty miles west of Yellowhead Pass,
to Aldermere, in the Bulkley Valley,
a distance of approximately 415
miles.
J. W. Stewart, managing director
of the firm, has been at Montreal
for nearly ten days. Negotiations in
regards to various details are now
in progress and it is expected that
the deal will be closed before the
end of the week.
The same firm built the main line
westward from Saskatoon and expects to have the rails extended
across the summit to Tete Jaune
Cache by the end of December next.
Railhead is now only twenty miles
east of Yellowhead Pass, at the summit, and grading is in progress west
of the divide to Tete Jaune Cache.
Complete in 1l>t:«
Messrs.   Foley,   Welch   &   Stewart
OPENING  CAMPAIGN
Sir Alan Aylesworth Minister of Justice
Will Not be a Candidate
at Election.
His  Portfolio  Will   Be  Taken,  It Is
Expected, by Hugh Guthrie
of Guelph
(Special to The Journal)
Ottawa, Aug. 8.—Sir Alan Aylesworth has definitely announced that
he will not again be a candidate in
North York. He has tendered the
resignation of the portfolio of minister of justice to Sir Wilfrid, who
will be obliged reluctantly to ac-
eept it.
The premier strongly urged Sir
Alan to continue in the government
but the latter, on account of his
deafness, thinks it right he should
retire.
He will continue to hold the portfolio a few weeks yet, until his successor, who will probably be Hugh
Guthrie of Guelph,  is sworn  in.
I Special to The Journal)
Montreal, Aug. 8.—R. L. Borden will open his campaign In
the eastern townships on August
29 with an address at Farnham.
In the next few days following
he will speak at Sherbrooke. He
will be accompanied by Hon.
.1. C. Doherty, Charles Casgrsin
and H. S. .Ames.
I will undertake to complete the entire
Brltich Columbia section before the
end  of  11113,  when  the  line  will  be
[formally opened for through traffic.
The advantage of awarding the
whole of the intervening space to one
firm under one contrail is commended upon by experienced men as of
decided advantage in tlie early completion of the work. It will enable
the firm to put a very complete outfit on the ground and thus expedite
| the work very materially.
It is more than probable the river
steamers used by the company on the
I Skeena will  he taken  to pieces with
| the completion of the line to Hazel-
Sir Alan  will resume the practice!1"11  **n**   ,he  machinery    and   other
of law in Toronto.
No Shooting in City
A bylaw against the use of fire-
anus in the city bounds lias been
been ordered prepared by the city
council, it will be along the usual
lines, making it unlawful to shoot
within the city limits without special
permission.
 o :	
Supplying   Liquor
Mrs. Reda was this morning fined
$200 and costs by J, II. McMullIn,
S. M., upon a charge of supplying
liquor to an Indian. The charge was
laid by A. J. Phlllipson, special officer for the Indian department. A
second charge has been laid agalnsl
her by the city police—that of selling liquor without a license. This
was adjourned this morning.
parts available will be taken lo the
waterways In the interior to be used
in tiie carriage or supplies to the
different points to be so reached.
Undoubtedly this had a part in the
awarding of thhe contrail. It would
lie doubtful if the contracting com-
  puny  would  find  it  advisable to  un-
Judge Lampman of victoria Is dertake the work except on condition
holding I'ourt here, this week while!"1' having a large contrail ahead of
rudge Young is absent In Hazelton them such as the 416 miles repre-
holdtng court  there. sents.
Yesterday  the case of Creech  vs. —o    -
Skinner  was  heard  by Judge Lamp-1 OPENS HARNESS SHOP
HOLDING COURT HERE
Judge    Liimpmnu    is   in   the   City
Relieving Judge
Young
judgment     given     this
I'ii'st   of   Ils   Kind   lo   Ite   Located   in
Prince Rupert  Begins Business
on   Second   Avenue.
man     and
morning.
In this action Harvey Creech, the
plaintiff, sought to recover $35 for
a boat which he contended had been
lost to him by the defendant allow-; The first harness shop In Prince
ing It to be used during his ahsence, | Itupert opened for business yesterday
over a year ago. He also had a'morning on Second avenue near
claim for lumber used for shelving, I Eleventh street. It has been opened
which lie I'ontended Mr. Skinner had by Austin Brown, well known in
taken out of the buildings. this   city,   and   who   is   himself   an
The  defendant  on   the  last  count  experienced  harness  maker.     He has
contended he was given permission
to use the lumber to put the place
in   repair   when   he   rented   It.
His honor gave judgment for the
plaintiff as to the value of the boat,
bul dismissed the action in as far
as the shelving was concerned.
very coniniodleeus quarters and has
fitted up his shop with electrically
driven machinery, being equipped to
do all closses of new work or repairing.
The harness Bhop and saddlery will
carry a very ful' line of goods, thus
The mall  for Skeena  River points
ill close a:  s o'c'ock this evening.
L, VV, Patmore appeared for the filling a want in the city. The best
lainttff and C. V. Bennett for the! attention will he given by Mr. Brown
' fe iiiinnt. I to all customers. PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Tuesday, August 8, 1911.
ON TUBERCULOSIS
Inquiries Into the Various Forms Which
are Net With Among
Animals.
Information Derived From Investigation Into the Whole
Subject
Tlie final reporl of the British
royal commission appointed to inquire into tlie transmission of tuberculosis and other aspects of tlie ills-
ease was issued two weeks ago. The
commissioners hold thai tlie human
and bovine types are two varieties
of the same bacillus, anil the le'sinns
which they produce are manifestations of ihe same' disease. Important recommendations on ihe subject
of ihe public milk supply are contained in the report, the government
being urged to enforce feuul regulations to afford better security against,
the infection of human beings
through articles of diet derived from
tuberculosis animals.
Tlie commission was appointed to
investigate the following questions:
Whether the disease in animals
and man is one and the same.
Whether animals and man can be
reciprocally   infected   with   it.
Under what conditions, if at all,
the transmission of the disease from
animals to man takes place, and
what are the circumstances favorable or unfavorable to such transmission.
The com missioners state that for
purposes of description it is advisable to distinguish three types of
tubercle bacilli, having individual
characters—the human, bovine, and
avian types. The commission has
therefore attempted to answer the
above questions by studying these
three types of the disease in animals and in man as it occurs naturally
as well as when produced by experiments.
In the three interim reports presented during the investigations, the
commission presented earlier results
as they were arrived at, and it now
shows In the final report how far
the total results afford replies to
the questions to he investigated.
In regard to the first question the
commission concludes that the human and bovine types are two varieties of the same bacillus, and the
lesions which they produce, whether
in man or in other animals, are manifestations of the same disease.
This conclusion was deduced from
the following observations: The
chief difference Detween bovine and
human bacilli is the difference of
virulence towards certain animals,
but in many animals a fatal issue
results in both cases, notably in
guinea pigs, chimpanzees, and other
monkeys. While as a rule the human bacilli present a greater luxuriance of growth than those of the
bovine type, the gap between tlie
two varieties, and in certain instances, Is very small  indeed.
Human and bovine bacilli are
"morphologically indistinguishable"
—that is, they have taken the same
form. Note must be taken, too, of
the exceptional characters of bacilli
isolated from lupus and equine tuberculosis, which' combine features
of both types. There would remain,
therefore, only slight cultured differences for making the two types distinct  organisms.
The commission states that there
is not sufficient ground, however,
for asserting that the avian and human types are one and the same disease.
Dealing with the second question,
the commission concludes that, excluding fowl and other birds from
the reply, mammals and men can be
reciprocally infected with tuberculosis. Many cases of fatal tubercu
losis have been produced in the hu
man subject by the bacillus known
to produce the disease in cattle. Pigs.
on the other hand, are capable of
harboring, if not encouraging, the
human and avian tubercle. The
chimpanzee, one of the mamals most
resembling man, is susceptible to
both bovine and human types, but re.
sists attempts to Inoculate the avian
type.
The report adds that it is extreme
ly Important to bear In mind that the
pulmonary form of the disease in
man can sometimes be caused by the
bovine bacilli.
Discussing possible sources of In.
fection, tbe commissioners say it may
be asked in what way are children,
who are especially liable to exhibit
acme fatal tuberculosis as an ab
douiinal affection, most likely to obtain a large and fatally infective
dose of tubercle bacilli? To this
question there can he put but one
answer.
"The evidence wliicn we have ac
cumulated goes to demonstrate that
a considerable amount of the tuber
culosls of childhood is to be ascribed tee Infection with bacilli of the
bovine type transmitted in meals
largely consisting of the milk of the
cow. In many cases of abdominal
tuberculosis and in tuberculosis of
the cervical gland the child may be
injured through the milk without
fatal results. In all cases of the
cervical gland tuberculosis investigated by the commissioners the patients had recovered or were recovering  after operation."
"In the interests of infants and
children," the report proceeds, "the
members of the population whom we
have proved to be specially endangered, and for the reasonable safeguarding of the public health generally, we would urge that existing
regulations and the supervision of
milk production and meat preparation be not relaxed; that, on the
contrary, the government should
cause to ben enforced throughout
the kingdom food regulations planned to afford better securityf against
the infection of human being
through the medium of articles of
diet derived from tuberculosis animals. More particularly, we would
urge action in this sense in order
to avert or minimise the present danger arising from the consumption of
infected milk."
The commissioners state in conclusion: "We are convinced that measures for securing the prevention of
the injection of living bovine tubercle bacilli with milk would greatly
reduce the number of cases of abdominal and cervical gland tuberculosis of children, and that such measures should include the exclusion of
the milk of the recognizably tuberculous cow, irrespective of the site
of the disease, .whether in the udder
or  in  the  internal   organs."
 o—	
LE ROI MINE SOLD
Reported   in   London   That   the   Famous Property Has Changed
Hands
The Canadian Associated Press in
London has been informed by A. J.
.McMillan, liquidator of the Le Roie
.Mining Company, says the Rossland
Miner, that an agreement has been
provisionally entered into with the
Consolidated Mining and Smelting
Company of Canada, Ltd., for the
sale to them of the Le Roi mine.
The agreement was ratified on Friday and the purchase price is stated
as being $250,000. R. H. Stewart,
general manager of the Consolidated
Company has confirmed the report,
although he has received no official
notification as yet. He was not in
a position to give any details of the
plan of development of the mine proposed by his company.
You Can Avoid This
by sending your Clothes to the
PIONEER  STEAM  LAUNDRY
There are Many
Reasons Why
IT   IS   TO   YOUR   INTEREST
We do first-class work and
are careful    with    your    Garments.    We can do your work
and return It within 48 hours
if necessary.    We call for your
uaundry and return It to you.
Should anything be lost or misplaced we will make it satisfactory.
v When your Laundry goes to the  Chinks there  are    many   drawbacks.    When you send It to us  your  money  helpB    pay   WHITE
LABOR.
PIONEER STEAM LAUNDRY
PUBLIC HIGHWAYS
Province of British Columbia
NOTICE is hereby given that all
Public Highways in unorganized Districts, and all Main Trunk Roads in
organized Districts are sixty-six feet
wide, and have a width of thirty-
three feet on each side of the mean
straight centre line of the travelled
road. THOMAS TAYLOR,
Minister of Public Works.
Department of Public Works, Victoria.  B. C, July 7, 1911.    jyl8-ol8
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE.
NOTICE Is hereby given that the
reserve of a parcel of land situated
on Graham Island, notice of which
appeared in the British Columbia
Gazette on the 25 th of February,
1909, being dated 23rd February,
1909, Is cancelled to permit of the
lands being acquired by pre-emption
only and for no other purpose
ROBT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Department of Lands,
Victoria, B. C, April 5th, 1911.
4-14—7-5
WATER  NOTICE
I, C. N. Prlng, of Prince Rupert,
B. C, occupation broker, give notice
that on the 12th day of July I intend tho apply to the Water Commissioner at his office in Prince Rupert, for a license to take and use
2.8 cubic feet of water per second
from Hot Springs on border of Lake
Lakelse in the Skeena Land Division of Coast District. The water is
to be taken directly from the Springs
and Is to be used on Lot No. 3983,
for sanitary purposes.
Dated June 12th, 1911.
C. N. PRING,
6-13-lm Prince Rupert, B. C.
NOTICE.
In the matter of an application for
the issue of a duplicate of the Certificate of Title for an undivided
one-half of Lot 883, Group I,
Cassiar District:
Notice Is hereby given that it is
my intention to issue at the expiration of one month after the first
publication hereof a duplicate of the
Certificate of Title to the above
mentioned land in the name 'of William Jordan Larkworthy, which Certificate is dated the 30th day of September, 1910, and numbered 3 26R.
WILLIAM   E.   BURRITT,
Di'rict Registrar.
Land Registry Office,
Prince Rupert, B. C,
May  26,  1911. J23
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Coast—Range  V.
TAKE NOTICE that John Kir-
naldy, of Lakelse Valley, occupation
farmer, i>... i to apply for~permls-
sion to purchase tin following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 120 chaius south
from the south end of Herman
Lake; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains.
JOHN  KIRKALDY.
Dated April 11, 1911. 5-5
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that I, V. W.
Smith, of Prince Rupert, occupation
contractor, intend to apply for permission to lease the following de-
scribed foreshore:—Commencing at
a post planted about 2 miles in a
southerly direction from Port Simp
son; thence northerly along high
water mark 25 chains and containing all foreshore between high and
low water mark.
V. W. SMITH,
Locator.
Staked 31st May,  1911. 6-6
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE.
Notice is hereby given the the
reserve existing by reason of. the
notice published in the British Columbia Gazette of the 27th December, 1907, over lands on Graham Island, formerly covered by Timber
Licences Nos. Nos. 37055, 37056 and
37057, which expired on the 6th day
of November, 1909, and the lands
embraced within Timber Licence No.
37059, which expired on the 26th
day of January, 1909, is cancelled,
and that the said lands will be open
for pre-emption only under the provisions of Section 7 of the "Land
Act" after midnight on June 16th,
1911.
ROBERT A.   RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Lands Department,
Victoria, B. C,
9th March, 1911.
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that Prince Rupert Sand & Gravel Company, Ltd.,
of Prince Rupert, occupation Industrial Company, intends to apply for
permission to lease the following described land:— Commencing at a
post planted at the Witness post on
the southerly boundary of Lot 4124;
thence southerly following the sinuosities of the shore line 60 cnains
more or less to southerly end of the
Island; tlience easterly 10 chains
more or less to low water mark;
thence northerly 60 chains more or
less along low water mark; thence
westerly 10 chains more or -eS3 to
the point of comnie-ncement.
PRINCE RUPERT SAND &
GRAVEL Co., LTD.
Per J. Y. Rochester, Agt.
Dated May 30, 1911. 6-2
Skeena   Land    District—District   of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that I, Joseph
Pastl, of Watson, Sask., occupation
farmer, Intend to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:— Commencing at a
post planted about 30 c.ains iu a
northerly direction from the N. E.
corner of Lot No. 2662 or T. L. No.
3 2598 at Lakelse Lake; tlience north
20 chains; thence east 40 cliains;
tlience south 20 chains along shore
of Lakelse Lake; thence west 40
cliains to point of commencement,
containing 120 acres, more or less.
JOSEPH PASTL.
George Hir, Agent.
Dated May 5,  1911. 6-2
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gilllngham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land:—
Commencing at a post planted six
miles N. E. of the mouth of White
River and the junction of the Naas
River on Canyon Creek, marked
Chas. J. Gillingham's S. E. Corner;
thence 80 chains North; tlience 80
chains West) thence 80 chains
South; tlience 80 chains East to
point of commencement and containing 640 acres more or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles M. Huff, Agent.
Dated March 4th, 1911. 4-18
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE, that I, Minnie
Meredith, of Victoria, B. C., occupation a married woman, intend to
apply for permission to purchase the
following desoribed lands:—Commencing at a post planted about 40
chalnB distant and in a South direction from the Southeast corner of
Lot 1733; thence east 40 chains;
thence south 40 chains; thence west
40 chains; thence north 40 chains
to point of commencement, containing 160 acres more or less.
MINNIE  MEREDITH.
John Klrkaldy,
Agent.
Dated  February  20th,  19J1.
Skeena  Land  District—District
of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that Joseph Edward Merryfield, of Prince Rupert,
occupation merchant, intends to apply for permission to lease the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about 10 chains
nortn from the northeast corner of
Lot 33; thence west 1500 feet to
shore of Smith's Island; thence following shore in a southerly direction
1200 feet; thence east to shore of
De Horsey Island; thence following
shore in a northerly direction to
point of commencemont.
JOSEPH EDWARD MERRYFIELD.
E. Spro, Agent.
Dated April 4, 1911. 4-7
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast Range 5.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles
James Gillingham, of Prince Rupert,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply for permission to purohase the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner of Lot 992 and
marked C. J. Gillingham's N. E.
Corner Application for Purchase; I,
C. J. Gillingham, intend to apply
for permission to purchase 320 acres
of land bounded as follows:—Commencing at this post; thence 80
chains south; thence 40 ohains west;
thence 80 chains north; thence 40
chains east to place of commencement.
CHARLES JAMES GIL1INGHAX
Robeirt Osborn Jennings, Agent.
Dated January 5, 1911.
Skeena    Land   District—District   of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that I, Charles
Percy Hickman, of Naas Harbour,
occupation constable, Intend to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lunds:— Commencing at a post plunted on the
east shore of Naas Bay, about two
miles in an easterly direction from
Lot 3, marked C. P. H., S. W. corner; thence east 20 chains; thence
north 40 chains to the shore; thence
along the shore line to the place of
commencement, containing 40 acres,
more or less.
CHARLES PRECY HICKMAN.
Dated June 7, 1911. 6-30
Skeena   Land   District —District   of
...ceena.
TAKE NOTICE that the Canadian
Canning Company, Limited, of 224
Winch Building, Vancouver, B. C,
occupation salmon caners, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted adjoining
a post marked W. N. about 300 feet
South of Wallace's wharf, Naas Harbour, B. C; thence east 20 chains;
thence south 20 chains; thence west
20 chains; thence following the
coast line in a northerly direction
back to the point of commencement
and containing forty acres more or
less.
CANADIAN CANNING CO., LTD.
Per G. H. Leslie, Agent.
Dated  6th June, 1911. 6-26
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast, Range 5.
TAKE NOTICE that T. H. Hughes,
of Lakelse Valley, occupation farmer,
intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted at the southeast corner of Lot
4128; thence 40 chains north; thence
40 chains east; thence 40 chains
south; thence 40 chains west to point
of commencement, ,and containing
160 acres, more or less.
TOM HUGH HUGHES.
Dated June 5, 1911.
Skeena  Land  District-—District
of Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that Thomas Stewart, of Prince Rupert, occupation
accountant, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted 40 chains north from
the southwest corner of Lot 1733;
tlience west 40 chains; thence south
40 chains; thence east 40 chains;
thence north 40 chains to point of
commencement.
THOMAS STEWART.
John  Klrkaldy, Agent.
Dated July 7, 1911.
WATER NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that an
application will be made under Part
V of the "Water Act, 1909," to obtain a licence in the Queen Charlotte
Islands Division of Skeena District.
(a) The name, address and occupation of the applicant—Orland P.
Merrill; Massett, Graham Island,
B. C;  prospector.
(If for mining purposes) Free Miner's Certificate No	
(b) The name of the lake,
stream or source (if unnamed, the
description is)—Ain Lake and Ain
River.
(c) The point of diversion—At
or near Ain Lake.
(d) The quantity of water applied for (in cubic feet per second)
—700.
(e) The character of the proposed
works — Hum, flume, pipe line and
power  plant.
(f) The  premises on  w'li !i  t
water is to be used   id '.■ s
—Near mouth of Ain River.
(g) The purposes  for  \vl*lch
water  is  to    be    used—General
power.
(h)    If for irrigation, describe
land to be irrigated, giving acre.'
—THE—
Oliver
Typewriter
—FOR—
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Please read the headline over
again. Then its tremendous significance will dawn upon you.
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—yours for 17 cents a day!
The typewriter whose conquest of
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(I) If the water is to be used for
power or for mining purposes, describe the place where the water is
to be returned to some natural channel, and the difference in altitude
between point of diversion and point
of return—Near mouth of Ain River
about 150 feet'below point of diversion.
(j) Area of Crown land intended
to be occupied by the proposed
works—• About 10 acres.
(k) This notice was posted on
the tenth day of June, 1911, and application will be made to the Commissioner on the fourth day of September, 1911.
(1) Give the names and addresses
of any riparian proprietors or licensees who or whose lands are
likely to be affected by the proposed
works, either above or below the
outlet—None.
(Signature)  ORLAND P. MERRILL,
(P.  O. Address)   Masset, B.  C.
George S. Mayer, Agent,
(P.  O.  Address)   Masset, B. C.
Note—One cubic foot per second
is equivalent to 35.71 miner's inches.
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that I, John Y.
Rochester, of Prince Rupert, occupation broker, intend to apply fir permission to lease the following described land:— Commencing at a
post planted on the northerly end of
an island in the Skeena River about
Mile 45 on the Grand Trunk Pacific
Railway; thence north 1000 feet
more or less to low water mark;
thence westerly along the low water
mark 1000 feet more or less;
thence southerly 1000 feet more or
less; thence easterly 1000 feet to
the place of commencement.
J. Y. ROCHESTER.
Dated May 30, 1911. 6-2
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that T.- M. Turner,
of Lakelse Valley, occupation farmer, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands: — Commencing at a post
planted on the Omineca & Hazelton
right of way and'adjoinlng the N. E.
corner of Lot 518; thence west 17
chains to corner of Lot 3996; thence
north 20 chains; thence following
right of way to point of commencement.
T. M. TURNER,
John Klrkaldy, Agent.
Dated 14th June, 1911. 7-4
Skeena    Land    Notice—District    of
Coast—Range V
TAKE NOTICE that Daniel W.
Beaton, of Prince Rupert, B. C, occupation carpenter, Intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about five miles
up the Exchumslk River from Its
mouth, and on its south bank; thence
east 40 chains; thence north 40
cliains; thence west .40 chains;
thence south 40 chains to place of
commencement.
DANIEL  W.   BEATON.
Dated  June  14,  1911. J-ll
We announced this new sales plan
recently, just to feel the pulse of the
people. Simply a small cash payment—then 17 cents a day. That
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The result has been such a deluge of applications for machine!
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The majority of inquiries has
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standing who were attracted by the
novelty of the proposition. An Impressive demonstration of the Immense popularity of the Oliver Typewriter.
A startling confirmation of our belief that the Era of Universal Typewriting is at hand.
A Quarter of a Million People are
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OLIVET**
The Standard Visible Writer
Tbe Oliver Typewriter Is a moneymaker, right from the word "go!" So
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Wherever you are, there's work to
be done and money to be made by
using the Oliver. The business world
is calling for Oliver operators. There
are not enough to supply the demand.
Their salaries are considerably above
those of many classes of workers.
"An Oliver Typewriter In
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That is our battle cry today. We
have made the Oliver supreme In
usefulness and absolutely Indispensable In business. Now comes the
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The simplicity and strength of the
Oliver fit it for family use. It Is becoming an important factor In the
home training of young people. An
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Our new selling plan puts the
Oliver on the threshold of every
home in America. Will you close
the door of your home or office on
this remarkable Oliver opportunity?
Write for further details of our
easy offer and a free copy of the new
Oliver catalogue.    Address:
R. C. BEAN
Prince Rnpert Agent
General   Offices:   Oliver   Typewriter
Building, Chicago, 111.
MISS HENNY WENNERSIjlN
SWEDISH SPECIALIST
Electric, « aclal and Scalp treatment;
Scientific Massage treatment for
rheumatism, nervousness and poor
circulation. Manicuring also Chiropody work. m
Tuesday, August 8, 1911.
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
IMMIGRATION FRAUDS
T. R. G. Mclnnes Goes Very Fully Into
the Whole Question in Letter
to Press.
He  Replies  to  the  Finding  of  Mr.
Justice Murphy and Tells of
Whitewashing
In a letter to the Montreal Star,
T. R. E. Mclnnes replies at length
to the findings made by Mr. Justice
Murphy on Chinese smuggling. He
Bays:
Sir—On Saturday you published
the findings of Mr. Justice Murphy
of Vancouver, who sat as a commissioner to Inquire into Chinese immigration and opium smuggling in British Columbia. My reputation is at
stake in this matter, and 1 now ask
you to give equal prominence to what
I have to say in reply to this honorable judge.
I make four charges: (1) I say
that the first four statements or findings made by this commissioner in
summing up his report are irrelevant; (2) I say that the Dominion
government permitted Hie fraudulent
entry of Chinese to continue without
any attempt at prevention for at
least two years after its attention
had been formally drawn thereto;
(3) I say that the Dominion government deliberately delayed criminal
proceedings against the guilty Chinese indicated by its own commissioner, Judge .Murphy, for two
months In order to allow them to
escape from justice; (4) I say that
If Sir Wilfrid Laurier, when replying to Mr. Borden in the House on
Friday, meant me when he said:
"The only person not a Chinaman
who was suspected was not appointed
by this government," then Sir Wilfrid Laurier did not speak by the
book.
I will deal with this last charge
first, and the .doing so involves the
whole question of my connection
with the government. In August,
1907, the Indians of the Garden River reservation iu Algoma were being debauched by American whisky
sellers, operating on Sugar Island in
the State of Michigan, just across
the river from the Canadian reservation. Members of parliament, priests
and missionaries were asking the
government to do something in the
matter, but as the whisky sellers
were on American territory and the
Canadian Indians crossed the river
to them, the situation was difficult.
Neither under U. S. federal or state
laws was it unlawful to sell liquor
to a Canadian Ionian on American
territory; and so the offenders felt
secure. My services were asked by
the Indian department. As a result,
inside of a month the offenders were
arrested, convicted of something, and
jailed  in  .Michigan.
In the following month the Chinese riots occurred in Vancouver,
and Hon. Frank Oliver, mindful perhaps of my Michigan success, asked
me to go to Vancouver, to report on
the situation, and advise as to what
should be done. I returned in three
weeks with a report which anticipated the later finding of Mackenzie
King. My report was acted upon,
and copies were sent to tlie Imperial
government and to the government
of India. Two months later, owing
to the activities of the Asiatic Exclusion League, and the fear of renewed
riots, Sir Wilfrid Laurier wrote a
note to Mr. Oliver.giving it to me to
take to him, asking that I be sent
again to the coast, nominally for
the immigration department, in reality to attempt to check a dangerous
situation, and to be on hand to advise if emergencies arose. I was
there all winter. The riots threatened and actually planned in Seattle
wgre averted. To Gordon Grant,
president at the time of the Asiatic
Exclusion League, the credit for this
Is largely due. His sense of loalty
was awakened when he was shown
what was being planned by American
agitators, and what the success of
their plot would mean to Canadian
and Imperial interests. This Is the
Mr. Grant upon whom Commissioner
Murphy throws a slur in the third
paragraph of the summary of his
report.
The next summer, I acted as adviser to all the Chinese of Vancouver
in preparing their damage claims
for consideration by Mackenzie
King, special commissioner to assess
damages in connection with the September riots. On this occasion, I
talked with Owyang King, then Chinese consul at San Francisco, and
Tung Chlng Ling, attache of the Chinese embassy at London, as to future relations between Canada and
China and the chance of developing
a large trade between the two countries, the profits of which would
tend   to  overcome  race  antagonism.
At that time there was no Canadian
trade commissioner in China.I :::id
many Chinese clients, and a knowledge of local Chinese customs u;:d
business methods. I sent in a report either to the trade and commerce department or the interior department, I forget which, but dealing with the whole question of developing Canada's trade with China
and urging the appointment of Canadian commissioners at Canton,
Shanghai and Tien Tsin. I discussed
the matter with Mackenzie King, and
he heartily approved, and promised
his support if I wanted the position.
Many strong recommendations were
made on my behalf. The government
adopted the suggestions in my report so far as to establish an office
at Shanghai, but appointed the late
Mr.  MacLean  Instead of me.
After Mr. MacLean's death, which
occurred In the following September,
Mr. O'Hara telephoned for me, and
asked If I were still open for the
position. I replied that I was, and
would be willing to go in February,
after I had finished my first draft
of a new immigration act, which I
had been retained by Mr. Oliver to
prepare. A recommendation to council was prepared accordingly, and
signed by Sir Richard Cartwright.
The appointment, however, was
blocked by Mr. Templeman. That
ended the matter. I never sought
the position after that, because Mr.
Templeman had unwittingly done me
a good turn; remaining in Canada
proved vastly to my advantage. From
time to time after that I had a retainer from the government for special services. Among them was the
drawing of the new Immigration Act
referred to. This involved observation of the methods actually practised by American and Canadian officers at seaports and on the boundary.
Now it. happened that the Hon. Frank
Oliver, in September, 1908, feared
something in Alberta on the part of
the Conservatives which he called
"skullduggery." The general elections were on at the time, and he
asked me to go to Calgary and vicinity on a still hunt for this "skullduggery." Up to this time my services had been absolutely non-political, and Oliver knew that I had
no more respect for one side than for
the other. He did know, however,
that I generally got results worth
while in any matter which I undertook. I found to my surprise, however, that he did not propose to
pay my fee from any party fund, but
that I was to go on political service
at government expense, to cover
which I was to make a report on
immigration matters. This was not
much to my stomach, but in connec
tion with the act upon which I was
working I wanted to observe the official immigration machinei between
Winnipeg and Vancouver, particularly along the Britisii Columbia border and at Seattle. I did, however,
throw an eye over political methods
at Calgary and vicinity for about
ten days, becoming satisfied that
honest voting was the style there,
and that anything in the nature of
"skullduggery" was more to be apprehended from the Liberals than
from the Conservatives. This I told
to the Hon. Frank, and left him to
go about my proper business.
On December 10 1908, I sent In
a report to Mr. Oliver, covering my
observations on this trip, and making certain recommendations. It
was during this visit to the coast
that I first paid any particular attention to the smuggling of Chinese
Immigrants. In drafting my Immigration Act, I wished it to apply
equally to Chinese, considering that
there should be but one Immigration
Act, designed to apply equally to all
classes of immigrants, and administered by one department. As far
aB I remember, however, I made no
written report then as to this smuggling, wishing to make a fuller investigation later on. But a year before that time 1 am told that Officer Busby of the customs department,
had noticed and reported upon these
frauds, but, to put It mildly, was
not encouraged to disclose anything
further In that line.
Well a year later, November 10,
1909, I made another report to Mr.
Skeena Land Llstrict—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post, planted
one mile east of the southeast corner of C.L. 4472; thence west 80
cliains; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence south
80 chains to place of commencement.
AUSTIN M.  BROWN.
Dated July 17,  19-11.	
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the southeast corner of C.L. 4472; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south
80 chains to place of commencement.
AUSTIN M.  BROWN.
Dated July 17, 1911.	
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the northeast corner
of C.L. 4471; theuce west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east
80 chains; thence north 80 chains to
1-lace of commencement.
AUSTIN M.  BROWN.
Dated July 17, 1911.
(Continued on Page Six)
Queen Charlotte Land District—District of Skeena
TAKE NOTICE that S. Barclay
Martin, Jr., of New Westminster,
occupation engineer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted at the
northeast corner of ungazetted lot
1428, said lot being T.L. 39979;
thence north and following the
westerly shore of Massett Inlet 80
chains; thence west 20 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east
40 chains, more or less, to the point
of commencement, and containing
240 acres, more or less.
S.  BARCLAY MARTIN, Jr.
Dated  July  21,  1911. S-8
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
"'ARE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince nupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the northeast corner
of C.L. 4471; thence east 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence west
80 chains; thence north 80 chains,
to place of commencement.
AUSTIN M.  BROWN.
Dated July 17, 1911.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date; I, Austin M. Brown, of
Priiice Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the south corner of
C.L. 44i0; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thonce south
80 chains; thence east 80 chains, to
place of commencement.
AUSTIN M.  BROWN.
Dated July 17,  1911.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE   NOTICE   that   thirty   days
from  date,   I,  Austin   M.   Brown,  of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler,  Intend  to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and  petroleum
on and  under 640  acres of land  on
Graham    Island    described    as    follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the southeast corner   of   C.L.   4470;   thence   east   80
chains;    thence   north    80    chains;
thence west 80 chains;  thence south
80 chains, to place of commencement.
AUSTIN M.  BROWN.
Dated July 17, 1911.
Skeena Land  District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, b. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the northeast corner
of C.L. 4469; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 ehains; thence east
80 chains; thence north 80 chains,
to place of commencement.
AUSTIN M. BROWN.
Dated July 17, 1911.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the northeast corner
of C.L. 4469; thence eaBt 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence west
80 chains; thence north 80 chains to
place of commencement.
AUSTIN M.  BROWN.
Dated July 17, 1911.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, Intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the southeast corner
of C.L. 4476; thence west 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence east
80 cliains; thence south 80 chains,
to place of commencement.
AUSTIN  M.  BROWN.
Dated July  17,  1911.
Skeena  Land  District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, Intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the south corner of
C.L.4475; tlience north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; tlience south
80 chains; thence west 80 cliains to
place of commencement.
AUSTIN M.  BRO..N.
Dated July 17,  1911.
Skeena  Land  District—District  of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prin.ce Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, Intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile north of the northeast corner of C.L. 4477; thence west 80
ehains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence north
80 chains, to place of commencement.
AUSTIN M.   BROWN.
Dated July 17, 1911.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to tt| Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on* and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows :—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the northeast corner
of C.L. 44,4; ihence east 80 chains;
tlience south SO chains; thence west
80 chains; thence north 80 chains, to
place of commencement.
AUSTIN  M.   BROWN.
Dated July 17, 1911.   	
Skeena Land  District—District  of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Henry Edenshaw, of
.Masset, B. C, occupation storekeeper, Intend to apply to the Chief Commissioner of Lands for a license to
prospect for coal and petroleum on
and under 640 acres of land on Graham Island described as follows: —
Commencing at a post planted on the
west shore of West River, one mile
easterly from the mouth of said river; thence soutli 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence north 80 j
chains; thence west 80 chains to the j
place of commencement.
HENRY EDENSHAW.
Dated July 17,  1911.
COAL MINES ACT
Skeena Land  District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Henry Edenshaw, of
Masset, B. C, by occupation storekeeper, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham, Island described as follows:
—Commencing at a post planted on
the west shore of the West River,
about one mile easterly from the
mouth of said river; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 cliains; thence south
80 chains, to place of commencement.
HENRY EDENSHAW.
Dated July  17,  1911.
Skeena   Land   District—District    of
( ' (i c S i '1 r
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, ii.tends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Commencing at post planted 6%
miles N. E. of the mouth of the
White River and the junction of the
Naas, marked Chas. J. Gillingham's
S. E. Corner; thence 80 chains
North; thence 80 chains West;
thence 80 chains South; thence 80
chains East to point of commencement and containing 640 acres more
or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles M. Huff, Agent.
Dated March 4,  1911. 4-18
Skeena  Land  District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows'—Com mincing at. post planted
at the southeast corner of C.L. 4477;
thence east 80 chains; thence north
80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
tlience south 80 chains, to place of
commencement.
AUSTIN M.  BROWN.
Dated July 17, 1911.	
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
at the southeast corner of C.L.4478;
thence north 80 chains; uienee east
80 chains; e..ience south 80 chains;
thence west 80 ehains, to place of
commencement.
AUSTIN  M.  BROWN.
Dated July 17, 1911.	
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen  Charlote Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Wirt A. Stevens, of Chicago, 111., U. S. A., occupation civil engineer, intends to
apply for permission to purchase
the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on
the shore of Masset Inlet about one
mile northeast of the mouth of the
Ain River; thence north 80 chains;
tbence west 40 chains more or less
to the eastern boundary of T. L. j
35413; thence south along the
boundary of T. L. 35413 and!
T. L. 35414, a distance of 80 chains;
thence east 40 cliains, more or less,
to point of commencement, containing  320   acres  more  or  less.
WIRT   A.   STEVEMS.
G. S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated Feb.  24th,  1911.
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that I, Roy.
Chrisman, of Port Esslngton, B. C
occupation prospector, intend to apply for permission to lease the following described land:—Commencing at a post planted about five
miles distant and in a southwesterly
direction from the point at the entrance to Captain Cove, Petrel
Channel, and on the northeast side
of McCauley Island; thence west 20
chains; thence south 40 chains;
tbence east about 20 chains to shore
of Petrel Channel; thence northerly
along shore line of Petrel Channel
to point of commencement and containing eighty acres more or less.
ROY CHRISMAN.
Dated April 11, 1911. 4-25
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
C1 Jis s i iir
TAKJ NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, Intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Comencing at a pet planted 7 miles
N. E. of the mouth of the White
River and the junction of the Naas,
marked Chas. J. Gillingham's S. E.
Corner; thence 80 chains North;
thence 80 chains West; thence 80
chains South; thence 80 chains East
to point of commencement and containing 640 acres more or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles  M.  Huff, Agent.
Dated  March  5th,  1911. 4-18
Skeena   Land   District—District    of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Commencing at a post planted 7>4
miles N. E, of the mouth of the
White River and the junction of the
Naas and marked Chas. J. Gillingham's S. E. Corner; thence 80
chains Nortli; thence 80 chains
West; thence 80 chains South;
thence 80 chains East to point of
commencement and containing 640
acres more or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles  M.  Huff, Agent.
Dated March 5th, 1911. 4-18
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
at the southeast corner of C.L. 4467;
thence north 80 chains; thence east
80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains, to place of
commencement.
AUSTIN M.  BROWN.
Dated July 17, 1911.	
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that W. H. Ferguson, of Prince Rupert, B. C, occupation civil engineer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about one
mile southerly, following the sinuosities of the shore line from the
southwest corner of Lot 104, Range
V; thence 20 chains west; thence 20
chains south; thence 20 chains west,
thence 20 chains south; thence 20
chains west; tlience about 40 chains
south; thence along shore northerly
to point of commencement.
W. H. FERGUSON.
G. Hansen, Agent.
Dated April 22nd, 1911. 4-25
Skeena Land District—District of
O&ssi [ir
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, intends te
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Commencing at a post planted 7 Vi
miles N. E. of the mouth of the
White River and the junction of the
Naas, marked Chas. J. Gillingham's
S. E. Corner; thence 80 »hains
North; thence SO chains West;
tlience 80 chains S-Mth; thence 80
chains East to point cf commencement and containing 640 acres more
or leas.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles  M.  Huff, Agent.
Dated March  5th,  1911. 4-18
Skeena Land  District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
at the southeast corner of C.L. 4465;
tlience north 80 chains; thence east
SO chains; thence south 80 cliains;
thence west 80 chains, to place of
commencement.    ,
AUSTIN  M.  BROWN.
Dated July 16, 1911.       	
Skeena Land  District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Henry Edenshaw, of
Masset, B. C, by occupation storekeeper, Intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and urider e,nl acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:
Commencing at a post planted on the
hank of west River, about one mile
easterly from the mouth of said river; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains, to
place of commencement.
HENRY EDENSHAW.
Dated July 17, 1911.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Henry Edenshaw, of
Masset, B. C, by occupation storekeeper, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum on
and under 640 acres of land on Graham Island described as follows: —
Commencing at a post planted on the
west shore of West Kiver, about one
mile easterly from the mouth of said
river; thence north SO chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence south SO
chains; thence east SO chains, to
place of commencement.
HENRY EDENSHAW.
Dated  July  17,   1911.
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast
TAKE NOTICE that F. T. Saunders, of Vancouver, occupation master
mariner, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands:— Commencing at a
post planted about 6 miles northwest of Love Inlet on the north
east shore of Pitt Island; thence
south 20 chains; thence west 40
chains; thence nortli to shore;
thence following shore In a southeasterly direction to point of commencement , containing 80 acres
more or less.
FRANK TAUNTON SAUNDERS,
Locator.
W. Hamilton, Agent.
Staked 17th, Feb., 1911.
Skeena Land District—Dlstrlot of
Queen Charlotte Island.
TAKE NOTICE that Robert Fraser Ogllvle, of Vancouver, occupation banker, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the folowing
described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 2 miles west of
the southwest corner of A. P. 12-
037; thence east 80 chains; tbence
north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains to
point of commencement, containing
640 acres.
ROBERT FRASER OGILVIE.
Arthur  Robertson,  Agent.
Dated  Dec.  9,' 1910.
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
TAKE     NOTICE   that   Charles   J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation    contractor,    intends    to
apply to  the  Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect   for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land:-—
Commencing at  a  post  planted   6 u
miles N.  E.  of the  mouth    of    the
White River and the junction of the
Naas, and marked  Chas. J. Gillingham's     S.   E.   Corner;     thence     80
chains   Nortn;    thence     SO     cnains
West;    thence    80    chains    South;
thence 80 chains    East to point of
commencement   and   containing   640
acres more or less.
CHARLES J.  GILLINGHAM.
Charles  M.  Huff, Agent.
Dated March 4th, 1911. 4-18
Skeena    Land    District—District    of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Commencing at a post planted about
8 miles N. E. of the mouth of White
River and the junction of the Naas
River, marked Charles J. Dillingham's S. E. Corner; thence 80
chains North; tlience 80 chains
West; thence 80 chains South;
thence 80 chains East to point of
commencement and containing 640
acres more or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles  M.   Huf,", Agent.
Dated March 5th, 1911. 4-18
Skeena Land District—District of
of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that James G.
Cromble, of Prince Rupert, occupation auditor, Intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:— Sommencing at a
post planted at the 'northwest corner, 55 chains east and 20 chains
south from northeast corner of Lot
1116 (Horry Survey), Coast. Dist.,
range 5; thence 20 chains east;
thence 25 chains, more or less,
south to Angus McLeod Pre-emption; thence 20 chains west; thence'
25 chains, more or less, north, to j
ieost of commencement, containing
GO acres, more or less.
JAMES G.  CROMBIB.
Fred  Bohlen, Agent, i
Dated  June  14,  1911. 6-23
Skeena Land  District—District
of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that Victor H.
Reynolds, of Hull, Massachusetts, occupation chauffeur, Intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described land:—Commencing at a post planted at high water
mark on the northerly side of tbe
entrance to a small unnamed cove on
the west coast of Pitt Island, about
one-quarter mile south of the entrance to Kltkatla summer village;
thence east forty chains: thence
fioutli twenty chains; thence west
forty chains; thence north ten
chains more or less to high water
mark; thence following along high
water mark around the head of the
cove back to the commencement, and
containing sixty (60)  acres more or
VICTOR H.  REYNOLDS.
J. H. Plllsbury, Agent.
Dated Feb. 18th, 1911.
LINDSAY'S CARTAGE & STORAGE
G. T. P. CARTAGE AGENTS
oiTlce nt H. II. Rochester, Centre St.
LADYSMITH  COAL
Is handled hy us.   All orders recelv*
prompt attention.   Phone No  68.
,-*> PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Tuesday, August 8, 1911.
prince ISuoert journal
Telephone  138
Published twice a week ou Tuesdays and Fridays from the office of
publication, Third Avenue, near
McBride Street.
Subscription rate to any point in
Cauada, $2.00 a year;  to points out-:
side of Canada, $3.00 a year.
Advertising    rates    furnished    one
application.
O. H. NELSON,
Editor.
Tuesday, August  8,  1911.
the United States, the reversal of
the imperial preference doctrine
have changed all this. They who
have been silent on political questions are speaking out. Some who
have supported the government on
business grounds can do so no longer.
Less ardent Conservatives who gave
a silent vote, or cast uncertain ballots according to personal preference
or local issues, are now outspoken.
This is a contest-in which many
new voices will be heard, and many
will speak more Impressively than
ever before.
Illi:   IMPENDING  CONTEST
The election now pending will be'
less distinctly a party struggle than
those of recent years. While Hie
leaders are the same us tliree years
ago, the chief issue is new. In 1908
Sir Wilfrid Laurier assured the people that reciprocity was no longer
soughi or desired by Canada, and
that '.iu- government was promoting
c'oser trade relations with the Empire, says the News-Advertiser. Today we find the government returning toward the programme of twenty
years asu, which the people rejected
with scorn in 1SS7 and 1891. On
this ousolete policy the premier Is
appealing to the obsolete constituencies.
A purely party struggle for office
and patronage does not greatly interest the average man of business,
unless lie has a natural liking for
politics for its own sake. There are
many professional men, especially
preachers and teachers, who do not
concern themselves much with the
political game. But these and others
who have lookea upon elections as
an entertainment for politically disposed persons, find their attention
earnestly attracted to the issue now
before the county. It is not a mere
fight between the ins and the outs.
A great national and imperial issue
is pending. President Taft has told
us one solemn truth. Canada is at
the parting of the ways.
It is no small thing which drove
Mr. Sifton, Mr. German and Mr.
Lloyd Harris, all Liberal members,
and one of them a former minister,
to resist the government policy in
the House of Commons. Only a departure of the gravest moment
would have driven eighteen leading
Liberal business men of Ontario to
issue their protest against the treaty
and to organize a league to oppose
it. Again we point out that one of
these Libera's is president of the
Toronto Board of Trade, and three
others have held that office; that
one has been deputy minister of justices, and one lieutenant governor
of Ontario. One has been, or is now,
president of the second largest bank
in Canada, and others are known
to trade and industry throughout
Canada. Among others who have
raised their voice against reciprocity,
is the last Liberal premier of Ontario, now a senator of Canada.
Mr, Sifton has made an appeal to
the Canadian Clubs. There are many
loyal and national societies which
will find it impossible to be neutral!
with the reciprocity issue before the
country. Many persons whose position and professional relations cause
them to withdraw from political controversy find it wrong to keep silent'
In this emergency, and Impossible to |
refrain  from  a  protest  by ballot.
A fair share of the leaders in business In the commercial, industrial i
and financial centres have until now
given tlie Laurier administration j
their support. They took notice of,
the fact that the government did not. j
destroy the national policy. They
found that unrestricted reciprocity
and commercial union were dropped.)
They observed that the government |
was going forward with the develop-1
ment of ihe west and continued the
policy of railway development even
to the limit of recklessness. It is
well known that manufacturers, railway builders and contractors have
nol left, ministers without campaign
funds. Bul the suilili'ii change of
programme and the restoration of
the- eiid policy of entanglement with
THE   LAST  ELECTION
In the election of 190S the Liberals elected 134 members and the
Conservatives S7. According to the
statement of the Clerk of the Crown
In Chancery the popular vote stood:
Liberal       596„533
Conservative       579,571
Majority          16,962
If the parties had been represented according i.o the vote the membership would have been:
Liberals        112
Conservatives       109
Following is the standing of the
House by provinces:
Liberal Con.
Ontario       36 50
Quebec       54 11
New  Brunswick   . .   11 2
P. E. Island  ..."..     3 1
Manitoba      2 8
Ilritish Columbia   .     2 5
Saskatchewan    ...     9 1
Alberta       4 3
Yukon           1 (1
THE CALL TO ARMS
It is thirty-three years since we
had a September election in Canada.
The last time was in 1878, when a
Liberal government went to the country with high hopes and its opponents achieved one of the most decisive victories in the politics of the
Dominion, says the Edmonton Journal.
The date of the voting in that year
was on September 17, four days
earlier than that which Sir Wilfrid
Laurier and his colleagues have now
picked upon. Will history repeat
itself?
The situation then and now offers
another parallel. It was a trade issue which brought about the defeat
of the government in 1878. It
thought that its fiscal policy was so
completely in line with public sentiment that the possibility of defeat
was never suggested. The Laurier
administration challenges a popular
verdict with undoubted self-confidence. If it did not think that it
could win out, there would of course
be no premature dissolution. But
its leaders and its newspapers do not
speak half as vauntingly as did their
predecessors a third of a century ago.
Pride has many a time gone before destruction and a haughty spirit
before its fall. Such was certainly
the case with the Mackenzie government and it will as surely be so with
that which as occupied the place of
power since 1896.
Sir John A. .Macdonald raised the
banner of economic independence.
Mr. Borden is doing the same. The
same forces that made victory for
the old leader are bound to come
to the support of the man who now
wears his mantle.
But the latter's task is rendered
less dififcult for another reason. Mr.
.Mackenzie's government had been in
powev but four and a half years. Sir
Wilfrid's for over fifteen. Where
the one had given exceptionally honest and businesslike administration
and was in the full flush of vigor and
youth, the other has all the weaknesses of a long tenure of office, with
the Inevitable record of departmental scandal and of internal fueds to
contend with.
If ever a time was ripe for a Conservative victory, It Is the present
and In the testimony of both the
present and the past the party should
find everything to encourage It to
go into the fray with courage nnd
confidence. The cause which it is
championing Is one that must appeal
to all who have the future welfare
of the country at heart. It is a vast
responsibility which is committed to
those who are citizens of Canada at
the present moment. On the verdict
which they render the course which
the enormous development in prospect for us is to take will very largely
depend.
It is no ordinary feeling of partisan loyalty, therefore, which
should inspire those who will rally
in the course of the next few weeks
to the support of the men who are
leading the onslaught on the forces
that have too long held the reins of
authority.
[EMIT   DUTY
Government Allows Coal From U. S.
to t'onie in Free to Overcome
Effects of Strike
That the efforts of the various
boards of trade, business en's associations and labor organizations In
ihe province of Alberta to bring
about a remission of the Canadian
customs duties on coal imported
from the United States have been
productive of results Is evidenced by
the fact that an order in council
has been passed suspending all duties on coal for a period of two
weeks.
The news of the action of the government was contained in a telegram
received by Hon. C. R. Mitchell, attorney general and acting premier of
the province. The telegram follows:
Ottawa, Oont., Aug. 1. 1911—Hon.
C. R. Mitchell, Acting Premier, Alberta, Edmonton, Alta.—The federal
government has passed an order in
council authorizing the remission of
duties on coal importated into Alberta on and after August 7, provided work is not resumed at the mines
by that date; such remission of duties to continue for a period of two
weeks after the enactment of a further order which' may be passed by
the governor In council, revoking the
present order, and which it is the
intention of the government to pass
as soon as in the judgment of the
governor in council mining operations have been sufficiently resumed
to meet public requirements.
W.  L.  MACKENZIE  KING,
Minister of Labor.
 o	
Wrecked  on   Island
After a very narrow escape from
drowning Austin Brown of this city
has returned from a prospecting tour
on the west coast of Graham Island.
With Henry Edenshaw, Matthew
Youmans and a young son of Mr.
Edenshaw, Mr. Brown was caught
in rough weather off the west coast
of the island. They were caught
in an open boat, which could not
live in the surf encountered. The
boat capsized but fortunately the
force of the waves threw them all
landwards and they managed by holding too the boat to reach shore.
''."i.***********************.:.
* .♦«
* News of the Province      *
* 7
&*************************
NEW WESTMINSTER—The first
British Columbia section of the Canadian portion of the Pacific highway
has been formally opened, and F. J.
McKenzie, M. P. P.; Government
Agent Fletcher and Alderman Bry-
son had the distinction of travelling
in the first automobile over the new
road. It was regretted that John
Sprott, road superintendent, who had
taken such an active interest in the
construction of the new road, and
who was looking forward to being
one of the first to travel over it, was
unable to be present on account cf
ill-health. The party left New Westminster, and went over the highway
to the highest point, where they j
were met by another automobile
from Blaine, bearing Harry Lytton,
a prominent citizen of Blaine, who
had worked hard for the building of
the Pacific Highway; H. W. Sheets,
editor and proprietor of the Blaine
Journal, and A. Broe, a photographer. Perhaps one of the happiest
of the party was Mr. McKenzie, who
has supervised the work on the road.
***************** *********
Remember
That we
Import
Our Wines
* direct from Europe;  and that
S no house in Prince Rupert can
* equal   them   for   quality.     No
*
* better can be bought anywhere
...
... in the Province.    We make a
* specialty  of
Family Trade
and guarantee satisfaction
* We  also   carry   a   complete *
* *
* stock of other *
Liquors
Try a glass of
Cascade
Beer
* The best local  beer on  the X
* market. '?
•:• v
* *
*  .  *
CLARKE BROS.
*
* Christiansen & Brandt Bid.
*
* Telephone 30
Third Avenue  *
*
9j>*************************
The section of the road opened yesterday is nineteen miles long, and
the $35,000 appropriated by the provincial government has all been
spent, grading and clearing it to the
full width of forty feet. Since May
1, five camps have been at work,
including about six or eight teams
of horses and twenty men. The road,
having been all graded and cleared,
the government is now preparing to
macadamize it, and by next year
there will be one of the finest roads
from Vancouver to tbe United States
boundary that exists anywhere.
TRAINING   TEACHERS
VICTORIA—One has only to visit
the camp outside Work Point barracks to see some of the benefits
the school teachers have obtained
from their month's course of training for the cadet instructors' course.
Bronzed and smiling faces, brawny
limbs, and a generally soldierly and
alert appearance tell their own story,
says the Colonist. Such results
were confirmed by conversation with
the twenty-one volunteers taking
part, who have come from public
schools in all parts of the province
and have derived must enjoyment as
they have knowledge from their first
experience of military life. They
have been encamped since July 4,
and every day since then have gone
through a regular and systematic
course of military training to prepare
them for their practical and theoretical   examinations   for   Hie  cadet   in-
The British Columbia Company
LIMITED.
AUTHORIZED CAPITAL $100,000.::  PAID UP CAPITAL $41,500
DIRECTORS:—Reginald C. Brown, President; J. C. Maclure, Vice-
President; H. E. Marks, Managing Director; Capt. E. Nash, William
McNair, R. A.  Bevan, and F.  C.   Williams, Secretary.      :-:       :-:
INTEREST 4 PER CENT. DEPOSITS
This Company acts as Executors, Administrators, Transferees and
Secretaries to Public Companies.    Commercial, Industrial and other
business propositions underwritten.    Issues  made  on  the
London and New York Stock Exchanges.
TIMBER, COAL, LANDS, and
COMPANY ORGANIZATION
Head Office for Canada, 203, 208, 210, 215 Carter-Cotton Building,
VANCOUVER, B.C.
The Staneland Co. Ltd
•IS THE-
Paint Supply House
of British Columbia
ALL GOODS ARE GUARANTEED
WRITE FOR PRICES AND SAMPLES
The Staneland Co. Ltd
836-840 Fort Street, VICTORIA, B.C.
I —"***1
Replenish
the
Pantry
High-Class,...
Grocery
Stock
to choose from
EVERYTHING CLEAN AND FRESH
Goods for the Table to Suit the Most
Fastidious  Housewife
! MERRYFIELD'S |
CASH GROCERY
I
■
structor's diploma. The examinations
begin today and will onclude on
Thursday. The camp will break up
the following day. Some idea of the
scope of study and practical work
done by the teachers each day from
"early morn to dewy eve" while in
camp may be gathered from the syllabus of the examinations for the
cadet  instructor's certificate.
The Thompson
Hardware Co.
Job  Printing of all  kinds neatly
executed at the Journal Office.
—Second Avenue-
4   Paints. General Hardware,
*     Oils, Stoves and Ranges.
*
2nd Avenue
Prince Rupert,
B.C.
Real
Estate
INVESTMENTS
Real
Estate
List Your
Properties
with
Uncle Jerry
JEREMIAH H. KUGLER   -   -
He Sells Buildings He Sells Contracts
He has Houses to Rent
He Buys Lots He Builds Homes
He Buys Leases He Loans Money
He Ha3 Farms for Sale
He Sells Houses He Rents Stores
kodh
JEREMIAH H. KUGLER
Special Bargains in
KITSELAS LANDS
FRANCOIS LAKE LANDS
LAKELSE LANDS
HAZELTON  DISTRICT   LANDS
BULKLEY  VALLEY  LANDS
KISPIOX VALLEY LANDS
PORCHER  ISLAND  LANDS
KITSUMKALUM   LANDS
SAND,   GRAVEL  AND   MARBLE   DEPOSITS ^.
Tuesday, August 8, 1911.
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
**************************
I   MARINE NEWS   I
* *
* *
**************************
JOLLIFFE WAS IN
The steam tug William Jolliffe of
the B. C. Salvage Company at Esquimalt was in port on Sunday night.
She is doing fishery patrol duty
while the steamer Kestrel is being
overhauled. Captain Newcomb is on
board her representing the Dominion government and directing the
course of the vessel.
BID  CAPTAIN   FAREWELL
When the Princess Beatrice visited
port last week Captain Locke, formerly master of the Amur, was In
command. Captain Whiteley, who
has just left the steamer was very
popular. He has taken up his work
as a Victoria pilot. When the steamer reached the wharf at Victoria on
her last trip, under command of
Captain Whiteley, he was summoned
to the saloon, where the ship's company had gathered, and Chief Officer J. Shaw presented him with a
gold mounted umbrella, accompanied
by an illuminated address signed by
all hands, from chief officer to cabin
boy, congratulating the piaster on
his appointment and expressing regret that he was leaving the steamer
where he was so well liked by all
hands.
SEALING AGREEMENT
The Algerine lias not been instructed lo order the Victoria sealing
schooners.! essie, Pescawha, Thomas
F. Bayard and Lady Mines back from
Bering Sea lor the new pelagic sealing agreement is not to come into
force until netx spring. This means
that the schooners will complete the
present season in Bering Sea, wliere
36 Japanese  sealers  will  also  work.
No word has yet been received
from Ottawa regarding arrangement
for the compensation of the local
sealers, whose claims, as a result of
the stoppage of the industry, amount
to in the neighborhood of $500,000,
which is a small portion of the
amount which the Canadian government, will receive as a result of the
arrangement,
With the coming into force of the
agreement next spring clearances
will be refused to all sealers to operate north of the 35th parallel of
north latitude in the Pacific, but the
work of the hunters off Cape Horn
and in the south seas will not be
interfered wiiee.
The Japanese government will he-
gin the killing of seals ashore at
Robben bank, or as the Japanese re-
christened this place after its capture from the Russians, Arazashi
Islet, in April next. Since the Japanese took over this rookery it has
been carefully protected, the old
cruiser Musashi being ordered to patrol the nearby seas and a guard
equipped with a field gun has been
stationed there. Seals have increased as a result of this protection and
the total number there is estimated
at 6,000. Arrangements will be made
by a Japanese commossion as soon
as Messrs. Dauke and Kitahara arrive home via Siberia from Washington as to the number of seals to be
killed yearly, and Canada is to receive 20 per cent of tlie gross proceeds under the arrangement.
FLOATING CANNERY
The ship Glory of the Seas, which
went through troublous times early
this year and eventually appeared as
a bone of contention in the admiralty
court, has taken on another phase
of activity and is now reported as
a successful vessel engaged as a floating cannery In northern waters.
From Juneau, Alaska, a despatch
says that the Glory of the Seas Is
pursuing a triumphant course, with
all sails set, in the wake of king
and other varieties of salmon, canning the salmon as they are caught.
The Glory of the Seas lay in Esquimalt harbor for some months pending the hearing of a libel suit
brought by the former crew In the
admiralty court for wages due for a
cruise in the norlh. The former
owner did not oppose the suit, but
consented to the sale of the ship and
the use of the money to discharge
the debts. The sale resulted in the
payment of all dues and the large
ship then passed into the hands of
a Seattle firm, who were represented
at the sale by J. C. Johnston of Seattle. She was taken to Seattle and
commissioned, and sailed l'roih that
port to the salmon fisheries. In northern waters she Is moving from
p'ace to place in accordance with the
migration of the various varieties of
salmon, and is reported a tremendous success as a floating cannery.
By canning the fish the day they
are caught and b keeping in the wake
of the moving sockeyes. etc., It is
believed by her captain that he will
be able to operate for a much longer
season that the plans which are established upon the shore.
 o	
WICKERSHAM AFFAIR
House  Committee  Reports  Evidence
Taken in Connection Witli Alaska
Delegate's Charges
Following general charges and denials between the two Wickershams
of the government—the attorney general and the delegate from Alaska—
the house committee on judiciary decided that it had no power to do
anything but report the vldence to
the house, says a Washington despatch. It will report Delegate
Wickershani's resolution, calling on
the attorney general to furnish all
the papers and data bearing on the
alleged frauds in connection with
government coal contracts. The committee will not recommend that the
house investigate Delegate Wicker-
sham's charges that Attorney General Wickershaiu has shielded and
protected Alaska "syndicate criminals."
In a hearing enlivened with fre-
(liient and bitter clashes between the
two Wickershams, it developed that
the delegate from Alaska had offered
his legal services in 1908 to the Guggenheim interests in the Northwestern Commercial Company for a salary of $15,000 a year and the main-
Seattle, the proposal being made in
reply to an offer by the Guggenheims.
The Alaska delegate renewed his
statements that the attorney general
had shielded and protected lawbreakers who represented the Guggenheim interests in Alaska. Members of the judiciary committee frequently called on him to prove statements he made, and in some cases
challenged the sufficiency of his
proof.
Attorney General Wickersham declared that the charges of the Alaskan delegate called for vigorous denial from the fovernment officials.
 o	
'** •J* *** *»* ■$- *** 9 *** *J* *•* *** v *** *** *** *»* *•* *** *** *»* *** **■ *** *** *** ***
! LIFE AND DEATH !
* *
lie *
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
Dr. Andrew Wilson writes an interesting article on the two great
mysteries of life and death. He says:
It is only repeating a truism to
assert that death divides the Interest
of life with birth and development,
therefore it Is not surprising to find
that the subject of death has always
occupied a very large place in the
literature both of scientific and of
ordinary kind. The topic, besides
is many sided. Scientifically, we are
interested in the causes and manner
of death, and in the phenomena
which accompany the flickerings of
the lamp of life. Theologians devote
their energies to discussions regarding the nature of the existence after
death which nearly all religious systems postulate. A third body seeks
to penetrate the veil which hids the
beyond from us, and to establish evidence that communication between
the living and the sentient dead, if
1 may so term the "intermediate"
state which is theoretically set forth,
Is not only a possibility hut an actuality. There are others who deal
with the subject after their own
Ideas and fashions, but of all the
episodes which dying and death include, the two first mentioned hold
deepest sway over mankind. What
death really means physically, or, as
the theologian would say, spiritually,
are the special phases of thought that
engage the attention of humanity.
I have been perusing a bulky volume entitled, "Death: Its Causes and
Phenomena," by Hereward Carring-
ton and Jonn R. Meader, and the
perusal has served once more to demonstrate to me how hopeless Is all
our searching after the exact nature
of death itself—its intimate causation, I mean—and how equally futile is the search after direct evidence
(I do not refer to religious faith)
regarding the state or phrase of existence, if such there be, which supervene when we have crossed "the
bourne from which no traveller returns." People often neglect to note
that death and life are conipleniental
mysteries. To the question "What
Is Life?" no definite reply can be
returned; simi arly to th e query
"What, is Deaili?" we can only reply
"the cessation of life," which leaves
the problem exactly where we found
it. I do not get any help from
Messrs. Carringthon and Meader's
book. It is bulky, discursive and
wanders over and around every conceivable subject, from the signs of
death to descriptions of death "beyond the veil." We read of accounts
given by "spirits" concerning the
"process of dying"  (and after).
We even find photographs of
bodies taken after death with mystical globes of light and other luminous manifestations appearing around
the body. We have a section devoted to "Photographing and Weighing
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IF  YOU  RUN  A
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THE WORLD
Write  for Catalog P10
The Canadian Fairbanks Co., Ltd.
101-107 WATER STREET
Locul Agent—F. M. DAVIS
VANCOUVER, B. C.
- PRINCE RUPERT
THE CONTINENTAL TRUST COMPANY, LIMITED
Authorized Capital     $500,000
Officers:
WILLIAM T. KERGIN, M. D., Press. DAVID   H.   HAYS,  First Vice-Pres.
M. 3. HOBIN, 2nd Vice-Pres. & Mgr. JAY   KUGLER,   Secretary-Treasurer
C.   II. PETERSON,  Ass't Manager
Executor nnd Administrator Receiver or Assignee
Fiscal Agents Trustees
Real Estate and Insurance
Registrar and Transfer Agent Farm La,1<ls n,,d Mine8
Agent for Care of Real Estate Escrow Agents
Trustee  Under Mortgages and  Deeds of Trust Collections
SAVINGS DEPARTMENT
4 per cent on Deposits        SAFE DEPOSIT VAULT AND BOXES
We will be pleased to answer any inquiries regarding investments in
Prince  Rupert  and  Northern  British  Columbia,
THE CONTINENTAL TRUST COMPANY, LIMITED
SECOND AVENUE
PRINCE   RUPERT,   B.   C.
the Soul," and so forth; and from
such derails it may be gathered that
the book, like the sheep's head of
Scot's repast, provides "a mass of
fine confused feeding." It is very
doubtful, however, whether the intellectual nourishment to be gained
by a perusal of this book on "Death"
really compensates for the labor of
travelling through its pages. It
stands as a discursive work, composed of all kinds of opinions and testimonies, collated with a very big
sweep of the net, indeed, in contradistinction to the works, say, of
Myers. He wrote with a philosophical mind, and his unbiassed sittings
of the evidence left him (as regards
the question of the power of communicating with the dead, at least)
as it leaves us all, as ignorant of the
state "beyond the veil" as were the
first men who essayed to solve the
problem  of  the  hereafter.
Mr. Carrington has, of course, his
own theory of the nature of the
death. We are not any wiser when
we have mastered his hypothesis. He
conceives that "raising the dead" is
a phenomenon which might be far
more frequently represented if the
"laws of life were more thoroughly
understood." Which is as much as
to say that as we do not know the
so-ca'led "laws of life," an expres
sion I take to mean that "nature of
life," so we cannot tell what death
really is. Mr. Carrington, I fear
must be regarded as hopeless from
the scientific point of view, for we
find him asking why, "on the materialistic theory," whatever that may
mean, "stoppage of the heart, or its
emptying of blood, should cause sudden death?" The only answer is that
the circulation of blood is a condition
of life's 'maintenance, and that living
tissue can only exist through constant nourishment. This answer
should suffice for any reasonable
soul. What might be a sensible
question would be that which inquired why life, in high and low
spheres alike, can only be so maintained ?
I wonder whether Mr. Carrington
has ever chanced to reflect that the
mystery which attends the life of an
amoeba—a blob of protoplasm living
in the pools—is just as great, if not
greater, than that which encompasses the existence of man. Here
is a speck of living matter, eating,
moving, and reproducing its kind,
alive In all Its parts; it dies in time,
and the mystery of Its death Is, In
turn, as deep as that which faces
us when i.nother microscopic living
unit, say, the brain cell of a man,
ceases to function. Possibly the
cause of death Is similar in each
case. The living substance no longer
receives its nourishment as it grows
1836 1911
The Bank of
British North America
75 Vcjri In Biileereel.
Capital and Reserve Over $7300,000
A Complete
Banking Service
Collections made in any part
of Canada. Negotiable paper discounted. Money advanced at
reasonable terms to finance your
business. I<ocal and foreign
Drafts bought and sold. Money
transmitted by Money Order or
Telegraph Transfer. Letters of
Credit issued payable in all the
leading cities of the world.
We invite your account.
Prince Rupert Branch—
F. S. LONG, Maaager.
08^
Double Weekly Service
S.S. PRINCE RUPERT & S.S. PRINCE GEORGE
Sail for  Vancouver,  Victoria  and  Seattle
Mondays and Fridays at 8 a.m.
Km'STEWART Thursdays and Sundays 8 a.m.
Special reduced fare Sunday's Loot J9.S0
return,   Including   meals   and   berths,
S.S.PRINCE ALBERT for Port Simpson, Naas River, Masset and
Naden Harbor, Wednesdays, 1 P.M., and for Queen Charlotte
Island points, Saturdays, 1 P.M.
RAILWAY SERVICE TO COPPER RIVER, mixed trains from
Prince Rupert Wednesdays and Saturdays, 1 P.M.; returning  Thursdays   and   Sundays,  5:20 P.M.
THE GRAND TRUNK RAILWAY SYSTEM, connecting with
trains from the Pacific Coast, operates a frequent and convenient
service of luxurious trains over its DOUBLE TRACK route between
Chicago, Toronto, Montreal, Quebec, Halifax, Portland, Boston,
New York and Philadelphia.
Atlantic  Steamship bookings arranged via all lines
Full information and tickets obtained from the office of
A. E. McMASTER
Freight and Pasenger Agent, G. T. P. Wharf.
old and enfeebled, and -cannot feed
itself; and so the purely physical mechanism wears out, its working
ceases, and it dies. The old doctors
told us death begins either in the
brain, or in the heart, or in the
lungs; but this is a statement of the
secondary cause of death, not of its
real origin. We, scorning the often
irreverent charlatanism that asserts
its power (at a fee) to converse with
the dead, may, much more wisely
re-echo old Omar's lines:
Strange is it not that of the myriads
who
Before us passed  tne door of Darkness through,
Not  one  returns  to  tell   us  of  the
Road,
Which   to  discover  we   must   travel
too?
CUTTING  DOWN   PARK
Anger and amazement have been
created at Galgary and in Banff by
the leaking out of the fact that the
Dominion government has decided to
cut several Ihousand square miles
off the area of the Rocky Mountain
National Park, of which Banff is the
centre   says the Edmonton Journal.
On June 8 last an order-in-council
was passed at Ottawa converting the
entire northern section of the park
into a forest reserve and taking it
out of the jurisdiction of Commissioner Howard Douglas. This order-
in-council was never made public,
but now the news has leaked out at
Banff, and has created consternation.
An indignation meeting of the Banff
board of trade was held  Sunday af
ternoon al which some very hard
tilings were said about the government, and the Alberta Fish and
Game Protective Association has
wired a strong protest to Ihe government.
The fact that the size of the park
had been cut down and the part
taken away converted into a forest
reserve would not matter so much
were fears not expressed that the
game regulations which for years
have been enforced in the park, will
not. apply to the section taken away.
At its narrowest part the park will
now be only sixteen and a half miles
in width, where tt formerly was a
hundred.
The part created into a forest reserve contains the breeding round
of all the sheep, goats and other
wild animals, which should be in the
mountains. If the game regulations
are not made to apply to this part
it will imply that the game will be
slaughtered on grounds which they
have learned from long experience is
sacred. The result will be the ultimate disappearance of all game
from this section of the Rockies.
Sportsmen and hunters are naturally
greatly incensed and it is feared that i
the work of ten years will be undone
in a few months.
Excursions!
Let us tell you all about the cheap
ROUND TRIP  EXCURSIONS
to all Towns and Cities in Eastern
Canada and United  States
Via
The Great Northern
Choice of Return  Route
Tickets to the Old Country by all
Lines.     Take    any    Steamer    from
Prince Rupert.
ROGERS STEAMSHIP AGENCY
Phone 110 Second Ave
Prince Rupert, B.C.
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY CO.
B. C. Coast S. S. Service
#
Famous
Princess
Line
^^
•»* •»* •j* •I* *i** *j* *** -*»* *** *Sf *** *** *** *•** *** •J* *** *■** *** •i* *i* *i* ••** *** *•* **»'
! STORAGE?
* v
* Household Goods and Baggage ♦
% given careful attention. .-.
'•'   Forwarding,   Distriouting   and *
Shipping Agents *
TRANSFERERS f
* Prince    Rupert     Warehousing i
and   Forwarding  Co. '*
First  Ave.,   near   McBride   St.  *
* %
DOUGLAS SUTHERLAND,     *
Manager.  *
Phone 202 %
* * * * •> * * * * * * * * *
| Princess Beatrice
Wednesday, Aug 9, 9 a. m.
SOUTHBOUND FOR
Vancouver, Victoria,
AND
Seattle
f    P. O. Box 007
*
■I* * * * * * * * * * * *'
»»^.»^»^.»^.4<i|i4.e|.^i<»»^H|.»^Hi.^.^.^,4.^.^.4t^«t,^.ete^i4ieHi»<»»»^eei,^.^.»^.4|,»4.^<.<.4.
GROUND
♦   *>
I Floor Space For Rent   J
* .;.
| IN THE                                     I
j HARTBUILDING    !
►J* •.
X Corner of Second Avenue and Sixth Street
* *
I The Best Business Corner in  f
•J* V
a *
| Prince Rupert
Jermiah H. Kugler, Ltd.
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast—Range' V.
TAKE NOTICE thai Edward H.
Port, of Prince Rupert, B. C„ occu-
ntion farmer, Intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following described lands:— Commencing
at a post planted in the Soulh West
Corner, on Ihe shore line of Lake
Lakelse; thence. 20 ehains Easl, to
South West Corner of Lot 884;
thence 30 chains North, following
along the West line, of Lol 684 to
post; thence Soutli, following along
the shore line of said Lake to point
of commencement, containing about
4 0 acres.
EDWARD II.  PORT.
By C.  N.  I'ring. Agent.
Dated June 20,  1911. 8-26
6-26
J. G. McNAR,
General Agent.
Free Employment
Office
For all kinds of help. Cooks, waiters, dishwashers, hotel porters, all
kinds of laborers or mochnnlrs, call
up 178 or call at  the
FREE EMPLOYMENT OFFICE
GRAND HOTEL
Headquarters for Cooks and Waiters
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlol te Ulands.
TAKE NOTICE lhat Alice Millard
of .Masset, B. C, occupation married i
woman, intends to apply for permission  to  purchase  the  following  de- i
scribed  lands:—  Commencing  at  a ;
post  planted   about   SO  chains  east
and  120  chains north  of the N.  E. !
corner  of  Lot  33;   thence  north  80 |
chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
south   SO  chains;   thence    west     80 i
chains, containing 640 acres.
ALICE MILLARD,
M. A. Merrill, Agent
Dated Nov. 2."., 1910,
ROGERS & BLACK
Wholesale Dealers In
BUILDING   MATERIAL,     CEMENT,
LIME,   HAIIt-I HIRE PLASTER
COKE, BLACKSMITH COAL,
COMMON BRICK, PRESSED BRICK
SHINGLES AM) LATH
NEW  WELLINGTON   COAL
All   orders   promptly   filled—see   us
for prices.
PHONE 11(1 PHONE 116
t
For Neat Job Printing
see the Journal Man
Tel. VIS
) PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Tuesday, August 8, 1911.
AUGUST : FURNITURE : SALE
If You have not visited our store it will PAY YOU TO DO SO NOW.   Since lowering to street grade, we have our immense
stock in shape for your inspection and convincing SALE PRICES in all grades of FURNISHINGS.   Have you stopped to consider
the Savings of $ $ $ on the House Furnishing you require?
FOR  CASH       20 and 25 per cent. Discount       pQR  CASH
Music and Parlor Cabinets
DINING TABLES, BUFFETS,
CHINA CABINETS, CHIFFONNIERS, LARGE EASY CHAIRS,
Leather Covered; PARLOR TABLES
and COUCHES
Iron Beds
Regular   Value   of   IRON   BEDS,
$5.00.    Sale Price, any size  ..$3.50
This same reduction given  to  all
Iron Beds in our large assortment.
20 Different Designs BRASS EXTENSION RODS, at Cut in Two
Prices.
DRAPERIES
Ten Thousand Yards — MADRAS,
MUSLINS, CRETONNES, SATEENS,
NETTINGS for your window treatment to be offered at this Daring
25   %   Discount.
Dressers and Stands
DRESSERS and STANDS, Surfaced
Oak. Rregular Value, $18.50. Special Sale Price $14.50
15 other different designs to receive this  reduction.
DRESSERS, So'id, Quarter-Cut
Oak, Golden Mahogany and Early
English receive our Special 20% Reduction.
GO-CART SPECIAL
Regular $13.50 and $12.50 Collapse-
able GO-CART.    Sale Price  . .  $8.50
OFFICE DESKS
A Full Line of OFFICE DESKS—
Roll Tops, Flat Tops and Type Writing  Desks.
Complete House Furnisher
THIRD AVENUE
GEO. D. TITE,
Complete House Furnisher
THIRD AVENUE
GOVERNMENT WORK
Hudson's Bay Railway Will be Construe
ted as a Public Undertaking.
Undertaking Will  Re  Started  ut an
Early Date From
the Pas
Action looking to the construction
of the Hudson's Bay Railway will
be taken immediately. Following
the government's decision to construct the railway itself, surveys
were completed and tenders asked for
last June for the construction of the
first 200 miles extending from Pas
Mission, Keewatin territory, to
Thicket Portage and running in a
northeasterly direction through the
country north of the Saskatchewan
River. Tenders have been opened.
In all, eight were received, but the
choice, it is said, was narrowed
down to two, those submitted by J.
D. McArthur of Winnipeg and M. J.
O'Brien. It is the intention of the
government to start the work of construction at the earliest possible moment and It is regarded as likely
that the successful contractor will
be at work before September 1. Con-
slruction will commence from the
north end of the government bridge
over the Saskatchewan at the Pas.
If. as Is probable, Port Nelson Is
selected as the terminal port, the
railway will be approximately 500
miles in length and the government
anticipates putting down a considerable portion of the first 200 miles
of roadbed provided for by the present contract before the advent of
winter.
 o	
NO   LABOR   FAMINE
west,  this province will  otbain her
full share.
"The Canadian Pacific and Grand
Trunk Pacific railways are prepared
to send in a couple of thousand laborers immediately. At Toronto
crowds are flocking to the offices of
the provincial departments or to the
offices of the railway companies,
eager to make the journey into the
west, and earn the high wages
which are to be paid during the
western farmer hustling season.
"The railway companies were
companies were afraid that if they
granted through tickets to Alberta j
in connection with their harvest excursions, this province would get the
lion's share of the supply of harvest
hands, but we are confident that the
supply will be met."
A large force of men is to be employed by the provincial government
to supply intending harvesters with
detailed information as to the need
for hands in various parts of Alberta. The force will be under the
direction of Commissioner Daley in
Winnipeg, and a list compiled from
the statistics of various districts will
be at their command. Farmers who
are in need of help have been appealed to by the department of agriculture to send in a list of the men
required, and when the hands who
are to gather in the bumper crops
leave Winnipeg they will in many
Instances have determined their exact destination in advance.
IMMIGRATION FRAUDS
(Continued from Page Three)
Alberta Will  Have Plenty of Work-
ers  for  Tills   Vein's
Harvest
"The Albertan's farmers' call foi
harvesters Is meet'ng with a ready
response in Ontario and the notliern
states," says Publicity Commissioner
Hotchkiss, "and the prospects are
that of the abundance of labor In
tbe east generally available for the
work of atherlng in the crops of the
Egg Competition
Great Interest is manifested by
provincial poultrymen in the egg-
laying competition, which Ib to continue for one year from October 1
next, under the joint auspices of the
provincial association and the Vancouver exhibition directorate, entries
for which are to clOBe on the 14 th
prox. A committee of experts controls all arangement8, and the prizes
are of no Inconsiderable value, running from $10 to $100 In each class
—In addition to which winning birds
are certain to obtain such advertising as will make their future eggs
almost golden in the values they will
command In the fanciers   market.
People of Norwalk are suffering
from "oily eye " the latest human
affliction, according to physicians. It
was caused by the placing of 100,000
gallons of oil on the streets.
Oliver, detailing the system of fraud
practiced by the Chinese both as regards evading head tax and smuggling opium. That report is completely verified in every detail by
the evidence given before Commissioner Murphy two years after, and
the commissioner makes that two-
year-old report of mine the basis of
the only conclusions and recommendations that are relevant or worthy
of consideration in his own report
now laid on the table of the House.
But when I made that report In
November, 1909, Mr. Oliver was
afraid to act upon it. I urged him
strongly one day in February, 1910,
saying that not only was the continuing fraud bad alike for the reputable
Chinese and the whites, but that the
government' was losing hundreds of
thousands of dollars of revenue.
Mr. Oliver, in his own frank
phraseology, replied: "To hell with
the government; I'm not going to
mix up in the thing and get old
Cartwright jumping on me in council." About March, however, a copy
of this last report came into the
hands of Mr. O'Hara, and he began
inquiries on his own account; Inquiries which he pushed to a successful  conclusion.
In July, he instructed Secret Service Officer Foster—a man familiar
with the coast, and who had done
good service there during the Asiatic
troubles—to go to Vancouver and
observe the working of the Chinese
Immigration Act at that port. At
the same time Sir Wilfrid, then acting minister of the interior issued
the following order: "That T. R. E.
Mclnnes should again visit the western provinces with a view to his reporting along the same lines as he
did in his reports to the minister
of the 10th December, 1908, and the
10th November, 1909, touching on
the immigration questions and the
adminlstatlon of the Immigration
Act in these provinces. Mr. Mclnnes will return In the month of
September next, and his employment
will be on the same terms as authorized before by the minister."
Now, Foster, although a very ca-
able officer, would have been helpless at Vancouver 1n this matter
without the assistance which 1 was
able to give or procure for him, because he had no special knowledge
of Chinese, and he had to encounter
the strong opposition of the govern
ment officials, and the C. P. R. and
other steamship company , officials,
and also political influences on both
sides. The Liberal patronage committee for some reason wanted no
interference with the status qou;
the Conservatives did not want to
assist for various reasons.
The Chinese ring took advantage
of the situation. Having got Foster
under way, assisted by David Lew,
I went to Calgary and gave Sir Wilfrid an interim verbal report. He
approved and said to proceed, and
I did so. When the time was ripe
for the sudden suspension of Yip
On, I wired to Sir Wilfrid's secretary,
asking that it be done, and my suggestions were carried out to the letter. As a result the system of fraudulent entry was exposed, some of
the guilty .officials have been recommended for prosecution and given
time to escape, and a complete
change In the administration of the
Chinese Act along the lines which I
recommended in 1909 has taken
place.
This brings me to the third charge
which I make. If the government
had acted immediately on the commissioner's report being received the
guilty Chinese could have been arrested and tried, and at such trial
much more evidence implicating
others could have been brought out.
I know that the recently smashed
smuggling ring counted upon political protection; they thought they
had secured the friendship of leading Liberal and Conservative, politicians in Vancouver, to such an extent as to make them Immune from
prosecution. Nevertheless, the ring
has been smashed, and their revenues
from smuggling of immigrants and
opium have for the present been cut
off. Some people are very sore over
this whole affair, and these people
are not all Chinese by any means,
although they seem to have a very
yellow streak in them. As I happen
to be the main Instrument of their
undoing there is nothing at which
they will stop to injure of vilify me.
And Sir Wilfrid Laurier and Hon.
Frank Oliver, Instead of having sufficient manliness to at least make
my position honorably clear to the
public, say nothing, or insinuate, as
Sir Wilfrid did on Friday, that the
government had nothing to do with
me or my part in the affair.
As to the first and second
charges; the second was made clear
in my explanation of the fourth.
Now as to the first: The commission-
THE CANADIAN  BANK
OF COMMERCE
SIR EDMUND WALKER, C.V.O., LL.D., D.C.L, President
ALEXANDER LAIRD, General Manager
CAPITAL, - $10,000,000
^^^^^^^^^^___       REST, - $7,000,000
DRAFTS ON FOREIGN COUNTRIES
Every branch of The Canadian Bank of Commerce is equipped to issue drafts on
the principal cities in the following countries without delay :
Africa Crete
Ambit (   Cuba
Argentine Republic Denmark
Australia
Austria-Hungary
Belgium
Brazil
Bulgaria
Ceylon
Chili
China
Egypt
Faroe Island,
Finland
Formosa
France
Greece
Holland
Iceland
India
Ireland
Italy
Japan
Java
Fr'ch Cochin China Malta
Germany Manchuria
Great llritain Mexico
New Zealand
Norway
Panama
Persia
Peru
Philippine Islands
Portugal
Roumania
Russia
Ser%'ia
Severn
Siberia
Soudan
South Africa
Spain
Straits Settlement*
Sweden
Switzerland
Turkey
United State
Uruguay
West Indies, etc.
H^e amount of these drafts is stated in the money of the country where they are payable j that is they are drawn in sterling, francs, marks, lire, kronen, florins, yen,
taels, roubles, etc, as the case may be. This ensures that the payee abroad will
receive the actual amount intended. 233
J. M. CHRISTIE, Manager, Prince Rupert Branch
er's mission was to Inquire into the
working of the Chinese Immigration
Act, evasions of it, suggested improvements, and as a side issue the
question of opium smuggling. He
was not commissioned to whitewash
Templeman or the Liberal executive,
or to vilify myself or Gordon Grant
or David Lew or Officer Foster or
other persons supposed to be distasteful to the ruling Liberal clique
of Vancouver. He made a farce of
the session of the commission by
inviting all sort of irrelevant evidence which might or might not affect the status of the Liberal party
In Vancouver but which had clearly
nothing to do with evasions of the
Chinese Immigration Act. For instance, he brought in Joe Martin to
say that Bob Kelly sold the political
positions of Vancouver; then he
brought in Bob Kelly to say Joe Martin was a liar; and so on ad nauseam.
But to the real subject under investigation not one-half of the time
of the commission was devoted to it.
Then In his findings he first whitewashes Templeman (who had not
been accused), whitewashes the Liberal executive (which was not the
subject of investigation) and then
he finds me (under a special authority from the premier to Investigate)
guilty of intrigue for bo doing, saying that I, to use his own puerile
way of pitting it, tried "to establish
some sort of connection with the administration of the Chinese Restriction Act at Vancouver by obtaining
control of the Chinese interpreter
and possibly in other ways. Its object   was   to   serve   some   persona]
ends." He associates Gordon Grant
and David Lew with me in this. And
yet it was Gordon Grant as counsel
sanctioned by Sir Wilfrid before Templeman had him ousted in favor of
one of his own pets who secured the
success of the preliminary investigation; and it was David Lew upon
whom Commissioner Murphy himself
had to depend to secure evidence,
and reliable interpretation, to the
very last session of the commission.
Then this brave commissioner attacks one of the most faithful and
tried police officers in the Dominion
service by intimating that he was
so weak or venal that I secured him
and "utilized him to advance this
Intrigue." Judge Murphy descends
to playing politics of the meanest
variety had his first four findings:
had been drafted for him by the
Liberal executive there would have
been no variation In the language.
His other findings are simply what
I recommended or stated in my report to the government of November,
1909. I will publish that report
and let the public compare It with
Murphy's report, and it will be evident where he gets whatever there
Is of value in it. His last findings
as to opium, saying "that its consumption must be discouraged by
drastic amendments" shows that he
does not even keep abreast of the
acts of parliament. I drew for Mackenzie King this session the new
Opium Act, which Is the most drastic and effective act against the use
of opium and cocaine to be found on
the statute books of America.
(Ottawa)       T. R. E. McINNES. I
Tuesday, August 8, 1911.
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Report That Eight Foot Seam  Has
Been  Located  Near
Victorii|
fy****************************************************
!     AMONG THE MINES     I
* *
4- *
*****************************************************
HARD COAL I offices     in     Paris     and     branches
throughout the Old and New World,
has a "finger in the pie" wherever
the precious metal is forced from the
bosom of Mother Earth, and in Europe, Africa, Asia, North and South
America, Bloch money has helped
develop mineral resources.
"It's true that I came here with
Monsier Bernay, one of our firm's
consulting engineers, to look into a
number of tempting propositions
that have been made to our firm by
our agents," said Monsieur Bloch
when seen at the hotel Elysium. "We
have had our eye on British Columbia and the Yukon district for some
time, but we have been so busy in
other parts that we could not until
now devote sufficient time to the
local field. Recent reports, however, from our local correspondents
have been so favorable and tempting
that I have decided to come out here
myself and look over the field.
"Of course, I cannot say at this
moment which are the exact places
that we have in mind for closer inspection, because that might interfere with our ultimate plans, but I
am willing to say that business conditions here appear very sound and
seem withstand close scrutiny and
that alone is a pretty safe sign. Besides that, this province, in almost
all mining districts, has excellent
railway facilities, which is highly encouraging.
,"We are going to stay in this province for several weeks and I am
pretty certain that we will be among
Britisii Columbia's taxpayers before
many moons are passed, provided
Monsier Bernay finds that the prop-
sitlons which we will inspect will
come up to the flattering reports."
cSOfo. .locatetot,th-Becmfwypcmf{wl
 o	
From Jordan River, near Victoria,
has been brought a report of a find
of a big seam of anthracite coal
eight feet thick on a hill back of
the camp of the Vancouver Island
Power Company. Opinion is divided
over the authenticity of the report.
The story was brought by returned
workmen, and was to the effect that
when cutting tiie right-of-way for
a railroad for the V. I. P. Company
and the Canadian Puget Sound Lumber Company the railroad workers
uncovered coal. It was hard coal,
anthracite, they said, and the story
was to the effect that the seam uncovered was no less than eight feet
thick. If this report proves correct
the find will mean much to Vancouver Island. Heretofore only soft
coal has been mined "on the Island.
 o	
MAY   LOCATE   WORKS
Sir Donald Mann Has in View Installing a Mueller in
Stewart
According to Toronto despatches
Stewart may be selected as the point
for the establishment of a big smelter, says the Portland Canal Miner.
Shareholders of the Island Smelting
and Refining Company, the big $10,-
000,000 corporation organized by
Sir Donald D. Mann, have agreed
that a testing plant be established in
Britisii Columbia for the treatment
of lead, zinc and other refactory ores,
and in view of Sir Donald's large
mining interests in the Portland
Canal district this point was suggested as the most advantageous. The
Toronto company has acquired the
patents of a process that has revolutionized the reduction of ores, as
outlined some time ago in The Journal, and If the Island Smelting and
Refining Company can do what . is
asked of them, Sir Donald Mann, ac-
codrdlng to what was stated at the
meeting, obligates himself to proceed
with the protection of the patents
throughout the world, and the establishment of a reduction works in
this province. For this purpose the
sum of $100,000 is set aside to protect any infringements.
Sir Donald . ann will shortly visit
Stewart in company with some noted
mining engineers and smelter experts. By that time the railway will
be completed to the junction of American Creek and Bear River and
an announcement regarding both the
continuation of the railway eastward
and the construction of a smelting
plant by the Island Smelting and Refining Company will probably be
given. Representing Sir Donald at
the recent meeting of the patent
smelting company in Toronto was
M. I. Stewart, formerly of Stewart,
who has become a heavy shareholder.
His father, F. P. Stewart, was in
Stewart last week, and confirmed
the information given above.
 o .	
INDIAN MINES
SLOGAN'S MINES
Development Work on the Standurd
and Rambler-Cariboo Will Make
Them Dividend Payers
Showing nt the Property Is Good—
Fine Body of Ore Is
Opening Up
George Clothier is back from an
Inspection trop to the Indian mines
on Salmon River and reports that
every foot being driven is showing
good results. The open cut below
the big galena exposure has opened
upon twenty-five feet of an ore
shoot, eight feet of solid ore being
exposed in the face which will be
extended by further crosscuttlng.
The. main tunnel, 150 feet vertically
below, Is In a distance of seventy
feet, the last ten feet being on the
vein.
Charles Guzman -of Ketchikan was
In the city last week on his way to
Stewart. He will inspect the Indian
mines, in which he is interested, and
In which he has the greatest faith.
 o	
LOOKING  TO   PROVINCE
Great Mining Brokers Will Invest in
British Columbia and
Yukon
That Europe's greatest mining
brokers have their eyes on Britisii
Columbia and the Yukon Territory
has become known with the arrival
of Monsieur Edmond Bloch, who, accompanied by one of his family's
consulting engineers, Monsieur Henri
Bernay, has come to this city from
Paris via New York, says the Victoria Colonist, to investigate in person a number of mining propositions
in this province, favorably reported
upon by the firm's local agents.
The firm of Paul Bloch, with beau
Public interested centred in the
development of the Standard and the
Rambler-Cariboo mines in the Siocan
B. C. district will be greatly accen
tuated within the next 60 day, when
according to H. D. J. Jackson, a mining expert of Spokane, the two properties will be placed upon a dividend
paying basis. The net earnings of
the two mines, which are controlled
by Spokane operators and associates
is estimated at $400,000 a month.
Work is being rushed to equip the
Standard with tramway, compressor
and concentrator, and it is announced that the mine should be in post
tlon to ship fully 200 tons of ore
dally the early part of September.
Half oi the product will be clean
ore, going directly to the smelter,
and the rest of lower grade is to
be treated in the new mill. The
tramway will have a capacity of 20
tons an hour, or 200 tons in a ten
hour shift. The mill will treat from
100 to 125 tons a day. The ore and
concentrates will yield a net proft of
$60 a ton and on that basis it is
estimated the earnings will be about
$200,000 a month.
The latest news from the Standard
is that the ore body has been encountered in the No. 6 tunnel level, which
is 240 feet below No. 5 level, where
the most extensive work has been
done in the big ore shoot. The point
where the ore was encountered was
so far from wliere the beginning of
the ore shoot was expected to be
found that it was not at first thought
to belong to that body. While this
has not been demonstrated, recent
developments make ft appear so. At
any rate, the work during the next
few weeks will settle this point. If
It is a part of the main ore shoot,
then that body undoubtedly Is much
longer on the No. 6 level than it
was on either side of the higher
levels.
The ore shoot recently broken into
on the 1,200 foot level of the Rambler-Cariboo has widened from two
feet of clean ore to tbe full width
of the shaft. This is the second of
the three lenses which have been
well developed on, the 900 foot level.
Where opened on the 1,050 foot
level, the same lens had a width of
only one foot, which gradually wid.
ened to a maximum of six and a
half feet. Ore from the Rambler
Cariboo mine shows a higher grade
of silver than the Standard ore,
ranging from 100 to 150 ounces to
the ton. The lead value of both
mines is between 50 and 60 per
per cent.
The Rambler-Cariboo mine also
will be equipped as quickly as possible with a tramway and concentrator. The tramway Is to have a
capacity of 200 tons a day and the
mill will treat not less than 100 tons
In the 24 hours. Production from
the  mine  will  be near  that  of  the
JBSL
>.«?>
THE JOURNAL
$2.00 a Year
| Job Printing I
If you want your printing
handled   expeditiously   by
thoroughly trained and ex
perienced printers have it
done at the Journal Office.
THE JOURNAL
$2.00 a Year
3BS
J. L. PARKER
MINING ENGINEER
Prince Rupert, B. C.
Open for Consultation and Mine
Examination
Temporary Address:—
Prince Rupert Inn
FREDERICK PETERS, K. O.
Barrister, Solicitor and Notary Public
Office in
EXCHANGE BLOCK
WM. S. HAL.L, L. D. S. D. D. S.
:-:    DENTIST   :-:
Crown and Bridge Work a specialty.
All dental operations skillfully
treated. Gas and local anaesthetics
administered for the painless extraction of teeth. Consultation free.
Offices, Helgerson Bk., Prince Rupert
NICKERSON-ROERIG COMPANY
CUSTOMS AND MERCHANDISB
Brokers, Forwarding Agents,
Storage, etc.
J.  W. POTTER
ARCHITECT    AND    STRUCTURAL
ENGINEER
Re-inforced Concrete a Specialty
—o—
Law-Butler Building - Prince Rupert
HAYNOR  BROS.
FUNERAL   DIRECTORS
and
PROFESSIONAL  BMBALMERS
Standard, while its higher silver
value will make the tonnage profit
larger. It is entirely likely that the
net earnings of the Rambler-Cariboo
will be close to $200,000 a month as
soon as the equipment of the property is completed and the ore shoots
are opened on the 1,400 foot level,
where development work now is
mainly concentrated.
, o	
LUMBER   MERGER
Provincial Companies Organize New
Concern  With Large Capitol
Bonds Sold in London
The London, England, branch of
the Royal Bank of Canada recently
offered for subscription an issue of
93 per cent of £350,000 6 per cent
first mortgage bonds of the Canadian
Pacific Lumber Company, Ltd.,
which embraces a proposed amalgamation of five distinct Britisii Columbia sawmill corporations, together with their respective timber holdings. The authorized capital is
$3,000,000. It is understood that the
flotation  proved  very successful.
According to the prospectus issued
In London the companies forming the
merger are as follows: Canadian Pacific Lumber Company, Ltd., Port
Moody; Anglo-American Lumber Co.,
Ltd., Vancouver; Gibbons Lumber
Company, Arrow Lake; Barkley
Sound Cedar Company, Ltd., Alberni Canal, Vancouver Island: and the
Rivers Inlet Timber Syndicate, Owe-
kano Lake. They own four sawmills
with an estimated sawing capacity of
270,000 feet dally. The total timber holdings of the combination is
given at 2,337,469,000 feet. The
value of all their freehold and leasehold lands, and plant and equipment,
Is placed at $638,000 and $572,000
respectively. For the first four
months of this year the profits of
the Canadian Pacific Lumber om-
pany at Port Moody and the Anglo-
American Lumber Company are given
as $37,000 and $54,000 respectively.
The prospectus points out that up
to the present time the timber has
been left practically untouched, and
the profits have been almost wholly
earned by manufacturing lumber
from logs purchased in the open markets.
It is intended to continue this
policy for the present, as it is firmly
believed that the timber will increase
materially in value from year to
year, as has been the experience in
other parts of Canada and thhe United States.
The directors of the new corporation are as follows: M. B. Carlin,
Victoria; W. W. Fraser, Winnipeg;
R. W. Gibson and J. D. McArthur,
Winnipeg; and Thomas Meredith,
New Westminster.
ACQUIRES   LIBRARY
Rare   and    Unrivalled    Records
Western Canadian  Exploration   Secured
of
To form the backbone of the provincial library when It is housed In
the fine new library wing to be erected on Parliament Square, the splendid historical library of Mr. Justice
Martin has been acquired on behalf
of the government by Ethelbert O. S.
Scholefield, librarian and archiogtsl
of the province, who is now engaged
in completing the arrangements and
catalogues of the volumes for their
new home, says  the Victoria Times.
The collection is the result of close
upon a quarter of a century's untir-
in geffort on the part of the learned
judge, and the very valuable collection, which In particular, Is unriv-
| ailed in bearing upon the exploration
of the Dominion west of Lake Superior, also includes the collector's
own work on the Hudson's Bay Company's Land Tenures," and "Lord
Selkirk's Settlers in Red River ".published  In  London  In  1898, together
with volumes by the same author on
the mining lands of this province,
and other erudite subjects.
In assisting Mr. Scholefield to
value the library, Dr. F. C. New-
combe of Victoria and his hour Judge
Howay, acting on behalf of the government, lent valuable expert assistance.
For several years the collection of
rare volumes, maps, charts, engravings and manuscripts, had taxed to
the utmost the private library of the
owner, and, indeed, part of it had
perforce to be stored in safetay
vaults, which, of course, rendered it
inconvenient for either Mr. Justice
Martin or the many people who so
frequently sought reference to the
collection to readily refer to the
works.
In these circumstances, the suggestion made by Mr. Scholefield that
the collection should be purchased by
the government and placed in the
proposed new fire proof library at
the parliament buildings, where It
would be both easily accessible and
free from danger of being destroyed,
did not fall to appeal to the collector, and although he naturally ox-
perlenced keen regret at letting the
fruits of so many years' systematic
searchings over ....mographlc regions
of Europe and Canada go out of bis
own possession yet, as It woulel still
be available for Victorians, the sale
was eventually arranged, and the
government library is Incomparably
the richer for it.
These unequalled historical records include practically all the scarcest books and pamphlets on the
whole subject of Northwesl Cana-
eliana, the Rockies, In 1823-3 by
Hudson's Bay Company's officers,
and perhaps the chief trasure is the
original log of the ship Imperial
Eagle, which, under command of
Captain Charles Barkley, visited
these shore's in  177*.
Mr, Scholefleld's buci essful efforts
to get this famous collection for the
DR.  W. B. CLAYTON
DENTIST
—O—
Office  in    the    Westenhaver   Block,
Over Orme's Drug   Store.
Prince Rupert
 LADYSMITH	
COAL
ROCHESTER & MONROE, Phone US
Corner Eighth and Eraser Street*
Clinton Rooms
Newly    remodelled    and    furnished.
Board   and   lodging.   Home cooking
a specialty.    Mrs.  Anderson,  Prop.
Rooms, $3 Per Week
New Knox Hotel
ARTAUD & BESNER
Proprietors
The New Knox Hotel Is run on the
European plan. Flrst-clas service.
All the latest modern Improvements
THE BAR keeps only the best
brands of liquors and cigars.
THE CAFE Is open from 6.30 a.m.
to 8 p.m. Excellent cuisine; flrBt-
class service.
Board, $1 a Day — Beds, 50c and np
First Aventi"   Prince Rupert
Hamblin7 s Bakery
Just Re-opened
Sale    counter    in    MERRYFIELD'S
STORE, Third Ave. and Fifth St.
Family trade catered to.   Will supply restaurants and steamers.
Cakes and  Confectionery of all
kinds
THE WESTHOLME LUMBER CO.
LIMITED
We handle all kinds of
Building Supplies
First Avenue Telephone 180
GRAND HOTEL
WORKINGMAN'S HOME
    25c
Rooms 50 Cents
Spring Beds, Clean
White Sheets
Best in Town for the Money
FIRST AVE. AND SEVENTH ST.
J. Goodman, Proprietor
people eif British Columbia will be
us greatly appreciated as the generosity eif Mr. Justice Martin in
agreeing to give them up.
The Journal (twice a week), only
$2.00 a year. I    8
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Tuesday, August 8, 1911.
OLIVER   CHARGES
Unsatisfactory Way in Which These are
Left by the Government.
Criticism   Offered   by   an   Edmonton
Paper of the Course
Followed
The dissolution of parliament
brings an end to the investigation
into the charges against Hon. Frank
Oliver. It is said that Mr. Oliver
is very much put out over the result,
that he wanted' the matter gone into
thoroughly in order that his character as a public man should stand
quite unsullied when he comes back
west to seek the suffrage of the
electors, says the Edmonton Journal.
A little examination of the facts
will show what a pitiful pretense
all this is. When the session was
resumed at the middle of last month
no move was made to proceed with
the hearing till Mr. Borden called
attention to the need for taking action. At last a meeting of the committee was called for July 25.
It was immediately announced that
all those whose names had been mentioned in connection with the
charges, including the bank officials,
were being subpoenaed. Mr. Mei-
gben, one of the Conservatives on
the committee, urged on its assembling that there be no delay in getting to work as dissolution rumors
were in the air. Several material
witnesses were then present, including the man who denounced the minister of the interior to the premier.
But the Liberals asked for an adjournment on the ground that one
of their number was not present.
This was finally agreed to, August
1 being fixed as the day when the
proceedings should begin, on the
assurance being given by the chairman that the House would be sitting
then. As we know, it was dissolved
on Saturday and the committee is
thus permanently out of business.
There is only one conclusion to
be reached from a study of the history of this investigating body. The
Liberals made quite a show of being
willing to conduct a thorough enquiry, knowing that, when the witnesses were on deck the House would
have passed out of existence. Why,
if they wede willing to hear these
witnesses, who should have been able
to cast light on the transactions that
have been been given so much publicity to did they not call them
away last spring At that time not
only was nothing done to secure their
presence, but no assurance could be
obtained that the committee would
be empowered to hear them.
When you read of the grief of
Mr. Oliver over the hard turn of
events which prevented him from
meeting his accusers, get a copy of
Hansard and turn up the report of
the proceedings in the House on the
third of May last. One of the speakers in the debate on the functions
of the Oliver committee was E. G.
Porter. Here is part of what he
had to say:
"The prime minister," he said,
"asks us to consent to the nomination of a tribunal for the purpose of
hearing tlie charges which were
made to him by Mr. McGIIlicuddy.
I would like to ask the prime minister here if he would give us the
assurance now that the powers of
the committee are wide enough to
enable it to call upon Mr. McGIIlicuddy to give the same evidence
which he gave or which he tendered
to the prime minister, if the prime
minister does not do that, it is proof
conclusive that he does not expect
or does not intend that this House
shall have the same opportunity for
investigating the charges which
were made to him by Mr. McGIIlicuddy against the minister of the
Interior that he himself had. There
seems to be no answer to that, as
the prime minister does not reply.
Perhaps the prime minister will tell
us? If he wil give us the assur-
anec that the committee which he Is
appointing now will have full power
to investigate and receive the evidence of Mr. McGIIlicuddy as It was
given to him or as It was tendered
to him? As the prime minister does
not answer, I see that he does not
intend us to look at the original
bank account of which we have seen
a photograph, which is the most pos-
tive proof we have, although as the
minister of the interior himself said,
he could, If he chose, allow us to go
into his bankeiooks and clear himself, but that he does not intend to
do so. If he does not intend to do
so. he knows that the scope of this
resolution Is not broad enough to
allow Mr. McGIIlicuddy or to allow
the committee to produce the evidence which might clear up tlie
matter."
Other membes asked to receive the
assurance that Mr,  Porter was after,
but In vain. -\ow within the past
week we havebeen told with a great
flourish of trumpets that all the evidence which Mr. Porter and his colleagues sought to have allowed last
spring was to be available, that the
bank accounts were to be produced
and the bank officials brought to
Ottawa to explain them. Then before the chance has been given to
carry out this programme, in steps
the government and has the House
dissolved. Was there ever a cheaper
or a more transparent bit of party
tactics? It was very bold and courageous, but only when it knew that
there was no chance that Its courage
would be put to the test.
As for Mt. Oliver's indignation
over the action of his colleagues in
rushing dissolution, it is a bit of
stage play which can only impress
those with poor memories. Can we
forget so easl lyhis protests of last
spring against the attempt of the
vile conspirators to make him divulge
his  private  affairs?
"I do not think," he told the
House, "that it would add to the
dignity of parliament or to the standing of public life In Canada to say
that parliament should be the assistant of thugs and blackmailers by requiring the exposure of a bank account on such a statement as has
been put before the public."
And now he is reported to have
threatened toassatilt Mr. Fielding because he insisted on the dissolution
before this bank account could be
exposed.
If anything was needed to convince
the electors that the government had
i great deal that it wished to cover
up in this connection and that Mr.
Oliver was really handling money
that came into his hanTTs most improperly, this foolish bit of eleventh
hour acting should serve the purpose.
 o	
DAMAGE TO  NIOBE
PATRIOTIC  WORK
Eastern Paper Tells How Cruiser Came
to Get Into Dangerous
Place.
Canadian Warship  Was Assigned  to
Task of  Aiding
Celebration
The Nova Scotia Pilot, referring
to the accident to the Niobe, the
Canadian cruiser, says: Yarmouth
harbor accommodates vessels of from
15 to 20 feet draught, while the
Niobe draws 27 1-2 feet. Against
these disadvantages Yarmouth can
set the great advantage of being a
strongly Liberal town. An election
is approaching, a local festival was
being held, and to help in the celebration the Niobe was sent. She
could not enter the harbor. She had
to stay in the roadstead, and was
caught and had to fight her way to
sea in a combination of wind, fog,
and current, off one of the most
dangerous coasts in the world. Thus
sailors on the Niobe were sent by
politicians on a political errand. It
may be guessed that every effort
will be made to throw all the blame
on Captain MacDonald, but the real
cause is the use of the ship on the
lines of I. C. R. Meanwhile, after
patching the ship up, the first step
will be to hold a courtniartial on
Captain MacDonald for getting his
ship ashore.
 o	
Jules Levy has returned from the
south and is so well satisfied with
the progress that Prince Rupert Is
making that he has decided to take
up his residence here again. He will
go into business, probably opening
a loan office.
Among the visitors to the city by
the last ti. T. P. steamer was H. J
Cambie, consulting engineer of the
('. P. R. at Vancouver. He accompanied his son, H. B. Cambie of this
city, who returned from a vacation
in the south. Miss Cambie also ac-
companied her father north. Mr.
Cambie, who has been Identified with
his company for years on the Pacific
Coast, was very much Interested in
the railway construction here. He
went to the end of the steel.
Magazine Devoted to Spread of Information About Noted
People.
Hon.    Dr.   Young   Introduces
.Scheme  Into Educational
Department
New
They were watching the youngsters on Easter Monday. "It is all
nonsense!' exclaimed the man, who
is usually out of the house at night
and out of temper in the morning.
"What do you mean?" inquired his
wife, who can smile while she speaks
firmly.
"This idea of rolling eggs."
"Of course, dear; but let the children have their little pleasures, in
the course of time they will grow
up and realize the superior intellectual development to be attained by
striking a white guttapercha hall over
Hip grass and following it with a
golf club."
A genuine innovation, which is a
somewhat radical and at the same
time exceedingly interesting depart
ure in connection with the educational work of British Columbia has
just been decided upon by the min
Ister of education, Hon. Dr. Young,
whose very deep and practical interest In all matters appertaining to the
progressive development of the educational affairs of British Columbia
will be at once conceded and appreciated by all residents of the province, regarddless of party differences
in political faiths. The innovation
is one the autnorship of which is the
minister's alone, the essential principle of which is to Inspire patriotism by a simple and intelligent presentation to the children of the public schools of all that Is most admirable in the accomplishment of the
great statesmen,, soldiers, naval heroes, scientists and leaders in useful
thought among the people of Canada
and of the Empire.
This most desirable educational
campaign it is designed to prosecute
and advance by means of a small
pamphlet or public school magazine
of sixteen pages or thereabouts, to
be printed under government auspices and distributed monthly to all
the public school pupils from the
third grade up, the expectation being
that a monthly issue of 20,000 copies
will be required.
The publication will be conducted
on lines that will tend to foster and
promote a spirit of true imperialism.
The contributions each month will
include two or three of strictly Canadian interest and two or three imperialistic, the admirable accomplishments of Canadians In all fields
of highly useful and patriotic endeavor being given special prominence, but the central idea belnj; to
promote the unitv of the Empire.
It is expected that the department
will soon be in a position to issue
the first number soon after the resumption of the schools, in early September.
The publication will be freely illustrated by means of line engravings,
while the regular contributors will
include Miss Maria Lawson and a
number of naval and military officers, prominent clergymen, students
of statecraft, educationists, and eminent specialists in the domains of
science and industrial activity. Special features will be made of historical sketches dealing simply and
plainly, in a stle especially adapted
to win the attention and be thoroughly understood by youthful readers,
of the careers of leading Britisii
statesmen, soldiers and naval heroes,
and captains of industry, incidents of
Canadian and Britisii history, etc.
More particularly will attention be
given to sketches of the lives of eminent Canadians who have distinguished themselves as statesmen, in
the army or navy of their country
and inthe fields of science, invention
and industrial activity.
From one-third to one-half of the
space in the forthcoming publication
it is proposed to reserve for a record o fthe achievements of those who
have played such a patriotic part in
the upbuilding of Canada, who have
gone from Canada to serve the king
and flag in the army or the navy,
who have won Rhodes scholarships,
or who have graduated from the
schools of this country to play the
part of useful and patriotic men and
women in the educational work of
11lie Dominion and in the advance-
I ment of national greatness and Im-
j perial  unity.
Such a policy will readily be recognized as being in thorough and complete harmony with the well known
ideas of Hon. Dr. Young as minister
of education and his determination
to preserve the policy of the educational department as altogether nonpartisan and non-political. The essence of the purpose aimed at in
the proposed publication is to Interest and Inspire the pupils of the
Britisii Columbia public schools so
as to promote their development as
staunch and useful Canadians, and
true and worthy British subjects.
The distribution of the new school
journal will be made through the free
text book department and preliminary
circulars will be sent to the various
trustee boards fully explaining the
purpose In view, and to the teachers
requesting them to see to the proper
distribution of the journal and to
explain to their pupils Its meaning
and significance. The pupils will be
requested to take each number home
and read its several articles, and the
teachers will be invited when opportunity presents itself to review the
contents of each number and talk
them over with the scholars, with a
view to seeing that they otbain a
thorough understanding of the various articles and their significance.
Every care will be taken that the
contents of each number shall be as
agreeably diversified as possible in
character and of such a nature as to
interest youthful readers, be easily
understood by them, and systematically and tactfully promote the development of the spirit of patriotism,
Canadlanism and love of a united
Empire.
 o	
ENGINEER'S   ASSISTANT
Another One Is Needed to Take
Place of Mi*. Simpson, Who
Resigned
the
To the Ladies of Prince Rupert
Did you ever stop to think how much easier it would be for you,
if at the end of each month, you could pay all household bills
by check? We solicit your account and have special facilities
for handling it. Private writing rooms are provided for the use
of customers and individual attention is given each depositor.
We allow 4%  on Deposits and the use of checks.
The Continental Trust Company, Limited
 SECOND AVENUE	
The questional an additional assistant to the city engineer came up
last evening on the report of the
streets committee. This favored the
appointment of a man to take the
place of Mr. Simpson, who had resigned some weeks ago. The engineer asked for such an appointee
at a salary not exceeding $125 a
month. This assistant would be engaged in miscellaneous work until
the Woodworth proposition was entered upon, when he would give his
attention to that branch.
Aid. Newton said he would stand
for no further increases in the engineering department until he was perfectly sure that the department was
not overmanned at present. He had
satisfied himself that the staff was
too great.
Aid. Hilditch felt it was necessary
to have this additional help. Colonel
Davis asked for a man and he felt
he would not ask if it were not necessary.
Aid. Douglas said he favored retrenchment.
Aid. Kirkpatrick called attention
the fact that Aid. Douglas signed
the  report.
Aid. Douglas admitted he did.
Aid. Newton contended that Aid.
Hilditch did not know whether additional   help  was  needed  or  not.
Aid. Hilditch said he knew it was
needed. He knew how much help
Colonel Davis needed. He would
not go on his knees to plead for it,
however, if the council did not want
to  grant it,  they could  refuse.
Reference being made to the report on the city's engineer's department presented some time ago, Aid.
Hilditch said it was not a report of
the committee. It was Aid. Newton's report.
"It's a deliberate falsehood
Aid.  Newton.
The report carried.
l©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©@[n|[D]lgJlO
HOTEL
ENAMELWARE
HAVE JUST RECEIVED A SMALL SHIPMENT OF HOTEL
ENAMELWARE ESPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR USE IN
HOTELS, RESTAURANTS AND CAMPS. WE GUARANTEE
THEM TO LAST TWICE AS LONG AS ORDINARY ENAMEL
WARE.
A CALL IS SOLICITED
Prince Rupert Hardware & Supply
Company, Ltd.
third avenue phone 120
5]©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©[d
FOR SALE
Lot 56, Blk. 34, Sec.  1, $5,000; 1-3 cash, bal. 6 and 12 months.
Lots 33 and 34, Blk 5, Sec. 1,    $4,000;  half cash.
FOR RENT
STORES,  OFFICES AND DWELLINGS
FIRE INSURANCE in old English, Canadian and American
companies, at tariff rates. Policies good as collateral at All Banks,
and all written in our own office. PLATE GLASS, ACCIDENT
and MARINE INSURANCE
MM. Stephens & Co. Ld.
said
REAL ESTATE
Phone 222
LOANS        INSURANCE
Office: Third Avenue
INVESTMENTS
P. O. Box 275
Claim Anticosti
It was stated in Montreal that descendants of a French-Canadian family named Lemieux, to the number
of 60, will shortly enter suit for the
restoration of the title to the island
of Anticosti, now in the possession
of Menier, the French chocolate
king.
The Lemieux family, to which the
Canadian postmaster general is not
related, bases its claims upon its alleged inheritance of the property
from one Parent, many years ago,
and claims that M. Menier purchased
the island at his own risk.
Tancrede Pagnuelo, a Montreal
lawyer, is stated to be in Paris at
the present time looking up documentary evidence in  the case.
nought Residence
E. Cotes of Calcutta, India, who
is interesting himself in Prince Rupert, has added to his purchases the
home of Dr. Hall on Fourth avenue.
He paid $2,600 for the property.
TO  WATER TAKERS
On account of scarcity of water
the supply will be' cut off between
the hours of !i p. m. and 5 a. m.
during the dry weather.
WM.   MAHLON   DAVIS,
tf Supt. of Water Works.
**************************
!   FOR RENT   I
e* Store building on Second *
* Avenue at Seventh Street. *
Low  Rent. X.
*
*
*
■	
* *
**************************
JEREMIAH H. KUGLER, LTD.
**************************
| 75 x 100 Feet \
* *
%   ASK
* UNCLE
| JERRY   ^^^^^^^
I JEREMIAH H. KUGLER, LTD.
.;. * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *** * *
For Lease on Third *
*
Avenue at Ninth     *
Street %
Hea*Suy Sfttuf&cteery' R&nge
Good, Sound Reasons for
MONARCH Economy
Monarch Ranges are built so that they can
never have "air leaks"—
For around every opening into the body there
is a   Malleable   Iron frame to which the
steel is riveted.
No putty is needed In such joints.    They are
air tight when new and stay air tight.
If these other ranges were built in this way
they might be economical too.
Investigate this matter of rivet construction
versus  stove  bolts and  stove  putty.    It's
important to  every  one  using  or  buying
a range.
SOLD AND GUARANTEED BY THE
Kaien Hardware Co.
Telephone 3
Third Avenue
TIDES AT PRINCE RUPERT, AUGUST, 1911
|  HIGH WATER
LOW WATER
DATE AND DAY
Time!  Ht Time'  Ht j]  Timej  Ht | Time|  Ht
1
Tuesday   ....
6:13
16.5
18:38
18.0j
0:11
6.S|12:13
7.5
2   Wednesday   ,    .    .
7:26
15.2
19:38
17.4
1:04
7.3|13:03
9.1
3   Thursday   ....
8:44
14.5
20:30
17.1|
2:27
7.4
14:06
10.3
4  |Friday	
10:04
14.6
21:33
17. u
3:40
7.0
15:20
10.7
5    Saturday   ....
11:12
16. U
2 2:32
17.7i
4:44
6.3
16:28
10.6
6   Sunday   	
12:00
16.0
23:21
18.3
5:34
5.4[17:22
10.1
7   JMonday    ....
12:39
16.8
6:12
4.6|18:04
9.3
8   ITuesdav   ....
0:01
19.i
13:14
17.5
6:46
3.8:18:4L   8.5
9 Kvednesday   .    .    .
0:39
19.7
13:45
18.01
i:18
3.3 li):16j'  7.6
10  (Thursday   ....
1:15
20.2
14:13
18.5
7:49
2.9|19:50|  6.8
11  jFriday	
1:52
20.5
14:40
18.9
8:19
2.8:20:25,   6.1
12   iSaturday 	
2:29
20.5
15:08
19.2
8:49
2.8)21:01   5.6
3'07
20.2
15:38
19.4
9:20
3.3
21:40
5.3
14  |.uonday	
3:45
19.7
16:11
19.5
9:55
4.1
22:25
5.2
15   Tuesday  .....
4:27
18.7
16:48
19.5
10:34
5.1
23:16
5.5
16  (Wednesday ....
5:13
17.6
17:34
19.3
11:17
6.4
17  (Thursday   ....
6:14
16.3
18:32
18.9
0:14
5.8
12:11
7.7
18   jFriday	
7*45
15.5
19:46
18.8
1:28
6.9
13:20
8.9
19   aaturday   ....
9:18
16.6
21:04
19.2
*:52
5.4
14:40
9.3
20
10*35
16.6
22:18
20.0
4:06
4.2
16:00
8.8
21
Monday	
11:40
17.el
23:21
21.1
5:08
2.9
17:12
7.6
22
Tuesday  	
12:30
19.2
6:02
1.7
18:09
6.3
23
Weanesday ....
0:16
22.0
13:12
20.3
6:50
0.9
18:58
5.1
24  jThursday   .
1:06
22.5
13:51
21.0
7:33
0.7
19:45
4.2
25  IFriday	
1*54
22.5
14:29
21.2
8:14
1.1
20:30
3.7
26
Saturday   .   .   .    .
2:39
21.9
l.e:06
21.2
8:52
2.0
21:14
3. i
27
Sunday   	
3:22
21.0
15:43
20.7
9:28
3.3
21:57
4.1
28
Monday	
4:05
In.7
16:20
20.0
10:03
4.9
22:41
4.9
29
Tuesday   ....
4:49
r8.2
16:58
19.2
10:40
6.6
23:28
5.9
30
Wednesday   .    .    .
5:37116.6
17:38
18.2
11:20
8.4
31
Thursday   .    .    .    .
6: 35)15.2
18:26
17.3
0:24
6.9
12:06
9.9
The Time used Is Pacific Standard, for the 120th Meridian west. It Is
counted 0 to 24 hours, from midnight to midnight.
The Height Is In feet and tenths of a foot, above the Low Water datum
adopted for the Chart. The Harbor Datum, as established by tlie G. T. P.
Railway, Is one foot lower.

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