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Prince Rupert Journal Aug 18, 1911

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 - *i-*?"**iiiniiCTt"""*"a°M*'
^-mhillMI.- .LUeMWIIBMMWMPl
few*!
New Wedliiftn
Coal
is the best
ROGERS ft BUCK
Sole Agents
Prince ftttj*ert Jannutl
High/Class
Job Printing
in all Lines
VOLUME II.
Published  Twice  a  Week.
PRINCE   RUPERT,   B.   C. FRIDAY, AUGUST  18,  1911.
Price, Five Cents.
NO. IS.
PLANS OF GRANBY
Smelter Company Has Not Yet Decided
Upon the Location of Smelter
for the North.
General Officers Now At Goose Bay
Say They Await Further
Information
The final decision with regard to
the location of the Granby smelter in
the nortli has not yet been reached.
This was the announcement of J.
Graves upon his arrival here on Wednesday by the Prince Rupert. He is
accompanied by Mr. Sylvester, also
of the headquarters staff. They have
gone to Goose Bay to inspect the
work there in progress. While it
Beems highly probable that Goose
Bay will be the location of the smelt-
*   *   *   #   *   *   *   *   *   *   *
*       G.  T.  P.  PARTY COMING       *
* Towards   the    close   of   the *
* month   Prince   Rupert   will   be *
* visited    by    Charles    H.    Hays *
* president of the G. T. P.; E. J. »
* Chamberlin, vice president, and *
* Mr. Smithers, of London, repre- *
* senting   the   London   investors. *
* There will accompany these offi- *
* clals several of the heads of de- *
* partments In the company, the *
* tour  being one for general in- *
* spectlon of the work. *
er, nothing definite has yet been decided. Mr. Graves said his company
would wait until they had further
reports In from some of the officials
now on the field in the north before reaching a conclusion.
The party of Granby officials was
accompanied here by Mr. Trewartha
James, the head of the Tyee company, which has a model smelter at
Ladysmith, built and equipped under
the guiding eye of Thomas Kiddle,
one of the most expert smelter men
on the Pacific slope.
The presence of '.Mr. James *lnay
have no significance but at present
the Tyee company is not operating
any mines In the south, depending
upon the northern output largely for
its supply of ore.
The Granby company it Goose Bay
Is carrying out Its work in a thoroughly systematic way. A splendid
plank roadway, according to recent
visitors, has been built from the water to the mine and all the work
is being carried out in the best of
style.
Mr. Graves said in his visit here
this week that the company was proceeding with the necessary work In
connection with developing the mine.
They were also installing power for
that purpose and putting up the
buildings that would be necessary.
A force of about 150 men is now at
work. Nothing was being done yet,
however, he said, as the work of
installing the smelter there, nor
would it be until the decision was
reached by the company. The town-
site proposition had not been considered either.
 o •
Drowned at Goose Bay
George Macdonald, who formerly
conducted a bakery here, lost his
life at Goose Bay by drowning. Some
time ago Mr. Macdonald went to
Stewart to live and went Into business there.
A SIRE WINNER
* (Special  to  The  Journal)       •
* Kamloops,    Aug.     18. — The  •
* Conservatives   of    Yale-Cariboo *
* have    unanimously    nominated *
* Martin  Burrell  as  their  candl- *
* date for the riding. He is a sure *
* winner   against   any   one   who *
* opposes him. *
* *
**************
Duncan D. Munro of Vancouver,
who is interested in the Lakelse Valley, has been in the city after a
trip up the river. He has left for
the south again.
 o	
Drowned  in  Skeena
H. Buckingham, a brakeman em
ployed on the G. T. P., lost his life
on Wednesday in the Skeena River,
He had gone out fishing, and was
crossing a log to a sandbar when he
fell In and was caught by the swift
waters of the river. The body has
nut, been recovered.
OIL BEDS LOOK WELL
Graham Island is Attracting Attention
as a Petroleum Producer at
the Present Time.
Drill Near Otard Bay Is Encountering   Formation   to  Give
Good Results
Richard Parnall, representing the
B. C. Oilfields, engaged in boring for
oil near Otard Bay on the west coast
of Graham Island was in the city
for a few days this week. His company is the first to invade the new
oil area of theh northwest and the
results are proving entirely satisfactory. The plant taken In by Mr. Parnall and his associates Is pronounced
by all to be the most complete that
could be obtained. The work is being done In a systematic way and
those interested have no doubt as to
the results.
The loss of cylinder oil delayed
operations for about ten days but
with a good supply now on hand the
company is pushing the work forward as fast as possible.
When Mr. Parnall left the place
the drill was down about 190 feet
and throughout the whole boring the
results had been very close to what
the experts had foretold would be
the character of rock cut through.
Blue shale was first encountered.
This has been followed by a black
shale, which, accordoing to the experts, is the proper formation for
oil. After the black shale, the sandstone, in which at depth the oil is
expected, is looked for.
Mr. Parnall says he expects to
reach oil at about 700 feet, although
It may be necessary to go deeper than
that. The plant installed is equipped to bore to a depth of 5,000 feet
so that there will be no trouble if
greater depth is required than is anticipated. With depth comes increased pressure, so that it Is no
drawback to have to go down.
C. D. Emmons, an expert who
reported upon the formation for the
B. C. Oilfields before ,vorIi i,ds
started, is on the ground. He has
located property nearby what is supposed to be another promising basin.
He will begin work right away on
his property. He will put in a drill
without waiting for the original company to complete its bore so sure
is he  of  the  oil  being there.
Mr. Parnall's company is only a
short distance from Otard Bay, where
a  first  class  harbor exists.
A syndicate of local men and residents of Graham Island have staked
a large tract of territory close to
these holdings of the B. C, Oilfields
and Mr. Emmons. Their land, according to the reports brought by
those who visited the place, has exactly the same formation as the holdings now being worked. The company has organized with a provisional
directorate composed of: Dr. Kergin,
president; George Tite, vice president; W. Vicaers, secretary-treasurer; L. W. Patmore, J. Loren McLaren, Thos. Deasy and Austin
Brown, directors.
The company will organize for
work at once and In all probability
start testing  the ground.
The west coast of Graham Island
will, according to prospects, be the
scene of marked activity during the
next four months. If oil is found
by the pioneer company as expected,
without the necessity of a second
bore, there Is sure to be a rush to
the latest oilfields on the Pacific
Coast. The oil has been looked upon
as of an asphaltum base but there
are Indications now that It will be
very high grade. Asphaltum Is found
In the rock seams at the surface,
where It has been forced through the
seams and the oil has evaporated.
TO HEAR COMPLAINTS
Railway
Commission Will  Arrive
the City Tomorrow
Horning.
in
D'Arcy Tnte, G. T. P. Solicitor, Will
Accompany Them to Represent
His  Coni]Ntny at Sitting
Sculling Chumpionship
The articles of agreement for the
boat race for the championship of
America between Jack Hackett and
Eddie Durnan have been received,
duly signed by the former, and seem
to meet the demands of the Toronto
sculler. The conditions call for the
race of three miles with a turn on
the Rainy River, Thursday, September 7. The referee, who Is to be
mutually agreed upon, Is to name
the starter. The race is to be for
$1,000 a side.
 o	
The Royal Blues defeated the
Crescents hy the score of 4 2 to 20.
This makes the third win for the
former team.
The railway commission will reach
the city tomorrow and proceed at
once with the consideration of applications to be heard by them. D'Arcy
Tate, solicitor for the G. T. P., is
expected to be present representing
his company in anything that may
come up for consideration by the
board.
Chief Commissioner Mabee has
won for himself a reputation for the
expeditious way in which he disposes
of applications which come up.
The commission will sit in the
court house, arrangements having
been made for quarters there.
Judge  Young  has  returned  from
holding court at Hazelton.
BARNARD IS NAMED
Victoria City Will Again Send Conservative Candidate Back to
Ottawa.
H.
Hon.   William   Templeman   Will   Go
Down  to  Defeut  in   His
Home Hiding
(Special to The Journal)
Victoria, Aug. 18.—G. H. Barnard
was unanimously nominated the
Conservative candidate for Victoria
to oppose Hon. William Templeman
at the forthcoming election on September 21 at a convention held in
Institute Hall last night.
Mr. Barnard successfully contested the seat against Mr. Templeman at the last election, when the
conditions were never more favorable
for the minister.
The city of Victoria is strongly
antagonistic to reciprocity and Mr.
Barnard is expected to win against
all the forces that can be brought
to bear to redeem the riding.
WILL REDEEM THE RIDING
(Special to The Journal)
Vancouver, August IS.—H. S. Clements, the unanimous choice
of the Comox-Atlin nominating convention, sends greetings to the
electors of the northern pint of the constituency and wishes to express his high appreciation of the honor the Conservatives of
Comox-Atlin liavc conferred upon him.
He will redeem the constituency. The campaign opens in Wellington on Saturday night, when he will address the electors in
tlie most southern part of the riding. Later he will visit Prince
Rupert and other northern centres.
WARSHIPS ARE USED
Foit Vessels are in the Mersey to Protect Shipping Against the
Strikers in Liverpool.
Serious   Condition   of   Affairs   Prevails in the Old Country—lliots
Ave Frequent in Cities
(Special to The Journal)
Liverpool, Aug. 18.—Four warships arrived In the Mersey yesterday to protect shipping. Electric
light and power has been cut off as
the strikers were threatening to
wreck the power houses.
The prices of provisions are rising rapidly.
Special constables are enrolling
enro'ling rapidly at London, Liverpool and Sheffield. At the latter
place two signal cabins have been
wrecked.
The strike fever has become epidemic in Great Britain. From one
end of the country to the other, men
either have struck or are threatening
to do so, and even the women and
the girls In the smaller factories of
the larger cities are demanding better conditions of ,abor.
Uailwaymen throughout Ihe country have assumed a threatening attitude nnd a complete tieup of every
line is possible. The locomotive engineers adopted a resolution In favor
of ii national strike. This followed
I lie action of tbe 2,000 London railwayman employed on tlie Midland,
Great Central, anil .Metropolitan
lines who decided to call a general
strike on all subway and surface
lines In the London distric Saturday unless their grievances are remedied.
Troops Are Ready
At midnight neither the board of
trade, railway managers nor union
leaders had any definite information
as to how far the railway men were
responding to the call for a general
strike. The government is deploying troops all over the country to
meet any emergency.
Plans to cope with the strike have
been  fully  arranged.
 o	
Want  Duncan  Ross
A strong delegation of Liberal representatives left here this morning
for Nanaimo to attend the nominating convention. They have gone determined to put up a vigorous fight
for Duncan Ross, and are very confident of securing their desires.
RUTHERFORD TO RUN
He Has Been Nominated for Edmonton
by Opponents of Hon. Frank
Oliver.
Ex-Premier of Alberta Finds Favor
With Liberals of the
Constituency
(Special to The Journal)
Edmonton, Aug. 18.—At the convention held here on Wednesday of
the Liberals called by P. E. Lessard,
president of the Liberal district association, but declared by Senator Tal-
bor, president of the Liberal provincial association, as illegal, ex-Premier
Rutherford was chosen the Liberal
candidate for the Edmonton constituency instead of Hon. Frank Oliver, minister of the interior.
Mr. Oliver hilmself repudiated the
convention.    He stated:
"I have no intention of recognizing
the so-called Liberal convention held
in this city on August 10. Tlie well
recognized method of calling a nominating convention in Alberta is under the authority of the provincial
executive. Convents have already
been called In this section for the
selection of candidates for the contest in four or tbe seven Alberta
constituencies, and In two of them
nominations have already been made.
In due course, no doubt, such a
convention will be called lor Ihe
Edmonton electoral districl. When
it is held, 1 shall be glad to submit
my name as a candidate, for nomination. Meantime, 1 do not propose
to pay any attention to a special arrangement made to secure endorsement for the candiature of a certain
man, even though it may be called
a convention. I may say that I do
not think the effort to defeat the
Liberal cause in the Edmonton district by holding a bogus convention
will succeed."
 o	
Anniversary   Services
On Sunday next, the Baptist
Church will celebrate Its first anniversary. One year ago yesterday the
local church started upon Its history
in .Melntyre Hall. Last October Rev.
Dr. McLeod became pastor and a
successful year has been the result
On Sunday the day will be observed
as a special one. In tlie evening
there will be special music and Rev.
Dr. McLeod will preach a sermon
specially adapted to the occasion.
STRONG CANDIDATE
L. Clements Will  Contest  Comox-
Atlin in the Conservative Interest at Election.
Popular  .Man  Chosen  to  Itun  in  tlie
Constituency—He Has Had Long
Experience and Is a Winner
Nanaimo, Aug. IS.—The Conservative nominating convention selected
Herbert L. Clements as the Conservative candidate for Comox-Aflin in the
forthcoming contest, the choice being made unanimous.
The northern delegation put forward the name of S. M. Newton and
voted for him throughout. Only one
other name went before the convention, Thos. Bates of Cumberland, but
he secured only a small vote and
dropped out, leaving the field to Clements and Newton, the former securing the full strength of Mr. Bates.
The candidate, who formerly lived
in Prince Rupert, is an experienced
politician, and popular wherever
known and is regarded as a specially
strong candidate and a sure winner
for the northern constituency.
Mr. Clements, who has been selected as the Conservative candidate, was
formerly a resident of Prince Rupert. He was a commission merchant, representing the Standard
Oil Company in the early days, and
well known to all who lived here at
that time. He is a politician of experience, having taken an active part
in Dominion affairs in Ontario before
coming west. He sat in the House
of Commons but at the last general
election in West Kent, Ontario, he
was defeated by the very narrow
margin of 82 by A. B. McCoig of
Chatham.
Mr. Clements is a fluent speaker
and has an easy manner on the platform. He will enter into the campaign with vigor and will receive a
very hearty support in the north as
well as In the south.
METHODIST VISITORS
Important Company of Church Workers
Paid Short Visit to City
This Week.
Rev.   Dr.   Chown   ami   Others   Were
on Their Way to Port Simpson  Conference
The Prince Rupert on Wednesday
brought to the city aii important
company of Methodist clergymen and
laymen who were on their way to
Port Simpson to attend the conference of Indian church workers, when
the whole of the needs of the Indian
work comes up for consideration.
At the head of the party was Rev.
Dr. Chown, genera] superintendent
of the church. Among others were
Rev. Dr. Ferrler of the mission
board, Rev. A. E. Roberts, president
of the B. C. Conference; Rev. Dr.
Sanford, Reeve Bell of Enderby.
Here, they were jointed by a num-
*****
RALPH   SMITH   RUNS
* (Special  to  The  Journal) •
* Duncan,     Aug.      18.—Ralph •
* Smith was unanimously selected *
* as the Liberal candidate for the *
* Nanaimo   constituency   at   the *
* convention  held  here.     He has •
* already  entered  upon  his  cam- •
* paign.
« •
***************
MANY   ENTRIES
Dominion   Rifle  Mutches Promise to
Be Great Success
This  Year
(Special to The Journal)
Ottawa, Aug. 18.—Entries for the
Dominion  rifles  matches promise  to
be greater than ever this year.
IMPROVING OLD SCHOOL
Contracts  Awarded  by  the Trustees
for the  Plumbing ami
Painting
The board of school trustees met
yesterday afternoon in the city hall
for the purpose of awarding contracts for the plumbing for the room
to be opened in the old school on
Second avenue after the holidays and
for the painting of the inside walls
of the room. The contracts in each
case were awrded to the lowest tenderer. The plumbing goes to the
Acme Plumbing Co. for $109, while
the painting was awarded to Silver-
side Bros, at $32.
The school has been raised to the
street level and will he ready for
the opening of the school after Ihe
vacation. One room will he used
only, the pupils entering being only
the smnll ones. A teacher will be
transferred from the Central School
to take charge.
PERSONALS
II. Semi ni' the Hamilton Powder
Works of Victoria arrived in the <'ily
mi  the Prince Rupert.
.Miss Allen of the nursing staff of
the Royal Jubilee Hospital, in Victoria arrived In the city on Wednesday.
* *     *
Mrs. J. A. Kirkpatrick, after a five
weeks' vacation in Victoria, returned
to the city by the Prince Rupert, on
Wednesday. She Is feeling much better for her holiday.
* *     *
G. Simpson of Vancouver was a
passenger by the Prince Rupert. He
represents the Fairbanks company
and is pleased with Prince Rupert.
Mr. Simpson is the champion swimmer of the province, having won Ihe
honor for tliree years in  succession.
ber of the missionaries from different points on the Skeena and the
Coast, who accompanied them to
Port Simpson by the Prince John.
Among these there were: Rev. Mr.
Lee of Kispiox, Rev. Mr. Pierce, Rev.
Dr. Spencer of Skidegate, Dr. Large
and others.
During the stay In the city Dr.
Chown and others visited the site of
the new church which it is proposed
to erect here this fall. A conference was held with Rev. C. H. Sing
and the quarterly board here. Before returning south Dr. Chown will
again visit the city and more fully
discuss the question with the board.
Rev. Dr. Chown is fully impressed
with the importance of this city. He
realizes lhat there is a great future
for it and he is deeply in sympathy
with the local church in its efforts
to provide a church building suitable
to the needs of the place. Dr.
Chown is a man of broad views,
known throughout (he whole of Canada as an extremely practical church
worker. The provision made by the
trustees of tbe local church in the
pian for looking after the social side
of the work seemed to meet with
very general approbation from Br.
Chown, Mr. i.oberts and other
workers.
BORN
STEPHENS In this city on Augusl 18, in tlie. wife' of M. M. Stephens, a daughter.
FIT FOR  SOUTH
iiulm' Lampman Gave Judgment in
Mining Case Before Sailing
for Victoria
Judge Lampman of Victoria, who
has been holding court here for over
a week, left this morning for the
soutli. He made many friends here
during bis stay and became quite
enthusiastic over the opportunities
which await investment in this part
of the country. ,
Hefore leaving he handed down his
judgment In the case of Attorney
General of II. C. vs. Lee, In which
the question of assessment work on
FOSTEI1  AGAIN   RUNS
* tcr
«  in
* to
(Special  tei The Journal)
Toronto, Aug   is.- -Q, E.Fos-
was unanimously nominated
North Toronto   all opposition
him having petered out
a mining claim at Stewart was involved.
His worship gave judgment for the
plaintiff.
The defendant had put up a claim
that there had been a greater
amount of work done than was necessary, while the plaintiffs contention was that regulations had not
been  complied  with.
W. E. Fisher represented the Attorney General, while W. B. Williams
appeared for the defence.
0. A. Woe.els, e'ity clerk, has gone
on bis holidays to Lakelse Lake, ac-
companled by Mrs. Woods. PRINCE RUPERT JOLRNAL
Friday, August 18, 1911.
PRESS OPINIONS
THE  COMING  ELECTION
Recent events may not have been
without their influence in deciding
Sir Wilfrid to bring parliament to an
abrupt conclusion. The Oliver investigation, the pointed enquiries
which were to be made regarding
Mr. Pugsley's blanket tenders for
Courtenay Bay, the Chinese Immigration frauds in British Columbia, Involving a loss to the country of
$1,1100,00(1, and other scandals are
now, as far as investigation Is concerned, conveniently side-tracked.
But the besmirched record of the
Laurier government remains. The
white plumed knight and the political bandits and grafters that follow in his train with their transcontinental contracts, their sawdust
wharves, their Newmarket canal
jobs, their dredging scandals, and
their endless schemes and extravagance for wasting tlie expanding revenues of the country, have still to
be dealt with. For this reason alone,
despite the injustice that an early
election will entail on some sections
of the community, Conservatives
throughout the country will welcome
the fight, now it is forced upon them.
But above and beyond the general
record of thoh government the coming election is to be fought on a
greater issue. Reciprocity as defined by President Taft fs designed to
strike a blow at the closer union
of the nations of the Empire. It
is designed to wean Canada from her
allegiance to the Motherland, and
to sever once and for all that "Imperial Commercial band reaching
from England around the world to
England again." The Laurier government, bound hand and foot to
Taft, professes to be blind to the
dangers of the situation, and insists
on the adoption of the agreement.
Against the Separatists will be
ranged not only Conservatives, but
every Canadian who believes in the
great destiny which awaits a United
Empire. Borden and British Connection against Laurier and Separation is the real issue in the coming
fight. No one who reviews Canada's
long record of steadfast loyalty to
the Motherland can doubt that when
the day of reckoning comes, the upholders of Borden and Britisii Connection will win a sweeping victory
at the polls.—St. John Standard.
THE   DESERTERS
"Tory protectionists of the Chamberlain school In England and In
Canada will not forgive Sir Wilfrid
Laurier zecause he would not lend
himself to their schemes."
So says the Toronto Globe, which,
like Sir Wilfrid himself, has managed to forget that the premier was
in 1903 and 1907 a protectionist of
the Chamberlain school. In the Colonial or Imperial conferences held
in these years Sir Wilfrid supported
the resolutions endorsing the Chamberlain project of Imperial Preference. He was one of the premiers
who promised to bring the subject
before their respective governments
and parliaments. Sir Wilfrid spoke
and voted for ihe resolution asking
the Imperial government to adopt
the Chamberlain scheme.
It. is not surprising that others
who joined In the declaration, or
who heard it gladly, should find It
hard to forgive the deserter who lias
taken tbe other turn at the parting
of the ways. The advocate of the
Imperial band, who turns bai'k to
President Taft in trying to prevent
the completion of the Imperial band,
can hardly expect his former associates to be rfatlent with him.
It is significant of the change (hat
has come over Sir Wilfrid Laurier's
partisans  that  they now  pour rldi-
cule and contempt on the Chamberlain school to which four years ago
they were proud to belong. If we
wish to know what reciprocity will
do we may learn something by reflecting what it has done already in
changing the party point of view
toward Imperial trade relations.—
Vancouver  News-Advertiser.
ONLY ONE SIDE ON THE SHIELD
Now that the election Is on the
the public will be able to size up
the merits of the great issue which
has been submitted to them, namely
the merits and demerits of reciprocity as proposed hy Sir Wilfrid Laurier. A careful reading of his manifesto just published and the Globe's
article yesterday shows one thing
big and clear, namely, that both Sir
Wilfrid and the Globe present only
one side of the shield. Their one
platform is the wider market, and
Sir Wilfrid Laurier by suggestion and
the Globe by the publication of tables yesterday say the American duties will be taken off our farm products going into the United States.
Neither one of them, however, deals
with the question of American competition in Canada; and the Globe
abso:ute!y fails to publish a single
table showing what duties (which
now keep the Canadian market for
the Canadian producer) will be removed, and the Canadian market
given to the United States. In other
words, they show only one side of
the shield, and that is the side that
deals with something that is prospective aud is uncertain. They say
nothing about the certainty that the
Canadian farmer now has of his own
market, and which they propose to
make most uncertain, and, a., a matter of fact, to surrender.
This reciprocity has two sides, and
must be looked at from two sides,
namely, the wider market, which is
illusive and uncertain, and the home
market, which is certain, which is
profitable and which is higher in
many respects than the American
market. What the Canadian farmer,
the fruit man and vegetable grower
wishes to know is how his own home
market is to be affected by American competition. This has been
built up and preserved to him by a
wise national policy to date. What
is to become of him if the market
i>, shared with the American farmer,
fruit grower and vegetable gardener,
especially if the American has superior advantages in the way of climate and other things.    ,
Sir Wilfrid Laurier and the Globe
have made the issue one of markets,
and by this question of markets and
prices their proposition must be
judged. It can never be judged if
only one side of the situation is presented.—Toronto World.
AN   ASTONISHING   STATEMENT
Readers of tho Victoria Times,
which is owned by Mr. Templeman,
got a surprise on Saturday last when
the Times spoke in a pessimistic and
almost contemptuous tone of the
hopes and prospects of British Columbia fruit growers. What do the
orcbardists of the Okanagan and
Kootenay, or the older fruit country
nearer the Coast and on Vancouver
Island  think of this teaching?
"There are perhaps 1,000 people
in Britisii Columbia growing fruit.
They do not grow enough nor ever
will grow enough to supply the provincial and prairie markets. Yet
there arc 200,00b people in British
Columbia who eat fruit. When they
have to import it they must pay an
average of IB per cent duly. No
apjpreciable quantity of fruit grown
In domestic varieties is Imported
when there is any locally grown fruit
in the market. Because 1,000 people cannot grow enough fruit to supply 200,000 people, 190,000 people
must pay 15 per cent more for fruit
than is necessary. Sir Wilfrid Laurier would end this state of affairs,
but Mr. Borden says it must continue.   Figure it out for yourself."
The Times speaks of fruit growers
of British Columbia as if they were
a few small gardeners in some single
village who had about reached the
limit of their productiveness, and
were a negligible element In the population. Does Mr. Templeman know
that not less than 125,000 acres, and
probably 150,000 acres of land, in
this province is planted with fruit?
Does any one suppose that these
lands are cultivated by 1,000 persons. The Fruit Magazine told us
last year that 90 per cent were engaged In fruit culture. Yet Summer-
land had only 3,000 acres of fruit
trees planted, one-fortieth of the provincial acreage, and something less
than ten acres per family. If the
number of gruit growers in the province given by the Times was multiplied by twelve or fifteen, it would
be nearer correct, but still below the
mark.
Probably less than one-third of the
fruit trees planted in this province
have yet become productive, and a
much smaller number are in full
bearing. Yet the value of fruit produced last year Is placed at $2,000,-
800. This the Times seems to think
about sufficient for 10,000 consumers, which allows $200 worth of fruit
per person. While it is true that this
province does not grow enough fruit
to supply its own and the prairie
population, it is not true that it never
can. The area now planted would,
in full bearing, now produce, say,
five times the present supply. It Is
safe to say that not 10 per cent of
the land suitable for fruit has yet
been planted. The area now planted
will, when in full bearing, supply
more than the present population of
Canada west of Lake Superior. Happily, the consuming population will
increase as the area in fruit increases, so that Britisii Columbia
fruit growers may hope to find a
growing market for their growing
supply.
But it is easy to see what will
be the consequence of throwing into
that market the much larger product
of the older and more extensive fruit
growing states souin of us. With
the provincial and prairie market we
have opportunity for a large and
prosperous fruit growing population
in this province. If conditions are
not changed we shall have this splendid population in a remarkably short
time. It will be a great misfortune
for Britisii Columbia if Sir Wilfrid
Laurier and Mr. Templeman are
allowed to "end this state of affairs."
—News-Advertiser.
You Can Avoid This
by sending your Clothes to tbe
PIONEER, STEAM   LAUNDRY
There are Many
Reasons Why
IT   IS   TO   YOUR   INTEREST
We do flrsUclass work and
are careful with your Garments. We can do your work
and return It within 48 hours
If necessary. We call for your
laundry and return it to you.
Should anything be lost or misplaced we will make It satisfactory.
When your Laundry goes to the Chinks there are many drawbacks. When you send It to us your money helps pay WHITE
LABOR,
PIONEER STEAM LAUNDRY
JUSTIFIED BY EVENTS
Whatever doubt may have heretofore existed in the minds of skeptics
as to the effect of R. L. Borden's
western trip upon the reciprocity situation in that part of the country,
it should now be set at rest for all
time.
When Mr, Borden announced his
tour of the west there were plenty
of people who ridiculed the idea. So
well had the campaigning nf the
Liberal .Manipulators of the Grain
Growers' Association been done that
the impression was general that the
whole west was a unit for reciprocity, and that for the Conservative
leader to attempt to preach any other
policy to the westerners would be
like putting his head in the lion's
mouth.
Well, Mr. Borden went west, and
while there, was met everywhere by
grain growers' deputations, each with
Its sterotyped reciprocity resolution,
provided from Liberal headquarters.
To them all the Conservative leader
had the one Btory to tell. He was
unalterably opposed tei reciprocity,
and was prepared to, and did, give
reasons for bis opposition. And so
logical ami straightforward was bis
attitude un tbe question that, before
he had mel many audiences, there
was a decided change In the current
of public opinion.
What that changed current lias
been accomplishing since Mr. Borden's return to the east may be understood from an official statement
of the Grain Growers' Association,
just published. Where once the reciprocity enthusiasts of the west were
so strong for closer American connection that they talked of running
Dominion candidates of their own,
they now annouce that there will be
one. The organ of the association
says that It will take no official part
in the election, and expresses soreness that the contest was called by
Laurier for so early a date. Members of the association are urged to
attend each his own party convention and exert influence to have candidates named "favorable to farmers'
Interests."
The noteworthy thing about this
official statement is that It contains
no   words   of   reciprocity,   showing
conclusively that there has arisen
such a difference of opinion in the
association's ranks on this subject
that it was not deemed advisable to
make special reference to it in the
communication to membersi And
the effect of this will be all to the
benefit of the Conservative cause in
the west on election day. Mr. Borden's western trip was well worth
while, as events are proving.—Hamilton Spectator.
 o	
ON   A   VACATION
Thomas Edison Has Gone to Europe
In  Order to Worry
a Little
For the first time In twenty-two
years, Thomas A. Edison has found
time to take a vacation. He departed for England on board the steamship Mauretanla.
"I am going to meet MrsJ Edison
and my daughter in England, and
then we will make a motor trip
through France, he said. "I want
to forget all about business and have
a chance to worry a little."
"To worry a little?" repeated a
listener.
"Certainly," said Mr. Edison. "I
haven't had a chance to worry for
about twenty-two years—been too
busy."
He explained that he had been at
work recently perfecting the talking
moving pictures and a new phonograph record which approaches nearer to the human voice than anything
heretofore devised.
"No, I have not been trying to
build an aeroplane." he said. In answer to the question. "Thirty years
ago we had the principleof the flying machine, but no adequate power;
so I tried to improve on the internal
combustion engine. Experimented
with one which would use guncot-
ton. That ended my aerial experiments."
Corner Eighth and Fraser Streets
Clinton Rooms
Newly remodelled and furnished.
Board and lodging. Home cooking
a specialty. Mrs. Anderson, Prop.
Rooms, $3 Per Week
New Knox Hotel
ARTAUD & BESNER
Proprietors
The New Knox Hotel is run on the
European plan. First-clas service.
All the latest modern improvements
THE BAR keeps only the best
brands of liquors and cigars.
THE CAFE is open from 6.30 a.m.
to 8 p.m. Excellent cuisine; first-
class service.
Board, $1 a Day — Beds, 50c and np
First Avenii"   Prince Rupert
WATER NOTICE.
NOTICE is hereby given that an
application will be made under Part
V. of i.he "Water Act, 1909," to obtain a licence in the Queen Charlotte islands Division of Skeena District.
(a) The name, address and occupation of the applicant—Merton A.
Merrill, Masset, Q. C. I., B. C,
Prospector.
(If for mining purposes) Free
Miner's Certificate No	
(b) The name of the lake,
stream, or source (if unnamed, the
description is)—I-in-tsua Lake, Tsu-
Skundale Lake and Ain River.
(c) The point of diversion—At er
near the outlet of Tsu-Skuudale
Lake into Ain River.
(d) The quantity of water applied for (In cubic feet per second)
—1,000.
(e) The character of the proposed works—Power Plant, Dam,
Plumes, etc.
(f) Tlie premises on which the
water Is lo be used (describe same)
—At or near the mouth of the Ain
River.
(g) The purposes for which the
water Is to he used—Generating
power.
(h) If for Irrigation, describe
ihe land Intended to be Irrigated,
giving acreage	
(i) If the water Is to be used for
power or mining purposes, describe
the-j place where the water is to be
returned to some natural channel,
and the difference in altitude between point of diversion and point
of return—At or near the mouth of
the Ain River, about 100 feet below
point of diversion.
(J) Area of Crown land intended to be occupied by the proposed
works—10 acres more or less.
(k) This notice was posted on
the 28th day of November, 1910,
and application will be made to the
Commissioner on the 1st day of
June, 1911.
(1) Give the names and addresses of any riparian proprietors or
licensees who or whose Iands are
likely to be affected by the proposed works, either above or below
the outlet—Don't know of any.
(Signature)
MERTON  A.   MERRILL,
(P.  O. Address)  Massel, B. C.
NOTE.—One cubic loot pw second is equivalent to 35.71 miner's
inches.
PUBLIC HIGHWAYS
Province of British Columbia
NOTICE is hereby given that all
Public Highways in unorganized Districts, and all Main Trunk Roads in
organized Districts are sixty-six feet
wide, and have a width of thirty-
three feet on each side of the mean
straight centre line of the travelled
road. THOMAS TAYLOR,
Minister of Public Works.
Department of Public Works, Victoria. B. C, July 7, 1911.    jyl8-ol8
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE.
NOTICE is hereby given that the
reserve of a parcel of land situated
on Graham Island, notice of which
appeared in the British Columbia
Gazette on the 25th of February,
1909, being dated 23rd February,
1909, is cancelled to permit of the
lands being acquired by pre-emption
only and for no other purpose
ROBT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Department of Lands,
Victoria, B. C, April 5th, 1911.
4-14—7-6
NOTICE.
In the matter of an application for
the Issue of a duplicate of the Certificate of Title for an undivided
one-half of Lot 883, Group I,
Cassiar District:
Notice is hereby given that it is
my intention to issue at the expiration of one month after the first
publication hereof a duplicate of the
Certificate of Title to the above
mentioned land in the name of William Jordan Larkwortby, which Certificate Is dated the 30th day of September, 1910, and numbered 326R.
WILLIaM  E.   BURRITT,
Di '.rid Registrar.
Land Registry Office,
Prince Rupert, B. C,
May 26, 1911. J23
NOTICE
In the matter of an application for
the  issue   of  a  duplicate  of  the
Certificate  of Title  for  Lot  361,
Range 5, Coast District:
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
it  is  my   intention   to   Issue  at   the
expiration  of  one  month  after  the
first publication hereof a  duplicate
of the Certificate for the above described lands in the names of Truman S. Baxter and Albert D. Durham,
which  Certificate  of  Title  is  dated
25th   November,    1909,   and   numbered 44 I.
WILLIAM  E.   BURRITT,
District  Registrar.
Land Registry Office, Prince Rupert, B. C, August 14, 1911. ala-sl5
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE.
Notice is hereby given the the
reserve existing by reason of the
notice published in the British Co-
luml !a Gazette of the 27th December, 1907, over lands on Graham Island, formerly covered by Timber
Licences Nos. Nos. 37055, 37056 and
37057, which expired on the 6th day
of November, 1909, and the lands
embraced within Timber Licence No.
37059, which expired on the 25th
day of January, 1909, is cancelled,
and that the said lands will be open
for pre-emption only under the provisions of Section 7 of the "Land
Act" after midnight on June 16th,
1911.
ROBERT A.  RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Lands Department,
Victoria, B. C,
9th March, 1911.
WATER  NOTICE
1, C. N. Prlng, of Prince Rupert,
B. C, occupation broker, give notice
that on the 12th day of July I intend tho apply to the Water Commissioner at his office in Prince Rupert, for a license to take and use
2.8 cubic feet of water per second
from Hot Springs on border of Lake
Lakelse in the Skeena Land Division of Coast District. The water is
to be taken directly from the Springs
and Is to be used on Lot No. 3983,
for sanitary purposes.
Dated June 12th, 1911.
C. N. PRING,
6-13-lm Prince Rupert, B. C.
Skeena Land District—District of
oKeena.
TAKE NOTICE that the Canadian
Canning Company, Limited, of 224
Winch Building, Vancouver, B. C,
occupation salmon canera, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted adjoining
a postmarked W. N. about 300 feet
South of Wallace's wharf, Naas Harbour, B. C; thence east 20 chains;
thence south 20 chains; thence west
20 chains; thence following the
coast line In a northerly direction
back to the point of commencement
and containing forty acres more or
less.
CANADIAN CANNING CO., LTD.
Per G. H. Leslie, Agent.
Dated 6 th June, 1911. 6-26
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast, Range 5.
TAKE NOTICE that T. H. Hughes,
of Lakelse Valley, occupation farmer,
intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted at the southeast corner of Lot
4128; thence 40 cliains north; thence
40 chains east; thenca 40 chains
south; thence 40 chains west to point
of commencement, and containing
160 acres, more or less.
TOM HUGH HUGHES.
Dated June 5, 1911.
Skeena  Land  District—District
of Coast, Range 6
TAKE NOTICE that Thomas Stewart, of Prince Rupert, occupation
accountant, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted 40 chains north from
the southwest corner of Lot 1733;
thence west 40 chains; thence south
40 chains; thence east 40 chains;
thence nortli 40 chains to point of
commencement.
THOMAS STEWART.
John  Kirkaldy, Agent.
Dated July 7, 1911.
WATER  NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that an
application will be made under Part
V of the "Water Act, 1909," to obtain a licence in the Queen Charlotte
Islands Division  of Skeena District.
(a) The name, address and  occupation of the applicant—Orland P. ,
Merrill;   Massett,    Graham    Island,
B. C;  prospector.
(If for mining purposes) Free Miner's Certificate No	
(b) The name of the lake,
stream or source (if unnamed, the
description is)—Ain Lake and Ain
River.
(c) The point of diversion—At
or near Ain Lake.
(d) The quantity of water applied for (in cubic feet per second)
—700.
(e) The character of the proposed
works—Dam, flume, pipe line and
power plant.
(f) The premises on w'li.h te.e
water Is to be used (de; 'le s::. e
—Near mouth of Ain River.
(g) The purposes for which ' i
water is to be used—Genera!;-;
power.
(h) If for irrigation, describe :' p
land to he irrigated, giving acreage
(1) If the water is to be used for
power or for mining purposes, describe the place where the water is
to be returned to some natural channel, and the difference In altitude
between point of diversion and point
of return—Near mouth of Ain River
about "L50 feet below point of diversion.
(j) Area of Crown land Intended
to be occupied by the proposed
works— About 10 acres.
(k) This notice was posted on
the tenth day of June, 1911, and application will be made to the Commissioner on the fourth day of September, 1911.
(1) Give the names and addresses
of any riparian proprietors or licensees who or whose lands are
likely to be affected by the proposed
works, either above or below the
outlet—None.
(Signature)  ORLAND P. MERRILL,
(P.  O. Address)   Masset,  B.  C.
George S. Mayer, Agent,
(P.  O.   Address)   Masset,  B.  C.
Note—One cubic foot per second
is equivalent to 35.71 miner's Inches.
Skeena   Land   District.—District   of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that I, John Y.
Rochester, of Prince Rupert, occupation broker, intend to apply fir permission to lease the following described land:— Commencing at a
post planted on the northerly end of
an island In the Skeena River about
Mile 45 on the Grand Trunk Pacific
Railway; tlience north 1000 feet
more or less to low water mark;
thence westerly along the low water
mark 1000 feet more or less;
tbence southerly 1000 feet more or
less; tlience easterly 1000 feet to
the place of commencement.
J. Y. ROCHESTER.
Dated May 30, 1911. fi-2
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that T. M..Turner,
of Lakelse Valley, occupation farmer, Intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands: — Commencing at n post
planted on the Omineca & Hazelton
right of way and adjoining the N. E.
corner of Lot 518; thence west 17
chains to corner of Lot 3996; thence
north 20 chains; thence following
right of way to point of commencement.
T. M. TURNER,
John Kirkaldy, Agent.
Dated 14th June, 1911. 7-4
Skeena    Land    Notice—District    of
Coast—Range V
TAKE NOTICE that Daniel W.
Beaton, of Prince Rupert, B. C, occupation carpenter, Intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about five miles
up the Exchumsik River from its
mouth, and on its south bank; tbence
east 40 chains; thence north 40
chains; thence west 40 chains;
thence south 40 chains to place of
commencement.
DANIEL  W.   BEATON.
Dated June  14,  1911. J-ll Friday, August 18, 1911.
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
PROTECTING FORESTS
Rules Put in Force by Provincial Minister of Railways With This
Object in View.
Companies   During   Construction   of
Lines and Alter Operation
—ust Take Precautions
In an effort to prevent the distribution of the forests of the province,
the provincial government has put in
force a set of rules governing railways which it is expected will have
the effect of precluding the chance
of fires starting from railways. The
rules have been put in force. They
were prepared by Hon. Thomas Taylor, minister of railways in the province. They are as follows:
The  Right of Way
"1. During construction, the right
of way bf railways shall be cleared
of all trees, logs, brush and other
perishable matter. Logs specially reserved to be made into ties, timber
or cordwood must be removed within a reasonable time. AH other inflammable material must be piled as
near the centre of the right of way
as possible without interfering with
the construction of the roadbed, and
burned under permit from tlie provincial fire ward. Before issuing any
such permit the warden must be sure
that ample precautions have been
taken to render such burnings safe.
"2. Trees and brush must not be
thrown upon adjacent lands, but
must be piled and burned on the
right of way as provided above.
Trees unavoidably felled outside of
the right of way must be cut up, removed to right of way, and there
disposed of.
"3. In addition to clearing its
right of way, is provided above, every
railway company shall remove, when
so ordered, from land alongside its
right of way, any dead timber or
accumulation of debris that endangers the safety of adjoining timber lands, and shall pile and burn
such dead timber and debris under
direction and permit from the district fire warden.
"4. The right of way of every railway company must at all times be
kept free of dead timber, brush dry
grass and other Inflammable matter.
"ii. In especially dangerous
places, when so directed by the minister, railway companies will be required to cut and clear fireguards
on lands adjacent to their right of
way. Whenever fires shall occur in
proximity to the right of way, railway companies and their contractors,
upon request of the minister of railways, shall place the laborers in their
employ at the disposal of any official
duly authorized by the minister.
"Tin. Sufficient provision of buckets, mattocks, shovels and axes, for
fighting bush fires must be made by
every company at suitable places
along its line.
Cutting Timber on Crown Lauds
"6. Debris, caused by the cutting
of any timber by a railway company,
under special permit of the minister
of lands, on lands of the crown adjacent to the right of way, must at
once be limbed off and piled, and
dealt with subsequently by burning
or otherwise, in accordance with the
orders of the minister of lauds. Due
notice must be given to the minister
of lands before any such cutting is
done in any locality.
Safety Appliances
"7. Every locomotive engine having an extension smoke box shall be
equipped with netting mesh, the
mesh to be not larger than 2V£x
2% per Inch .so. io Birmingham,
wire gauge, and to be placed In the
somke box so ns to extend completely over the aperture through which
the smoke ascends—the openings of
the said mesh not lo exceed a quarter of an Inch nnd one-sixty fourth
on an Inch to the square Inch. On
every engine equipped with a diamond stack the niesli to be not more
than 3x3 per inch of No. 10 Birmingham wire gauge, and to be placed
across the top of the stack so ns
to completely cover the same, the
opening of the said mesh not to exceed three-sixteenths of an inch and
one sixty-fourth of an Inch to the'
square inch.
"8. The openings at the back of
the ash pans on every locomotive
engine must he covered with heavy
sheet Iron dampers or with screen
netting dampers 21/&x2>4 per inch
of No. 10 Birmingham wire gauge,
such dampers to be fastene'd either
by a heavy spring or a split cotter
and pins.
"9. Overflow pipes from the Injectors must be put Into the front
and back parts of the ashpans and
used from April to October Inclusive.
"10. During the months from
April lo October inclusive, wire
screens must be fixed to the windows
of all smoking compartments of railway carriages.
Inspection
"11. Every railway company shall
provide inspectors at terminals where
its locomotive engines are housed
and repaired, and shall cause these
inspectors to examine at least once
a week the fire-protective appliances
used on all engines running Into the
said terminals.
"12. Record of such inspection
shall be kept in a special book at
each terminal, and the book shall
show the condition of the fire-protective appliances and the date of
the inspection,
"13. At such terminals the railway company shall at reasonable
times allow any fire warden appointed by the government of Britisii Columbia to inspect the fire protective
appliances on any engine, and to
examine the record of inspection
kept by the company in accordance
with the preceding regulation."
 o 1—■
CENTRALIZE TRAFFIC
Agreement   Entered    Into   Between
C. P. R. and Port Arthur to
Bring Trade to City
Announcement has been made by
the city council of Port Arthur of
an agreement between the city and
the Canadian Pacific Railway, signed by Sir Thomas Shaughnessy and
the secretary of the company and
Acting Mayor Dawson and Clerk Mc-
Tigue for the city, which practically
establishes Port Arthur as the upper
lake headquarters for all passenger
traffic of tliree transcontinental railways in accordance with the two big
steamship companies. The Canadian
Pacific, in consideration of exemption from taxation on its property
here, agrees to build new passenger
docks at a cost of $260,000, and
give running rights over Its lines
from West Fort for the Grand Trunk
Pacific Railway, thus providing for
the much desired entry of that road.
Summarized, the agreement is as
follows: Port Arthur gets exemption
from all claims for damages by the
Canadian Pacific Railway for the
Current River washout in May, 1908;
the erection by the Canadian Pacific
of large passenger docks and freight
sheds to cost $260,000. The preliminary plans of this dock show
double sheds, with six tracks running between the sheds; entry of
the Grand Trunk Pacific and the
arranging for handling of all baggage, freight, express and passenger traffic; a union passenger station for the three transcontinental
railways, and a Canadian Pacific
Railway  park.
Port Arthur gives exemption from
taxation on all Canadian Pacific
Railway property in Port Arthur,
except for school and local Improvement purposes; no such exemption
being recognized in the case of property leased by the railway to others;
acceptance and execution of a lease
of waterfrontage from the Canadian
Pacific Railway for the use of municipal docks; exemption from taxation of any property which the Canadian Pacific Railway may convert
into a park, and land, within three
years, when required, to be granted
to the Canadian Pacific Railway for
the erection of a union passenger
station for the Canadian Pacific
Railway and the Grand Trunk Pacific  Railway.
Skeena Land bistrict—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKiS NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the southeast corner of C.L. 4472; thence west 80
chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 cliains; thence south
80 chains to place of commencement.
AUSTIN  M.  BROWN.
Dated July 17,  1911.	
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler', intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the southeast corner of C.L. 4472; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence soutli
80 chains to place of commencement.
AUSTIN M.  BROWN.
Dated July 17, 1911.	
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the northeast corner
of C.L. 4471; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; tlience east
80 chains; thence north 80 chains to
place of commencement.
AUSTIN M. BROWN.
Dated July 17,  1911.
Skeena Land  District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that Ih'rty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince ivupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the northeast corner
of C.L. 4471; thence east 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence west
80 chains; thence north 80 chains,
to place of commencement.
AUSTIN M.  BROWN.
Dated July 17,  1911.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at. post planted
one mile east of the south corner of
C.L. 44e0; tlience north 80 chains;
thence west 80 cliains; thence south
80 chains; thence east 80 chains, to
place of commencement.
AUSTIN  M.  BROWN.
Dated July 17, 1911.
"Is it true your student lodger is
studying  astronomy?"
"Well,  ]   think  he  must   be.     lie
sleeps  all   day,   but   at  night   be  is
always out."
 o	
Percy 'neath a great arc light,
Paused a maiden fair to greet
But the shadow  that   he east
Sent her flying down the street.
NOTICE.
A book Is kept In tbe City Clerk's
Office in which to enter the names
and addresses, etc. of citizens of
Prince Rupert desiring employment
on City work. All desiring employment should register ai once.
ERNEST A. WOODS,
City Clerk.
Skeena Laud District—District of
Cassiar
TAKE NOTICE that Marion Mc-
Diarmid, of London, Ontario, occupation nurse, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described land:—Situated on the
Kitwancool River; commencing at a
post planted at the northwest corner and about 5 1-4 miles distant ill
a northwesterly direction from the
north end of Kitwancool Lake;
thence south 80 cliains; tlience east
SO chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 cliains to point of
commencement, and adjoining Lot
1878 to the north; and containing
640 acres, more or less.
MARION McDAIR.Min.
Daniel  McDonald, Agent.
Dated July 24   1911. A-l.'e
Skeena Land  District—District  of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, Intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 64 0 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the southeast corner of C.L. 4470; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south
80 chains, to place of commencement.
AUSTIN M.  BROWN.
Dated July  17,  1911.
Skeena Land  District—District  of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the south corner of
C.L.4475; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence south
80 chains; tlience west 80- chains to
place of commencement.
AUSTIN  M.  BRO.vN.
Dated July 17,  1911.
Skeena  Land  District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile north of the northeast corner of C.L. 4477; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains;
tlience east 80 chains; thence north
80 chains, to place of commencement.
AUSTIN  M.  BROWN.
Dated July  17,  1911.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to t' | Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and tinder 040 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the northeast corner
of C.L. 4474; tbence east 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence west
0 ehains; thence north fO chains, to
place of commencement.
AUSTIN M.  BROWN.
Dated July 17, 1911.	
Skeena  Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Henry Edenshaw, of
.Masset, B. C, occupation storekeeper, intend to apply to the Chief Commissioner of Lands for a license to
prospect for coal and petroleum on
and under 640 acres of land on Graham island described as follows: —
Commencing at a post planted on the
west shore of West River, one mile
easterly from the mouth of said river; thence south 80 chains; tlience
east 80 chains; thence north 80
chains; thence west 80 chains to the
place of commencement.
HENRY EDENSHAW.
Dated July  17,  1911.
Skeena  Land  District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Henry Edenshaw, of
Masset, B. C, by occupation storekeeper, Intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:
—Commencing at a post planted on
the west shore of the West River,
about one mile easterly from the
mouth of said river; thence east 80
chains; thence nortli 80 cliains;
tlience west 80 chains; tlience soutli
80 cliains, to place of commencement.
HENRY EDENSHAW.
Dated July  17,  1911.,
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Queen   Charlotte  Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Charles Lamb
of Blair, Nebraska, U. S. .-(.., occupation farmer, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 4 miles west and
4 1-2 miles nortli from the southwest corner of Lot 99i; thence south
SO chains; thence west 80 ehains;
thence north SO chains; i.ience east
80 chains to point of commencement;
containing 64 0 acres.
CHARLES LAMB.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated July   10    i911. A-15
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on'
Graham Island described as follows'—Commencing at post planted
at the southeast corner of C.L. 4477;
tlience east 80 cliains; thence nortli
SO chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains, to place of
commencement.
AUSTIN M.  BROWN.
Dated July 17,  1911.	
Skeena    Land    District—District    of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that Edward H.
Port, of Prince Rupert, B. C, occupation farmer, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following described lands:— Commencing
at a post planted in the South West
Corner, on the shore line of Lake
Lakelse; thence 20 chains East, to
South West Corner of Lot 684;
thence 30 cliains North, following
along the West line of Lot 684 to
post; thence South, following along
the shore line of said Lake to point
of commencement, containing about
40 acres.
EDWARD H. PORT,
By C.  N.  Pring, Agent.
Dated June 26,  1911. 6-26
6-26
Skeena    Land    District—District    of
Queen   Charlotte  islands
TAKE NOTICE that Haltie Sutherland of Blair. Nebraska, O, S. A.,
occupation housewife intends to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about 5
miles west and 2 1-2 miles north
from the southwest corner of Lot
991; thence west 60 chains; thence
north SO chains; thence east 60
chains; thence south SO chains, to
point of commencement; containing
about 480 acres.
HATTIE SUTHERLAND.
George S. .Mayer, Agent.
Dated July  16    1911. A-15
Skeena    Land    District—District    of
Queen  Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Abram Sutherland of Blair, Nebraska, U. S. A.,
occupation insurance agent, intends
to apply for permission to purchase
the following described lands:—■
Commencing at a post planted about
5 miles west and 2 1-2 miles north
from the southwest corner of Lot
991; thence east SO chains; tlience
north 80 cnains; thence west SO
chains; tlience south SO cliains, to
point of commencement; containing
640 acres.
ABRAM SUTHERLAND.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated July  10,  1911. A-15
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 040 acres of land on
Graham island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
at the southeast corner ofC.L.447S;
thence north 80 chains; uience east
SO chains; e.ience south SO chains;
thence west 80 chains, to place of
commencement.
AUSTIN  M.  BROWN.
Dated July 17,  1911.	
Queen Charlotte Land District—District of Skeena
TAKE NOTICE that S. Barclay
Martin, Jr., of New Westminster,
occupation engineer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted at the
northeast corner of ungazetted lot
1428, said lot being T.L. 39979;
tlience north and following tho
westerly shore of Massett Inlet 80
chains; thence west 20 chains;
thence south SO chains; thence east
40 chains, more or less, to the point
of commencement, and containing
240 acres, more or less.
S.  BARCLAY MARTIN, Jr.
Dated July 21, 1911. S-S
Skeena    Land    .jistrict—District    of
Queen  Charlotte  Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Miriam Hal-
ler of Blair, Nebraska, U. S. A., occupation housewife, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about 5 miles
west and 1 1-2 miles north from
the southwest corner of Lot 991;
tbence east SO chains; thence north
80 cnains; thence west SO chains;
tbence south 80 chains, to point of
commencement; containing 640
acres.
MIRIAM  HALLER.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated July  16,  1911. A-15
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 040 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
at the southeast corner of C.L. 4467;
thence north 80 chains; thence east
80 chains; thence south SO chains;
thence west SO chains, to place of
commencement.
AUSTIN M. BROWN.
Dated July 17,  1911.	
Skeena Lund Dislrict—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, ti. C, by occupation
sadler. Intend lo apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing nt post planted
one ni ilo east nf the northeast corner
of C.L. 4469; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; Ihence east
80 chains; thence nortli 80 chains,
to place of commencement.
AUSTIN   M.   BROWN.
Dated July  17,  1811.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, ot
Prince Rupert, B. ('., by occupation
sadler, Intend lo apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 aires of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the northeast corner
of C.L. 4469; thence east 80 chain.:;
thence south So cliains; thence west
80 chains; thence north SO chains to
place of commencement.
AUSTIN M.  BROWN.
Dated July 17,  1911.
Skeena Land  District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of!
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief!
Commissioner of Lands for a license!
to prospect for coal and petroleum |
on and under 040 acres of land on,
Graham Island described as foi-!
lows:—Commencing at posl planted;
at the southeast corner of G.L. 4465; [
tbence north 80 chains; thence easti
80 chains; thence soutli sn chains; !
tlience west SO chains, to place of
commencement.    ,
AUSTIN  M.  BROWN,
Dated July 18,  1911.
Skeena   Land   District — District   of
Queen  Charlotte  Islands
TAKE NOTICE that W. G. McMorris of the City of Vancouver in
the Province of British Columbia,
occupation, broner, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted on an island
in Skidegate Inlet about 500 yards
east from the mouth of Slate Chuck
Creek, separated from the mainland
of Graham Island at high tide;
tlience south three chains; tlience
east ten chains; thence north three
chains; thence west ten chains to
point of commencement, containing
two acres, more or less.
W. G. McMORRIS,
Dated   July   29,   1911.       Locator.
Skeena    Land    District---District    of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that James Mullin
of Murdo, South Dakota, occupation
farmer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 4 1-2 miles west
and 1 1-2 miles north from the southwest corner of Lot 991; tnence east
40 chains; thence south SO chains;
thence west 4 0 chains; thence north
80 chains, to point of i-oinmence-
ment;  containing 320 acres.
JAMES MULLIN.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated July 16.  1911. A-15
Skeena    Land    District—District   of
Queen  Charlotte  Islands
TAKE NoTICE that Belle Lamb
of Blair, Nebraska, occupation housewife, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands: — Commencing at a
post planted about 4 miles west and
■I 1-2 miles norlh from the soutk-
west corner of Lot 991; Ihence north
SO chains; thence west 80 chains;
tbence south SO chains; thence east
80 ehains, to point of commencement;  containing 640 acres.
BELLE  LAMB.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated July  16,  1911. A-15
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 040 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the southeast corner
of C.L. 447e,; thence west 80 chains;
tlience north SO chains; thence east
SO chains; thence south SO chnlns,
to place of commencement.
AUSTIN  M.  BROWN.
Dated  July 17,  1911.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from dale, I, Henry Edenshaw, of I
Masset, B. C, by occupation storekeeper, Intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under uiO acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:
Commencing at a post planted on the
bank of west River, about one mile
easterly from the mouth of said river; thence west 80 chains; thence
south SO chains; tlience east SO
ehains; thence no'-th 80 cliains, to
place  of  commencement.
HENRY EDENSHAW.
Dated July 17,  1911.
Skeena  Land  District—District  of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Henry Edenshaw, of I
Masset, B. C, by occupation storekeeper, Intend (o apply to tbe Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum on
and under 640 acros of land on Graham Island described as follows: —
Commencing at a post planted on the
west shore of West River, about one
mile easterly from the mouth of said !
river; tlience north SO chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence south so
chains; thence east 80 chains, to
place of commencement,
HENRY EDENSHAW.
Dated July 17,  19J.1.
Skeena Land District—District of
of Coast.
take NOTICE that James G.
Cromble, of Prince Rupert, occupation auditor, intends to apply fori
permission to purchase the following
described lands:— Commencing al a
post planted at the northwest corner, 55 chains cast, and 20 chains
south from northeast corner of Lot
1116 (Horry Survey), Coast Hist.,
range 5; tbence 20 chains cast;
thence 26 chains, more or less,
south to Angus MoLeod Pre-emption; Ihence 20 cliains west; tlience
':.'• cliains, more or less, nortli. to
post of commencement, containing
".ii aifcs, more or less.
JAMES Q. CROMBIB,
Fred  Bolili'ii, Agent.
Dated   June   II,   1911. 6-23 ■
Skeena    Land    District—District    of
Coast    Range  V,
TAKE   NOTICE   that     I,     Jos.'pli
Pastl,  of   Watson,  Sask.,  occupation
farmer, intend to apply for permission to purchase the    following de-
siriiii'd lands:— Commencing   at a
post  planted  about     30  c, alns in  a
northerly direction  from tlie    N. E.!
corner of Lot No. 2662 or T. L. No. I
32698 at Lakelse Lake; tlience north J
20 chains;  tbence east    40    chains; I
tbence south  20 chains along shore
of  Lakelse  Lake;   thence  west     40 j
chains  to  point   of    commencement,
containing  120  acres,  more or Ices.
JOSEPH PASTL.
George HIr, Agent.
Dated  May  5,  1911. 6-2
Prince  Rupert   Private    Detective
Agency
N. McDonald, Manager
All kinds of legitimate detective work
handled  for  companies  and  Individuals.    Business strictly conJidentla'
P. O. Box 81)11 — Phone 210
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that I, Charles
Percy Hickman, of Naaa Harbour,
occupation constable, intend to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:— Commencing at a post planted on the
easl Bhore of Naas Bay, about two
miles in an easterly direction from
Lol 3, marked c. P, ii., s. w. corner; tbence easl 20 chains; thence
nortli 40 chains to the shore; tlience
along the shore line to the place ol
commencement, containing 40 acres,
more or less.
CHARLES   PRECY   HICKMAN.
Dated June 7,  1911. 6-30
Skeena   Land   Dislrict—District
of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that Victor II
Reynolds, of Hull, Massachusetts, occupation chauffeur, Intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described land: Commencing at a post planted at high water
mark on the northerly side of the
entrance to a small unnamed cove on
the west coast of Pitt Island, about
one-quarter mile south of the entrance to Kitkatla summer village;
tbence east forty chains: tlience
south twenty chains; tlience west
forty chains; thence north ten
chains more or less to high water
mark; thence following along high
water mark around the bead ot the
cove back to the commencement, and
containing sixty  (60) acres more or
VICTOR H.  REYNOLDS.
J. H. Plllsbury, Agent.
Dated Feb.. 18th, 1911.
LINDSAY'S CARTAGE & STORAGE
G. T.  P. CARTAGE AGENTS
Office nt H. B, Rochester. Centre SL
LADYSMITH  COAL
is handled by us.   All orders recelvs
prompt attention.   Phone No  68. PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Friday, August 18, 1911.
•prince tfuycrt journal
Telephone   138
Published twice a week on Tuesdays and Fridays from the office of
publication, Third Avenue, near
McBride Street.
Subscription rate to any point in
Canada, $2,00 a year; to points out
side of Canada, $3.00 a year.
Advertising rates furnished on
application.
0. H. NELSON,
Editor.
m
Friday, August  IS,  1911.
STRONG CANDIDATE
in tin- selection of II. s. Clements
the Conservatives of Comox-Atlin
have made a wise I'lioice. He is a
man of experience in politics and in
a constituency like this that is necessary. While S. M. Newton was the
choice of the nortli there never was
any desire on tlie part of local Conservatives to make it manifest that
no one else would be acceptable. Mr,
Clements was the popular choice and
will receive no heartier support anywhere in the constituency than he
will get in Prince Rupert and the
Skeena district. He is well known
here. He knows the needs of the
north country and will receive the
hearty endorsation of tlie whole
party..
Steps will be taken at once to
carry on a vigorous campaign hi the
interests of Mr. Clements, who is
expected to be the next member for
the constituency.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * **■
1 *
|      News of the Province      *
* *
* * * * * * * * * * * •;.*.;. * * * * * * * * * * * *
NEW CONNECTION
NEW WESTMINSTER—A strong
deputation, consisting of F. J. Mackenzie, M. P. P. Mayor Lee, Alderman Gray, City Solicitor MeQuarrie
and Publicity Commissioner Wade, of
New Westminster; Reeve Sullivan, of
Surrey; A. Smith, of Delta; and Editor Bates, of the Fraser Valley Record, visited Victoria to.press the ques-
lion ul' a Victoria-New Westminster
direct steamboat line on the shipping
concerns previously interviewed by
Mr. Wade. Premier McBride was
also interviewed and promised his
support to have New Westminster's
claims carefully considered. It is
expected that a definite move towards
establishing a Victoria-New Westminster line will be taken within the
next two weeks.
SETTLEMENT MADE
The signing on behalf of the government of the agreement whereby
a settlement of the taxation question
betwen th city and the G. T. P. becomes settled is welcome news in this
city. The return of Mayor Manson
tomorrow will be followed, it is expected, by the final passing of the
bylaw necessary to be put before the
property owners of the city and an
immediate vote. The bylaw will, it
is acknowledged, he passed easily,
after which nothing stands in the
way of the carrying out of the programme of the G. T. P. with respect
to development here.
The effect of a settlement being
reached is, according to some of the
best informed real estate men, to be
followed by a decided movement this
fall in the city. It will, they say,
have the effect of steadying the feeling on the outside with respect to
the city and they know of investors
who are awaiting the final settlement to come in with capital.
So far In the history of the city
the relations between tiie G. T. P.
and Prince Rupert have been exceedingly cordial. It is to be hoped this
condition of affairs will continue as
the two parties are tied up In a very
close way with one another and can
mutually benefit each other.
It is said that the chief stumbling
block which met the mayor in his
negotiations with the government
was that with regard to the parcels
of land granted In fee simple to the
city by the government. There has
not been a great deal of stress laid
on this aspect of the settlement by
the council, probably owing to the
fact that they preferred to have the
agreement safely through before
making too much allusion to it. The
land taken over, however, by the
city under tlie this arrangement and
of which they become the absolute
owners without restriction of any
kind   Is of  immense value.
In many instances subdivision may
be made and the values are difficult
to estimate. It will run into several hundreds of thousands of dollars according to some of those who
have looked very fully into the different parcels.
Il is to be hoped that within as
short a time as possible the vole will
be taken, when, it Is safe to say,
there will be no uncertainty as to
the acquiescence of the property owners to the arrangement entered Into.
BISHOP'S   RESIGNATION
VICTORIA—The Right Reverend
Wlllcox Perrin, D.D., D.Cb., of Victoria, has been created the first suffragan Bishop of Willesden, London.
As Bishop of Willesden, Dr. Perrin
will be called upon to direct and
administer a see of such magnitude
and complexity that might well appal
a man of less vigor and resource.
The Willesden diocese will comprise
practically the whole of the north
of London, and is to include the important rural dearneries of Hamp-
stead, Hornsey and St. Pancras, as
well as that of Willesden. This
means that Bishop Perrin will administer a diocese which has a population of over 850,000 souls, and a
very large proportion of whom belongs to the industrial classes of the
"capital of the world." Willesden
itself is the home of nearly a quarter of a million artisans, who will
be quick to appreciate the presence
of so dominating and pictureques a
personality as that possessed by the
first bishop of the new diocese. The
bishopric, on the other hand, includes
the borough of Hampstead, one of
the most beautiful residential dis
tricts in the whole of Loudon.
LARGE LUMBER ORDER
One of the largest orders for lum
her placed on this coast has been
given to the Victoria Lumber Manufacturing Company Chemainus, Vancouver island, by the Grand Trunk
Pacific Company. The transcontinental railroad has placed an order with
the local mill for 10,000,000 feet of!
lumber, mostly heavy timbers, bridge
material, etc., for delivery In Manitoba for construction work east of
Winnipef. The lumber, which will
be carried east by the Great Northern and Grand Trunk railroads, will
fill fifty cars. The first shipment
is to be sent from Chemainus during
the coming week on the car ferry
Sidney of the Great Northern Railroad Company, which was in port a
few days ago with a cargo of steel
for the Jordan River Power Company. The Sidney will deliver its
cargoes to the Great Northern Railroad at Vancouver, and this road will
carry the lumber to Portage la
Prairie, where it will be delivered to
the Grand Trunk Pacific. Part of
the big order is to be sent to Trans-
cona, and the balance to Reditt and
Grabame, stations on the G. T. P.
line east of Winnipeg.
CLIFFORD SIFTON TALKS
Former   Liberal   Minister   Reiterates
Hie    Arguments   Against
Reciprocity
Hon. Clifford Sifton, formerly minister of the interior, was recently
interviewed at Ottawa, and is reported  as  follows:
Do you intend to be a candidate
in Brandon again?    be was asked,
No; 1 have written to the Liberal
Association of the country intimating that I have no Intention of offering myself there for re-election.
Will you contest any other riding?—I have no present intention of
doing so.    I prefer not to be a candidate.
Will you take any part in the election?—I shall be willing to do anything in my power to assist in the
campaign against reciprocity. The
views which I have expressed in the
House have become stronger as the
discussion has proceeded.
What are the principal grounds of
your opposition to the treaty?—
From a business standpoint, the arrangement is upon the whole injurious. General phrases about larger
markets, the greater freedom of trade
are meaningless without application
to the particular condition of the
country. In any arrangement of the
kind proposed, there will be some
benefits as largely problematical,
while the injuries in any e'ase are
certain. Taking the situation as a
whole, It appears to me that the disadvantages largely outweigh the advantages. To be more specific, take
the case of Ontario and Quebec.
While there may be opened up a
market for a few more or less unimportant products, which are not now
readily saleable, and while the prices
of a few hign class products may
be temporarily raised, there is an
absolute certainty that the market
for the great bulk of the staple products of the farm, such as butter,
eggs, sheep, hogs, etc., will be flooded
from the outside. In addition to this
it is certain that many important industries will be seriously affected.
Northwestern Wheat
What about northwestern wheat?
—The contention that the western
wheat grower will get a better price
under reciprocity has been pretty
well shattered. A leading article in
the Manitoba Free Press, giving a
moderate and reasoned statement of
the case for the treaty, does not
claim that the price will be higher.
The article, after pointing out that
Great Britain takes only 105,000,000
cwt. of wheat from all countries, and
showing that the western wheat crop
may soon reach 400,000,000 bushels,
puts the question as follows: "The
problem before Mr. Borden is to demonstrate how the Canadian producer
can dispose of this volume if he is
to be limited to the Canadian market
and to the British market."
Can this question be satisfactorily
answered?—I think so. Great Britain
settles the price of wheat for three
reasons: She is the largest importer
of wheat; she is a free trade country; she is the world's carrier. She
therefore acts as the world's clearing
house for wheat, as for many other
commodities. The price in Britain
is settled by the world's supply and
demand. If the United States should
become a wheat importing country
and want 50,000,000 bushels, It
would make not the slightest difference whether she bought it from Canada, Argentina, Egypt or India. What
the United States absorbed from the
world's supply would affect the demand and the price in precisely the
same way wherever she might get
it. Ten years hence they would not
market a single bushel more of Canadian wheat because of wheat being
free between Canada and the United
States. The ratio of the whole available supply to the whole demand
fixes the price of wheat in the world's
centre of trade; and that in turn
regulates the price in the remotest
corner of the earth wliere there is
transportation to take the wheat to
the world's market.
Can you put the case a little more
concretely?—Yes. Suppose next year
there Is a shortage in the United
States of 50,000,00 bushels. This
shortage in the United States Increases the demand upon the world's
supply and raises the price at the
world's centre of the trade. From
there tt stiffens the demand and
raises the price at all the primary
shipping markets of the world. The
United States buys its fifty million
bushels wherever it Is most convenient at the market price enhanced
by the United Stales demand. It
makes makes not the slightest difference where the wheat Is bought.
Every primary market in the world
gets the benefit of the increased demand and the enhanced price caused
by  the shortage In  the States.    In-
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * .*• *** * * * * * * *
* *
* *
I |
1 Remember f
i That we  |
* *
| Import
I Our Wines 1
direct from Europe; and that
no house in Prince Rupert can
equal them for quality. No
better can be bought anywhere
in the Province. We make a
specialty  of
Family Trade
and guarantee satisfaction
*
* We  also   carry  a   complete  *
* f
* stock of other
f
Liquors
Try a glass of
Cascade
Beer
*
*
*
I
f   market.
The best local  beer on  the
CLARKE BROS.
Christiansen & Brandt Bid,       *
+   Telephone 89
Third Avenue  f
i*************************
cidentally, I may remark that a study
of the statstics and the agricultural
conditions of the United States does
not indicate that she is any nearer
to becoming a wheat Importing country than she was twenty years ago.
The Sacrifice of Independence
But the most serious feature of
the arrangement, Mr. Sifton continued, is the sacrifice of our fiscal
independence. The more you look
at it, the more certain does It become
that from the moment the treaty
takes effect, our policy will be controlled by what is done at Washington. Today we are the most independent country in the world. We
absolutely control every department
of our public administration. Once
we put ourselves in a state of dependence upon American markets
and American tariffs, our freedom is
gone. With It goes the mainspring
of our national life. No Intelligent
man can deny that the policy followed by the United States in excluding us from her markets in the past
has been a prime factor in making
Canada a self-reliant and independent country. It was at first a hardship, and there was every excuse
for those who sought reciprocity.
Now that we have overcome the difficulty, and won our way through to
Independence and prosperity, there Is
no excuse for throwing away the advantages of our position. The true
path for Canada Is the path she has
been following—a dignified Independence  in   policy  and  a  virorous
The British Columbia Company
LIMITED.
AUTHORIZED CAPITAL $100,000.::  PAID UP CAPITAL $41,500
DIRECTORS:—Reginald C. Brown, President; J. C. Maclure, Vice-
President; H. E. Marks, Managing Director; Capt. E. Nash, William
McNalr, R. A. Bevan, and F. C.   Williams, Secretary.      :-:      :-:
INTEREST 4 PER CENT. DEPOSITS
This Company acts as Executors, Administrators, Transferees and
Secretaries to Public Companies.   Commercial, Industrial and other
business propositions underwritten.    Issues made on  the
London and New York Stock Exchanges.
TIMBER, COAL, LANDS, and
COMPANY ORGANIZATION
Head Office for Canada, 203, 208, 210, 215 Carter-Cotton Building,
VANCOUVER, B.C.
61 Floor Varnish
Made
Especially
for Floors
Will not crack nor peel off.
Water will not turn it white.
Sold only In sealed cans.
Ask for sample panel.
If your dealer does not stock It write
The Staneland Co. Ltd
836-840 Fort Street, VICTORIA, B.C.
-™1
Replenish
the
Pantry
L—.....
«j
High-Class....
Grocery
Stock
to choose from
EVERYTHING CLEAN AND FRESH
Goods for the Table to Suit the Most
Fastidious Housewife
r-1
■™i
! MERRYFIELD'S S
i
i
CASH GROCERY      i
development and careful conservation of her own resources. The treaty
is the first step towards the exploitation and .the subordination of
Canada.
Have you any opinion to offer regarding the probable result of the
election?—-No, but I hope and trust
that there are a great many thousands of Liberals In Canada who are
patriotic enough to put country before party, and stand by our true
national interests. Particularly, I
hope  that  the  thousands  of  young
men who have lately been forming
themselves Into non-political Canadian clubs for purposes of discussion
will see that the Ideals toward which
they have been working are In danger, and will, regardless of party
affiliations, throw themselves into
the fight. It makes little difference
to the future what Is the name of
the party which Is In power for the
next five years, hut It is of incalculable Importance that the true lines
of our national development should
he firmly and jealously maintained.
2nd Avenue
Prince Rupert,
B.C.
Real
Estate
INVESTMENTS
Real
Estate
JEREMIAH H. KUGLER
He Sells Buildings He Sells Contracts
He has Houses to Rent
He Buys Lots He Builds Homes
He Buys Leases He Loans Money
He Has Farms for Sale
He Sells Houses He Rents Stores
JEREMIAH H. KUGLER
Special Bargains in
List Your
Properties
with
Uncle Jerry
KITSELAS LANDS
FRANCOIS LAKE LANDS
LAKELSE LANDS
HAZELTON  DISTRICT  LANDS
BULKLEY  VALLEY  LANDS
KISPIOX VALLEY LANDS
PORCHER  ISLAND  LANDS
K1TSUMKALUM   LANDS
SAND,   GRAVEL   AND   MARBLE   DEPOSITS Friday, August 18, 1011.
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
SPORTS
CROQUET   CHAMPIONSHIP
The finals of the croquet tournament, held on the grounds of the
Jericho Country Club in Vancouver,
were played off yesterday afternoon.
In the open singles, J. W. Kerr won
from J. S. Bowker of Voctoria, the
former cupholder. Mr. Kerr a'so defeated Mr. Bowker in the men's
handlcaj singles. The ladies' cup
was won by .Mrs. Willoughby Brown,
who defeated Mrs. J. S. Bowker. Mrs.
Willoughby Brown held the cup last
year also. With Mrs. Tuthill as a
partner, Mrs. Willoughby Brown won
the ladles' doubles from Mrs. Bowker and Mrs. J. S. Bowker. In the
open doubles, Mr. O'Reilly and M>*s.
Kirk won from Mr. and Mrs. J. S.
Bowker.
GAMBLE ON PLAYERS
Buying minor league ball players
is merely a gamble. A raw minor
league player may set his league
afire with his bril'iancy on the field
and big league scouts may tout him
as a wonder, but when you remove
his cactus-hued raiment and outfit
him with a neat grey uniform with
New York or Detroit on his short
bosom It's a different proposition.
Nine times out of ten the manager
finds that he is "shine" and that
he lacks confidence and gameness
and an adequate knowledge of the
fine points of the big game.
In paying $22,500 for the release
of Pitcher O'Toole of the St. Paul
Club, Barney Dreyfuss, the Pittsburg
magnate, has hung up a record price
that may not be equalled for many
years. Assuming that Dreyfuss actually paid this amount, O'Toole has
earned the distinction of being twice
as valuable as any ball player whose
services have been secured for cash.
Muggsy McGraw paid $1,000 for
Marquard several years ago, which
was said to he the top notch until
Connie Mack bought Lefty Russell
of Baltimore for $12,000. Marquard
failed to deliver the goods in New
York the first two years, but this
year'he is the Giants' mainstay on
the turret. He is a marvellous
pitcher.
Every baseball fan remembers
when the Boston Club handed $10,-
000 to the Chicago Club for Mike
Kelly, and equal sum a year later
for the peerless boxnian, John Clark-
son. Boston also put up $30,000 for
the old Detroit stars, Brouthers,
Richardson, Bennett and Ganzel.
Connie Mack will tell you that
Lefiy Russell has not come up to
expectations. There are scores of
other similar examples in big league
baseball. Whether O'Toole can deliver the goods or not remains to
be seen. It's a good wager that
he doesn't create the sensation in
the major circles that Pitcher Alexander of the Phillies has this year
and    Dooin's   big  heaver  only   cost
»3,"el)0.
In scores of instances players secured for almost nothing have shown
the required calibre. Alexander's release could not be purchased for
$25,000. Ty Cobb only cost the Detroit management $2,500, if not less
than that sum. The Georgia peach
is worth $100,000 to Jenning's club.
Buying ball players, therefore, is
nothing more than a gamble, particularly in the case of minor
leaguers, and changes would not be
taken by the big club owners without, the liberal patronage of the
public.
Winners mean large profits, and
in the competition for talent the richest magnates have placed no limit
on their expenditures. Dreyfuss outbid the White Sox, Cardinals and
other clubs in his desperate attempt
to strengthen the faltering Pirates
.with the acquisition of O'Toole, and
as the Pittsburg magnate is a good
judge of hall playing talent his
friends will be surprised If he has
made a mistake.
Between now and next spring the
major league clubs will probably
spend $225,000 for new players, yet
according to precedent they may find
that only a small percentage of the
newcomers measure up to the necessary standard. It's a good thing for
the little clubs, however, for without this competition among the big
fellows they would find It difficult
to make ends  meet.
 o—i	
MINE  MAY  CLOSE
close down all operations at the end
of the present month.
The present rate on ore from Car-
cross to Skagway, $1.75 per ton in
carload lots, has been very satisfactory to the operators of the mine, as
at that reasonable charge for transportation the mine could be developed at a profit, even though the ore
has been hauled by wagons a distance of six miles from the mine to
the depot. But at the rate announced
to take effect Septmbr 1 Colonl Conrad says there will be nothing in it
and he has announced that he will
cease if the railroad company insists
on the Increased rate.
In the event of the mine closing
down the last shipping operations in
the Yukon, so far as the quartz industry is concerned, will have passed
Into history, and owls and bats will
iu future hold high carnival where
now all is activity and bustle.
It Is sincerely hoped that Vice
President and General Manager Dlck-
eson of the railroad, who returned
this week from a business trip to
Chicago, may succeed in having the
tariff order respecting ore rscinded,
in which event the Big Thing mine
will be operated continuously and indefinitely, and Carcross and vicinity
will continue to bask in the refulgent rays of prosperity's sun which
have beamed so lovingly, caressingly
and benignly upon them for the past
several months.
WIRELESS  SERVICE
Bishop Stringer To Make Effort to
Aid the Yukon
District
An effort to get wireless stations
established at outlying points in this
district will be undertaken at Ottawa
soon by Bishop Stringer. The bishop,
in fact, has taken up the work
already in a modest way, and has
prepared to ground to some extent.
He believes that such places as Herschel Island, Fort MacPherson and
Rampart House would be robber of
a great share of their isolation and
the people and the country in general would be wonderfully benefitted
if wireless plants were in operation
in such places. The bishop talked
over the project with F. T. Congdon
member of parliament for Yukon, last
month, while Mr. Congdon was visiting his constituency. Mr. Congdon
spoke favorably of the project.
Bishop Stringer is also looking
into the feasibility of bringing reindeer into this territory for the natives. He is much interested in the
movement undertaken by Frank Oliver, minister of the interior, and
says that since a number of reindeer
are being taken into the MacKenzie
Valley it might be well to have some
experiments conducted with them in
this territory. The bishop, however,
will consider the matter carefully before deciding as to any recommendations. Reindeer were brought into
Alaska thirteen years ago, and the
herd has grown to more than 000,-
000. They are scattered over most
of the northern portion of Alaska,
and some are said to be close to
Fort Yukon, only 200 miles or so
from the Canadian boundary line.
Quite a number are farther down
the Yukon, near Nulato. It is claimed that it would be far less expensive
and easier to bring a number of
them by boat up the Yukon for this
territory than to introduce any of
the new herd which the government
recently secured from Labrador.
 o	
REDUCED RATE
YOU ARE SURE OF
Engine  Reliability
IF  YOU  RUN  A
Fairbanks - Norse Marine Engine
OVER 125,000 IN USE THROUGHOUT THE WORLD
TWO
CYCLE
FOUR
CYCLE
HEAVY
DUTY
MEDIUM
DUTY
■
Runabout
Type
MOST  COMPLETE  LINE OF GASOLINE ENGINES IN
THE WORLD
Write  for Catalog P19
The Canadian Fairbanks Co., Ltd.
101-107 WATER STREET
Local Agent—F. M. DAVTS
VANCOUVER, B. O.
- PRINCE RUPERT
THE CONTINENTAL TRUST COMPANY, LIMITED
Authorized Capital     8500,000
Officers:
WILLIAM T. KERGIN, M. D., Pres. DAVID   H.   HAYS,  First  Vice-Pres.
M. J. HOBIN, 2nd Vice-Pres. & Mgr. JAY   KUGLER,   Secretary-Treasurer
C.  B.  PETERSON, Ass't Manager
Executor and Administrator Receiver or Assignee
Fiscal Agents Trustees
Real Estate und Insurance
Registrar nnd Transfer Agent Fan11 La"ds and Mines
Agent for Care of Real Estate Escrow Agents
Trustee Coder .Mortgages nnd  Deeds of Trust Collections
SAVINGS DEPARTMENT
4 per cent on Deposits        SAFE DEPOSIT VAULT AND BOXES
We will ho pleased to answer any Inquiries regarding investments in
Prince Rupert nnd Northern British Columbia,
THE CONTINENTAL TRUST COMPANY, LIMITED
SECOND AVENUE PRINCE   RUPERT,  B.  O.
in fact, the question of motive power need not be entered into only
as a matter of speed. The swift-
flowing Fraser, averaging at least
seven miles an hour, will prove
a cheaper and more rapid carrier
than the freight wagon of the Cariboo road, supplemented by the long
steamboat haul up river from Soda
Creek. Just how much the new
route will cheapen the freight rate
is variously estimated. There is good
reason to believe, however, that the
new rate will be only a third of the
present one. This is a conservative
estimate and many shippers believe
that one-fifth of the present rate will
cover the toll on the new route. At
present the freight rate from Vancouver averages at least 7 cents per
pound. If by the new route this can
be reduced to 2 cents, what a boon
it would be to the people of the
country! The year of 1913 should
see the road to Fort George from
east to west.
IV    THE    SUPREME    COURT    OF
BRITISH  COLUMBIA
In  the matter of the  "Official  Administrator's Act"
And
In the matter of the estate of
Thomas Smith deceased intestate.
TAKE NOTICE that by order of
His Honor Judge Lampman, made
the 16th day of August, 1911, I was
appointed administrator of the estate
of the said Thomas Smith deceased,
and all parties having claims against
the said estate are hereby required
to forward same properly verified to
me on or before the 4th day of Sep-
ember, 1911; and all parties indebted to the said estate are required to
pay the amount of their indebtedness
to me forthwith.
Dated August IS, 1911.
JOHN H. McMULLIN,
Official Administrator.
Prince Rupert, B. C.
 o	
The Journal (twice a week), only
$2.00 a year.
New Route by River Will Supersede
tlie Cariboo Trail,  Says
The Tribune
Raise  In   Freight  Rates   Has   Been
Announced by the
Company
If the White Pass Railroad carries
out its announced intention of raising
the rate on ore from Carcross to
Skagway from $1.75 to $2.75 per
ton on September 1, which notification has been given to Colonel J. H.
Conrad, principal owner of the Big
Thing mine, which has been shipping
ore regularly for the past six of
eight months or more, that mine will
H. A. Carney and Russel Peden
of Fort George have left the northern town for Edmonton via the Yellowhead Pass to arrange for freight
shipments by rail to Tete Jaune
Cache and thence down the Fraser
to Fort George this fall. The Tribune states:
Il is now generally known thnt
steel Is laid within a comparatively
short, distance of Tete Jaune Cache,
and that from the end of steel a good
wagon road extends to the head of
navigation on the Fraser. If conditions are favorable Mr. Peden Intends bringing in supplies by the
new route for his sawmill camp.
These will include a large quantity
of grain for the teams employed In
his logging camp.
The proposition of putting in a
sawmill at the Cache to supply lumber for the building of barges and
other craft to be usee? in transporting goods down Ihe Fraser to Fort
George will also be looked Into.
Without a doubt next year will
find Edmonton a supply point for
Central British Columbia. The
Grand Trunk Pacific has officially
announced that the steel will be laid
as far as Tete Jaune Cache early
this fail. From the Cache down
river to Fort George the transportation system is one easy of solution;
IN THE COUNTY COURT OF ATLIN
HOLDEN AT PRINCE RUPERT
In the matter of "Official Administrators Act"
And
In the matter of the estate of Patrick
Kennedy deceased intestate.
TAKE NOTICE that by order of
His Honor Judge Young, made the
17th day of June 1911, I was appointed administrator of the estate
of the said Patrick Kennedy, deceased, and all parties having claims
against the said estate are hereby
required to forward same properly
verified to me on or before the 4th
day of September, 1911; and all
parties indebted to the said estate
are required to pay the amount of
their indebtedness to me forthwith.
Dated August 18,  1911.
J. A. FRASER,
Official Administrator.
Atlin, B. C.
IN THE COUNTY COURT OF ATLIN
HOLDEN AT PRINCE RUPERT
In  the matter of  the "Official Administrator's Act"
And
In the matter of the estate of George
McLeod deceased intestate.
TAKE  NOTICE   that  by  order  of
His  Honor Judge Young, made  the
28 th  day of July,  1911,  I  was appointed administrator of the estate
of the said George McLeod deceased,
and all parties having claims against
the said estate are hereby required
to forward same properly verified to
me on or before the 4th day of September, 1911; and all parties indebted to the said estate are required to
pay the amount of their indebtedness
to me forthwith.
Dated August IS, 1911.
JOHN H. McMULLIN,
Official Administrator.
Prince  Rupert,  B. C.
IN THE COUNTY COURT OF ATLIN
HOLDEN AT PRINCE RUPERT
In   the  matter  of  the  "Official   Ad
ralnlstrator's Act"
And
In the matter of the estate of John
Bowman deceased intestate.
TAKE NOTICE that by order of
His Honor Judge Y'oung, made the
16th day of June, 1911, I was appointed administrator of the estate
of the said John Bowman deceased,
and all parties having claims against
the said estate are hereby required
to forward same properly verified to
me on or before the 4th day of September, 1911; and all parties indebted to the said estate are required to
pay the amount of their Indebtedness to me forthwith.
Dated  August  18,  1911.
JOHN   II.   McMULLIN,
Official  Administrator.
Prince Rupert, B. C.
TO WATER TAKERS
On account of scarcity of water
the supply will be cut off between
the hours of 9 p. m. and 5 a. m.
during the dry weather.
WM.   MAHLON   DAVIS,
tf Supt. of Water Works.
********.>*******< ****** *•>•:
| 75 x 100 Feet
*
X    ASK     For Lease en Third
I UNCLE     Avenue at Ninth
JERRY
Street
| JEREMIAH H. KUGLER, LTD. |
»> •J* ♦> «2«->>»3»»5"t& igi $ »j» ►*« »jt $ fjtt.jt *■•« »ji »♦« »j. »j» »j» «j« .j. »j, .*.
I   FOR RENT I
* *
* Store     building     on     Second ••:•
* Avenue    at    Seventh    Street. *
* Low   Rent. f
* ...
| JEREMIAH H. KUGLER, LTD. *
•> ■£••
•j- »j« •>£■* .j* »j* ♦!« *;« *J* *;• ijf »j* «j4 »;* »j« »j» »j» ♦ j« »j« tj«»;«*j* i>jt »*« ►;« »j* »j.
♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦«>■♦♦■♦
The Thompson
: Hardware Co.
-Second Avenuk-
< >   Paints. General Hardware,    . >
Oils, Stoves and Ranges.
Double Weekly Service
S.S. PRINCE RUPERT & S.S. PRINCE GEORGE
Sail for Vancouver,  Victoria and Seattle
Mondays and Fridays at S a.m.
For STEWART Thursdays and Sundays 8 a.m.
Special reduced fare Sunday's boat J9.50
return,   Including   meals   and   berths.
S.S. PRLNCH JOHN' for Port Simpson, Niias River, Mnsset and
Naden Harbor, Wednesdays, 1 P.M., and for Queen Charlotte
Island points, Saturdays, 1 P.M.
RAILWAY SERVICE TO COPPER RIVER, mixed trains from
Prince Rupert Wednesdays and Saturdays, 1 P.M.; returning   Thursdays   and   Sundays,  5:20 P.M.
THE GRAND TRUNK RAILWAY SYSTEM, connecting with
trains from the Pacific Coast, operates a frequent aud convenient
service of luxurious trains over its DOUBLE TRACK route between
Chicago, Toronto, Montreal, Quebec, Halifax, Portland, Boston,
New York nnd Philadelphia.
Atlantic Steamship bookings arranged via ail lines
Full information and tickets obtained from the office of
A. E. McMASTER
Freight and Pasenger Agent, G. T. P. Wharf.
•> * ***** * * * * * * * * * * *&* * * * * * * * * *
{STORAGE
* V
e£» *
* Household Goods and Baggage *
£ given careful attention. .;.
%   Forwarding,   Distributing   and *
* Shipping Agents *
I TRANSFERERS |
* Prince Rupert Warehousing *
X and   Forwarding   Co. *
* First  Ave.,   near   McBride   St.  *
* DOUGLAS SUTHERLAND,      *
*, Manager. %
* P. O. Box 007 Phone 202 *
* v
* •••
**************************
GRAND HOTEL
WORKINGMAN'S HOME
25c
Rooms 50 Cents
Spring Beds, Clean
White Sheets
Best In Town for the Money
FIRST AVE. AND SEVENTH ST.
J. Goodman, Proprietor
Excursions!
Let us tell you all about the cheap
ROUND TRIP EXCURSIONS
to all Towns and  Cities In Eastern
Canada and United  States
Via
The Great Northern
Choice of Return  Route
Tickets to the Old Country by all
Lines. Take any Steamer from
Prince Rupert.
ROGERS STEAMSHIP AGENCY
Phone 110 Second Ave
Prince Rupert, B.C.
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY CO.
R. C. Const S. S. Service
Famous
Princess
Line
TENDERS WANTED
Sealed tenders will be received by
the Building Committee of the Methodist Church of Prince Rupert, B. C,
until 12 o'clock noon, August 22nd,
1911, for the erection nnd completion of a Church building, to be
erected on Sixth Avenue, in the City
of Prince Rupert, B. C, according
to plans and specifications prepared
by G. L. Proctor, architect, Prince
Rupert. A certified check, equal to
ten (10) per centum of the amount
of the tender drawn in favor of the
Treasurer or Trustee Board, which
will be forfeited if the party tendering declines to enter into a contract
when called upon to do so; or If he
or his heirs or executors fail to complete the contract. The lowest or
any other tender not necessarily
accepted.
Plans and specifications may be
se-en at the office of I'. McLaughlin,
Third Avenue, alter noon, Tuesday,
August 16th, 191 l.
*****************************************************
GROUND
Princess Royal
Friday, Aug 18, 11 a. m.
SOUTHBOUND FOR
Vancouver, Victoria,
AND
Seattle
J. G. McNAB,
General Agent.
Free Employment
Office
Floor Space For Rent
IN THE
HARTBUILDING
Corner of Second Avenue and Sixth Street
The Best Business Corner in
Prince Rupert
Jermiah H. Kugler, Ltd.
For all kinds of help. Cooks, waiters, dishwashers, hotel porters, all
kinds of laborers or mechanics, call
up  178  or call at  the
FREE EMPLOYMENT OFFICE
GRAND HOTEL
Headquarters for Cooks and Walters
ROGERS & BLACK
Wholesale Dealers In
BUILDING   MATERIAL,     CEMENT,
LIME,  HAIR-FIBRE PLASTER
COKE,  BLACKSMITH COAL,
COMMON BRICK, PRESSED BRICK
SHINGLES AM) LATH
NEW   WELLINGTON   COAL
All   orders   promptly   filled—see   us
for prices.
PHONE 11(1 PHONE 110
***ej. **** ******* **** ******************■<
• **** * ****** PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Friday, August 18, 1911,
AUGUST : FURNITURE : SALE
If you have not visited our store it will PAY YOU TO DO SO NOW. Since lowering to street grade, we have
our immense stock in shape for your inspection and convincing SALE PRICES in all grades of FURNISHINGS.
Have you stopped to consider the saving of $ $ $ on the House Furnishing you require ?
20 and 25 per cent. Discount for Cash
Pillows and Cushions
Our New Stock of PILLOWS is
what you require. At our Sale, Prices
20 and 25% From Regular Values.
All grades to make selection. DOWN
PILLOWS, GOOSE PILLOWS, HEN
FEATHER PILLOWS, MIXED
FEATHER and WOOL PILLOWS.
Also KAPOCK CUSHIONS for Settee
and  Cosy  Corners.
Regular Value of IRON BEDS,
5.00.   Sale Price,  any size. . .$3.50
This Same Reduction given to al"
IRON BEDS in our large assortment.
Twenty Different Designs BRASS
EXTENSION RODS, at Cut in Two
Prices.
Here's a Record
in
Chiffonnier
Values
SURFACED OAK CHIFFONIER
with Five Drawers and Hat Compartment; British Bevel Mirror on
top. Regular Value, $20.00. Sale
Price      $1-1.00
SURFACED OAK CHIFFONNIER
with Five Drawers and Oval British
Mirror. Regular Value, $22.50.
Sa e Price $15.00
SURFACED OAK CHIFFONNIER
with Five Drawers; Serpentine Front
Shaped Mirror. Regular Value,
$26.00.    Sale Price $17.00
CHIFFONNIER, Quarter-Cut Oak,
Five Drawers, Oval Mirror. Regular
Value, $30.00.    Sale Price... $20.00
CHIFFONNIER, Solid Quarter-
Cut Oak, Five Drawers and Hat Compartment, Oval British Mirror. Regular Value, $38.50. Sale Price,$27.00
CHIFFONIER, Quarter-Cut Oak,
Five Large Drawers, Swivel Front.
Regular      Value,       $45.00. Sale
Price    $82.00
Dining Tables
DINING TABLES, BUFFETS,
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GEO. D. TITE,
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PREMIER McBRIDE
ON RECIPROCITY
At Annual Picnic of Victoria  Conservatives the Provincial Head of Party Makes His Position Clear
as an Opponent of the Pact Proposed
to be Entered Into With the
United States.
At the annual picnic given by the
Conservatives of Victoria and the
soutli end of Vancouver Island, Premier McBride a few days ago, made
a strong speech, which he denounced
the reciprocity pact.    He said:
".Mr. Chairman, Ladies and Gentlemen—I feel it a very great pleasure and privilege, indeed, to see so
many hundreds of citizens of Victoria here today, and 1 feel proud
indeed of the splendid reception that
you have been kind enough to extend
to my colleagues and myself this
afternoon, our annual picnic falling
at so opportune an occasion to dis-
i-iiss in our own western fashion the
pertinent issues that are In bo dis-
leeeseel of hy the people of Canada on
the 21st proximo. Last year when
we foregathered al Sidney, nee <-if<--
tion appeared to be Imminent, yet
we were encouraged with various reports from all the several districts,
speaking well for ..ee perfection ol
organization and general readineBi of
the party In Ilritish Columbia whenever ii ii election might come. The
conditions, so favorable in 1910, cx-
Isl today in even larger measure,
and there should be no difficulty In
our rendering on the 21st September an excellent report to our chieftain, Mr, Borden. The people of
this western province of Canada are
British lo the core, and British too
in the best sense of worthy Imperialism. 1 myself am but just returned
from the coronation of his majesty
tlie king, and it is my good fortune
to   be  able   to   tedl   you.   fresh   as   I
    from   the  great   city  of  London,
with wiiiit wonderful Interest the people of the Homeland are now looking
to Canada and how deeply they, too,
are concerned in Hie distiny of Ihis
country of ours, a destiny so Inseparably Interwoven with the issue that
it is to be decided so shortly at the
polls.
"Never before in the history of the
Empire has Canada loomed so large
in the eyes of Britons as it does now.
Never has so general and so intelligent, an interest in her affairs been
made plainly manifest. It seems to
me that with the very large number
of prominent Canadians at tlie coronation and Ihe prominence that Canadian iterests have latterly assumed
In the Old Land, our importance as
a factor in the Empire was never
before so strongly accentuated. The
people of the Motherland realize
that while they are wealthier than
We have hav more to show in established civilization for their greater
age and consequent perfected maturity, yet in natural resources and
all the true potentialities ol strong
nationhood, Canada presents the evidence thai it must some day become
iho dominant factor in the Greater
British Empire. And in the working
lent ot this great destiny, we do nol
want to disappoint our kinsfolk of
the Motherland. We want to semi
them a message on the 21st Soptein-
lie'f Hint they will understand as
clear and unmlstakeable—that we
are as Canadians still firm and
strong for the Empire, that wo are
going to keep as our flag the good
old Union Jack, that we are determined to preserve our Dominion
for that great future that nature has
mapped out for it. 1 have never
before been so deeply, so absolutely
impressed With the greatness and per-
I'ei'tion of Britain's true democracy.
We bear so much of the spirit of
freedom and equality typified by the
Stars and Stripes, but those who live
under that flag cannot begin to realize the full meaning or law, of liberty, of true equality In citizenship
until they have been privileged to
live under the Union Jack. No better example of this Is to be found
inywhere   than   in   this   Ilritish   Co
lumbia of ours. In the point of
admirable laws, no state and no territory in the Union to the soutli is
enabled to enjoy the same freedom,
privilege and liberty as obtain in this
Province of Britisii Columbia under
the Union Jack. I have discussed
this question with many leading Americans, pointing out conditions as
they exist here 1n this province, and
with wonder and amazement they
have all been forced to admit that
they dare not attempt to attain the
same true democarcy in the United
States because of the dominant influence there of political cliques and
combinations.
"Which i"
"Are we of Canada going to preserve this blessed heritage of liberty
or are we to exchange it and our
present fortunate conditions for those
other conditions in which we find
so much to criticize across the boundary line.' Our Liberal friends declare that the policy of the Conservative party today is one of jingoism
and talk of imaginary dangers of annexation. The the position of the
Conservatives is sound and sane, that
Conservative conclusions are the only
ones that can legitimately be drawn,
we have Incontrovertible proof of.
We have as evidence upon which
to base our conclusions tlie authority
of Sir Wilfrid Laurier himself on
una hand, and on the other President Taft—that if ever there was a
time when argument against the possibility of annexation was most per-
tini'in, now is the time and Hie opportunity. Did not Sir Wilfrid in
sieiilieel language and set terms say
to the people of Canada when asking them to endorse Ihe National
Transcontinental Hallway project In
1!)03, lay it down as an axiomatic
principle that the whole of this line
would have to be on Canadian soil
so as to have it remain independent
Of the United States? And did not
Sir Wnfrld then say that 'the best
and the most effective way to mainl
tain friendship with our ..merlcan
neighbors is to be absolutely independent of them"? This surely is a
very strong argument against the action of the Liberal government which
now wishes to' tie us up with the
United Slates and so Interlock our
trade with theirs that it will be Impossible for us to remain Independent of that country in trade matters.
And did not President Taft, speaking
In New York but a short Lime ago,
say that he wanted his American
brethren to clear the way for reci
procity, because reciprocity must
quickly be followed by closer political
relationship and it was essential to
the prevention of a wider imperial
connection? We have here, then, the
warning of our own Canadian prime
minister on the one hand and that
of the president of the United States
on the other. Surely there were
enough to arouse every man and
every woman of Canada, to stir even
the most lethargic to recognition of
tlie Inner meaning of this proposed
compact. Surely this should be sufficient to Induce our Liberal friends
—if there were any Liberals left in
Britisii Columbia—to come out as
Canadians and oppose this reciprocity arrangement under the Conservative flag. Surely it was time for
them to make such a move, after being for sixteen years misled by their
party chiefs. Did they not recollect
how they had been told in 1890 that
if the Liberals came into office, free
trade should reign in Canada from
the Atlantic to the Pacific shores.
That was the great inducement held
out by Liberalism in Canada In 1896,
but today the Liberals were found
as staunch in their faith as protectionists as the most ardent of the
Conservative party. The line of demarcation between the parties had
become merely a sentimental one.
Putting of the Ways
"To come down to the plain facts,
had not sentimeiitalisiii been carried
to an extreme, had it not merged
Into hero-worship, and thereby and
thereby alone Sir Wilfrid Laurier re-
power? Should such seiitimentalism
prevail today, when the people of
Canada were called upon to answer
question which was ill effect, 'Are
you going to stand firm by the British connection, British liberty and
British institutions, or throw these
over so as to pander to flie many
corrupt Influences arising and fostered In the United States?' I think that
I may say, in the rirst place, that,
whether Liberals or Conservatives in
this country, the people of British
Columbia will give me this much
credit, to admit that in what I have
striven to do for British Columbia
I have been prompted by no selfish
motives, but have formulated and
carried out my policies with the aim
that we shall have in this province
Hie home of a large, a prosperous
and a contented section of the British people. And now I should not
be doing my duty did I not do my
level best In this crisis to see that
our beloved province of Britisii Co-
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
SIR EDMUND WALKER, C.V.O., LL.D., D.C.L., President
ALEXANDER LAIRD, General Manager    ,
CAPITAL, - $10,000,000        REST, - $7,000,000
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Belgium
Brazil
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Chili
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Greece
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India
Ireland
Italy
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The amount of these drafts is stated in the money of the country where they are payable ; that is they are drawn in sterling, francs, marks, lire, kronen, florins, yen,
taels, roubles, etc., as the case may be. This ensures that the payee abroad will
receive the actual amount intended. 233
J. M. CHKISTIE, Manager, Prince Rnpert Branch
lumbia stands as the stronghold of
Conservatism, and, as a part of Canada, more Imperial than ever. The
Conservative conventions in this
province will be held In a few days.
We have candidates galore to select
Ihe best men from, and in a few days
more candidates will be -e field.
Our organization Is being perfected
and we shall .eave nothing undone
to bring back to our chieftain, Mr.
R. L. Borden, a solid phalanx of
seven from British Columbia. But
iu addition to organizing, we want
the people to come In with us—the
men and the women and the boys
and girls—so that we may leave no
stone unturned that might in any way
contribute to tlie brilliant victory that
Is to be achieved. We want the
ladies, who dominate the homes, to
advise the men patriotically, to vote
right, to vote straight, to vote for
the continuity of the British connection. In Victoria we can look forward with confidence to piling up a
creditable majority for our candidate—and it is whispered that Mr.
Barnard will he that candidate—a
majority to which he can point with
pride. The forthcoming election is
brought on at a most unusual time
—the time of harvesting, and when
the unusual presents itself In such
events it must excite suspicion and
careful investigation of the reason.
Complete Vindication
"The dissolution of the Canadian
parliament on July 29 was so sudden
as to greatly surprise the people of
Canada, who could not see the reason
for such precipitate action by Sir Wil
frid Laurier, supposedly entrenched
at Ottawa with a strong following,
well disciplined. Yet perhaps Sir
Wilfrid was not as well satisfied as
he might be with his cabinet material, or quite so strong as would
appear to the outsider. Must not his
action In dissolving parliament be
taken as a complete vindication of
the position taken by the Conservatives and those opposed to reciprocity. It was the Conservatives who
demanded and insisted that such a
question should be sumltted to the
electorate of Canada, and it was the
Conservatives that had urged the government to hasten redistribution so
that this question might be submitted fairly. It was untrue, as Liberals had charged, that the Conservatives had been simply blocking supply in the House at Ottawa; they had
been quite willing and ready to allow
supply to pass, and the sudden resolve of Sir Wilfrid to dissolve the
House was obviously due to other
causes, most probably growing dissensions in the ranks of the Liberal
party. The hasty nature of dissolution was plainly evidenced and echoed
in Sir Wilfrid's appeal of July 29—
the weakest document ever offered
to the people by the Canadian premier. That appeal was In reality
nothing more than a clumsy effort to
shift responsibility for the dlEslu-
tlon to the shoulders of the Conservatives and was In striking contrast to the dignified and logical address of Mr. Borden, published side
by side with Sir  Wilfrid's and fully
(Continued on Page Eight) Friday, August 18, 1911.
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
***tt***************************+ir******ir-ki<+1,i,i<i,if1ri,*
I       Nail Carriers9 Hardships
****+**+****************************************+**+
Because of the daring with which
their skippers have sailed them out
upon   board   and   deep   water   arid
braved the perils of storm, fog and
hidden rocks, two diminutive vessels,
the Seabird and the Pandora, are
now very much in the public eye.
The first of these craft to attract
attention, at least on the Atlantic
seaboard of the United States, was
the Seabird, a tight little yawl measuring 25 feet 9 inches in length on
deck and 8 feet in beam, with a draft
of the body of the hull not much
more than 18 inches and a draft to
the bottom of the keel of about 3
feet. At a normal loading the length
of the waterline of the Seabird is
about  20  feet.
The Seabird is one of several designs for shiall boats which the Rudder has published during the last
dozen years or so—stall, serviceable
craft, designed with ah eye to comfort, safety, service, ease of construction, and, last, but not least, low
coast. From these various designs
scores of boats have been built by
amateur hands, not merely in the
United States but throughout the
world, and, judging from the publ-
iished stories of their construction
and subsequent service, they seem
to have been successful and popular.
Thomas Fleming Day, the editor of
the Rudder, built a boat from one
of these designs as far back at 1901,
and named her the Seabird. In cross
section the Seabird represents in her
underwater body a greatly flattened
V, with top sides which rise straight
from the bilges, which are at the
waterline. The Seabird is decked
throughout, and the raised cabin provides as much headroom as one can
reasonably expect in a shallow-bodied
boat of this form. There is a storage room for spare sails, etc., in the
forecastle and there are two berths
in the cabin. The space between the
berths and the ship's side and underneath the berths has been utilized for
ship's stores.
The Seabird of 1911 differs from
the Seabird built in 1901. At that
time she had a shallow keel, through
which ran a centreboard. As now
reconstructed, the centreboard has
been taken out and the keel has
been lowered until the boat has a
normal draft of about three feet.
Furthermore, In the bottom of the
keel are 700 pounds of lead ballast.
Another important change has been
the installing of a 3-horse power
motor, which will serve to drive the
boat at four knots. Under sail and
motor power combined she is expected to make about six knots. The
fuel consists of 30 gallons of gasoline and 50 gallons of kerosene. The
consumption is about ten gallons a
day; but, of course, it is intended
to use the motor only wliere there
is no wind, or the wind is very light,
and if progress is slow, when the
winds are ahead.
Rigged as u Yawl
The Seabird is rigged as a yawl,
with jib, mainsail and mizzeu. The
yawl rig is recognized among yachtsmen and all sailor men as about the
most handy and safe for the smaller
craft, particularly when they are exposed to heavy weather and sudden
squalls. A yawl whose sail plan Is
well balanced can be sailed under
jib and mizzen, she is particularly
a handy craft in quite a strong blow;
and if the wind should rise to the
strength of a full gale all sail may
be furled and the vessel handled
nicely under a small trysail on tha
mainmast,
Public interest in the Seabird lies
' in the fact that she Is now sailing
across the Nortli Atlantic Ocean on
a pleasure trip, if you please, to
Rome. The crew of the little craft
consists of Mr. Day and three others.
He believes that there is no greater
danger for small craft, if Indeed as
much, In ocean sailing than there is
in sailing in sheltered but crowded
waters, such as Long Island Sound.
He believes that the best Corinthian
sailors are found among those who
boldly strike out for deep water and
learn to navigate by sextant and
compass. It Is largely due to his
influence that long distance ocean
races now form a regular part of the
summer schedule of our yachtsmen,
both on the Atlantic and theh Pacific. Notable among these are the
races to Bermuda and those from
New York to Marblehead.
Mr. Day has always been a firm
believer in tbe seagoing qualities of
the yawl, and the present cruise from
Boston to Rome on the Mediterranean, Is proof that he has the courage
of his convictions, even though his
craft is so small that Hudson's Half-
moon could have stowed her away
on deck and not have been greatly
Inconvenienced thereby. The course
laid out for the Seabird was for a
run of 2,200 miles to the Azores,
900 miles from the Azores to Gibraltar,    and    another  900   miles  to
Rome via the Straits of Bonafaclo.
Not many days after the Seabird
had set her course to the eastward,
there came into New York harbor
anothe r little yawl, the Pandora,
which had just accomplished, on a
much larger scale, the ocean-sailing
feat now being attempted by the Sea-
bird. The Pandora is much bigger
than the Seabird, having, indeed, a
length of 37 feet 9 inches, and measuring some nine tons.
Built   in   Australia
The Pandora was built In Australia for two experienced navigators,
Captain George Blythe of Coventry,
England, and Captain Peter Arakais,
a Greek. She was constructed for
the express purpose ofmaking a voyage entirely around the world, sailing to the eastward. The trip was
made party for experiment, but
more in search of adventure. On
May 3 of last year she set sail from
the port of Bunbury, West Australia,
and she has just completed her trip
across the South Pacific and around
Cape Horn. She is not unlike the
North Sea fishing boats; and her
beam of fourteen feet gives her at
once good stability and abundance
of room for her owner and skipper.
The craft set sail from Bunbury
on May 3 of last year and coasted
to Melbourne, which was reached on
May 29. On July 10th following the
coasting trip was continued, the next
port of call being Sydney, which
was reached on August 16, and the
following day the little craft was
headed eastward for New Zealand,
this being, of course, the real start
of the deep-sea voyage. The run to
Auckland Is described by the captain as being the worst of the entire
voyage. On August 28 the wind rose
to the strength of a gale and then
to a hurricane. The boat was stripped to bare poles and, even at that,
shipped a heavy green sea, which
swept her full length and flooded
her cabin. Part of the bulwarks was
carried away. Finding that the
craft could not run safely before a
big following sea, she was hove to
with a sea anchor. The sea anchor
parted and a further section of the
bulwarks was town away; but with
the aid of a trysail on the mainmast,
the Pandora rode out the gale and
reached Auckland, New Zealand, on
September 4. There she remained
for repairs until October 2, when she
left for the Pitcairn Islands, which
lie 2,750 miles east of New Zealand.
On November 21 she passed the Pitcairn Islands and reached Easter Island on December 12. After a brief
stay, the Pandora started for the
Falkland Islands and made her
stormy run around Cape Horn,
which she passed on January 16.
On January 23, during a fierce
hurricane, the vessel was driving
under bare poles and lashed wheel,
when a heavy sea fell upon the vessel, turned her bottom up and finally, as the masts went by the board,
brought her around again to an even
keel, the little craft having been
turned through a complete circle
from left to right. A Norwegian
whaler opportunely hove in sight and
towed the Pandora two miles to the
New islands, where she was laid up
for repairs.
She left the Falkland Islands on
March 4 for Saint Helena, and sailed
thence on April 26, reaching Ascension Island on May 3. On May 7
she started for -,ew York, which port
she reached on June 23.
After spending six weeks in New
York, the two captains start for London  on their journey via the Mediterranean and the Suez Canal.
 o	
TUBERCULOSIS IN CATTLE
VICTORIA—Hon. Price Ellison,
provincial minister of agriculture,
intends visiting Nelson and personally Investigating Ihe situation that
has arisen In that section of the
Kootenay in connection with the discovery of a large percentage of tuberculosis among the dairy herds.
Veterinary exports have declared
that virtually all the slaughtered'
cattle are perfectly fit for beef purposes, and the" doctors have agreed
that there could be not the least
danger arising through the use of
such beef as food. The butchers, decline, however, to have anything to
do with condemned dairy cattle, and
it would seem that compensation tor
a flat loss, when those animals are
ordered sacrificed, may have to be
arranged for by the provincial authorities.
 o	
Extending Business
The business of the Grand Trunk
Railway has become so extensive in
the maritime provinces that it lias
been found necessary to appoint a
special representative, and John S.
Corcoran has been appointed traveling passenger agent at Moncton, N.B.
THE JOURNAL
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Family trade catered to.  Will supply restaurants and steamers.
Cakes  and  Confectionery of all
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ffinnw;
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Budweiser
Appeals to people of discriminating taste because of
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it always has the same snappy flavor—its in a class by
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--£?.ra£5fe PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Friday, August 18, 1911.
AGREEMENT SIGNED
Provincial Government Favorable to the
Arrangement Made Between
City and G.T.P.
Mayor   Manson   Is   Expected   Back
From Victoria Tomorrow
By Prince George
Aid. J. A. Kirkpatrick, acting
mayor, has received from Mayor
Manson the information that the
agreement entered into between the
city and the G. T. P. has received
the sanction of the provincial government and Is thus complete, all
the parties to it having agreed to
sign.
The government likewise allows
ion feet of waterfront joining the
100 feet allowed by the railway company to be used as a city wharf. This
200 feet of waterfront is at the
Junction of the G. T. P. waterfront
and the government owned section
at the end of Eighteenth street.
As far as known, the government
agrees upon the terms as entered into
by the city and the company, including the granting of parcels to the
city in fee simple and those leased
for nine hundred and ninety-nine
years.
 o	
J. Y. Rochester has returned from
the south. He is accompanied by
Miss Rochester.
 o	
PREMIER McBRIDE
ON RECIPROCITY
(Continued   From   Page  Six)
setting out the Conservative position. In their hearts the Liberals
wish that this ill-advised bargain to
tie up the trade oi Canada with the
United States had never been entered
into. The dissatisfaction that leading Liberals feel is well set out in
the very comprehensive statement issued last February with the names
of such gentlemen as Sir Edmund
walker, Sir William Mortimer
Clarke, formerly lieutenant governor
of Ontario, and other prominent men
attached. They plainly state that the
government had no mandate from the
people to make the bargain of reciprocity with the United States and
that to make the changes proposed
would check the present unexampled
prosperity of Canada; besides, they
pointed out the great danger threatened to Canadian nationality.
"Reciprocity is generally recognized now as threatening disastrous
effects to Canadian national welfare.
British Columbia is strongly opposed
to it, as shown oy the resolution
passed in the legislature on February
13, 1911, when tuere was only one
voice in opposition to the condemnation of the proposed reciprocity bargain—and -Mr. Brewster, so halfhearted a champion that lie did not
divide the House to put himself on
record. The reasons now advanced
against recoproeity are now as strong
as then, and if anything, accentuated.
It is not a mere political question;
but a national one, in which patriotic
men of all parties should combine
to uphold Canada's prosperity and
nationality—and our place In the
Empire.
No Longer Suppliant
"There is no use in the Liberals
going back to ancient history nnd
stating that the feeling of Canada
was at one time in favor of recipro
city—that time is past, and we no
longer need to be suppliant for an
outlet for our trade. We have a market for all we produce, and without
making sacrifices. The United States
now needs Canada's products and
we could have well afforded to wait
for them to cut down their tariff
without touching ours in any way.
We have a population today of
8,000,000 against 4,000,000 In 1879,
while our export trade, which was
only $60,000,000 in 1879, grew to
$279,000,000 in 1910. Our best customer is not the United States, but
Great Britain, and there we have to
face United States competition. In
1910 Great Britain took our home
products, $139,500,000, or 50 per
cent of our exports. In the same
year the United States took only
»104,000,000, or 37.3 per cent. Under protection we have built up in
Canada a trade of enormous proportions: in 1879 it was $153,000,000;
in 1910 it was $693,000,000. In our
own province of Britisii Columbia
trade has increased nearly $10,000,-
000 since 1909.
"There is no necessity for reciprocity—Canada is progressing so
well that It Is a great mistake to
suddenly disrupt our present hcan-
nels of trade for a visionary idea.
Let us look at it as a business affair.
Do you think if this Dominion had
any Important business to perform,
it would send Mr. Fielding and Mr.
Paterson to perform it? It seems
to me that if Sir Wilfrid Laurier was
determined to give Canada away he
should have sent two up-to-date and
able Canadian ambassadors to confer
with the keenest wit among 100,-
000,000 people. The people of Canada might depend on it if the United
States had not got the best of the
bargain they would not have wasted
a minute on reciprocity. The United
States had come to the end of its
raw supplies and what was more
natural, more necessary,, than for
them to come to Canada, and to come
at a time when they felt that our
own industries and institutions were
not sufficiently developed to make
it difficult? Could anyone show a
single instance where the Americans,
as good business men, had not wanted everything for Uncle Sam? They
were now in a position where they
must come to Canada for raw material and if Sir Wilfrid had only
been patient for a few years the
United States would have been glad
to take down their tariff and welcome Canada's products free, while
Canada could have played Uncle
Sam's old game and raised her wall
still higher (Prolonged cheering}.
We, in British Columbia, had an
illustration of this when we awoke
one day to find that the logs from
our forests were going to Everett,
to Bellingham, to Blakely, and to
Blaine, and that while our mills were
were idle here, they were doing a
thriving trade over the line. The
result of the export royalty had been
a development of our timber industry
400 per cent, and the establishment
of many thriving towns.
Merciless Trusts
"If reciprocity were passed it
would not take many weeks to find
out what material losses Canadians
were suffering. It was all right to
say that we would get cheaper tobacco and cheaper this and that, but
under reciprocity we would pass into
the grasp of the most merciless
trusts, and, moreover, the wages of
our workingnien would fall to the
level of those across the lines."
The premier went on to quote from
statements of Sir Wm, Van Home,
selected as a strong man to built
the C.  P.  R.,  who  became a  Cana
dian, and who would be recognized
as a man now alive to the situation.
What did Sir Wm. Van Hoi-ne, a
good Canadian, although he had no
politics, have to say at this crisis'?*
He said:
"To my amazement and distress
and shame I now see a magnificent
work of a generation faded away for
a vague idea of a childish sentiment,
the splendid commercial and industrial position we have reached and
our proud independence partered for
a few wormy plums, and I feel it my
duty to join in the protest that is
heard from every section of the country. Today we are in an enviable
position, with a commerce three
times as great, per capita, as that
of the United States, and without a
cloud in our sky save the one which
has just been raised. Does not common sense tell us to let well enough
alone?"
If It had not been very much to
the advantage of the United States,
that nation would never have made
overtures towards reciprocity. It is
all very well to say that we can
throw the arrangement aside at any
time, but knowing the United States
as I do, I fully agree with Sir Wm.
Van Home in his view of the situation; and generally he is a man who
understands conditions in the Uited
States.    He says:
"The Weaker Party"
"Let us not run away with the idea
that if we make a mistake in this
matter of reciprocity, we shall be
able to correct it at pleasure. We
may not be permitted to do. It
should be remembered that there are
such things as vested interests with
nations as with individuals, and corporations, and that the vested interests of nations, real or alleged, are
terribly binding upon the weaker
party. When Mr. Hill had extended
his seven or eight lines of railway
into the Canadian Northwest—lines
which have for some years been resting their noses on the boundary line
waiting for reciprocity, or something
of the kind, to warrant them in
crossing—and when other American
channels of trade have been established, affecting our territory, and
when the American millers have tasted our wheat, and the American
manufacturers have got hold of our
markets, is it probable that we shall
be permitted to recede? Not a bit
of it. We are making a bed to lie
in and die in."
"Canada's aim," continued the premier, "should be to promote interprovincial and imperial trade—
something that is being built up at
present. With the trade lines running north and south, it is bound
toaffect, injuriously, our transportation from west to east, and that
means that the freight rates instead
of being lower will increase. Then
as to the Liberal contentions, that
recipritcy will lower the prices of
fopd products in Canada,—I venture
to say that after the first flush,
when competion has been stamped
out, and many Canadians are forced
out of work, prices will be raised to
as high or higher a notch than at
present. Most of these things in the
States are governed by gigantic
trusts, and we will see them taking
possession of Canada, and placing
us under tribute to them. In fact,
the whole scheme is an endeavor of
the United States to control Canada's natural resources.
"The farmers of Canada will suffer
from reciprocity, and as to the Liberal's argument that a great field
will be opened for their produce in
the United States, President Taft, in
Chicago on June 3, said: 'The only
real importation of agricultural prod
ucts that we may expect from Canada
of any considerable amount will consist of wheat, barley, rye and oats.
The world price of these four cereals
is fixed abroad where the surplus
from the producing countries is disposed of and i slittle affected by the
place from which the supply is derived.
The  Fruit  Industry
"Unquestionably British Columbia
will be greatly hurt in the prairie
provinces to which we now export
our fruit. The province has done
much towards building up this industry, and last year the value of
the fruit crop was $2,500,000. With
an older industry, more cleared lands,
and cheaper labor, Oregon, Washington and California will be able to
send fruit into the prairies duty free
at a price that will seriously handicap British Columbia in spite of the
general better quality of our fruit.
At the same time it is very questionable that such fruit as oranges,
lemons and bananas, which are not
raised in Canada, will be any cheap
er, as there is no competition to
meet here and such industries are in
the hands of large trusts which dis-
tate prices. Vegetables and other
agricultural products, including
eggs, poultry and livestock will also
be imported at the expense of our
mixed farmers.
"Supposing that the reciprocity
agreement was in force and it was
decided to end it, Canada would be
in the position of suddenly having
to find new markets and trade would
be greatly disorganized. Canada, in
the last ten years, stands second in
the list of countries in the increase
of trade with 93.16 per cent, the frist
being Argentina with 132 per cent,
while the United States only shows
47.16 per cent and is the fourteenth
on the list. The United States has
In many lines reached its capacity
of production, so now wishes to
avail herself of Canada's raw products to help her keep up in the race.
United States manufacturers have invested over $400,000,000 in mills
and factories in Canada where they
can get raw material cheap and in
abundance.
"Last year there were 100,000 cars
of grain, etc., sent out of the prairie
provinces. Of these the C. P. R. took
59.6 per cent, Canadian Northern
31.8 per cent, G. T. P. 7.3 per cent
and the Great Northern 1.3 per cent.
Under reciprocity a great change will
take place and a very much larger
proportion will be diverted from Canadian to United States lines of railway. Undoubtedly this was what
J. J. Hill was thinking of when he
said, after the agreement had passed
the United  States  Senate:
" 'If the Senate had voted against
the pact, it would have meant the
begining in England for such an Imperial trade union as would shut us
out.'
At  Best  an  Experiment
"At the .very best, the whole matter of the agreement is an experiment— a foolish interference with
the country when it is progressing
at a marvelous rate, and, as the Ottawa Citizen calls it, a 'gamble'—
the ill results of which may be most
disastrous to Canada.
"The people across the line are
jealous of our resources and it was
assured that if they, with theirw organization and their majority control, were given this measure of trade
reform, they would sap the best of
Canada and use it for their own interests. The people of Canada realize this, and on September 21 they
will have no hesitation in casting
their votes for one king, one country
and one empire."
To the Ladies of Prince Rupert
Did you ever stop to think how much easier it would be for you,
if at the end of each month, you could pay all household bills
by check? We solicit your account and have special facilities
for handling it. Private writing rooms are provided for the use
of customers and individual attention is given each depositor.
We allow 4 %  on Deposits and the use of checks.
The Continental Trust Company, Limited
 SECOND AVENUE	
aEEEEEEEEBEEEEEEEEBEEEEHHE
HOTEL
ENAMELWARE
HAVE JUST RECEIVED A SMALL SHIPMENT OF HOTEL
ENAMELWARE ESPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR USE IN
HOTELS, RESTAURANTS AND CAMPS. WE GUARANTEE
THEM TO LAST TWICE AS LONG AS ORDINARY ENAMEL
WARE.
A CALL IS SOLICITED
Prince Rupert Hardware & Supply
Company, Ltd.
THIRD AVENUE
PHONE 120
EEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEQEEEEE
FOR SALE
Lot 56, Blk. 34, Sec. 1, $5,000; 1-3 cash, bal. 6 and 12 months.
Lots 33 and 34, Blk 5, Sec. 1,    $4,000; half cash.
FOR RENT
STORES,  OFFICES AND DWELLINGS
FIRE INSURANCE in old English, Canadian and American
companies, at tariff rates. Policies good as collateral at All Banks,
and all written in our own office. PLATE GLASS, ACCIDENT
and MARINE INSURANCE
MM. Stephens & Co. Ld.
REAL ESTATE
Phone 222
LOANS       INSURANCE
Office: Third Avenue
INVESTMENTS
P. O. Box 275
Good, Sound Reasons for
MONARCH Economy
Monarch Ranges are built so that they can
never have "air leaks"—
For around every opening into the body there
is a   Malleable   Iron frame to which the
steel is riveted.
No putty is needed in such joints.    They are
air tight when new and stay air tight.
If these other ranges were built In this way
they might be economical too.
Investigate this matter of rivet construction
versus stove bolts  and stove putty.    It's
Important to  every  one  using  or  buying
a range.
SOLD AND GUARANTEED BY THE
Kaien Hardware Co.
Telephone 3
Third Avenue
'Jag*
'"~:-}5^=iitsX
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ei
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"
ee
i
The Big
Furniture
We beg to announce to the public that we are going to
remain at the same old stand cor. 6th St. and 2nd Ave.
GRAND 15 DAY SALE
We are using Ihe entire
Hart Block for 18 Days—
A    Grand     15    Day    Sale.
Sole Agents for the
Ostermoor
Mattresses
We
arc   using
the
entire
Hart   Block
foi-
l.-
Days—
A
Grand
15
Day
Sale.
* *
**
*•:•
**
* *
* *
If
**
FURNITURE, STOVES, LINOLEUM, CARPETS, FLOOR COVERINGS, REED AND RATTAN FURNITURE, BLINDS, CURTAINS, QUILTS,
COMFORTS, BLANKETS, SHEETS, PILLOWS, MATTRESSES, SPRINGS,
IRON AND BRASS BEDS. BEST LINES OF UPHOLSTERED COUCHES,
ARM CHAIRS, PARLOR SUITES, ENAMELWARE, CROCKERY, GLASSWARE, LAMPS, TABLE CUTLERY, SCREENS, PICTURES, MIRRORS,
WASHING MACHINES, BASKETS, FRUIT JARS, HAMMOCKS, SEWING
MACHINES, BABY CARRIAGES.
**
**
**
**
**
**
WE ARE CLOSING OUT THE
STOVE DEPARTMENT.
IF  YOU   ARE  INTERESTED
CALL AND GET OUR PRICES
Store
F. W. HART
Cor 6th Street & 2nd Ave
Phone 62      P.O. Box 230
-»♦♦♦♦♦♦
♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»»♦»»♦♦♦♦. + ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦'♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ ♦-»-♦-»

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