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Prince Rupert Journal Sep 23, 1910

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VOLUME   1
Published Twice n Week
PRINCE  RUPERT, B. C, FjEflDAY,  SEPTEMBER  23,  1910,
Price, Five Cents
XO.   20.
TESTING ORCHARDS
Twenty-Five Demonstration Centres Will
Be Provided in the
Province.
Government    Making   Arrangements
to  Carry  Out   Plans   Laid
Last Session
*  *  *  *  *
MANUFACTURERS' OFFICERS
(Special to The Journal)
Victoria, Sept. 23.—Preparations
are advancing rapidly for tbe location
of the twenty-five demonstration orchards provided for by the appropriation of $100,000 last session.
Of these, two or three, at least, will
be located In Northern British Columbia, where it Is felt much good
work could be done to demonstrate
the possibilities of the fruit-growing
sections along the line of the G.T.P.
 o	
YAKOUN  IMPROVED
(Special to The Journal)
Vancouver, Sept. 23.—The
Canadian Manufacturers' As
soclation has been in session
here this week with a large
gathering of eastern men in
attendance. The election of
officers for the year resulted
as follows: \V. H. Rowley, the
E. B. Eddy Co., president; W.
Curry, Montreal, vice-president; G. Booth, Booth-Coper
Co., treasurer; R. J. Rogers,
Vancouver, vice-president for
Britisli Columbia.
Clearing   of   River   by   Government
Authority Has Worked Advantages
Reports from Masset are to the
effect that the Yakoun River is being
much improved by the work that the
Dominion government is carrying out
there. For many miles now it has
been cleared of the accumulations in
the way of logs that have accumulated.
This will enable the salmon and
trout to spawn and the Yakoun will
be improved as a fishing river. The
residents of the district are delighted  witli  the improvements.
FAILED TO PASS ALPS
Aviators   on   Third   Attempt  Forced
Hack by Winding Snowstorms
(Special to The Journal)
Brieg, Switzerland, Sept. 23.—
Aviator Chavese and Welmann have
failed in their third attempt to fly
over the Alps to Milan. They were
driven back by a blinding snowstorm.
Ladeolf, the Italian, who accompanied  them, was also  unsuccessful.
Miss Sutherland, deaconess of the
Presbyterian church, has arrived in
the city to take charge of her work
here..
ELECTRIC SERVICE
Proposition to Build From Barkerville
to Fort George on
G.T.P.
Surveyors   Are   Now   in   the   Field
Examining Route And Esti-
milting  the  Cost
(Special to The Journal)
Victoria, Sept. 23.—To survey a
route for an electric railway from
Barkerville down the Willow river
joining in the G. T. P. at or near Fort
George, a distance of 120 miles, a
party has been despatched by~Gore &
McGregor of this city. The project
is being undertaken by a Vancouver
concern. The cost has not yet been
estimated and will depend largely
upon the report of the engineers.
It is felt that if the line is to be
built it must be rushed forward at
nnce so an to take advantage of the
freight handling during construction
days.
At Barkerville connection could be
made with the stage line and automobile line.
DUMPING ON STREETS
TO DEATH
STOOD BY COAST TEAM
Subject Causes Split in the Streets Com-, Finn Girl Loses Her Life in Hotel Fire
mittee of the
Council.
Aid. Hildltch Threatens to Bring in
a Minority Report I'jion
the Subject
at Schrieber, Ontario.
Another Occupant of the
Not Recover—Othei
Injured
Bouse May
s Are       -    !
FINAL CHAMPIONSHIP
GAME TOMORROW
New Westminster Lacrosse   Team   Will   Undoubtedly
Hold the Minto Cup—Last Saturday's
Game Showed Strength of
Team.
Tomorrow the Xatlonals of Montreal again meet the New Westminsters in the deciding match for the
Minto Cup, and in effect the lacrosse
championship of the world. In the
match tomorrow the Xatlonals will
have to gain five goals over the Pacific Coast team to gain the trophy. The
victory is to go to the team winning
the greater number of goals In the
two matches. With the score 7 to 3
last Saturday, it will be seen that
the handicap to secure the championship to the Nationals is five goals. It
Is not for a moment believed that the
Westminsters will be defeated.
The game last Saturday was witnessed by about 12,000 spectators,
whose striking Impartiality was a
feature to be remembered. The arrangements to handle such a huge
crowd were excellent and from start
to finish everything was kept ln order. All the stands were packed with
people who assembled full of hope
that a great battle would be decided",
and ln this respect they were not disappointed for the game was exceptionally fast and certainly ranked as
one of the finest exhibitions of lacrosse ever put up, says the News-
Advertiser.
It cannot be denied that the better
team won and that the difference ln
the score about represents the actual
play. Midway through the second
Quarter the homesters had established a lead of three goals and from this
time onward the Issue was never In
doubt, for possessing this advantage
the Royals seemed to be suddenly Inculcated with Increased vigor and attacked the Nationals' citadel in a way
which was thrilling to see.    In  the
third quarter they increased their
lead to five to love, playing great
lacrosse all the while.
Then an electrifying incident occurred, for the Xationals who at such
a juncture could be forgiven for feeling a little downhearted, stormed
around the goal mouth of the Royals,
and Lalonde, with characteristic
lightning rapidly, shot the rubber Into the net and scored the first goal
for the challengers. Hardly had the
game been renewed when the Nationals made another determined attack
and within eleven seconds of the
former tally, Dr. Lachapelle made
the score read 5 to 2. At this period
both teams were going great guns
and the way the. vlstors rallied was
indeed a revelation. Within four
minutes of the start of the last quar?
ter Dulude sent In a stinging shot
which beat Gray and this made matters somewhat exciting, speculation
being rife as to what would be tha
final outcome.
But the work of the Nationals to a
great extent consisted of spasmodic
bursts, while New Westminster played consistently stellar lacrosse
throughout, never letting up through
the whole progress of the game. The
defence of the homesters was magnificent and this department was kept
busy attending to Newsy Lalonde who
as usual, had a box of tricks to unload. He proved himself to be a performer of the first water and always
kept two men busy attending to him.
Quite a few times ,he puzzled his
checks and the way he slashed the
rubber Into the goal mouth was not.h-
(Continued on  Page Five)
There promises to be two reports
from the streets committee at the
next meeting of the council on Monday night relative to the dumping of
excavated material from building
sites. From the discussion that was
introduced at last night's council
meeting it would appear that the
members of the committee, Aid.
Lynch, Aid. Hilditch and Aid. Barrow
are agreed that there should be
dumping allowed by prospective
builders. The point upon which Aid.
Hilditch differs from the other two
is as to the best provision to make
to ensure the city in being put to no
additional expense in finding other
places to dump after being usurped
by the private individuals.
Early in the proceedings last evening Aid, Hilditch wished to know
if no report was forthcoming from
the streets committee on this subject. He had wanted to make a
minority report on  the subject.
it was explained that the main
report was not yet ready.
Aid. Hilditch complained of the
delay and believed it should be
fought out in the council.
Aid. Barrow, who was presiding
over tbe council, ruled this out of
order as no report was before the
council.
Aid. Hilditch, however, was apparently in no humor to be frustrated
In his effort to have the matter discussed.
Later on a specific application for
leave to dump on the street coming
up, the subject was again introduced
by Aid. Hilditch.
Aid. Mclntyre said that there was
u small amount of material involved
Permission might be granted In this
particular as it had in other cases.
Aid. Lynch pointed out that there
was a question involved which was a
serious one. If permission was given
to fill in on the street for a small
amount it would have to be granted
for the larger amounts. The city
would then find itself obliged to find
some dumping ground for its own
cuts on the streets.
The acting mayor ruled that there
being no report presented the discussion was out of order.
Aid. Hilditch thought that the discussion was in order. The report
was not presented owing to the negligence of the acting mayor.
Aid. Barrow ruled It out of order
and the matter again dropped only to
come up a little later when Aid. Hilditch moved to allow.intending builders permission to dump material on
the streets, the city engineer making
arrangements that those using the
streets should give a bond that they
would become responsible for the
added cost of the removal of city
dumping to another place to the ex
tent that their private dumping had
made this necessary.
Aid. Hildltch said there was a difference of opinion In the streets committee. He believed it was a duty to
allow intending builders to dump excavation on the depressions on the
streets. The engineer reported that
there would be 46,000 yards of surplus rock ln section one. He him-
suit felt that there would be thai
amount required ln section five ana
other sections of the city. He felt
that the builders should have the
privilege of dumping.    They should
i Special to The Journal)
Scfftleber, Ont., Sept. 23.—The
King Edward Hotel here has been
destroyed by fire. A Finn girl
named .Miss Patmi, was burned fo
death in her bed. Two other employees were injured and Miss Moore,
a guest in the hotel, may not recover.
 o	
Local News
• Special in The Journal)
Ottawa, Sept. 23. !'. D. Ross,
ol ii awa, has resigned from
ii e custody of the Minto Cup,
the emblem of the lacrosse
championship of Canada, now
held by New Westminsters,
urging pressure of other business. It is understood his
resignation is really due to a
difference with Premier McBride, another trustee, regarding I lie dates for the
championship matches. While
no statement is given out, it is
inferred that the Premier of
the Pacific coast province insisted upon dates that would
not work to the disadvantage
of the Xew Westminsters, and
with characteristic determination stood by his demands.
SHOT BY COMPANION
Joseph Beaudoio  Killed By Rifle Ball
hired  By  Room
Hate.
*   t'lii'i'iljiiiil.v
« Richer
ii
s   in   Motive—Alfons
iav   Been   Placed
Custody
In the police court this morning
John Datson was fined $5 and costs
for being drunk.
* *    *
Rally Sunday exercises will be conducted in the Methodist church Sunday school next Sunday afternoon at
2.30 p.m. Special music and addresses
by members of the Adult Bible class
will be included in the programme.
A general invitation is extended to
everyone to come.
* *    *
At last night's council meeting the
agreement with the Bank of Montreal
with the city in the matter of advancing money pending the issue of debentures was read. The money will
I be advanced at six per cent per annum, payable quarterly, and on the
issue of inscribed stock the bank becomes the agent for the placing of
the amount represented by the advances.
* *    *
On Thursday, September 22nd,
there was celebrated the marriage of
John Stp'-linp Stickney and Miss
Hi.iel I dtA Cllffe, both of Prince
Rupert. The ceremony was performed by the Rev. Chas. R. Sing,
B.D., at the Methodist parsonage on
Sixth avenue. Charles Embleton performed the duty of groomsman, and
Miss eVrnie Cliffe, sister of the bride,
acted as bridesmaid. The happy
couple take up their residence in the
city.
CONSIDER BIDS HIGH
DIED FROM INJURIES
Charles   Daly   Fell   Into   Hollow-
Death   Followed   Accident
(Continued  on  Page Five)
Charles Only, a longshoreman,
who fell near the corner of Eighth
street and First avenue on Wednesday night, succumbed to the injuries
he received and died last night.
The coroner, J. H. McMullin is
looking into the circumstances surrounding his death with a view to
deciding whether he will hold an Inquest or not.
Daly has not been here long, and
has no friends living here as far as
is known. He took a by-path which
is used across a deep hollow near
the spot where the accident occurred.
This is covered by a single plank
and Is on private property. He apparently missed his footing and fell
a distance of nearly twenty feet
among rocks.
C. Cole passed shortly after and
beard groaning. An alarm wns given
ind the man discovered with his head
badly Injured.
Dr. Tremayne was summoned and
all done to relieve him, He was found
to be suffering from a concussion of
the brain and bad other Injuries.
Later he was removed to Dr. Ewlng's
hospital but. all efforts lo save li Is
life proved Ineffectual.
Joseph Beaudoin, an employee of
the G. T. P. was shot last night in
his cabin located In the eastern extremes of the city. His companion,
Alfonse Richer, has been placed under custody awaiting an investigation.
He Is believed to have fired the shot
that proved fatal and will have to
stand trial on the charge which will
be laid.
As to whether the shot was fired
accidentally or was deliberately discharged at Beaudoin will have to be
investigated. So far as known there
were no eye  witnesses.
Death was the result of a shot from
a 22 calibre rifle. The ball passed
through the left lung and also touched the heart.
The two men were French Canadians and no motive for the shooting
lias been suggested other than a report that they had some words over
a question of money. Whether
Richer intended to shoot his companion or discharged the rifle accidentally will remain to be shown
when the case comes to trial.
Sergt. Regan and Police Officer
McEwan made the arrest, The shooting occurred about midnight last
night.
Tiiis afternoon the inquest opened.
A coroner's jury has been impannel-
led and will view the remains, after
] which  the  inquiry  into the  clrcum-
wlll be
$85,000, the latter being the offer of Postponed awaiting the medical ex-
Bullens, of the B. C. Marine Railway,  aminatton.
 n I  1 O	
Princess May Has Been Taken Off Ways
at Esquimalt Temporarily
Bullous Have Asked $85,000 to Put
O. P. I!. Steamer in Shape
Again
(Special to The Journal)
Victoria, Sept. 23.—The underwriters have considered the bids submitted for repairing the C. P. R.
steamer Princess May, damaged by
stranding on Sentinel Island, to be
excessive and the steamer has been
ordered from the ways pending some
arrangements being made.
The Bids range from $131,200 to Istances surrounding the deat
The next meeting of the city council will be on Monday night.
J.   to.   Swan,   the   official   photographer for the G. T. railway and the
G.   T.   P.,   will   spend   several   days
The   ladies   of    the   Presbyterian [here taking views of Prince Rupert
congregation are arranging for a con-: to be used  by  the company  in  concert early in October. inectlon with its publicity work.
THE GREAT SCENIC
ROUTE OF CONTINENT
LORD ROBERTS INSPECTS 0.0. R.
Among the many honors bestowed
upon the Queen's Own Rifles of Toronto during their visit to England
probably none was regarded with
greater satisfaction than the inspection of the honorary colonel, Lord
Roberts, a few days ago. The Idol ol
tne British army, In company
with the Minister of War, Hon. Mr.
Haldane, made an inspection of thi,
Canadian  force.
Lord Roberts addressed the regiment observing that as he was honorary colonel of the regiment he wished
to bid them welcome in person. He
said that a great step was made to-
army when the Canadian regiment
and contingents nf Australia, New
Zealand and Tasmania so loyally and
so promptly came forward to take
their part In the South African war.
The Honorable Artillery Company
of London has entertained the officers of Q. O. R. The Karl of Den-
beigh, president, welcomed the gnosis
as an integral part of the Imperial
forces.
Colonel Sir Henry Pellatt. said that
although the regiment was Just mnde
up of citizen soldiers there wbi behind them tens of thousands. Can
ada was just as ready and willing as
they were to respond to the call of
Party of Artists and Writers are Enraptured Over the
G.T.P. Line of Railway Across the Province
of B.C.—Finest Scenery Offered of
Any Road in America.
After a most interesting trip across I party,  tiie  means  provided  consisted
the northern part of   the    province i of two dug outs.    With these a start
wards the unification  of the  British I Ihe Motherland.
along the route of the G. T. P., a
party of four have reached civilization again with a vast fund of general
information re'lttlre t3 the cu.tilry
through which the line is tc ;;:ss.
The party originally started uut fp in
the east composed if I-l. R Ohanton,
advertising manage" of 1": '"• T. P ,
E. G. Lowry, the Washington correspondent of the New York Evening
Post, R. C, to. Lett, colonization
agent of the company, O. Il irne 11" i-
sell, an artist of Montreal, Fred, A.
Talbot, representing t L «• World's
Work magazine of London, and J. \V.
swan, the official photographer of
tne company.
At Tete Jeune Cache the flrsl two
mentioned left the main party audi
returned east by way of Ashcroft,
The other four, with a very complete
pack train, kept on the course right
through to the Pacific coast. Theyj
have been about three months on the
lour and have made a very careful
examination Into the territory
ill rough which they passed from the
various standpoints which they had
In v aw,
Boats Heavily Loaded
Mr. Russell contracted rheumatism
on the way and suffered a good deal
In consequence. Apart from that
there was no sickness, and the trip
was without special Incident except
for a tedious w'alt for canoes on the
run down to Tete Jeune. When transportation was secured to take the
place of the canoes which had been
intended for the party but were impressed  Into  service  by  an  advance
was made but loaded as they were it
was impossible as one of the party
described It, to shift a chew from one
side of the mouth to the other without
endangering the crafl. The solution
was found after a council In which
all took part and which ended in
lashing the two boats together and
Improvising a shield along the outside rims which wore raised as rough
water was entered so that the occupants and their freight were kept dry
mid the boal was nol filled with
water.
ICntbiisiastlc over Route
All Hie members of the party are
enthusiastic over the route selected
"> Hie 'I. 'I'. P, through the province,
Mr, Russell, who has travelled lime
and again through the picturesque
routes on the continent, Is free to
slate that there Is none that compares with this one In scenic beauties. The first 200 miles out of
Prince Rupert are, In his opinion, the
limsi scenic run In the world. This
is the famed Skeena River route, and
this alone, he thinks, will attract
thousands as soon as it becomes advertised and the road Is In running
order. Along the route of the C. P. R.
with all Its attractions, there Is
nothing, he thinks, to compare with
i tills section of the country. It is one
succession of high mountains with
glaciers ever In view. Where the
nearer mountains fall away It but
opens the view to other ranges behind these with similar glaciers and
grand scenery.    The whole makes up
(Continued  on   Page Pour' THE   PRINCE  RUPERT  JOURNAL
Friday, September 23, 1910.
ANOTHER   ISLAND
Earthquake Shock in Alaska  Followed
By Uplifting of New
Land.
Continuous Erruption   of   Volcanoes
Near I'liiiiiuk I'nss Attracts Attention of  Sailors
Concurrent with the rocking of
building in the towns of Unalaska
and Dutch Harbor by two violent
earthquake shocks September 1, a
new island thrust its head above the
ocean's surface twenty-live miles to
the westward, further increasing the
Bogoslof group, the unaccountable
change in which during late years has
attracted the attention of scientists
the world over.
The quakes and attendant volcanic
activities were reported at Seward by
officers of the revenue cutter Bear,
upon her arrival from Xome. So extraordinary were the changes in the
Bogoslof group the officers of the
revenue cutter Tahoma, which has
been cruising about tbat part of the
Aleutian islands, decided to make a
detailed investigation.
A party of volunteers, who will
undertake to survey the new island
and report in detail upon it, was or-
ganiezd in Dutch Harbor. This is
under command of Lieut. R. R.
Waesehe, of the revenue cutter service. The party was landed on the
island and it is their plan to camp
there for a week or ten days.
The earthquakes resulted in no serious damage. They occurred in a
district where tremors are frequent
and although they were a little more
violent than those of the past several
years, no panic resulted.
The new island rose at a place ln
the group where it was least expected
because of the depth of the water.
The soundings made by the geodetic
survey last year sHowed a depth of
seventy fathoms at tbat position. The
new island Is In the form of a great
rounded hill, very close to Perry
Peak, the new island discovered last
year by the officers of the revenue
cutter Perry.
Vessels arriving at Seattle from
Behring sea continue to bring news
showing how remarkable has been
the activity of Mount Shishaldln or
"Old Moses" as the volcano on Unimak island is known to old salts who
have spent much of their time in the
far North. Latest details brought by
those on board the three-masted cod-
fishing schooner Veda which arrived
last night serve to indicate that the
lofty peak which stands as a giant
landmark at the entrance to Behring
sea, has been in violent eruption for
at least five months. '
While making the Pass last April
Captain Pete Nelson and the crew of
the Veda witnessed a tremendous upheaval on the summit of the mountain when vast bodies of flame shot
heavenward and were later lost in
clouds of steam, smoke and cinders,
which finally settled on the mountain
side.
Many weeks afterward when the
Veda was nearly 100 miles from Unimak island, those on board mistook
the light at the summit of Shishaldin
for Halley's comet which they had
been looking for for some time
At a later date news was brought
from the three-masted codfishing
schooner W. H. Diamond, that In
coming down through Unimak Pass
showers of molten lava descended on
their decks and set fire to their
spanker and rigging. The flames
were extinguished before more serious damage, which threatened, had
been done. At the time the W. H.
Diamond went through, the soa for
Fcores of miles was covered with
ashes and floating pumice.
When the Veda came back through
Unimak Pass two weeks ago flames
were still Issuing from Shishaldln
and the sides of the mountain were
covered  with cinders.
SPOR TS
hARNED'S RECORD
William A. Lamed, five times ten
nis champion, has recently been out
of the game with a sprained tendon,
which he first injured when serving
as a volunteer in the Spanish war.
Larned has the most remarkable
history of all American tennis champions.
When he was 19 years old he won
the intercollegiate championship in
1892, representing Cornell. In this
tournament he defeated the redoubt
able Bob Wrenn of Harvard. During
the same year he was the runnerup at
the national championships at Newport, being defeated by the then
champion, O. S. Campbell. He was
again runnerup in the Newport tournament in 1894, 1895 and 1896.
The Spanish war kept him out of
the game for some time after this,
but in 1902 he achieved his ambition
and won the all-comers at Newport
by defeating Beals Wright and acquired the title through default of
the champion, M, D. Whitman.
In 1902 he defended his title successfully against R. P. Doherty, but
In 1903 he wasb eaten by H. L. Doherty, who was the champion of England at that time. It was not until
190" that he renewed his tournament
play. That year he again won the national championship defeating Robert
LeRoy in the final round. He repeated his victory in 1908 and 1909, successfully defending his title against
Beals Wright and W. J. Clothier.
At Longwood he has been most
successful. Beginning in 1894 he won
the Longwood title 11 times, the
other years being 1895, 1897, 1901,
1903, 1904, 1905, 1906, 1907, 1908,
and 1909.
LORD HAWKE'S BIRTHDAY
especially a fighter. Two years of
such a life will be a long time, and
wnen at the end of that period Johnson attempts to get himself into
shape to fight some husky young fellow iwth a lot of vitality and recuperative powers he will find that
he wl" be in the same class as Jim
Jeffries—"the can't come back class."
It does not necessarily take drink to
sap the vitality of a fighter. Irregular living, loss of sleep, lack ot
regular exercise will do the work, and
those who follow boxing are likely
to see Madden's prediction verified
in the case of Johnson.
FAMOUS TROTTER
Last month Lord Hawke, captain
of the Yorkshire Cricket Club, celebrated his fiftieth birthday, and
every lover of the national summer
game will wish him "many happy returns of the day." For twenty-five
years he has captained the Yorkshire
team, and made it one of the most
powerful elevens in the country. He
is undoubtedly among the most popular cricketers in England, and has
specially endeared himself to Yorkshire professionals on account of the
keen interest he has always taken in
their welfare. He is godfather to
most of their children and out of the
season he has each professional in
turn, with his wife and family, if
such exist, to stay with him at Tad-
caster. It. is stated that among his
lordship's personal possessions there
is, perhaps, nothing quite so interesting or so highly valued as a little
well-worn edition of the English
prayer book. This has belonged to
Lord Hawke since he was a child,
and on its interleaved pages is entered a careful record of every Sunday he has spent abroad in his life.
As Lord Hawke has been an almost
constant travelled, the diary covers
a good many pages.
JOHNSON'S END
In addition to having helped to
make Milwaukee famous with his
well known beverage, August Uihleln,
owner of the Harvester, 2.03 Vt, the
champion stallion trotter of the world
is rapidly making Milwaukee famous
with his grand racing machine which
Is sweeping everything belori' him
again this year.
Milwaukee can well fetl proud of
this fast stepper, as he Is the sensation of the trotting world again this
season. This horse has an almost unprecedented record in the history
of the turf in this country. Since that
memorable day at Syracuse, N. Y., In
September, 1908, when he first faced
the starter, his fame has increased.
The Harvester's record is:
Owned by August Uihein, of Milwaukee.
Age, five years.
Champion trotting stallion of the
world.
Sire, Walnut Hall by Dam Netelet.
Has never lost a race.
Has lost only two heats.
First race at Syracuse, N. Y., August, 1908.
Winner of Kentucky futurity in
1908.
Winnings to date, $42,700.
Record, 2.03%; also world's mark
for fastest heats, 2.04% and 2.03%,
made at Cleveland, August 13, 1910.
Harvester's big victory' In 1909,
Charter Oak at Hartford, Conn.
Purchase price, $9,000.
Harvester's Winnings
1908
Syracuse    $  1,000
Columbus, Ohio      3,500
Columbus, Ohio      3,000
Lexington, Ky.  (futurity)   . .   10,000
1909
Windsor, Canada     1,000
Detroit a. .     1,000
Kalamazoo, Mich      1,000
Buffalo      1,000
Cleveland      1,000
Hartford (Charter Oaks)  ...   10,000
Syracuse, N.  Y      2,000
Columbus         3,000
Lexington, Ky., won two heats and
was withdrawn owing to illness.
1910
Detroit      2,000
Cleveland      2,000
That the Harvester has been a
good investment is shown by the fact
that in the short space of two years
he had won $42,000 in purses for
Mr. Uihleln.
BASEBALL SALARIES
Of all the men actually playing
baseball, and eliminating Connie
Mack, manager of the Athletics, who
owns stock In the club, Frank Chance
manager of the Cubs, is considered to
be far and away above all other active players in his earnings from
baseball. This, too, is because Chance
also is a stockholder ln the Chicago
Cubs, owning a one-tenth Interest.
Prior to the season of 1908, Chance
received a salary of $5,500 a year,
which was augmented by his dividends and the share of one player in
post-season and exhibition game receipts. Chance had signed a four-
year contract at $7,500 a year, but a
dispute arose between him and
Charlie Murphy, president of the club
and he announced that he would not
play with the Cubs.
A Chicago man was sent to California to arrange a truce between
Chance and Murphy. One of the conditions of the truce was that no party
to it should ever reveal the salary
part of the deal, whether raised or
continued the same. But, with his
dividends on his one-tenth interest,
Chance earns between $20,00.0 and
$30,000 a year, probably $25,000 a
year on an average.
This one-tenth interest was obtain-
for Chance in the same manner ln
which Murphy obtained a majority of
the stock. Charles P. Taft, brother of
President Taft, loaned money to Murphy and Chance to buy the club,
which was sold at the bargain price
of $105,000 in 1905, a figure so small
that several persons to whom the
franchise was offered, thought something was wrong and refused to consider it.
Because of the national commission decision in his case sentencing
him do play for his contract salary,
it is known that Johnny King signed
a three-year contract for $4,000. To
this, of course, must be added what
the players get from the post-season
series, which, when the world's championship games are played, runs up
to $1,500 to $2,000 extra. Brown,
Overall, Tinker and Evers probably
receive amounts varying from $4,000
to $5,000.
Fred Clarke of the world's champion Pirates Is reputed to receive
$12,500 annually for services as
player and manager, while Wagner is
called a "$10,000 beauty," although
It Is not likely that figure Is correct.
Ty Cobb of eDtroit, and Charles A.
Comiskey recently picked as the
greatest ballplayers of the time, were
reported to receive $9,000 a year.
Probably some salt can be placed on
this estimate also.
The average player of experience
on a winning club considers himself
worth from $2,500 to $3,000, while
one with pretensions to being star estimates himself as worth from $3,000
to $5,000, depending on the club and
his ability. This Is good money for
seven months' work, Including the
training season; more, probably, than
the same player could average In
other lines of endeavor. But the life
of a ball player Is short. Club owners with winning teams are raking in
enormous profits, and of sentiment
there Is little. It is pretty safe to
say that the players earn all they get.
The
Washington Cafe
A PLACE TO EAT
Seats For Ladles
Everything Clean and Tasty
Prices Reasonable
W. P. CARPENTER,  PROPRIETOR
Second Avenue, near Seventh Street
LAND PURCHASE  NOTICE
Coast Land District—District of
Skeena.
TAKE NOTICE that we, George
Hie and Robert Corlett, of Little Canyon, B.C., occupation farmer and
■farmer, Intend to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted at the south-east portion of an island situated and lying
about two miles below Little Canyon,
near the south bank of the Skeena
river, Range V, Skeena Land District,
District of Coast, thence northerly,
thence easterly, thence southerly
around the shores of the island back
to the point of beginning and Inclosing 30 acres, more or less
GEORGE HIE,
ROBERT CORLETT.
Dated August 1, 1910.
A19
t\dm\t\A lt\d kAdkAd kAd kAd kAd kAd kAd kAd kAd kAi kAi kAd kAd kAd kAd kAd kA
********>>******»K-****«***************^
THE JOURNAL   I i
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♦
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During the last financial year of
the Glasgow street railways the municipal system carried 222,730,571
passengers, an increase of 986,002
over the preceding twelve months.
Eight, miles of new tracks were added to the system and the car mileage
was 20,974,016, an increase of 171,-
219 miles. The traffic receipts
totalled In round figures $4,450,000.
Of the passengers carried no less
than 62,225,260 paid one cent, 132,-
920,172 two cents, and 17,042,626
three cents—only about 10,000,000
paying more than three cents. In
this connection it is worth notice
that at the half yearly meeting of
the Central London Railway Company, Sir Henry Oakley reported that
the two-cent stage had proved a success. Cheap fares encourage traffic
and are profitable as well as a public
benefit
Billy Madden, the old-time fighter
and manager of boxers, himself in
his time one of the cleverest lightweights in the world, announces it as
his opinion that two years will about
see the finish of Jack Johnson as
the heavyweight champion of the
world. Madden can be credited with
bringing out more good big boxers
than any man ln ring history, barring
Billy Delaney. Among the men he
discovered and developed were John
L. Sullivan, Charley Mitchell, Peter
Maher, Gus Ruhlln, Denver Ed. Martin and several others. It was Madden who first saw the merit of Johnson as a lighter, which he became
wise to when he matched Ed. Martin
against the Texan black several years
ago. Madden thought he had a
champion in Martin, who was a clever
and hard-hitting two handed lighter,
but when he stacked him up against
Johnson he soon discovered that he
bad another guess coining.
After that contest Madden, who
hadobtained a good line on Jeffries,
made the statement more than onnp
that if Jack Johnson and Jim Jeffries ever met in the ring, Johnson
would win, and he has stuck to his
ground ever since, and had the pleasure of winning a considerable sum of
money backing his opinion against,
the New York admirers of Jeffries
when the Reno fight was brought
about. According to Madden's ideas
now, Johnson can't last at the pace
he Is going. Billy says that the big
black Is living loo fast for an athlete.
The effect of this sort of living which
Johnson Is indulging in now is making him fat, an effect which I? sure
to test the vitality of any man, more
*
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Is the Official Advertising
Medium for the City
of Prince Rupert
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3
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Oliver
Typewriter
—FOR—
Seventeen Cents a Day
Please read the headline over
again. Then Its tremendous significance will dawn upon you.
An Oliver Typewriter—the standard visible writer—the most highly
perfected typewriter on the market
—yours for 17 cents a day!
The typewriter whose conquest of
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The typewriter that Is equipped
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We announced this new sales plan
recently, Just to feel the pulse of the
people. Simply a small cash payment—then 17 cents a day. That
is the plan In a nutshell.      '<•
The result has been such a deluge of applications for machines
that we are simply astounded.
The demand comes from people ot
all classes, all ages, all occupations.
The majority of Inquiries has
come from people of known financial
standing who were attracted by the
novelty of the proposition. An Impressive demonstration of the Immense popularity of the Oliver Typewriter.       '
A startling confirmation of our belief that the Era of Universal Typewriting is at hand.
A Quarter of a Million People are
Making Money With
OLIVER
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The Standard Visible Writer
The Oliver Typewriter is a moneymaker, right from the word "go!" So
easy to run that beginners soon get
in the "expert" class. Earn as you
learn. Let the machine pay the 17
cents a day—and all above that Is
yours.
Wherever you are, there's work to
be done and money to be made by
using the Oliver. The business world
is calling for Oliver operator!. There
are not enough to supply the demand.
Their salaries are considerably above
those of many classes of workers.
"An Oliver Typewriter ln
Every  Home!"
That is our battU cry toddy. We
have made the Oliver supreme in
usefulness and absolutely indispensable in business. Nov comes the
conquest of the home.
The simplicity and strength of the
Oliver lit It for family use. It Is becoming an Important factor ln the
home training of young people. An
educator as well as a money maker.
Our new selling plan puts the
Oliver on the threshold of every
home ln America. Will you close
the door of your home or office on
this remarkable Oliver opportunity?
Write for further details of our
easy offer and a free copy of the new
Oliver catalogue.    Address:
R. C. BEAN
Prince Rupert Agent
General   Offices:   Oliver   Typewriter
Building, Chicago, 111.
CANCELLATION  OP RESERVE
NOTICE Is hereby given that the
reserve existing on Crown lands ln
the vicinity of Babine Lake, and
situate in Cassiar District, notice of
which bearing date June 30th, 1909,
was published ln the British Columbia Gazette, dated July 2nd, 1908, Is
cancelled.
ROBERT A. RL'NWICK,
Deputy Commissioner of Lands.
Lands Department,
Victoria, B. C, June 16th, 1910
(First Insertion July 5.) Friday, September 23, 1910.
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
t« Of ♦> »;. <« i|i .;.»;..;«.j..;.,;..;.....;..',.-.,% ...,-,...
■5.
| The Hermit Kingdom !
$        . *
^W'.'V'.".' WW*.40 w*i*Vv»'" .- *-■ *£*
The Hermit kingdom and the empire of Korea have become historical
terms. Twelve millions of people
have been added to the population of
Japan, and territory as large as England has become part of the Japanese
empire. • The treaty of Portsmouth,
which settled the war between Japan
and Russia, reads that Japan shall
have the guidance, protection and
control of Korea, and the last stage
of this agreement has now become
an actuality after three years of experimenting to discover a practical
method for preserving tire national
entity of the Korean peninsula.
End of Vi Dynasty
The Yi dynasty in Korea has lasted
for f>18 years. Seven branches of the
family remain and the heads of these
will rank as princes. A number of
other Korean officials will be elevated
to the Japanese nobility.
Throughout the negotiations the
mass of Koreans have been kept in
entire ignorance of what has been
happening. Tbe newspaper censorship is complete, and Japanese newspapers have not been permitted to be
sold in Korea. It is not believed,
however, that annexation by Japan
will involve disturbances in any section of Korea, which is thoroughly
policed. Certainly, the court and
cabinet officials in the peninsula are
quite complacent. The vast majority
of the people of Korea realize that
conditions in their country will be
Improved and it will be impossible
for the malcontents to arouse sufficient feeling to create uprisings.
History of Korea
The beginnings of Korean history
are associated with Ki-tse, who Is
said to have founded a nation there
some time after B. C. 1122. In B. C.
108 the country was annexed to the
Chinese empire. Soon after the
Christian era it was divided among
three petty principalities called the
San Han. About 960, one of them,
called Corl or Koryu, became paramount, and maintained Its independence during a brilliant period of progress. In 1329, however, a palace
revolution took place, which resulted
In the overthrow of Buddhism, the
banishment of the priests, and the
establishing of the present dynasty.
In 1592 Hideyoshi, the Japanese regent, sent a large! nvadlng army into
Korea as a first step to the conquest
of China. His armies overran the
country as far north as the Pingyang
and Wonsan, but on the arrival of
Chinese assistance Hideyoshi's troops
were gradually driven southward,
and In 1597 they were recalled. In
1627 the Manchus appeared and
placed the country under vassalage,
and from that date until 1894 a
tribute-bearing mission annually
visited Peking. In 1S64 the king died
without having named a successor.
The present Emperor Yi Hyong, then
a child of 12, was chosen, and his
father appointed Tai Wen Kun as
regent. For nine years he ruled with
a rod of iron.
Persecuted Christians
His persecution of the Christians
led to a French expedition in 1866,
which accomplished nothing, and
the policy of exclusiveness and the
doctrine of "Corea for the Coreans"
was rigorously enforced. In 1871 a
United States expedition, sent to enquire into the fate of a shipwrecked
crew was equally fruitless. It fell
to the lot of the Japanese to be the
first to make a treaty of friendship
and intercourse witli Korea. In 1876
they formally recognized the Independence of Korea, and In return
the port of Fusan was opened to their
trade, as were Wonsan in 1880 and
Chemulpo In 1881. In 1882 Commodore Shufelt secured a treaty of
friendship between the United States
and Korea. This was followed In
1883 by treaties with Great Britain
and Germany. In 18S4 with Italy
and Russia. In ^886 with France, In
1892 with Austria, and In 1897 with
China. Meanwhile there was much
conflict ln Korea between the Con-
servallves and the Civilatlon parties,
but the latter triumphed.
Independence was brought about
by Ihe China-Japanese war in 1894-5.
The ostensible cause of It lay In the
dispatching of troops by the Chinese
government to assist In suppressing
an uprising of peasants. Without
first notifying Japan in accordance
with an agreement between LI Hung
Chang and the Marquis Ito, active
hostile operations were at once begun ln Korea, though war was not declared until August 1, 1894.
Formal Independence
Following the decisive victory of
Japan the Korean king declared his
Independence January 8, 1895, and
the treaty of Shlmonosekl confirmed
this. There remained, after the war,
a powerful party, aided by the queen,
inimical to Japanese influence. In
October, 1895, a popular tumult, en
gineered by the Japanese authorities,
broke out at Seoul, and a mob invaded the palace and murdered the
queen. The king sought refuge in
the Russian embassy. For about wto
years the Russian influence was in
the ascendency, but in April, 1898,
the contending powers entered into
an agreement recognizing the independence of Korea, and pledging
themselves to abstain from interference with the internal affairs of the
country. In 1897 the sovereign
adopted the title of emperor. Public
interest was diverted for a time to
China, and the question of Manchuria
where Russia was firmly entrenched
itself as a result of the event3 connected with the Boxer uprising. In
1903 the Korean bank of the lower
Yalu became the scene of Russian activity, which was regarded with apprehension by Japan as constituting
an attempt, to occupy Korean territory. The first landing of the Japanese troops was began at Chemolpo
February 8, 1904, and on February
23 the emperor subscribed to a treaty
by which, In return for a guarantee
by the Japanese government of the
independence of the imperial household, he bound himself to follow the
advice of the Japanese government
in the execution of pclitical reforms,
and to enter into no treaty with a
power contravening the terms of the
convention. Practically Korean Independence was at an end from this
time. On August 22, a second agreement provided for the appointment
of Japanese financial and diplomatic
advisers. In the second article of
the treaty of Porsmouth, September
5, 1905, Russia recognized the paramount position of Japan in Korea,
and in November tne emperor consented to a treaty with Japan providing for the appointment of a Japanese resident general at Seoul, who
should have entire control of foreign
affairs. This resulted in sporadic uprising of the natives In 1905 and
1906.
 o	
Judging from the talk of some enthusiasts, one would ifagine that the
modern airship could do everything
that, the bird does except lay eggs.
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Reginald
Davey, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation machinist, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands, ln the vicinity of
Citwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
nortb-weBt corner and about 6 Vi
miles distant ln a north-westerly direction from the north end of Kitwancool Lake, thence south 80
chains, thence east 80 chains, thence
north 40 chains, thence west 40
chains, thence north 40 chains,
chains, thence west 40 chains to a
point of commencement, and containing 480 acres (more or less).
REGINALD   DAVEY.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated  May  30,  1910. Jy8
Coast Land District—District of
Skeena.
TAKE NOTICE that Elijah
Rounds, of Victoria, B.C., occupation
Stewart, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted one-half mile north,
and one-half mile east, of Nettie A.
Lairds N. E. corner of application to
purchase; and 300 feet east of Ana-
ham Lake trail, marked E. R.'s
south-west corner, thence 40 chains
east, thence 40 chains north, thence
40 chains west, thence 40 chains
south to point of commencement,
and containing 160 acres, more or
less. ELIJAH  ROUNDS.
Vincent M.  Schibner, Agent.
Dated May 25, 1910. Jn2i
LAND   PIKOHASE  NOTICE
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that John Cherry,
of Victoria, B. C, occupation mattress maker, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-east corner and about 14 miles
distant In a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence west 80 chains, thence
south 80,ehains, thence east 80
chains, thence north 80 chains to
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
JOHN CHERRY.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 3,  1910. Jy8
LAM) I'lIU'HASi: NOTICES
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE tbat Brenton
Brown, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation insurance agent, intends to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands In the vl-
vinity of the Kltwancool or Chean
Wein Valley:—Commencing at a
post planted at the north-east corner and about ten miles distant in
a north-westerly direction from the
north end of Kitwancool Lake,
thence south 8 0 chains, thence east
80 chains, thence north 80 chains,
thence west 80 chains to point of
commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
BRENTON BROWN.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 1, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Jessie Stead-
man, of Victoria, B. C, occupation
married w.'man, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following described lands, in the vicinity of
Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-east corner and about 6 %
miles distant in a north-westerly direction from the north end of Kitwancool Lake, thence south 80
halns; thence west 80 chains, thence
north 80 chains, thence east 80
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 640 acres, more or
less. JESSIE STEADMAN.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated  May  31,  1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassia
TAKE NOTICE that Bruce Older-
shaw, of Victoria, B. C, occupation
Jeweller, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of the
Citwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at
he north-west corner and about 7 %
miles distant in a north-westerly direction from tbe north end of Kitwancool Lake; thence south 80
chainB, thence east 40 chains, thence
north 80 chains, thence west 40
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 320 acres, more or
less. BRUCE OLDERSHAW.
James W.  Smith, Agent.
Dated May  31,  1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
r^€\ rjcjq t*
TAKE NOTICE that Echo Dud
geon, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
assistant dentist, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of the
Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-east corner and about 7 %
miles distant in a north-westerly direction from the north end of Kitwancool Lake, thence south 80
chains, thence north 80 chains,
thence east 80 chains to point of
commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
ECHO DUDGEON,
James to. Smith, Agent.
Dated May 31, 1910. Jy8
LAND PURCHASE NOTICES
Skeena Land District-—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that William
Hume Grant, of Stewart, B.C., occupation engineer, Intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a
post marked W.H.G.'s S.W. Cor., and
planted adjoining Alfred Manson's
corner post, thence 80 chains north,
along W. N. Harrison's west line,
thense east 8u chains, thence south
80 chains, thence west 80 chains, following Alfred Manson's north line to
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
WILLIAM HUME GRANT.
Frank R.  Strolm, Agent.
Dated July 2, 1910. Jy22
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that The Canadian
Fish and Cold Storage Company, of
Vancouver, B. O, occupation mercantile and manufacturing, Intends
to apply for permission to purchase
the following described lands: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-east corner of lot 34, Range 5,
Coast District, thence south 20
chains, thence east 40 chains, thence
north 25 chainB more or less to the
shore line, thence following along
the shore line to the point of commencement and containing 90 acres,
more or less.
The  Canadian  Fish  &  Cold
Storage Company Limited.
J. H. Plllsbury, Agent.
Dated July 14, 1910. Jyl9
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that William
Simpson, of Lindsay, Ont., occupation hotel-keeper, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands In the vicinity of the Kitwancool or Chean Wein
Valley:—Commencing at a post
planted at the south-east corner and
about 7% miles distant In a north
westerly direction from the north
end of Kitwancool Lake, thence
north 80 chains, tlience west 80
chains, thence south 80 chains,
thence east 80 chains to point of
commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
WILLIAM SIMPSON.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated May  31,  1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Ceorge Tutt,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation den-
Ist, Intends to apply for permission
o purchase the following described
ands In the vicinity of the Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—Commencing at a post planted at the
north-east corner and about 8%
miles distant in a north-westerly direction from the north end of Kltwancool Lake, thence south 40
chains, tlience west 40 chains, thence
nortb 40 chains, tnence eaBt 40
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 640 acres, more or
lesB. GEORGE TUTT.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June  1,  1910. JyS
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Lome Thompson, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
dentist, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of the
Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:
Commencing at a post planted at the
south-west corner and about 8%
miles distant In a north-westerly direction from the north end of Kitwancool Lake, thence north 80
chains, thence east 40 chains, tlience
south 80 chains, thence west 40
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 320 acres, more or
less. LORNE THOMPSON.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 1,  1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Sarah Ward,
of Victoria, B. O, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. E. corner and about 22 milec distant in a north-westerly direction
from tiie north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north SO chains, thence
west SO chains, thence south 80
chains, thence east SO chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or ;ess.
SARAH WARD.
James W. Smith, Agen!.
Dated June 6th, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that George Mc-
Bain, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
merchant, intends to apply for permission lo purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kltwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. W. corner and about 26% miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north 80 chains, thence
east 80 chains, thence south 80
chains, thence west 80 chains to
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
GEORGE  McBAIN.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 8th, 1910. Jy8
LAND PURCHASE NOTTCES
Skeena i..,.''  Disti li :     District -if
'
TAKE .. T IS .!: .: .':. .
Tutt, of Selkirk, .Manitoba, occupation merchant, intends to apply fur
permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted ai the
S. W. corner about 14 % miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, tlience north 40 chains, thence
east 4 0 chains, thence south 4 0
chains, thence west 4U chains to
point of commencement, and containing 100 acres, more or less.
FREDERICK  TUTT.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 3, 1910. JyS
.:,'!;
RCHASE NOTICES
il:   .i  District—District of
Cassiar.
iJE that Leihi Cherry,
i of Victoria, 11. ('., occupation married woman, Intends to apply for
permission to purchase tiie following
crlbed lands in Hie vicini ■•. ; it-
wancool or Cbean Wein Valley:—■
Commencing at a poht planted at tiie
S. E. corner and about 21 miles distant in a north-westerly direction
i from the north end of Kitwancool
[Lake, thence north SO chains, tlience
I west Su chains, thence south SO
chains, tlience east su chains to tbe
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
LEIHI   CHERRY.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June Oth, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Catherine
Welsh, of Vancouve,, ti. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands in the vi-
vinlty of Kitwancool or Chean Wein
Valley:-—Commencing at a post
planted at the S. E. corner and about
17% miles distant In a north-westerly direction from the north end of
Kitwancool Lake, thence north 80
chains, thence west 80 chains, thence
south 80 chains, thence east 80
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 640 acres, more or
less. CATHERINE  WELSH.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 4, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land  District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Henry Van
Wyck, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation hotel keeper, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands In the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Weln
Valley:-—Commencing at a post
planted at the north-east corner and
about 20 miles distant in a northwesterly direction from the north end
of Kitwancool Lake, thence south SO
chains, thence west 80 chainB, thence
north 80 chains, thence east 80
chains to point of commencement,
and containing- 640 acres, more or
less. HENRY VAN WYCK.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated  June  6th,   1910.% Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Minnie Clarke
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Weln Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. W. corner and about 28% miles
distant and in a north-westerly direction from the north end of Kitwancool Lake, thence south 40 chains
thence east 80 chains, thence north
40 chains, thence west 80 chains to
point of commencement and containing 320 acres, more or less.
MINNIE  CLARKE.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated  June   8th,   1910. Jy8
*
PHONE 138
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE  .NOTICE  that  John  Grieve,
of Vancouver, B. c, occupation
agent, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wien Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. E. corner and about 21) miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from tiie north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north SO chains, thence
west SO chains, thence south SO
chains, thence east SO chains to
point of comemncement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
JOHN GRIEVE.
James to. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 6th, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiai.
TAKE NOTICE mat Alfred E.
Partington, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation broker, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of
Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. E. corner and about 15% miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kltwancool
Lake, thence north 80 chains, thence
west 80 chains, tlience south 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
ALFRED E.  PARKINGTON.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 3, 1910. Jy8
FOR
LETTER HEADS ENVELOPES
BUSINESS CARDS
VISITING CARDS       STATEMENTS
Prince Rupert Journal
m
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that George Williams, of Winnipeg, man., occupation
clerk, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool
or Chean Weln Valley:—Commencing at a post planted at the S. to.
corner and about 16%. miles distant
in a north-westerly direction from
the north end of Kitwancool Lake,
thence north 40 chains, thence
east 40 chains, thence south 40
chains, thence west 40 chains to the
point, of commencement, and containing 160 acres, more or less.
GEORGE WILLIAMS.
James W.  Smith,  Agent.
Dated June 4, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Edward Cas-
pell, of Cayley, Alberta, occupation
merchant, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of the
Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. W. corner and distant about 15%
miles in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence south 80 chains, thence
east 80 chains, thence north 80
chains, thence west 80 chains to
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
EDWARD CASPELL.
James W.  Smith, Agent.
Dated June 3, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
PjmRiftr
TAKE NOTICE that Charles Gei-
ger, of Victoria, b. C, occupation
clerk, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands In the vicinity of Kltwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Comemnclng at a post planted at the
S. E. corner and about 19 miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kltwancool
Lake, thence north 80 chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence south 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
CHARLES GIEGER.
James W.  Smith,  Agent.
Dated June 4th, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiu..
TAKE NOTICE that Thomas Sills,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation machinist, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands In the vicinity of Kltwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. to. corner and about 26% miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence soutii 80 chains, thence
east 80 chains, thence north SO
chains, thence west 80 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
THOMAS SILLS.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 8th, 1910. JyS
Skeena Land District—District of
Pfmsifl v
TAKE NOTICE that John Reid,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
broker, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kltwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. W. corner and about 15% miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north 40 chains, thence
east 40 chains, tlience south 40
chains, thence west 40 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing  160  acres,  more  or less.
JOHN REID,
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated   June   3,   1910. Jy8
Dlstriel of
Skeena Land District—District of
CaRSiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Sarah Cox,
of Monarch, Alberta, occupation marled woman, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands In the Kltwancool or
Chean Wien Valley:—Commencing at
a post planted at the N. W. corner
and about 4 % miles distant In a
north-westerly direction from the
north end of Kltwancool Lake, thence
soutii 80 chains, thence east 80
chains, thence north 80 chains,
thence west 80 chains to point of
commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
SARAH COX.
James W. Smith, Agent
Dated May 31st, 1910.
Skeena Land Dl&trict—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE tbat William Wallace, of Toronto, Ont., occupation
insurance agent, Intends lo apply for
permission to purchase the following
diBcribed lands In the vi.V ilty of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Comencing at a post planted at the
iJLtTT nonH, tTr?6%   m"°S ! ':^' thence^south'so chains"," Ihence
?™m   tn     n    th       hestf'y ?lrMro','  west    SOchalns.    thence    north    80
rom    he  north   end   of   Kltwancool  ,.hill       lhenPe eagt so cna,      t0 the
-«?'   «r   .Z?*?tt ,1° ChalDS' "L"*S! Point of commencement, and contain-
west    80  chains,    thence    north  80
chains, thence east 80 chains to tbe
Skeena Land Dlstrlct-
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Grace Cess-
ford, of Victoria, B. C, occupation
married woman, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of
Kitwancool or Chean Weln Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. E. corner and about 23 miles distant In a north-westerly direction
from   the   norlh   enil   of   Kitwancool
point  of  commencement,  containing
640 acres, more or leBS.
WILLIAM  WALLACE.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated   June  8th,   1910. Jy8
-District of
Coast Land District—District of
Skeena.
TAKE NOTICE that I, George A.
Skeena Land District
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Samuel John
Mclllarmld, of Monarch, Alberta, occupation farmer, Intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following described lands In the Kltwancool or Chean Weln Valley:—Commencing at a poBl planted at the N.
E. corner and about 4 % miles In a
north-westerly direction from the
north end of Kltwancool Lake,
thenco soutii 80 chains, thence west
SO chains, thence norlh SO chains,
thence east SO chains to point of
commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
SAMUEL JOHN McDIARMID.
James to. Smith, Agent.
Dated  May 31st, 1910. Jy8
Skeena  Land   Disirict     District  of
Cassiar.
ing 640 acres, more or less.
GRACE CBSSFORD.
James W. Smith, Agent
Dated June Oth, 1910. JyS
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE Ihat Henry Hemming, of Victoria, B. C, occupation
hotel keeper, Intends to apply for
permission io purchase the following
described lands In the vicinity of Kltwancool or Chenn Weln Valley: —
Commencing al a post planted at the
N. E. corner and about 21 nillos distant, In a north-westerly direction
from the norlh end of Kilwancool
Lake, thence south 80 chains, thence
west SO chains, thence north 80
chains, thenco enRt so chnlns to the
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or Icrs.
HENRY   HEMMING.
James to. Smith, Agent.
Dated June Oth, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE      NOTICE      that      Nelson
jflowen,   nf   Victoria,   B.   C,   occupn-
TAKE NOTICE that Annie Gowan,  tion  mining engineer, Intends to ap-
of Victoria,  B.  C,  occupation   mar- i
Poole, of Prince Rupert, occupation ried woman, Intends to apply for per-
printer, Intend to apply for permts- mission to purchase Ihe following
sion to purchase the following de-1described lands In the vicinity of Kit-
scribed lands:—Commencing at a! wancool or Chean Weln Valley:,—
post planted on the north-east shore , Commencing at n post planted at the
line  of  Smith   Island,  distant   abOUt|N, W. corner and about 28 miles dls-
one mile south-east from Lot 38, and
marked "Q. A. P.'s North-west Corner Post," thence 20 chains south,
tlience  80  chains east,  thence  north
ly for permission to purchase the
following described lands ln the vicinity of Kltwancool or Chean Weln
Valley:—Commencing at a post
Planted at the N. E. corner and about
19 miles distant In the nortb-west-
"ily direction from the north end of
Kltwancool Lake thence south 80
chains, thence west 40 chains, thence
north 10 chains, thence west 40
iins.   thence     north     40     chains,
tant  ln  a  north-westerly    direction
from   the  north   end   of   Kilwancool
Lake; thence soulli SO chains, thence!
oust    80     chains,     thence  north   SO  cl
to shore line, thence following shore .chains, thence west SO chains to the thence  east   80   chains   to   point   of
line to point of commencement, con-  point  of  commencement,   and     con-  commencement,  and   containing   4S0
lainlng 160 acres, more or less. |tabling 640 acres, more or less. acres, more or less.
GEORGE  ARTHUR  POOLE. ANNIE COWAN. NELSON   OOWEN.
Dated Satvrday, July 2, 1910. James to. Smith, Agent. James to. Smith, Agent
(First Insertion July 5.) Dated June 7th, 1910. Jy8       Dated June 4th,  1910. Jy8 PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Friday, September 23, 1910.
prince Bupert journal
Telephone 138
Published twice a week on Tuesdays
anil Fridays from the office of publication, Third Avenue near McBride St.
Subscription rate to any point in
Canada, $2.00 a year; to points outside
of Canada, 83.00 a year.
Advertising''rate furnished on application.
O. H. NELoON,
Editor..
Friday, September 23, 1910.
STAR CHAMBER  PROCEEDINGS
The city council is being charged
in season and out of season with following a system of star chamber Bit-
tings for the  transaction of  public
business. We do not approve of the
practice of holding private meetings
on the part of any representative
body as a habitual practice. On the
other hand we do not believe that
private meetings are not sometimes
essential. Questions may arise from
time to time when the city council
would be perfectly Justified in holding a private session. The occasions,
it Is true would, in our opinion, be
very limited and no council should
take to itself such a right except under very exceptional conditions. In
the public interest there are occasions arise when the members of the
council can best serve the public by
a private meeting.
We have not lost faith in the human race to the extent that we must
regard all private meetings of a body
like the city council as indicative of
mischief plotting. There are questions
of policy sometimes to be. decided by
the members of the council which
if discussed in open session might
undo the very thing that the members of the council may have in view.
All this may involve matters that
are perfectly honorable and concerning which there is no desire to be
secretive except in furthering the interests of the public. While tbe
practice of holding secret sessions is
open to being abused, it is surely going too far to suggest that all private
sessions of the council are open to
condemnation.
 o— —
DUMPING GROUNDS
There has arisen a decided difference of opinion on the Streets Committee of the City Council relative
to the matter of dumping the excavations from private property on the
streets. The subject has come up
in a small way from time to time
ever since the city has been incorporated. With the arrival on the
scene of the city engineer and the
preparation of estimates by the engineer's department of the cuts and
fills, the situation has necesarily become more aggravated. Now the
streets committee is grappling with
the difficulty of finding a dumping
place for the excavations from property where it is proposed to erect
buildings.
Aid, Hildltch wants to grant permission to dump the excavations on
•the streets, at the same time taking
a bond from the owner that be will
pay the addiiional amount which it
costs the city to carry surplus filling
to another place in consequence of
the fll'ing tbat the owner has placed
there.
Aldermen Lynch and Barrow, the
other members of the committee, are
agreeable to the allowing of the
dumping, but are somewhat undecided how best to adjust the matter of
ensuring the return of the difference
In value between dumping the city's
excavations according to the original
plans and the new ground which may
be necessary through private parties
usurping the dump.
All are agreed that nothing should
be put In the way of those who want
to build. Willi that we agree. Every
Inducement should be offered to prospective builders at this particular
slage of the cilv's h'story. To work
oul any scheme thai will call for reimbursing al n future time when tho
city wants a fill is n difficult mailer.
Will: changes In the owners of property which will b" very frequent in a
city like Prince Rupert, there would
be a lot of trouble collecting unless
the city fills are made very soon and
collections effected. We fear that In
the end there would be a number of
collections that would never he made.
What would be more Inequitable
would be tbe fact, that some collections would be made on the bonds
and some would escape.
It would be belter rather lhan
have such a state of Inequality lo
arise to forego all restrictions upon
builders for using the streets. It
is quite possible that at the present,
stage of the city's history it would
be a wise policy on the part of the
council to give permission lo dump
on   the streets  free of all  cost  and
without any entanglements in the
way of bonds or advances to reimburse the city. The council might
well offer such an inducement to
prospective builders taking care that
the excavations were fo'lowed by immediate construction, and the dumping was all done under the direction
of the city engineer's department.
Later facilities will be provided for
h.e more expeditious and cheaper
handling of material. Under the engineering department private dumping could possibly be so arranged as
to facilitate work on the part of
private owners and at the same time
reduce the future cost to the city for
additional dumping to a comparatively small amount. The council might
with advantage consider the wisdom
of offering what would thus be a
small bonus lo construction work
carried out'at once, li would later,
perhaps, cost the city something, but
the amounl at the most would only
be nominal while in the meantime
ai a period in the city's history when
construction work is needed there
would be a decided advantage which
would many times over pay for the
added expense later on.
 o	
The dance to be given by the
Kaien island Club this evening is expected to be one of the very best that
lias ever been given in this city. No
expense has been spared in endeavoring to make this formal opening of
the club a great success. The committees state that everything has
been arranged for and that all is in
readiness for a very pleasant evening.
* *     *
Capt. Francis, special police constable, arrived on the steamer Bruno
from Masset, and left aagin for Tel-
el river, to secure witnesses in an
assault case which arose over a mining dispute, which occurred several
months ago. The defendant left the
country when he received information that a warrant had been issued
for his arrest. He returned recently
and surrended to the authorities.
The case will be heard before C. Harrison, stipendiary magistrate.
* *       ,;:
The Salvation Army is about to
open operations here. Major Morris,
who Is In command of the work in
this province, and Mrs. Morris, have
reached the city, accompanied by Ensign and Mrs. Johnstone, and Lieut.
Wright, who will have charge of the
work. A barracks that will serve as
a home for the officers will be erected at once on the lots purchased some
months ago for the Army. The contract has been let for the building
for about ?5,000.
* *    *
At the council meeting last night
the health committee reported upon
the matter of the complaint made by
W. C. C. Mehan, superintendent of
the G. T. P., as to the nuisance offered by dumping refuse into the harbor. The committe reported recommending that in view of the fact
that the city had no means of reaching the waterfront with refuse that
Mr. Mehan be asked to let the matter
stand over until the question of
waterfrontage for the city was taken
up with the G. T. P.
 o ■—
THE HAIDA NATION
Once Powerful Race is  Now Reduced
in Numbers on
Coast.
Under   the  Influence  of  Missionary
Teachings  Indians Are Recovering  Places
The fo'lowing Is contributed to
the Journal by one who has made a
careful study of the Queen Charlotte
Island Indians: —
Here and there, along Ihe shores
of Graham Island, are twenty-three
deserted Indian Reserves, with their
totem poles standing as mute testimony of a former race of warriors,
dreaded   by  all  of  the native  tribes,
from   the   California   shores   to   the
southern interior or AlasiU. The l"iis
of thousands of warriors have
dwindled down, until the nation now
numbers but five hundred souls, and
two well-kept towns hold the Increasing Haida nation, few in numbers,
but a credit to their spiritual advisers and the Indian Department.
Where the God of War decimated
the once proud race; where the family crest was but a mark of the high
birth of some ancient chief; where
the shelving on two adjacent spruce
trees marked the resting place of the
conquerors of the hundreds of tribes
scattered over the former colony and
adjacent territories: now the churches and schools, city council and government agencies, peace and prosperity rules,  and  Is again  bringing
forward a stalwart and increasing
class of citizens, who have adopted
the ways of the whites.
Future historians will sing the
praises of the generations that have
gone. We will deal with the remaining few and attempt, in a short article, to show the Halda Indian of
today, in his true colors. In order
to direct attention to the progress
made in the past fifty years, it might
be mentioned that former slaves of
the Haida's are still living in Masset,
and the son of the former chief is
one of the best known residents of
the Northern country, where he owns
a launch, hotel, cattle and horses,
and is the proud father of eight
young Edenshaw's. Every Sunday
morning he reads the Collect In the
Anglican church and interprets, from
English into Ihe Haida language, the
sermon of the Anglican clergyman
who directs the spiritual affairs of
the native congregation Seated at
the organ is the chief councillor, Alfred Adams, another descendant of
the Haida's, and around him is massed the surplised choir of Indians who
sing "the praises of the Lord of
Hosts" from the hymnbooks used in
the churches throughout the land.
In one of the town stores Daniel
Stanley, another councillor, dispenses
wares of every description and was
the recipient a few days ago of $1,-
500, the value of a schooner built
by the Haida's and sold to Captain
Clark of Vancouver.
On the Yakoun River, where the
Dominion government appropriated
$10,000, for the clearing of that
stream of the accumulation of timber, fifteen Haida's are employed,
with a number of whites, and are
expert boatmen and axemen. The
construction of Agency buildings is
in the hands of expert carpenters of
the Haida's and a wharf, for the accommodation of ocean-going steamers, is also being erected by the Indians. The war canoes, of former
days, are to be seen beneath the
trees, in the neighborhood of the settlement, and the former resting-
places of their dead looks primitive,
even to the' inhabitants of the Masset
agency. They have a graveyard,
with the marble headstones and other
signs of civilization, and have adopted the Christian methods in the manner of burying their dead. Their
brass and reed band comprises twenty young men, under the leadership
of one of the Haida's,- and the selections, given at their last concert,
were from the latest and best composers. Each family is the possessor
of a well-built and modern house and
the streets are well kept, under the
supervision of the town council. They
are expert boat-builders and good
fishermen. Along their streets stand
several of the old totem poles and
the older residents still talk in the
native dialect, retaining their old
customs and looking askance on the
innovations of the followers of the
white race. Here and there the evidence of old customs can be traced;
but civilization is fast superceding
the work of the ancients and should
save from extinction the once proud
possessors  of  the  country.
There is an object lesson in the
regeneration of the Haida nation,
and thanks are due the pioneer missionaries for their fostering care of
the Indians. The Rev. William Duncan was the first to lead in the uplifting of the Haida's, paying them
periodical visits and leading them
into the path of righteousness. He
was followed by the Rev. W. H. Col-
ltson, a gentleman who spent the best
years of his life on Masset Inlet and
who induced the scattered Indians to
move to one reserve. The church,
rectory, scholhouse and other Improvements are monuments of Rev.
W. E. Collison's watchful care of the
Indians. He fostered their love of
music, subscribing liberally to their
hand fund. The Indians delight in
singing the praises of their former
spiritual adviser, and, to his watchful
care the natives are Indebted for
their freedom from many of the Ills
that other Indians contract. He was
also Ihe medical atl uidant, and kept
the Haida's from dying off from con-
i. vous diseases, caring for them by
nignt and by day.
During recent years the Indians of
Masset have been fortunate in having
Ihe Rev. William I-Iogan as their pastor. A graduate of Trinity College,
and. a whole-souled native of Dublin,
there are few men in the North who
have not enjoyed the hospitality of
this missionary. He has been nineteen years among the Indians, and
wherever he goes, the natives love
and respect him. An athlete, and a
specimen of the race from which so
many worthy Christian teachers have
gone out to save the untutored races,
"Father" I-Iogan is as much thought
of in the great northern land as the
late "Father" Pat was the model In
the Kootenay's. In order lo show the
labor performed by this missionary,
we will give the work performed on
Sunday last:   He held  morning ser
vice In the Mission church, then proceeded to the white settlement on
the Inlet, where another Sunday service was performed. Returning to the
reserve, he held divine service during the evening and baptized two
children. He thinks little of rowing
from one settlement to another, at
any time of the night or day, and performs the duties with that winning
way which brings the respect, not
only of his own congregations, but
also of those who have been brought
up in other paths. The church and
the schools are doing more for the
Haida's than many realize and their
benign influence may yet save from
extinction the few remaining members of this once powerful race.
Situate at tbe south end of Graham
Island is the Skidegate tribe of
Hiada's. Their beautiful "White
Village" can be seen from a distance,
when entering Skidegate Inlet. This
portion of the Haida Nation is Just
as progressive and law-abiding as
their brethren to the north. They
have a school, church and other improvements, that tend to make them
a well-behaved class, and are under
the tutelage of the Methodist church.
Only very recently one of their number has been sent out in the missionary field. He held the position of
teacher in the Indian day school, and
to Peter Kelly is due a great deal of
credit for his zeal and good work.
The Indians of Skidegate own a
wharf and oil works, where they ship
dog-fish oil and where the steamer
calls every week. They are the best
fishermen on the northern coast, and
a large number converse in the English language. They also have adopted the ways of the whites, and own
homes that are a credit to the native
builders and. householders. Rev. J.
C. Spencer Is the missionary in
charge at Skldegate, and he Is indefatigable in his attention to the
spiritual and physical wants of his
charges. It is the intention to construct a beautiful church on the rising ground at the back of the village,
and a new schoolhouse will be erected by the Dominion government. The
installation of water-works and the
erection of a second wharf at the
village, are tinder way. A number of
the Indians are employed at the sawmill In Queen Charlotte City, while
others, who learned trades at the
boarding schools, are engaged in
other occupations.
During the past summer the Haida's have been engaged at the salmon
canneries on the Skeena river, where
they all succeeded in accumulating
a goodly share of the results of the
season's fishing. They are now preparing fish for winter use, at the
river's along the shores of Graham
Island. On their return to their
homes the work of building residents
and improving their streets will be
taken up. Their council are elective
and the laws they promulgate are
strictly carried out. Any visitor will
find the young men ready to adopt
the days of the white brethren, and
no more tractable people could be
desired. The half-century of civilization has done wonders for the
Haida's, and it is to be hoped that
the advent of white immigration will
not leave in its wake the demoraliza-
H;n so frequently seen, where the
ancients and modernism come In contact.
THE GREAT SCENIC
ROUTE OF CONTINENT
(Continued from Page One)
a picture that is never ending in variety and grandeur. It will be but a
very short time until this part of the
route will be supplied with tourist
hotels to meet the demands of the
tourist trade that must be built up.
Then again there are hot springs
along the route that will add to the
attractiveness of the resorts that may
oe established. v
Mount Robson
Mr. Russell has several paintings,
particularly one of Mount Robson,
the highest peak in Canada, which
are now on view at the exposition in
Brussels. His trip, which has Just,
ended, will enable him to execute
some additional paintings which will
be made use of by the company.
From his enthusiastic relation to the
Skeena River section of the route
there will undoubtedly be some
works covering this section of the
line of road.
On the way the party went into the
Mount Robson district and took advantage of the opportunity of getting
a view of that majestic peak. They
camped for a time at Grand Forks
which will be within easy reach of
the mountain from the G. T. P. and
made careful study of the scenery.
While Robson of course overshadows
the other peaks in the neighborhood,
there are other attractive features
and the whole will form a magnificent resort when the railway is completed and a summer hotel erected
there.
Changed  Scenery
Through the Nechaco Valley the
scenery is more prosaic. Tiie country
apears there to be more of an agricultural and grazing section with an
absence of the more striking features
met with in the mountain section.
The members of the party are agreed,
however, that in the trip across the
province this will not be any disadvantage. It will afford an opportunity
for a change of scene that will afford
relief to the tourist giving variety
that will be most welcome. At either
end of the line insofar as the province
of Britisli Columbia is concerned,
there is the grandest and wildest of
scenery. The Bulkley Valley affords
a sort of blending of the two forms
of scene. There is the rich agricultural areas with mountains rising in
the background.
A Rich Valley
Of the Bulkley Valley they had no
doubt of its becoming one of the richest of the farming sections of the
province. The soil, they say, Is a
good one, and should give rich returns to the farming community that
will make its home there. They were
surprised at the Immense area that
there was offering itself to cultivation. Its productiveness has already
been proved by the Immens • crops "
hays and farrA produce including
vegetables that are being raised on
the lands there.
Speaking of the Yellowhead Pass
through which the railway will enter
the province, the members of the
party say that it dissipates the ordinary conception of a pass. It is ln
reality a valley through which you
pass before you are aware of the fact
that the divide has been gone over.
Members of the party on the lookout
for the pass, had to be informed after they had gone through It that the
pass was behind them. It will thus
he an ideal pass for railway purposes.
 o	
Arsenic is mined In Japan, Italy,
Portugal, Spain, Germany, England,
and, within a limited area, In tbe
United States. Its uses are many. As
a poison it has been known from
very early times. The peasant women of Austria consume large quantities of it, having faith in its virtue
as a beautlfier, and the man of the
same region are adicted to Its use
In the mistaken belief that it increases their bodily strength and endurance.
Atlantic Steamship
 Agency	
DURESCO
The King of Water Paints
FIRST IN THE FIELDEEEEfflOST EVER SINCE
JSOLE AGENTS IN WESTERN CANADA!
The Staneland Co. Ltd
836-840 Fort Street, VICTORIA, B.C.
mm
VtRB8&
GRAND TRUNK PACIFIC STEAMSHIPS
For VANCOUVER, VICTORIA, SEATTLE.
Connecting   with   Eastbound   Trains
Prince Rupert sails every Thursday, 8.3u p.m.
Prince George sails every  Monday, S.30  p.m.
FOR STEWART:
Bruno sails every Sunday at 5 p.m.,  returning  Monday evening  to
connect with Prince George, southbound.
Di nun sails Wednesday, 5 p.m., returning   Thursday   evening,  connecting with  Prince Rupert  southbound.
FOR MASSET—Bruno sails 10 p.m.  every Monday, returning Tuesday night, and for Skidegate and  other  Moresby   Island   Ports,
Bruno sails 10 p.m. Thursday, returning Saturday.
Tickets, reservations and Information    from
A. E. McMASTER
Freight and  Passenger Agent, G. T. P. Wharf.
Through tickets and excursion
rates to
England, France, Germany,
and all
Scandinavian Ports.
Call or write for rates to any
part of the world. I am also
agent for all American steamers
to and from Prince Rupert;
Northern Pacific Railway; Alaska Pacific Express.
J. H. ROGERS
General Steamship and Railway
Agent, Prince Rupert, B.C.
Union Steamship Co'y
of B.C. Ltd.
The new Steel Passenger Steamer
"Camosun"
PRINCE RUPERT every Sunday at 9 a.m. for Vancouver,
arriving Monday afternoon.
For Stewart City on arrival from
Vancouver Friday night.
Northbound, leaves Vancouver
Wednesdays at 9 p.m.
Steerage Fare $5.00
The "Camosun" is the only steamer
on the run having water-tight bulkheads and double bottom, thus ensuring safety of passengers in case of
collission or wreck.
J. H. ROGERS,   Ticket Agent
HAYNOR  BROS.
FUNERAL  DIRECTORS
and
PROFESSIONAL  EMBALMERS
1)R.  W. B.  CLAYTON
DENTIST
—o—
Office  in    the   Westenhaver   Block,
Over  Orme's Drug   Store.
Prince Rupert
WM. S. HAlL, L. D. S. D. D. S.
:-: DENTIST :-:
Crown and Bridge Work a specialty.
All dental operations skillfully
treated. Gas and local anaesthetics
administered for the painless extraction of teeth. Consultation free.
Offices, Helgerson Bk., Prince Rupert
J. H. PILLSBURY
CIVIL    ENGINEER
Surveying,   Designs,   Estimates,   etc.
Room   7,  Exchange  Block,
Corner Third Ave and Sixth Street
Prince Rupert
G. to. NICKERSON & CO.
—o—
CUSTOMS AND MERCHANDISE
Brokers, Forwarding Agents,
Storage, etc.
J. W. POTTER
ARCHITECT     AND     STRUCTURAL
ENGINEER
Re-inforced Concrete a Specialty
—o—
Law-Butler Building - Prince Rupert
GRAHAM ISLAND — "The surest
sign of the progress of a town or
district is its newspaper—live, active, hustling." "The Masset Review," Masset, Q.C.I.
The Thompson
Hardware Co.
—Second Avknoe—
Paints. General Hardware,
Oils, Stoves and Ranges. Friday, September 23, 1910.
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
LINDSAY'S CARTAGE & STORAGE
G. T. P. CARTAGE AGENTS
Office at H. B. Rochester, Centre St.
—o—
LADYSMITH COAL
Is handled by us.  All orders receive
prompt attention.  Phone No. 68.
Some Rock
Bottom
Prices
5« Us For Investment
Rupert City Realty & Information Bureau, Ltd.
PRINCE RUPERT,
B.C.
The Roland Rooms
Splendid  Accommodations
Newly Furnished
Hot  baths;   right down town;   good
table board all round
RATES, FIFTY CENTS AND UP
Fred Stork
General Hardware
...Complete Line of...
VALVES
Pipe and Pipe Fittings
CANCELLATION  OF RESERVE
NOTICE is hereby given that the
reserve existing on Crown lands ln
the vicinity of Babine Lake, situate
in Range 5, Coast District, notice of
which was published In the British
Columbia Gazette, dated December
17, 1908, is cancelled in so far as
said reserve relates to lots numbered 1519, 1518, 1517, 1516, 1515,
1510, 1507, 1506, 1506A, 1503 1501,
1502, 1512, 1511, 1505, 1504, 1513,
1514, 1509, 1508, 1530, 1527, 1528,
1529, 1531, 1532, 1533, 1534, 1535,
1537, 1639, 1536, 1538, 1540, 1541,
1544, 1543, 1545, 1546, 1542, 1547,
1548, 1549, 1550, 1520, 1521, 1522
1523, 1524, 1525, 1526, and 1551.
ROBERT A. RENWICK,
Deputy Commissioner of Lands.
Lands Department,
Victoria, B. C, June 16th, 1910.
(First insertion July 6.)
 LADYSMITH	
COAL
H. B. ROCHESTER,  -   Centre Street
7iNAL CHAMPIONSHIP
GAME TOMORROW
(Continued from Page One)
Clarmont Rooms
Sixth Avenue near Fulton Street
Comfortable, Homelike Rooms; Newly Furnished Throughout; Bath
Rooms   with   Hot   and
Cold Water
Hates, $3.00 a Week   and   Upwards
Mrs.   Annie   AlcGrath,   Proprietoress
IN THE COUNTY COURT OF ATLIN
HOLDEN AT ATLIN
In the matter of the Estate of Thomas D. Kearns, deceased, Intestate
All parties having claims against
the above Estate are required to forward the same, with full particulars
thereof, duly verified, to the undersigned, not later than the sixteenth
day of February, 1911, after which
said date the Estate of the said deceased will be distributed amongst
those entitled thereto.
Dated at Atlin,   B.C.,   this    nineteenth day of August, A.D. 1910.
PATRICK FOLEY,
A6-OS Administrator.
LAND PURCHASE  NOTICES
Skeena Land District—District of
• Queen Charlotte.
TAKE NOTICE that the Queen
Charlotte Whaling Company Limited,
of Victoria, British Columbia, occupation manufacturers, Intend to apply
for permission to purchase the fol-
owing described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about fifteen
chains south of a small creek on the
west side of Rose Harbour, Moresby
Island, thence west forty chains,
thence north forty chains, thence
east forty chains, thence southerly
following the sinuosities of the foreshore line forty chains, to the point
of commencement.
Queen Charlotte Whaling
Company Limited,
Per Sydney Charles Ruck, Agent
Dated July 14th, 1910.
Rose Harbour, Q.C.I.       . A5
Portland Canal Short Line Railway
HOSPITAL   NATRON
C. D. NEWTON
Real Estate
Noney to Loan
Notary Public
Exchange Block
Corner 3rd Avenue and 6th Street
P.O. Box 226   Tel. 226
Hear
the
Truth
There's nothing about a set of
harness that requires such careful
attention, In both leather and workmanship, as traces and collars, there's
where the strain lies, there's where
we excel, though we are just as
watchful as to every other detail of
a complete set of harness, be It for
heavy or light work.
B. C. Saddlery Company
Limited
MANUFACTURERS OF SADDLERY
Jobbers of Leather, Harness, Saddles, Whips, Trunks and Valises,
Pads, Blankets, Rugs; Harness Soaps
and Dressings.
500 YATES STREET
VICTORIA, B.C.
Pursuant to Section 7 of the Navigable Waters Protection Act ,(R. S.
Can. cap 115) notice is hereby given
that there has been deposited in the
office of the Minister of Public
Works at Ottawa and a duplicate In
the Office of the Registrar of Titles
at Prince Rupert, plans and description of the site and side elevation of
a proposed railway wharf and trestle
approach thereto to be constructed
near the mouth of Bear River at
Stewart, British Columbia, and that
one month after the first Insertion of
this notice the Company will apply
to the Governor-in-Councll for the
approval thereof.
Dated at Victoria, British Columbia, this 16th day of September,
1910.
GERARD RUEL,
Chief Solicitor.
EBERTS & TAYLOR,
S23 Agents at Victoria, B.C.
WANTED—Good   sales    girl;    easy
work; short hours.   Apply Simon's
Fair, Third avenue.
DUMPING ON STREETS
(Continued from Page One)
only be asked to put up a bond thai
they would if there was insufficient
dumping ground for the city owing
to this private dumping pay for thb
extra haulage up to the amount they
had put ln the fill.
Aid. Mclntyre seconded the motion.
Aid. Barrow, the acting mayor, did
not know whether this was in ordei
or not.
Aid. Pattullo said he would favoi
allowing the committee longer time
to consider this ln view of the explanation of the chairman of the
committee that further time was
needed. He did not oppose this mo'
tion on principle. He simply did It
in order to give the committee time
to report as asked for.
Aid. Lynch explained thai Ihe difficulty he met In connection with this
wns the necessity for safeguarding
the granting of tho bond. Thero
might be removals and the sale of
property which would out ail all kinds
of trouble In collecting the bond. He
was ln favor of giving the fullest, opportunity to proceed with building
and was willing to stretch the point
as far as possible to allow this. Ho
had considered the matter from all
points and was not yet in a position
to suggest a satisfactory way of safeguarding the city's Interests. The
proposal of Aid. Hilditch was altogether too vague to suit him. There
was no specification of any amount
per yard for which the bond would
be given.
It was finally decided to lay the
matter over for further constderalion
by the committee. Aid. Hildltch and
Aid. Mclntyre voting for the motion
of Aid. Hilditch, and Aldermen Lynch
and Pattullo against, with Aid. Barrow giving the casting vote against
the motion.
ing short of marvellous. He received
some support from Dulude and
Gauthier, the latter being responsible for some fine runs, while the
former shone through the undaunted
manner in which eh pierced his way
through right up to Gray. Cattari-
nlch played a solid game at point,
but he was at times non-plussed by
the sweeping rushes of the Royals'
home brigade, who bored In repeatedly. Jimmy Gifford played grand,
his checking being superb oil all occasions. Len Turnbull attacked with
determination and at all times contrived to beat his man, a feat of
no small significance, having regard
to the speedy opopsition he had to
contend against. He was the highest
scoring player, managing to net
three. The Spring brothers excelled
at certain periods and the dazzling
way in which they kept at their men
and repeatedly led in a concerted attack, gained for them many admirers.
As a team the homesters excelled, but
when it came to Individual play there
was not much to differentiate about,
although Newsy Lalonde shared with
Jimmy Gifford the honors of being
the best players of the day.
While no doubt to a certain extent
the Royals' eariy lead had a somewhat demoraliizng effect upon the
challengers, the French-Canadians
are to be congratulated on the game
they put up taking the match as a
whole. Had they shown better combination instead of dilly-dalling while
in their opponents' territory they
might have brought about a more
even finish. At one period they were
playing 12 men to 10 and if they had
persistently gone after their men instead of waiting for them to pass, it
is quite likely that a different complexion would have been put on the
game. As It was the salmonbellies
recognizing their numerical weakness
delayed as much as possible, waiting
for the two men to come off the penalty bench. "Play the game" was repeatedly shouted, but the cupholders
intended taking no chances and consequently played the monotonous
"waiting" practice. Of course, New
Westminster knew that they had the
highest championship honors to de
fend and one could hardly blame
them for their tactics.
Joe Lally, of Cornwall, the man
who Is doing so much to keep up
the prestige of the game of lacrosse
as the chief national sport, faced the
ball.'
"The best team won," was the
comment of Mr. Lorenzo Prince, one
of the directors of the National club
and managing editor of La Presse:
when approached after the match.
He, however, condemned some of the
tactics of the winning team, saying
that a few of the players used profane remarks during the progress of
the game. He further deprecated the
action of the Royals in playing a ragtime game, this expression referring
to the occasions when the cupholders
held on to the ball and kept dancing
about without making any definite
movement to attempt to score.
Shiner White, the coach of the
team, said: "Don't worry; we will
take the cup back to Montreal." Some
of the players who were asked their
opinion declared that there should
not have been an adverse balance of
four goals. They thought that the
score 5 to 3 would have better represented the day's play.
Asked as to what arrangements
would be made with a view to capturing next Saturday's match and
possibly the Minto cup, the officials
stated that nothing had been decided
yet, but. Inferred that a decidedly different result would prevail in the
second encounter, to be played next
Saturday. The Nationals also staled
that some of the men had not become
acclimatized and that the mnjorily
were suffering from colds and were
not, therefore, so lit to play as on
oilier occasions.
The Association Makes Choice of Miss
NcTavish to Take
Charge.
Institution   Will   Likely   Be   Ready
About December—Woman's Auxiliary to be Formed
The city hospital association at a
meeting held on Tuesday afternoon
when a report was read from the
architect, W. Lailey that the work
promised to be done by December 1.
A hot water system of heating was
recommended by the architects, the
estimated cost being put at $3,000.
On motion of Aid. Pattullo it was
decided to call for tenders for the
work.
For matron applications were received from Miss Kate McTavish, Atlin; Miss Emmie Johnson, Vancouver; Miss Eva E. Allen, Victoria; Miss
A. Helen Adam, Victoria; Miss E.
Bonnell, New York; and Miss Margaret A. Christie, Prince Rupert.
On a ballot Miss Kate McTavish
was appointed at $100 a month.
The financial statement submitted
by the secretary, A. Cuthbert, showed the following:
Receipts
Subscriptions to date $4,121.05
Expenditure
Building,    architects,    surveyors,  and  for  foundation    $3,096.53
For   supplies   and   printing
expenses         182.95
Miscellaneous  debit  checks
charged         29.75
Miss Nellie Papln is paying a visit
lo her sister, Mrs. C. D. -Newton.
LAM) LEASE NOTICE
|    Skeena Land District—District of
Coast
TAKE   NOTICE    that    I,  William
j David Allen, of Victoria, B.C., agent
! intend   to   apply   for   permission   to
: lease the following described land:
i Commencing at a post planted at the
i northwest corner of Lot 542. Range
5  Coast   (Skeena),  thence   east    60
chains to the inner part of Kinnealon
Inlet, thence soutii SO chains to soulli
east corner of said  lot,  thence west
80  chains  to  westerly  limit  of  said
lot, thence north and at right angles
I to the southerly limit of said lot
the shore line, tlience north along the
shore  line  of  said  Inlet to  place  of
beginning:      containing   about    600
acres, more or less.
WILLIAM DAVID ALLEN.
Robert Mason, Agent
Dated Sept.  23. S.23
Victoria carries sixteen men and will
engage in fishing in Hecate Straits.
While in Vancouver, Capt. Clark
was offered a large profit on his Investment by persons desiring to purchase the craft. The first product of
the Indians of Graham Island was
greatly admired by the yachtsmen of
Vancouver, and an effort was made to
have the schooner sail under the
colors of the V. Y. C.
from
Total expenditures $3,909.23
Balance to credit account. .      21i.oj
It was explained that if the outstanding expenses to date are paid a
deficit of about $200 would be made.
The sums required to complete the
work were set forth as follows:—
For building    $14,000
Furnishing      5,000
Heating         3,000
Stand pipe           250
To Arrive
Friday,    Sept.    23.—Camosun
Vancouver.
Saturday,   Sept.   24.—Princess  Beatrice from Skagway.
Prince Albert from  Masset.
Sunday,   Sept.    2~>.—Camosun   from
Stewart.
Prince George  from Vancouver.
City of Seattle from Seattle.
Amur from Vancouver, via Queen
Charlotte Islands.
Monday,   Sept.    26.—Prince    Albert
from Stewart.
Princess Royal from Vancouver.
Cottage City from  Skagway.
Tuesday,  Sept.  27.—Humboldt from
Skagway.
Prince   Albert  from   Queen   Charlotte City.
Wednesday, Sept. 28.—Prince Rupert
from Vancouver.
To Depart
Friday,    Sept.     23.—Camosun     for
Stewart.
Saturday,  Sept.  24.—Princess Beatrice for Vancouver.
Sunday, Sept. 25.—Camosun for Vancouver.
Prince Albert for Stewart.
City of Seattle for Skagway.
Monday, Sept. 26—Prince George for
Vancouver.
Amur for   Vancouver    via    Queen
Charlotte Islands.
Prince Albert for Queen Charlotte
City.
Princess Royal for Skagway.
Cottage City for Seattle.
Tuesday,   Sept.   27.—Humboldt   for
Seattle.
Wednesday, Sept. 28.—Prince Albert
for Stewart.
 o	
NEW   PASTOR  HERE
TO IMPROVE THIRD
Grades Will Remain Unaltered and Tenders Will Be Called for the
Work.
City Council  Passes  Upon  the Question And Decide Upon Policy
to Pursue
Total $22,250
A systematic canvass will be made
to raise the money required. In connection with the money offered the
subscription of Foley, Welch & Stewart of $250 and of Mr. Stewart for
$100 was mentioned.
The Builders' Exchange wrote
withdrawing its $15 subscription owing to alleged failure to comply with
the conditions relative to building.
A woman's auxiliary was suggested and it was decided to cal la meeting for the purpose of organization.
There were present Mr. J. A. Kirk-
patrick, who presided, and Messrs. P.
1. Palmer, H. H. Clarke, D. G. Stew-
are, A. Carss, T. D. Pattullo, Lailey,
and Arthur Cuthbert, secretary.
MARINE NEWS
RUPERT CITY IN
The Rupert City, chartered by the
G. T. P., arrived in port last evening
from the south, carrying a full cargo
of freight, including 14,000 feet of
lumber for the sash and door factory,
and a load of coal for the G. T. P.
BANNOCKBURN IN
The steamship Banockburn, Capt.
Dent, reached port Tuesday afternoon after a 64 day voyage from
Sydney, C. B. She has 6,400 tons of
steel rails and accessories for the G.
T. P.
Work has already commenced In
unloading her at the storage point
between the wharves of the (!. T. P.
and Foley, Welch & Stewart. The
officers are Hume Douglas, chief officer; ,1. to. Hums, second officer; J.
.1. Barker, third officer; C. Newell,
chief engineer, P. Harding, second
engineer; M. Kidci, third engineer,
and II. Kelsey, fourth engineer.
The voyage was without incident
except for rough weather rounding
tiie Horn.
The Bannorkhurn is one of the
newest vessels of the Burn line, and
is equipped in a modern way throughout.
MASSET  IH'ILT SCHOONER
The schooner Princess Victoria,
Capt. Fred Clark, arrived In Prince
Rupert on Wednesday with a consignment of halibut The vessel was purchased recently In Masset, from Daniel Stanley, one of the Haida Indians, for $1,600, and was taken to
Vancouver, where a 35 horsepower
engine was installed,    The  Princess
Rev. Mr. McLeod Will Preach First Sermon in Baptist Church on
Sunday.
Well
Trained   Minister   Will
Charge   of   the   Local
Congregation
Take
The new pastor of the First Baptist
church of this city arrived on the
steamer Prince Rupert on Wednesday evening. The Baptist people are
very fortunate in securing a man so
thoroughly educated and with such a
wide experience. Rev. Mr. McLeod
received his B.A. degree from
Acadia College, the Baptist school of
the Maritime provinces. He spent
three 5;ears at the Newton Theological Institution, Boston, Mass., graduating from this school in 1901.
Newton is the oldest Baptist theo-
logicu' school in the United States.
Mr, .McLeod also took a post graduate course for four years at the
University of Chicago. He was appointed to a fellowship in the university which is a recognition of excellent scholarship. He received the
degree of Bachelor of Divinity from
the University of Chicago, and was
presented with the same degree ad
eundem gradum by McMaster University last June.
Mr. McLeod has been pastor of
several important churches and
has had experience in various lines
of Christian work. He has been pas-
lor In Kansas, Wisconsin, Ontario
and   Illinois.
The Baptist Standard of Chicago
speaking of Mr. McLeod'a Chicago
work, said: "Rev. W. H. McLeod,
late pastor of Humbo'dl Park Baptist church, Chicago, nnd recently n \
Btudenl al the University of Chicago,
has lie ul notably active In the work
of the evangelistic band. Mr, McLeod has made a good record for
himself in Chicago."
A resolution passed by the Plrsl
Avenue Church of Hutchinson, Kansas, says; "The work of Rev, Mr.
McLeod has been almosl phenomenal
.mil absolutely unequalled for iiuc-
cess  in  the history of the church."
Mr. McLeod will preach nexl
Sundoy morning and evening in the
building now occupied ley the Baptist church and situated at the head
of Sixth Btreet. The members of the
church cordially Invite the citizens of
Prince Ruperl to attend these ser-
\ ices and hear their new pastor.
 o	
Thomas   Deasy,   Indian   agent   at
.Masset, is in Ihe city.    lie has visited
the southern pari of the Islands.
 o—■—
Dr. A. 11. Wallace, of the Hazelton
hospital, was In the cityt his week nn
his way to Vancouver.
The city council held a short sitting last evening. His Worship the
Mayor, Aid. Mobley, Aid. Naden nnd
Aid. Smith were all absent, there
being just enough present io complete the quorum and allow the sitting to he held. Aid. Barrow was
e'ected to act as mayor.
The streets committee reported on
several  works.
n recommended the putting In of
a 16 foot plank way ut Seal Cove
Circle from Eighth street at the junction with Kelliher and Sixth street.
This was a work that has been petitioned for and the committee recommended acceding to it.
A recommendation was also submitted by the committee that no
change be made in the grade on
Third avenue. As the difference to
be effected would not. be great; as
there were only fifteen petitioning for
it, and among these there was considerable difference of opinion; and
as any change would have to be submitted to the Lieutenant-Governor in
Council for approval, the committee
felt it would be better to allow the
grade to stand.
Aid. .Mclntyre felt that It would
be wise to leave the grades on Third
avenue as they were. This was the
better course in view of the fact that
the plans were registered. If left
as it was it would allow work to
progress. He moved the adoption of
the report, which motion was carried.
To Proceed With Work
Later in the evening Aid. Mclntyre
introduced the subject of work on
Third avenue on a motion to proceed with the calling for tenders. He
moved that the grades on section
one should remain as it was and that
the clerk should be empowered to do
the necessary advertising for grading on Third avenue.
Aid. Pattullo thought this whole
work might proceed. First avenue
should be graded as well as Third
avenue. He himself, however, believed that these matters should go
through the committee before being
passed on by the council.
Aid. Lynch believed that there
were some matters to attend to on
First avenue which necessitated delaying a little. Third avenue could
With advantage be proceeded with.
The motion of Aid. Mclntyre carried, which will allow of a start being made on Third avenue very
shortly.
In the matter of the proposed alteration in the grade at Hays Cove
the committee recommended that it
he lowered only four feet instead of
ten feet as suggested.
The petition with the suggestion
will be returned to the petitioners.
MODEL  WHARF
According to advices from Seattle,
the new Grand Trunk Pacific dock In
that port Is to become the headquarters of the port warden and his staff
of assistants. The 50-ft. tower on the
dock, which commands a view ot
Klliot Bay and the surrounding
waters, is regarded as an Ideal location for the official's offices. G.T.P.
officials have expressed their willingness of furnishing quarters for Ihe
port warden and as soon as the offices can be fitted up the official will
move ln. The new dock Is considered the fini'si on Seattle's waterfront
and commands a view of the entire
harbor. The tower on the water end
is one of the landmarks of Seattle's
skyline and It Is the most conspicuous
object on the from
The work of covering Prince Ruperl thoroughly from the standpoint
of the underwriters Is being done by
a. m. Ross of Vancouver, and J.
Seeley also of the Vancouver office.
Mr. Seeley hns gone on lo Stewart
to go over the territory there. The
Intention of Mr, Ross is to make quite
a complete examination Into the
whole situation hero and later lo
again Inspecl li from the view of the
Insurance men. In Mr, Ross the underwriters have one of the most con-
scienttous of representatives and one
who has had long experience ln the
coasl c ities of the province.
 o	
Mr. Tatterefleld, of the O. T. P,
Btaff, spent a day or two at Masset
iins week.
Last evening Mr. and Mrs. F. H.
Spraguc and II Sprague lefl by ihe
Prince  Ruperl   for  Bedford, Oregon. PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Friday, September 23, 1910.
* •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• * •:• >:• * * •:•♦ •:• >:
*.-.....% .*..'
* WW*.
COAL NOTICES
PEARL FISHING
In the stirring times of strife between English, Dutch and Spanish
traders in the East India trade during the seventeenth, century, the
hardy buccaneers who visited Ihe desolate coasts of northern nnd north-
western Australia, little thought as
they faced the dangers of those unknown tropic sens that they were
sailing over treasures far greater
than those which they had obtained
by force and fraud and which they
risked their lives lo keep.
The pearlier of today follows a
calling as picturesque and little less
dangerous than those hardy pioneer
navigators of the Indian Ocean.
Broome, on the west coast and
Thursday Island on the north, are
headquarters of the industry, but the
western pearler has a far more extensive range for his operations, having at the same time more to dread
from the violence of the tropical
storms.
Along the northwestern Australian
coast from Onslow south to Derby
north, a distance of about 1,000, the
pearl oyster abounds; and although
the diver is unable to work in water
deeper than twenty-five fathoms, so
shallow are the ocean beds in these
latitudes that there are areas available some 250 and 300 miles from
shore. Up to the present time all the
diving is done by Malay or Japanese
from luggers—small, well built, and
equipped craft from five to fifteen
tons carrying capacity Each lugger
carries six or seven colored crew, and
In most instances a white master,
whose chief duty is to take charge of
shell and prevent any peculation of
"stones"   (pearls).
The accommodation on board the
lugger is most primitive, the crew
occupying closely-packed bunks forward, while the white master has, in
most instances, to share his tiny
cabin with his diver. This is a necessary evil; the diver having to give
sailing orders is obliged to maintain
a self-respecting distance from his
crew.
The deck space on the lugger is
necessarily limited. The pumping
gear—the most important feature of
the boat's equipment—takes up a
great deal of the area forward, while
amidships is the primitive cuddy—
a box of sand in which stands a camp
oven—where all the cooking for master and crew is done—really wonderful dishes, too, the beautiful
snow-white bread made with rice
yeast.
Aft, room has to be found for mes-
ter's cabin, spareroom, repairing gear
etc. Neither master nor men, therefore, have much room for exercise,
and the master's life cannot be called strenuous. He can, if so minded,
take swimming exercise in the shallows, or row in his dingy in the evening; but for companionship he must
wait for his Sunday's visit to the
schooner, which forms a base for a
fleet of luggers, a store, a postoffice,
nnd in some instances an hotel. The
"skipper" of the schooner is generally a convivial old sea dog, known
locally as the "old man," who makes
his visitors welcome, dispenses hos-
pita'lty and drives a brisk trade at
the same time.
On Sunday night each master rejoins his lugger at a favorable moment for wind and tide, and his diver
directs his course to some chosen
spot to be ready for work on Monday
morning. At dawn all are astir on
board. Coffee is made and served to
all hands, the diver donlng his dress
the while he takes his coffee and then
his helmet 1b placed, the race plate
securely fastened, and he Is lowered
over the side and the air pump Is set
going. Two lines are previously attached to Ihe diver's dress, his life
(signal line) being under the care of
line lair pipe), and pumper line
his lender—a member of the crew
chosen by Hie diver himself, ns his
life while below Is In the "lender's"
hands."
There Is a weird fascination In descending to the ocean bed anil roaming fathoms deep through the submarine forests, or over picturesque
reefs, treasure hunting. Hundreds
of curious fish, attracted by the odd
apparition, crowd around the diver,
who will roam as far as his lifeline
permits In every direction, trying to
fill his shell hag. An experienced
diver knows Just where to look, the
presence of shell being variously indicated according to the nature of
the sea bed He rejects chicken shell,
that below a certain diameter, and
stays below varying periods of from
twenty to thirty minutes. If he be
lucky enough lo strike a "patch" he
might fill his bag in a short time, but
fori une does not often lie that way,
and he might spend many, many unprofitable days. As he Is always a
shareholder, lie can be trusted to do
I    Skeena Land District—District of
Coast.
TAKE NOTICE  that I, K.  M.  Mc-
Innes,  of  Prince  Rupert,  occupation
mariner,    intend      to   apply   for   a
license to prospect for coal and petroleum    on    the    following    described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted on the south shore of Crow Bay,
thenco north SO chains, thence west
| SO   chains,   thence  soutii   80   chains,
Ithence east 80 chains to post marked
K.M.McI.'s S.E. corner.
Dated August 18th, 1910.
Slii KENZIE McLEOD MclNNES.
Skeena Land District—District of
Coasl.
TAKE NOTICE  that   I,  K.  M.  Mc-
Innos,  of  Prince  Rupert,  occupation
mariner,  intend    to apply  for a  li-
' cense to prospect for coal and petro-
ileiini   over   the   following   described
.lands:—Commencing at'a post plant-
led on the soutii shore of Crow Bay,
Ithence north  80  chains,  thence east
180   chains,   thence  south   80   chains,
tlience west SO chains to post marked
I K.M.McI.'s S.W. corner.
Dated August ISth, 1910.
S16 KENZIE McLEOD MclNNES.
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that I, K. M. Mc-
Innes, of Prince Rupert, occupation
mariner, intend to apply for a license to prospect for coal and petroleum over the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted on the south short of Crow Bay,
thence south 80 chains, thence west
80 chains, tlience north 80 chains,
thence east 80 chains to post marked
K.M.McI.'s N.E.  corner.
Dated August ISth. 1910.
S16 KENZIE McLEOD MclNNES.
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that I, K. M. Mc-
Innes, of Prince Rupert, occupation
mariner, intend to apply for a license to prospect for coal and petroleum over the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted on the south shore of Crow Lake,
thence south 80 chains, thence east
80 chains, thence north 80 chains,
thence west 80 chains to post marked
K.M.McI.'s N.W. corner.
Dated August 18th, 1910.
S16 KENZIE McLEOD MclNNES.
NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that application will be made to the Legislative Assembly of the Province of
British Columbia at its next Session
for an Act to incorporate a company
! with power to construct, equip,
maintain and operate a line or lines
of railway of standard guage with
any kind of motive power for the
! conveyance of passengers and freight,
| and with all the powers contained
in the "Model Railway Bill": Commencing from a point at or near
Port Simpson, or Work Channel, in
the Coast District, British Columbia,
by the most feasible, desirable and
practicable route to a point on the
Eastern boundary of the Province of
Britisli Columbia, via the South-west
side of Work Channel to the Skeena
River; thence up the North side of
the Skeena River to a point near
Hazelton; thence to the junction of
the Bulkley River; thence up the
right bank of this River eight (S)
miles to the Suskewa River; tlience
up this River by a low divide to the
head of Babine Lake; thence to the
north end of Stuart Lake; thence
north of McLeod Lake to the Mls-
nichinca River; thence up the Mis-
nichinca River by Summet Lake to
Pine River Pass; tlience north-westerly to head of Pine River, and down
ihis River to Moberley Lake; and
thence by the Peace River to the
Eastern boundary of the said Province of British Columbia; and with
power to construct, operate and
maintain all necessary bridges, roads,
ways and ferries; and to build, acquire, own and maintain wharves and
docks in connection therewith; and
to build, acquire, own, equip and
maintain steam and other vessels and
boats, and to operate the same on
any navigable waters; and with
power to build, equip, operate and
maintain telegraph and telephone
lines in connection with the said
Railway and branches, and to transmit messages for commercial purposes, and to charge tolls therefor;
and to generate and to sell electricity
for the supply of light, heat and
power; and with power to expropriate lands for tbe purposes of the
Company; and to acquire lands,
money bonuses, privileges or other
aids from any Government, municipal corporation or other persons or
bodies; and to levy and collect tolls
from all persons using, and on all
freight passing over any of such
roads, railways, ferries, wharves and
vessels built by the Company; and
with power to connect with and make
traffic or other arrangements with
railway, steamboat, or other companies:
Dated at Victoria, B.C., this 11th
day of August, 1910.
BARNARD & ROBERTSON,
A19.       Solicitors for the Applicants.
LAND PURCHASE NOTICES
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Phillip Williams, of Sydney, Nova Scotia, occupation accountant, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein
ley:—Commencing at a post planted
ut the S. E. corner and about 16 Vi
miles distant in a north-westerly direction from the north end-of Kitwancool Lake, tlience north 80
chains, thence west SO chains, thence
south SO chains, thence east SO
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 640 acres, more or
less. PHILLIP  WILLIAMS.
James to. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 4,  1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Annie Grieve,
of Victoria, B. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. to. corner, and about 17 >/2 miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thenee soutii 40 chains, tlience
east 4 0 chains, thence south 40
chains, thence east 40 chains, thence
north 80 chains, thence west 80
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 480 acres, more or
less. ANNIE GRIEVE.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 4,  1910. Jy8
LAND PURCHASE NOTICES
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Pearl Caspell
of Cayley, Alberta, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the-folicwing do-
scribed lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. E. corner and about lo'a miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kltwancool
Lake, thence south SO chains, thence
west ill chains, thence north 40
chains, tlience west 40 chains, thence
north 40 chains, thence east 80
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 480 acres, more or
less. PEARL CASfELL.
James to. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 3, 1910. jy8
LAND PURCHASE NOTICES
COAL CLAIMS
Skeena District—Queen  Charlotte
Islands.
To all to whom it may concern:—
NOTICE is hereby given that I, the
undersigned, intend to apply for a
icense to prospeet for Coal and
Petroleum upon the following lands
situate on Graham Island, one of the
Queen Charlotte Group, in the Province of British Columbia, and more
particularly described as follows, viz:
Commencing at a stake planted one
and a quarter miles west of the
north-east corner of Louis Inlet, and
marked "P. C. Coates' S. E. Corner
Claim No. 1," thence west 80 chains,
thence north 80 chains, thence east
80 chains, thence south 80 chains to
the place of commencement.
Staked June 14th, 1910.
Dated this 28th day of July, 1910.
P. C. COATES,
By his Agent, Wm. Edward Laird.
A9
COAL CLAIMS
his best, and good divers make a
considerable income. As a rule they
receive from £20 to £25 a ton for
"lay" on shell, and a commission of
from five to eight per cent on the
value of any "stones" or "by-ar-
rogne" misshapen pearls.
Owing to the many risks attending
the calling it is, however, left almost to the colored races. The
greater number of fatalities occur
through the rashness of the divers
themselves in venturing, in calm
weather into water twenty-eight to
thirty-two fathoms deep. Budden
death from paralysis may occur or
the unfortunate victim of his own
rashness may be a cripple for the
hest of his life. During the months
of June, July and August there is
more deep water diving and many
fata'ities, but the Maylas and Japs
display a stoical disregard for death
and there is always a candidate for
the rear man's diving gear Immediately forthcoming.
Accidents occur at times in shallow
water also through carelessness In
adjusting vital parts of the dress,
fouling the lines or defective gear,
but these are so rare that a great
manw white men make experiments
diving in from eight to twelve fathoms of water, and experience no discomfort after a little practice.
A fine body of men the pearlers are
as a rule, the open air, unconven-
tiona life, and the charm of those
tropic seas exercise a fascination
which does not seem to wane even
with advancing years. Veterans and
pioneers of the industry, who amassed easy fortunes In the earlier days
still return periodically to Broome-
Cossak to compare their methols with
those of the present, and taunt what
they call "verandah pearlers" (those
who own fleets but do not personally
superintend them) with their lack of
pluck and enterprise.
Meanwhile the luggers range over
seas which cover strange histories,
and still present, odd sights. At the
I.acepedges and Montehello Islands
myriads of lurlles make their breeding grounds, and gulls their nests
and here, by-and-bye, a new Industry
in turtle hunting and bechelde-mer
and tropang fishing will arise, Further soutii are Bernier and Dirk
llantog islands, the former a retreat
for natives suffering from contagious
nnd infectious diseases, the latter a
sheep run. Off these Islands there are
still to be seen, at low tide, portions
of wrecks of vessels of an earlier
century, and from time to time par-
liesof enthusiasts ransack the shore
line of these islands hoping lo find
burled treasures of the bucanneers,
who evidently regarded these desolate spots as safe hiding places.
Up to date, however, only n few
rusty, battered relics, arms, cooking
utensils, rusty bolts, bars and anchors of a bygone age have revealed
themselves.   But once there the dolce
far niente fascination of those poales-j ° '
cent tropic seas fastens itself on the I     For Hob Printing of all kinds see
imagination of the most prosaic, and j (he Journal man.
Skeena  District—Queen  Charlotte
Islands.
To all to whom It may concern:—
NOTICE is hereby given tbat I, tha
undersigned Intend to apply for a
icense to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum upon the following lands,
situated on Graham Island, one of
the Queen Charlotte group, In the
Province of British Columbia, and
more particularly described as follows, viz:—Comemnclng at a stake
planked at the S. E. corner of P. C.
Coates' Claim No. 1, and marked
"Wm. Penman's S. W. Corner, Claim
No. 1," thence east 80 chains, thence
north 80 chains, thence west 80
chains, thence south, 80 chains to the
ilace of commencement.
Staked, June 14th, 1910.
Dated this 28th days of July, 1910.
WM. PENMAN.
By his Agent, Wm. Edward Laird.
A9
LAND   LEASE   NOTICE
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that The Canadian
Fish & Cold Storage Company Ltd.,
of Vancouver, occupation Mercantile
nnd Manufacturing, Intends to apply
for permission to lease the following described land:—Commencing at
a post planted at high water mark
on the westerly side of Prince Rupert Harbor and distant about 110
chains from the north-east corner of
Lot 443, thence west 20 chains,
thence south 20 chains, thence east
5 chains, more or less to high water
mark, thence following along the
high water mark to the point of commencement and containing 20 acres
more or less.
The Canadian Fish and Cold
Storage Company, Limited,
J. H.  Plllsbury, Agent.
Dated June 20th, 1910. Jylji
one sees In fancy the old Dutch merchantman with the Spanish galleon
in hot pursuit, and the treasure trove
becomes a not too remote possibility.
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that John Cox, of
Monarch, Alberta, occupation farmer, intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described
lands, situated in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Comencing at * post planted at the
north-west corner and about five and
one-quarter mileB distant in a northwesterly direction from the north end
of Kitwancool Lake, thence 80
chains south, thence 80 chains east,
thence 80 chains north, thence 80
chains west to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres,
more or less.
JOHN COX.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated  May  30,  1910. Jy5
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Mary Brown,
of Vancouver, B.C., occupation married woman, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity ol
the Kitwancool or Chean Weln Valley:—Commencing at a post planted
at the North-east corner and aboul
ten miles distant in a north-westerly
direction from the north end of tho
Kitwancool lake, thence south 80
chains, thence west 40 chains, thenca
north 40 chains, thence west 40
chains, thence north 40 chains
thence east 80 chains to point ol
commencement, and containing 480
acres, more or less.
MARY  BROWN.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 1, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that James Alexander McDonald, of Monarch, Alberta, occupation farmer, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands, situated In
the Kltwancool or Chein Wein Valley:—Commencing at a post planted
at the N. E. corner about five and
one quarter miles distant in a northwesterly direction from the north
end of Kitwancool Lake, thence south
80 chains, thence west 80 chains,
thence north 80 chains, thence east
80 chains to point of commencement,
and containing 640 acres, more or
less.
JAMES ALEXANDER MCDONALD
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated May 30, 1910. .   Jy5
Coast Land District—District of
Skeena.
TAKE NOTICE that I, Ernestine
A. Roney, of Prince Rupert, occupation married woman, Intend to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted on the north
bank of the Skeena River about half
a mile south of Geo. T. Church's preemption, thence west 10 chains,
thence north 40 chains, tlience east
to the Skeena River; thence southwest following the bank of the
Skeena River to the place of beginning, and containing about 80
acres.
ERNESTINE A. RONEY, Locator.
W. A. Roney, Agent.
Dated July 7th, 1910. .   Jy22
Coast Land District—District of
Skeena.
TAKE NOTICE that I, J. Adolpb
Perry, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation
book-ke.eper, intend to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted on the north bank of the
Skeena River, about a mile west of
Lot 31, thence north 40 chains,
thence east 80 chains to lot 31,
thence south 40 chains to bank of
Skeena River, thence west about 80
chains following north bank of
Skeena River to point of commencement, and containing about 320
acres.
J. ADOLPH PERRY, Locator.
Wm. A. Roney, Agent.
Dated July 16th, 1910. Jy22
Coast Land District—District of
Skeena.
TAKE NOTICE that I, Mary M.
Roney, of Stillwater, Minnesota, U.
S.A., occupation married woman, Intend to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands.
Commencing at a post planted on the
north bank of the Skeena River at
the Bouth-east corner of Geo. T.
Church's pre-emption, thence north
40 chains, thence east 40 chains,
thence south to the bank of the
Skeena River, thence south-west following the Skeena River to the place
of beginnldg and containing about
120 acres.
MARY M. RPENY, Locator.
W.  A.  Roney,  Agent.
Dated July 8th, 1910. Jy22
Skeena Land District—District of
Ofl Rflf AT*
TAKE NOTICE that Violet Gelger,
of Victoria, B. C, occupation married woman, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kltwancool or Chean Weln Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. W. corner and about 23% miles
distant In a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kltwancool
Lake, thence south 80 chains, thence
east 40 chains, thence north 40
chains, thence east 40 chains, thence
north 40 chains, thence west 80
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 480 acres, more or
less. VIOLET GEIGER.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated  June  7th,  1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that John Henderson, of Vancouver, B. O, occupation
agent, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at'a post planted at the
S. .W corner and about 25 miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, tlience north 80 chains, thence
east 40 chains, thence south 80
chains, thence west 80 chains to
point of commencement and containing 320 acres, more or less.
JOHN   HENDERSON.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 7th, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Laura Gordon
of Victoria, B. O, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. E. corner and about 18 miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from tbe north end of Kltwancool
Lake, thence south 40 chains, thence
west 40 chains, thence nortb 40
chains, thence east 40 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 160 acres, more or less.
LAURA GORDON.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated  June  4,   1910. jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Ethel Welsh,
of Vancouver, B. O, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—-
Commencing at a post planted at the
south-east corner and about 10 miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north SO chains, thence
west SO chains, thence soutii 80
chains, thence east SO chains to
point of commencement and containing 640 acres, more or less.
ETHEL WELSH.
James to. Smith, Agent
Dated June 1st, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Henry Welsh,
of Vancouver, B. O, occupation
printer, Intends to apply foi permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing at. a post planted at the
S. E. corner and 11 miles distant
in a north-westerly direction from
the north end of Kitwancool Lake,
thence north 80 chains, thence west
80 chains, thence south 80 chains,
thence east SO chains to point of
commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
HENRY WELSH.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 2, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Frederick
Welsh, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation clerk, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kit-
wandool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-east corner about 11 miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kltwancool
Lake, thence south 80 chains, thence
west 40 chains, thence north 80
chains, thence east 40 chains to
point of commencement, and containing 320 acres, more or less.
FREDERICK  WELSH.
James to. Smith, Agent
Dated June 2, 1910. JyS
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Walter Marke
of Toronto, Ont., occupation traveller, Intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands in the vicinity of Kltwancool
or Chean Wein Valley:—Commencing at a post planted at the N. E.
corner and about 27% miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence south 80 chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence north 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to the
point of commencement and containing 640 acres, more or less.
WALTER MARKE.
James  VV. Smith, Agent
Dated June Sth, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Marguerette
Burns, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission cu purchase the
following described lands In the vicinity of Kltwancool or Chean Wein
Valley:—Commencing at a post
planted at the N. E. corner and distant about 12 miles ln a northwesterly direction from the north
end of Kitwancool Lake; thence
soutii '80 chains, thence west 20
chains, thence north 80 chains,
thence east 20 chains to point of
commencement, and containing 160
acres,  more or less.
-MARGUERETTE   BURNS.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 2, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Richard
Howie, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation dentist, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands ln the vicinity of
Kltwancool or Chean Weln Valley:—•
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. E. corner and about 24% miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kltwancool
Lake, thence south 80 chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence north 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
RICHARD HOWIE.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 7th,  1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Sandford
Burton, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation mining engineer, Intends to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands In the vicinity of Kltwancool or Chean Weln
Valley:—Commencing at a post
planted at the N. E. corner and
about 23 % miles distant ln a northwesterly direction from the north
end of Kltwancool Lake, thence south
80 chains, thence west 80 chains,
thence north 80 chains, thence east
80 chains to point of commencement
and containing 640 acres, more or
lesa. SANDFORD BURTON.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 7th, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Norman Cle-
land, of Vancouver, B. C., occupation printer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands In the vicinity of Kltwancool or Chean Weln Valley:—
Comencing at a post planted at the
S. E. corner and about 26% miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kltwancool
Lake, thence north 80 chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence south 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
NORMAN  CLELAND.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 8th, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiai.
TAKE NOTICE that James Welsh,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation machinist, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. W. corner and about 12 miles distant In a north-westerly direction
from the nortk end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence south 80 chains, thence
east 20 chains, thence north 80
chains, thence west 20 chains to the
point of commencement and containing 180 acres, more or less.
JAMES  WELSH.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated  June  2,  1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles F.
Burns, of Moncton, New Brunswick,
occupation auditor, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein
Valley:—Commencing at a post
planted at the south-west corner and
about 12 miles distant in a northwesterly direction from the north
end of Kitwancool Lake; thence
north 80 chalnB, thence east 80
chains, thence south 80 chains,
thence west 80 chains to point of
commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
CHARLES  F.   BURNS.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated  June  2,  1910 Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
fljiRslflr
TAKE NOTICE that James Jar-
dine, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
merchant, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of Kltwancool or Chean Weln Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. W. corner and about 13 miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kltwancool
Lake, thence south 80 chains, thence
east 80 chains thence north 80
chains, thence west 80 chains to
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
JAMES JARDINE.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 2, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that John McDIar-
mid, of Lucknow, Ont., occupation
farmer, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands In th« vicinity of the
Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:-—
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. W. corner and about 13 miles distant ln a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kltwancool
Lake; thence north 80 chains, thence
east 40 chalnB, thence south 80
chains; thence west 40 chains to
point of commencement, and contain-
in j   320 acres.
'JOHN McDIARMID.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 2, 1910. Jy8 Friday, September 23, 1910.
THE  PRINCE  RUPERT  JOURNAL
FRENCH NAVY PLAN
Increased Expenditure on Warships By
the European Republic
Battleships, Cruisers, Destroyers and
Submarines Are All Included
in the Programme
Tbe French naval estimates for
1911, which have just been approved
in their general lines by the Commission du Budget, shows that out of
a total expenditure of $82,500,000
for the navy, no less than $28,600,-
000 will be devoted to shipbuilding
and artillery. Although this represents the greatest effort the republic
has as yet made towards maritime
expansion, the French naval men are
by no means satisfied that it is at all
adequate. They deplore the purely
administrative expenses, unproductive from a military standpoint,
which have Increased with every successive civilian minister, and absorb
a relatively considerable part of the
estimates, to the detriment of new
construction and efficiency. They
point out that Germany, with a total
tonnage in commission superior to
that maintained by France is able to
employ (1909-1910) $50,000,000,
thus half her marine budget, to provide for the future. With these views
the parliamentary committee of
finances fully concurs, as the reduction of nearly $80,000 it has made In
administrative Items has shown.
The new construction estimate
comprises appropriations for the completion of the six battleships of tha
Danton class and for the continuation of the Jean Bart and Courbet,
for the completion of the armored
cruiser Waldeck-Rousseau, for an
ensemble of twenty destroyers in
hand, for twenty-two submarines and
for two mine layers, besides a small
sum for the completion of a salvage
dock, already ordered. Thus, altogether, fifty-five units will be next
year in various stages of construction. To this very moderate programme, however, must be added two
battleships of 23,500 tons, which will
be laid down early in 1911, and for
which supplementary estimates will
be asked, should the "organic law"
fall to be voted and promulgated in
time. •
It is Interesting to note that Important reductions have been made in
the estimated cost of the battleships
ln hand In government arsenals.
Through a judicious appeal to competition, and also more businesslike
methods in the awarding of commands, the rather startling economy
of 9.45 per cent Is claimed to have
been realized in the case of the Jean
Bart and Courbet, now apparently
to cost only $12,600,000 instead of
the $13,800,000 that bad been officially anticipated from past experience. Even the Danton and Mira-
beau, though they are rapidly approaching completion, have seen
their estimated price cut down by
$200,000. A slight reduction has also been found possible in the case of
the cruisers Quinet and Rousseau.
On the other hand the cruisers completing in private yards—viz., the
Voltaire, Condorcet, Diderot and
Vergnioud—are to cost on an average
slightly more than was expected, a
change which has excited some comment and seems to prove, contrary to
the opinion held by many, that ships
built by contract turn out to be more
expensive than those entrusted to the
state dock yards. From all this the
one thing to be clearly gathered Is
the intention of the admiralty to
utilize to the utmost the resources of
the arsenals and to suffer no longer
naval contractors "to make their own
prices."
 —o	
SETTLERS  HUSH
Gathering at Edson on C. .T P. For
ElXOdus to Pence River Section
What gives Indications of being
one of the most historic rushes In
the glowing annals of Canadian colonization, is scheduled to start from
Edson, Alberta, on the line of the
G. T. P. early In January, when the
new fifteen foot wagon road to Sturgeon lake, the gateway of the Grand
Prairie and the Peace river country, will be open to traffic. Already
forty families, comprising over a
hundred men, women and children,
the vanguard of a host that is hourly
Increasing and will probably reach
several thousand souls before the
great trek begins, are camped on the
outskirts of Edson, awaiting the
word to start.
A heterogenous mass of household
and farming utensils, as varied in
their make and mark as in the nationality of their owners, strew the
roadside. Dakotans and Mlnneso-
tans, giving the He to recent reports
that Americans are returning to their
old farms in the States, Manitobans
and Albertans, Russians and Germans, have pitched their tents by the
side of the road for the last rest be-
fort the start for the land of promise
is made.
Whole households are being moved. Women and children form no
small part of the advancing army of
colonists. Eight infants in arms are
among the number. Horses, oxen and
dogs are also being taken along.
 o	
POPULATION  OF  CITIES
London    7,537,196
New York 4,766,883
Paris 2,714,068
Tokio    2,085,160
Berlin    2,040,148
Chicago    1,698,575
St.  Petersburg    1,678,000
Vienna    1,674,957
Canton    1,600,000
Peking (estimated)    1,600,000
Moscow 1,359,254
Philadelphia  ...   .'. 1,293,697
Constantinople, estimated.. 1,125,000
Osaka    1,117,151
Calcutta and suburbs 1,026,987
NO  ROYAL-VISIT
King and Queen are Not Likely to Make
Tour of the Dominions.
Lord   Wenlock,   Who   is   Closely   in
Touch With the Situation, Gives
His  Opinion
Lord Wenlock, K.-?.B., G.C.S.I.
G.C.I.E., vice-chamber lain to the
queen, and formerly head of the
household of the Prince and Princess
of Wales and ex-governor of the
presidency of Madras, who is on a
tour through Canada in the capacity
of chairman of the Yorkshire insurance company, gave it as his personal
opinion that it is very unlikely that
King George and Queen Mary will, as
crowned heads of the empire, visit
Canada or any other of the great
oversea dominions.
A report to this effect which recently came in cable despatches from
London he pronounced without hesitation as entirely incorrect.
Lord Wenlock has long been on
terms of close intimacy with their
Majesties, and was a prominent member of the suite of the present king
and queen when as Duke and Duch
ess of Cornwall and York, they made
their trip of the empire on H. M. S.
Ophlr and their famous railway
journey Canada from the Atlantic to
the Pacific. He is one of the very
few men who would be among the
first informed if such a tour were
now contemplated by their Majesties.
He said quite emphatically that he
had received no information whatever of any such purpose. All he
had seen was the newspaper report
on the other side of the Atlantic
which he did not believe had the
slightest foundation, and probably
arose out of the fact that, as was well
known, the king was deeply disappointed, owing to the unexpected
death of his father—at being unable
to go to South Africa to participate
in the inauguration of the new federal parliament thera
There are in addition to the fact
that an entirely new precedent would
be created by the reigning sovereign
making a tour of the dominion, the
Inconvenience and the risk attendent
upon a long Sbsence of the king from
the seat of empire, such as a visit
to Australia would entail. So far as
Canada Is concerned it would be impossible to come here without going
to Australia and South Africa, as
spch a trip to one great self-governing dominion would, If It did not actually give offence to the others, be
deeply disappointing.
Lord Wenlock added that the king
and queen regarded with the most
profound Interest the developments
In progress here and in other parts
of the empire and were always eager
to know what was going on.
 o	
A farmer believing himself to be
dying, sent for a clergyman, and
somewhat shocked that good man by
the offhand, easy way in which he
announced his fitness to die Pressed
upon certain topics, particularly upon the question of forgiveness to his
enemies, he said he forgave everybody who had injured him, "except
Johnny Smith."
John had played him such a trick
about the sale of a certain cow, that
Ihe farmer declared nothing should
make him forgive him. Impressed
by the exhortations of the clergyman,
and moved by fear of the consequences of dying unforgiving and un-
forgiven, he turned to the minister
and said, with an air of satisfaction:
"All right; jest as you say. If I die,
I forgive him; but if I live, by Jlm-
miny, he'd better look cut!"
NEWS OF THE PROVINCE
Items of General Interest From Centres in British Columbia.
No Report Yet
Victoria.—The Hon. Dr. H. E.
Young, minister of education, has
authorized a point blank denial to a
statement to the effect that the government has had in its possession for
some weeks past the report of the
University Site Commission. "Up to
the present," says Dr. Young, "we
have not received the report, nor
have we had any Intimation of what
Its contents will be . Before the educationalists who have the matter in
hand left the city at the end of July,
their chairman, Dean Weldon, stated
that the report would be forwarded
to us In the course of a few months
We expect to receive it before the end
of the present month. Any statements
that we have received the report are
absolutely incorrect."
*    *     *
Crimean Veteran Dies
Revelstoke.—Capt. William Smith,
one of the few surviving Crimean veterans, died at the home of his son,
Mr. J. L. Smith, Campbell avenue,
on Tuesday. The deceased >had
reached the age of 85, and has been
a resident of this city for many years,
and his death will be greatly felt
among the whole community. Capt.
Smitn, who served in the Prince of
Wales Royal Canadian Rifles and
17th Infantry, was the hero of many
campaigns in those terrible wars of
the Crimea.
Okanagan Peach Output
Pentlcton.—The big rush of peach
shipments from southern Okanagan
points reached Its culmination this
week when average daily shipments
of over three cars a day were made
from the Summerland and Pentlcton
districts. Summerland, with Its older
orchards, Is contributing in the ratio
of two to one this season. The Pentlcton peach crop will be many times
larger next year, as a large additional number of orchards will have come
Into bearing. In spite of the fact
•that apple growing is still in Its Infancy here the outlook for a good
harvest is very bright.
Missionary Work
Vancouver.—The home mission
board of the Presbyterian church in
British Columbia, which met In St.
John's church, Vancouver was attended by Rev. Leslie W. Clay, Victoria; Rev. Dr. Ferguson, Nelson;
Rev. D. Campbell, Armstrong; Rev.
Dr. McLaren, Toronto; Rev. G. A.
Wilson, Vancouver, and Messrs. W.
H. Leckie and A. Sullivan, Vancouver.
During the past six months five
new mission fields were opened making a total of 73 maintained by the
mission board. In addition 19 augmented congregations received aid,
at an outlay during the six months
ending September 30, of $11,322.
The following appointments from
Westminster Hall were made: R. L.
Rayner, Duncans; R. C. Eakin, Stewart; J. J. Hyde, Shuswap; C. D. Kerr,
Princeton; R. Van Munster, Jordan
River; T. Morrison, Powell River;
C. C. Inglis, Falrview; J. Macdougali,
North Bend; M. W. Graham, Rock
Creek.
Must Buy  Lands
Victoria.—It transpires that the
Canadian Northern Railway will have
to purchase Its entire right-of-way
and station sites and yards in British
Columbia, involving an expenditure
of several thousand dollars. No provision for a grant of crown lands for
railway purposes was made In the
contract negotiated between the company and the Provincial Government.
During his recent visit to Victoria,
Mr. William Mackenzie, president of
the Canadian Northern, negotiated
an agreement respecting this matter.
The Provincial Government has decided to sell the company the property required at a valuation of $5 per
acre for agricultural land, $2.50 per
acre for uplands, and $1 an acre for
wild lands, the inspection and classification to be made by a provincial
land surveyor to be mutually agreed
upon.
Sells  Fruit  Land
Vancouver.—At a figure approximating $100,000, Mr. Smith Curtis,
ex-M.P.P., has just sold 1,600 acres
of land which forms a portion of the
original Deadman's Creek Indian reserve, near Savona, on the main line
of the C.P.R., west of Kamloops. The
area Is located ln the so-called "dry-
belt," and comprises two large level
tracts known as tSewart's Flat and
Bates' Flat, on plateaus near tho
Thompson River, and adjacent to the
British Columbia Horticultural Estate Company, Limited. The buyer
is a syndicate consisting of Messrs.
James C. Shields, of Savona, F. W.
Anderson, C. H. Clendlnnlng of Vancouver, and Robert Booth and Gordon Booth of Pembroke, Ont. It is
the intention of the new company to
set out young fruit trees, and as soon
as these orchards reach a high state
of development they will be divided
Into small holdings of from five to
ten acres.
C. P. R. Hotel in Kootenay
Nelson.—W. Sharp & Son are the
successful tenderers for the construction of the new C. P. R. summer
hotel at Balfour, Kootenay Lake, 20
miles from Nelson. The contract
figure Is $150,000 and the hotel is
to be completed by May next, so as
to be ready for the opening one
month later. Like the other summer tourist hotels of the C. P. R.
the handsome structure- that will
overlook the lake and the west arm
will be chiefly of frame construction.
Considerable stone and cement will
however, be used and a large portion
of the exterior will be rough cast. It
will be the first hotel to be build
by the Canadian Pacific in southern
British Columbia.
Scaled Mount Hammond
Windermere.—On Friday, September 2nd, C. W. Harnden, of Boston,
and Chas. D. Ellis, of Windermere,
B.C., concluded to attempt the climb
of Mount Hammond. This mountain
has long been the show peak of the
range, standing as it does far out
from its sister peaks, looking majes
tically down the valley. The start
was made from an elevation of 8,000
feet. The summit, reached at about
two o'clock in the afternoon, was
found to rise to an altitude of 12,125
feet. There was no evidence whatever cf the peak having been climbed before. The summit was covered
with fragments of green lime shale,
tinged with red iron stain. The whole
top would long since have disintegrated and fallen away but for the
layer of lime just below. The crown
is sp'it in almost equal parts, the
south summit being only a few feet
higher than the north. Mr. Ellis, after making his records, placed them
in a bottle previously emptied, and
deposited them in a cairn which he
hastily built. Mount Hammond Is
the loftiest peak yet conquered in the
Selklrks, Its nearest rival being
Mount Dawson, near Glacier, 11,113
feet. But Hammond must look to
her laurels as many other peaks in
the locality challenge her supremacy
and the above record shows the great
height of this part of the range, offering vast fields for climbers.
Mount Hammond was named in
honor of the late Herbert Carlyle
Hammond, of Toronto, a public-
spirited man, who for years was interested ln the development of British Columbia, and who was largely
interested in the Paradise and other
mines.
The Westholme
Lumber Company, Ld.
We carry the largest stock of
Building Supplies in the North.
Quotations given on short notice in all lines.
Rough and Dressed Lumber
* Shingles and Lath
Mouldings and Cases
Doors and Windows
We handle Plaster and Lime at reasonable prices
Get our quotations for all classes of buildings.
FIRST AVENUE
OFFICE AND
WAREHOUSES
^00000000000000000^
SHERWIN & WILLIAMS
-PAINTS-
COVER THE EARTH.
WE   ARE   SOLE   AGENTS
CARLOAD JUST ARRIVED
Ready Nixed Paints,
Paints Ground in Oil,
Paints Ground in Japan,
Varnishes, Shellac, etc.
Water Stains
and
Decotint
IN ALL COLOIiS
Prince Rupert Hardware & Supply
Company, Ltd.  thos. dunn, m.
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EEBEBBEBEBEEEBEBEEBBEBBBEE
MAY* BUILD TO HALIFAX
Belief Prevails Tbut C. P. B. Will Extend its Line In That Direction
An announcement from Halifax to
the effect that the Canadian Pacific
is quietly buying up property in that
city once more gives color to the belief that the company will extend Its
main line to Halifax In the near future, if it cannot secure running
rights over the Intercolonial.
Since the Canadian Pacific secured
the control of the Dominion Atlantic
railway, and with this an entrance Into Halifax, all doubt has been dispelled as to the Intention of the company
to make Halifax a terminus of its
main line. In Ihe event of failure
to come to terms with the government for running rights over the Intercolonial from St. .John to Halifax,
it is thought that the company will
build a new line across N'ew Brunswick, starting from the junction of
the C. P. It. and Intercolonial at
Fredericton.
Another Inducement for the Canadian Pacific railway to run its own
trains into Halifax is the fact that It
would save the company time and
money if Halifax were made the permanent winter port for the fast pas-
seffger boats, while St. John would
continue to be the winter port for the
freight boats. This, it is generally
believed, is what will eventually be
done.
 o	
Sugar Is said to have been known
to the Chinese three Ihousand years
ago, and there Is not much doubt that
Hie manufacture of the article was
carried on in China two hundred
years 13. C.
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* *
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Further particulars regarding the
loss of the British cruiser Bedford,
Capt. Fitzherbert on the Samarang
rocks, off Quelpart, between Japan
and Korea, with eighteen lives, were
received by the steamer Monteagle.
Only the tops of th-. tlnee funnels
showed above water when the Mon-
eagle passed the scene bound to
Nagasaki from Changhai The Bedford with the Minotaur, Kent and
Monmouth, had just completed a
four-hour full-speed trial and was
running down when she struck, uf-
ing about five miles distant from the
other warships and much out of her
course. The stokers remained at their
post despite the inrush of water with
the result that Allen Jones, artificer
engineer in charge, fifteen stokers
and two seamen were drowned. It
was soon evident that the vessel was
a total loss, she settling quickly, and
tbe remainder of the crew was taken
on board the Minotaur and Monmouth. The Japanese cruisers Yode
and izumi, two salvage steamers and
a large number of coolies were sent
from Nagasaki and Sasebo, but heavy
weather et in and they were obliged
to put Into Mokpo, Korea. Meanwhile
the Bedford gradually settled. The
survivors of the disaster were sent
home ln the steamer Nubia.
The victims of the Bedford disaster were: Allen Jones, artificer engineer; Colin Ferguson, leading
stoker, first class, 277,961; William
Horner Taylor, stoker petty officer,
0. X. 277,442; John Hart, chief
stoker, O. N. 185,975; John Wilson,
leading stoker, O. N. 296,497; Arthur
Richard Austin Eastwood, stoker,
first class, O. X. 298,172; Walter I.Ill,
sloker, first class, K. 124; George
Fovargue, stoker, first class, K, 206;
John Thomas Fogarly, sloker, first
clas, K.260; Alfred Percy Andrews,
stoker, first class, K.146; James
Henry Calam, stoker, first class, S.
106,528; John McKittrlck, stoker,
first class, O. X. 104,751; Andrew
.McDowell, stoker, lirsl class, O. X.
106,C72; George William Goodall,
stoker, first class, O. X. 311,424;
William George McElligott, stoker,!
first class, O. N. 304,020; William!
Cook, stoker, O. X. 296,491; Tliimasj
White, able seaman, 0. X. i!38,666;
Henry James Crust, able seaman, O.
N. 238,394.
The Bedford, which is a twin-screw'
armoured cruise." of fl,800 tons, and j
22,000 horsa power, was built by the]
Fairfield  Company at  Govan,  where
she was launched on August 31, 1901 !
and completed two years later. Her
cost was £706,000. Her measurements aree, length 440 feet, and
beam 66 feet. Her engines gave a
speed of 22.7 knots at her trials. She
was recommissioned at Hongkong In
March last year with a crew of 537.
The latest number of the Navy list
gives the names of the officers as follows:—Captain Edward S. Fitzherbert, Commander George Trewby,
Lieutenants A. E. Dixi (N.), E. L.
Wharton (T.), D. to. S. Douglas lG.),
to. C. Lucas, P. to. S. King, C. A. O.
Douglas, and A. Johnstone.
NOTICE TO  CONTRACTORS
Grnlinin Island School
SEALED TENDERS, superscribed
Tender for Graham Island School,"
will be received by the Honourable
the Minister of Public Works up to
and including Monday, the 10th day
of October, 1910, for the erection and
completion of a small one-room
school building at Graham Island,
one of the Queen Charlotte Islands,
Skeena  Electoral  District.
Plans, specifications, contract and
forms of tender may be seen on and
after the 12th day of September,
1910, at the offices of John L. Barge,
Secretary to the School Board, Queen
Charlotte City; the Government
Agent, Prince Rupert; the Mining
Recorder, Jedway; and the Department of Public Works, Victoria.
Each proposal must be accompanied by an accepted bank cheque
or certificate of deposit on a chartered bank of Canada, made payable
to the Honourable the Minister of
Public Works, for the sum of $125,
which shall be forfeited if tbe party
tendering decline to enter Into con-
traCc when called upon to do so, or
If be fall to complete tbe work contracted for. The cheques or certificates of deposit of unsuccessful tenderers will be returned to them upon
the execution of the contract.
Tenders will nol be considered unless made oul on the forms supplied,
t-!t-'ij«cl witli Hie actual signature of
Hie tenderer and enclosed ln the envelopes furnished.
Tha lowest or any tender not
necessarily accepted.
F. C. GAMBLE,
Public Works Engineer.
Public Works Department,
Victoria, B.C., September 7, 1910.
EXAMINATION    FOR    INSPECTOR
OF STEAM BOILERS AND
MACHINERY
Examinations for the position of
Inspector of Steam Boilers and Machinery, under the "Steam Boilers
Inspection Act, 1901," will be held
at the Parliament Buildings, Victoria, commencing November 7th,
1P10. Application and instruction
forms can be had on application to
the undersigned, to whom the former
must be returned correctly filled In,
not later than October 24th, 1910.
Salary $130 per month, increasing at
(lie rate of $5  per month each year
to a maximum of $iso.
JOHN PECK,
Chief Inspector of Machinery,
New Westminster, B.C. THE   PRINCE  HUPERT   JOURNAL
Friday, September 23, 1910.
First Lots Now Offered For Sale
A chance of a lifetime to get in on the ground floor. This is your opportunity to invest in the first real inland townsite put on the
market by the G.T.P. Railway
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THE FIRST DIVISIONAL POINT EAST OF PRINCE RUPERT
ELLISON
Is the natural supply point for the
great nnd wealthy mineral belt of
that district. Coal, Silver, Lend,
Gold and Copper have been located in
huge bodies that are rich in ore.
These are nil waiting for transportation, when tiie mining camps will
flourish.
t ELLISON is the first passenger and freight divisional
; point east of Prince Rupert. It will be an important
Grand Trunk Pacific town with a population of several
thousand before long. ELLISON is just east of the
fruit belt of Northern B.C. ELLISON Townsite is a
; natural beauty spot. It is in the dry belt and the
climate is unsurpassed.
ELLISON
Is situated on the banks of the
Skeena River, one hundred mid
seventy-two miles east of Prince Ru-
pert. Ellison is the nntural hub of
the Huckley Valley, (the garden of
Prince Rupert). The land here hns
proven this to be rich  for farming.
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Two Hundred and Fifty Lots are Already Sold
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♦ ♦»♦♦♦■»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦■»♦■»♦♦■♦♦♦•♦♦♦■»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦
TERMS:
One-Fifth down and 4 Semi-Annual
Payments at 7 per cent, per annum
..
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Naps and full particulars can be had from
C. D. Newton
Agent, Prince Rupert
F. E. Mitchell
Financial Agent, Victoria
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