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Prince Rupert Journal Jul 14, 1911

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Array H   '■*$' elMHM
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VOLUME II
Published Twice a Week.
PRINCE  RUPERT,  B.  C, FRIDAY, JULY 14, 1911
Price,   Five  Cents.
GARBAGE PROBLEM
City Council Considers the New Bylaw
Governing Scavenging in
City.
el. M. Davis Wants the Scow Moored
in  Another  Place
Now
Wednesday evening at the city
council was given over to a large extent to the unsavory subject of scavenging. The bylaw governing the
disposal of garbage which contains
the contract entered into by J. Weston for two years was considered at
some length. In addition to this a
letter was read from Mr. Davis giving notice that fact that he was not
to have the towing of the garbage
scow that the contract for the use
of his wharf as a mooring place
should expire in a week's time.
This was referred to the committee to go into for the purpose of
seeing what was the best thing to
do under tbe circumstances.
The scavenging bylaw was considered In committee of the whole, when
several knotty Ittle questions arose.
A feature of the contract which is
made a part of the bylaw was that
the scavenging firm was to receive
free water during the life of the contract.
There was some objection to this
but the city solicitor pointed out
that he only followed the draft contract made between the scavenger
and Aid. Morrissey, who has charge
of this work.
It was pointed out that the free
water should only apply to that used
in the scavenging business. Water
used by the members of company in
any other way should be paid for.
The clause was amended to carry
this out.
Another section gave some concern. This was the clause which
gave the city scavenger the sole right
to remove garbage.
Members of the council felt that
while the contracting firm should be
protected in so far as a prohibition
against others coming In and removing garbage for pay, yet any owner
of a vehicle who wished to do it
should have the right to remove the
garbage from his own place provided
it was done it) accordance with the
rules laid down by the health office.
Aid. Douglas felt that they were
taking away the rights of the citizens in such a move.
An amendment to this effect was
introduced.
The bylaw will be considered later
in committee.
FISCAL   BONDAGE
A. S. Goodeve, N.P. Shows the Weakness
of the Policy of Government.
Ho Is Not  Prepared in  Days When
All Is Prosperous to
Alter Course
PRINCE INVESTED
Interesting Ceremony is Performed at
Carnarvon Castle in
Wales.
Welsh  People Give Enthusiastic Be-
ccption to Royalty on Visit
Yesterday
tSpecial to The Journal)
Canarvon, Wales, July 14.—In the
Castle of Carnarvon yesterday the
young Prince of Wales was invested
with the sinsignia of his high office.
Great crowds gathered along the
routhe from Griffiths Crossing, near
here, where the royal party alighted,
to the castle gate. The scene within the castle was picturesque, Their
majesties and the prince received an
enthusiastic reception.
 o	
MINING O* ISLAND
E. M. Morgan of Lockport, Queen
Charlotte Island, reports that nine
men are at work on the Nelson
group of copper-gold claims at Lock-
port, on which $5,000 is being spent
on their development this summer.
He has great confidence in this
group and expects them to be shipping before long. On the Apex
group, Russ Bell, Bill Harris and
Alex. Patterson are also doing considerable work. It is expected that
the construction of the new government wharf will he commenced
shortly.
 o	
J. H. Bacon has returned to the
city. He will spend some little time
here now. Mr. Bacon remarks upon
the progress made in transforming
the streets in business thoroughfares
during his absence.
Speaking In Vancouver on questions of the day A. S. Goodeve,
M. P. for Kootenay, expressed his
opinion as to the reciprocity pact.
Before dealing with reciprocity he
gave a short sketch of work done in
the present session. The forest reserve bill was also a matter which
touched Britisii Columbia closely.
The Conservatives were heartily In
sympathy with forest conservation,
but they did fight against a subsection in the bill giving the absolute
jurisdiction over these reserves and
all they contained, to the minist r
of the interior, thus making him
czar over 25,000 square miles of valuable county. He pointed out that
the predecessor of the minister of
the interior bad been able to make
enormous wealth for himself out of
the resources of the country.
Oriental Immigration
Speaking on the question of Japanese immigration, he pointed to the
good work done by Mr. Cowan In
opposing the continuance of the old
agreement with the Japanese government, by which they were giving
to the Japanese greater freedom than
was ever accorded to British subjects.
Under that agreement if a shipload
of Japanese landed in Vancouver no
one could say them "Nay." The minister of agriculture went further and
said not only would they let the Japanese in, but they were seriously
considering whether they should not
allow the Chinese in on the same
terms. In face of all their pledges
they were prepared to hand over the
control of immigration to Oriental
nations themselves.
Touching on the Verville eight
hour bill he quoted Sir Wilfrid Laurier, saying that he had no doubt the
workingmen of Canada would like
to see the bill passed in its original
form, but there were other people
than the working classes to be considered. Sir Wilfrid Laurier did not
say this until after the bill had been
circulated throughout Canada in its
original form, and it was afterwards
amended so as to make it ineffective.
When any government did this they
deceived the people and wronged the
whole Dominion of Canada. (Applause.)
Reciprocity
"I will now," said the speaker,
"turn to that question which has
stirred more feeling than any other
question in Canada since Confederation. I mean the great question of
reciprocity."
He said that the government accused the Conservatives of waving the
old flag. Well, if they studied history they would find that no nation
had ever become so on a cold blooded question of dollars and cents, but
by the warmer motives of patriotism
and loyalty. (Cheers.)
"If, however," he continued,
they wish to discuss the question on
a cold blooded dollar and cent basis,
we are quite ready to meet them."
He said that one of the great arguments used in favor of reciprocity
was thai it would open to the people
of Canada u market of 90,000,000
people to the soutn. But was It not
a fact that last year we had bought
from this nation goods to the value
of $223,000,000 and they had
bought from us $112,000,0000, or
just about half? Last year 80 per
cent of our eports went to the Mother
Country, and to the United States
only 9 per cent.
Two men had gone down to Washington and, meeting there the representatives of the United States, had
bolted the door and pulled down the
blind and said, "Now let us have a
little game of reciprocity together."
The Americans had said, "What will
you give us?" and the Canadians
had replied, among other things, "We
will give you the fruit market that
should belong to British Columbia."
The speaker next pointed out how
the pact worked out to the disadvantage of Canada in the timber and
pulp industry.
Mr. Goodeve then quoted from the
American "Pearsons' an article by
Mr. Benson in which he showed clearly   that   the   people   of   the   United
AMENDMENT  PASSED
Alderman Smith Objects to Report in
Newspaper Concerning
Himself.
He Relieves It Must Have Reen Made
Witli Malicious
Intent
The liquor bylaw amendment
passed its final stage at the city
council meeting on Wednesday when
it came up for final consideration.
Aid. Douglas moved that the suspension of Clause 36 only affect
hotel licenses.
This amendment was lost, only
Aid. Douglas and Newton voting
for it.
Aid. Newton later moved the six
months' liolst in connection with the
final adoption of the amendment and
in doing so challenged the right of
Aid. Smith to vote -on this in view
of the fact that his brother had a
license which would be affected by
this.
Aid. Smith asked the ruling of the
city solicitor on this point.
Mr. Peters said there was no question as to the right of Aid. Smith
to vote on the question. He was in
no way disqualified.
On further discussion, Mr. Peters
explained that Aid. Smith was not
voting on these licenses at all in his
vote at the council board.
The bylaw was finally adopted.
Aid. Smith, before the matter was
closed, called attention to the statement which appeared in the News,
in which Aid. Newton was credited
with stating that Aid. Smith .was interested in a bottle license. Aid.
Newton, as he understood it, never
made such a statement and he could
not understand why the report so
appeared. It looked to him "as
though it were put in there with malicious  intent."
Aid. Newton said he did not say
that Aid. Smith was interested ir
the license and at some length re
peated his stand on the question.
WENT TO HAZELTON BASEBALL LEAGUE ASK FOR REASONS
Provincial Mineralogist Has   Left
Interior on Season's Field Work
for Department.
for
He Will  .Make mi  Inspection of the
Mining Locations Now in
Public Eye
On the Prince Rupert on Wednesday, there arrived William Fleet
Robertson, the provincial mineralogist on his way to Hazelton. He
left by the train a few hours later.
•Mr. Robertson will be absent about
seven or eight weeks, probably during which time he will make an examination into the mining properties
in the interior of this northern section of country.
His visit is another indication of
the deep interest which Premier McBride takes in this part of the province, the premier being minister of
mines, and thus directly responsible
for the visit of the mineralogist.
The provincial mineralogist is not
concerned usually in heralding his
visits, preferring to go Into a ramp
and make a careful examination for
himself, reporting the exact conditions as he finds them. He is never
charged with being overly optimistic
with respect to mining locations, his
reports being always well within the
safe line and as such are never
doubted by the investing public.
Mrs. Robertson accompanied her
husband on the trip as far as here
and their son Douglas also came
north. The latter has gone to Hazel
ton with the mineralogist. Mrs. Robertson is making the round trip on
the Prince Rupert, going on to Stewart yesterday. She was delighted
with the coast tour.
Prince Rupert is Arranging to Have
Schedule of Championship
Games.
Council Request Board of Trade for Information Relative to Hydro-
Electric System.
Committee   Having   Mutter  in   Hand
Is  to  Settle  t'pon  Series
Next Week
The young men of the city are going to satisfy themselves with indoor
baseball until such time as there is
provision made for preparing a recreation grounds on some of the city
property.
A committee of enthusiastic lovers of sports has the arrangements in
hand. It is composed of Aid. George
Kerr,   as   chairman,'   Chief   Vickers,
FOB PUBLICITY WORK
* (Special   to  The  Journal)
Victoria, July  14.—Preceding
* the steamer Prince George out
* of the harbor yesterday was the
* tug Dorothy, on which was J. W.
* Harbect, cinematographer of Se-
* attle,   with  his  moving  picture
* machine.    Pictures of the move-
* ments  of  the ship  were  caught
* on the film.
* Following   the   developing   of
* the  pictures  the  G.  T.  P.   will
" use   them   for  advertising  pur-
* poses.
Communctttion  Has  Recti Sent  Dealing With This Aspect of tlte
Proposition
(Continued on Page Five.)
• Went to Higher Court
One of the pioneers of Prince Rupert's restricted district was
called upon to stand her trail before
Judge Young on a charge of unlaw
fully entering a house on Comox
avenue. The accused, who rejoices
in the chic name of Gipsy, showed a
disposition to object to her next door
neighbors and according to the complainants she undertook to forcibly
eject them, claiming a right to do so
as the proprietress. Magistrate Carss
decided after hearing the evidence to
commit the accused for trial in the
higher court. Judge Young dismissed the case.
 o^	
William Lorimer of Victoria, after
a visit to his mining properties on
Banks Island, returned to the city
yesterday.
No Admittance
The Benchers of B. C. have been
obliged to refuse admission to the
Britisii Columbia bar to the first lady
applicant, who was formerly a Nova
Scotia barrister and practised there.
The regulations of this province
eiiak'fe no provision for female lawyers.
Imposed Fine
In the police court this morning
John Anderson was charged with disobeying the rules laid down in the
city bylaw relative to blasting. The
blast complained of was on First
avenue near the Market Place. He
explained that he had put timbers
over the spot but not bush as was
required by the bylaw. He has always been careful and this blast,
owing to the character of the rock,
had acted differently to what was
intended. The chief of police said
Mr. Anderson was a careful powder
man and this was the first complaint
against him. Magistrate Carss Imposed a light fine of $25.
 o	
J. F. McDonald has gone to Hazelton to engage in business.
secretary, and Rev. Mr. McLeod and
George Tite.    Entries for the league
are being called for  up  to July  21,1
Already  there  are  several  teams  in
existence   which   have   been   playing
matches  with  one another  and  the
number  of  these  is  ever  increasing.
The latest addition is the Quill Drivers, a club open to all office  men.
Its  officers  elected  recently  are  as
follows:   President,   Mayor   Manson;
vice president, Mr. Howard; captain,
Mr. Vance; secretary-treasurer, F. P.
Bratt;    comittee,    Mr.    Holtby,    Mr.
Vaughan.
There has arisen a little dispute
as to the wisdom of the rule introduced to allow clubs to select members up to twelve in number from
anywhere in the city. This feature
will probably be discussed at a later
meeting.
 o	
STOCK   COMPANY  COMING
May Roberts, With Splendid Support,
Will Hold the Boards at
Empress Theatre
DEATH TOLL HEAVY
IN FIRE SWEPT AREA
It is Conservatively Estimated That Between 200 and
250 Lives Have Been Lost as a Result of the
Conflagration in Northern Ontario-
Flames are Now Under
Control.
(Special to The Journal.)
Toronto, July 14.—The fires which
have swept the Porcupine district in
Northern Ontario are now under control. Searching parties have entered
the fire belt to rescue any injured
who may have escaped death. The
entire fire zone will be covered and
all bodies found will be burled on
Wednesday. The estimate of 200
dead is believed to be a conservative
one.
Seventeen refugees who arrived
here yesterday estimate the number
of those who were drowned and
burned at from 200 to 250.
In addition to miners and muckers
who perished in the Dome and West
Dome shafts, 57 in all, about 70 were
driven Into the lake by the fire at
South Porcupine or were drowned
when launches were upset. Fully
100 additional perished in the woods
where  they  sought   shelter.
Of 140 Italians employed in Dome
hut 50 have been accounted for| The
survivors who escaped from the
woods and reached the ruins of Porcupine state that the trails are strewn
with the bodies of prospectors.
The towns of Cochrane, South
Porcupine and Pottsvllle have been
obliterated. The fire swept clean the
townships of Langmuci, Eldorado,
Shaw, Deloro, Ogden and McArthur
and the Cripple Creek district.
The estimates of the dear, based
upon unverified reports, run as high
as 400. The refugees from the burned
area say it covers 10,000 square
miles comprising a district inhabited
by 20,000 people. Some of the survivors tell of stumbling over tlie
bodies of those who had run before
them and died on the way.
Supplies and provisions are being
rushed to the stricken towns, the
local board of trade funds having
reached $23,000. The Federal and
Ontario governments are expected to
make grants.
Manager Stevens, who has been
presenting a splendid line of moving
pictures at the Empress theatre, has
decided to give his patrons K change
of programme and will next week
have the May Roberts Company here
for a limited number of evenings.
The company is one of the best
known of the stock companies and
May Roberts, it is assured, has a
strong support.
MINING   MEN   HERE
Harry   Howson   of   Victors   Pays   a
Visit to This Northern Part of
the  Province
The water committee of the city
council, after considering the resolution forwarded by the board of trade
relative to tlie segregation of the
water and hydro-electric system by
bylaws, has requested fuller information from the board of trade.
A report of the water committee,
signed by V. W. Smith and George
W. Kerr, was presented at the council meeting on Wednesday evening
and adopted. It was as fol'ows.:
The Mayor and Aldermen, Prince
Rupert,  B.  C.
Gentlemen:—Your water committee, to whom was referred the communication from the board of trade
dated 7th inst., would recommend
that the city clerk be directed to
reply as follows:
The Secretary,  Prince Rupert Board
of Trade, Prince Rupert, B. C.
Dear   Sir:—1   am   directed   to   acknowledge  receipt  of  your  letter  of
the  7th   inst.,   in   which  you   convey
the   following   resolution,  passed   by
the board of trade at their meeting
on the 4til inst.:—"It was moved by
M. P. McCaffrey and seconded by F.
G. Dawson that it was the opinion of
the board of trade of Prince Rupert
that money  bylaws  for  the  Installation  of a  water system and  hydroelectric power plant should be segregated and voted upon separately and
that  the  board  recommend  the  city
council that they consider this opinion  before  the  final  passing  of   the
present   proposed    bylaw   combining
the two"; and to state that the council   would   be   pleased   lo   receive   a
memo of the reasons upon which the
board of trade bases the opinion  re-
1ferred  to in the above resolution  In
order that some consideration may be
given   to   the   representation   of   the
board.     Yours   truly,
ERNEST  A.  WOODS,
City Clerk.
Respectfully submitted,
V.    W.   SMITH.
GEO.   W.   KERR,
Water Committee.
 o	
New Locomotives
The Grand Trunk Pacific Railway has placed an order with the
Montreal Locomotive Works for 20
consolidation, 16 Pacific type and 10
switching locomotives, for delivery
between July and October.
 o	
STARTS  THE PUMP
City Engineer Has Been Obliged to Supplement Water Supply From
Hays Creek.
Shortage of   Water  Supply   Is   Again
Facing the citizens—Care to
He Exercised
Hurry Howson of Victoria a well
known mining man, reached the citv
by the Prince Rupert. He is on his
way to Alice Ann, where he will look
Into some properties. Following this
he intends to pay n visit to the interior of Hie Skcnea district in the
neighborhood Of Telkwa where he
is heavily Interested in coal and
copper.
He will go by launch to Alice Arm
and expects to get away on Saturday.
C. Emmons, another mining man,
is In the city on his way to look Into
propositions he has in hand in this
northern section of country.
Mrs. S. P. McMordie left this morning for a trip to Skagway by the
Princess Mary.
• *    ■
Capt. John Irving, who arrived in
the city a few days ago, is confined
to his room through illness.
* *     *
Rev. G, li. Raley of Port Simpson
was in the city this week. He left
this morning for his home.
.    *    .
C. II. Gilllngham, road superintendent, is in the olty. Two sons of Mr.
Gillingham, from Vlctorlo, have arrived  in  the city.
The city engineer lens found ii nei'-
essary to start Hie. pumps to ^11j>j■ 1 <-—
ment the water supply for the eiiy.
This menus the wnicr from Hays
Creek Is forced iiitu tii.- reservoir
which supplies tlie' city, and an In-
creased force is secured. The pump
was started because the supply in
Hue reservoir lias been exhausted
again us was the ease lasl year,
Prom now on it looks as though
the pump will have to be kept geilng.
I'sers of water are advised to be as
careful as possible so ns to assist the
water department in meeting tlie de-
mauds.
This year the number of users has
very materially Increased, which will
aggravate" the situation. The engineer's figures show that there has
been an Increase In the number of
services of about one-half more than
were in  use  last  year.
Strawberry  Festival
The Ladles' Aid of the Methodist
church will hold a strawberry festival
in Hie church tomorrow afternoon
and evening, Strawberries and
cream and cake will be served from
3 until 1". The public are Invited
to attend and aid the ladles In their
work.
 o	
II. .Mnrboeuf of Victoria Is in the
city. PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Friday, July 14, 1911
MINERAL OUTPUT
Minister of Mines for  B.C. Presents
His Annual Report for
1910.
The Total  Production  Shows  a   Decided Increase Over Last
Year
The annual report of the minister
of mines for Britisii Columbia for
the calendar year ended December
31, 1910, which is the offcial account
of the year's mining operations in
tbe province, was issued a few days
ago. As usual, it is comprehensive,
systematically arranged and very
illustrated.
In particular, many engaged in, or
otherwise concerned about, mining
in Britisii Columbia are well pleased
to have thus placed at their disposal
the provincial mineralogist's annual
survey of the condition and progress
of the industry, based partly on the
personal observations of that official and partly upon the reports sent
in to the bureau of mines by gold
commissioners and mining recorders,
together with the important addition
of statistical and other information
derived from returns supplied to the
bureau by owners or other operators
of mines and smelters in the province.
Statistics
The statistics of production, carefully compiled from the most reliable
data obtainable and presented in tabulated form so as to clearly exhibit
the position from a comparative point
of view, are of much practical value
to those using the information thus
made conveniently accessible. From
some of these it Is ascertained that
the net increase in value of production of 1910, as compared with that
of 1909, is $1,934,041; that respective totals for the two years being
$26,377,066 and $24,443,025. Incidentally, it may here be mentioned
that last year's total value was the
greatest of any year in the history
of mining in Britisii Columbia, the
previous highest record having been
that for 1907, with a total of $25,-
882,560. The proportions of the several minerals included in last year's
total of production, and the respective increases and decreases, are
shown in the following excerpt from
one of the tables:
Gold, placer, $540,000; increase
$03,000.
Gold, lode, $5,553,380; increase,
$0(19,290.
$1,245,016;
Silver,
$5,746.
Lead,     I
$322,909.
Copper,
$1,047,010
Ziu
12;
Coal,
495.
Coke.
044.
Other
crease, I
Total
Increase
1,386,350;
$4,781,
$192,475;
9,800,101
increase
decrease
decrease
decrease,   $207,-
increase $2,777,-
$1,308,174; decrease, $244,-
1,500,000;    In.
material,
300,000.
produce,   $26,377,066;    net
$1,934,041.
Total Production
This production added to that of
all previous years brings the aggregate value of the mineral production
of the province to Hie beginning of
1911 up to $37 1,1 lie,650. The proportions arc shown in the next following table:
Gold, placer   $ 71,213,103
Hold, lode         60,811,067
lows: British Columbia, $24,684,
593; Yukon, $4,550,000; all other
provinces,  $38,551,838.
Large   Increase   in   Coal
The most noticeable feature In the
mineral production of the year was
the large increase in coal.    The gross
output,   that  is   including   the  coal,
made into coke, was 3,139,235  tons
(of 2240 pounds).    This is the greatest production of this mineral made
in the history of coal mining in the
province.    After a deduction of 339,-
189 tons made into coke, the net output of coal was 2,800,046 tons, which
is an increase of nearly 800,000 tons
over that of the year 1909.    As the
greatest  net  increase  made  In  any
previous year was of about 328,000
tons, which was In 1909 as compared
with  1908, it is very evident that a
big advance was made last year.  Before turning to other matters it will
here be noted  that Included in  the
lull   information   given   relative  to
coal ining is some, presented in tabulated form, showing (1) the output
and the per capita production of coal
In  the  several  districts  during the
last four years  and (2) analyses of
accidents in coal mines in different
districts during 1910.    These tables
give interesting data, especially valuable for purposes of comparison.
Other Noticeable Features
The special reports included In the
report  ore  those  of  the  provincial
mineralogist on Portland Canal, Lillooet and Tatlayoko districts, and of
the provincial assayer on part of Atlin mining division, Bella Coola and
Valdez   Island.     Those   on   Lillooet
and Tatlayoko districts are of more
than ordinary interest since there has
not heretofore been available much,
if any,  official information  relative
to them.    These descriptive articles
are  rendered   more   interesting  and
valuable  by  reason   of  their  being
freely illustrated with some excellent
and representative views.
The reports of the various branches
of work done by or under the bureau
of mines also deserve favorable notice. These include the practical
work of the provincial assay office,
that of the boards of examiners of
assayers and coal mine officials, and
of the chief inspector of mines and
the several district inspectors under
him. Especially is the information
relative to mine-rescue apparatus
provided and mine-rescue training
work done, of deep interest to those
concerned in the protection of the
lives of coal miners.
 o	
"Does your wife usk you for things
she knows you cannot afford?"
"She hasn't asked me for a thing
since  we  were  married."
"Great!    How do you manage it?"
"When she wants a thing she does
not ask me; she tells me."
Total   gold   ,
Silver    	
Lead   	
Copper   	
Coal  anil  coke
.$132,024,170
.     31,nil:, I Tie
.     24,646,605
6ii,7i:!,lu.",
.   114,012,5961
Building stone, bricks,,     10,593,100
Other metalB, zinc, etc,      1,083,17:'
Aggregate value. . . . $371 197,650
in regard to tbe statistical tablea
;—an aeieiiiiein has made to that showing in delail the production of the
metalliferous mines, etc., separate
columns having been Included tor
zinc null miscellaneous minerals, respectively, so thai this elaborate table now shows details for Ihe four
last years of all minerals produced
except coal and csoke.
Only one more reference lo the
statistical tables f which will be
dealt with in delail later) will now
be made, namely, to that comparing
geographically the output of certain
mineral products in British Columbia
to that of similar products in all
other provinces in the Dominion. This
■shows lhat in regard to gold, silver,
lead, copper iron and coal and coke
this province produced in 1910 an
amount equal to more than 64 per
cent of that of alt the other prove-
inees combined. I[ should be noted
that the Yukon Is not included In
ihis comparison, and that not all the
minerals produced, but only those
above narrated, and comprises in the
totals compared, The respective
totals for those minerals are as fol-
PUBLIC SERVICE ACT.
The qualifying examinations for
Third-class Clerks, Junior Clerks,
and Stenographers will be held at
the following places, commencing on
Monday the 3rd July next:—Armstrong, Chilliwack, Cumberland,
Golden, Grand Forks, Kamloops,
Kaslo, Kelowna, Ladysmith, Nanalmo, Nelson, New Westminster, North
Vancouver, Peachland, Revelstoke,
Rossland, Salmon Arm, Summer-
land, Vancouver, Vernon and Victoria.
Candidates must be British subjects between the ages of 21 and
30, if for Third-class Clerks; and
between 16 and 21, If for Junior
Clerks or Stenographers.
Applications will not be accepted
if received later than the 15th June
next.
Further Information, together
with application forms, may be obtained from the undersigned.
P. WALKER,
Registrar, Public Service,
Victoria, B. C, 27th April, 1911.
4-27—0-16.
NOTICE.
PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given
that, under the authority contained
in section 131 of the "Land Act," a
regulation has been approved by the
Lieutenant-Governor in Council fixing the minimum sale prices of first
and second-class lands at $10 and $5
per acre, respectively.
This regulation further provides
that the prices fixed therein shall
apply to all lands with respect to
which the application to purchase Is
given favourable consideration after
this date, notwithstanding the date
of such application or any delay that
may have occurred in the consideration of the same.
Further notice is hereby given
that all persons who have pending
applications to purchase lands under
the provisions of sections 34 or 36
of the "Land Act" and who are not
willing to complete such purchases
under the prices fixed by the aforesaid regulation shall be at liberty to
withdraw such applications and receive a refund of the moneys deposited on account of such applications.
WILLIAM R. ROSS,
Minister of Lands.
Department of Lands,
Victoria, B. C, April 3rd, 1911.
4-11—6-11.
NOTICE
PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given
that, under the authority contained
in section 131 of the "Land Act," a
regulation was approved by the Lieutenant-Governor In Council fixing
the minimum sale prices of first and
second-class lands at $10 and $6
per acre respectively.
This regulation further provided
that the prices fixed therein should
apply to all lands with respect to
which the applications to purchase
«ere given fuvou.uble consideration
uter tne date of bai- regulation,
.1     ely, April 3, 1911.
Further >t!-e 's > r'— tha'
... , .ue of a regulation appuved by
:i e .ieutenaiil-Go eiaor in Council
on the 10th of May, 1011, t..ue the
regulation dated 3:e. .. .r< , I'.'.l, Le
held not to apply to ■• '-"tions '
purchase vacant Crown lands whl"li
were received by the Assistant Con -
missioners of Lands on or before the
said April 3rd, 1911, and with re-
spmJ. to which the required deposit
of mty cents per acre had been received by said Commossioners on or
before the said April 3rd, 1911.
ROBT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Department of Lands,
Victoria, B. C, 16th »f May, 1911.
5-23—lmo
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE.
NOTICE is hereby given that the
reserve of a parcel of land situated
on Graham Island, notice of which
appeared In the British Columbia
Gazette on the 26£h of February,
1909, being dated 23rd February,
1909, is cancelled to permit of tiie
lands being acquired by pre-emption
only and for no other purpose
ROBT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Department of Lands,
Victoria, B. C, April 6th, 1911.
4-14—7-5
NOTICE.
In the matter of an application for
the issue of a duplicate of the Certificate of Title for an undivided
one-half of Lot 883, Group I,
Cassiar District:
Notice is hereby given that it is
my intention to issue at the expiration of one month after the first
publication hereof a duplicate of the
Certificate of Title to the above
mentioned land in the name of William Jordan Larkworthy, which Certificate is dated the 30th day of September, 1910, and numbered 326R.
WILLIaM  E.   BURRITT,
Di'.rict Registrar.
Land Registry Office,
Prince Rupert, B. C,
May 26, 1911. J23
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE.
Notice is hereby given the the
reserve existing by reason of the
notice published In the BrltlBh Columbia Gazette of the 27th Dacem-
ber, 1907, over lands on Graham Island, formerly covered by Timber
Licences Nos. Nos. 37055, 37056 and
37057, which expired on the 6th day
of November, 1909, and the lands
embraced within Timber Licence No.
37059, which expired on the 25th
day of January, 1909, is cancelled,
and that the said lands will be open
for pre-emption only under the provisions of Section 7 of the "Land
Act" after midnight on June 16th,
1911.
ROBERT A.   RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Lands Department,
Victoria, B. C,
9th March, 1911.
Skeena   Land    District—District   of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that Prince Rupert, Sand & Gravel Company, Ltd.,
of Prince Rupert, occupation Industrial Company, intends to apply for
permission to lease the following described land:— Commencing at a
post planted at the Witness post on
the southerly boundary of Lot 4124;
thence southerly following the sinuosities of the shore line 00 chains
more or less to southerly end of the
Island; thence easterly 10 chains
more or less to low water mark;
thence northerly 60 chains more or
less along low water mark; thence
westerly 10 chains more or ess to
the point of commencement.
PRINCE   .U'PLRT  SAND  &
GRAVEL Co., LTD.
Per J. Y.  Rochester, Agi.
Dated May 30, 1911. 6-2
WATER NOTICE
I, C. N. Pring, of Prince Rupert,
B. C, occupation broker, give notice
that on the 12th day of July I intend tho apply to the Water Commissioner at his office in Prince Rupert, for a license to take and use
2.8 cubic feet of, water per second
from Hot Springs on border of Lake
Lakelse in the Skeena Land Division of Coast District. The water is
to be taken directly from the Springs
and is to be used on Lot No. 3983,
for sanitary purposes.
Dated June 12th, 1911.
C. N. PRING,
6-13-lm Prince Rupert, B. C.
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that John Kirkaldy, of Lakelse Valley, occupation
farmer, il.. s to apply for permission to purchase tht following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 120 chaius south
from the south end of Herman
Lake; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains,
JOHN KIRKALDY.
Dated April 11, 1911. 6-6
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that I, V. W.
Smith, of Prince Rupert, occupation
contractor, Intend to apply for permission to lease the following described foreshore:—Commencing at
a post planted about 2 miles in a
southerly direction from Port Simpson; thence northerly along high
water mark 25 chains and containing all foreshore between high and
low water mark.
V. W. SMITH,
Locator.
Staked 31st May, 1911. 6-6
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE, that I, Minnie
MeredRh, of Victoria, B. C, occupation a married woman, intend to
apply for permission to purchase the
following desoribed lands:—Commencing »t a post planted about 40
chains distant and in a South direction from the Southeast corner of
Lot 1733; thence east 40 chains;
thence south 40 chains; thence west
40 chains; thence north 40 chains
to point of commencement, containing 160 acres more or less.
MINNIE  MEREDITH.
John Klrkaldy,
Agent.
Dated  February 20th,  1911.
Skeena Land  District—Der.rict
of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that Joseph Edward Merryfield, of Prince Rupert,
occupation merchant, intends to apply for permission to lease the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about 10 chains
north from the northea-.t corner of
Lot 33; thence west 1500 feet to
shore of Smith's Island; thence following shore in a southerly direction
1200 feet; thence east to shore of
De Horsey Island; thence following
shore in a northerly direction to
point of commencement.
JOSEPH EDWARD MERRYFIELD.
E. Spro, Agent.
Dated April 4, 1911. 4-7
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Flora Orr, of
Masset, B. C, occupation spinster, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:
—Commencing at a post planted
about 40 ohains south and 80 ohains
east of the N. E. corner of Lot 36
thence north 80 chains; thence west
80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains, containing 640
acres.
FLORA ORR.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated November 25, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Arthur Ives,
Sr., of Masset, B. C, occupation hotel
keeper, intends to apply for permission  to purchase  the  following described  lands:—  Commencing at a
post planted about 40 chains south
and  120  chains east  of the S.  B.
corner of Lot 35;  thence south  80
chains;     thence    east    80    chains
thence north 80 chains; thence west
80 cliains, containing 640 acres.
ARTHUR IVES, Sr.
M. A. Merrill, Agent
Dated Nov. 25, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte ,; .ends.
TAKE NOTICE that Lynn Sutherland, of El Paso, Texas, U. S. A., occupation auditor, Intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 40 chains south
and 120 chains east of the S. E. corner of Lot 35; thence north 80
chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains, containing 640 acres.
LYNN SUTHERLAND.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 26, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Arthur W.
Nelson, of Chicago, 111., U. 8. A., occupation clerk, Intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing
at a post planted about 4% miles
north of the S. E. corner of T. L.
40869; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence south
80 chains; thence west 80 chains,
containing 640 acres.
ARTHUR W. NELSON.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 27, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Wesley Singer, of Masset, B. C, occupation farmer, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted about 4 miles north of the N. W.
corner of T. L. 40859; thence south
80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence east
80 chains, containing 640 acres.
WESLEY SINGER.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 27, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast Range 5.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles
James Gilllngham, of Prince Rupert,
occupation contractor, Intends to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner of Lot 992 and
marked C. J. Gillingham's N. E.
Corner Application for Purchase; I,
C. J. Gilllngham, Intend to apply
for permission to purchase 320 acres
of land bounded as follows:—Commencing at this post; thence 80
chains south; thence 40 chains west;
tbence SO chains north; thence 40
chains east to place of commencement.
O.iARLES JAMES GILIINGHAX
Robeert Osborn Jennings, Agent.
Dated January 5, 1911.
Skeena    Land    District—District   of
Ceiast-   Range  V.
TAKE  NOTICE  thai    I,    Joseph
Pastl, of  Watson, Sask., occupation
Farmer, Intend to apply for permission  to  purchase the    following described lands:— Commencing    at   a
post  planted  about    30  c.ains in a
northerly direction from the    N. E.
corner of Lot No. 2 6G2 or T. L. No.
32598 at Lakelse Lake; thence north
20 chains; thence east    40    chains;
thence south  20 cliains along shore
of  Lakelse  Lake;   thence west    40
iiains  to point of    commencement,
'ontaining 120 acres, more or less.
JOSEPH PASTL.
George Hir, Agent.
Dated  May  5,  1911. 6-2
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that I, John Y.
Rochester, of Prince Rupert, occupation broker, Intend to apply fir permission to lease the following described land:— Commencing at a
post planted on the northerly end of
an island in the Skeena River about
Mile 45 on the Grand Trunk Pacific
Railway; thence north 1000 feet
more or less to low water mark;
thence westerly along the low water
mark 1000 feet more or less;
thence southerly 1000 feet more or
less; thence easterly 1000 feet to
the place of commencement.
J. Y. ROCHESTER.
Dated May 30, 1911. e,g
Skeena    Land    District—District    of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE lhat Annie Kirkaldy, of Melville, Sask., occupation
married woman, Intends to apply for
p lrmlsslon to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted 120 chains southwesterly from Herman Lake; thence west
80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 ehains; thence north
80 chains, containing 640 acres more
or less
ANNIE KIRKALDY.
John Kirkaldy, Agent.
Dated May 13, 1911. 5-19
Skeena   Land    District—District   of
Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that George
Rudge, of Port Simpson, occupation
marble worker, Intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 2 miles In a
southerly direction from mouth of
Union Bay and on south side of Bay;
tfience soutli 20 chains; thence west
20 chains; thence north 20 chains to
shore; tbence following shore in an
easterly direction to point of commencement, containing 40 acres
more or less.
GEORGE RUDGE.
Lionel Crippen, Agent.
Staked 11th May, 1911. 5-23
For Job Printing of all kinds seel
The Journal man.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that A. Walter De
Lisle, of Masset, B. C, occupation
farmer, Intends to apply for permls-
sionu to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 40 chains south
and 120 chains east of the S. E. corner of Lot 36; thence south 80
chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence east
80 chains, containing 640 acres.
A. WALTER DE LISLE.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 25, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District ot
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Fred. A. De
Lisle, of Masset, B. C, occupation
farmer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 40 chains south
and 120 chains east of the S. E. corner of Lot 35; thence north 80
chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence
east SO ohains, containing 640 acres.
FRED. A.  DE  LISLE.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 25, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Frank Nelson
of Chicago, 111., U. S. A., occupation
clerk, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following de
scribed lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about one mile north of
N. W. corner of Application to Purchase 6953; thence south 80 chains;
tlience west 80 chains; thence north
80 chains; thence east SO chains, containing 640 acres.
FRANK NELSON.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 25, 1910.
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Typewriter
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again. Then its tremendous significance will dawn upon you.
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—yours for 17 cents a day!
The typewriter whose conquest ot
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We announced this new sales plan
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The result has been such a deluge of applications for machines
that we are simply astounded.
The demand comes from people of
all classes, all ages, all occupations.
The majority of Inquiries has
come from people of known financial
standing who were attracted by the
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A startling confirmation of our belief that the Era of Universal Typewriting is at hand.
A Quarter of a Million People are
Making Money With
T^e.
Skeena  |Land    District—District   of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that William H.
Hargrave, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation banker, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lanus:—Commencing at a post planted on the west
shore of Lakelse Lake, and about
1% miles distant and In a southwesterly direction from the S. W.
corner of Lot 3982, Skeena Land
District, District of Coast, Range V;
thence west 40 chains; thence south
80 chains, more or less, to the shore
of Lakelse Lake; thence following
the shore of said lake to point of
commencement, containing 160
acres more or less.
WILLIAM H. HARGRAVE.
Mancell Clark, Agent.
Dated  20th March,  1911.
GRAHAM ISLAND — "The surest
sign of the progress of a town cr
district is its newspaper—live, active, hustling." "Th« Masset Review," Masset, Q.O.I
OLIVER
Typewriter
The Standard Visible Writer
The Oliver Typewriter is a moneymaker, right from the word "go!" So
easy to run that beginners soon get
in tbe "expert" class. Earn as you
learn. Let the machine pay the 17
cents a day—and all above that Is
yours.
Wherever you are, there's work to
be done and money to be made by
using the Oliver. The business world
is calling for Oliver operators. There
are not enough to supply the demand.
Their salaries are considerably above
those of many classes of workers.
"An Oliver Typewriter in
Every  Home!"
That Is our battle cry today. We
have made the Oliver supreme In
usefulness and absolutely Indispensable In business. Now comes the
conquest of the home.
The simplicity and strength of the
Oliver fit it for family use. It is becoming an important factor In the
home training of young people. An
educator as well as a money maker.
Our new Belling plan puts the
Oliver on the threshold of every
home in America. Will you close
the door of your home or office on
this remarkable Oliver opportunity?
Write for further details of our
easy offer and a free copy of the new
Oliver catalogue.    Address:
R. C. BEAN
Prince Rupert Agent
General   Offices:   Oliver  Typewriter
Building, Chicago, 111.
MISS HENNY WENNERSJ.jiN
SWEDISH SPECIALIST
Electric, * aclal and Scalp treatment;
Scientific Massage treatment for
rheumatism, nervousness and poor
circulation. Manicuring also Chiropody work. Friday, July 14, 1911
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
HERRING DRIFTERS
J. J. Cowie an Authority on This Branch
of the Fishing Industry
Gives Advice.
He Suggests That Nets Should Re Set
so as to Outlier in Harvest From
Deep Water
In a pamphlet issued by the marine and fisheries department regarding herring fisheries the suggestion
is made that instead of relying upon
the coming of herring Into the harbors as has been the custom of fishermen they should secure drifter?
and take herring in the open waters,
After publishing a number of reports
from various places to the effect that
herring were plentiful outside- and
did not come into the harbors, with
the result that tbe fishery was unsuccessful, J. J. Cowie, author of the
pamphlet, says: "This Is surely a
serious and deplorable state of uncertainty which hampers this important industry. Were it otherwise
not only would a sure and plentiful
supply of fresh bait be secured when
most needed, but a greater quantity
of this unsurpassed quality of summer herring would be packed for consumption as food and the wealth produced from our seas materially increased. Seeing therefore that 'the
mountain does not come to Mahomet,
Mahomet must move out to the mountain.' In other words, the habitat
of the summer schools must be
sought ten, twenty, or thirty miles
out in deep water. This applies to
the Pacific as well as to the Atlantic
coast. The important herring fishery at Nanaimo, B. C, was little more
than a failure last season because
the big schools did not enter the
harbor as usual, but kept swimming
outside in the Gulf of Georgia most
of the season.
"In order to benefit by the presence of these off-shore schools, and
to solve forever the serious question
of bait supply, it becomes necessary
that our fishermen should direct
their thoughts to the plan which for
centuries has been found so effective
for deep sea herring fishermen by
the fishermen of Norway, Holland,
France and Great Britain, namely,
that of drift net fishing. The term
drift net partially explains the method. The nets are neither anchored
nor towed, but are strung out across
the tide at any distance from the
land where signs of fish are apparent to the experienced fisherman and
the vessel and nets allowed to drift
or move with the tide. Any ordinary
Canadian fishing schooner of 10, 15
or 20 tons with a good big main
hatch can be readily used as a drifter
to carry from 15 to 20 nets. If fitted
with a gasoline engine, so much the
better In order to make to and from
the land, if necessary, for the dis
posal of fresh catches. To prepare
ordinary Canadian herring nets for
drifting they should he mounted with
a much stronger head or cork rope
than that used at present. The ends
of the nets should be made fast to
each other, at top aud bottom, so as
to form a continuous string of netting. Wliere each net is joined to
the other, at the top, there should be
made fast a rope of about three fathoms length, at the end of which
should be attached a buoy, or small
cask of sufficient buoyancy to remain
above water when the nets are set.
Along the foot rope should be strung
the usual amount of lead or other
sinkers.
"The fisherman must use his own
Judgment as to the most suitable size
of net to be used. There are times
when a fleet of small meshed nets
would pay him best, while at other
times nets of a large mesh would he
most profitable to him. Before proceeding to sen the fleet of nets so
strung together should be carefully
laid In the hold, on some sort of
temporary platform, one net after
the other, with the head rope aft
and tbe other rope forward. The
setting, or shooting of a fleet of
drift nets, although a simple operation in itself, requires a great deal
of judgment and care. On reaching
the desired spot for fishing, which
must be well clear of vessels at
anchor, and of sufficient depth to
prevent the foot rope of the nets from
catching the bottom, and assuming
that the tide runs east and west,
with the wind, say, from the southerly direction, the vessel, with just
enough sail set to give steering way,
would head away in a northerly direction, while the nets are paid out
over the lee side. When the nets
are all out the sail is taken In and
the vessel swung around bow on to
the fleet. One end of n strong manila
rope Is made fast to the last net,
and the other end to the vessel. This
rope should be let out to a length
of about 20 fathoms.
"Drifting nets should be set at sun
set and hauled in at daybreak as a
general rule; thus, in the course of
five or six intervening hours the ves-
el and nets will have moved with
the tide over a considerable stretch
of water, which obviously must give
the nets a much better chance of
striking a body of fish than if anchored to one spot the whole night
through. The herring are sometimes
astir at the close of evening, and at
other times about dawn, and in such
cases the fisherman has to rely on
his own judgment as to when he
should begin hauling in his nets. The
nets should not be allowed to remain in the water during the daytime. This is an objectionable practice because the herring, being a very
timid fish, is apt to be thereby scared
away from the vicinity.
"The operation of hauling in the
net should be performed on the
weather or windward side of the vessel. The wisdom of this course Is
plain, for otherwise the tendency of
the vessel would be to drive over
its own nets. During the haullng-in
process the herring should be shaken
clean out of the nets.
"Although, as a rule, the length
of the buoy ropes, or in other words,
the distance between the top of the
nets and the surface of the water
is about three fathoms, experience
has taught drift net fishermen that
the depth at which herring swim,
especially in clear northern waters,
varies with the lightness and darkness of the night, and with the coldness and warmth of the atmosphere.
On dark nights, or when the weather
is mild they swim well up towards
the surface, and in such circumstances the buoy rope is shortened;
while on moonlight nights, or when
the weather is cold the buoy rope
is lengthened and the nets let well
down  from  the surface.
"Practical fishermen do not require to be reminded of the fact
that herring fishing in any form is
a more or less uncertain business,
and anything calculated to minimize
this uncertainty Is bound to appeal
to them.
"Now, while drift net fishermen
have no definite guide in locating
bodies of herring other than the appearance of whales and gannets, and
the knowledge that certain fishing
grounds were found prolific on some
previous occasion; and although at
times a whole night is spent toiling
for nothing. It cannot be doubted,
with respect to summer and fall
schools, that the success of our Canadian fishermen would be much more
certain If, instead of laying immovable .traps, and setting fixed nets
close to the shore with hope that
the course of the great armies of
herring may be deflected towards
them, they carried the war right
Into the natural domain of the finny
tribe by means of movable drift nets.
Such reports as those quoted, that
herring schooled outside the harbor,
and were consequently beyond the
reach of the fishermen's nets, would
then cease to come to hand.
"Many European writers of an
earlier day have given it as their
opinion that herring annually descend
from the Arctic circle in huge masses, dividing into smaller schools and
distributing themselves over well
known haunts near the shore. In
the light of the knowledge gained,
however, by the enormous development of the French, British, Dutch
and Norwegian herring fisheries, and
by the pursuit of this fishery at times
and places not dreamed of by those
early writers, the theory of the great
descent from the nortli is now looked
upon by scientists and others as erroneous, and in its place is accepted
what is doubtless the true one; namely, that herring inhabit the seas adjacent to the coasts and bays where
they resort for spawning purposes,
and that after spawning they move
back to the deep water In the neighborhood, where they remain feeding
until the spawning season again approaches. That this opinion is the
most rational one Is evidenced by
the fact that on the British coasts,
for example, herring of a particular
size and quality resort to the same
locality every year."
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that James Mul-
lin, of Murdo, So. Dakota, U. S. A.,
occupation farmer, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands: — Commencing at a post planted on the
shore of Masset Inlet, about one
mile northeast of the mouth of the
Ain River; thence west 40 chains,
more or less, to the eastern boundary of T. L. 35414; thence south
60 chains, more or less to the shore
of Masset Inlet; thence northeasterly along the shore to point of
commencement, containing 60 acres
more or less.
JAMES   MULLIN.
G. S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated  Feb.  24th,  1911.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE t at J. K. Anderson, of Masset, B. C, occupation farmer, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:.—Commencing at a post planted on the shore of Masset Inlet,
about two miles west of the S. W.
corner of T. L. 40787, thence north
80 chains; thence west 40 chains;
thence south 80 chains more or less
to the shore of Masset Inlet; thence
easterly along the shore back to the
place of commencement, containing
320 acres, more or less.
J. K. ANDERSON.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 25, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlote Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Wirt A. Stevens, of Chicago, 111., U. S. A., occupation civil engineer, intends to
apply for permission to purchase
the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on
the shore of Masset Inlet about one
mile northeast of the mouth of the
Ain River; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 40 chains more or less
to the eastern boundary of T. L.
35413; thence south along the
boundary of T. L. 35413 and
T. L. 35414, a distance of 80 chains;
thence east 40 chains, more or less,
to point of commencement, containing  320  acres  more or less.
WIRT   A.   STEVENS.
G. S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated Feb.  24th, 1911.
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that I, Roy,
Chrisman, of Port Esslngton, B. C.
occupation prospector, intend to apply for permission to lease the following described land:—Commencing at a post planted about five
miles distant and in a southwesterly
direction from the point at the entrance to Captain Cove, Petrel
Channel, and on the northeast side
of McCauley Island; thence west 20
cliains; thence south 40 chains,
thence east about 20 chains to shore
of Petrel Channel; thence northerly
along shore line of Petrel Channel
to point of commencement and containing eighty acres more or less.
ROY CHRISMAN.
Dated April 11,  1911. 4-26
Watching for Bodies
It' Is possible that the bodies of
the six Alpine climbers, Including
the American, Randall, who were
killed at Mont Blanc, in 1870, will
shortly be given up by the natural
movement of the Glacier des Bessons,
upon which they perished. The party
consisted of eleven. Five were
found, Including Dr. Bean of Baltimore. Others were supposed to
have fallen into a crevasse and have
not been seen since. Recently a
broken alpenstock with Dr. Bean's
name carved on it has been found
near the mouth of the glacier, Indicating that the bodies may not be
far away. It is expected that they
will be found well preserved in the
ice. Chnmiioni guides are watching
for  the  bodies.
COAL MINES ACT
of
Skeena   Land   District—District
C^o csqI flT*
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, iLtends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Commencing at post planted 6%
miles N. E. of the mouth of the
White River and the junction of the
Naas, marked Chas. J. Gillingham's
S. E. Corner; thence SO chains
North; thence 80 chains West;
thence 80 chains South; thence 80
chains East to point of commencement and containing 640 acres more
or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charfes M. Huff, Agent.
Dated March 4, 1911. 4-18
Skeena   Land   District—District    of
Cassiar.
TAKJ NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to tbe Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land:—-
Comencing at a pet planted 7 miles
N. E. of the mouth of the White
River and the junction of the Naas,
marked Chas. J. Gillingham's S. E.
Corner; thence 80 chains North;
thence 80 chains West; thence 80
chains South; thence 80 chains East
to point of commencement and containing 640 acres more or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles M. Huff, Agent.
Dated March 5th, 1911. 4-18
Skeena   Land   District—District    of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land:—-
Commencing at a post planted 7 Vi
miles N. E. of the mouth of the
White River and the junction of the
Naas and marked Chas. J. Gillingham's S. E. Corner; thence 80
chains North; thence 80 chains
West; thence 80 chains South;
thence 80 chains East to point of
commencement and containing 640
acres more or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Pharles M? Huff, Agent.
Dated Marth 5th, 1911. 4-18
thence 80 chains North; thence 80
chains West; thence 80 chains
South; thence 80 cliains East to
■point of commencement and containing 640 acres more or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles M. Huff, Agent.
Dated March 4th, 1911. 4-18
Skeeua   Land   District—District   of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect ror Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land:—
Commencing at ;. post planted about
8 miles N. E. of the mouth of White
River and the Junction of the Naas
River, marked Chas. J. Gillingham's
S. E. Corner; thence SO chains
North; thence 80 chains West;
thence 80 cliains South; thence 80
chains East to point of commencement and containing 640 acres more
or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles M. Huff, Agent.
Dated March Oth, 1911. 4-18
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Coast—Range V. .
TAKE NOTICE that W. H. Fergu
son, of Prince Rupert, B. C, occu
pation civil engineer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about one
mile southerly, following the sinuosities of the shore line from the
southwest corner of Lot 104, Range
V; thence 20 chains west; thence 20
chains south; thence 20 chains west,
thence 20 chains south; thence 20
chains west; thence about 40 chains
south; thence along shore northerly
to point of commencement.
W. H. FERGUSON.
G. Hansen, Agent.
Dated April 22nd, 1911. 4-25
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast
TAKE NOTICE that F. T. Saunders, of Vancouver, occupation master
mariner, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands:— Commencing at a
post planted about 6 miles northwest of Love Inlet on the north
east shore of Pitt Island; thence
south 20 chains; thence west 40
chains; thence north to shore;
thence following shore in a southeasterly direction to point of commencement , containing 80 acres
more or less.
FRANK TAUNTON SAUNDERS,
Locator.
W. Hamilton, Agent.
Staked 17th, Feb., 1911.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Island.
TAKE NOTICE that Robert Fraser Ogllvle, of Vancouver, occupation banker, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the folowlng
described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 2 miles west of
the southwest corner of A. P. 12-
037; thence east 80 chains; thence
north. 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains to
point of commencement, containing
640 acres.
ROBERT FRASER OGILVIE.
Arthur  Robertson,  Agent.
Dated Dec.  9, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that James G.
Crombie, of Prince Rupert, occupation auditor, Intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:— Commencing at a
post planted at the northwest corner, 55 chains east and 20 chains
south from northeast corner of Lot
1116 (Horry Survey), Coast Disk,
range 5; thence 20 chains east;
thence 25 chains, more or less,
south to Angus McLeod Pre-emption; thence 20 chains west; thence
25 chains, more or less, north, to
post of commencement, containing
50 acres, more or less.
JAMES  G.   CROMBIE.
Fred Bohlen, Agent.
Dated June 14, 1911. 6-23
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Commencing at a post planted about
8 miles N. E. of thi mouth of White
River and the junction of the Naas
River, marked Chas. J. Gillingham's
S. E. Corner; thence 80 chains
North; thence 80 cliains West;
thence 80 chains South; thence 80
chains East to point of commencement and containing 640 acres mo: j
or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles M. Huff, Agent.
Dated March 6th, 1911. 4-18
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land:—-
Commencing at a post planted 7 M
miles N. E. of the mouth of the
White River and the junction of the
Naas, marked Chas. J. Gillingham's
S. E. Corner; thence 80 rtains
North; thence 80 chains West;
thence 80 chains South; thence 80
chains East to point of commencement and containing 640 acres more
or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles M. Huff, Agent.
Dated March 5th, 1911. 4-18
Skeena   Land    District—District   of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for a
license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 64 0 acres of land: —
Commencing at a post planted about
8 miles N. E. of the mouth of the
White River and the junction of the
Naas, marked Chas. J. Gillingham's
S. E. Corner; thence 80 chains
North; thence 80 chains West;
thence 80 chains South; thence 80
chains East to point of commencement and containing 640 acres more
oi* less
CHARLES   J.   GILLINGHAM.
Charles M. Huff, Agent.
Dated March 6th, 1911. 4-18
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that George Stanley Mayer, of Masset, B. C, occupation farmer, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at av
post planted on the east shore of
Tsu Skundale Lake; thence east 8f>
chains; thence south 40 chains, more
or less, to the north boundary of
T. L. 35413; thence west and south
along the boundaries of T. L. 35413,
to the shore of the Ain River; thence
northerly along tbe shore, back to
the place of commencement, containing 500 acres, more or less.
GEORGE STANLEY MAYER.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 28, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Robert Cross,
of Masset, B. C, occupation farmer,
intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted on the east shore of Tsu Skundale
Lake; thence east SO chains; thence
north 80 chains, to or near to the
S. E. corner of Lot 35; thence west
40 chains, more or less; thence
south 40 chains, more or less; thence
west 40 chains more or less, following tbe southern boundaries of Lot
35; thence south to the shore; thence
southerly along the shore back to the
place of commencement, containing
500 acres, more or less.
ROBERT  CROSS.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov.  28, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Christina Orr,
o( Masset, B. C, occupation married,
intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described
lands: —Commencing at a post planted about 40 chains south and 3 miles
east of the N. E. corner of Lot 35;
thence touth 40 chains; thence west
SO chains; thence north 40 chains;
thence east 80 chains, containing 320
acres.
CHRISTINA ORR.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 25, 1910.
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land:—
Commencing at a post planted 6>i
miles N. E. of the mouth of the
White River and the junction of the
Naas, and marked Chas. J. Gillingham's S. E. Corner; thence 80
chains North; thence 80 cnains
West; thence 80 chains South;
thence 80 chains East to point of
commencement and containing 640
acres more or less.
CHARLES Jt GILLINGHAM.
Charles M.  Huff, Agent.
Dated March 4th, 1911. 4-18
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
TAKE NOTICE th;.t Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, intends to
applj to the Minister of Lands for a
license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Commencing at a post planted about
8 miles N. E. of the mouth of the
White River and the junction of the
Naas, marked Chas. J. Gillingham's
S. E. Corner; thence 80 chains
North; thence 80 chains West;
thence 80 chains South; thence 80
chains East to point of commencement and containing 640 acres more
or less.
CHARLES   J.   GILLINGHAM.
Charles M. Huff, Agent.
Dated March  6th,  1911. 4-18
Skeent Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Clara Orr, of
Masset, B C., occupation spinster,
Intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted about 40 chains south and 80
chains east of the N. E. corner of
Lot 35; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence north
80 chains; thence east 80 chains, containing 640 acres.
CLARA ORR.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 25, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Merton A.
Merrill, of Masset, B. C., occupation
prospector, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted at the S. W. corner of
T. L. 407S7; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south
80 chains, more or less, to the shore
of Masset Inlet; thence easterly along
the shore back to the place of commencement, containing 640 acres,
more or less.
MERTON A. MERRILL.
Dated Nov. 25, 1910.
WATER NOTICE.
Skeena   Land   District—District-   of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles .1.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Commencing at a post planted about
8 miles N. E. of the mouth of White
River and the junction of the Naas
River, marked Charles J. Gilling-
hum's S. E. Corner; thence 80
chains North; thence SO chains
West; thence 80 chains South;
thence 80 chains East to point of
commencement and containing 640
acres more or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles M.  Huff, Agent.
Dated March 5th, 1911. 4-18
Skeena   Land   District—District    of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gilllngham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Commencing at a post planted 6 •%
miles N. E. of the mouth of White
River and tha junction of the Naas,
marked Chas. J. Gillingham's S. E.
Corner; thence 80 chains North;
thence 80 cliains West; thence 80
cliains South; thence 80 chains East
to point of commencement and containing 640 acres more or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles M. Huff, Agent.
Dated March 4th, 1911. 4-18
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, Intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land:—
Commencing at a post planted six
miles N. E. of the mouth of While
River and the junction of the Nans
River on Canyon Creek, marked
Chas. J, Gillingham's S. E. Corner;
NOTICE Is hereby given that an
application will be made under Part
V. of the "Water Act, la09," to obtain a licence in the Queen Charlotte Islands Division of Skeena District.
(a) The name, address and occupation of the applicant—Merton A.
Merrill, Masset, Q. C. I., B. C,
Prospector.
(If for mining purposes) Free
Miner's Certificate No	
(b) The name of the lake,
stream, or source (if unnamed, the
description is)—I-in-tsua Lake, Tsu-
Skundale Lake and Ain River.
(c) The point of diversion—At -r
near the outlet of Tsu-Skundale
Lake into Ain River.
(d) The quantity of water applied for (in cubic feet per second)
—1,000.
(e) The character of the proposed works—Power Plant, Dam,
Flumes, etc.
(f) The premises on which the
water Is to be used (describe same)
—At or near the mouth of the Ain
River.
(g) The purposes for which the
water Is to be used—Generating
power.
(h) If for irrigation, describe
the land Intended to be irrigated,
giving acreage	
(i) If the water Is to be used for
power or mining purposes, describe
the place where the water Is to be
returned to some natural channel,
and the difference In altitude between point of diversion and point
of return—At or near the mouth of
the AIn River, about 100 feet below
point of diversion.
(j) Area of Crown land intended to be occupied by tho proposed
works—10 acres more or less.
(k) This notice was posted on
the 28 th day of November, 1910,
and application will be made to the
Commissioner on the 1st day of
June, 1911.
(1) Give tbe names and addresses of any riparian proprietors or
licensees who or whose lands are
likely to be affected by the proposed works, either above or below
the outlet—-Don't know of any.
(Signature)
MERTON   A.   .MERRILL,
(P.   O.  Address)   Massee.   B.   C.
NOTE.—One cubic loot per second Is equivalent to .'1 .".71 miner's
inches,
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE  NOTICE  that Carl  Nelson,
of Chicago, 111., U. S. A., occupation
draughtsman,   Intends   to  apply   for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a
post  planted   about  80  chains  east
and  120  chains north  of N.  E.  corner of Lot  35;   thence    south     80
chains;     tbence    east    80    chains;
thence north 80 cliains; thence west
SO chains, containing 040 acres.
CARL NELSON.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated, Nov. 26, 1910.
Skeena    Land    District—District   of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that Freadrick
Madden, of Seattle, Wash., occupation laborer, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described land:—Commencing at a
post planted about two hundred feet
east of mile 77 on the south side of
O. T. P, Right-of-way; thence west
40 chains following the said Right-
of-way; thence south to bank of
Skeena River; thence east following
the sinuosities of said river until
due south of said post; thence north
to point of commencement, containing 130 acres more or less.
FREADRICK MADDEN.
Thos. L, Fay, Agent.
Dated April 27, 1911.
5-16
NOTICE.
A book Is kept in the City Clerk's
Office in which to enter the names
and addresses, etc. of citizens of
Prince Rupert desiring employment
on City work. All desiring employment should register at once.
ERNEST A.  WOODS,
City Clerk.
Prince  Rupert   Private   Detective
  Agency
N. McDonnld, Manager
All kinds of legitimate detective work
handled for companies and  Individuals.    Business  strictly confidential.
P. O. Box 80.1 — Phone 210
Job  Printing  of all  kinds  neatly
executed at the Journal Office.
If
in  want  the honey
That   conies   from   the
Pake up the phone mid
Call one., double five.
hive PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Friday, July 14, 1911
prince IRupcrt journal
Telephone   138
Published twice a week on Tuesdays and Fridays from the office of
publication, Third Avenue, near
McBride Street.
Subscription rate to any point in
Canada, $2.00 a year; to points outside of Canada, $3.00 a year.
Advertising rates furnished on
application.
0. H. NELSON,
Editor.
Friday, July  14,  1911
<;ool> SHOWING
Principal Hunter Is to be congratulated upon the success which attended his class that wrote on tlie
Higli School entrance examinations
this year. He has passed 80 per
cent of his pupils, which is a very
creditable showing in view of all the
circumstances.
Out of the number who passed two,
Lloyd and Katherine Johston, have
moved from the city, so that the
school stands with but a small number of pupils fitted for High School
work. It is not probable under the
circumstances that the trustees will
see their way clear to opening a High
School at present. Some steps may
be taken, however, to cover a part of
the High School course in the public
school for the pupils who have
passed.
BUSH FIRES
The terrible disaster that has visited Northern Ontario whereby hundreds of lives have been lost and a
very heavy sacrifice has been made
in the matter of property has a warning to all who inhabit timber districts. British Columbia is showing
a laudable determination to minimize
the chance of loss from fire by carefully patrolling the districts and by
spreading information relative to the
prevention of fires. Such a lesson
as has been taught by the fires in
the Porcupine District is sufficient
to warrant all possible steps being
taken to prevent any such disaster.
There is a lesson for every private
citizen as well as for governments.
Those who are obliged to light fires
in the timbered areas should take
the utmost care to see that they are
exinguished before leaving the place
'j> *************************
f *
* News of the Province      |
* * * *»* * * * * * * * * * * * * * *** *** *** * * * * * *
PROVINCIAL POLICE
VICTORIA—A telegram has just
been received by the acting premier,
Hon. Dr. Young, from John Kirkup,
tlie veteran government agent stationed at Rossland, accepting the
commission to go into the Tete
Jaune Cache district and report at
once as to its necessities in the way
of magisterial and police representation, li is stated that there are
already in the country between Tete
Jaune Cache and the Yellowhead
Pass no fewer than three thousand
men. following construction either
of the G. T. P. or the C. N. P. This
number, it is expected, will be increased to ten thousand during the
ensuing twelvemonth, and the urgent
necessity for the presence of law
and peace officers is readily apparent. Mr, Kirkup, who has had long
and eminently practical experience
in the handling of conditions on the
frontiers of advancing civilization,
will proceed to the front at once.
It is probable that upon his report
and recommendations, appointments
will be made of local men to act,
respectively as justices of the peace
and constables..
IMPROVING SMELTER
APPRECIATED ADVANTAGES
Captain Dimpault, the French in
vestor who recently paid a visit to
Prince Rupert, was strongly im
pressed with the future of the city
In an interview given in Victoria
after his return Captain Dimpault expressed himself confident that in a
short time Britisii Columbia will offer
the greatest prospect on the Pacific
coast of this North American continent as a field for investment. He
noted the prospects for advancement
in the proximity of Prince Rupert to
Alaska and Hie certainty of that trade
ultimately coming to Prince Rupert,
the immense possibilities in its fishing Industry, the fact that il had a
country inland hi draw from, rich in
mineral ami agricultural possibilities
more or loss ascertained, and the
fact that it offers the shortest route
to the Orient, and contrasted these
for a commencement with Hie future
of the other great cities of tbe Pa-
i-ifie- const at their inception lo the
overwhelming advantage of Prince
Rupert. Captain Dlmpaull says that
nowhere In the world is there scenery
tee compare with that on the route
from Vancouver to Prince Rupert,
unless ii be the fjlords of Norway.
GRAi\D FORKS—Work on the
huge slag elevator now being constructed at the Granby smelter is
progressing steadily, and about two
mones hence it will be ready to go
into commission. A high trestle is
being built, and on this the slag,
after being granulated, will be carried to a distant part of the dump
by means of an endless and slag
conveyances and piled in miniature
mountains around the works. This
improvement will be an expensive
piece of work, as the belt alone will
cost about $14,000; but in the long
run it will prove an economic innovation. The costly method of disposing of the slag now in use, involving the maintenance of a number
of slag trains and considerable railway trackage, together with the employment of a small army of engineers and brakemen, will be entirely
eliminated. The furnace room will
also be a more endurable place to
worK in after the installation of this
system, as much of the heat in that
portion of the works at present is
generated from the pots filled with
molten  slag.
MAY  MOM-:  TOWN
A certain minister losl his manuscript one Sunday morning, so he
spoke oul thus:
"i am very Borry Indeed to have
to Inform you thai I have -er- somehow or other mislaid thy sermon for
this morning. I must -er—lliere-
fore, trust to Providence for Inspiration. Tonlghl I will come better pre-
pared."
BARKERVILLE — Representations are being made to the government by the people and interests of
Barkerville with a view to securing
the removal of that historic town-
site to same adjacent district in
which it will be less liable to over-
How by flood. This action is In consequence of the reputed-failure of
ihe bulkhead which has been under
construction and repair during five
years past to retain the turbid waters of Williams creek when, as at
this season of the year, they are
swollen by the contributions of the
melting snows on the mountains. A
fortnighl ago Barkerville was thoroughly washed out by such a flood,
several children narrowly escaping
being carried away and very considerable tncdonvenience together with
much excitement being caused. At,
the present time Mr. Napier of the
engineering staff of the public works
department is on the scene, making
thorough investigations with a view-
to reporting as to the necessities of
the situation. Barkerville, which is
the oldest and possibly most historic
town in British Columbia, is of
course a registered townsite. The
government also has a reserve about
;e mile- lee-low tlie town, and it is to
this which il Is proposed the town
should bo removed,
service has shipped to "Jack" Kirkup, who has left for Tete Jaune
Cache as special representative of
the government, a new Union Jack,
ten feet in length by five, which will
probably be the first British flag to
be unfuruled as the symbol of British authority in the country through
which the G. T. P. and the C. N. P.
are now advancing their construction
forces. With the flag goes forward
200 feet of halliards, sufficient for
its display on the most Imposing
flagpole that the forests of the country  will   produce.
INSANE   STATISTICS
NEW WESTMINSTER—The report of Dr. Doherty, resident superintendent of the medical hospital tor
ihe insane, during the month of
June shows lhat at the beginning of
the month there were 631 inmates
of that institution, 482 being males
and 180 being female. Twenty-nine
patients were admitted during the
month, all but two of these being
males'. Two pation'3 who escaped
returned, and two female patients
were returned from probe tlon. S'x
patients were discharged on probation, the sexes equa'ly divided. One
male patient was discharged at the
expiration of his probation. Eight
patients died during the month, six
being males and two females. Four
patients, all males, escaped. At the
close of the month, there were 635
patients in the hospital, 458 being
males and 177 females. Forty-five
males and 23 females are on probation and the total number of patients now under treatment is 703,
of whom 503 are males and 200 are
females.
 0 ——
MUST  IMPOSE  FINE
Punishable Without Option by
Magistrate
A recent case in one of the smaller towns of the interior wherein a
person convicted of a violation of
the Bush Fires Act—in having utilized fire in land clearing without
first securing the necessary permit
In this behalf—pleaded ignorance of
the law and escaped, upon convict-
iion, with a warning from the bench,
may be taken as an object lesson for
the benefit of rural magistrates and
justices of the peace throughout the
province. It is no unusual thing for
these minor judges to exceed their
jurisdiction, and this is what was
done In the case in question. For
the benefit of all magistrates and
peace officers, as well as the general public, it may be stated that
no judge in the land has powqr
upon a conviction being recorded
recorded under the Bush Fires Act
to exercise such discretion as to relieve the convicted party of the payment of the penalty. The law prescribes a minimum fine of $50, and
this must be imposed. Any suspension of sentence may only be legally
permitted with the express concurrence and authorization of the attorney  general's  office.
(APT. WARREN ON BRIDGE
TIIE   UNION  JACK
VICTORIA—Chief Janitor Richard
Ryan   of   the   provincial   government
The steamer Venture has come
north with Captain .1. D. Warren,
a veteran of the northern trade, on
the bridge. Captain Morehouse was
suffering from illness and Captain
Warren relieved him.
Captain Warren, who had command of the steamer Boscowitz until some years ago, when he retired
soon after the old time steamer left
the run, is one of the pioneers of
steamship navigation on the North
Pacific coast. When he bad the
sloop Thornton, engaged in trading
to the north in 1S68, in which year
many outrages 1111011 crews by northern Indians culminated with the murder of Hie entire crew of the Puget
Sound trading schooner growler by
Haidahs, Captain Warren turned e-he
tables on the Indians. He was tack-
Ing near Storm island, off the north
end of Vancouver Island, when some
Indians came alongside' and asked
him to go inshore as their tribesmen
had many furs to barter. Several
canoes came off and Captain Warren
1 Remember j
I That we
t \
} Import    j
I Our Wines j
* direct from Europe;  and that
* no house In Prince Rupert can
* equal   them  for   quality.     No
* better can be bought anywhere
*
* in the Province.    We make a
*
* specialty  of
Family Trade
%      and guarantee satisfaction      *
* *
We  also  carry  a  complete *
stock of other *
*
*
Liquors       I
Try a glass of
Cascade
Beer
* The best local beer on the f
y T
* market. *,
*
*
*
CLARKE BROS.
*       Christiansen & Brandt Bid.
* Telephone 30       Third Avenue *
* *
* *
* *
* *
* *
ty*************************
noticed they had firearms concealed
under their blankets. Captain Warren ordered a rifle brought to him
and when it was handed to him the
Indians began shooting from the
canoes. Captain Warren and others
opened fire, and at the first volley
two natives were killed. The fight
continued for some time, fourteen
of the Indians being killed and six
wounded. Captain Warren received
a charge of buckshot which laid him
up for some time, and two of his
crew were wounded. It was some
time after this occurrence before any
other traders were attacked.
Captain Warren, who began trading on this coast in 18 64, was one
of the pioneers of the sealing industry, and lost heavily as a result of
the seizures of 18S6 and 1887. He
has been interesteo in many steamers plying in British Columbia waters, the Barbara Boscowitz, the
wreck of which Mes at Esquimalt, being one of the best known.
The Old Story
Tired and dusty, a party ou a holiday trip were returning by train.
Simkins, a little bald man, seated
himself down lo read,,but dropped
off into a sleep. On the rack was
a ferocious crab in a bucket, and as
Simkins went to sleep the crab woke
1111 and finding things a bit dull
in the bucket started exploring.
By careful navigation it got to the
edge of the rack. Down it fell, alight-
The British Columbia Company
LIMITED.
AUTHORIZED CAPITAL $100,000.::  PAID UP CAPITAL $41,500
DIRECTORS:—Reginald C. Brown, President; J. C. Maclure, Vice-
President; H. E. Marks, Managing Director; Capt. E. Nash, William
McNair, R. A.  Bevan, and F. C.  Williams, Secretary.      :-:       :-:
INTEREST 4 PER CENT. DEPOSITS
This Company acts as Executors, Administrators, Transferees and
Secretaries to Public Companies.    Commercial, Industrial and other
business propositions underwritten.    Issues  made  on   the
London and New York Stock Exchanges.
TIMBER, COAL, LANDS, and
COMPANY ORGANIZATION
Head Office for Canada, 203, 208, 210, 215 Carter-Cotton Building,
VANCOUVER, B.C.
The Staneland Co. Ltd
-IS THE-
Paint Supply House
of British Columbia
ALL GOODS ARE GUARANTEED
WRITE FOR PRICES AND SAMPLES
The Staneland Co. Ltd
836-840 Fort Street, VICTORIA, B.C.    *
r1
L.
Replenish
the
Pantry
J
1  High-Class....              1
|   Grocery   \
I    Stock     |
1       to choose from       j
I     EVERYTHING CLEAN AND FRESH      1
5     Goods for the Table to Suit tbe Most       S
J                   Fastidious  Housewife                    J
r1
■
■
Li
MERRYFIELD'S
CASH GROCERY
"1
1
1
1
1
,j
■ M
ing on Sinikin's shoulder, and it
grabbed the man's ear to steady itself. The passengers held their
breath, and waited for developments, but Simkins only shook bis
bead and said:
"Let go, Sarahl I tell you I have
been at the office all the evening."
The Thompson
Hardware Co.::
Teacher—What change takes
place   when  water   freezes?
Tommy (innocently)—A change in
price  1 guess.
-Second Avenue—
Paints. General Hardware,
Oils, Stoves and Ranges.
■ »
11
11
11
11
KKiHI
2nd Avenue
Prince  Rupert,
B.C.
Real
Estate
INVESTMENTS
Real
Estate
List Your
Properties
with
Uncje Jerry
JEREMIAH H. KUGLER
He Sells Buildings He Sells Contracts
He has Houses to Rent
He Buys Lots He Builds Homes
He Buys Leases He Loans Money
He Has Farms for Sale
He Sells Houses He Rents Stores
(UMI
JEREMIAH H. KUGLER
Special Bargains in
KITSELAS LANDS
FRANCOIS LAKE LANDS
LAKELSE LANDS
HAZELTON   DISTRICT   LANDS
SAND,  GRAVEL  AND   MARBLE   DEPOSITS
BULKLEY VALLEY LANDS
KISPIOX VALLEY LANDS
PORCHER  ISLAND  LANDS
KITSUMKALUM   LANDS Friday, July 14,  1911
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
UTTERS   WARNING
Montreal Witness Opposes Course Pursued by Sir Wilfrid
Laurier.
Prominent    Liberal    Organ    Cannot
Agree Witli Canadian Leader's
Attitude  Towards   Empire
Tbe Montreal Witness, which has
been- one of the strongest Laurier
supporters in Canada, comes out
strongly against the prime minister
for his course in England, and its
utterances are of the greatest significance, showing that some of the
strongest Liberals will not support
tbe premier in his anti-Imperial
course. The Witness says editorially:
"We have no question that the
world is moving towards better
things. Those of us ia, whom this
forward vision has assumed the instrumentality of the Britisii Empiro
as one of the great forces in bring
ing this about look upon the continuance of that Empire as being in
the line of greatest-good to the world,
and it seems not to need proof that
Its continuance depends on its organic cohesion. We must confess
that we find it difficult to co-ordinate this elementary view with the
objection raised by Sir Wilfrid Laurier to governments of tbe dominions
being consulted by the Imperial government in matters affecting foreign
policy. He is reported to have said
that such consultation would imply
a duty on the part of such dominions to aid the Empire which protects them, and of which they have
hitherto been supposed to form a
part. It looks very much like a declaration that Canada is not an integral part of the Empire, but a
dependency—and at that, a dependency that assures its independence.
"This is an untenable position.
The very declaration of it reveals itq
instability. We must either move
toward the Empire or away from it.
For Canada, any weakening of the
British tie means dependence in another direction. We cannot but gather from Sir Wilfrid's practical declaration of independence, taken with
this larger vision, that he would
rather see his county develop into
one of a group of allied nations than
into a part of the Britisii Empire,
with the obligations that that relationship necessarily implies. Yet,
even were that a desirable destiny,
we cannot side with him In questioning Canada's liability to share in the
Imperial foreign policy The liability would not be less but prac
tically more, were she a separate
allied power. Hitherto the ground
of refusal—a flimsy one we have
always called it—has been the fact
that Canada has no share in the
counsels of the Empire. We never
had any doubt that she would have
her full share, if not more than her
full due, if she would only do her
share. But the crucial moment came
when the promise was made to share
those counsels. The Mother Country
declared that in future tbe governments of the dominions would be
consulted with regard to all foreign
policy affecting them—that is, upon
all questions that are Imperial in
their scope ns distinguished from
trade questions, which, at the demand
of tlie colonics, each member is free
to negotiate separately. Instead of
hailing this forward step, Sir Wilfrid repuriated it for the reason that
he gave.
Further Obstruction
"He also took the lead in obstructing the extension to tlie dominions
of that benign labor movement railed
the Labor Exchange, the object of
which was to create a national, and,
If possible, nn Imperial registry office, tu reduce unemployment by the
exchange of Information as to where,
within the Empire, any particular
class of labor might be needed. The
Imperial value of this is undeniable.
Its value in Canada, if Canada is to
retain her British constitution and
to assimilate her inflowing foreign
element, is obvious. Its humanitarian claims are imperative. Yet, from
the point of view of pure protectionism, and in the interests of those
who wish to monopolize the oppor-
tunites of Canada, Sir Wilfrid refused, on the part of Canada, to cooperate. In doing so he no doubt
spoke the mind of those in Canada
most interested,, and he plainly gave
as bis reason that it would not be
welcome to them. It is no doubt the
part of a statesman to express the
known will of his people. But in
so far as this is the declaration of
separation, and a refusal to share
with our fellow subjects in Great
Britain the blessing which Great
Britain at their expense has so largely conferred upon us. This is in some
respects a more serious refusal than
the other. We should expect, with
some regard to the question of con
sultations, that the Imperial government would consult the dominions
all the same, and that If Sir Wilfrid
refused to be consulted, someone
would be found who would not. The
conditions are here, whether they
agree with our liking or not. But
in the other matter we are inclined
to think he has the mass of the people with him, in so far as their views
are articulate, and that the policy
that has reversed the noble old boast
of the United States, that It was a
shelter for all the distressed, and
that has so greatly checked the advance to Australia, is prevailing with
us to our great detriment.
GOVERNMENT QUARRY
CHILLIWACK—The discovery of
a good granite quarry on the Ved-
der mountain will facilitate the work
of making the inter-provincial highway a good stone road. The government has purchased a large portion of the quarry, and under the
supervision of Mr. Cruickshank, is
installing a rock crushing plant there
A dynamo, to be run by power from
the B. C. Electric line, will do the
work, and a spur of the tram Hn6
will be built to the bunkers and enable the rock to be shipped to almost
any part of the constituency. Rock
under these conditions can be laid
down at difefrent points of the road
for about 50 cents a square yard.
 o	
ij» * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *** * *
!   Shipping Report   j
* By Dominion Winless. |
**************************
July 14—8 a. in.
Skidegate—Clear; light west
wind; sea smooth; steamer Lillooet,
at Skidegate.
Ikeda—Cloudy; wind northwest;
barometer 30.18; temperature 58;
sea smooth.
Triangle—Cloudy; wind west, 35
miles; barometer 29.55; temperature
46;  sea rough.
Estevan—Clear; calm; barome'er
29.70; temperature 57; sea smooth;
three masted steamer, black funnel,
white band, southbound, 3:30  a.  m.
Pachena—Clear; fresh southeast
wind; barometer 29.84; temperature
54; sea smooth; Tees eastbound at
9:30 p.  m.
Tatoosh—Cloudy; wind south, 9
miles; barometer 30.01; tempertaure
52; out, Umatilla at 6:50 a. m.; in,
Seattle Maru at 7:30 p. m., schooner
Robert Hind at 1 a. m.
Point Grey—Clear; wind northwest; barometer 30.02; temperature
44; in, British Empire at 7:55 p. m.
Cape Lazo—Clear; calm, barometer 30.10; sea smooth; steamer Chicago southbound at 7 a. in.
YOU ARE SURE OF
Engine Reliability
IF  YOU   RUN A
Fairbanks - Norse Marine Engine
OVER 125,000 IN USE THROUGHOUT THE WORLD
TWO
CYCLE
FOUR
CYCLE
JPH!
JM»'t,
fl* iMl^
Wv
^MfJ*
HEAVY
DUTY
■
MEDIUM
DUTY
■
Runabout
Type
MOST  COMPLETE  LINE OF GASOLINE ENGINES IN
THE WORLD
Write for Catalog P19
The Canadian Fairbanks Co., Ltd.
101-107 WATER STREET     -
Local Agent—F. M. DAVIS      -
VANCOUVER, B. C.
- PRINCE RUPERT
FISCAL BONDAGE
PRINCESS  MARY  CALLED
The C.P.R. steamer Princess Mary,
which is taking the run of the Princess Royal this time, reached port
after midnight last night. In spite
of the unseemly hour there were
quite a few who made it a point
to visit the steamer and inspect her
during her stay here. She left again
this morning.
The Princess Mary is a very modern vessel and showed good speed on
her trip up, Some little rivalry was
shown between her and the City of
Seattle of the Alaska Steamship
Company, the vessels coming north
together. The Mary claims to have
passed the City of Seattle twice, a
feat made possible by the fact that
the Mary bad to make calls that the
United States steamer did not.
lings among the children of Isreal
who, when Moses would lead them
forth to the promised land, wept and
gnashed their teeth and said, 'No,
let us return to the fleshpots, let us
go back to the bondage of Egypt.'
Is there a man in Canada who would
go back to the fiscal bondage of
the United States, who would desert
tbe glorious Empire that has stood
so long for all that is best and truest
in the world, in war as in peace?
Is there' a man who would barter
himself into the bondage of a fiscal
tariff?    1 say no."
The conclusion of Mr. Goodeve's
eloquent address was greeted with a
prolonged  storm   of  applause.
"While we and our good neighbors
are so nearly kith and kin we dc
not keep house together; and until
we do, we must each clean our own
doorstep and warm ourself at out
own fireside. We must each solve
our own domestic problems of trade
and commerce from the point of view
of our own interest and as long as
Canada remains part of the British
Empire, and so has interests in common with it, it is surely our plain
duty to at least have some regard
for those common interests, when
we are seeking to establish new relations with another country."
 o ■
LOSS   BY   FII1E
TOURIST TRAVEL
The Prine-e Rupert on her last trip
north brought a good number of passengers. Included in the number
were many round irip passengers
who had come north in order to enjoy the scenery which the route
offers. A number of the passengers
went on to Stewart, remaining with
the steamer throughout the trip.
CITY  OF   SEATTLE   IN
(Continued from Page One)
States most anious for this pact were
the big trusts, who wanted to squeeze
what they could out of the resources
of Canada. "Are we," said the speaker, "to be made the fish vendors, the
lumberjacks and the market gardeners for the United States? I think
not."   (Applause.)
Turning to the ideal side he
sketched the painful processes by
which the greatness of Canada had
been built up. "And now," he added,
"in 1911 when we have built three
transcontinental railways at enormous expense to bring the trade east
and west, now when no other country
in the world is prospering as we are,
they come knocking at the door, and
this is the message they bring." He
read President Taft's famous declaration about Canada being at the
parting of the ways, and quoted
Champ Clark's famous statement that
the Stars and Stripes would wave
over the whole American continent.
(Loud cries of "Never" from the audience.)
Mr.  Clark's Joke
"They tell us," said Mr. Goodeve,
"that Mr. Champ Clark was joking.
Joking! he was never more serious
in his life. But you are right, the
Stars and Stripes will never wave
over Canada." (Loud and continued
applause.)
"You people," he continued, "who
have the glorious privilege of living
on the shores of the Pacific ocean,
have often no doubt gone out in
the morning and watched the incoming of the tide. Sometimes and for
a while it seemed so slow that you
did not know whether it was coming
in or going out. But steadily, imperceptibly, it came on, and suddenly surging onward the whole power
of the Pacific ocean seemed to come
rushing al your feet. So It is with
Canada. Men like my grey haired
friend to whom I have referred have
stood, scarcely knowing whether we
were going backward or forward.
But we had patience. We watched,
we waited, and suddenly, just ns the
tide of prosperity is rushing in upon
us like a bolt from the blue comes
this question. Have we come to
the parting- of tlie ways?"
"Is there any higher ideal for Canada,' 'asked the speaker, "than to be
part und parcel of that glorious band
of commercial trade which will startInection     with     logging     operations
from  England  ronnd  the world and  shall see thai all brush and Inflam-
u-ill reach to England again?    (Ap- mable matter is removed tor
plause.)  We have built  up this i-oini- j "f not less than  50 feel  on
try  on   this  policy   of  ours   for   150
THE CONTINENTAL TRUST COMPANY, LIMITED
Authorized Capitol     $500,000
Officers:
WILLIAM T. KERGIN, M. D., Pies.  DAVID   H.   HAYS,  First Vice-Pres.
M. J. HOBIN, 2nd Vice-Pres. & Mgr.  JAY   KUGLER,   Secretary-Treasurer
C.  B. PETERSON, Ass't Manager
Executor and Administrator Receiver or Assignee
Fiscal Agents Trustees
Ileal   Estate and   Insurance
„„,..»,„    ..in,        «      i       .. Km in  Lands  and  .Mines
Registrar and Transfer Agent
Agent for Care of Real Estate Escrow Agents
Trustee  Under  Mortgages  und  Deeds of Trust Collections
SAVINGS DEPARTMENT
4 per cent on Deposits        SAFE DEPOSIT VAULT AND BOXES
We wil] bo pleased to answer any Inquiries regarding investments in
Prince Itupert ami  Northern Itritish Columbia.
THE CONTINENTAL TRUST COMPANY, LIMITED
SECOND AVENUE
•RI.VCi: RUPERT, 11. O.
Double Weekly Service
S.S. PRINCE RUPERT & S.S. PRINCE GEORGE
Sail for Vancouver, Victoria and Seattle
Mondays and Fridays at 8 a.m.
For STEWART Thursdays and Sundays 8 a.m.
Special reduced fare Sunday's boat J9.50
return,  including   meals   and   berths.
S.S.PRINCE ALBERT for Port Simpson, Naas River, Masset and
Naden Harbor, Wednesdays, 1 P.M., and for Queen Charlotte
Island points, Saturdays, 1 P.M.
RAILWAY SERVICE TO COPPER RIVER, mixed trains from
Prince Rupert Wednesdays and Saturdays, 1 P.M.; returning  Thursdays   and   Sundays, 5:20 P.M.
THE GRAND TRUNK RAILWAY SYSTEM, connecting with
trains from the Pacific Coast, operates a frequent and convenient
service of luxurious trainB over its DOUBLE TRACK route between
Chicago, Toronto, Montreal, Quebec, Halifax, Portland, Boston,
New York and Philadelphia.
Atlantic Steamship bookings arranged via all lines
Full information and tickets obtained from the office of
A. E. McMASTER
Freight and Pasenger Agent, G. T. P. Wharf.
Record of the Value Represented by
Carelessness With  Respect to
Forest   Conflagrations
The Alaska Steamship Company's
steamer City of Seattle called here
this morning northbound. She
brought a good cargo of fruits and
general freight. In common with
the other steamers calling here lately there were a number of round trip
passengers on board.
"My wife married me to reform
me."
"Did she succeed?"
"Yes, thoroughly. I wouldn't
marry again if I lived to be as old
as  Methuselah!"
"Have you ever noticed how a bum
actor can get laughter and applause
by using a cuss word?"
"Oh, yes.    What's the reason?"
"I've found out. I think.    The audience  has  been  wanting to swear,
but   is  too  polite."
An analysis of the causes operating to produce forest fires, by
which the citizens of British Colum-
last year alone the direct loss and
cost of protection aggregated $829,-
915—shows that next to carelessness with camp fires, similarly criminal carelessness in the operation of
donkey engines In logging camps is
largely responsible for the yearly
worse than waste. In connection
with this particular phase of the lamentable carelessness which has
proven and is proving so expensive
to the people of Britisii Columbia,
it would be well indeed for everyone in any way identified with the
lumbering industry to note just what
the legally prescribed regulations
are which govern the operation of
donkey engines In logging camps.
These read as folows:
Any   person   or   persons   using   or
operating  a   donkey   engine  in   con-
t,**** *******ti«<*********&*
STORAGE!
*
Household Goods and Baggage *
given careful attention. ,5.
A
Forwarding,   Distributing   and *
Shipping Agents *
TRANSFERERS    J
Prince    Rupert    Warehousing *
and   Forwarding   Co. .;.
First  Ave.,  near  McBride  St. f
DOUGLAS SUTHERLAND,
I Manager.
;   P. O. Box 007 Phone 262
• * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * ** * % *•* **4 *•* *3* *'
NICKERSON-ROERIG COMPANY
CUSTOMS AND MERCHANDISE
—o—
Brokers, Forwarding Agents,
Storage, etc.
Excursions!
Let us tell you all about the cheap
ROUND TRIP EXCURSIONS
to all Towns and Cities in Eastern
Canada and United States
Via
The Great Northern
Choice of Return Route
Tickets to the Old Country by all
Lines. Take any Steamer from
Prince Rupert.
ROGERS STEAMSHIP AGENCY
Phone 116 Second Ave
Prince Rupert, B.C.
J.  W.  POTTER
ARCHITECT     AND     STRUCTURAL
ENGINEER
Re-inforced Concrete a Specialty
—0—
Law-Butler Building - Prince Rupert
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY CO.
B. C. Const S. S. Service
HAYNOR   1SROS.
FUNERAL   DIRECTORS
and
PROFESSIONAL  EMBALMERS
DR.
W.  B.   CLAYTON
DENTIST
Office   in    the    Westenhaver   Block
Over  Orme's   Drug    Store.
Prince Rupert
District  of
years, and lire We to be like tlie weak-
1836 1911
The Bank of
British North America
75 Years In Rnilness.
Capital and Reserve Over $7,300,000
Banking by Mail
is a great convenience to those
who live some distance from
town.
Deposits may be sent in, cash
drawn, or other business transacted by Mail, without any
trouble or delay.
Write or ask our Local Manager to explain our system to
you.
Prince Rupert Branch—
F. S. LONG, Moiuger,
Skeena Land District-
Coast, Range- ."..
TAKE NOTICE that T, II. Hughes,
of Lakelse Valley, occupation farmer,
Intends to apply for permission to
a apace purchase the following described
ill Bides lands:- Commencing at a post plant-
thereof, ed at the southeasl corner of Lol
There shall be. available at each 4128; thence 40 chains north; thence
donkey engine in use during the dry 40 ehains oast; thence 40 chains
season 11 supply of water eif nol less 'south; thence 1" ehains west to point
than 400 gallons, such amount to b<- of commencemenl
obtainable al all time's therein; to- "'" acres
gether with 12 large galvanlzed-lron
£
Famous
Princess
Line
Princess May
Friday, July 14, at 9 a. m.
SOUTHBOUND FOR
Vancouver, Victoria,
AND
Seattle
Friday June 16,   at 9 a.m.
J. Q, McNAB,
General Agent.
Free Employment
Office
,   and   containing
more or less,
TOM  HUGH  HUGHES.
buckets to be kept exclusively for
fire protection purposes and in a
convenient position therefor.
There shall also be available and
kept sole for Eire protection purposes (i good shovels and :i good
mattocks, and located In a suitable
position  therefor.
In addition to tlie above, there
shall be available at such donkey engine a suitable band pupm, to be
maintained In good working order,
and  in  readiness  for an  emergency.
It shall be the duty of the owner
or operator of each donkey engine
to maintain a watchman in the vicinity thereof during such time as
the same is under fire and there Is
any possibility of fire spreading from!
such engine.
A spark arrester shall be placed
on the top of the smoke stack eel'
each donkey engine. The arrester
shall be constructed with a good
strong  steel   or   iron   frame
Date-d  .lieu.
1911.
, fastened   to  the  top  of  the  shack.
The ribs shall be Close enough together to prevent the wire from
falling in or collapsing, The cover
of the arrester shall be woven wire
of n diameter of not less than No,
Hi, II. W, C, having 26 squares to
to the seiuare Inch in mesh, The
top of the arrester to be not less
than three times the area of the top
of the smoke stack, and at least IS
inches above the top thereof.
Attention   to   these   commonsense
rules and their rigid observance will
go far toward at least  reducing ma-
|terially the annual foresl fire waste.
 o	
Pupil       (to      schoolmaster)—Sir,
would   .vein   mind   taking  great   care
how you  draw  up  my  report?    My
parents     suiter     dreadfully     from
firmly nerves.
For all kinds of help. Cooks, waiters, dishwashers, hotel porters, all
kinds of laborers or mechanics, call
up  17S  or call  at  the
FREE EMPLOYMENT OFFICE
GRAND HOTEL
Headquarters for Cooks iinil Wait org
ROGERS & BLACK
Wholesale Dealers In
BUILDING  MATERIAL,    CEMENT,
LIME,   HAIR-FIRRE PLASTER
COKE, BLACKSMITH COAL,
COMMON BRICK, PRESSED BRICK
SHINGLES AND LATH
NEW   WELLINGTON  COAL
All   ordeis   promptly   filled—see   us
for prices.
PHONE 110 PHONE 116
F" Neat Job Printing
• the Journal Man
Tel. 138 /
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Friday, July 14, 1911
^*********************************r*******************
* *
*
*
+
SPORTING NEWS
**************************
HOPE TO WIN Cl'P
Vancouver stands a better chance
of lifting the Minto trophy this season than in any previous season, says
the News-Advertiser.    The team as
it  is  at  present   constituted   Is  the
strongest that has ever represented
this city,  all of the players are In
the  best  possible condlton  and  the
home  has  perfected   a  combination
that is hard to beat.    It  is argued
that  the  Royals  are  not  the  same
team they were when they won the
cup or even last season.    This may
be true, but this season Is probably
the first one in which they have been
really  called  upon  to extend  themselves, and they are opposed  to an
aggregation of stick wielders equally
as clever and  who  set a pace  they
can   maintain   from   start   to   finisl:
Unless the Vancouvers show an aw
ful reversal of form in one of their
matches their prospects for bringing
the cup over here are bright.    So far
In the league competition the teams
have been successful in  their home
matches,   but   the   Vancouvers   have
made  it closer in  their  matches  In
New Westminster than the champions
have in their games here.    That is
one reason why the Vancouvers look
stronger  than  their  opponents.     In
the opening match in the Royal City
on May 24, the Royals got home by
a one goal margin, and in the next
game   only  the  odd   goal  separated
the teams at the finish, and in this
particular     match     the    champions
played  for twenty minutes with  all
but one  man  on  the defence, Vancouver pressing hard right up until
the   finish.     There   is   no   question
but that the locals will continue to
improve -in   their   matches   on   'the
Queen's Park oval, and if the champions  ever  slip  a  cog long  enough
to let Vancouver get a goal or two
in front it will take some phenomenal
work on the part of the red shirts
to even up.    The Royals were a good
team,  the best in the business, but
this season the Vancouvers are just
as good if not better, and if the locals can turn the trick at New West
minster next Saturday the champions
will find the sledding hard in fu-ture
matches.    In the event of the teams
winning a'l of their home matches,
the league series resulting in a tie,
it  is  altogether  likely  that  a  two-
game series will be played, one match
In  each  city, the total   number   of
goals scored to decide the issue.    At
present  the Vancouvers are leading
in the aggregate of goals by a five-
goal margin.    The team scoring the
majority   of   goals   in    the   league
matches  this  season   will  receive  a
handsome cup, the gift of T. P. Hart-
ney, a well known local enthusiast,
Tcciiinselis  May   Come  West
It   begins   to  look  as   if  Charlie
Querrie  will   pilot  the  Toronto  Te-
cumsehs to another championship in
the east.    The Indians have a clean
sheet to date, being the only undefeated team in the N. L. U., and as
they have won from the Nationals in
Montreal   they  will   find   the   going
easier.    Torontos hardly look  as if
they will come through, while Montreal appears to be the only other
real contender for the w nfalon, and
the wearers of the winged "M" have
not been showing any form to date
that would seem to indicate that they
were destined for another championship.
Should the Vancouvers win the
.Minto Cup, and there are thousands
of Vancouverites who expect them to,
President Con Jones will take the
team on a tour of the east, leaving
the latter part of September. Matches
would be played In all the leading
eastern cities. According to Charlie
Querrie, manager of the Tecumsebs,
if the Indians win the N. L. U. title
this season they will Immediately
challenge for the Mnito Cup, which
would mean that the Vancouvers, In
the event of winning the B, C.| championship, would |have to postpone
their little jaunt until they have It
out with the eastern Redskins in a
cup series.
***************************
would permit. Pursuits from the
scene of action were plentiful and
often the judge of play sought refuge behind disguises. Police were
not present, as they are today, and
the league chiefs did not back up
their  men.
Silk a Beau Hriiinmel.
"Did I ever get chased by an
angry mob?" queried Silk in St.
Louis, looking more like a retired
clothing merchant than a mere arbitrator, for Silk, whose neck looks
red upon the ball yard, Is quite the
Beau Brummel of the arbitrators,
wearing polished shoes, even creases
in his pants, and a green necklie on
state occasions.
"Being pursued by an excited
throng is no fun," continued the
umpire, "and let us pass over that
lightly. The funniest thing I ever
did see happened in Syracuse, N. Y.
back In the late 90s.
"You remember Mickey Finn, who
managed ball clubs at Youngston,
0., Little Rock and elsewhere?
Well, Mickey was manager of the
Albany club. I was just breaking in
as an umpire. You know in the old
days they used to erect roofs over
the home players' bench and let the
visitors swelter in the sun. In 1897,
I think it was, the order went out
in the National League that both
benches should be protected from the
weather. In Syracuse they stretched
canvas over the visiting bench and
let it go at that.
Heer Always Plentiful
"Baseball in those days was not conducted with the decency which
marks the game now. Beer always
was an important part of every game
and the grounds that didn't own a
saloon drew little patronage. They
had a good one in Syracuse.
"Syracuse and Albany oved each
other less than Cleveland and Detroit sympathized in 1908, when the
Naps finished a half game behind
the Tigers. To make a long story
short, Albany came over to Syracuse,
and Mickey Finn, as manager, came
along. The race was close, and
Mickey was none too popular in the
home town.
"Early in the game Syracuse
forged ahead, and later Albany enjoyed a spurt and had a lead of two
runs. Tbe crowd had been guying
Finn when his team was behind, and
when his men took the lead he could
not refrain from telling the fellows
back of the bench what he thought
of them.
Mickey Finn Baptized
"All of a sudden there was a big
commotion about the Albany bench,
and a couple of policemen ran out
and gTabbed Finn, who shook his
fists and shouted all mannner of evil
at the home rooters. I stopped the
game and went over to see what
had happened. I found out. Somebody had taken a knife, cut a hole
in the canvas roof of the Albany
bench and poured a bucket of beer
on Finn just as he was telling the
home rooters where they should go.
When the players found out what
happened they nearly died from
laughing.
"Just think of anything like that
occurring today. After the games
now the umpire can throw out his
chest and walk away Ifrom the
ground with all the dignity of a
man who paid $1.50 for a box seat.
Nobody chases you, and if the criwd
goes so far as to throw cushions, fifteen policemen suround you and
bounce the missies off their helmets.
"No, the 'good old days' may be
all right for the fellows who played
ball then," concluded Silk, "but, as
for us umpires we will take ours
as they hand It to us In 1911 in
the big leagues."
GOOD OLD DAYS
Tlie "good old days" of baseball,
justly celebrated and far-famed by
such old timers as have come to life
again to write pieces for the papers,
and magnates, bear no charms for
one class of active sport participants
—name, the umpires, Ask any arbitrator the golden ago of baseball
endeavor and In a voice you can hear
in Kansas City he will shout:
"Right now!"
Far be it from us to hang upon
the fluffy locks of silk O'Loughlin
the suspicion Of old age, but Francis
labored dodging plays In the days
when pop bottles were natural and
approved weapons of offence when
the festive athlete in his wrath did
anything   to   tin-   umpire  his  size
PLAYGROUNDS
Extract from speech by T. C. Hors-
fall on the subject of open spaces,
gardens and recreation grounds .
Town planning conference, London, England, October, 1910.
"This Is a subject to which I have
devoted 30 years of attention and
work, and I know it to be one of the
most important subjects that can
possibly occupy the attention of English people. It Is absolutely impossible to bring up children in health
In a town of any size unles you give
them systematic physical training;
and, of course, the open space Is the
condition sine qua non for giving
children a good physical training,
because physically the training given
In tho closed room is not one hundredth part the value of that which
Is given in the fresh air. I would
like those of you who do not. know
the facts, to realize bow- urgent Is the
need of giving our children open
siuices. In the perodirnl panics which
take possession of the land at short
intervals, we all clamor for more
Dreadnoughts;   but  does the nation
ever ask itself where it is going to
get the men for those Dreadnoughts?
The navy needs about 5,000 boys a
year. It cannot get 5,00 boys up to
its standard, and to get 5,000 boys
of useable quality it has to reject
30,000 bays a year. That Is one of
the most horrible facts connected
with civilized life, that I know.
"Then, with regard to the army,
things are as bad. In Manchester in
1899, 11,000 young men offered to
enlist. Eight thousand had to be
rejected at once. Of the 3,00 who
were not rejected, only 1 000 were
good enough for regiments of the
line, and 2,000 went into militia regiments. In Germany, by virtue of
good gymnastic training given to the
people, 58 per cent of the young men
can pass a much more severe examination than we subject our recruits
to. Germany has long given, weekly,
two hours of gymnastic training to
all Its children in the elementary
schools. It has now put on a third
hour weekly. Even that does not
suffice, and a very large organization, the like of which is unknown
in Great Britain, for the promotion
of popular and children's games, has
been formed.
"The association recognizes that
children must have games in addition to systematic gymnastic training. Under its nfluence an act has
been passed which allows districts
to have compulsory games on one
afternoon a week for all the children
attending the elementary schools in
the town. Tbe Germans are people
of common sense and they know that
the child it not much helped, if it
is simply offered a playground.
Knowledge of games has died out
amongst our urban population, or in
a great part of it. The Germans
know, therefore, that they must provide open spaces, and also must provide keepers of order and teachers of
games. They have trained more
than 20,000 teachers, men and women, to act as leaders of games in
elementary schools. They give them
a small addition to their salaries on
condition that they give their services on the afternoons for compulsory games.
"Let me give you one typical result: The town of Pforzheim, in
Baden, has 50,000 inhabitants. Its
air is polluted with smoke, and there
is a good deal of chemical vapor.
The town is rapidly growing and the
children were getting sicklier and
sicklier every year. The Germans are
great people for recording statistics
and they recorded these useful figures — the figures relating to the
number of hours which the children
were compelled to be absent from the
elementary schools owing to illness.
The number of hours was increasing
steadily year by year by 10,000, in
spite of the gymnastic training. The
year before last the Pfrozheim town
council introduced a compulsory afternoon for games and last year, not
only was there not the normal increase of 10,000 hours of sickness,
but they reduced the number of
hours of sickness of the previous
year by 25,000.
"An Englishman who has a great
deal to do with the training of instructors for the boys in our navy,
told me that he Swedes have been
changed from one of the most degenerate nations in Europe, as they
wliere some years ago, into physically, the finest people in Europe, by
means of those great improvements
—town planning, temperance and
good physical training of the young
people. What is most encouraging
is that the urban Swedes arc even
a finer race than the country Swedes,
in spit of the advantage of purer
air in the country, because physical
training can be given in the town
and that makes all the difference in
the world."
RATHER SUGGESTIVE
A well known New York clergyman, Rev. Charles Parkhurst, published an article tlie other day which
makes Interesting reading for Canadians, lie details, in figurative language, the history of the trade relation of tlie two countries. After
describing at length the early efforts
of the Dominion to secure entrance
to the neighboring market, he goes
on to say:
"The way in which Canada persistently clung to us was indeed hardly maidenly, She would not take
'no' when It was handed to her. The
powers at Washington would have
regarded with more tender consideration her persistent overtures had
she been able to bring a dowry.
"But all she had to offer was
herself; and we were not ready to
marry here merely for love, even
had our heart been soft toward her,
which It was not.
"The girl, bruised by repeated rebuffs, demitted her caresses about
the beginning of the present century
"Persuaded that she was getting
rather past the marriageable age1,
and talented to work, by sagacity
and industry, commenced laying the
ABSOLUTELY
ALONE
AT THE TOP
of the world's bottled beers is the supreme position
occupied by Old Reliable
Budweiser
Its high reputation and mild and exquisite flavor is the result of 50 years of untiring devotion to Quality and Purity,
and exacting obedience to every law known to the ancient
and honorable art of brewing.'
Bottled only (with Corks or Crown Caps)
at the The North British Columbia
Anheuser-Busch Brewery Liquor Co., Limited
St. Louis, Mo. Distributors Prince Rupen, B.C.
foundation of a fortune which has
wondrously accumulated. Her an
nual commercial dealings withoub-
side people have crept up during the
last forty years from $130,000,000
to   $730,000,000.
"So that now, although she has
become somewhat of an old maid,
she is beginning to be attractive.
"And, therefore, at this advanced
period of her womanhood, the United States, with an eye to the main
chance, commences making love to
her."
This puts the situation very aptly,
says the Edmonton Journal. The
wonder is that the viewpoint is not
taken more widely by Canadians. If
there is such a thing as national self-
respect, surely the majority of our
people will adopt the very obvious
attitude that Dr. Parkhurst expects
them to.
Supporters of the government's
policy argue from the conditions of
twenty, thirty and even fifty years
ago. Are those of today, after the
experience which we have had In
dealing with out neighbors and after
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
SIR EDMUND WALKER, C.V.O., LL.D., D.C.L., President
ALEXANDER LAIRD, General Manager
CAPITAL - $10,000,000        REST, - $7,000,000
DRAFTS ON FOREIGN COUNTRIES
Every branch of The Canadian Bank of Commerce is equipped to issue drafts on
the principal cities in the following countries without delay :
Africa
Crete Greece
Arabia Cuba Holland
Argentine Republic Denmark Iceland
Australia Egypt India
Austria-Hungary    Faroe Islands Ireland
Belgium Finland Italy
Brazil Formosa Japan
Bulgaria France Java
Ceylon
New Zealand
Norway
Panama
Persia
Peru
Philippine Islands
Portugal
Roumania
Russia
Scrvia
Siam
Siberia
Soudan
Soutli Africa
Spain
Straits Settlement*
Sweden
Switzerland
Turkey
United States
Uruguay
West Indiri
etc
_ eylon Fr'ch Cochin China Malta
Chili Germany Manchuria
China Great Britain Mexico
The amount of these drafts is stated in the money of the country where they are payable; that is they are drawn in sterling, francs, marks, lire, kronen, florins, yen,
tads, roubles, etc., as the case may be. This ensures that the payee abroad will
receive tlie actual amount intended. 233
J. M. CHRISTIE, Manager, Prince fcupert Branch
we have made for ourselves the position that we occupy in the world
of commerce independently of a.l the
unfriendliness that they have shown,
not vastly  different?
TIDES AT PRINCE iRUPERT, JULY, 1911
HIGH WATER
LOW WATER
DATE AND DAY
Time| Ht| Time| Ht || Time| Ht | Tlme| Ht
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
Saturday  .
Sunday.    .
Monday   .
Tuesday   .
Wednesday
Thursday  .
Friday.   .   .
Saturday  .
Sunday .   .
Monday .   .
Tuesday.   .
Wednesday
Thursday  .
Friday.   .
Saturday  .
Sunday .   .
Monday.   .
Tuesday .  .
Wednesday
Thursday .
Friday.   .
Saturday  .
Sunday .   .
Monday.   .
Tuesday.   .
Wednesday
Thursday  .
Friday.   .
Saturday  .
Sunday.    .
Monday.   .
4:44|19.7il7:47
6:42 18.118:89
6:50jl6.6 19:33
8:06 15.fii20:29
9:21
10:28
11:22
12:09
0:17
0:54
1:30
2:06
2:43
3:21
4:01
4:46
5:42
6:49
8:14
9:38
10:48
10:49
0:26
1:17
2:06
2:53
3:40
4:28
5:18
15.3121:24
15.4122:14
15.9 22:58
16.4i23:39
12:50
19.8
20.2
20.4
20.4
20.2
19.8
19.2
18.3
17.3
16.3
15.8
16.0
16.8
17.9
22.6
22.9
22.8
22.2
21.1
19.8
18.9
18.4
18.0
17.8
17.9
18.3
18.8
19.3
17.0
13:26 17.5
14:01
14:35
15:08
15:40
16:13
16:48
17:30
18:20
19:20
20:26
21:33
22:34
23:„2
12:41
13:29
14:15
15:00
15:44
16:27
17:09
18.1117:52
17.8
18.1
18.2
18.3
18.4
18.4
18.3
18.4
18.6
19.0
19.8
20.8
21.8
19.0
19.9
20.4
20.7
20.6
20.2
19.5
18.7
11:15
3.7
6:49
7.9
1:58
7.7
3:10
7.2
4:14
6.4
5:05
5.5
5:49
4.7
6:28
4.0
7:03
3.5
7:36
3.1
8:08
2.9
8:41
2.9
9:15
3.0
9:50
3.5
10:27
4.2
14:07
5.0
11:52
6.0
0:49
6.9
2:03
6.4
3:19
6.3
4:28
3.9
5:26
2.3
6:18
1.1
7:06
0.2
7:52
—.1
8:37
0.2
9:21
1.0
10:04
2.3
10:46
3.9
11:28
5.7
23
■IT
7.6
12
05
5.3
12
58
6.9
13
56
8.3
15
00
9.1
111
00
9.6
16
50
9.6
17
3 4
9.5
IS
14
9.2
IS
53
8.8
19
31
8.4
20
08
8.1
20
4 5
7.7
21
23
7.5
22
03
7.2
22
48
7.2
23
43
7.0
12
48
7.0
13
57
7.9
lfe
13
8.2
10
21
8.0
17
22
7.4
is
18
6.8
19
11
6.0
20
02
5.6
20
51
5.2
21
89
5.2
22
2S
5.5
23
18
6.0
The Time used is Pacific Standard, for the 120th Meridian west. It
is counted from 0 to 24 hours, from midnight to midnight.
The Height is in feet and tenths of a foot, above the Low Water datum
adopted for the Chart. The Harbor datum, as established by the Grand
Trunk   Pacific  Railway,   is   one  foor lower.
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that T. M. Turner,
of Lakelse Valley, occupation farmer, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands: — Commencing at a post
planted on the Omineca & Hazelton
right of way and adjoining the N. E.
corner of Lot 51S; thence west 17
chains to corner of Lot 3996; thence
north 20 chains; tlience following
right of way to point of commencement.
T. M. TURNER,
John Kirkaldy, Agent.
Dated 14th June, 1911. 7-4
Skeena    Land    Notice—District    of
Coast—Range V
TAKE NOTICE that Daniel W.
Beaton, of Prince Rupert, B. C, occupation carpenter, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about five miles
up the Exchumslk River from Its
mouth, and on its south bank; thence
east 40 chains; thence north 40
chains; thence west 40 chains;
thence south 40 chains to place of
commencement.
DANIEL  W.  BEATON.
Dated June  14,  1911. J-ll
LINDSAYS CARTAGE&STORAGE
G. T. P. CARTAGE AGENTS
Office nt H. B. Rochester, Centre St
LADYSMITH COAL
Is handled by us.  All orders receiv*
prompt attention.  Phone No  68. Friday, Ju'y 14,  1911
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
ERRORS OF REPUBLIC
Blunders Hade by the Portuguese Statesmen With First Taste of
Liberty.
Those Wro Preached Freedom Now
Fall to Practice Doctrines
Taught
tion. Yet the result obtained by
these methods is to ensure recognition of the republic from Europe s
civilized nations
To further the cause of Republicanism daily arrests are made of persons supposed to be implicated in
anti-Republican piots. These are
the men who have preached freedom,
equality, and fraternity, but who fail
to practice it.
 o	
FINANCIAL REVIEW
The recent general elections In
Portugal afford timely opportunity
for a review of the conditions leading up to the result In the complete
confirmation of the people of Portugal in republican ideals. For the
benefit of those who have not followed matters closely it is necessary
to go lightly over events from October 5 last to date, otherwise a just
appreciation of the situation is impossible, says the London Standard.
On October 5, 1910, a republic was
declared by means of the gross
treachery of a prime minister, who
delivered his king and his country
to a band of Republicans, who could
not have assumed power without his
aid. Of the Monarchists it can only
be said that some knew what was
coming, and were either indifferent
or afraid, and the others were taken
absolutely off tneir guard. The army
was also betrayed by its headquarters staff, and never had a chance of
showing its fidelity to its king and
to its oath of loyalty.
Thus we find a body of men placed
In power by an act of treachery—
not by the country's wish. These
men had a dlficult task before them,
though the finances of the country
and its commerce generally were in
a better condition than they had been
for some years. The obvious policy
was to show clemency to opposing
views and to try to attract to the
side of the government the more
honest elements in the country for
the purpose of evolving a policy of
development without oppression. But
they had made use of dangerous
tools—those of the lower-grade Democrats—and found that, instead of
governing, they must obey those who
had placed them in power. One of
the first steps was the expulsion of
the Jesuits, which, although it may
have been necessary, was carried out
in an unnecessarily bruta' manner.
Then came the law authorizing
strikes, which has really placed the
employer of labor at the mercy of
those  he  employs  and   pays.
The law of landlord and tenant follows, by which the landlord has to
submit to an entire 'alteration of his
relationship towards his tenant without being consulted on the matter.
Omitting sundry small decrees of
doubtful necessity, wp come to that
decree widening the means of avoiding all matrimonial ties—a law
which has given great offence to the
north and many of the provinces,
and which was promulgated apparently to "regularize" the family
irregularities of certain prominent
Republicans and Freethinkers. The
next action taken is to issue a decree of treason, whereby it becomes
a crime to propagate, politically or
otherwise, any views contrary to
those held by the Repub'ic. Then
comes the election law, placing in
the hands of the Republican "cen-
tros" the power of declaring who
may vote and who may not be a candidate.
Next comes the decree of separation of Church and State, which
really amounts to the nnneaxtion of
all church funds and properties by
the state and must lead to the official stamping out of religion. Thus
wc arrive at the present crisis, and
can realize why so many have left
the country—why there are such per-
sltent rumors of unrest and discontent. Nor bus the seir-nppoiiited
government been satisfied to act so
injudiciously in Internal afaflrs;
wo find the same want of knowledge
of men nnd ways in its externa]
dealings. The minister for foreign
affairs warns foreign powers,
through the press, that flip Portuguese people are being kept au fait
with all diplomatic transactions, and
that unfavorable action by any government will result In commercial
loss to that government's trade Interests. The prime minister also
goes so far as to Interview a reporter of a Spanish Republican paper
and assure him that the Portuguese
government is heart and sole with the
Republican movement in Spain.
But it is with the elections one is
now mostly concerned, which are to
show that the country has declared
in favor of a republic. Let us pause
and soo liow this result is arrived
at. The treason law disposes of the
Monarchist at. elections, so that only
an independent candidate has an opportunity of standing. His career Is
a short one, for lie- Is promptly arrested as a conspirator—a fa*e which
overtakes the unfortunate cleric who
protests against the law of separa-
Big Corporations Practiced Economy
and  Thus Were Able to De-
clare  Dividends
The month just ended brought to
its close a half-year  of uncertainty
and  dullnes  In  both  financial  and
business, with many decidedly unfavorable conditions, says a New York
financial review.    The beginning of
the year found  the  steel  trade  unsettled,   the   copper   trade   demoralized,   capita)   awaiting  rather   fearfully the supreme court in operation
of the Sherman anti-trust law, pending   which   many   new   enterprises
were held back.    Foreign trade was
unsatisfactory,  the political outlook
unsettled, and general business at a
low point.    The changes throughout
the six months elapsed are of such
a decided character that a marked
improvement  is  quite  generally expected  during  the  remained  of the
year.    The supreme court's decisions
in  the  Standard  Oil  and  American
Tobacco Company cases and the interstate commerce  commission's  refusal to permit railroads to inaugurate   a  general   increase  in   freight
rates  removed   the   hcief   cause   of
uncertainty.     While   the   commerce
company's decision resulted in a temporary depression of security values,
conservative opinions  seem  to  have
adopted   the   belief   that  the   rejection of the railroads'  petitions was
beneficial rather than otherwise. By
enforcing a policy of rigid economy
most of the transportation companies
have been able to maintain dividends,
while at the same time the tendency
toward increasing the cost of living
was checked effectively in  one important    direction.      The    supreme
court decisions were immediately interpreted   as   favorable   to   what   is
known  as   "big   business,"   and   relieved the financial world of many
forebodings, paving the way for large
enterprises which had been delayed
for many months.    While improvement in general business conditions
has been slow, and there are no in
dications  that  a  speedy  revival  on
a pronounced scale may be expected
signs of bettermen are not wanting.
The copper trade has recently experienced  an  awakening as a result of
a more vigorous domestic  and foreign demand.    Steel orders ere considerably   larger  than   in   the  early
year.   Foreign trade has exceeded all
previous     marks,     exports     having
reached the value of $2,000,000,000
for the first time in one year.  Crop
prospects are on  the whole unfavorable. The financial situation is sound
with an abundance of money at abnormally low rates.    Uncertainty as
to  Hie  extent   to  which   tariff revisions may be carried still constitute
a restraining influence, the effect of
which'is heightened by the govern
ment's  proceedings   against   various
corporations and  their  officals  and
the investigation of great industries
by congress.   The course of the stock
market indicates general expectations
of immediate improvement.   Trading
has been narrow and dull during the
greater  part  of  the   year,   but   the
i market   recovered   effectively   from
ihi>   depression   ot    1910.     stocks
reached their highest prices of the
twelve  months  during  May,  and  in
June the movement was carried further.    The dulness of the market is
shown  by the relatively small total
number of stocks dealt in during the
six   months,  the  aggregate! having
been   57,070,000,  as  compared   with
97,989,000 in the first half of 1910.
The stock market maintained its dull
and nil her uncertain tone last week.
Its hesitation was ascribed, as in
recent weeks, to the undermined
crop prospects and the chances of
politics. The report of the commissioner of corporations on United
States Stee' had no adverse effect on
shares of the various industrial companies.
A smart commercial traveler, calling upon his best customer, was very
disappointed to learn that he had
purchased all the silk required for
the season. At the man's request
a sample was shown him.
"Ah!" he exclaimed. "You say
you bought this at—?" mentioning a
price. "Why, sir, I cou.d have sold
you the same Identical thing, for sixpence a yard cheaper!"
The customer smiled. "Then send
me on a credit note for the difference," he rejoined. "It should
amount to about forty pounds. I
bought the silk from your house last
week by letter!"
**************************
* *
i   War on the Fly   f
t t
**************************
"Swat that fly," says Dr. J. B. Anderson, city health officer of Spokane, who has opened vigorous war
on the insetc. "It is equal to swatting 200 flies two months later. Get
him now while he's still droswy from
his winter's nap.
"But there's a better way to wage
war upon the pestiferous little Insect.
Cut off his food suppy and starve
him to death. Box up his breeding
places and put an end to his race.
This method has the advantage over
swatting. It is wholesale slaughter."
The health officer sounded the
bugle for the charge on the fly when
he condemned several downtown livery stables that faned of proper sanitation. That is just the beginning.
Want Housewives' Aid
"Before we get through," said Dr.
Anderson, "we are going to have
every housewife and half the men
and children in Spokane enlisted. It
will be a war to the finish. I predict there'll not be many flies left
in Spokane. We can get rid of them,
numerous as they are, just as surely
as the south beat down the mosquito
"Scientists who have made a study
of the little fly have learned that
all the armies of ancient and midern
times put together had not the de-
structiveness of the little fly. Where
the sabre thrust of one of Napoleon's
charges or the rifle bullet of a sharpshooter in the Civil War let out the
blood of one person, the fly has
claimed 100 lives.
"His mode of battle, his ammunition, are those of modern warfare.
They are more destructive than lyddite. His arsenal is the garbage pile
or filth of the vilest kind.
His weapons are his little hairy
feet. He loads these at the arsenal
and then flies to the kitchen or the
dining room and leaves typhoid, consumption, scarlet fever, diptheria,
smallpox, cholera infantum, summer
complaint and numerous miscellaneous Infections.
"The sae fly that crawls over the
butter on your table may have just
come from a patient in the last
stages of consumption or typhtod
fever."
The health department has recently issued order that all manure must
be kept covered. There must be a
vent to prevent overheating and over
this vent must be a screen. This
order was a charge upon the fly
army.
Manure Pile Breeding Place
The manure pile is not the chief
feeding ground of the fly. It is not
there that he gets the bacteria of the
worst diseases. But in the hotbed
of manure the fly lays her eggs by
the hundreds. The heat of the manure does the rest and in eight days
a small army conies forth. This is
the reserve force of the fly army.
The health department orders that
manure receptacles be emptied once
a week.
Having deprived the fly of his
breeding place, the next step Is to
cut off his food supply. The best
way to do this is to keep the yards
and alleys clean. The rules of the
health department provide that all
garbage cans must be kept covered
and emptied regularly. In addition
to this pour a little kerosense on the
can, whether it is full or empty. No
fly can survive Standard Oil.
Screen the Homes
The homes must be screened. The
fly will eat any clean food, if he can
not find any other kind, and he can
live on Hint. But most important,
llie screens keep out the fly that
has persanps found a bed of filth not
yet located by the health department.
There is nothing like a fly to discover these places.
The doctor will issue an order that
all sick rooms must be screened. The
fly must be kept away from the
patient suffering with au infectious
or contagious disease. Unless screens
are provided an Inspector will be
put on duty to seg that the doors
and windows are kept closed.
The health department will keep
a close watch on milk. Whenever
a case of diphtheria is reported the
health department asks: "Who do
you buy milk if?" If Ihe name of
a certain dairy happens to be reported too regularly there is room for
suspicion and an Investigation will
follow.
"There Is no myth about the de
structlveuess of the fly," continued
the doctor. "The poisonous snake is
harmless in comparison. The germ
that the fly carries is only one twenty-five thousandth of an inch in
diameter. He can carry many germs
on one foot and he has a lot of feet.
"The common fly Is one of the
most violent emetics known. If you
put a fly in a capsule and give it to
a patient, tplllng him it is quinine,
ho will vomit nine times out of ten."
Subscription
The Best
Publicity j$2.00
Channel
Year
THE JOURNAL
Is the best Advertising
Medium in the City
of Prince Rupert
FOLLOW THE TREND OF THE CITY'S
PROGRESS BY SUBSCRIBING
FOR THE PAPER
The Journal aims at keeping Prince Rupert
and new B.C. ever before the public eye. Send
it to your friends and any whom you wish to
interest in the coming Metropolis of the North.
WATER  NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that an
application will be made under Part
V of the "Water Act, 1909," to obtain a licence in the Queen Charlotte
Islands Division of Skeena District.
(a) The name, address and occupation of the applicant—Orland P.
Merrill; Massett, Graham Island,
B. C;  prospector.
(If for mining purposes) Free Miner's Certificate No	
(b) The name of the lake,
stream or source (if unnamed, the
description is)—Ain Lake and Ain
River.
(c) The point of diversion—At
or near Ain Lake.
(d) The quantity of water applied for (in cubic feet per second)
—700.
(e) Tlie character of the proposed
evorks—Dane, flume, pipe line and
;ower  plant.
(f) The  premises on  v ii ii  i
evater is to be used  (<le>>   Ibe s
—Near mouth of Ain River.
(g) The purposes for vH"h
water   is  to     be     used—Gene . '
power.
(li)    If for irrigation, descr'bp
land  to he irrigated, giving acre.
(i) If the water is to he used for
power or for mining purposes, describe the place wliere the water Is
to be returned to some natural channel, and the difference in altitude
between point, of diversion and point
of return—Near mouth of Ain River
about 150 feet below point, of diversion.
Ij) Area of Crown land intended
to be occupied by the proposed
works— About 10 acres.
(It) This notice was posted on
tho tenth day of June, 1911, and application will be made lo the Commissioner on tbe fourth day of September, 1911.
(1) Give the names and addresses
of any riparian proprietors or licensees who or whose lands are
likely to bo affected by the proposed
works, either above or below the
outlet—None.
(Signature)  ORLAND P. MERRILL,
(P. O. Address)   Masset, B. C.
George S. Mayer, Agent,
(P.  O.  Address)   Masset, B.  C.
Note—One cubic foot per second
is equivalent to 35.71 miner's Inches.
Skeena   Land    District—District   of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that I, Charles
Percy Hickman, of Naas Harbour,
occupation constable, intend to apply for permission to purchase the
following described iands:— Commencing nt a post, planted on the
east shore of Naas Bay, about two
miles in an easterly direction from
Lot 3, marked C. P. H., S. W. corner; thence east 20 chains; thence
north 40 chains to the shore; thence
along the shore line to the place of
commencement, containing 40 acres,
more or less.
CHARLES PRECY HICKMAN.
Dated June 7, 1911, 6-30
You Can Avoid This
by sending your Clothes to the
PIONEER  STEAM LAUNDRY
There are Many
Reasons Why
IT   IS   TO   YOUR   INTEREST
We do first-class work and
are careful with your Garments. We can do your work
and return it within 48 hourB
if necessary. We call for your
uaundry and return it to you.
Should anything be lost or misplaced we will make it satisfactory.
When your Laundry goes to the Chinks there are many drawbacks. When you send it to us your money helps pay WHITE
LABOR.
PIONEER STEAM LAUNDRY
Hamblin's Bakery
Just Re-opened
Sale    counter    in    MKISKVFIELD'S
STOKE, Third Ave. and Fifth St.
Family trade catered to.  Will sup-'
ply restaurants and steamers.
Cakes and Confectionery of all
kinds
IHE WESTHOLME LUMBER CO.
LIMITED
We handle all kinds of
Building Supplies
First Avenue
Telephone 180
Skeena    Land   District—District   of
.jrieena.
TAKE NOTICE that the Canadian
Canning Company, Limited, of 224
Winch Building, Vancouver, B, C,
occupation salmon Caners, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted adjoining
a post marked W. N. about 300 feet
Soutli of Wallace's wharf, Nans Harbour, B, C.J thence past 20 chains;
tlience south 20 chains; thence west
20 chains; thence following the
coast line in a northerly direction
back to the point of commencement
and containing forty acres more orj
less.
CANADIAN CANNING CO., LTD.    j
Per i.;. H. Leslie, Agent.
Dated   Oth  June,  1911, 6-26
— LADYSMITH-
COAL
ROCHESTER & MONROE, Phone 115
Corner Eighth and Eraser Street*
Clinton Rooms
Newly remodelled and furnished.
Hoard and lodging. Home cooking
a  specialty.     Mrs.   Anderson,  Prop.
Rooms, $3 Per Week
New Knox Hotel
ARTAUD & BESNER
Proprietors
The New Knox Hotel is run on tbe
European plan. First-clas service.
All the latest modern improvements
THE BAR keeps only the best
brands of liquors and cigars.
THE CAFE Is open from 6.30 a.m.
to 8 p.m. Excellent cuisine; flrst-
class service...
Hoard, $1 a Day — Ilcds, 50c and np
First Avenue   Prince  Rupert PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Friday, July 14, 1911
\
MADE GOOD SHOWING
Prince  Rupert  Public   School  Passed
80 Per Cent, of its Pupils at
Entrance Examinations.
Eight Pupils Qualified to Enter Upon
High School Work in the
City
MOUNTAIN  HOTELS
G. T. P.
Make  Choice  of   a  Charming
Location in Jasper
Park.
Large Tourist Headquarters Will Be
Located on tbe Main Line East
of Rookies
(Special   to  The  Journal)
Victoria, July 14.-—The results of
the entrance examinations as far as
rural centres are concerned have been
made known. Prince Rupert made a
good showing. Throughout the prov-1
ince in the division of the entrance
examinations there were 332 candidates. Of these 100 were successful.
Prince Rupert school
In Prince Rupert 10 candidates
and 8 were successful. The eight
successful candidates were Frank D.
Holland, GS5; Edith M. Sing, 657;
H. Lloyd Johnston, 633; Walace E.
Anderson, G24; Alma M, Christiansen, 583; Genevieve M. MacDonald,
575; Kathleen F. Haslett, 570; Kath-
erine S.  Johnston,  559.
Port Essington had 2 candidates
writing, both of whom passed. They
were Mary C. Intig, 638; Wilmot G.
Radge, 550.
In the province the highest figures vere obtained by Miss Marjorie
Tennant of Royal Oak school, near
Victoria, who obtained 827 marks
out of a possible 1100.
KILLED AT WHARF
John Stucci  Fell  From  Frame Work
While at Work and Net
Death.
Coroner's  Jury   Brings  in a Verdict
That Deafh Was Due to
Accident
John Stucci, who was employed on
the Government wharf with the West-
holnie Lumber Company, met his'
death on Wednesday morning hy falling from the woodwork, striking a
cross piece before he reached the
water below. According to the evidence taken at the inquest yesterday
there was no blame attaching to any
one in the matter. He was engaged
in a work which he had done on
previous occasions. He was on a
two-foot wide planking and was pos
sibly drawn so as to overbalance by
a wire cable he was handling.
An inquest was held yesterday before Coroner J. H. McMullen. A
verdict of occidental death was
brought in.
. o	
Mr.   and   Mrs.   A.   F.   Rowe   have
arrived in the city.   They are accompanied by Mr. H. Rowe.
*     *     *
Miss Grace Davies of the provincial government office lias returned
from a holiday in the south.
Miss Smith of Victoria, a daughter
of J. McB. Smith, deputy minister of
finance, paid a visit to the city this
week, being the guest of Mr. and
Mrs. Vernor W. Smith. Yesterday
Mrs. Smith accompanied her visitor
to Stewart.
 o	
She—How far can your ancestry
be traced.
He—Well, when my grandfather
resigned his position as cashier of
a country bank, they traced him as
far as China,  hut  he got away.
The large tourists' hotel to be
erected by tiie Grand Trunk Pacific
in Jasper Park will be located at
Fiddle Creek, 8-1 miles west of Wolfe
Creek, right in the gap through
which the railway enters the great
natural summer resort, if the recommendations to be made by W. P. Hin-
ton, general passenger agent, and
H. R. Charlton, general advertising
agent for the road, are followed. On
a recent trip to the park Mr. Hinton
and Mr. Charlton selected a hotel
site one and a half miles southeast
of the station at Fiddle Creek.
This is one of the most attractive
spots in the immense mountain reserve. It overlooks Brule's lake and
tl.e valley of the Athabasui, and the
mountains which lie beyond, while
in the vicinity of the hotel the mountains peaks rise to a height of 8,000
feet. The new hotel wil! be located
only a few miles from the sulphur
springs in Jasper Park, which are
situated on Sulphur Creek, a tributary of Fiddle Creek. Mountain
roads will be constructed from the
hotel to the sulphur springs.
Mr. Hinton, Mr. Charlton and R.
C. W. Lett spent several days in that
section of the park, looking over the
various locations on which it would
be possible to erect a hotel. The one
chosen was considered to have the
most charming suroundings of any.
Although plans for the erection of
the building are only in their initial
stages, it is understood that construction work will be commenced next
year.
ERIE   MINE   GOOD
Excellent Ore Is Taken From Prop.
erty Near Hazelton—Will Pay
for Shipping
Since the first report of the big
strike on the Erie mine reached town
last week a number or Hazelton men
have gone out to see it. They returned with word that the report
is not only all to the good, but that
the seam of high grade ore is widening as depth is obtained, says the
Inland Colonist.
The shaft is now down over 3
feet, and shows two feet of solid
silver-lead ore on the one wall. This
seam of solid ore has widened from
IS inches to two feet in less than
the last eight feet of sinking. Three
shifts are now at work sinking, and
machinery for operating compressed
air drills will be brought in shortly.
Miners who have been working on
other properties on Four Mile mountain and who have gone over to the
Erie to se the big strike report it a
wonder. A number of them came
right into town and purchased Erie
stock, particularly William Dalton of
the Babine Mining Company, whose
ground adjoins the Erie. Dalton
bought 3,000 shares of Erie stock as
soon as he reached town.
Two tons of shipping ore is now
being taken out to the foot depth,
and the company intends commencing ore shipments this fall. Of 59
assays of samples taken from differ
SECURITY  IS THE  IMPORTANT THING
to consider in the disposition of valuables. You have eliminated every
possibility of loss if you have a box
in a modern fire and burglar proof
vault, such ns you will find at the
Continental Trust Company, Limited.
The Continental Trust Company,^.
SECOND AVENUE, PRINCE RUPERT, B. C.
Btssm
NEW STOCK ARRIVING
wnm&^?asM®BifflBs&i!*m
About
50 Suits to
be Closed Out
3-Piece    SUITS    in    Worsteds    and
Flannels.     Regular   price   $10.00.
NOW     $4.75
2   and   3-Piece   SUITS   in   summer
weight.    Regular $12.00.
NOW     $0.00
Grey   and   Striped   Tweed   Suits;   3
Piece.   Regular   $15.00.
NOW     $7.50
A few  20th  Century  Suits  to go at
a great reduction.    So come early.
SLOAN &  COMPANY
6th STREET
ALDER BLOCK
nraia]|§[5]|5^
HOTEL
ENAMELWARE
HAVE JUST RECEIVED A SMALL SHIPMENT OF HOTEL
ENAMELWARE ESPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR USE IN
HO . JlLS, RESTAURANTS AND CAMPS. WE GUARANTEE
THEAI TO LAST TWICE AS LONG. AS ORDINARY ENAMEL
WARE.
A CALL IS  SOLICITED
Prince Rupert Hardware & Supply
Company, Ltd.
THIRD AVENUE PHONE 120
DiiDiiiiiDifgiHraiii!^^
We Require Listings of Inside Business Property
Also Residence Property at Right Prices
GRAND HOTEL
WORKWOMAN'S HOME
Spring Beds, Clean OR/i
White Sheets    -    -    £OC
Room* 50 Cents
Best in Town for the Money
FIRST AVE. AND SEVENTH ST.
J. Goodman, Proprietor
FREDERICK PETERS, K. C.
Barrister, Solicitor and Notary Public
Office in
EXCHANGE BLOCK
WM. S. HAi^L, L. D. S. V. D. S.
:-:    DENTIST   :-:
Crown and Bridge Work a specialty.
All dental operations skillfully
treated. Gas and local anaesthetics
administered for the painless extraction of teeth. Consultation free.
Offices, Helgerson 3k., Prince Ruperi
ent parts of the vein, the returns run
from $69 to $670 per ton.| This ore
can be laid down in Prince Rupert
at a cost of $10 per ton to the company, so judging by the high values
In the ore now being taken out, .the
shareholders In the Erie should be
receiving handsome returns on their
investment before another spring is
here.
Mr. Rich—I suppose you find that
a  baby brightens up the house.
Mr. Benedict—Yes; we burn
nightly twice the gas we used to.
WANTED
Teacher wanted for the Port Simpson  Publ'c  Schools.    Apply  to John
Deane,   School   Trustee,   stating   attainments and enclosing testimonials.
J-ll-14
A mother sent this somewhat sn-
tirical note to the teacher of her
small son: "Pardon me for calling
your attention to the fact thnt you
have pulled Johnnie's right ear until it is getting longer than the other.
Please pull his left ear for a while
and  oblige  his  mother."
M.M. Stephens & Co. Ld.
Real Estate, Insurance and Investments,
Notaries, Nines, Timber
Box 275
PHONE 222
llee Sl»y Sallse. e' ,ry It&nje
PRINCE RUPERT, B.C.
OFFICE  THIRD  AVE.
Gr id, Sound Reasons for
MONARCH Economy
Monarch Ranges are built so that they can
never have "air leaks"—
For around every opening into the body there
is a   Malleable   Iron frame to which  the
steel is i -eted.
No putty is needed in such joints.    They are
air tight when new and sti.y air tight.
If these other ranges were built in this way
they might be economical too.
Investigate this matter of rhet construction
versus  stove bolts  and  stove putty.     It's
important to every  one  using or  buying
a range.
SOLD AND GUARANTEED RY THE
Kaien Hardware Co.
Telephone 3 Third Avenue
FOR   SALE
SECTION ONE
BLOCK LOTS BLO^K
19 ..
11 1-2-3-4-5-6
11 S 10
12     22
13     21-22
18    1-2
l,OTS
 3-4
19 15-16
20 19-20
34 36-37-38
34    42
27    9-10
27 42-43
SECTION FIVE
9     22-23
18 22-23
W. S. BENSON
SECTION SI-
'I 7-8-9-10
The Atlnntic Realty and Improvement
Com.nana Ltd.        -        P.O. Box 51
We beg to announce to the public that we are going to
remain at the same old stand cor. 6th St. and 2nd Ave.
The rest of the month of July we nre offering extraordinary values in all lines of HOUSE FURNISHINGS    rt'e ai.  tiusy opening up new stock
and placing nil broken lines and odd lots on  the Bargain Tables for quick soiling.
NOTE PARTICULARLY THE VARIETY OF MERCHANDISE WE CARRY
The Big
Furniture
Store
Sole Agents for the
Ostermoor
Mattresses
*♦
**
**
**
* *
**
**
* *
**
* *
tt
FURNITURE, LINOLEUM, CARPETS AND ALL FLOOR COVERINGS, REED AND RATTAN FURNITURE, BLINDS, CURTAINS, QUILTS,
COMFORTS, BLANKETS, SHEETS, PILLOWS, MATTRESSES, SPRINGS,
IRON AND BRASS BEDS. BEST LINES OF UPHOLSTERED COUCHES,
ARM CHAIRS, PARLOR SUITES, ENAMELWARE, CROCKERY, GLASSWARE, LAMPS, TABLE CUTLERY, SCREENS, PICTURES, MIRRORS,
WASHING MACHINES, BASKETS, FRUIT JARS, HAMMOCKS, SEWING
MACHINES, BABY CARRIAGES.
WE ARE CLOSING OUT THE
STORE DEPARTMENT.
IF   YOU   ARE  INTERESTED
CALL AND GET OUR PRICES
F. W. HART
Cor 6th Street & 2nd Ave
Phone 62      P.O. Box 230
:»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦
♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦»♦»♦
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