BC Historical Newspapers

BC Historical Newspapers Logo

BC Historical Newspapers

Prince Rupert Journal Jul 25, 1911

Item Metadata

Download

Media
prj-1.0311848.pdf
Metadata
JSON: prj-1.0311848.json
JSON-LD: prj-1.0311848-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): prj-1.0311848-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: prj-1.0311848-rdf.json
Turtle: prj-1.0311848-turtle.txt
N-Triples: prj-1.0311848-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: prj-1.0311848-source.json
Full Text
prj-1.0311848-fulltext.txt
Citation
prj-1.0311848.ris

Full Text

Array /   /... ,i.
Hew Welllnjton
Coal
is the best
ROGERS ft BUCK
Sole Agents
Print* Uttiwri
5fl U^isfatjve JJS
A „wst.m-. ...
e.      '
High Class
Job Printing
in all Lines
VOLUME   II.
Published   Twice  a   Week.
PRINCE  RUPERT,   B.   C.   TUESDAY, JULY 25, 1911.
Price,  Five  Cents.
No.   11.
HARVEST   LABORERS
The Situation it is Expected Will Not be
as Serious as Reported.
The   Middle   States   Will   Finnish
Supply to Canada, It Is
Expected
(Special to The Journal)
Winnipeg, July 26.—-Intimation
conies from Saskatchewan to the effect that the government of that
province has pretty well taken care
of any excess of harvesters it may
require this year over previous
years. The great number of harvest-
esters required in the prairie provinces Is considered usually to he
very much over-rated. In a measure,
the fortunate operations of providence are likely to help out where
the arrangements of officials may
prove ineffective. The crops in the
middle wst states are expected to be
so light this year that many men
who would otherwise be engaged in
harvesting them will drift north Into
the prairie provinces.
Hon. Duncan Marshall, minister of
agriculture in Alberta, has not yet
heard anything deflntely concerning
the suggestion that the railways permit the flat fare rate of ten dollars
to convey harvesters west to Leth-
bridge, Calgary, Edmonton and intervening points, i ormerly that rate
has only applied to those coming
not farther west than Moose Jaw.
Mr. Marshall understands that the
railways are considering the proposal
"There will be a scarcity of labor,"
he said, "but our commissioners at
Montreal and Toronto will endeavor
to have train loads of men sent direct to this province. Formtrly they
have been staying off in Manitoba
and Saskatchewan simply because
because the ten dollar rate only carried them as far as Moose Jaw; but
this year we hope to have the same
rate prevail right to the Alberta
towns."
 o	
Arc Light System
The light committee of the council
has had the question of installing
arc lights instead of clusters of in-
eandescents for street lighting referred to it. The cost is not to exceed
$3,000, according to the estimate.
THIRD CANDIDATE
George Norrow  Will   Divide   Honors
in the Liberal Cause
Here.
He Will Contest Comox-Atlin at the
Next Dominion
Contest
The repeated rumors of a Dominion election is' having the effect of
arousing the fighting spirit on both
sides of politics. While it has become generally agreed that Duncan
Ross shall be the Liberal candidate
if he wishes to accept there are
others seeking that honor. Among
them   are   George   Morrow,   so   well
PASSES SENATE
Washington, July 25.—Reciprocity with Canada was passed
by the Senate of the United
States in pwrae tically the same
e-hape In which It had passed
the house. The vote was 53 to
27. The McCumher amendment was defeated by a vote of
G4 to 16 just before the measure was put. The amendment
provided for the reduction of
duties on various household
articles.
Nelson's amendment placing
duties on grain, butter, cheese,
horses, cattle and sheep, and the
Simons amendment placing
meat products on the fre list
also were defeated.
know here. According to reports
received from Mr. Morrow he will
offer to receive nomination on the
Liberal side but if he does not get
It he will not be disappointed, for
he will enter the fight as an independent.
Duncan Ross is not regarded with
entire favor by the party. There are
other names mentioned and it is
even mentioned that the bench might
be invaded in order to secure a suitable candidate to contest the seat.
BACK  PROM TRIP
Dr.   Kergin   Has   Returned  From  a
Trip to Alice
Arm
Dr. Kergin has returned from a
holiday trip' made in his launch, the
Sunbeam, as far as Alice Arm. The
return trip was made from that point
to Prince Rupert in ten hours, his
new launch proving excedlngly fast.
The trip made by the doctor was
very much enjoyed and he s feeling
much better for the outing.
The territory visited Is not now
to Dr. Kergin, who has visited nearly all points on the northern coast
and knows them well.
Speaking of the mining outlook
at the different points visited, he
says there are excellent showings being made by the operators which
promises well for the future. Rich
ore bodies are constantly being developed and the outlook is exceedingly bright.
 o	
Resignation   Accepted
The resignation of Mr. Simpson
in the city engineer's department
was accepted by the council last
evening. Aid. Newton In moving the
adoption of the report hoped that
no one would be engaged to fill his
place.
 o	
LEFT FOR ISLANDS
Many are Going  to  Queen Charlottes
to Investigate Natural
Resources.
Lumber and Fisheries of tlie District
> Arc Attracting
Investors
On her last trip to the Queen Charlotte islands the Princess Beatrice
took a large number of timber cruisers, who have gone over to investigate the timber of the islands for
intending investors. The party took
with power boats so that they might
get about the inlets with greater
ease.
In addition to these timber cruisers there also went to the islands
a party of men representing British
capital who have in view the investigating of the fishing industry of the
coast. The latter will go to the west
coast of Graham Island In the search
for a site for the station'which Is
contemplated. ,
The Indications are that before the
present slimmer has passed there will
be an immense amount of interest
shown In the islands and the outlook
is exceedingly good for that portion
of  this   northern   territory.
The weather conditions and the
Immense natural resources of the islands are sufficient to warrant the
belief that within the next few years
the Queen Charlottes will have a population that will form in itself a
large trade with this port. The
Islands produce the best of timber,
unlimited supplies of fish, coal and
other minerals and has agricultural
resources that a suffficient to meet
the demands of a vast population in
the matter of dairy produce vegetables and  fruits.
ULTIMATUM COMES
FROM SIR WILFRID
He Threatens That if Reciprocity is Not Put Through
Without Appeal to Country He Will Cut the West
off From its Proper Representation
(Special to«The Journal)
Ottawa, July 25.—"Permit a vote
to be taken in parliament on reciprocity or we will take the vote of
the Canadian people on it without
delay," was the ultimatum which Sir
Wilfrid Laurier addressed to the Conservative opposition in parliament
yesterday.
The chief obstacle to holding the
election to which the premier referred is that under the census,
which is just being taken. Western
Canada would be entitled to twenty
or more additional members. The
census will not be completed until
October and the law giving the west
its increased representation cannot
be passed for some weeks after that.
If an election were held before the
law is enacted the west will be under
represented in parliament for at least
four years the political leaders believe the west will show resentment
to which ever party it holds responsible.
"Our opponents," said Sir Wilfrid
Laurier, "try to convince the public
and the country they are not obstructing us. Neither the census nor
the re-distribution is before the
house today and we cannot go on
with them. But reciprocity is he-
fore the house to be dealt with. We
do not want reciprocity to wait. We
want It to pass either in this house
or before the country."
R. L. Borden replied that as Canada had waited forty years for reciprocity it could afford to wait six
months longer and allow re-distribution to give the west its proper representation.
WATER IN CABINS IS SEEKING  PEACE
Aid. Newton in Pressing for Reduction
Runs up Against Difficult
Situation.
Readjustment  of  Rate   Might  Have
to Be Made if His  Proposal
Came Into Effect
King George is Intervening to  Avoid
Creation of Large Number .
of Peers.
A Satisfactory Solution of the Riffi-
culty Seems Now in
Sight
AN  OFFICIAL  YISIT
liuues   Thomson   of   Hudson's   Ray
Company Is in the
North
James Thomson of the Hudson's
Bay Company, accompanied by Mrs.
Thomson and their son, was a passenger by the Princess Royal today.
Mr. Thomson went on to Wrangcl,
where he will leave Ihe steamer, in-
tending to proceed up the Stlcklne
on his regular tour of Inspection.
Owing to the condition of the river
Mr. Thomson is a little doubtful
whether he will be able to ascend
the  river.
Returning, he will go up the Skeena and tlience into the interior of
the province in the interests of the
company he represents.
Mr. Thomson Is one of the most
energetic representatives of a company that is not behind in point of
energy. He will spend a longer time
here on his return trip from
Sticklne.
 o	
The Princess Royal of the C. P. R.
line reached port this forenoon
northbound. She carried a large
number of passengers on the round
trip. Among there were Mr. Ford
of the Saturday Sunset and Judge
Grant of Vancouver.
Aid. Newton introduced a motion
last evening at the city council in
favor of making the water rates collectable for cabin tenements proportionate to the rate charged hotels.
The motion brought forth quite a
discussion, after which it was referred to the water committee for
consideration. >
Aid. Hilditch wanted to know
what the rate of hotels were so as
to compare them. Two men "batching" in a cabin should use as much
water as a man and his wife in a
five room house, said Aid. Hilditch,
and he did not see why they should
have a lower rate than the family
men.
Aid. Newton explained that what
he had in view was the reduction
of the rates where a row of cabins
were built and occupied. He did not
think it was quite fair to charge
for each of them the same rate as
would  be charged  for  a  house.
Aid. Hilditch said that if they
lowered the rate on one section it
would have to be raised elsewhere.
Men with families had to pay $12
a year now. There was a certain
revenue to be derived. If reductions
were made on one class of water
users others woulu have to bear an
additional  burden.
A reference to the bylaw showed
that hotels paid a rate upon a certain number of rooms and then $2
a year extra for each room.
Aid. Hilditch did not think the
city could afford to let cabins off at
$2 a year.
A little cross-fire between Aid.
Newton and Aid. Hilditch followed,
the former contending that his motion did not mean a reduction to
that figure, and Aid. Hilditch expressing the view that he could not
Interpret  it in any other way.
It was finally referred to the water committee.
Against Launch
The streets committee reported
against the launch offered the city
by Foley, Welch & Stewart. It was
considered to be insufficient for general work.
 o	
Tenders  for  Coal
Tenders were received last evening by the council for the delivery of
225 tons of lump coal for the lighting plant. The tenders were as follows: Rochester & Munro, $ 85;
Rodgers & Black, $8.25; Union
Transfer, $8.25. These were referred
to the committee with power to act.
 o	
Pipe Oi-gim for City
The Methodist Church of Prince
Rupert has received the pleasing
news from Victoria that the Metropolitan Church of that city will present the local congregation with the
pipe organ which was in use there
until a year ago, when it was replaced with a larger one. The organ
will he available for the new church
to be erected by the Methodists of
Prince Rupert. It is a first class
organ and was considered one of the
best in Victoria previous to the introduction of the new one there.
—; o	
WOULD SETTLE HERE
Rev. Father Hartman of This City is
Interesting Himself in Proposed Settlement.
German Families Accustomed to tho
West Want to Take Up Forms
in Naas Vulley
REVIEWING COURTS
Several Aldermen Severely Criticise the
Police Magistrate for
Judgments.
Mayor Manson Makes it Clear
the Commissioners Are
Blameless
That
(Special to The Journal)
London, July 25.—King George
has actively intervened in an attempt
to steer the warring political factions to a peaceful goal over the Liberals' veto bill. None is more anxious than he to avoid swamping the
house of peers with new creations,
and if his personal influence can
effect it, he will arrange some plan
for overcoming the political deadlock.
His majesty on Monday gave audiences to Premier Asquith, a. J. Bai-
WON  KING'S  PRIZE
(Special to The Journal)
Bisley, England, July 25.—
The victory of Private Clifford
of Toronto in the King's Prize
on Saturday, the Canadian
team carried off the most coveted  prize of the  meet.
Corporal J. Trainor of Toronto headed the aggregate in
the first stage of the King's
Prize, winning tlie bronze medal
of the National Rifle Association. In the third and final
stage Private Clifford led, winning the gold medal and purse.
four and Lord Lansdowne. It was
said his majesty would see other
leaders later.
Meanwhile the king has postponed
his departure for Goodwood wliere
he was going to visit the Duke of
Richmond and attend the race meeting.
 o .
Rev. Father Hartman of the Roman Catholic Church returned to the
city hy the Prince Rupert on Saturday.
CONSERVATIVES
Attention!
A meeting of all the supporters of the Conservative party
in the City of Prince Rupert will be held in Melntyre Hall on
Tuesday evening, July 25, ut 8 o'clock, for the purpose of naming delegates to a convention to he held later to nominate a
candidate  for the electoral district of Comox-Atlin.
Admission will he hy ticketi These may be secured upon
application from the following!— J, G. Scott, M. M. Stephens,
Dr. Melntyre, G. W. Kerr, Prank E. Cullin, Dr. Clayton, .1. W.
Potter, .1. F. Macdonald, Dr. Cade, L. Crippen, M. Albert.
W.  J. QUINLAN,  Secretary.
Rev. Father Hartman of this city
has returned from a visit to Victoria,
where, in company, with the representative of a prospective colony
from near Edmonton, he interviewed
members of the provincial government relative to securing the lands
necessary for the purpose. The site
proposed by Father Hartman is adjoining what is known as Naas Lake
Certain difficulties have to be considered by the government in connection with the scheme submitted.
The desire of the represenatives of
the settlers is to have the land taken
up as pre-emptions without the necessity of going to the expense and
labor involved in each coming to the
land and staking themselves, as is
necessary under the laws of the
province. They desire to act collectively In this part of the work. If
the difficulty can be overcome in any
way tlie land will at once he taken
up. The area proposed to be taken
is  twenty-five miles square.
The families intended to be re-ISe-h
moved io the farms are not to come
directly from Germany. They are on
the prairies near Edmonton and
while they are of German blood they
know conditions in the wesi. They
would prefer to come to the Pacific
coast, where the weather conditions
are more to their liking and if tho
necessary arrangements can he made
for the taking up of the land 150
families will sell out on the prairie
and make their homes here.
The representatives of the party
have visited the location. They are
well satisfied with conditions. The
land is rich and according to the representative who went in with Father
Hartman is superior even to the
famed Okanogan as a farming location.
If the land is taken the settlement
.\ill ark thai a wagon reiael be |>ut
in before they are obliged to move
onto the land. Bach of the families will take up l'ln acres of land
und Hie money derived from th<- sale
of the lands on the prairies will be!
well equipped to enter upon farming on a good scale. The clearing]
will not he excessively high and the
land  is productive,
In point of market the development of the mining districts in the
north at. Goose Bay, Alice Arm and |
Stewart and elsewhere will give a
splendid opportunity for disposing of
the produce.
Father Hartman, who visited the
location himself, is delighted with
the character of the country and predicts a great future for the Naaa
Valley and the vast districts tributary to It,
The "root and branch" men of the
city council were- strongly in evidence ai the council meeting last
evening. Their attention was for the
time being directed toward the po-
lice magistrate and they proceeded
to sit as a court of appeal and general review upon the decisions of the
magistrate. Tlie subject was introduced by Aid. Clayton and the attack upon the magistrate found an
echo from Aid. Newton and Aid.
Douglas who "corroborated" the
others.
Aid. Clayton moved that a report
concerning the recent gambling
cases should be furnished hy the city
solicitor.
Aid. Douglas said there was a lot
of comment about these cases. It
was a disgrace the way the people
were talking about these, he said.
Aid. Newton was afraid that the
remarks of Aid. Douglas would lead
to a belief that the police were lax.
He believed that today Prince Rupert
could pride itself on its police force.
It was a difficult task the police
had. He believed that the police
were not as blamable as the officials. He had it on good authority
that the magistrate reprimanded the
chief for not having gone first to
him and given the information before bringing the gambling cases into
court. Believing this to be true, It
is a lamentable state  of  affairs.
There was too groat a tendency to
deal lightly with some while pouncing upon others. Some of
those most responsible should not
go unpunished. This "pulling up"
of six men and letting the really
guilty one go free looked too much
like partiality being shown. He objected to the magistrate acting as
one who wanted to act as prosecutor,
judge and jury.
Aid. Clayton said he did not propose  to  connive  at  crime.     He  did
(Continued on Page Eight)
, o	
TO NAME DELEGATES
Conservatives of   the City  Will Meet
This Evening Preliminary to
Big Convention.
tlon    Will    Ite-    Mail'    •
f   Those
Who  Will   Represent   1
ic.-ll
Association
Alex.   Fraser  of  Victoria,  accom-
lanied by his sisters, made the round
rip to Skagway by the Princess May.
('turning south  Monday.
Tonight the Conservatives of this
city will meet in Melntyre' Hall for
the purpose- of select ing the dele-
gales that will represent this centre
at the convention for the riding of
Comtx-Atlln which will be called in
due course to select the parly nominee for tlie next Federal election,
it is desired by the association that
all supporters of the- party in Federal politics attend the convention
und take part In the selection of tho
delegates who will be- entrusted in
conjunction with the delegates from
thi< oilier centres with the duty of
naming the candidate who will contest the seal in the nexl i ampalgn,
The meeting Is one' for Bupport-
..is ol the Dominion Conservative
party only, but all wine are in accord
with thai policy are requested to be
present. Admission will be by ticket
so thai the attendance may be Um-
Ited to those who are In hearty accord with thi Conservative causa.
The party is in the besl of spirit
with respect to the coming campaign and will have a strong candidate in the field, when ever the fight
is called. From a'l over the riding
there are the most encouraging reports relative to the situation and
arrangements are well in hand for
the opening of the contest, whenever that may come.
Then- should be a very full attendance at the meeting to be held
this evening in Melntyre Hall so
that all may have a voice in the election of the delegates upon whom will
fall the task of making a choice.' eif
a candidate to lead Hie party to victory at election.
a * PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Tuesday, July  25,  1911.
£>»>»>»> •>•>->»>*> *** »>*> ** ***
*
**********************************
WAS TRAIL BLAZER
.;. * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
"There is certainly a great change
in the Kootenays since I first canil
up the Kootenay River in 1865. At
that time, of course, there was hardly a white man in the country with
the exception of one lonely settler
at Grand Forks and some score of
placer miners at Wild Horse Creek,
near where Fort Steele is now located," said Hon. Edgar Dewdney,
builder of the great Dewdney trail,
ex-member of the provincial house
for Kootenay and ex-lieutenant governor of the province, on a recent
visit to Nelson.
It was In April of 1865 that Mr
Dewdney, then chief civil engineer
for the crown colony of British Columbia, left New Westminster, which
was then the capital, and proceeding
to Hope, commenced that trail blazing trip of his with a party of four
white men and 18 Indians which was
destined to be marked with white
stones in the history of Britisii Columbia. The trail opened up a country which had hitherto been a terra
incognita; a land of mighty rivers
and almost impassable pine clad
mountains known only to the deer,
the bear and other native animals,
and a few scattered bands of Indians. Its mineral resources were
only indicated by a few placer de-
popsits,' lode mining was unthought
of; its timber was not needed, and
it was yet 30 years before the adaptabilities of its fertile soil to fruit
was  discovered.
Through this country Mr. Dewd
ney commenced to survey the great
trail, in all over 300 miles in length
which extended from Wild' Horse
Creek to Hope and there connected
with a road to the coast, from which
all supplies had to he drawn. The
actual number of miles of trail,
hewn out of the virgin forest, was
211, and the cost to the country was
$74,000, a trifling sum compared
with the difficulties of the work and
the advantages that accrued to the
province, that are still, in certain
sections, falling to the lot of the
Britisii Columbian,
,"I explored the country between the
Arrow Lakes and the Kootenay River," said Mr. Dewdney, "and finding that it would be necessary for
me to come up the river, I sent out
two of my party with some of the
Indians out toward Grand Forks,
then called Grand Prairie, and wishing to obtain a boat I despatched
one of my Indians to the mouth of
the Kootenay River where is joins
theh Columbia. At that spot there
was a large Indian village, ruled by
Chief Gregorle, one of the big chiefs
of the Kootenay tribe. He supplied
me with a canoe, and after I had
made the trip to Fort Colvllle, on
the other side of the boundary line,
for supplies, I commenced the trip
ui> the Kootenay River.
"It was no picnic. We made 14
portages in all, and at some places
had to go miles from tin- river to
find a deer trail through which the
Indians could carry my boats and
supplies.
"I remember my first sight of the
Bonnington Falls. We were making
a portage and although some distance from the river I heard tho
sound nf the water. 1 asked an Indian what ii was and he replied
'Hyas Skookitin Marie,' and told me
to look. I made my way to the
river and saw what 1 then considered, and in fact still consider, the
most beautiful falls in the world.
The scene was magnificent,
"Following the river, we passed
where Nelson now stands, and I
went on io W'ilel Horse Creek In
Easl Kootenay. There I found a
number of miners washing gold from
the alluvial diggings, some of which
arc being worked today, and after
determining upon ihe route for the
trail tu Hope I succeeded in obtaining between <•" und 70 men ami
placed them in charge- nf William
Fi-rnle, the fine old tinier who elis-
covered coal In tin- Crow's Nest and
after Whom the city nf Fertile is
named.
"By the middle of September wo
had the trail built through our own
country, over which wns subsequently supplied all the food and other
materials required in the early development of the Interior."
There were other troubles than
physical with which Mr. Dewdney
had to contend in building the trail.
The Indians, he said, were good
workers, but they would not accept
money In payment. For this there
were two reasons. One was that all
the money In the interior, which
erlcanwas not of any great amount,
was American', and the Indians hated
the Americans as they hated soap
and water, and would not take their
money. English money, when they
had learned its value, was all right,
as they liked "King Georgo men,"
as  they  called   the  English,   but  to-
*************************
bacco, articles of clothing and powder formed the most acceptable payment that could be made to them.
The Dewdney trail commenced at
White Horse Creek, passed through
Cranbrook, which was then called
"Pea Vine Prairie," to Moyie, and
then down Goat River and across
the divide to the Kootenay flats.
From there it wound its way up Summit Creek, passed where Ymlr now
is, down the Pend D'Oreille to Fort
Sheppard, a Hudson Bay post. The
next point was Trail Creek, from
wliere It passed in sight of Red
Mountain, where the Le Roi mine
was later discovered and where
Rossland has since been built, to
Christina Lake through Grand
Prairie to the Boundary country and
up Rock Creek. The trail then followed the Similkameen River to
Keremeos and up to Princeton,
where it connected with a road which
had been built from Hope.
Previous to embarking upon what
may be regarded as the greatest
achievement of his life, Mr. Dewdney
surveyed the townsite of New Westminster, the capital of the Colony of
British Columbia, which until 1866
was separate from the Colony of
Vancouver Island, which had Victoria
as its capital. He also explored
along the present route of the
G. T. P. and was up the Skeena,
Omineca and Babine rivers opening
a route to the Omineca country,
which was consuming a great amount
of supplies owing to the placer oper-
at'ons in that district.
Later, Mr. Dewdney was elected
member for Kootenay and took part
in the memorable debate on March
9, 1870, when it was decided that
the colony should join the Dominion Confederation. From 1892 to
1897 he was lieutenant governor of
the province. Mr. Dewdney has
great faith In the future of the Similkameen country and has its mineral, timber and farming resources
at  his  finger tips.
while he was on his way to Lucknow
his force was stopped by a walled
enclosure. A little soldier, a Punjabi Mohammedan, seeing the difficulty, endeavored to open the door
which barred their way. When he
tried first to draw the bolt one of
his hands was cut off by one of the
enemy. Then he managed to unfasten the bolt with his other hand,
which was subsequently nearly severed from the wrist.
 o	
J. F. MacDonald spent a few days
in the city this week. He has his
furniture stock in Hazelton and has
opened up business there.
PUBLIC HIGHWAYS
Province of British Columbia
NOTICE is hereby given that all
Public Highways in unorganized Districts, and all Main Trunk Roads in
organized Districts are sixty-six feet
wide, and have a width of thirty-
three feet on each side of the mean
straight centre line of the travelled
road. THOMAS TAYLOR,
Minister of Public Works.
Department of Public Works, Victoria. B. C, July 7, 1911.    jyl8-ol8
WATER NOTICE
I, C. N. Pring, of Prince Rupert,
B. C, occupation broker, give notice
that on the 12th day of July I Intend tho apply to the Water Commissioner at his office in Prince Rupert, for a license to take and use
2.8 cubic feet of water per second
from Hot Springs on border of Lake
Lakelse in the Skeena Land Division of Coast District. The water is
to be taken directly from the Springs
and Is to be used on Lot No. 3983,
for sanitary purposes.
Dated June 12th, 1911.
C. N. PRING,
C-13-lm Prince Rupert, B. C.
DANGER FROM FIRE
(heater Care Is Necessary if Forests
Are   to   Re   Protected   From
Ravage of Flames
While the province has been exceptionally fortunate in the matter
of forest fires and consequent loss
thus far this season—in large part
owing to ceasless watchfulness—It Is
only by observance of the utmost
care that outbreaks can now be
avoided in certain dangerous districts, points out Commissioner W.
C. Gladwin.
"In some districts," says the commissioner, "the conditions existing
at present are such that should a
fire originate, it will only be with
the greatest difficulty that a heavy
lass will he prevented. The department, of course, has a considerable
force of rangers out patroling the
various districts night and day, hut
one careless Individual may cause all
their efforts to count for naught and
start a fire occasioning heavy loss
In lives and property."
This fact cannot be too frequently
impressed upon the public mind, now,
that the dry season of midsummer
is at hand.
 o	
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE.
NOTICE Is hereby given that the
reserve of a parcel of land situated
on Graham Island, notice of which
appeared in the British Columbia
Gazette on the 2 5 th of February,
1909, being dated 23rd February,
1909, is cancelled to permit of the
lands being acquired by pre-emption
only and for no other purpose
ROBT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Department of Lands,
Victoria, B. C, April 5th, 1911.
4-14—7-5
Skeena   Land    District—District   of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that John Klrkaldy, of Lakelse Valley, occupation
farmer, u... -. to apply for permission to purchase tlu following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 120 chains south
from the south end of Herman
Lake; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains.
JOHN   KIRKALDY.
Dated April 11, 1911. 5-5
Skeena   Land    District—District   of
Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that I, V. W.
Smith, of Prince Rupert, occupation
contractor, intend to apply for permission to lease the following described foreshore:—Commencing at
a post planted about 2 miles In a
southerly direction from Port Simpson; thence northerly along high
water mark 25 chains and containing all foreshore between high and
low water mark.
V. W. SMITH,
Locator.
Staked 31st May,  1911. 6-6
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Flora Orr, of
Masset, B. C, occupation spinster, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:
—Commencing at a post planted
about 40 chains south and 80 chains
east of the N. E. corner of Lot 35;
thence north 80 chains; thence west
80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains, containing 640
acres.
FLORA ORR.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated November 25, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Arthur Ives,
Sr., of Masset, B. C, occupation hotel
keeper, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:— Commencing at a
post planted about 40 chains south
and 120 chains east of the S. K.
corner of Lot 35; thence south 80
chains; thence east 80 chains;
tlience north 80 chains; thence weBt
SO chains, containing 640 acres,
ARTHUR IVES, Sr.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 25, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
tjueen Charlotte -^   ends.
TAKE NOTICE that Lynn Sutherland, of El Paso, Texas, U. S. A., occupation auditor, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—-Commencing at a
post planted about 40 chains south
and 120 chains east of the S. E. corner of Lot 35; thence north 80
chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains, containing 640 acres.
LYNN SUTHERLAND.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 25, 1910.
NOTICE.
In the matter of an application for
the issue of a duplicate of the Certificate of Title for an undivided
one-half of Lot S83, Group I,
Cassiar District:
Notice is hereby given that it is
my intention to issue at the expiation of one month after the first
publication hereof a duplicate of the
Certificate of Title to the above
mentioned land in the name of William Jordan Larkworthy, which Certificate is dated the 30th day of September, 1910, and numbered 326R.
WILLIAM  E.  BURRITT,
Di   rict Registrar.
Land Registry Office,
Prince Rupert, B. C,
May 26,  1911. J23
PUNJABI'S  BRAVE  DEED
Lord
Roberts  Tells   of   .Most   Heroic
Deed He Ever
Witnessed
The Duke of Connaught, Earl
Roberts, Earl of Derby and the
Bishop of Hereford was among the
large company which assembled on
Ihe occasion of "speech day' at Wellington College. His royal highness
presented the majority of the prizes.
The Duke of Connaught congratulated the college on the. fact that Old
Wi'lllngtiinlaiiH had been chiisi-n for
many high positions throughoul the
Empire, lie particularly wished to
II. (1. W. II. Stone, who passed first
trey, who passed first out of Sand-
liursl, and L. A. Barratl, who gained
the sword of honor at Sandhurst.
The term "Welllngtonlan" was looked up to not only at home but
throughoul the Empire.
In handing his prize to Harvey
Jones, as the best all-round boy In
the school, Lord Roberts said It was
Jones' ambition to join the Indian
army. If he achieved his object he
would find that, although conditions
had changed since he (Lord Roberts)
joined sixty years ago, and the army
was better prepared, the natives of
India still formed the army. If Jones
would make friends with them, learn
their language, and treat them considerately, ho would find they would
readily  follow him.
He (Lord Roberts) had been asked
what was the bravest deed he had
ever    seen.     He    remembered    that
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE,
Notice is hereby given the the
reserve existing by reason of the
notice published in the British Columbia Gazette of the 27th December, 1907, over lands on Graham Island, formerly covered by 'limber
Licences Nos. Nos. 37055, 37056 and
37057, which expired on the 6th day
of November, 1909, and the lands
embraced within Timber Licence No.
37059, which expired on the 25th
day of January, 1909, is cancelled,
and that the said lands will be open
for pre-emption only under the provisions of Section 7 of the "Land
Act" after midnight on June 16th,
1911.
ROBERT A.  RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Lands Department,
Victoria, B. C,
9th March, 1911.
Skeena   Land    District—District   of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that Prince Rupert. Sand & Gravel Company, Ltd.,
of Prince Rupert, occupation Industrial Company, intends to apply for
permission to lease the following described land:— Oommenclng at a
post planted nt the Witness post on
the southerly boundary of Lot 4124;
thence southerly following the sinuosities of the shore line 60 chains
more or less to southerly end of the
Island; thence easterly 10 chains
more or less to low water mark;
thence northerly 60 chains more or
less along low water mark; thence
westerly 10 cliains more or .cso to
Ihe point of commencement.
PRINCE   .IUPL14T  SAND  &
GRAVEL Co., LTD.
Per J. Y. Rochester, Agt.
Dated May 30, 1911. 6-2
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast—Range; V.
TAKE NOTICE, that I, Minnie
Meredith, of Victoria, B. C, occupation a married woman, intend to
apply for permission to purchase the
following desoribed lands:—Commencing at a post planted about 40
ehains distant and in a South direction from the Southeast corner of
Lot 1733; thence east 40 chains;
thence south 40 chains; thence west
40 chains; thence north 40 chains
to point of commencement, containing 160 acres more or less.
MINNIE   MEREDITH.
John Kirkaldy,
Agent.
Dated  February  20th,  1911.
Skeena   Land    District-—District   of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that I, Joseph
Pastl, of Watson, Sask., occupation
farmer, intend to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:— Commencing at a
post planted about 30 cains In a
northerly direction from the N. E.
corner of Lot No. 2662 or T. L. No.
3 2598 at Lakelse Lake; thence north
20 chains; thence east 40 chains;
thence south 20 chains along shore
of Lakelse Lake; thence west 40
chains to point of commencement,
containing 120 acres, more or less.
JOSEPH PASTL.
George Hlr, Agent.
Dated  May  5,  1911. 6-2
Skeena Land  District—D.r.rlct
of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that Joseph Edward Merryfield, of Prince Rupert,
occupation merchant, intends to apply for permission to lease the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about 10 chains
nortn from the northeuu corner of
Lot 33; thence west 1500 feet to
shore of Smith's Island; thence following shore in a southerly direction
1200 feet; thence east to shore of
De Horsey Island; thence following
shore in a northerly direction to
point of commencement.
JOSEPH EDWARD MERRYFIELD.
E. Spro, Agent.
Dated April 4, 1911. 4-7
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast Range 5.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles
James Gillingham, of Prince Rupert,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply for permission to purchase th'
following described lands:—Com
mencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner of Lot 992 and
marked C. J. Gillingham's N. E.
Corner Application for Purchase; I,
C. J. Gillingham, intend to apply
for permission to purchase 320 acres
of land bounded as follows:—Commencing at this post; thence 80
chains south; thence 40 chains west;
thence 80 ohains north; thence 40
chains east to place of commencement.
C.iARLES JAMES GILIINGHAX
Robeert Osborn Jennings, Agent.
Dated January 5, 1911.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Arthur W.
Nelson, of Chicago, 111., U. S. A., occupation clerk, Intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing
at a post planted about 4% mlleB
north of the S. E. corner of T. L.
40859; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence south
80 chains; thence west 80 chains,
containing 640 acres.
ARTHUR W. NELSON.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 27, 1910.
—THE—
Oliver
Typewriter
—FOR—
Seventeen Cents a Day
Please read the headline over
again. Then Its tremendous significance will dawn upon you.
An Oliver Typewriter—the standard visible writer—the most highly
perfected typewriter on the market
—yours for 17 cents a day!
The typewriter whose conquest of
the commercial world Is a matter of
business history—yours for 17 cents
a day!
The typewriter that Is equipped
with scores of such conveniences as
"The Balance Shift"—"The Ruling
Device"—"The Double Release"—
"The Locomotive Base"—"The Automatic Spacer"—"The Automatic tabulator"—"The Disappearing Indicator"—"The Adjustable Paper Fingers"—"The Scientific Condensed
Keyboard"—all
Yours For 17 Cents a Day
Skeena Land District-—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Wesley Singer, of Masset, B. C, occupation farmer, Intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lauds:—Commencing ai a post planted about 4 miles north of the N. W.
'4*orner of T. L. 40859;  thence south
80 chains; thence west    80    chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence east
80 chains, containing 640 acres.
WESLEY SINGER.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 27, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that A. Walter De
Lisle, of Masset, B. C, occupation
farmer, Intends to apply for permls-
slonu to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 40 chalnB south
and 120 chains east of the S. E. corner of Lot 35; thence south 80
chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence east
80 chains, containing 640 acres.
A. WALTER DE LISLE.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 25, 1910.
Skeena   Land    District—District   of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that Annie Klrkaldy, of Melville, Sask., occupation
married woman, Intends to apply for
pirmlsslon to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted 120 chains southwesterly from Herman Lake; thence west
80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence north
80 chains, containing 640 acres more
or less.
ANNIE KIRKALDY.
John Kirkaldy, Agent.
Dated May 13, 1911. 5-19
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that George
Rudge, of Port Simpson, occupation
marble worker, Intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 2 miles in a
southerly direction from mouth of
Union Bay and on south side of Bay;
thence south 20 chains; thence west
20 chains; thence north 20 chains to
shore; thence following'shore In an
easterly direction to point of commencement, containing 40 acres
more or less.
GEORGE RUDGE.
Lionel Crippen, Agent.
Staked 11th May, 1911. 5-23
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Fred. A. De
Lisle, of Masset, B. C, occupation
farmer, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 40 chains south
and 120 chains east of the S. E. corner of Lot 35; thence north 80
chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains, containing 640 acres.
FRED.  A.  DE  LISLE.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 25, 1910.
Skeena Land District-—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Frank Nelson,
of Chicago, 111., U. S. A., occupation
clerk, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following de
scribed lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about one mile north of
N. W. corner of Application to Purchase 6953; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence north
80 chains; thence east 80 chains, containing 640 acres.
FRANK NELSON.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 25, 1910.
We announced this new sales plan
recently, just to feel the pulse of the
people. Simply a small cash payment—then 17 cents a day. That
is the plan In a nutshell.
The result has been such a deluge of applications for machines
that we are simply astounded.
The demand comes from people of
all classes, all ages, all occupations.
The majority of inquiries has
come from people of known financial
standing who were attracted by the
novelty of the proposition. An Impressive demonstration of the Immense popularity of the Oliver Typewriter.
A. startling confirmation of our belief that the Era of Universal Typewriting is at hand.
A Quarter of a Million People are
Making Money With
T!)6.
Skeena   |Land    District—District   of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that William H
Hargrave, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation banker, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lanas:—Commencing at a poBt planted on the west
shore of Lakelse Lake, and about
1 % miles distant and In a southwesterly direction from the S. W.
corner of Lot 3982, Skeena Land
District, District of Coast, Range V;
thence west 40 chains; thence south
80 chains, more or less, to the shore
of Lakelse Lake; thence following
the shore of said lake to point of
commencement, containing 160
acres more or less.
WILLIAM H.  HARGRAVE.
Mancell Clark, Agent.
Dated 20th March,  1911.
GRAHAM   ISLAND — "The    surest
sign of the progress of a town or
district  Is  Its  newspaper—live,  ac-
For Job Printing of all kinds seeltive,  hustling.",    "Tho   Masset Re-
The Journal man. view," Masset, Q.O.I
OLIVER
The Standard  Visible Writer
The Oliver Typewriter Is a moneymaker, right from the word "go!" So
easy to run that beginners soon get
in the "expert" claBS. Earn as you
learn. Let tbe machine pay the 17
cents a day—and all above that Is
yours.
Wherever you' are, there's work to
be done and money to be made by
using the Oliver. The business world
is calling for Oliver operators. There
are not enough to supply the demand.
Their salaries are considerably above
those of many classes of workers.
"An Oliver Typewriter In
Every Homo!"
That Is our battle cry today. We
have made the Oliver supreme In
usefulness and absolutely indispensable in buBlneBB. Now comes the
conquest of the home.
The simplicity and strength of the
Oliver fit It for family use. It Is becoming an Important factor in the
home training of young people. An
educator as well as a money maker.
Our new selling plan puts the
Oliver on the threshold of every
home In America. Will you close
the door of your home or office on
this remarkable Oliver opportunity?
Write for further details of our
easy offer and a free copy of the new
Oliver catalogue.    Address:
R. C. BEAN
Prince Rupert Agent
General   Offices:   Oliver   Typewriter
Building, Chicago, 111.
MISS HENNY WENNERSTi.V
SWEDISH SPECIALIST
Electric, racial and Scalp treatment;
Scientific MaBsage treatment (or
rheumatism, nervousness and poor
circulation. Manicuring also Chiropody work. 11
/   I
T3™
Tuesday, July 25,  Iffll.
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
A MODERN BATTLE
German Expert Discusses the Question
From Standpoint of New
Armament.
Immense Bodies of Iron Would Take
Part—Some of the Striking
Features
The size of a modern battlefield
has been the subject of discussion
recently among German military experts who have been stimulated
thereto by a new book by General
Falkenhausen, one or the most eminent authorities ou land war strategy. The conclusions at which the
participants in this interesting debate
arrive revealm to the uninitiated the
amazing dimensions which a.battlefield in a twentieth century war
would assume.
General Faulkennausen discusses
the theoretical case of an army with
a rival force of approximately the
game numbers, and he says that the
operations would extend over an
area fully 200 miles from side to
side and not less than 150 miles
deep, that is from the rear of one
army to the rear of its enemy.
But an army of this size would
be small in an up-to-date warfare,
for forces of this numerical strength
took the field as long ago as the
Franco-German campaign of 1870,
since when marvelous developments
in military matters have ensued.
In a struggle between two great
European powers, it is quite possible
and indeed probable that each of the
opposing forces would number something over three million troops, for
German, France, Russia, and Austria-Hungary are all capable of
sending such armies to the front
without touching their respective
last lines of reserves. If two such
armies were engaged in battle, the
field of their operations would probably extend quite 500 miles from side
to side, while the distance from the
rear of the one force to the rear
of the other could hardly be less
than 300 miles. Thus the battlefield would have an area of 15,000
square miles.
When Frederic the Great fought
his battles In the eighteenth century,
the field of operations never exceeded more than four miles from side
to side and in the Russo-Japanese
war, when, owing to the great distance from the respective bases,
there were never more than three
or four hundred thousand troops simultaneously in action, the battlefields remained limited in extent.
Siipee liiiin.iii Trick
Will the generals of the future be
equal to the almost superhuman task
of directing operations over such immense areas? Every army must
have a commander-in-chief and the
generalissimo must control the move,
ments of all the troops united under
his orders. He will have all the
latest technical devices at his disposal. Hundreds of miles of telegraph and telephone wires will be
rapidly laid down in order that he
may exchange orders and communications with his auxiliar yofflcers.
There will be motor cars and flying
machines, dirigible airships and
spherical balloons, bicycles and apparatus for wireless telegraphy and
telephony, besides other mechanical
contrivances   for   signalling.
Will they suffice to surmount the
purely technical difficulties nvolved
inestablishing effective communication over such an area, especially
as they have to be installed and
equipped for service in a very short
space of time? And if they furnish
a perfect communicating machine,
wil there be any human brain capable of mentally digesting the information supplied to him with be-
wildering speed from so many different soudces and In working out In
his mind the profoundly complex
problems connected With the movements of such legions of human engines of war? Would Molike, tho
greatest stateglst of modern times,
If he were alive, be able lo handle
armies of millions with the ease and
celerity necessary for success? Are
the great armies created by the leading countries of Europe really efficient Instruments of war or would
the complicated machinery break
down tinder the stress of actual hostilities?
Experts Discuss Problem
All these questions are occupying
the minds of European experts, but
only a war can supply conclusive
reply to them. There is.however, a
strong inclination among many competent judges to regard the countless legions of the great powers as
inefficient because they are too big
and unwieldy to handle with facility
and because no human brain can
surmount the difficulties of directing their movements with precision.
There would  be plpenty of other
problems to solve besides those of
generalship. The feeding of such
vast hosts of men would be a gigantic task. As the great army moved
forward, something like 3,000 field
bakeries would have to be constructed for use every day and as there
are underground, and created by excavating earth, extensive areas of
country would be honey-combed by
these holes, involving much damage
to landowners and farmers and danger to all pedestrians in those regions. Soldiers do not live by bread
alone, and the supply of other provisions for a three-million army
would strain the resources of any
commissariat department, even the
smartest, to the uttermost. The
supply of pure water, too, would
present grave and In dry weather
perhaps insuperable difficulties.
There would be tens and hundreds
of thousands of horses to tend and
feed and enormous quantities of
petroleum required for the various
motor cars employed for auxiliary
purposes. The ordinary brain reels
at the thought of all the intricate
machinery that would have to be
set In motion and kept in good working order in the event of a great
modern war.
Some German authorities predict
an abandonment of very great
armies based on compulsory military service for every male adult in
the country and recourse to smaller
armies of trained fighters. Then
comparatively few professional sol-
battles of the nation, as is the case
in England and America. One thing
is regarded as certain, if the great
military powers of Europe and Asia
do not abandon conscription and fall
back on smaller armies of professional soldiers, then both America
and E-igland will be compelled, as
a matter of self-preservation,, to
adopt conscription.
RUSSIA AND CHINA
Reported   Understanding  for  Offensive and Defensive Alliance
With Japan
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that James Mul-
lin, of Murdo, So. Dakota, U. S. A.,
occupation farmer, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands: — Commencing at a post planted on the
shore of Masset Inlet, about one
mile northeast of the mouth of the
Ain River; thence west 40 chains,
more or less, to the eastern boundary of T. L. 35414; thence south
60 chains, more or less to the shore
of Masset Inlet; thence northeasterly along the Bhore to point of
commencement, containing 60 acres
more or less.
JAMES  MULLIN.
G. S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated Feb.  24th, 1911.
COAL MINES ACT
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE tat J. K. Anderson, of Masset, B. C, occupation farmer, Intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted on the shore of Masset Inlet,
about two miles west of the S. W.
corner of T. L. 40787, thence north
80 chains; thence west 40 chains;
ihence south 80 chains more or lessA
to the shore of Masset Inlet; thence
easterly along the shore back to the
place of commencement, containing
320 acres, more or less.
J. K. ANDERSON.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 25, 1910.
Dr. Dillon, discussing foreign affairs in the Contemporary Review,
states that Russia still keeps her
gaze turned Far Eastwards, uncertain whether to dream on or act.
Temptation is more potent there than
than elsewhere, the line of resistance
being weaker. There Is an attraction about China which fascinates.
And it is made stronger hy the fact
that aggression there may easily appear to a patriotic nation a rational
form' of self-defence, a duty it owes
to itself. Moreover, the time is short
and whatever is to be done in China
must be achieved quickly. It was
delay that frustrated all Russia's
plans In the Near East and in Persia.
And delay may ruin her prospects
in China for all time if it be persisted in. The perspective is all the
moie alluring that Japan and Russia
are now virtually allies. And if Japan he with Russia, who can prevail
against her? The Russian war min-
mlnlster, GeneralSukhomllnoff, has
accordingaly st out for the Far East,
desirous of studying the whole question on the spot, especially in its
more practical aspects, before coming to a decision as to Russia's attitude. Rumor is rife that an offensive
and defnsive alliance with Japan is
In preparation—a dual alliance for
the extreme Orient. That, howver,
is almost superflous, so rlosely allied
are the two enemies today. Meanwhile China is bestirring herself;
her movements, says Dr. Dillon, are
mechanical, clumsy, uncontrolled—
perhaps uncontrollable for th mo-
men.t. They suggest a mighty monster awakening out of a long sleep,
but not yet in a state of full con-
sciousnss. The European and American press chronicle marvelous progress ther during tho past three years
—seven-mil strides towards culture
and military development. The Russian statesmen, it is said, rails these
things, believes them, and feels
alarmed, If China becomes a mlll-
lary power, then Russian alms, that
seemed within easy distance of al-
tP'.nmnt, will fade, away Into the infinite void. And another flv years
may suffice to mark of th China of
Ihe future from the Celestial Empire
Of  the  past.     Anything  thai   ran   lie
accomplished In the way of obtaining guarantees for China's good behavior In coming years must, therefore, be taken in hand at once. There
Is no time to lose. In another five
years the op;:o tunlty may have vanished. Such is the line of reasoning
attributed to Russia by the European press. Dr. Dillon says he cannot believe It, and it Is his Impression that they sincerely wish to live
in peace with their Mongolian neighbor.
 o	
Proud Motorist—Yes; It took me
about six weeks' hard work to learn
to drive my machine.
Pedestrian—And what have you
sot  for your  pains?
Proud Motorist—Liniment.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen  Charlote Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Wirt A. Stevens, of Chicago, 111., U. S. A., occupation civil engineer, intends to
apply for permission to purchase
the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on
the shore of Masset Inlet about one
mile northeast of the mouth of the
Ain River; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 40 chains more or less
to the eastern boundary of T. L.
35413; thence south along the
boundary of T. L. 35413 and
T. L. 35414, a distance of 80 chains;
thence east 40 chains, more or lesB,
to point of commencement, containing 320  acres  more  or less.
WIRT   A.   STEVENS.
G.  S.  Mayer, Agent.
Dated Feb.  24th,  1911.
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that I, Roy.
Chrisman, of Port Esslngton, B. C
occupation prospector, intend to apply for permission to lease the following described land:—Commencing at a post planted about five
miles distant and in a southwesterly
direction from the point at the entrance to Captain Cove, Petrel
Channel, and on the northeast side
of McCauley Island; thence west 20
chains; thence south 40 chains,
thence east about 20 chains to shore
of Petrel Channel; thence northerly
along shore line of Petrel Channel
to point of commencement and con
taining eighty acres more or less.
ROY CHRISMAN.
Dated April 11, 1911. 4-25
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Cassiar.
TAKJ NOTICE that Charles J.
Gilllngham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, Intends to
ipply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 64U acres of land:—-
Comenclng at a pc-t planted 7 miles
iN. E. of the mouth of the White
River and the junction of the Naas,
marked Chas. J. Gillingham's S. E.
Corner; thence 80 chains North;
thence 80 chains West; thence 80
chains South; thence 80 chains East
to point of commencement and containing 640 acres more or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles  M.  Huff, Agent.
Dated  March 5th, 1911. 4-18
Skeena   Land   District—District    of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land:—
Commencing at a post planted 7%
miles N. E. of the mouth of the
White River and die junction of the
Naas and marked Chas. J. Gillingham's S. E. Corner; thence 80
chains North; thence 80 chains
West; thence 80 chains South;
thence 80 chains East to point of
commencement and containing 640
acres more or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles M. Huff, Agent.
Dated March 5th, 1911. 4-18
Skeena   Land    District—District   of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that W. H. Fergu
son, of Prince Rupert, B. C, occu
pation civil engineer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about one
mile southerly, following the sinuosities of the shore line from the
southwest corner of Lot 104, Range
V; thence 20 chains west; thence 20
chains soutli; thence 20 chains west,
thence 20 chains south; thence 20
chains west; thence about 40 chains
south; thence along shore northerly
to point of commencement.
W. H. FERGUSON.
G. Hansen, Agent.
Dated April 22nd, 1911. 4-25
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast
TAKE NOTICE that F. T. Saunders, of Vancouver, occupation master
mariner, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands:— Commencing at a
post planted about 6 miles northwest of Love Inlet on the north
east shore of Pitt Island; thence
south 20 cliains; thence west 40
chains; thence north to shore;
thence following shore in a southeasterly direction to point of commencement , containing 80 acres
more or less.
FRANK TAUNTON SAUNDERS,
Locator.
W. Hamilton, Agent.
Staked 17th, Feb., 1911.
Skeena Land District—DIstrlet of
Queen Charlotte Island.
TAKE NOTICE that Robert Fraser Ogllvle, of Vancouver, occupation banker, Intends to apply for
permission to purchase tho folowing
desoribed lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 2 miles west of
the southwest corner of A. P. 12-
037; thenco east 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thenco west 80
chains; tlience south 80 chains to
point of commencement, containing
640 acres.
ROBERT FRASER OGILVIE.
Arthur  Robertson,  Agent.
Dated  Dec.  9,  1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that James G.
Cromble, of Prince Rupert, oceupa
tlon auditor, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:— Commencing at a
post planted at the northwest corner, 55 chains east and 20 chains
south from northeast corner of Lot
1116 (Horry Survey), Coast Dlst,
range 5; Ihence 20 chains east;
thence 25 chains, more or less,
south to Angus McLeod Pre-emption; thence 20 chains west; thence
2 5 chains, more or less, north, to
post of commencement, containing
5 0 acres, more or less.
JAMES  G.   CROMBIE.
Fred Bohlen, Agent.
Dated June 14, 1911.
Skeena    Land    District—District    of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, ii.tends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Commencing at post planted 6%
miles N. E. of the mouth of the
White River and the junction of the
Naas, marked Chas. J. Gillingham's
S. E. Corner; thonce 80 chains
North; thence 80 chains West;
thence 80 chains South; thence 80
chains East to point of commencement and containing 640 acres more
or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles M.  Huff, Agent.
Dated March 4, 1911. 4-18
I thence 80 chains North; thence 80
cliains West; thence SO chains
South; thence 80 chains East to
point of commencement and containing  640 acres more or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles M.  Huff, Agent.
Dated March 4th, 1911. 4-18
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land:—
Commencing at u post planted about
8 miles N. E. of the mouth of White
River and the junction of the Naas
River, marked Chas. J. Gillingham's
S. E. Corner; thence 80 chains
North; thence 80 chains West;
thence 80 chains South; thence 80
chains East to point of commencement and containing 640 acres more
or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles M. Huff, Agent.
Dated March 6th, 1911. 4-18
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Commencing at a post planted about
8 miles N. E. of ths mouth of White
River and the junction of the NaaB
River, marked Chas. J. Gillingham's
S. E. Corner; thence 80 chains
North; thence 80 chains West;
thence SO chains South; thence 80
chains East io point of commencement and containing 640 acres mo: 3
or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles M. Huff, Agent.
Dated  March 6th,  1911. 4-18
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land:—-
Commencing at a post planted 7 V2
miles N. E. of the mouth of the
White River and the junction of the
Naas, marked Chas. J. Gillingham's
S. E. Corner; thence SO ehains
North; thence 80 chains West;
thence 80 chains South; thence 80
chains East to point cf commencement and containing 640 acres more
or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles M.  Huff, Agent.
Dated March  5th, 1911. 4-18
Skeena    Land    District—District   of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for a
license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acre3 of land: —
Commencing at a post planted about
8 miles N. E. of the mouth of the
White River and the junction of the
Naas, marked Chas. J. Gillingham's
S. E. Corner; thence 80 chains
North; thence 80 chains West;
thence SO chains South; thence 80
chains East to point of commencement and containing 640 acres more
or less.
CHARLES  J.   GILLINGHAM.
Charles M. Huff, Agent.
Dated March 6th,  1911. 4-18
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that George Stanley Mayer, of Masset, B. C, occupation farmer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted on the east shore of
Tsu Skundale Lake; thence east 80
chains; thence south 40 chains, more
or less, to the north boundary of
T. L. 35413; thence west and south
along the boundaries of T. L. 35.413,
to tbe shore of the Ain River; thence
northerly along the shore, back to
the place of commencement, containing 500 acres, more or less.
GEORGE STANLEY MAYER.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 28, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Robert Cross,
of Masset, B. C, occupation farmer.
Intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted on the east shore of Tsu Skundale
Lake; thence east SO chains; thence
north SO chains, to or near to the
S. E. corner of Lot 85; thence west
40 chains, more or less; thence
south 40 chains, more or less; thence
west 40 chains more or less, following the southern boundaries of Lot
35; thence south to the shore; thence
southerly along the shore back to the
place of commencement, containing
500 acres, more or less.
ROBERT  CROSS.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov.  28,  1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Christina Orr,
of Masset, B. 0., occupation married,
Intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described
lands: —Commencing at a post planted about 40 chains south and 3 miles
east of the N. E. corner of Lot 36;
tlience south 40 cliains; thence west
SO chains; thence north 40 chains;
thence east 80 chains, containing 320
acres.
CHRISTINA ORR.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 25, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Commencing at a post planted 6 %
miles N. E. of the mouth of the
White River and the junction of the
Naas, and marked Chas. J. Gillingham's S. E. Corner; thence SO
chains Nortn; thence 80 cnains |
West; thence 80 chains South;
thence SO chains East to point of
commencement and containing 640
acres more or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles M.  Huff, Agent.
Dated March 4th, 1911. 4-1S
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE tb.'.t Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for a
license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 64 0 acres of land: —
Commencing at a post planted about
8 miles N. E. of the mouth of the
White River and the junction of the
Naas, marked Chas. J. Gillingham's
S. E. Corner; thence 80 chains
North; thence 80 chains West;
thence SO chains Soulh; thence 80
chains East to point of commencement and containing 640 acres more
or less.
CHARLES  J.   GILLINGHAM.
Charles M.  Huff, Agent.
Dated  March 6th,  1911. 4-18
Skeent Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Clara Orr, of
Masset, B C., occupation spinster,
Intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted about 40 chains south and 80
chains east of the N. E. corner of
Lot 35; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence north
80 chains; thence east 80 chains, containing 640 acres.
CLARA ORR.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 25, 1910.
WATER NOTICE.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Merton A.
Merrill, of Masset, B. C, occupation
prospector, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at . a
post planted at the S. W. corner of
T. L. 40787; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south
SO chains, more or less, to the shore
of Masset Inlet; thence easterly along
the shore back to the place of commencement, containing 640 acres,
more or less.
MERTON A. MERRILL.
Dated Nov. 25, 1910.
Skeena   Land    District—District   of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Commencing at a post planted about
S miles N. E. of the mouth of White j
River and the junction of the Naas
River, marked Charles J. Gillingham's S. E. Corner; thence 80
chains North; thence 80 cliains
West; thence 80 chains South;
thence 80 chains East to point of
commencement and containing 640
acres more or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles M.  Huff,  Agent.
Dated March 5th, 1911. 4-1S
Skeena    Land    DlBtrlct —District    of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B, '.'.,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Commencing at a post planted 8%
miles N. E. of the mouth of While
River and tlu juiiclion of tho Naas,
marked Chas. J. Gillingham's S. E.
Corner; thence SO cliains North;
thence SO chains West; thence 80
chains South; thence 80 chains East
to point of commencement and containing 640 acres more or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles M.  Huff,  Agent.
Dated  March  ith, 1911. 4-18
Skeena
-District    of
Land   District
Cassiar.
TAKE     NOTICE   that  Charles   J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation    contractor,    intends    to
apply  to  the  Minister  of Lands  for
a  license  to  prospect   for  Coal  and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land:—
Commencing at a post planted    six
miles N.  E.  of the month  of White
River and the Junction  of the Naas
River   on   Canyon     Creek,     marked,
6-23 Chas. J.  Gillingham's S. E.  Corner; executed at the Journal Office.
NOTICE is hereby given that an
application Will be made under Part
V. of the "Water Act, la09," to obtain a licence in the Queen Charlotte Islands Division of Skeena District.
(a) The name, address and occupation of the applicant—Merton A.
Merrill, Masset, Q. C. I., B. C,
Prospector.
(If for mining purposes) Free
Miner's  Certificate No	
(h) The name of the lake,
stream, or source (if unnamed, the
description is)—I-in-tsua Lake, Tsu-
Skundale Lake and Ain  River.
(c) The point of diversion—At r
near the outlet of Tsu-Skundale
Lake into Ain  River.
(d) The quantity of water applied for (in cubic feet per second)
—1,000.
(e) The character of the proposed works—Power Plant, Dam,
Flumes, etc.
(f) The premises on which the
water is to be used (describe same)
—At or near tho mouth of the Ain
River.
(g) The purposes for which the
water Is to he used -Generating
power.
(h) If for irrigation, describe
ihe land Intended to bo lrrignted,
giving acreage	
11) If the water is to be used for
power or mining purposes, describe
ill. plae-ei where the water Is to he
returned to sonic natural channel,
and the difference. In altitude be-
tween point of diversion and point
Of return—At or near the mouth of
the Ain River, about 100 feet below
'point of diversion.
(j) Area of Crown land Intended to be occupied by the proposed
works—10 acres more or lesn.
(k) This notice was posted on
the 28th day of November, 1910,
and application will be made to the
Commissioner on the 1st day of
June,  1911.
(!) Give the names and addresses of any riparian proprietors or
licensees who or whose lands are
likely to be affected by the proposed works, either above or below
the outlet—Don't know  of any.
(Signature)
MERTON  A.
(P. O.  Address)
NOTE.—One   cubic
ond  is equivalent  10
Inches.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Carl Nelson,
of Chicago, III., U. S. A., occupation
draughtsman, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about SO chains east
and 120 chains north of N. E. corner of Lot 35; tlience south 80
chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence north SO chains: thence west
SO chains, containing 640 acres.
CARL NELSON.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated, Nov. 26, 1910.
of
Skeena    Land    District—District
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that Freadrick
Madden, of Seattle, Wash., occupation laborer, Intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described land:—Commencing at a
post planted about two hundred feet
east of mile 77 on the south side of
G. T. P. Right-of-way; thence west
40 chains following the said Right-
of-way; thence south to bank of
Skeena River; Ihence east following
the sinuosities of said river until
duo south of said post; thence north
to point of commencement, containing 130 acres more or less.
FREADRICK  MADDEN.
Thos. L. Fay, Agent.
Dated April 27, 1011,
.-.-10
NOTICE.
A book Is kept In the City Clerk's
Office In which to enter the names
and addresses, etc. of citizens of
Prince Rupert desiring employment
on City work. All desiring employment should register ai once.
ERNEST A.   WOODS,
City Clerk.
MERRILL,
Masse.,  II.  C.
loot   p'-er  sec-
;."..71     miner's
Job   Printing  of  all   kinds   neatly
Prince  Rupert   Private
 Agency
Detective
N. McDonald, Manager
All kinds of legitimate detective work
handled  for companies and   Individuals.     Duslness strictly  confidential.
P. O. Box 8011 — Phone 210
If you Hunt the honey
That   conies   from   the
Take up the phone and
(all one, double five.
hive PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Tuesday, July  25,  1911.
prince liJupert journal
Telephone   138
Published twice a week on Tuesdays and Fridays from the office of
publication, Third Avenue, near
McBride Street.
Subscription rate to any point in
Canada, $2.00 a year; to points outside of Canada, ?3.00 a year.
Advertising rates furnished on
application,
O. H. NELSON,
Editor.
Tuesday,  July
1911.
A FALSE POSITION
Sir Wilfrid Laurier. according to
tin- latest despatches, seems determined to bring on an election
wlthoul redistribution. His excuse
for so doing is that the Opposition
will not allow reciprocity to go to
a vote in a house now putting in ils
lasl hours. If ever there was good
reason fur demanding nn appeal in
the people on a live question it is on
this occasion.
Mr. Borden has assured the leader
of the Government that he will give
every opportunity to allow the passing of a redistribution act. He is
anxious to allow the West to have
its full voice in tlie parliament of
the Dominion before this question is
settled. This is what might have
been expected of a man of Mr. Borden's character, who is always eminently fair. On the reciprocity
question, however, he stands uncompromisingly in favor of the mandate
of the people being taken.
Sir Wilfrid seems to be fearful of
the results of redistribution. He
fears the spirit of the West with
the full representation to which It
is entitled, it is surely a sign of
weakness on his part as to the feeling of the West when he refuses to
give it the increased representation
before deciding a question of the importance of the reciprocity agreement.
Another disturbing feature which
the premier is doubtless afraid to
face is the question of reducing the
representation in the Atlantic Maritime Provinces. Fearful of the attitude of the increased representation
in the West and of the protest
against, decreased representation in
the East, Sir Wilfrid seeks to put
the responsibility for forcing the
election upon Mr. Borden and catching a verdict from the country upon
a distribution of seats that will not
adequately represent the electorate.
It is a course that is eminently
unfair and one which the electorate
will surely deal with in no uncertain way.
PROBLEM OI
'EERS
Lively Speculation on as to Government's Selections in ('use Wholesale Creation Is Decided Upon
titled to secure the high distinction
of viscountships.
Drawing on the House of Commons for new lords presents difficulties. If one hundred or more
members of the lower chamber are
taken, a miniature general election
will be necessary to fill their places
and the country and politicians alike
are tired to death of elections with
ihe consequent turmoil, expense and
disturbance to business.
-Moreover, the government cannot
afford to risk the members of parliament except from safe Liberal
constituencies. The exact social
status of the new peers, if hatched,
is the subject of no little speculation. Tiie Conservatives profess to
believe that they will be looked on
with amusement and contempt. One
writer says that ..moriran heiresses
an.' far too shrewd to find such
quasi-nohlemen objects of their ambitions.
Another suggests the adoption of
ihe title of count to the British
peerage for the purpose of Asquith s
peer for distinguishing the new from
the regular delegates as noblemen
created for a special political purpose.
The Daily Telegraph, a staunch
Unionist paper in an editorial says
not only that the House of Lords
will pass tlie third reading of the
veto bill today without division, but
when the government hill is returned
to the upper chamber shorn of the
lord s amendment, they also will
pass that, for the simple reason that
"there really is no practicable
choice," and because it would form
an evil and dangerous precedent to
bring the crown into the struggle
and it would be impossible for the
king to withhold his consent if the
ministers required the creation of
peers.
Practically the whole Unionist
press has now fallen into line with
the Telegraph in the admission that
this is the only reasonable policy for
the lords to follow, and that the "no
surrender" policy would be suicidal.
 o	
News of the Province      ;j;
»* »5* C* •5* »J* *5* "J* *** *** ♦♦* "♦* "J* *♦* "J* *** *5t*5t *** *** *** *** *2* *** *** ***
COAL IX  ALBERNI
will be instructed to ask that the application of the Vancouver board be
refused unless Nelson is guaranteed
a corresponding reduction in freight
charges from the east to Nelson. It
was pointed out that Vancouver, on
some goods, already has a lower rate
than Nelson, and that if the rates
to the interior were reduced the position of this city as a wholesale centre would be jeopardized unless Nelson also received a reduction.
HEAVY LAND SALES
There is much curiosity on the
part of politicians over the cabinet's
list of potential peers. That a list
has been made and is awaiting the
possibility of Its use in the event
that ibis is necessary to obtain the
passage of the veto bill in the House
Of Lords then- is no doubt. The
government's spokesmen have said
repeatedly within the last week that
Premier Asquith wns prepared to
meet all contingencies of ihe situation in all details, which is taken
to mean that he has hidden up his
sleeve; two leading sources of supply,
these being the eldest sons of Liberal peers and members of parliament.
Proposals to enable the eldest
sons presents an amusing phase of
revolution. Peers of baronial rank
think that If their sons are enoble-d,
they themselves should be promoted
tu be viscounts, when their sons are
made barons.
Sonic nf the promlenl members of
parliament, who are nol adverse to
joining the nobility, cherish the
Idea thai if a host of barons are to
hi' poured Into the upper house'. <>r
which a large proportion musl be
commonplace persons,  they are en-
ALBERNI—W. J. Dick, mining
engineer for the conservation commission of the Dominion of Canada,
spent a week in and around Port
Alberni making an examination of
the coal indications. He also made
a careful ispectlon of the coal show
ing that is now being developed on
the waterfront a short distance
south of the Waterhouse wharf. The
tunnel was in S5 feet when Mr. Dick
made his examination, and he pro
nounced the coal to be a good qual
ity suitable for steam purposes and
house fuel. It was already of a
marketable quality, while the quantity and the ease with which it could
be taken out made it a paying proposition. Mr. Dicks investigations led
him to the conclusion that the seam
on which the miners are working is
only one of three, there being evidence of tlie existence of two others
farther down, where a superior quality of coal would be found. He
could only speculate on the distance
of these seams from each other, but
thought the second might be struck
within (10 feet. At any rate the indications would certainly warrant
the operation of a diamond drill.
There was no doubt in Mr. Dick's
mind but there is an enormous body
of good e'oal under the townsite and
land on either side and behind it.
He estimated the area at eight
square miles.
OPPOSI-: VAXCOl VKR
NELSON—The freight committee
of the Board of Trade decided that
the Interests of the city and district
required thai the board be represented nt the sittings of the board
of railway commissioners al Vancouver nn Augusl 81, When the Case
nf the- coast city for lower rates from
iii.- coasl in tin' Interior will again
come up.    The local representatlv
VANCOUVER — That the land
operations of the Hudson's Bay
Company in Canada for the past year
exceed the operations for the year
previous by $1,542,500, and that the
land branch of the company reports
a total sale of 267,000 acres at an
average price of $14.03 per acre,
against 104,400 acres at an average
of $12.43 for the corresponding period, is the interesting report made
public here by Herbert E. Burbidge,
the company's general sales and store
commission, yesterday. "The report
of the Hudson's Bay Company,
which I have just received, covers
a period of 20 months, so far as it
concerns the sales shops accounts,
which have been brought up to January 31 last, whereas hitherto these
figures have always been made up
to May 31 of the previous years,"
explained Mr. Burbidge, in Vancouver, wherie he was supervising the
plans of enlargement of his company
in that vicinity. "The land covers
the period of 12 months ended March
31 last. The results obtained during
the period have been of a very encouraging nature, and particularly as
regards land operations, which have
been productive of no less than
$2,742,500, an increase of $1,542,-
000 as compared with 1909-1910.
Trading operations, which expression covers, of course, the company's
fur dealing business, have resulted
in a net profit of $S00,000, or about
$31,000 less than in the preceding
year. ' Considering the very serious
fall in the prices of furs, this must
be considered quite satisfactory.. Altogether, therefore, the company
shows net receipts of $3,542 5000
during the period in question as
against $2,031,000 during 1909-
1910."
 o	
"Do you believe in long engagements?" he asked after she had consented to be his.
"Yes, dear," she replied. "I have
always thought it was such a mistake for two people to rush into
matrimony before they learned to
really know each other."
"Well, about how long would you
wish  the  engagement  to  be?"
"Let me see. Would you think it
was too long if we didn't get married
until a week from next Thursday?"
COMMUNICATIONS
The Journal does not necessarily endorse
the views expressed in this column but believes in the freest discussion nf public concerns provided it is done in a proper wav..
WHERE   RESPONSIBILITY  RESTS
Editor The Journal:—It seems a
pity that people who can be relied
on lo he fairly truthful in ordinary
business matters, think it no harm
le indulge in niisreprsentation when
the object aimed is the advantage
of the party in poltics with which
they happen to be affiliated.
Such an instance occurred recently when the editor of the News stated that the responsibility for bringing on an election before redistribution, and thus practically disfranchising a large number of the western people, must rest with the Conservative opposition at Ottawa. Tlie
editor must have known that he was
slating something which is absolutely Incorrect and his net Ion can only
be accounted tor by the doctrine thnt
the end justifies the means. The
end in Ihis case being the success of
the government,
What  are  tlie  facts  of  Iho  cane?
Ik * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
* *
* *
Remember
That we
Import
Our Wines
direct from Europe; and that
no house In Prince Rupert can
equal them for quality. No
better can be bought anywhere
In the Province. We make a
specialty  of
!
Family Trade
and guarantee satisfaction
We  also   carry  a  complete  *
*
stock of other *
Liquors
* Try a glass of *
* *
I Cascade j
!    Beer    f
* The best local beer on  the *:*
* market. jj
»> ♦
I CLARKE BROS. j
.;. Christiansen & Brandt Bid.       *
* *
* *
* Telephone 39       Third Avenue  *
.'. ... »*. ... .** .*. .*• .•. •*. .'• ... .*. .*• .*. ... .'. ... .'. .'• .*. ... .*. .*. .*. •'. A
... »t. »,, y ... »t» »„. ... ... ... ♦,. .,. *,. »,« »j» *,. v»,».,..,.... v v ... ... ly
The present government has in no
sense any mandate from the people
of Canada to change the fiscal policy
of a generation without first submitting the matter to the country.
Laurier was returned to power mainly through his patriotic plea that he
was getting old and would like to
he allowed ,to finish his work before
retiring from public life, his work,
as lie put it. being the completion
of the G. T. P. On this plea he won
thhe election. Surely he will not
claim that it is any part of the completion of his railway policy to try
and divert traffic from the eastern
part of the Dominion to the American territory to the south.
The plain facts are that on this
question the opposition is standing
for responsible government and the
right of the people to be consulted
before any change having such a far-
reaching effect as this will have is
adopted. They have offered to vote
supply and assist the government to
carry on the business of the country for which they were elected, but
they will not allow a change In the
fiscal policy of the country, which
many people who are just as good
Canadians as the editor of the News,
believe will eventually result in our
absolute dependence on the United
States, If not our ultimate absoptlon,
without first putting it squarely before the people of Canada for their
decision,
If Hie government decides thnt the
question    oi    passing  reciprocity  at
The British Columbia Company
LIMITED.
AUTHORIZED CAPITAL $100,000.::  PAID UP CAPITAL $41,500
DIRECTORS:—Reginald C. Brown, President; J. C. Maclure, Vice-
President; H. E. Marks, Managing Director; Capt. E. Nash, William
McNair, R. A. Bevan, and P.  C.   Williams, Secretary.      :-:      :-:
INTEREST 4 PER CENT. DEPOSITS
This Company acts as ExecutorB, Administrators, Transferees and
Secretaries to Public Companies.    Commercial, Industrial and other
business propositions underwritten.    Issues  made  on  the
London and New York Stock Exchanges.
TIMBER, COAL, LANDS, and
COMPANY ORGANIZATION
Head Office for Canada, 203, 208, 210, 215 Corter-Cotton Building,
VANCOUVER, B.C.
61 Floor Varnish
Made
Especially
for Floors
Will not crack nor peel off.
Water will not turn It white.
Sold only in sealed cans.
Ask for sample panel.
If vour dealer does not stock It write
The Staneland Co. Ltd
836-840 Fort Street, VICTORIA, B.C.
J
Replenish
the
Pantry
L«
..........J
High-Class....
Grocery
Stock
to choose from
EVERYTHING CLEAN AND FRESH
Goods for the Table to Suit the Most
Fastidious  Housewife
! MERRYFIELD'S .
I       CASH GROCERY      i
once is of mole importance than a
proper represenatlon of the west In
the new parliament, It Is on the government that the blame must fall,
and not on the shoulders of the opposition leaders. The latter are only
fulfilling their obligations as representatives of the people when they
Insist that this question is too Important to be decided In the closing
days of a parliament elected on an
entirely  different   question.
Yours faithfully,
ANTI-RECIPROCITY,
The Thompson
: Hardware Co.
t —Second Avenue—
Paints. General Hardware,
Oils, Stoves and Ranges.
2nd Avenue
Prince  Rupert,
B.C.
Real
Estate
INVESTMENTS
Real
Estate
List Your
Properties
with
Uncle Jerry
JEREMIAH H. KUGLER
He Sells Buildings He Sells Contracts
He has Houses to Rent
He Buys Lots He Builds Homes
He Buys Leases He Loans Money
He Has Farms for Sale
He Sells Houses He Rents Stores
JEREMIAH H. KUGLER
Special Bargains in
KITSELAS LANDS
FRANCOIS LAKE LANDS
LAKELSE LANDS
HAZELTON   DISTRICT   LANDS
SAND,   Cl RAVEL   AND   MARBLE   DEPOSITS
BULKLEY  VALLEY  LANDS
KISPIOX VALLEY LANDS
PORCHER   ISLAND LANDS
KITSUMKALUM   LANDS /.-
Tuesday,  July  25,  1911.
PRINCE  RUPERT JOURNAL
ARE GETTING READY
Government is Preparing for  Settlers
in the Peace River
District.
Government's Survey Work Is Thoroughly in Hand for Season—
Up-to-date Information
if the strike is settled within the
next few weeks, they say, it will be
impossible to obtain fuel for a long
period, owing to the other demands
upon the supply, and shortage of cars
during the movement of the wheat
in the prairies. The board will hold
a special meeting to consider asking
the Canadian Pacific Railway to give
special rates on coal from Vancouver Island mines to relieve the situation. Otherwise importations must
be made from Pennsylvania.
With the despatch of two or three
complete and well equipped parties
to the great virgin territory on the
south fork of the upper Fraser between Tete Jaune Cache and Fort
George, the survey work of the prov-
Inve for the present season may bo
said to be thoroughly under way,
with prospect of decidedly beneficial
and practical results. These various
survey parties, of which there are
a greater number than usual in the
field, have directions to lay out the
several large reserves set aside for
the particular—indeed exclusive—
benefit of the prcemptor; and at the
same time they will, in accordance
with this season's instructions, supplement their orthodox professional
reports with helpful information of
the records as to temperature, rainfall, timber conditions soil character, etc., all of which data will be of
immense benefit to the prospective
settler, to whom it will be freely
available at the nearest government
office to the desired land as well as
at headquarters in this city.
There are also in preparation in
the department four distinct and separate preemptors' maps of sections
contiguous to existent or immediately
prospective railway facilities, which
maps are being rushed forward with
all possible celerity, and will be
quickly followed with others as soon
as essential data is sufficient for
their  compilation.
Settlement Policy
It is recognized by the minister
that there is small advantage in campaigning for the settlement and development of the new lands of British Columbia if, on their application
for specific and reliable information
in respect thereto,, prospective settlers cannot be Immediately and accurately advised as to the prevailing
conditions. The policy is therefore
being systematically developed of
providing the fullest and most up-
to-date Information for intended settlers, available where it will be most
convenient and of greatest advantage to such prospective colonists.
And in this connection the utilization of practical homestead inspectors will probably be necessary and
expedient in the not far distant future.
All the lands now being surveyed
under the direction of the lands department are In territory on the lines
of projected or assured railways, or
in touch witli navigable arterial waterways, which will assure their expeditious settling up; while surveys
are to be hereafter checked up sysT
tenia!It-ally- hy an independent and
capable official from headquarters.
W. s. Drewry has recently been appointed in this capacity. He is to
leave at once on his first Inspection
tour, in the course of which he will
check and confirm various recent
surveys in the East Kootenay district, afterwards going Into Cariboo
from Ashcroft northwards.
This will in all probability be the
last season in which government surveys will be conducted in this province by asisgned private members of
the profession, engaged by Ihe government, it being the intention to
inaugurate the bureau of. surveys
provided for in legislation of last
session and develop the work of the
bureau along systematic and thorough lines, the growth of Britisii
Columbia in population and industrial importance having necessitated
tlie inauguration of more modern
methods. Up to date the department has not found it necessary to
go outside of Ihe profession in this
province for men competent and
ready to direct its field enterprises,
and It is Improbable that such necessity wil arise for years to come,
although provision Is mnde In the
statute by which such a condition
may be met with should It present
Itself.
FORESEES   UNION
Governor Osborne of Michigan Gives
His View of Results to Follow
Reciprocity
COAL SHORTAGE
NELSON—That a joint meeting
of the boards of trade of Eastern
British Columbia and Southern Alberta should be held at an early date
to consider the passage of a joint
resolution asking the Dominion government to take some action to relieve the serious situation created by
the coal strike, is the suggestion endorsed by the Nelson board of trade,
and of the Fernle board of trade.
The meeting will probably he held
in Nelson. According to local coal
dealers, high prices for coal here this
winter are inevitable, while a famine  is  greatly  to  he  feared.    Even
In a welcoming speech at the opening session in Detroit of thhe National Editorial Association convention, Governor Chase Osborne de-
e'lared that the "new trade relations"
about to be established were a prelude to a union of nations from the
North Pole to the Isthmus of Panama.
"I think it is the destiny of America to abolish the long line of menace along our northern border," said
the governor, "until we have one
country with one type of government,
one language, one people from the
North Pole to the Isthmus of
Panama."
In his annual address to the convention, President Baumgartner discussed the advisability of a national
law licensing editors. He make a
vigorous attack on "yellow newspapers."
"The yellow newspaper is not the
worst form of journalism, however,"
continued President Baumgartner.
There is a class of newspapers that
is in the market brazenly on sale
to the higest bidder. Well edited,
typographically excellent, respectable, dignified and conservative, having the support of the business community, entering the best homes, yet
rotten at heart—these are the papers to be feared. In the purchasable and subsidized press is to be
found the most terrible foe of lib,
erty, progress and democracy."
 o	
:•*** **************** ******
I    RUSSIA AWAKENS    I
* *
V * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * .** * * * * *
it may seem curious that it should
he after China there should come the
awakening of Russia. Skilled observers profess to see the signs all
over the county—not alone in edu-
says the Montreal Herald.
Probably the majority of Canadians will wonder, not that should
be an awakening, but that it should
be so long delayed. Why should Russia have lingered so far behind Europe and America? The explanation
put forward Is that her people are
Slavs—almost Asiatic in their habits
and prone to accept things as they
are. Yet they are strangely given
io  idealize.
It is probable that their remoteness from other countries, which
kept thehm as a nation apart, aws
responsible for their lagging in I lie
commercial and industrial race. It
is only 50 years since slavery was
abolished and until then the owner
of peasants could maim, kill and outrage them as he pleased.
The Russian peasantry have just
and the face has become Known to
American. English and German producers, who have agents getting
busy all through the czar's dominions. There seems to be an opportunity for the Canadian manufacturers, too, if they feel like establishing branches there.
The harvester trust has bought a
factory near Moscow and has begun
to manufacture the agricultural machinery for which its name is famous
with a force of G.OJO men.
The beginning of a large amount
of business of this kind has been
made In Moscow, which is a great
commercial city and the real heart
of Hussla so far as material development Is concerned. St. Petersburgh
is a city ul' li'lilnoonlks (officials).
It Is artificial; not Russton, but cosmopolitan, in a cheap, second hand
sort of way. MOSCOW, on the other
hand, is echt-Russlach, It Is solid,
and rich, and genuine, with Its roots
deep In the past. You can see the
difference at once in the streets, in
the shops, In the hotels. The biggest shop by the way, is the enterprise of two Scotsmen, Mulr and Mir-
rilees, whose names In Russian look
strangely familiar and yet strangely
odd.
Russian merchants are nearly all
sons of peapsants who have piled up
their riches painfully, with Incredible
clear and certain ahead before they
embark on a speculation, In modern methods of business they are
scarcely equal competitors with the
foreigner, trained to think quickly,
cut losses, and take risks. And since
agricultural machinery is chiefly
English, German or American, the
agencies which deal in it are mostly
rather than Russian pure.
YOU ARE SURE OF
Engine  Reliability
IF  YOU  RUN A
Fairbanks - Norse Marine Engine
OVER 125,000 IN USE THROUGHOUT THE WORLD
TWO
CYCLE
FOUR
CYCLE
HEAVY
DUTY
MEDIUM
DUTY
Runabout
Type
MOST  COMPLETE  LINE OF GASOLINE ENGINES IN
THE WORLD
Write  for Cntalog P19
The Canadian Fairbanks Co., Ltd.
101-107 WATER STREET
Local Agent—F. M. DAVIS
VANCOUVER,  B. C.
- PRINCE RUPERT
AN UNWISE STEP
"The red, white and blue, with its
present number of stars, is sufficient
for me, and I am not at all anxious
to add another star to our neighbor's
flag with my vote," is the opinion on
reciprocity forcefully expressed by J.
E. H. Barnet of Renfrew, Ontario,
who is now on the Pacific coast.
Though Mr. Barnet's timber interests in this and other provinces are
figured in the millions, and sine timber men on this side of the boundary
line are commonly credited with
standing to reap considerable benefit
from any prospective reciprocity
treaty between Canada and the United States. Mr. Barnet is too loyal
to the flag of his own country to
permit himself to be swayed by
sordid selfishness when the prosperity of the entire Dominion is at
stake.
"To my way of looking at it, this
question of reciprocity is not to be
considered lightly or altogether in
the nature of a commercial agreement, for if such were the case 1
would soon be found on the side of
those advocating it, hut a step that
is likely to create a chilled feeling
between Canada and the Mother
Country. Frankly, I believe the
whole scheme is just in keeping with
the almost imperial commercial pol-
ie-y of the United States. This rec-i
proclty treaty is simply a bait held
out. to us in the hope that we will
he beguiled into such a trap, under
the guise of keeping dangling before
our eyes an entry for our products
into a market estimated at 90,000,-
000 inhabitants. But let the too-
confident Canadian beware of the
wily sons of Uncle Sam, who do not
e'lire a rap for our prosperity, but
their own. They are not so philan-
thropically inclined as to throw their
doors wide open to us. What they
will take from us is just a drop In
a bucket compared to what they expect lo ship into our markets. It
is an absolute fact that American
factories have been increased to such
an extent for the past five years that
if they want to continue to run at
full  blast they must find  an  addi-
THE CONTINENTAL TRUST COMPANY, LIMITED
Authorized Capital     $500,000
Officers:
WILLIAM T. KERGIN, M. D., Pres.  DAVID   H.   HAYS,  First Vice-Pres.
M. J. HOBIN, 2nd Vice-Pres. & Mgr.  JAY   KUGLER,   Secretary-Treasurer
C.  B. PETERSON,  Ass't Manager
Executor and Administrator Receiver or Assignee
Fiscal  Agents Trustees
Real Estate and In sura ace
Registrar and Transf".' Agent, F'ln" Lands and Mi"es
Agent for Cure of Real Estate Escrow Agents
Trustee Under Moi-tgages  and  Deeds of Trust Collections
SAVINGS DEPARTMENT
4 per cent on Deposits        SAFl DEPOSIT VAULT AND BOXES
We will lie pleased to answer any inquiries regarding investments In
Prince Rupert and Northern British Columbia,
THE CONTINENTAL TRUST COMPANY, LIMITED
SECOND AVENUE
PRINCE   RUPERT,   B.   C.
tional market for their surplus products, as they put out nearly one-
third more than the market of their
own country can handle.
"What has built up the United
States if not a prpotectlve tariff?"
Had they accepted our overtures
some twenty years ago, before Canadian industries sprang into existence,
it. would have been a good thing for
this country at that time, but now,
never."
"Just look at your own marvelous
progress In this province and then
tell me if British Columbia is not
destined to become the greatest province not alone in Canada, but on the
whole American continent. Why,
then, should we sell ourselves in
commercial slavery and political
bondage and enter upon a. road that
must ultimately lead to worse; namely, annexation or consolidation?
Every Canadian should have sufficient pride, if not patriotism, to remain independent and coveted rather
than tied up by a pact that only
gives the other fellow a welcome
outlet for his products. For almost
fifty years the United States has
spurned our repeated advances, because she did not need us, and now
when he trust bosses deem it opportune, she is willing to admit 'dear
little Canada' into her markets, but
not until after having studied carefully her own and this country's commercial resources. It is by no means
a spontaneous outburst of unselfish
friendship that makes the United
States want to recognize us al this
late hour as a friendly neighbor with
whom she should trade in neighborly fashion, bul a mosl cold-blooded
and deep-laid political plot, or, as it
used to be called, more politely, a
coup d'etat to lure this country into
an alliance that must ultimately result in her severance from the
Mother Country.
"I am no more a Conservative than
I am a Liberal. I am independent In
politics, and this subsidized enthusiasm for reciprocity is, to me, no
nore than a most nonsensical vote-
.'atcher."
Q0%
mm
Double Weekly Service
S.S. PRINCE RUPERT & S.S. PRINCE GEORGE
Sail for Vancouver, Victoria and Seattle
Mondays and Fridays al 8 a.m.
For STEWART Thursdays and Sundays 8 a.m.
Special reduced fare Sunday's boat $9.50
return,   including   meals   and   berths.
S.S.PRINCE ALBERT for Port Simpson, Nans River, Masset and
Naden Harbor, Wednesdays, 1 P.M., and for Queen Charlotte
Island points, Saturdays, 1 P.M.
RAILWAY SERVICE TO COPPER RIVER, mixed trains from
Prince Rupert Wednesdays and Saturdays, 1 P.M.; returning  Thursdays   and   Sundays,  5:20 P.M.
THE GRAND TRUNK RAILWAY SYSTEM, connecting with
trains from the Pacific Coast, operates a frequent and convenient
service of luxurious trains over its DOUBLE TRACK route between
Chicago, Toronto, Montreal, Quebec, Halifax, Portland, Boston,
New York and Philadelphia.
Atlantic Steamship  bookings  arranged via all lines
Full Information and tickets obtained from the office of
A. E. McMASTER
Freight and Pasenger Agent, G. T.  P. Wharf.
..;..;. .:..;..>.:..:..;e.:. ************ ****
STORAGE!
! Household Goods and Baggage *
' given careful attention.         *
; Forwarding,   Distributing   and *
'> Shipping Agents               *,
I TRANSFERERS I
% *
j,   Prince    Rupert    Warehousing .;.
J and   Forwarding   Co. *:,
!<    First   Ave.,   near   McBride   St. *
DOUGLAS SUTHERLAND,
Manager.
P. O. Box 007 Phone 202
GRAND HOTEL
WORKINGMAN'S HOME
25c
Rooms 50 Cents
Spring Beds, Clean
White Sheets
Best in Town for the Money
FIRST AVE. AND SEVENTH ST.
J. Goodman, Proprietor
Excursions!
Let us tell you all about the cheap
ROUND TRIP  EXCURSIONS
to all Towns and Cities in Eastern
Canada and United  States
Via
The Great Northern
Choice of Return  Route
Tickets to the Old Country by all
Lines. Take any Steamer from
Prince Rupert.
ROGERS STEAMSHIP AGENCY
Phone 110 Second Ave
Prince Rupert, B.C.
CANADIAN PACIFIC BAILIVAY CO.
B. C. Coast S. S. Service
Jj8k
Famous
Princess
Line
x^
The harvester trust has agents
everywhere, and insists upon them
all being ahle to speak Russian well,
so that they can explain the machinery and also chat and joke with
with possible purchasers. That Is In
Russia vastly important. More business is gained there by good-fellowship than anywhere else in the world.
The Germans understand this well.
They also realize that conditions
vary in different districts und require io be carefully examined.
"When an English traveler conies
here," 1 was told in one town, "he
seldom does much good, even if lie
can speak Russian, which is unlikely. For he only stays a day or two,
whereas German travelers settle
down for several weeks, get to know
everybody, and obtain a thorough
graps of the market situation. If
it pays a big business like that of
Messrs. Mather & Piatt lo keep an
office staff of nine in Moscow and
another firm as famous as John
Fowler s to circulate catalogues in
Russian and Polish, surely smaller
people with greater need of custom
might follow such excellent examples.
Much could be done, too, in this
way; it should be the business of
agents to persuade groups of small
holders to buy big machinery (e.g.,
reapers, threshers, seed drills) between them. This is done In Canada
and the United States. No doubt
co-operation would be more difficult
among Russians, who are extremely
suspicious, hut the advantages of
such a plan would soon become obvious.
in big middling-sized machinery
England keeps up pretty well. I
went around, writes a e ^respondent,
a number of yards where Importers
laid their wares on show and found
a comfortable percentage of good,
homely English names. But, looking to the future, the prospect is
cloudy. Al present a good deal of
agricultural machinery enters Russia
free. Bul there Is no doubl thai as
soon as Hussla ran manufacture agricultural machinery tor herself In
I any quantity a heavy duty will be
| clapped on. And that time need met
be tar distant, Blnce all over the
country small factories ar springing
up. As yet most of them only make
small Implements, bul 1 went over
one, an English one\ which was turning out a harvester every quarter of
an hour. This factory has Increased
Its output very largely In the last
few years.
What can English manufacturers
do, then, to avoid being squeezed out
of this market, which, during many
years to come will become more and
more profitable? A largo Polish
landowner whom I visited supplied
the answer. "Persuade your countrymen," he said, "to come to Poland
and build factories. We do nol wanl
tee buy from Germany, who treats
her Polish subjects so badly. We
are admirers and friends of England,
and we should have more confidence
in the shares of an English company than a company of our own.
The peasantry are buying lands In
all directions. Such an enterprise
would certainly pay."
As development proceeds ii Is
highly probable that the manufacturers only who have works In Russia will retain the trade and others
will he starved out.
The Girl—The man I marry must
he brave and brainy.
The Man—"I am bolli. Remember when we were out sailing the
boat upset, and I saved your life?
The Girl   -Bul thai was not brainy.
The Man—Yes, it was. I upse-t
the  boat   on   purpose'.
1836 1911
The Bank of
British North America
A Strong Britiih Bank, with
Connection* Throughout the
World.
Foreign Drafts
Agents in Canada for the Colonial Bank, London and West
Indies. We have special facilities
for handling business with Great
Britain and foreign countries.
Drafts on France, Germany,
South Africa, Australia, New
Zealand, India, China, Japan and
West Indies bought and sold.
Prince Ruperl Branch—
F. S. LONG, Manager.
Princess Beatrice
Wednesday, July 26, 9 a. m.
SOUTHBOUND FOR
Vancouver, Victoria,
AND
Seattle
J. G. McNAB,
General  Agent.
Free Employment
Office
For all kinds of help. Cooks, waiters, dishwashers, hotel porters, all
kinds of laborers or mechanics, call
up  178 or call at the
FREE EMPLOYMENT OFFICE
GRAND HOTEL
Headqnartera for Cooka and Waiters
	
ROGERS & BLACK
Wholesale Dealers In
j BUILDING  MATERIAL,    CEMENT,
LIME,  HALR-FIBRE PLASTER
COKE, BLACKSMITH COAL,
COMMON BRICK, PRESSED BRICK
SHINGLES AND LATH
NEW  WELLINGTON  COAL
All   orders   promptly   filled—see   us
for prices.
PHONE 11(1 PHONE 116
r
For Neat Job Printing
s
nee the Journal Man
Tel. 138
v
J
■- •■ PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Tuesday, July 25, 1911,
ANSWERS FIELDING
Sir Charles Tupper Meets the Position
Taken by the Minister of
Finance.
The Old Canadian Statesman Records
Himself us Against Reciprocity  Agreement
Sir Charles Tupper has replied
to Hon. W. S. Fielding on the subject of reciprocity and in no uncertain way describes the action of the
Laurier government. The letter of
Sir Charles is as follows:
The Mount, Bexley Heath,
June 3, 1911
To the Honorable W. S. Fielding.
Sir—1 have to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of May 2 6. As
you do not attempt to controvert the
main portions of my letter, yours
will require but little notice at my
hands.
Wilful Misstatements
I charged with a wilful misstatement in interpolating in the quotation of my reference to the tariff
you brought down the words "that
is the Laurier government tariff,"
when you knew that owing to the
injury which I proved it was inflict
ing, you, a month afterwards, sub-
stiuted another, saying, "I may say
we are proposing a number of
changes . . . We have desired to
meot the views of manufacturers who
complained they were severely affected by our resolutions. " But 1 need
not waste words in proving what you
still have the effrontery to deny,
that having denounced our protective
policy for years, you sold your principles and adopted our policy for
the the sake of obtaining and retaining power. It is not yet forgotten
that in the Laurier government tariff of 1897 you added a large increase to the tariff on goods coming
from England before you proposed
the illegal reduction of 12 1-2 per
cent.
You were forced to give the preference to Britisii goods, and as I
have shown, have since used every
means of impairing it until it is practically destroyed by your American
agreement.
Laurier's Bcnunciatioii
No one questions the long continued efforts to obtain reciprocal
trade with the United States, but
when you and your colleagues spent
six mouths with Lord Herschell at
your head he bewailed his fate by
saying to Mr. Pope, his private secretary, "Is it not too bad to waste
nothing but a broken leg?" When,
on your return, Sir Wilfrid Laurier
denounced on the floor of parliament
the action of the United States and
expressed determination to abandon
all such efforts, he was told by the
opposition that the whole house
would support him, and the standing offer of Canada was unanimously withdrawn. Under the policy then
then pursued Canada obtained a position that excited the envy of the
world. Her progress and prosperity
were unequalled In any other country.
Sir Wilfrid Laurier publicly proclaimed that no change in tariff
would be made without being carefully considered by a commission.
Pledges Violated
Could anyone, under these circumstances, believe that you would not
only, without any mandate, but In
violation of the public pledges of the'
government, go down to Washington
and make a secret treaty with President Taft to revolutionize the trade
between Canada and the United
States? Your government stood
pledged to the great Unionist party
in Greal Britain, Australia, New
Zealand and Soulh Africa to carry
out a policy of mutual preferential
trade,
President Tail's Fears
When the astounding fact is now
avowed   thai   Mr.  Tafl   is   pressing
upon the Senate of the United State's!
that unless this agreement is prompt-
ratified,   Greal   Britain   and   her
of the world. This is not a question
of sentiment, and for my part I am
firmly convinced that the economic
interests of Canada lie with this continent, and it is on the broad basis of
continental freedom of trade that I
place   the   question."
Duty  to Cumuli!  and Empire
I am strengthened in the opinion
that I have only discharged an imperative duty to Canada and the Empire in sending you my open letter
of April by a letter from one of
the most able members of the House
of Commons who was present in 1897
and since, who says: "After carefully
pursuing your admirable letter to
Fielding, pray accept my warmest
congratulations. Your analysis of the
conditions and incidents to which he
alluded in bis Montreal speech is
searching and unanswerable, and
your criticism exposes his record in
the sinister light It most thoroughly
deserves."
Yours faithfully,
CHARLES TOPPER,
P. S.—I omitted to mention that
after strong pressure from me, you
largely increased the bounties on iron
and steel. I hope you have noticed
the declaration of Mr. Oliver, your
colleague, at Boston, a few days ago,
that your present tariff is one
"high   protection."
A DINOSAUR'S  SKELETON
Unearth Bone of Prehistoric Animal
of Mesozoio
Age
ly
grout dominions will be Indlssolhbly
hound together, nnd the hopes of the
United Slates destroyed, can yon
wonder thai under these circumstances it is not forgotten that the
confederation of Canada was achieved in spite of your most determined
effort to prevent it, and that after
it had been in successful operation
for 19 years, you did your utmost to
break it. up, or that your leader, Sir
Wilfrid Laurier, when speaking at
Boston, November 10, 1890, said:
"Our object is, when there Is a Llb-
eral administration at Ottawa, to
offer to the United States the free
entrance to our territory of all American products, whether natural or
manufactured, provided tho United
Slates extend the same privilege to
the products of Canada. This Involves
that we would offer to the American
nation advantages denied lo the rest
The well preserved skeleton of
what appears to have been a dina-
saur, 30 to 40 feet long, and 15 to 18
feet In height, has been found in the
Palisades, opposite West 115th street.
The authorities of the American Museum of Natural History said the
discovery was the most interesting
and important of its character, both
from the popular and scientific viewpoint ever made eost of the Mississippi river.
The information that such a skeleton had been entombed in the rock
formation of which the Palisades are
a part was far more startling to
those at the museum, it was said,
than it is likely to be to the public.
Not a paleontologist at the museum,
from President Henry Fairfield Osborne down, ever for a moment hoped to add to the museum's rich collection of dinosaurs, the skeleton of
one of which almost beyond doubt
has walked and browsed or fed on
its prey where Broadway now is, and
possibly over the site of the museum
itslf.
The grat barren chalk lands of the
west have been the beds from which
the fossils of these prehistoric rep-
tils hav been taken. Scientists had
evidence in the shape of tracks in
the rocks that dinosaur once walked
both shores of the Hudson, and frolicked over what is now Manhattan
Island, but not so much as the fragment of a skeleton has been found
before.
The skeleton is of an animal which
lived probably 10,000,000 years ago,
and of had of course been living in
the rock In which it is embedded
ever since its death. It came first
to the notice of a half dozen Columbia students recently while they were
"geologizing" along the west bank of
he Hudson under the Palissades.
When the value of the discovery
became certain the problem of getting possession of the rock In which
the skeleton was encased and removing It to the museum was tackled.
It would hav been impossible to
chisel out the bones on the spot as
the shale is wet near the surface
and damp throughout with the result
that the 10,000,000 year old bones
would have disappeared the moment
the stone was cut from above them.
The entire block will have to be
brought to the museum and dried out
before much can be done toward getting the skeleton out,
Tin. dinosaur was of tlie [Izard
family, and Is described by Mr. Matthew as belonging to an order of fossil reptiles louud usually In rock of
i he Mesozolc age containing some of
tlie mosl wonderful land animals thai
have ever lived.
The dinosaur may be Bald to have
been something of a cross between
a crocodile and an ostrich on a
greatly exaggerated scale, said the
assistant curator, In habits the dinosaur wns most terrestrial and amphibious, and the structure of its
tall in some cases indicates its size
as swimming organ. Some were of
graceful bird-like action, walking,
running or leaping on their three-
toed hind legs. Others were heavy,
clumsy beasts, walking or crawling
on their solidly built four legs. They
grey to larger size than any other
animals, which, so far as known,
have ever Inhabited the earth in any
of its periods. Some of them were
from 07 to 70 feet long 20 feet
high in natural position, and weighing 20 to 25 tons. Some were var-
nlvorous, others herbivorous, the latter walking chiefly on two feet, with
two  undeveloped   front   feet   like   a
Anheuser-Busch's
^Hr
l
3UDWF.I3S
Budweiser
Its sale in many lands is due entirely and solely
because of its surpassing Quality and Purity. Its
nutritious properties come from the choicest Northern
Barley and its tonic properties from select Saazer
Bohemia Hops—its in a class by itself.
yga
wmm
I       Bottled only (with corks or crown caps) at the
Anheuser-Busch Brewery
St. Louis, Mo., \5. S. A.
North B. C. Liquor Co.
Distributors
Prince Rupert B.I
^^Srr«^2
kangaroo. A good deal about the
one found in the Palisades, the museum authorities admit, is yet to be
learned.
 o	
Nothing  Doing
Rat-a-tat-tat!
The old soldier stood on the doorstep and listened.
"Washing-day," he muttered;  "no
luck here, that's prettey sure."
"I  expect  it's  only  another  bothersome    beggar—counfound     'em!"
muttered the angry woman within,
as she hastily snatched her hands
from the steaming washtub and
marched grimly forward to meet the
base disturber of washing-day's ancient rites and ceremonies.
"If you jlease, mum,' 'muttered
the ancient hero, "I've lost my
leg "
"Well, I ain't got it! snapped the
woman fiercely.
And then the door closed with an
awful bang.
You Can Avoid This
by sending your Clothes to the
PIONEER   STEAM LAUNDRY
There are Many
Reasons Why
;,.M     IT   IS   TO   YOUR   INTEREST
We do first-class work and
are careful with your Garments. We can do your work
and return it within 48 hours
if necessary. We call for your
laundry and return it to you.
Should anything be lost or misplaced we will make it satisfactory.
When your Laundry goes to the Chinks there are many drawbacks. When you send it to us your money helps pay WHITE
LABOR.
PIONEER STEAM LAUNDRY
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast, Range 5.
TAKE NOTICE that T. H. Hughes,
of Lakelse Valley, occupation farmer,
intencjs to apply for permission to
purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted at the southeast corner of Lot
4128; thence 40 chains north; thence
40 chains east; thence 40 chains
south; thence 40 chains west to point
of commencement, and containing
100 acres, more or less.
TOM HUGH HUGHES.
Dated June 6, 1911.
TIDES AT PRINCE iRUPERT, JULY, 1911
HIGH WATER
LOW WATER
DATE   AND   DAY       | T1mo| Ht | Time| Ht || Time| Ht | Time| Ht
3
4
5
G
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
2G
27
28
29
30
31
Saturday   . .
Sunday.    . .
Monday   . .
Tuesday   . .
Wednesday .
Thursday   . .
Friday.   . .   .
Saturday   . .
Sunday  .   . .
Monday  .   . .
Tuesday.   . .
Wednesday .
Thursday   . .
Friday.    .. .
Saturday   . .
Sunday  .   . .
Monday.   . .
Tuesday . .   .
Wednesday .
Thursday  . .
Friday.    . .
Saturday  . .
Sunday .   . .
Monday.   . .
Tuesday.   . .
Wednesday .
Thursday  . .
Friday.    . .
Saturday   . .
Sunday.    . .
Monday.   . ,
19.7:17:
18.1 18:
16.6119:
15.6120:
16.8 21;
15.4122:
15.9122:
16.4123:
... .'12;
19.813:
20.2
20.4
20.4
20.2
19.8 16
19.2
18.3
17.3
16.3
15.8
16.0
16.8
17.9
22.6
22.9
22.8
22.2
21.1
19.8
18.1
18.9
18.4
18.0
17.8
17.9
18.3
18.8
19.3
17.0
17.5
17.8
18.1
18.2
18.3
18.4
18.4
18.3
18.4
18.6
19.0
19.8
20.8
21.8
19.0
19.9
20.4
20.7
20.6
20.2
19.5
18.7
11:15
0:49
1:58
3:10
4:14
5:05
5:49
6:28
7:03
7:36
8:08
8:41
9:15
9:50
10:27
14:07
11:52
0:49
2:03
3:19
4:28
5:26
6:18
7:06
7:52
8:37
9:21
10:04
10:46
11:28
3.7
23
■17
7.6
12
05
5.3
7.9
12
58
6.9
7.7
13
56
8.3
7.2
15
00
9.1
6.4
16
00
9.6
5.5
16
60
9.6
•1.7
17
34
9.6
4.0
18
14
9.2
3.6
18
53
8.8
3.1
19
31
8.4
2.9
20
08
8.1
2.9
20
46
7.7
3.0
21
23
7.5
3.5
2 2
03
7.2
4.2
22
48
7.2
5.0
23
43
7.0
6.0
6.9
12
48
7.0
6.4
13
57
7.9
5.3
15
13
8.2
3.9
16
21
8.0
2.3
17
22
7.4
1.1
18
18
6.8
0.2
19
11
6.0
-.1
20
02
5.5
0.2
20
51
5.2
1.0
21
39
5.2
2.3
22
28
5.5
3.9
23
18
6.0
5.7
The Time used Is Pacific Standard, for the 120th Meridian west. It
is counted from 0 to 24 hours, from midnight to midnight.
The Height Is in feet and tenths of a foot, above the Low Water datum
adopted for the Chart. The Harbor datum, as established by the Grand
Trunk   Pacific  Railway,  Is  one  foot lower.
Skeena   Land   District—District
of Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that Thomas Stewart, of Prince Rupert, occupation
accountant, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted 40 chains north from
the southwest corner of Lot 1733;
thence west 40 chains; thence south
40 chains; thence east 40 chains;
thence north 40 chains to point of
commencement.
THOMAS  STEWART.
John  Kirkaldy,  Agent.
Dated July 7, 1911.
WATER   NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that an
application will be made under Part
V of the "Water Act, 1909," to obtain a licence in the Queen Charlotte
Islands  Division  of  Skeena  District.
(a) The name, address and occupation of the applicant—Orland P.
Merrill; Massett, Graham Island,
B. C.;  prospector.
(If for mining purposes) Free Miner's Certificate No	
(b) The name of the lake,
stream or source (If unnamed, the
description is)—Ain Lake and Ain
River.
(c) The point of diversion—At
or near Ain Lake.
(d) The quantity of water applied for (In cubic feet per second)
—700.
te) The- character of the proposed
works—Dam, flume, ripe line and
i.i'.ver  plant.
ti) The promises on w'll.h tin
u.e'i'i- is to be used   Id he s
—Near mouth of Ain River.
(g)     The purposes  for  which   i
water   Is   to     be     used-—Gcneratlri
power.
(h)    If for irrigation, des•■•  '
land to be Irrigated, giving acrong
(I) If the water Ib to be used for
power or for mining purposes, describe Ihe place where the water is
to be returned to some natural channel, and the difference In altitude
between point of diversion and point
of return—Near mouth of Ain River
about 150 feet below point of diversion.
(j) Area of Crown land intended
to be occupied by the proposed
works— About 10 acres.
(k) This notice was posted on
the tenth day of June, 1911, and application will be made to the Commissioner on the fourth day of September, 1911.
(1) Give the names and addresses
of any riparian proprietors or licensees who or whose lands are
likely to be affected by the proposed
works, either above or below the
outlet—None.
(Signature)  ORLAND P.  MERRILL,
(P.  O. Address)   Masset, B.  C.
George S. Mayer, Agent,
(P.  O.  Address)   Masset,  B.  C.
Note—One cubic  foot  per second
is equivalent to 35.71 miner's inches.
Skeena   Land    District—District    of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that I, John V.
Rochester, of Prince Rupert, occupation broker, intend to apply fir permission to lease the following described land:— Commencing at a
post plantqd on the northerly end of
an island In the Skeena River about
Mile 45 on the Grand Trunk Pacific
Railway; thence north 1000 feet
more or less to low water mark;
thence westerly along the low water
mark 1(100 feet more or less;
thence southerly 1000 feet more or
less; thence easterly 1000 feet to
the place of commencement.
J. Y. ROCHESTER.
Dated May 30, 1911. ti-2
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast—Range V,
TAKE NOTICE that T. M. Turner,
of Lakelse Valley, occupation farmer, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands: — Commencing at a post
planted on the Omineca & Hazelton
right of way and adjoining the N. E.
corner of Lot 518; thence west 17
chains to corner of Lot 3996; thence
north 20 chains; thence following
right of way to point of commencement. -
T. M. TURNER,
John  Kirkaldy, Agent.
Dated  14th  June,  1911. 7-4
Skeena    Land     Notice—District    of
Coast—Range V
TAKE NOTICE that Daniel W.
Beaton, of Prince Rupert, B. C, occupation carpenter, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about five miles
up the Exchumsik River from Its
mouth, and on its south bank; thence
east 40 chains; tlience north 40
chains; thence west 40 chains;
thence south 40 chains to place of
commencement.
DANIEL  W.  BEATON.
Dated June  14,   1911. J-H
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that I, Charles
Percy Hickman, of Naas Harbour,
occupation constable, Intend to apply lor permission to purchase the
following described lands:— Commencing at a post planted on tho
easl shore of Naas Bay, about two
miles in an easterly direction froi.i
Lot 3, marked c. I'. [!., s. W. corner; thence east 20 chains; Ihence
north 4(1 chains to the shore: thenci
along the shore line to the place of
commencement, containing 40 acres
more or less.
CHARLES PRECY HICKMAN.
Dated June  7,  1911. 6-30
Skeena Land District—District of
oiceena.
TAKE NOTICE that the Canadian
Canning Company, Limited, of 224
Winch Building, Vancouver, B. C,
occupation salmon caners, Intends to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted adjoining
a post marked W. N. about 300 feet
South of Wallace's wharf, Naas Harbour, B. C; thence east 20 chains;
thence south 20 chains; thence west
20 chains; thence following the
coast line in a northerly direction
back to the point of commencement
and containing forty acres more or
less.
CANADIAN CANNING CO., LTD.
Per ii.  H. Leslie, Agent
Dated  Gth  June,  1911, 6-26 __
■ -;
Tuesday, July  25,  1911.
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
KING'S CHARACTER
T. P. O'Connor Deals With  the New
Sovereign of the
Empire.
He   Contrasts   Him   With   His   Late
Father and Queen
Victoria
Mr. T. P. O'Connor gives the following sketch of King George V,
which differentiates him from his
father:
An old courtier, writing for a publication of mine, and the old courtier
is very close to the present and to
the late king, suggests that King
George is a reversion to type, and
the type is the late Queen Victora.
He certainly has neither the carelessness, the joy of life, nor the bo-
bemian characteristics of his father,
and already society in England, and
especially certain sections of it have
had plain and even painful experience
of the change of mental attitude between the late and the present ruler.
Like Queen Victoria, his favorite
place is home; his family and wife
engross all his affection.
But this is only the beginning of
the difference between the two men.
The present king, as everybody
knows, was not the original heir to
the throne, and even in royalty the
younger son suffers from the disabilities which the law of primogeniture
inflicts on other of the higher
classes.
He never got the extraordinary
complete education from certain
points of view of his father. Probably one of the reasons is that
Prince Albert was so different a
parent from King Edward. Prince
Albert was a thorough German,'and
perhaps one might say, without flattery, a thoroughly good specimen of
the finer qualities of the race. He
had almost fierce respect for books
and study; and the result is that
perhaps the late king was over-educated, or at least overworked as a
youngster.
Anyhow, this brought him one immense advantage for the part he had
after to play in the life of his country, and was one of the reasons why
that part became so successful and
so momentous. He never could have
become the arbiter of Europe to the
extent he did if he had not been
able to speak to Frenchmen as If
he were a Frenchman and to Germans as if he had been born In Germany.
He spoke German, In fact, better
than he did English. Germans who
caught the tone of his conversation
as they passed him by in the Curgar-
ten of Marienbad used to say that
not only was his diction perfect, but
that the accent was equally so.
On tlie other hand, the accent of
King Edward in speaking English
was as markedly German as if he
had not been born at Windsor but
at Sans Souci. It may be that the
late king resented the severity of his
early training. There was a story
about him years ago, when he was
still Prince of Wales, which would
suggest that point of view. Charles
Matthews, a celebrated English comedian, long since dead, was then playing with great success an adaption
of one of the plays of Alexander Dumas, the younger. As everybody
knows, the great Alexander Dumas,
the father, was Ihe most jirodigal of
men, and after making millions, died
a pauper, while th son, also a maker
of -millions, was thrifty almost to
averlce, and the son fashioned a play
on this piquant contrast called "La
Pere Prodique." This Matthews
translated Into "My Awful Dad," and
all London went nightly for months
lo see the conflict between the serious son and the frivolous father.
It waB at that epoch that the
Prince of Wales paid a visit to the
splendid bul overgilt statue of his
father in Kensington Gardens, and
the gossips caught him saying, "My
awful dad," and, needless to say, all
London rang with the bon mot an
hour afterwards.
It will not be possible, then, for
King George to be the actual foreign
minister of England, as his father
tried to he before him. He has not
merely the want of the linguistic
knowledge necessary for such a part
but also lacks other and equally necessary qualities. His father was at
horn anywhere. Though he was not
a thinker nor a phrase maker, the
late king was a past master In all
small changes of social life.
He could say a pleasant word if
necessary to a hundred people In succession; he was never apparently
bored; ho not only did not resent
long and tedious ceremonials but he
positively enjoyed them, and he such
affability that he always left a pleasant impression.
King George will never be able to
exercise the social charm of his fa
ther. He is a shyer man, he has not
so much self-confidence, and, of
course, he has not so much knowledge of the world. The late king,
in the long years he was compelled
to wait for succession, had met all
sorts and conditions of men. He
had moved like a private citizen
through the great world of sport, a
world which even in England is the
most democratic that can be found,
the curbstone peddler who has risen
to be the gigantic bookmaker meeting on equal terms a duke of ancient
descent and boundless acres and even
the sovereign.
King George, on the other hand,
was rarely seen on a racecourse until he came to the throne, and it
Is doubtful If he ever would have
gone to a racecourse If his advisers
had not told him that this was one
of the functions In which an English
king was bound to affect if he did
not take an interest. For all these
reasons King George will never be
the popular social favorite that has
father was.
Nor will he ever be able to Imitate the ceaseless round of dinners
in which has father took delight. He
has a delicate digestion, while his father used to say that he was bound
to be a great eater. His ancestors in
Hanover were remarkable even there
of his health, the care which he has
always to take at the table, makes
more ridiculous,the story which was
popular some years ago, as popular
as the story of the alleged marriage
at Malta, that he is given to drink.
The story wounded King George
so much that he actual! ytook pains
to deny it. Once it is said, when
he was sitting for his portrait, he
made laughingly the remark that if
his nose was red it was from indigestion and not from drink. These
things are all to his credit, but they
are the kind of habits which make
him unpopular with the small sa-
ciety and the high and loose livers
generally, and these are taking badly
their eclusixon from the palace in
which under the other conditions
they were welcome and regular
guests.
On the other hand the vast mass
of the country, which is serious and
sober, rather like the change, and
already people are beginning to say
that the new regime is better than
the old.
In other points the king of today
has advantages over him of yesterday. He is a much more traveled
monarch for one thing. The late
king knew the Continent perfectly,
but this son knows the Empire still
better. There is scarcely a country
under its wide domain which he has
not visited. This has made him to
some extent suspected by Liberals.
Imperialism has come to be, and under the influence of the high tariff
party which Chamberlain brought
back from the grave, preferential
tariff between ngland and the colonies.
Now, the Liberal party will never
consent to even touch protection in
any shape or form. To Liberals all
tariffs are the unclean thing. On
that point they are united to a man;
It Is one of the convictions which
they cannot admit to even the approach to a compromise. And therefore Liberals looked with some apprehension to the advent of an imperialist king. And the peril remains
that if the high tariff party should
ever come into power in England
(there seems no posslbllty of that
for the moment) they would find
an ally in the king.
On the other hand, King George
is an Imperialist In the good as well
as the bad sense of the word. He
has seen self-government at work in
all the dominions; he has seen the
gigantic success in his own day of
the extension of that principle to
Soulh Africa, and therefore the pacification of Ireland would fit In well
wiih his views with regard to the
unification of the Empire.
He has from the first moment
made no concealment of his strong
hope und desire that Ireland should
be reconciled to England and to tho
dynasty. I believe he was anxious
at, the beginning of his reign that a
royal residence should be established
In Ireland, conscious of the neglect
that his family and especially his
grandmother had shown Irish sentiment.
It would not have been a wise
project for the time; it might have
done more harm than good. The Irish
people are not to be diverted from
their resolution to have liberties embodied in an Irish parliament by sentimental concessions, and they would
be more inclined to resent than to
welcome a royal residence until it
was the residence of a king ruling
over a self-governed country. But
the suggestion was a mark of good
feeling.
Of course, it would be an exaggeration to say that the king will carry
home rule, but I have little doubt
that when the decisive moment comes
he will lend no countenance to the
^
-".■;:
THE JOURNAL
 $2.00 a Year	
| Job Printing j
If you want your printing
handled   expeditiously   by
thoroughly trained and ex
perienced printers have it
done at the Journal Office.
fl
THE JOURNAL
$2.00 a Year
ra
extremist Orange policy of fighting
out the questiou to the hitter end.
The home rule bill will have been
passed by the House of Commons
and possibly will have been rjected
hy the House ol' Lords by July or
Vugust of next year. Then will come
the time when a settlement of the
long outstanding questions will
come, and that the Tory leaders will
he asked by even their own friends
to no longer delay what will be seen
to be inevitable.
It Is at such moments that the
power of the sovereign is immense.
I have little doubt that the present
kings great Influence will be exercised on the side of those who want
to close up this century-old quarrel.
It may be well that In eighteen
months from now he will be passing
in his carriage through the streets
of Dublin to reopen the old parliament house in College Green.
THE CANADIAN  BANK
Or COMMERCE
SIR EDMUND WALK..,,, O.V.O., LL.D., D.C.L., President
ALEXANDER LAIRD, General Manager
CANADA'S  WHITE COAL
Lnoiiiimis   Development   of   Water
Power   in   Provinces—Future
Possibilities
It Is estimated that there is $200,-
000,000 of capital Invested In power
propositions In Canada. To be exact,
the amount Is given ash (198,641,-
800. The capacity In horse power
which has been developed amounts
to a little over 2,000,000 horse power. In respect to capital Invested
and the amount of horse power generated, Ontario leads, having over
$84,000,000 of capital invested in
that province and 801,000 horse
power. Quebec comes second with
$71,000,000 of capital Invested and
563,000 horse power. British Columbia is third and Manitoba fourth.
The 2,000,000 horse power developed is but a small fraction of the
total horse power availab'e in the
Dominion of Canada, which has recently been estimated by the government     officials     at     25,682,907
CAPITAL, - $10,000,000        REST, - $7,000,000
DRAFTS ON FOREIGN COUNTRIES
Every branch of The L-.tnadian Bank of Commerce is equipped to If' jc drafts on
the principal cities in tha following" countries without dehiy :
Africa Crefo
Arabia . Cuba
Argentine Republic Per mark
Australia tyvyl
Au.stria-1 tunc*T Fa-oe Islands
Belgium Finland
Brazil Foi-m' -*■
Bulgaria France
Ceylon Fr'ch Cochin
Chili Germ.
China Great Britain
in China, IM
Greece
Hollared
Icelanel
India
Ireland
Italy
\ipan
ava
talla
Manchuria
Mexico
New Zealand
Norway
Panama
Persia
Pee
Siben'a
Soudan
South Africa
Spain
Straits Settlements
Philippine Islands Sweden
Porr-'ija! Switzerland
Heeueeeania Turkey
Kiss.ee United Statea
Si -eria Urue^uay
Siai 1 West Indies, etc.
1%e amount of these droits is slated in tlie money of the - -euntry where they re re payable ; that is they are di-ewn in sterling, francs, marks, ' te, kronen, florins, yen,
tacls, roubles, etc, as the case may be. This ensures that 'he payee abroad will
receive the actual amou-it intended. 233
J. M. OHJUSTUj!, Mannger, Prince Rupert Brunch
horse power, so thai the field for
further development is almost unlimited.
Canada Is blessed e\ ith an abundance- of white c eal nd there does
not seem to he the sliirhtr • loubt
but that the future p ,r tor II nu-
facturlng purposes, i well as for
tractions, will cone.. Horn clectricty
generated by water power. Throughout most of the country coal has
to be Imported, and its use in manufacturing increases the cost to a considerable extent. The use of white
coal, or water power, will undoubt-
ledy make certain sections in Canada
among the greatest manufacturing
districts in the world.
In Montreal and vicinity there is
an abundance of water ewer, and
It Is expected that In a ary short
time tens of thousands of horse power will be delivered in the city and
used for manufacturing purposes.
Cheap power I3 the first essential In
manufacturing. This will shortly be
supplied to Montrealers through the
medium  of the Canadian  Light  and
Power company, as we'll
power companies generaii
on the St. Lawrence.
The following table show
iriliution, cupliul invested 1
power by provinces.
Capital
Investment
Province' -
Alberta   . . .
B.  C	
Manitoba   . .
N.  B	
N,  S	
Ontario    . . .
Sask	
P. B.  Island
Quebec    . . .
0,42.',,000
18,393,000
14,470,000
820,000
37   ,500
84,2' '..100
10,000
70,872,200
a.'   other
t   power
s the dis-
ind horse
Capacity
in 11.1'.
81,700
134,316
»8,000
36,000
2,137
P01,ii36
3S.r.,000
4 1
663,166
FREDERICK PETERS, K. O.
$1118,041,800 2,062,680
 0 -
"Your conscience will tell you
when you've been naughty," tlie
mother told her brlgbt-eyed offspring. Hut ihe said e ffsprlng
wanted to know: "Will il tell you,
too?"
Barrister, Solicitor and Notary Public
Office in
EXCHANGE BLOCK
WM. S. HAL.L, L. D. S. D. D. S.
:-:   DENTIST   :-:
Crown and Bridge Work a specialty.
All dental operations skillfully
treated. Gas and local anaesthetic!
administered for the painless extraction of teeth. Consultation free.
Offices, Helgerson Bk., Prince Rupert
NICKERSON-ROERIG COMPANY
CUSTOMS AND MERCHANDISES
Brokers, Forwarding Agents,
Storage, etc
J.  W. POTTER
ARCHITECT    AND     STRUCTURAL
ENGINEER
Re-Inforced Concrete a Specialty
—0—
Law-Butler Building - Prince Rupert
HAYNOK   BROS.
FUNERAL   DIRECTORS
and
PROFESSIONAL   EMBALMERS
DR. W. B.  (3LAYTON
DENTIST
—o—
Office   in    the    Westenhaver   Block,
Over  Orme's  Drug   Store.
Prince Rupert
LINDSAY'S CARTAGE & STORAGE
G. T. P. CARTAGE AGENTS
Office at H. B. Rochester, Centre St
LADYSMITH  COAL
is handled by us.   All orders receive
prompt attention.  Phone No  68.
 LADYSMITH	
COAL
ROCHESTER & MONROE, Phone US
Corner Eighth and Fraser Street!
Clinton Rooms
Newly    remodelled    and    furnished.
Board   and   lodging.   Home cooking
a  specialty.     Mrs.   Anderson,  Prop.
Rooms, $3 Per Week
New Knox Hotel
ARTAUD & BESNER
Proprietors
The New Knox Hotel is run on the
European plan. FIrst-clas service.
All tbe latest modern Improvements
THE BAR keeps only the besl
brands of liquors and cigars.
THE CAFE is open from 6.30 a.m.
to 8 p.m. Excellent cuisine; flrst-
class  service.
Hoard, SI a Day — Beds, 50c and up
First Avenu"    Prince  Rupert
Hamblin's Bakery
Just Re-opened
Sale    counter    in    MERRYFTEIiD'S
STORE, Third Ave. and Fifth St.
Family trade catered to.  Will supply restaurants and steamers.
Cakes  und  Confectionery  of all
kinds
THE WESTHOLME LUMBER GO.
LIMITED
We handle all kinds of
Building Supplies
First Avenue
Telephone 18(1
comox Joseph Dat Is ol Comox
ie., learned, as 0 result of n recent
Invitation extended to him to appear
in court, thai there are occasionally
two sieles to 11 Joke. Mr, Davis
thought that ho bad a j>>ke- on the
government of British lolumbla and
the fori'sts protection department
'hereof. Ills juke arose oul of tli<i
fait that he had recently seu out a
large- lire for the purpose of clearing land, a fire which occasioned his
neighbor settlers very considerable
alarm, and had done, so without concerning himself with obtaining a permit as required by statutory law. Indeed, he had boasted openly lhat he
hal secured no permit, and did not
propose to dei so. Evidence to this
effect was offered before Mr. Bates,
.1. P,, at Courtenay, and upon conviction Mr, Davis was taxed $",0 and
for burning without a permit—the
minimum fine prescribed. One curious feature of the case is that although his fire- is long since reduced
lo    ashi's.    Mr,    Davis    is    still    hot
over it. PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Tuesday, July 25,  1911.
PLAN GREAT WORKS
The  Indian  Nines Limited on Salmon
River is Promising Well
With Depth.
G.  A.  Clothier Has  Small  Force
Work Until Roads Are
Built
"The Hidden Creek mine , on
Goose Bay, Observatory inlet, in the
northern part of British Columbia,
has proved to be so much bigger
and richer a property than we conceived when we took a bond on 80
per cent of its capital stock that wc
have had to revolutionize our plans
for the operation of our property,"
said .lay 1'. Craves, vice president
and general manager of the Granby
Consolidated .Mining and Smelting
and Power Company, recently in Spokane.
"When we took hold of the property our intention was to work it in
connection with the Grand Forks
smelter and to equip it with a small
matting plant. This intention is definitely abandoned, but exactly how
we shall equip and operate the prop-
ery will not be determined for two or
three months. This much is certain
however, that any plant which Is
erected to treat its ores wl'l have
an intial capacity of not less than
2,000 tons a day.
"Prior to the New York meeting
of directors, at which it was decided
take up our bond on the Hidden
Creek, six engineers examined the
property for us. Their reports showed from 6,000,000,000 to 12,000,-
000 tons of ore in sight. This
proved it to be at least as big a
property as our Phoenix mines and
put the matter of handling its product at our Grand Forks plant entirely out of the question.
"Most of our development work
to date has been by means of diamond drills and this work we are
following up, just as has been our
custom at Phoenix, as rapidly as possible, with tunnels, drifts and crosscuts.
"The best results we obtained
came from diamond drill No. 19,
19, which showed an ore body 300
feet wide, which averaged more than
G  per cent in copper.
"With a view to determining
where the smelter will be located
whether at the mine, Prince Rupert
or some other point on the coast
our consulting engineer, W. Y. Williams, now is in northern Britisii
Columbia investigating the available
ore supply from other mines in that
section and Alaska.
"In the meantime we are endeavoring to ascertain from the Tyee
and Tacoma smelters what kind of
contracts they are willing to enter
into for the treatment of our Hidden Creek ore. If we can make satisfactory arrangements we may postpone the erection of our own plant
for a year year or two.
"The surprising results obtained
from our development work to date
is responsible for the purchase it
the Rodgers interest, which We did
not at first take under bond. Now,
however, the entire property belongs
to the Granby company. O. B.
Smith, hitherto superintendent of our
Phoenix mine, lias been appointed
superintendent of the Hidden Creek
mine, witli an assistant at each
mine.
"i expect to make another trip
nortli in about a month's time, when
Messrs. Williams, Sylvester and
Smith will have accumulated a good
.leal of data. It is possible that we
may he enabled very soon therafter
io determine, ai least roughly, what
the  policy  of  the  company   will  be
a lead stack to the copper smelter
at Trail, B. C, which it had bought
from F. Augustus Heinze, American
ore buyers ceased to canvass that
country. The restrictions imposed
by the McKinley tariff bill had something to do with discouraging the
importation into this country of Canadian lead to be smelted in bond and
re-exported. Now, however, the native supply of lead ore, which Is not
controlled by the trust smelters, is
so inadequate to meet the independent smelters' needs, that another invasion of the Britisii Columbia field
is being planned.
Several Spokane people, who control silver-lead mines in British Columbia, lately have been approached
hy agents of one or other of the Independent smelters in the United
States, with offers to contract for
their output, and one of the smelting concerns at least has undertaken
to furnish a market for zinc as well
as for lead.
Ilritish Columbia mining men assert that the Canadian Pacific smelter at Trail, the on1 ■ lead smelter in
Canada, has been e I urging execesslve
rates for freight and treatment, besides gouging them outrageously on
settlements, which are based on the
London price for lead, less the alleged cost of putting the bullion in
the London market. As a matter of
fact, all the lead produced in Canada
and a good deal more is consumed
in that country; consequently, the
mine owners think that settlement
should be made on the wholesale
price in Montreal, Instead of on the
wholesale price in London.
In order to try and bring about
more equitable treatment by t he
Trail smelter the Britisii Columbia
mine owners are endeavoring to
form an organization on the lines of
a farmers' union, with the object of
marketing the entire output of all
the mines through one agent. American ore buyers are watching with a
great deal of interest in the hope
that they may be able to enter the
Canadian market and capture the entire lead ore supply, which is not
controlled, through ownership by
the Trail smelter.
The only extra cost to which an
American smelter is put in treating
bonded ores is the salary of a resident United States customs official,
usually in the neighborhood of $200
per month. An effort now is being
made to secure favorable freight
rates.
Beam made a number of trips to
the Nugget. The present examination and sampling is being conducted by Walter H. Wiley of Los Angeles, one of the most eminent of
American   engineers.
Mr. Beam organized the syndicate
which took up the bond on the Nickle
Plate mine at Hedley about two
years ago, since when the property
has proved one of the best paying
mines in Canada. His entry into
Sheep Creek is regarded by local
mining men as of the greatest significance to the camp.
SPLENDID ENTERTAINMENT
Dr
Slocum Put on Scenic Travelogue
at Empress
Theatre
SHOWING IS GOOD
Granby Company Will  Have  Immense
Reduction Works in
North.
lay P. Graves Tells of the Surprise
Which Hidden Creek Gave
Them
At the Empress Theatre last even
ing under the charge of Dr. Slocum,
a very interesting series of moving
pictures were <hown. The entertainment took tlie form of a travelogue,
Dr. Slocuni acting as guide.. The
pictures were taken by W. H. Har-
beck and were a magnificent collection. It included a trip by the
C. P. R. from Vancouver to Calgary
with side trips into the 10I10 Valley and Banff.
Another series gave the audience
a visit to California, and another a
trip with mountain climbers on
Mount Rainier.
Sir Wilfrid Laurier's reception at
the different cities from Calgary to
Victoria were included In the number and proved exceedingly interesting. The prominent citizens of Vancouver and Victoria were readily distinguishable. The reception by the
provincial ministers at the dock at
Victoria and the reception given by
the lieutenant governor at Government House proved attractive, non.
T. W. Paterson and Mrs. Paterson,
with the distinguished company present were all easily identified in the
crowd.
Another attractive film was one
brought right down to date. It was
the  coronation   parade  at  Victoria.
All who attended the two entertainments last night were delighted
and the only lament was that they
were not to be repeated. The programme takes two full hours to
put on.
Dr. Slocuni has managed to have
Mr. Harbeck visit Prince Rupert. He
will reach here next Saturday and
will take a series of motion pictures
here along the line of the G. T. P.
as far as Hazelton and probably beyond. These will be shown later all
over the world.
 o	
WATER EXTENSIONS
Alii
Hilditch and Aid. New ton "Mix'
on  Question  ut  Council
Meeting
REVIEWING  COURTS
(Continued From Page One)
with  reference to the erection
smelter."
of  a
WANT  LEAD ORES
ellers  of   the   V,   S.   Seek
From the Mines of B. ('.
Mi-i'i Demands
output
.lo
So great Is the demand for lead
ores and concentrates on the part of
American smelters that for the first
time in several years owners of galena mines In southern Britisii Columbia are heing canvassed for ore
e'ontracts, says a Spokane despatch.
In the early 90s all of the lead
ore produced in British Columbia
was shipped to American smelters.
At that time there was no lead trust
and there was charp competition for
ore supplies between all the principal competitors, which at that time
included smelters at Everextt and
Tacoma in Washington, Denver Omaha and Kansas City. Each of these
plants usually had resident ore buyers in the Inland Empire, and some
Of them mainlined local agencies In
Ilritish Columbia.
When the Canadian  Pacific added
G. A. Clothier spent several days
at the Indian Mines, Ltd. property
on Salmon River last week and Is
very much encouraged with the development so far, says a Stewart correspondent. The cut under the big
surface galena showing has just
reached the ore at a depth of twenty-
fice feet and the face is now in solid
ore. The width of this ore body'
will be proven at this depth with a
crosscut. About 450 feet from this
galena showing and about 200 feet
vertically down the hill a tunnel is
being driven. This is now In fifty
feet, running through surface wash
up to the last two rounds, when
the vein was struck, and it will be
a matter of only a few rounds until
the whole face will be in the solid.
Drifting will be continued in the vein
to get under the galena mentioned
above.
Mr. Clothier could work many men
on ibis property but on account of
no horse trails and consequent difficulty in getting supplies in will not
increase the present force of five
men.
BUYING AT SHEEP GREEK
Syndicate  That   Controls
Plate  at   Hedley
Interested
the
Is
Nickel
That T. W.liter Beam of Denver,
Col., who represents a syndicate of
capitalists which holds a controlling
interest in the Hedley Gold Mining
Company, which operates the famous
Nickel Plate mine, is in negotiations
for the purchase of the Nugget Mine
at Sheep Creek, is the anouncement
made at Nelson. Mr. Beam has secured an option on the property until September 1 next and then If the
examination and sampling of the
mine which is now in progress proves
satisfactory, the bond will be consummated for a sum in excess of
any yet paid for a Sheep Creek
mine.
Before the option was  taken  Mr.
The subject of an extension to the
water system across Hays Creek
came in before the council at last
night's sitting. It arose in connection with a petition for water beyond
the present, limits of the supply in
the direction of Ambrose street.
Aid. Hilditch thought if the water
system was to be extended something
like a systematic extension should
be made so as to avoid waste.
Aid. Douglas thought they should
do ahead with this extension on Ambrose street.
Aid. Hilditch said he did not believe there were six houses beyond
Donald street. It was all very
well to talk about extending the system but they should avoid wasting
money.
Aid. Newton contended that there
were people moving to the outskirts
because it was cheaper to ''ve there.
These should be given fullei service.
Aid. Douglas said he "substantiated" Aid. Newton.
Aid. Hilditch said if the houses
Aid. Newton had referred to were
not supplied with water he would
have been fighting for them. Aid.
Newton was altogether wrong. The
only building he saw below where
water was supplied is the English
Church, which  is nearly all roof.
It was referred to the water committee.
"I don't see any sense in referring
to the wisdom of Solomon," said the
man smartly.
"He had a thousand wive.
"Yes," answered the woman tartly, "he learned his wisdom from
them."
 o	
An Irishman was recently traveling a train accompanied by a minister, when two very stout old ladies
entered the compartment. They
placed themselves one on each side
of Patrick, and he was much crushed
between them.
The minister, on see Pat so placed,
said: "Are you quite comfortable,
Pat?"
To this question Pat quickly replied: "Sure, sorr, Oi haven't much
room to complain."
not favor making any difference.
The men who were in the game were
probably fined enough but the man
who owned the premises got off
free. He was going to find out how
he was immune.
The city solicitor pointed out that
there was an information laid. The
trouble was that there was not a
tittle of evidence against him. That
was the only reason why he had not
been  proceeded  against.
Aid. Clayton said he did not know
the full facts of course but he did
not propose to ha^e any one immune
and who boasted he was solid with
the authorities and could not be interfered with.
H,s worship said that as far as this
statement was concerned he would
like to see the man that had any
pull with the commissioners. He was
not going to sit and take any insinuations such as Aid. Clayton threw
out. He wanted any member of the
council or any citizen who thought
there was anything of the kind to
produce the name of the party. He
had publicly and privately instructed
the police time and time again to
see that the laws were lived up to.
There was no one who was given protection in violating the law. These
insinuations were not in good form.
Aid. Clayton said he did not single
out any single commissioner. He
felt, however, that if the magistrate
would not do his duty he should be
dismissed.
Aid. Newton said he would not
mince matters. He did not charge
anything against the commissioners.
He would name Police Magistrate
Carss. The police magistrate had no
right to ask the chief of police why
he brought these prosecutions without consulting him.
Aid. Douglas believed the law was
being violated by the hote's at present. It looked to him as if there
was illegal selling.
The city solicitor, being present,
was asked to explain the situation.
He said that there was no protection
shown to any one. Under the Dominion act under which the informations were laid it was necessary for
the chief of police, before a raid was
made, to get the sanction of a police
commissioner or the magistrate. This
was not done by the chief and so
he had exceeded the limits in that
regard. Mr. Peters said he did not
hear Magistrate Carss say anything
about it. He might properly enough
have called attention to this. The
magistrate certainly did not reprimand the chief.
Mr. Peters traced the history of
the case, where the evidence Is very
clear and the accused pleaded guilty.
The one who was running the game
was fined $50. He (Mr. Peters) had
pressed for imprisonment and in his
opinion such a punishment might
well have been meted out. The magistrate saw difficulty, however. He
was not there to say the magistrate
was wrong. Those who had been
in the place twice were fined $20
each and those who were shown to
have been there but once got off with
$15. These fines, he felt, were sufficient. As far as the case against
the man who owned the house was
concerned, there was no evidence
that would convict him.
It was decided to have the solicitor's report put in writing.
To the Ladies of Prince Rupert
Did you ever stop to think how much easier it would be for you,
if at the end of each month, you could pay all household bills
by check? We solicit your account and have special facilities
for handling it. Private writing rooms are provided for the use
of customers and individual attention is given each depositor.
We allow 4 %  on Deposits and the use of checks.
The Continental Trust Company, Limited
 SECOND AVENUE	
00000@00[n]0000[§000000000|
HOTEL
ENAMELWARE
HAVE JUST RECEIVED A SMALL SHIPMENT OF HOTEL
ENAMELWARE ESPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR USE IN
HOTELS, RESTAURANTS AND CAMPS. WE GUARANTEE
THEM TO LAST TWICE AS LONG AS ORDINARY ENAMEL
WARE.
A CALL IS SOLICITED
Prince Rupert Hardware & Supply
Company, Ltd.
THIRD AVENUE
PHONE 120
©
3@0000000000|£][S]00000000@[£]@
We Require Listings of Inside Business Property
Also Residence Property at Right Prices
M.M. Stephens & Co. Ld.
Real Estate, Insurance and Investments,
Notaries, Nines, Timber
Box 27S
PHONE 222
PRINCE RUPERT, B.C.
OFFICE  THIRD  AVE.
Tteo"St»y S4ttsf.utory"Rw\ge
PLEASED WITH   COUNTRY
V. W.
Smith Sees a Brighter Future
for the Interior of
Province
Vernor W. Smith has returned
from a trip to Hazelton. He was
accompanied by Mrs. Smith and his
cousin, Miss Smith, of Victoria, who
is visiting at his home, and by his
son Walter. The latter has remained at Hazelton for a few weeks.
In spite of the fact that Mr.
Smith has been identified with the
Foley, Welch & Stewart Company
with headquarters here for so long
this was his first trip to the Interior.
He has returned more than delighted with the country. Above
Hazelton, he thinks there are great
possibilities In a farming way. Some
fear has been expressed that there
would be summer frosts that would
interfere with operations. Of these,
Mr. Smith has no such fears. He
thinks that all danger from these
will pass with the clearing of the
land and general cultivation.
At the present time the country
looks splendid with fields of hay and
cereals. The fruits are ripening and
the whole country looked exceedingly good to him.
The fruit sections along the route
appealed to Mr. Smith and he looks
forward to a very rapid settlemnt.
 o	
Inspector Tyson of the Indian department left today for the Stlckine
county.
Good, Sound Reasons for
MONARCH Economy
Monarch Ranges are built so that they can
never have "air leaks"—
For around every opening into the body there
is a   Malleable   Iron frame to which the
steel is riveted.
No putty is needed in such joints.    They are
air tight when new and stay air tight.
If these other ranges were built in this way
they might be economical too.
Investigate this matter of rivet construction
versus  stove bolts  and  stove putty.    It's
important  to  every  one  using  or  buying
a range.
SOLD AND GUARANTEED BY THE
Kaien Hardware Co.
Telephone 3 Third Avenue
Personals
tile-
Y.   Rochester
city.
is  again  back  in
WANTED
Dr. Spencer of Skidegate was a
passenger from the south by the
Princess Fieatrice this week. lie has
been In Vancouver locating his family, who will spend the summer In
that city.
Rev. F. W. ..verr, pastor of the
Presbyterian Church, has gone on a
six-weeks' vacation. He will go east
and spend a few weeks at Chicago
University taking an advanced course
of study.
*    *    *
James Thomson of the Hudson's
Bay Company is expected to reach
here in a day or two. He will go
to the Stickine River and make a
general Inspection of the whole of
the company's operations In the
north. Mr. Thomson has charge of
the steamboat service in connection
with his other duties.
 o	
"See here, young man," said the
stern parent, "why is it that you are
always behind in your studies?"
"Because," explained the youngster, "if I wasn't behind I could not
pursue them."
Woman for kitchen work;
$35.00 per month and room.
Prince Rupert Hospital.
wars
Apply
tf
He   Was   Discharged
"Why are you wandering about
the country Instead of looking after
your wife and children at home?"
inquired the lady or the altered
tramj).
"Well, ma'am, it's like this," e.
Plained the tramp, ".My wif, has
a very fine servant. A perfect treasure."
"I   don't   believe
such a girl."
"There  only  Is  one,
my wife's got her."
"Good gracious! She's a very lucky
woman!'
"She is, ma'am.    But the trouble
is that girl didn't like me.'
"Well?"
"She didn't like me, and she told
my wife she must either discharge
me or her, so my wife discharged
me, ma'am."
Oh, I see!    Foor felow!
something for you!"
 o	
there  ever  was
ma'am,  and
Herle's
The Rector—Freddy, do you know1,
where little boys go who go flshini.
on  the Sabbath Day?
Freddy—Yes sir.   Follow me, ami
I'll show you the place.
/

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.prj.1-0311848/manifest

Comment

Related Items