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Prince Rupert Journal Jul 22, 1910

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 '
Subscription
During July
$1.50 a Year
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print* fjitpirt f^ffntttl
High-Class
Job Printing
In all Lines
VOLUME  1
Published Twice a Week
PRINCE RUPERT, B.  C, FRIDAY, JULY  22,  1910.
rice,  Five Cents
NO. 11.
FIRES STILL RAGING
Sandon Has Not Been   Destroyed But
Place is in Great
Danger.
Three Forks Near New Denver Suffers Loss—Large Force Now
Fighting the Flumes
(Special to The Journal)
Nelson, B.C., July 22.—The latest
reports from the lire swept district
of Interior British Columbia is that
Sandon has not been destroyed by
forest fires as was reported, but the
place is in imminent danger, being
surrounded by flames.
Three Forks has not been burned
outright but a number of mine buildings between that point and New
Denver have been destroyed.
A bush fire is raging near Rossland.
Along the Crow's Nest line of the
C. P. R. there are many fires raging.
The worst of these is near Moyie.
A large force of fire lighters are at
work but the loss will be exceedingly
heavy. Igg
 o	
Local News
The G. T. P. has given the city permission to make copies of certain
maps of Prince Rupert and a draftsman will be emplqved at once to do
the work.
* 4c       *
The I.O.O.F. have organized in the
city with the following officers: C.
Bennet, G.M.; G. R. T. Sawle, D.G.
M.; G. W. Arnott, secretary-treasurer.
* *     *
Dr. J. A. Stewart, late of the
Kenora General hospital, has arrived
in the city and has joined the staff
of Dr. Ewlng, who has the local hospital and the care of the men in the
various camps along the line of the
G. T. P.
* *     *
As a temporary means of protection, a system of fire alarms is being installed on telephone posts In
the city. The fire and light committee, after consulting in the matter,
came to the conclusion that this was
the best action to take.
* *     *
A general meeting of the Prince
Rupert Liberal Association will be
held in the Presbyterian church this
evening at 8 o'clock. All affiliated
Liberals will be made heartily welcome. The meeting is an important
one to deal with the question of the
reception to Sir Wilfrid  Laurier.
* *     *
A few evenings ago at the council
board, Aid. Barrow called attention
to the practice of using the city
streets as free stabbling for Vehicles.
He thought these would be exceedingly dangerous in case of a run
away or in case of a fast run to a
fire.
G. A. Fraser, of Victoria, formerly
a member of the provincial legislature and a general all round good
fellow, was among the passengers on
the Prince Rupert. He is making
the round trip and is delighted with
the north. Prince Rupert was a
grand surprise to him and he was
quite enamored  of  the place.
* *     •
The contract has been let to GI1-
lett & MacDonald, at Stewart, for
2,472 feet of approach to the government wharf, of the necessary 3,000
feet to bring the same up to Vancouver street. The contract calls for
a completion of the job in sixty days.
The approach will be 1G feet in width
and will be built at an approximate
cost of  $15,000.
 o	
MINING PROPERTY
C. N. Delgrove Has Offer From Victoria Syndicate to Buy
C. N. Delgrove, one of the prospectors who located the famous Bitter
Creek properties near Stewart, left
by the Prince Rupert for the mining
camp again. He was accompanied
by C. N. Tubman, who will look over
the property and other prospects In
the camp.
Mr. Delgrove has just returned
from Victoria where he was called to
consult with a syndicate there in the
matter of the property.
No deal has yet been completed.
D. D. MANN COMES NORTH TO INVESTIGATE
'It will become the greatest tourist
route in the world." These were the
words of D. D. Mann, of the Canadian Northern aRilway company, in
describing hl« impressions of the trip
up the coast to this city. Mr. Mann
arrived on the Prince R'-pert on
Wednesday evening accompanied by
Mrs. Mann and their son an' daughter. They went on to Stewart, where
Mr. Mann has heavy Interests. Mrs.
Mann and the family returned by the
same steamer, while Mr. Mann expects to spend about two weeks in
the mining centre, studying conditions thoroughly and laying plans for
the future.
The great railway builder had
never before made the trip along this
coast, although for years he has been
a frequent visitor to the Pacific, and
lias had heavy interests in the north.
He had never been north of Vancouver before. It is not long ago that
Mr. Mann in conversation regarding
the north, expressed the opinion that
the G. T. P. had gone too far north
in locating its terminus. That was
before the rich discoveries had been
made here and the views that the
railway magnate expressed with respect to this port on Wednesday
would Indicate that he has changed
his opinion entirely in that respect.
He was delighted with the trip and
says there will within a very few
years be a tremendous rush of tourists  along  it.     As  stated  above  he
predicts that it will be the most
frequented route for pleasure seekers in the world. Along the route,
he says, there were passed ideal spots
in plenty for summer resorts, where
the best of fishing and hunting could
be enjoyed. These places will be
taken advantage of and there will be
a wonderful trend of travel this way.
In the short time at his disposal
here, Mr. Mann, piloted by an old
friend in the person of Thomas Dunn,
counsel In these matters. When he
expressed himself as well pleased
with what he saw in this city to a
Journal representative, there was no
question that he was delighted.
Discussing the plans which he had
in view in visiting Stewart, Mr.
Mann said that he was simply going
to study the whole situation as it
presented itself and on the results
of his investigations on the ground
would depend the future plans with
♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦■»♦♦
GREAT TOURIST ROUTE TO BE DEVELOPED.
Speaking of the coast trip from  the south to Prince Rupert,
I). l». Ma one of the heads of   the   Canadian   Northern   Railway
company, says: "It will become the greatest tourist route in the
world. I saw lots of places along the route where ideal summer resorts could lie located. These will he developed and an immense
traffic will be attracted to the const."
"
■»♦»♦» O ■» »~» ♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦»»♦♦♦♦
made a tour ot Inspection about the
city. He was surprised at the development and it was quite evident that
he was quite taken with the city,
especially with its harbor. Those
who have had an acquaintance with
Mr. Mann know that they need not
expect any great effervescence in the
way of praise for any place, me is
a man of action and not of sentiment. He is a man that does little
talking and prefers to keep his own
respect to the work there. "We are
rather heavily interested there," he
said, "and I want to go over the
ground myself." With regard to the
report that his company was getting
a charter from the Dominion government to build from Edmonton to
Bear River, he said there was some
mistake about that. His company
were not seeking any charter from
the Dominion.
Mr. Mann was asked if his company intended to construct a line of
railway eastward from the present
short line being constructed at Stewart to open up the more northern
portion of the province. He said that
that had not been decided upon yet.
He had no settled plans with respect
to it and upon the results of his present investigations much in that connection would depend. From the
trend of Mr. Mann's remarks upon
the outlook in the northern mining
camp, one would be inclined to believe that he has in view the possibility of constructing in a more
northerly direction towards White-
horse. He says that the Information
available points to the mineral zone
which lias been discovered at Stewart extending away norm in that direction as well as coming south to
the Xaas and the Babine.
Questioned as to the intentions of
his company with respect to erecting
a smelter at Stewart he said that
they had not considered It yet. He
was interested in the mining and the
providing of rail carriage for the ore
that was all in view at present.
In British Columbia Mr. Mann has
the greatest faith. When he speaks
of its immediate future it is in the
most optimistic way. He has shown
his faith in the province by heavy
investments and there is no question
that he intends to take his full share
in developing every part of it.
CONFESSES TO CRIME
G T. Williams Admits That He Set Fire
to the Talbot House Tuesday
Morning.
The Preliminary Hearing of Charge
Against Him is Postponed I 'mil
Monday   .Morning
TO TRAVEL OVERLAND
Ross   Sutherland  of   Winnipeg,   Well
Known Capitalist, is on Visit
to Prince Rupert
He Will Return By Route of Grand
Trunk Pacific Across This
Province
Mr. and Mrs. Ross Sutherland and
their young son are visitors In the
city. They'are the guests of Dr. and
Mrs. Ewing at the hosiptal. Mr.
Sutherland represents ocnsiderable
capital and on his visit to the coast
is taking the opportunity of looking
over the field that offers here and
elsewhere. He is agreeably surprised
at the conditions in the city of Prince
Rupert and recognizes that it must
be a great city in a short time.
An Interesting trip will be made
by Mr. Sutherland and his fifteen-
year-old son on their way back to the
prairies. It will be a trip across the
province of British Columbia along
the route of the Grand Trunk Pacific. Mr. Sutherland will in this way
have an excellent opportunity to
study conditions in the interior before the railway line is built and
will in addition to making it a pleasure tour, have his eye open for investment.
On the first section of the trip he
will be accompanied by his wife and
Dr. and Mrs. Ewing and Miss Far-
ran. They will all go up to Hazelton by one of the river steamers, and
at the head of navigation, .Mr. Sutherland and his son will part company with the rest of the party, making the tour overland. Mrs. Sutherland will return to Winnipeg by the
ordinary routes going south to Vancouver by steamer.
MONTI III) ARRIVES
The new Venture of the Boscowitz
line, arrived in port on Wednesday,
til'ler calling at till the canneries
witli heavy supplies on the way
north. She had on board quite a
Dumber of passengers, all of whom
were enjoying a delightful trip along
the coast.
TO  RUSH   WORK
Water Pipe  Will  lie  Put in on  Congested Section at Once
The city engineer has reported
against the use of wooden stave pipes
in the water distribution system in
the city.
There has been ordered 3,000 feet
of six inch pipe from Peck & Moore,
and, as this is now ready to put in,
work will be rushed on installing it
on Second and Third avenues. This |
will relieve the danger from fire. The
orders are to put the pipe In, event
if it is laid on tbe surface of the |
ground.
HARBOR ATTRACTS SHIPPING FIRN
Alfred Holt & Co., of Liverpool, Will Probably Make Prince Rupert
a Port of Call for Blue Funnel Lines—Special Representative
of Company Makes Examination of Facilities Offering Here.
. This week the city has been visited
by the representative of the world-
known shipping firm of Alfred Holt
& Co. Capt. Bartlett, of the steamer
Bellerophon which reached Vancouver a few days ago, made the round
trip by the steamer Prince Rupert.
His trip was made upon cabled instructions from his home company
that operates the Blue Funnel Line:
to proceed to Prince Rupert and investigate the prospects for putting on
a service to this city as soon as the
opportunities present themselves.
Capt. Bartlett, who is accompanied
by A. F. Haines, the general agent
for the company on the North Pacific
Coast, will cable his report to the
home office at Liverpool as soon as
he returns to Vancouver.
The Holt steamers are among the
heaviest carriers in what is designated the round-the-world service. The
Blue Funnel liners belonging to this
company make the run from the Old
Land by way of the Suez, taking
feight to Indian and the Orient, making calls at Chinese and Japanese
ports  and  doing  an   immense   trade
not only direct from Liverpool to
America, but also between intermediate ports.
The company has now in/View the
making of Prince Rupert? a regular
port of .all fodUth^stflfmers. If this
is done as the nearest port to the
Orient and the first port of call on
the American continent, a very large
amount of the freight carried will be
landed here thus saving time in forwarding to its destination inland.
This, of course, would not be fully
developed until the G. T. P. finishes
construction of its line, although it is
probable that owing to the fact that
the Blue Funnel liners, in common
with other trans-Pacific vessels, come
comparatively close to Prince Rupert on the way to the more southern ports, the vessels will make this
a port of call at a very early date
and cater to the local trade.
The instructions to Capt. Bartlett
were to make full investigations as
to the harbor here and as to the
wharf facilities. This he has done,
and will acquaint the home company
with the results.
MAY BUILD ON ALLEY
Mayor  Believes   in Quick Action and
Suggests Taking Street Ends
for Fire Hall
He Does Not Believe in Being Held
Up By Little Obstacles And So
Expresses Himself
MINE IN TOWN SITE
Properties Being  Developed Right on
City Property at
Stewart.
Local  Man  Intrested  in  This  Latest
of    Moves    in    .Northern
Mining Camp
Among tbe latest sensations from
lie new mining centre at Stewart Is
the announcement that an excellent
prospect is being developed right on
the town-site, Among those interested are .1. Fred Ritchie, of this city,
who has always had great faith in
the camp,
The values are excellent in gold
and silver and a force of men are at
work on city lots taking out ore.
The promoters of the proposition
ave every faith In making it a good
paying mine, especially in view of the
fact that transportation will be so
easy of solution.
 o	
FISHING  PLANTS  BURNED
BIG GUN EXPLODES
Many Killed in Mimic War at United
States Fortress Manoeuvres.
Proper Precautious  Were Not  Taken
by  Soldiers  ill  .Adjusting
Cannon
(Special to Tbe Journal)
Washington,   July   22.—Ten   have
been killed, two are dying, and  Ave
slightly injured  by a  premature ex- letter was read u  tew eve
plosion  of a  12-Inch  gun  at   Fortress  j,,   re.ply   to  on,-  sent   to   ||
Munro, Va., In a mimic warfare which Bowser which Bald thai th
Mayor Stork and other members of
the city council  manifest a disposition to wait for nothing in providin|V!la^moT"n1ng.
for the needs of the city in the matter of public buildings.
When the question of providing
additional accomodation for the fire
apparatus came up on Wednesday
evening in a report of the engineer,
the suggestion was made that it
would require a very considerable
sum to strengthen the present fire
hall to render it sife for accommodating the new automobile chemical engine. It was represented, in
fact, that it would need to be practically a new buildir.g.
The suggestion that a temporary
site be obtained was raised.
"We will just take the end of some
street that is not in use and crack
up a building. There seems to be so
much red tap«t about these things
that this will be necessary," said
the mayor. He adds that he did not
favor renting lots and putting up
buildings temporarily. This rah
away with money.
Aid. .Mobley did not approve of doing anything to strengthen this building. It could not be done without a
lot  of expense.
Aid. Pattullo said that In view of
this, he thought flie only thing to
do was to take a street end.
His Worship suggested thai an
alley end near tbe ball be used now.
If'- did nol believe in being stuck
by these obstacles.
The   subject   will   he   looked   into.
Iii  tin- matter of the sit.- for the-
city   ball   on   tin.   Markel   Place,   a
ings  ago
n.   W.   .1.
minister
G. T. Williams, proprietor of the
Talbot House, is in custody, charged
witli arson in connection with the
fire in his house last Tuesday. The
prisoner lias confessed that be committed the crime which will materially simplify the case.
The conduct of the: case leading up
to the confession which lias been
made reflects a large share of credit
upon Chief McCarvell of the police
department. Without resorting to
any of the- obnoxious methods employed by the police in some' cities,
especially on ihe other side of the
boundary line and known now under
the name of the "third degree," the
Chief proceeded witli his detective
work along a line that accomplished
its end and at the same time was In
no wise unfair to the accused.
Chief McCarvell had bis suspicions
aroused on tile- morning of the fire
which was fortunately brought under
control witli small loss connned
largely to one bed room. These suspicious were held by the tire chief,
also, and on this an investigation was
promptly started.
As a result of the investigations
the arrest of Williams was made late
Wednesday night and when he was
brought before the chief and Magistrate   Carss   the  next  morning,   pre-
aratory to a formal charge being
laid, he admitted the crime saying,
"I did it." He broke down weeping
like a child and said he could not
understand why he did the deed unless it was that his mind was affected.
The case was adjourned until this
morning and this morning a further
adjournment  was   takes   until   Mon-
The absence of any motive in firing
the building somewhat baffled the
police and others. Mr. Williams has
borne a good character and did a
good business. He built the Talbot
House and It not Known to be financially in trouble. The morning before he set fire to his own place the
FIRST  MO.M.'V  BVLAW
The first money bylaw to be
voted upon by the property-
owners of this city will be the
Telephone Bylaw. The vote
will take place at Hie- City
Hall on August S, witli the
city clerk as returning officer.
Tiie bylaw lias passed the
council providing for the raising of $40,000 by debentures
covering twenty years for
taking over the telephone system as a public asset and
operating it   by tin- city.
The property owners in tin-
city must now by a three-
fifths vote of those c tist at the
election declare in favor of
it. after which the council will
finally pass th,- bylaw and
execute  the   agreement    with
Hie    prose-Ill      t''loplle om-
pany, The agreemenl is ready
for   signature-   and    has    been
approved   of   by   the council.
Voting will be from '■< to 7
in  Hie city  hall on  August   s.
waB being carried out there. would not he home until about tho house link
The explosion is believed  to have end of the mouth.
been  caused  by  the  closing  of  tiie      A.ld.     Pattullo     suggested     corn-
breach  before the   firing    pin    was|munlcatlng with the Premier and see-
(Special to The Journal)
Nanaimo, July 22.—A Japanese
fishery plant and that owned by
Green & Murray have been gutted,
and another plant damaged by fire.
'I'be loss will be about $1">,000.
drawn back.    One commissioned officer is among the Injured.
PROPOSES ARBITRATION
Hon. W. L. Mnckenize King Making
Efforts to Settle (J. T. Strike
(Special to The Journal)
Ottawa, July 22.—Hon. W. L. Mac-
itig it' tilings could nol
a little.
 o	
io hurried up
FIRE l\ TACOMA
Roomers in High Building Mail \ai
row Escape Prom Being Burned
(Special  to The Journal)
Tacoma,  July   22.—Thirty   horses
kenzie  King proposes  arbitration  in I were   burned,   a   large   livery   stable
and a number of shops were destroyed by fire here yesterday. The loss
will amount to fifty-five thousand dollars.     A   number  of   people-   rooming
an effort to settle the Grand Trunk
strike. He proposes that Ihe government pay the expenses. The minister urges that an effort he made tn
settle the trouble in the interest of
the public,
tire from the conflagration thai destroyed other buildings In
tin- vicinity. Williams, who had a
splendid fire equipment in connection
with his place-, worked hard to save
it and was successful in putting out
a lire thai stalled there. That he
should within twenty-four hours of
that time attempl to destroy his
building appears very strange.
Various reports are about the e-ity
that the accused at time-s acts in a
peculiar manner, and it is suggested
that his own remarks about, being
out of his mind may have some
foundation.
Before bis trial be will probably
b.- examined medically. His confession leaves the way clear to his being
in an eleven story building narrowly '011111111101] for trial at  the- prelimln
escaped. ary hearing. THE PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Friday, July  2^,  1910
OBSERVATORY INLET
Rich Territory Awaits Fuller Development According to
J. McGrath.
Well  Known Mining Man  Predicts n
Big  Rush  Into That Territory
At  Early Date
Among the visitors to Prince Unpen Uii.s week has been Joseph McGrath, a prospector who lias tramped
tin-   bills  i ally  every  country   in
the world, and who is still as keen
on tin- scent of minerals as a man
twenty years younger. He came to
tbe city lo outfit again for tbe Observatory Inlet country.
Of the future of the northern part
of British Columbia as a mining
country, Mr. McGrath has the utmost
faith. It is, according to bis views,
the best offering anywhere in the
world at the present time and be has
made up his mind to stay with it. In
common with the most of the practical mining men who have been over
the ground, he believes that the
whole north extending from Stewart
and the headwaters of the rivers that
drain Into Portland Canal to the
Naas Valley and possibly beyond ts
all included In one vast mineralized
section.
It was he who located the Portland
Canal mine In which C. U. . i«*«a
is Interested and which is now on
the eve of starting its concentrator.
Mr. McGrath still believes that the
Portland Canal will be a great producer and he has likewise unbound-
ing faith in the whole of the Stewart district.
Observatiry Inlet, he believes, Is
destined to be a marvellous producer
however. M. K. Rodgers, who is developing the Hidden Creek, has
spent about $400,000 on the mine
and has a marvellous showing. About
this mine little is given out as the
policy ot Mr. Rodgers has always
been to say little about bis properties.
At the present time tite great
drawback to that section of the country is the lack of transportalon facilities. The steamers all go to Stewart and Observatory Inlet is left without any regular mail or supplies.
When a mining man wants supplies
he must get a launch or some other
kind of craft and get out and secure
his own outfit. This is a costly undertaking and Mr. McGrath thinks
that if the merchants of Prince Rupert would only look a little ahead
It would pay them to make arrangements for a steady service and the
opening of stores in the district. The
whole of that section of country
must eventually be tributary to this
port and derive its supplies wholesale from here. He looks for a great
rush into the district at any time
and then there will be a scramble to
meet the demand.
Another need of the district, he
says, Is better police protection. The
Indians of the Naas have become
very arrogant and have an impression that they control the situation
and that the whites are but intruders. Before things go too far it
would he well to show the Indians
that they must conform to the laws
of tbe land, Unfortunately they are
being encouraged in their arrogancy
by whites,  in  some cases.
Mr. McGrath has located some
most promising properties in the
district. They are in general of the
same character as the Hidden Creek
mine operated by Mr. Rodgers One
group has already been taken by option by the well known mining experts,  flrewer and  Parker.
The timber we-altb of the district
Is also another valuable asset and
one thai will bring it into prominence
at an early date. Mr. McGrath experts that there will he erected there
mills that will have their part in
supplying Prince Rupert and also
shippers to other points in the north.
 o	
PRESENTS GUN  CARRIAGE
Hidden from the eyes of the curious behind the high walls and green
trees of Marlborough House, King
George the other day performed what
might be called the lasi of the funeral ceremonies of King Edward—the
presentation of ilie famous gunr
carriage to the bluejackets of II. M.
s. Excellent, who drew the lain
King's remains to their resting place.
Very simple-, yet very picturesque
ivas iIn- scene, .lust before twelve
o'clock the men, to the number of
138, witli live officers and three
petty officers, uneler the command
of Captain Reginald Tapper, marched from Victoria station to Marlborough house, and on the stroke
of noon they were drawn up in two
dues on either side of the gun-carriage which, grim, solitary, and unadorned, stood in the centre of the
lawn.
Shortly after twelve King George,
attired in the full uniform of admiral
of the fleet, emerged from the house
and accompanied by Queen Mary.j
passed quickly through the sailors'
ranks and inspected the men, after
which they were formed into single
line and inarched past a little table,
where his Majesty presented them
with the medal of the Royal Victoria
Order. As the men filed back to their
places it was amusing to observe
them "double" behind a tree and
hastily pin the medals to their
breasts.
The presentation concluded, the
two lines of men were turned inwards to form three sides of a
square around the gun-carriage, and
the King then advanced and in a
brief speech gave the gun carriage
into their care. The officer in command made a brief reply, and the
men were then marched quickly off
to Buckingham Palace, where they
were given lunch. Immediately after
lunch they returned to Marlborough
House  for   the    gun-carriage.
NEWS OF THE PROVINCE
Items of General Interest From Centres in British Columbia.
Branch Lines
Kamloops.—The construction by
the Canadian Northern Railway of a
blanch into tiie Okanagan Valley
from a point on the main line of
the company at or in the vicinity of
Kamloops is indicated by reports. It
is declared that in all probability
work on the building of this branch
will be started next year and Ibal
it is one of (lie railway lines which
Premier .McBride had in mind when
at tiie last session of the provincial
legislature he prophesied for Britisli
Columbia great railway development
on tiie heels of the construction of
the main line of the Canadian Northern.
It Is stated that an arrangement
has been suggested between the city
of Kamloops and the Canadian
Northern by which construction of
the branch to the Okanagan will be
commenced next year and pushed to
completion.
A reconnaisance survey of the
route proposed for the Okanagan
branch is reported to have been made
by railway surveyors last year. Generally the route will, it is said, follow the old stage route between Kamloops and the Okanagan, traversing
the Grand Prairie district, Campbell
Creek and the upper Salmon River
valley. The construction of a railway through this territory would
open up an immense tract of very
valuable agricultural land.
DEVELOPING MASSETT
Vancouver Company Invests in Rich Agricultural District Near Prince
Rupert.
A Rich Producer
Nelson.—It is claimed that the last
statement made by the Nugget gold
mines of Sheep Creek shows that in
twenty-eight months the property
has yielded twenty-six gold bricks of
an average value of $9,000 each, and
in addition shipments to the Trail
smelter have returned $150,000 in
the period mentoned. This lias been
accomplished by a four-stamp mill
and a comparatively small force. The
advent of electrical power into the
Sheep Creek camp should mean a
boom in that locality this season, declare the mining men.
Money Will  Be  Spent  In  Preparing
Area for Inrush of Settlers Who
Will Make Homes There
Masset, one of the rich districts
tributary to Prince Rupert is coming
into its own. The Natural Resources
& Investment Company of Vancouver
one of the strongest firms in that
city, has directed its attention to this
new area and will carry out the work
of development on a large scale. At
the head of the company is Mr. G.
J. Hammond, who has had plenty of
experience in this line of work, and
will undoubtedly induce a considerable influx of settlers into the district.
In this connection the recent visit
of P. N. Smith of Vancouver to that
district had considerable to do with
the investment which the new company has made. Mr. Smith is very
closely identified with the company
and bis report on the prospects there
was of the most optimistic character.
The Vancouver company has taken
over a large interest in the townsite
at Masset. An early start will be
made in reclaiming areas that will
be converted into rich meadow lands,
capable of supporting a large population and furnishing Prince Rupert
with a steady supply of vegetables
and dairy produce.
'I'be company has other important
development schemes In view in connection with tbe Masset district, and
will give it a thorough advertising
to the world as a farming centre.
N'ew Westminster. — St. Paul's
church schoolbouse will be the scene
of a unique gathering in the history
of this city next Monday afternoon, when the Primate of• all Canada, four bishops, a large concourse
of Anglican clergy and representatives of every denomination in this
city will gather around the same
board, at the luncheon to be held
after the consecration of Rev. A. U.
DePencier as Bishop of New Westminster. The diocesan board of the
women's auxiliary has the arrangements for the luncheon in hand and
others invited to be present, besides
those already named, will be the
wives of the city clergy, the officials
of the city and their wives, the officials of the women's auxiliary and
members of the congregation of St.
Paul's church. The luncheon will be
served at 2 p.m.
were obtainable which could not be
secured under the laws of British
Columbia in which province the operations of tiie company are still con-
cllp-te-d.
The passing of reports and other
routine business occupied the attention of this morning's meeting. Officers and dirertois were elected as
follows, tiie officials and the hoard
being practically the same as last
year: President and general man-
agei, W. [I. Barker; vice-president,
Aemilius Jarvis of Toronto; secretary and treasurer, R. J. Ker; assistant secretary, J. M. Whitehead; directors, Campbell Sweeney, William
Murray, E. E. Evans, Robert Kelly,
William Braid and R. J. Ker.
TOWN BUILDING
How (he Work of Populating Western Canada is Going Forward
HAYNOR BROS.
House Furnishers.
Located temporarily, since the fire,
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^     in  Ihiiicilin  Block, corner of Second
:  =    Avenue  and  Eighth  Street.
Some snaps in  slightly damaged   goods   which  we  want   to   clear
■  out  before moving  into new quarter's in Manson Blk., Third Ave.   \
FUNERAL  FURNISHERS
♦ ♦♦-»♦♦♦♦■♦»♦♦♦♦■♦♦■»♦♦♦»♦ + ♦ + •
Grand Trunk Pacific  Steamships
For VANCOUVER, VICTORIA, SEATTLE.
Connecting  with   Eastbound  Trains
"Prince Rupert" sails every Thursday, 8.30 p.m., and alter July 25
"Prince   George"   sails   every Monday  8.30 p.m.
FOR STEWART:
"Prince Rupert" sails Wednesdays 8 p.m., and commencing July 24
"Prince George"  sails Sundays at 8 p.m.
Steamer for Port Simpson, Kincolith, and Masset, Sundays, 3 p.m.
For Skldegate,  Queen Charlotte City,   and   other   Moresby Island
points, Wednesday at 3 p.m.
Tickets, reservations and information   from
A. E. NcNASTER
Freight and  Passenger Agent, G. T. P. Wharf.
■»♦♦♦■»■»■♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦■»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦■
B. C. Packers Meet
Vancouver—The first annual meeting of the shareholders of the British Columbia Packers' Association
since the company aws incorporated
under the laws of British Columbia
occurred last week. Till March of
the present year, when Incorporation
was secured in this province, the association operated under a charter
procured in New Jersey to which
state there was annually contributed
a percentage of the net earnings of
the company. The New Jersey charter was secured at the time of the
formation of the association but experience showed an annual outlay to
that state for which   no    privileges
It Is expected that the next eighteen
months will see the culmination of
one of the greatest colonization
movements in history, for during
that time it is schemed to build and
populate 220 towns in the Dominion
of Canada, an average of one town
for every other weekday In the year
and a half. By the middle of 1911,
if Canadian Government officials are
not wrong in their estimate, these
220 towns will have their official
places and names on the map of Canada, populations of from one hundred to a thousand each, and they will
have been made largely by good
American citizens from over the border, says the Technical World Magazine.
Never has a more interesting or a
more unusual scheme for the development of a country been undertaken
than this. That it will undoubtedly
succeed is assured by the fact that
ooth the government and tbe great
railroad interests of the Dominion
are behind it. Recently Andrew D.
Davidson, one of the big men of the
Canadian Northern, said: "I will
show you bow towns and cities are
born, as they have never been born
in any country in the world before;
I will show you how within a year or
two a vast wilderness, a thousand
miles in width, is to be populated,
so that from one town you will almost be able to see the smoke of the
next."
On the Grand Trunk Pacific westward from Winnipeg, a distance of
960 miles, a new town is to be located during the next year and a half
at a distance of every eight miles,
or 120 towns for the total distance.
Most of these towns are already
marked on the construction maps
and the majority of them are named.
On the mountain division of the same
road, which is to terminate at Prince
Rupert on the Pacific, 35 new towns
are to be planted. On the main line
and branches of the Canadian Northern in Saskatchewan and Alberta 30
new towns are to be brought into existence, and on the Canadian Pacific,
in the same provinces, 35, a total of
220 in all.
The history of these towns is to
be unlike that of any other in existence. They are not to he merely
platted and named, and then left to
vegetate. They are to be forced into
life. That is the remarkable thing
about them. And this is neither a
guess nor a hope. It is the result of
a "game of town building," which
has been played out by the government as carefully as one might play
a game of chess.
RENEWING   HIS   YOUTH
Sir James Grant is a Surprise Even
to Himself
Peat will be the only fuel used in
a great German electric power generating station.
The Pall Mall Gazette had the following in a recent issue: Staying in
one of the Westminster hotels is one
of the most remarkable men in the
world—Sir James Grant, the eminent
Canadian physician, who declares he
has made himself young again. He
will be seventy-seven years of age in
August, but he looks no more than
fifty, and his activity is something
phenomenal. In fact, it takes his
secretary, who is a young man, all
his time to keep up with him.
Sir James Grant is the physician
who two years ago created a great
sensation at the meeting of the British Assocation by reading a paper in
which he spoke of the wonderful rejuvenating powers of electricity.
Since then he has not only treated
himself, with wonderful results, but
also many eminent men on the American continent, Including, it is understood, some of the great financial
magnates of the United States.
His prophylactic against old age is
quite different from that of Metchni-
koff, though it is identical in the one
respect that it aims at improving the
standard of digestion. Sir James
Grant's treatment consists of electrical applications by means of a special
battery and systematized massage.
Both of these, he declares, assist
towards the perfect assimilation of
food.
I walked with him the other day
writes a Pall Mall Gazette correspondent, a distance- oi half a mile,
and could not help commenting on
his vigor and energy. I asked him
whether he wore spectacles, and his
answer was, "Yes, I do wear spectacles. I have worn them for forty
years—until such time as I began to
treat myself with electricity and
massage; today I do almost the whole
of my reading and writing without
using any spectacles at all. My hearing is as good as ever, and I feel that
I have the energy of a man of forty.
"I notice that your city is full of
taxi-cabs, but so far as I am concerned I never ride where I can walk, and
indeed if I were challenged I would
undertake to run a mile any day. I
can hardly believe that I will be
seventy-seven in August next; certainly I feel not more than forty-five,
and for this happy state of affairs I
thank my electrical treatment. My
motto is 'Early to bad, and early to
rise.' I get up at seven o'clock in
the morning, and go through a heavy
day's work. I do not believe In
either alcohol or tobacco—they give
no support to the human system, and
undoubtedly diminish vitality."
ARTIFICIAL   RUBBER
German  Has  Discovered  What  Will
Take Place of Natural Product
Quite recently one of the great
German aniline dye concerns, employing some 7,000 work people, and
having a capital of over £2,500,000,
submitted to a German chemist samples of rubber which they had manufactured by a secret process, with
the request that he would test them
in every way. He applied the most
stringent tests, and established beyond a dcubt that these samples were
In every way Identical with natural
rubber. Continuing his experiments,
and starting from isoprene as a
base, finding that natural rubber dissolves when heated with glacial
acetic acid, he treated isoprene (derived from turpentine oil), and observing certain conditions with the
same substance, ascertained that rubber could be produced in this way.
The artificial rubber is as elastic as
the natural product and Is of a
brownish white color. It appears to
be an established fact that the problem of manufacturing synthetic rubber has been solved. Of course, It
is not intended to imply that the
death knell of natural rubber has
been sounded, and some time will
necessarily elapse before the artificial product is likely to flood the
world's markets. But the death of
the natural Indigo Industry, as the
result of the Invention of a German
professor is an example it is well to
keep in mind. Once a flourishing
native industry in India, the production of natural indigo is absolutely
decaying, the synthetic preparation
having captured about four-fifths of
the world's market. Camphor is another instance. A few years ago a
German chemical concern placed on
the market a synthetic product,
Identical for all chemical purposes
with the natural product, in which
Japan had enjoyed practically the
monopoly, and while here the artificial product has not driven the natural one right out of the market, It
has most effectually kept down the
price, this being perhaps the lesson
that had best be impressed on those
who constitute the drlv'ng force in
the rubber market.
Brilliant Reception
Victoria.—The preparations being
made for the reception of Sir Wilfrid
Laurier In Victoria are on a more
brilliant scale than for any like
event in the history of that city,
which Intends to eclipse any ovation
tendered tbe distinguished gentleman
anywhere on bis trip.
.;. *\..;..;».;. »j«.;. *j».;..;. »j» »i« *;•»j«»;. »j..'. *'.. .\* »j. ►;».;«»j» »j. »;* .;<»;..;. <j« ^.»j»»j« »j. »j« *j* *;• »j. .J. *j« *j* »t» .j.»j«»!»»j»»J. »J. »j» »j. »J* *!» »J. *t«»;»•!< »J« *J.»J».J. .J* *J»»;«►!« »j. .1*»j«.j. »j« ►!• ♦;« .j. *j« »;• .j.,
Corner 2nd Avenue and 6th Street Corner 2nd Avenue and 6th Street
I* *i* *;• ♦•« tjt • j* *j« <$ »j« »;•»;«»j« »> ►;« *j« »;* •>*♦ »•« **« »** ►*« »*« »j» *;
Corner 2nd Avenue and 6th Street
Corner 2nd Avenue and 6th Street     %
We Are Busy Arranging Our 5c and 10c Tables
We have sold the bulk of some patterns of Dinner Sets, and we are almost giving the rest away.      Just selling an article for 5c or 10c that may be worth as much as 40c or 50c.
 . IF YOU ARE SHORT OF ANYTHING IN THIS LINE IT WILL PAY YOU TO STOCK UP	
*
*
Bric-a-Brac
I This  is  where we  shine.    There are Figures of ninny kinds, Vases,
T in variety, I r ediscent Glass Trays, Cups  Mugs,    all   of   which    we  are
* marking down.
REMEMBER
WE   AiiHi
COMPLETE   HOUSE   FURNISHERS
I
Glassware
We are cutting these on some lines  we  don't  intend  to  carry  and ^
some broken sets. *
There are WATER SETS and GOBLETS, and about 26 kinds of TUMBLERS.      We carry so many and sell them so cheap that you can't help but buy when you see them.
WE ARE CUTTING THE CUT GLASS DEPARTMENT.
WE OFFER CUT GLASS AT CUT PRICES
Opposite the Theatre    THE BIG FURNITURE STORE    Opposite the Theatre
*
•;•*•
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,.... .j ■!■...»,,... .f»,«►,«... *4. ... *,.... vv v v
I .
iitiiiwiinilHiiiiHiiiwiiiiii
Friday, July  22,  1910
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
CANADA'S   WHEAT
The News-Advertiser in a recent
issue deals with the question of
wheat exports and the part it may
be called upon to play In the affairs of Empire.    The editorial gives
food  for thought.    Is says: —
The agricultural industry in the
three prairie provinces has assumed such an important position in
the economy of the country that
everything connected with it has
come to be a matter of national interest and concern. At the present
time the prospects of this year's crop
in the North-west Is one of the subjects most discussed not only in
Western Canada, but In tho great
commercial centres in Eastern Can-
ade. For it is realized that the
wheat crop In the West has come to
be the greatest factor in the commercial and industrial life of the
country. A good crop is the foundation of active trade in the ensuing
months; it means a great demand for
the productions of eastern shops and
factories; a great addition to the
financial resources of the country and
the distribution through direct and
indirect channels of a large amount
of money among the. masses of the
people. Under the conditions that
we find today it is difficult to recall
the fact that scarcely a quarter of a
centuiy has elapsed since the time
when those who were regarded as an
authority on the subject expressed
grave doubts as to whether the severity of the climate in the Northwest and the danger of early frosts
would not make it unlikely that in
that part of the Dominion the cultivation of cereals would ever become
an important industry and the country be capable of supoprting a large
population.
Just as improbable would the suggestion have been regarded then
that the prairies of the North-west
would come to furnish a large part
of the food supplies of the people of
the United Kingdom. In the discussions on the policy of Sir John A.
Macdonald to aid in the construction
of a Canadian transcontinental railway to bind together the different
parts of the Dominion, little or nothing was heard about the transportation of grain from the West to the
eastern seaboard being likely to become an important item in the traffic
of such a railway, although in the
fierce controversy that raged over
the proposal In Parliament almost
every conceivable argument waB adduced either for or against the project. Now we have three great railway companies competing for a share
in the grain traffic, each of them
spending millions of dollars in adding hundreds of locomotives and
thousands of freight cars to their
rolling Btock in order that they may
have motive power and equipment
adequate to meet the demands for
transportation that the movement of
the  grain  eastward  annually  brings
upon them. Yet the development of
that traffic in the near future seems
likely to be so great, in the view
of business men of experience, that
plans are being matured for the carriage of part of the crop westward
to the Pacific Coast for transportation by water to the great markets of
the world. In justification of such
projects we have the fact that large
comparatively as is the area under
grain in Saskatchewan and Alberta,
it is but a small part of the land
suitable for the growth of cereals.
In connection with the position
that the Dominion occupies in the
Empire, and how important under
certain contingencies it might be that
the latter should be self-contained
and not dependent on foreign countries for the food supplies of the
teeming population of the British
Isles, the question of what proportion
of the grain consumed in the United
Kingdom can be supplied by Canada
is one of no little interest. In the
discussion which is going on In the
Mother Country on the subject of
tariff reform, and the granting to her
dependencies of preferential arrangements on the importation of grain
from the latter, one argument used
by Free Traders (or, more correctly
Free Importers) is that Great Britain
must depend on foreign countries
for the greater part of her supply of
grain, and it would, therefore, be
impolitic to discriminate against
them. But the expansion in the area
under cultivation in our North-west
territories bids fair before long to
change very considerably the proportion of her grain supply for which
Great Britain must rely on foreign
countries as compared with that
from her overseas dependencies. According to statistics prepared by the
British Board of Agriculture in the
four years, 1905-8, Canada furnished
101,000,000 bushels of grain out of
a total of 840,000,000 bushels received from all outside sources, or
less than one-eighth of the total Imports. But already Canada has largely Increased her actual and relative
amounts in the imports into the
United Kingdom, since in 1909 the
latter received 77,000,000 bushels of
whaet, or their equivalent in flour
from Canada. As the average annual requirement of imported grain
is about 210,000,000, Canada last
year furnished the British market
with more than one-third of its necessary supply. Mr. Balfour's proposed
tax on imports of foreign wheat
would undoubtedly operate In Increasing still more rapidly the imports from the colonies and particularly from Canada. But in any case
we may look forward with confidence
to Canada being able to supply the
larger proportion of Great Britain's
imports of grain within a few years,
since the settlement of our Northwest in going on so rapidly and the
area under grain being greatly en
larged with each succeeding year.
LANS PURCHASE NOTICE
I.AM) PURCHASE NOTICES
LAND PURCHASE NOTICES
LAND PURCHASE NOTICES
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that John Cherry,
of Victoria, B. C, occupation mattress maker, intends to apply for permission to purchase ihe following described lands in the vicinity of Kit-
wancocl or Chean Weln Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-east corner and about 14 miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence west 80 chains, thence
south 80 chains, thence east 80
chains, thence north 80 chains to
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
JOHN CHERRY.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 3, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Brenton
Brown, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation insurance agent, intends to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands in the vi-
vinity of the Kitwancool or Chean
Wein Valley.—Commencing at a
post planted at the north-east corner and about ten miles distant in
a north-westerly direction from the
north end of Kitwancool Lake,
thence south 80 chains, thence east
80 chains, thence north 80 chains,
thence west 8 0 chains to point of
commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
BRENTON BROWN.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 1, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Jessie Stead-
man, of Victoria, B. C, occupation
married woman, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following described lands, in the vicinity of
Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-east corner and about 6 %
miles distant in a north-westerly direction from the north end of Kitwancool Lake, thence south 80
chains; thence west 80 chains, thence
north 80 chains, thence east 80
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 640 acres, more or
less. JESSIE STEADMAN.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated May 31,  1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassia
TAKE NOTICE that Bruce Older-
shaw, of Victoria, B. C, occupation
jeweller, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of the
Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at
the north-west corner and about 7%
miles distant in a north-westerly direction from the north end of Kitwancool Lake; thence south 80
chains, thence east 40 chains, thence
north 80 chains, thence west 40
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 320 acres, more or
less. BRUCE OLDERSHAW.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated May  31,  1910. Jy8
CARBONIC ACID GAS
Medical Men Correct Wrong Ideas in
Connection Witli its Danger
The danger of an excess of carbonic acid gas in the air, the property which makes an overcrowded,
stuffy room so unpleasant, has been
robbed of all its terrors as the result of an experiment carried out at
the London hospital, says the Daily
Mail's medical correspondent.
To eight perspiring, shirt-sleeved
students, crowded in an airtight box
five feet long, five feet wide and
seven feet high, breathing their own
expired air over and over again, at
a temperature of 85 degrees Fahrenheit, is due the proof that carbonic
acid gas, formerly considered such a
deadly poison, can be breathed with
impunity In doses forty times as large
as the law allows.
In their hermetically sealed box
the eight students experienced all the
sensations or gradual suffocation for
three-quarters of an hour, uulil the
carbonic acid gas rose to four per
cent. A stuffy theatre atmosphere
might contain one-thirtieth of one per
cent. Peering through the large glass
windows in two walls of their prison
we could note their perspiring, flushed cheeks, quivering nostrils and general air of physical discomfort.
When the air temperature from
their breathing and the radiations
from their bodies drove the thermometer up to 88 degrees Fahrenheit
(most people keep their rooms at
about 68 degrees Fahrenheit), Professor Hill shouted: "Are you ready
for the fans?" A chorus of "Yes"
from the prisoners, and three electric
fans were turned on from the out
side. No fresh air was admitted, the
fans simply stirring up the moist
carbonic-acid-laden atmosphere.
The  effect  was  little    less    tha--
magical. The students immediately
stood more erect, breathed more
easily and deeply, and began once
again to chat and joke with one another. On coming out none of the
men showed any signs of the trying
ordeal he had just gone through.
"The experiment," Professor Hill
stated, "proves conclusively that the
carbonic acid present in a stuffy,
over-crowded and ill-ventilated room
is not the cause of the unpleasant
symptoms we formerly associated
with these conditions. It is the
moisture, high temperature and stagnation of the air which gives us the
headaches and dulness."
THE   BRAVE  BLACK   WATCH
Widow  of General   Waucliope Over-
conic nt Memornl Ceremony
An affecting scene was witnessed
at a luncheon given in Edinburgh to
tbe Black Watch (Royal Highlanders) after a formal presentation to
the city council of a memorial to
officers and men of the regiment who
fell in South Africa. Mrs. Waucliope, widow of General Wane-hope,
win was killed while leading the
Highland brigade at Magersl'ontein,
was asked to say a few words. In
tremulous tones she was only able to
say: "I think you all know what the
Black Watch means to me, and I will
just thank you." On sitting down
Mrs. Waucliope was overcome with
emotion, and the incident had a
marked effect upon all present.
Colonel Grogan, in formally handing
over the memorial erected at the
Mound—said that the fame of General Waucliope and his comrades did
not rest alone in the records of marble and bronze. Their memory
would be revered and honored in the
Ulack Watch as long as the regiment
was in existence.
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Echo Dudgeon, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
assistant dentist, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of the
Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-east corner and about 7%
miles distant in a north-westerly direction from the north end of Kitwancool Lake, thence south 80
chains, thence north 80 chains,
thence east 80 chains to point of
commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
ECHO DUDGEON,
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated May 31, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Sarah Ward,
of Victoria, B. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean .Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. E. corner and about 22 mile: distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north 80 chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence south 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 040 acres, more or .ess.
SARAH WARD.
James W. Smith, Agenf.
Dated June  6th,  1110 Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that George Mc-
Baln, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
merchant, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands In the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. W. corner and about 26% miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north 80 chains, thence
east 80 chains, thence south 80
chains, thence west 80 chains to
point of commencement, and containing 040 acres, more or less.
GEORGE  McBAIN.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 8th, 1910. ,Iy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Frederick
Tutt, of Selkirk, Manitoba, occupation merchant, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. W. corner about 14% miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north 40 chains, thence
east 40 chains, thence south 40
chains, thence west 40 chains to
point of commencement, and containing 160 acres, more or less.
FREDERICK   TUTT.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 3, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Catherine
Welsh, of Vancouver, li. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands in the vi-
vinity of Kitwancool or Chean Weln
Valley:—Commencing at a post
planted at the S. E. corner and about
17% miles distant in a north-westerly direction from the north end of
Kitwancool Lake, thence north 80
chains, thence west 80 chains, thence
south 80 chains, thence east 80
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 640 acres, more or
less. CATHERINE   WELSH.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 4, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Henry Van
Wyck, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation hotel keeper, intends to apply
for permission to purchase tbe following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein
Valley:—Commencing at a post
planted at the north-east corner and
about 20 miles distant in a northwesterly direction from the north end
I of Kitwancool Lake, thence south 80
chains, thence west 80 chains, thence
north 80 chains, thence east 80
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 640 acres, more or
less. HENRY VAN WYCK.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June  6th,   1910. JyS
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Minnie Clarke
of Vancouver, B. C., occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
X. W. corner and about 28% miles
distant and in a north-westerly direction from the north end of Kitwancool Lake, thence south 40 chains
thence east 80 chains, thence north
40 chains, thence west 80 chains to
point of commencement and containing  320  acres,  more or less.
MINNIE  CLARKE.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June  Sth,  1910. Jy8
m
JOB PRINTING
LETTER HEADS ENVELOPES
BUSINESS CARDS
VISITING CARDS       STATEMENTS
Prince Rupert Journal
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that John Grieve,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
agent, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wien Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. E. corner and about 20 miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north 80 chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence south 80
chains, thence east 8 0 chains to
point of comemncement, and containing  640 acres, more or less.
JOHN GRIEVE.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 6th, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Leihi Cherry,
of Victoria, B. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lauds in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at tne
S. E. corner and about 21 miles distant In a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north SO chains, thence
west SO chains, thence south 80
chains, thence east 8U chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 040 acres, more or less.
LEIHI   CHERRY.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 6th, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE tuat Alfred E.
Parkington, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation broker, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of
Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. E. corner and about 15% miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north 8 0 chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence south 80
chains, thence east SO chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
ALFRED E. PARKINGTON.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 3, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that George Williams, of Winnipeg, man., occupation
clerk, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool
or Chean Wein Valley:—Commencing at a post planted at the S. W.
corner and about 16 % miles distant
in a north-westerly direction from
the north end of Kitwancool Lake,
thence north 40 chains, thence
east 40 chains, thence south 40
chains, thence west 40 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 160 acres, more or less.
GEORGE WILLIAMS.
James W.  Smith, Agent.
Dated June 4, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Pfl.R^ifl.r
TAKE NOTICE that William
Simpson, of Lindsay, Ont., occupation hotel-keeper, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of the Kitwancool or Chean Wein
Valley:—Commencing at a post
planted at the south-east corner and
about 7 % miles distant In a north
westerly direction from the north
end of Kitwancool Lake, thence
north 80 chains, thence west 80
chains, thence south 80 chains,
thence east 80 chains to point of
commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
WILLIAM SIMPSON.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated  May  31,   1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Edward Cas
pell, of Cayley, Alberta, occupation
merchant, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of the
Kitwancool or Chean Weln Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. W. corner and distant about 15%
miles in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence south 80 chains, thence
east 80 chains, thence north 80
chains, thence west 80 chains to
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
EDWARD CASPELL.
James W.  Smith, Agent.
Dated June 3, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Samuel John
McDIarmid, of Monarch, Alberta, occupation farmer, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following described lands In the Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—Commencing at a post planted at the N.
E. corner and about 4 % miles in a
north-westerly direction from the
north end of Kitwancool Lake,
thence south 80 chains, thence west
80 chains, thence north 80 chains,
thence east 80 chains to point of
commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.   -
SAMUEL JOHN McDIARMID.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated May 31st, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that George Tutt,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation den-
ist, intends to apply for  permission
o  purchase  tbe  following  described
ands in  the vicinity of the  Kltwancool  or  Chean   Wein  Valley:—Com-j
menclng    nt    a  post   planted  at  tbe!
north-east   corner  and     about    8% '
miles distant in a north-westerly direction  from  the north  end  of Kitwancool     Lake,     thence    south   40
chains, thence west 40 chains, thence |
north   4 0  chains,   thence    east    40
chains  to   point   of   commencement,
and  containing   040  acres,   more  or
less. GEORGE TUTT.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June  1,  1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Lome Thompson, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
dentist, Intends to apply for permission  to  purchase  the  following  described lands in the vicinity of the
Kitwancool  or   Chean   Wein  Valley:
Commencing at a post planted at the
south-west corner   and    about    8% I
miles distant In a north-westerly di-
rectlon  from  the  north  end  of  Kit- i
wancool  Lake,     thence     north     80 j
chains, thence east 40 chains, thence
south  80  chains,   thence    west    40
chains   to   point   of   commencement,
and  containing   320   acres,   more  or !
less. LORNE THOMPSON.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 1,  1910. JyS :
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles Gei-
ger, of Victoria, B. C, occupation
clerk, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Comemncing at a post planted at the
S. E. corner and about 19 miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north 80 chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence south 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
CHARLES GIEGER.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 4th, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Sarah Cox,
of Monarch, Alberta, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands in the Kltwancool or
t'lieiin Wien Valley:—Commencing at
a post planted at the N. W. corner
and about. 4 % mlle-s distant in a
north-westerly direction from the
north end of Kltwancool Lake, thence
south 80 chains, thence east 80
chains, thence north SO chains,
thence west 80 chains to point of
commencement, and containing 64 0
acres, more or less.
SARAH COX.
James W. Smith, Agent
Dated May 31st, 1910.
Coast Land District—District of
Skeena.
TAKE NOTICE that I, George A.
Poole, of Prince Rupert, occupation
printer, intend to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted on the north-east shore
line of Smith Island, distant about
one mile south-east from Lot 38, and
marked "G. A. P.'s North-west Corner Post," thence 20 chains south,
thence 80 chains east, thence north
to shore line, thence following shore
line to point of commencement, containing 160 acres, more or less.
GEORGE ARTHUR POOLE.
Dated Saturday, July 2, 1910.
(First insertion July  5.)
-District of
Skeena Land District-
Cassii....
TAKE NOTICE that Thomas Sills,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation machinist, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. W. corner and about 26% miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence south 80 chains, thence
east 80 chains, thence north 80
chains, thence west 80 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
THOMAS SILLS.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 8th, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
( ' '( SSI ill"
TAKE NOTICE that John Reid,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
broker, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. W. corner and about 15% miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north 40 chains, thence
east 40 chains, thence south 40
chains, thence west 40 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing  160  acres,  more  or  less.
JOHN  REID.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated  June  3,   1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that: Grace Cess-
ford, of Victoria, B. C, occupation
married woman, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of
Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. E. corner and about 23 miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kltwancool
Lake, thence south 80 chains, thence
west SO chains, thence north 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 64 0 acres, more or less.
GRACE CESSFORD.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 6th, 1»!«. JyS
District of
Skeena Land  Dlstrlct-
Casslar.
SkeenaTLand^litrlct—District of        .TAKI': NOTICE """.Henry Hem-
C'lssiar ming. of Victoria,  H.  C, occupation
TAKE NOTICE that William Wal-  hotel  keeper,   Intends   to   apply   for
lace,  of Toronto,   Ont.,    nmnnaMnn I permission to purchase the following
cupation
insurance agent, iiitciiils to apply for
permission to purchase the following
inscribed hinds In the vl.ii ilty of Kitwancool or Chean W.-m Valley:—
Comencing at ;i post planted al the
\. E. corner and about 26% miles
distant in a north-westerly diroct on
from the north end nr Kitwancool
Lake, thence south su chains, thence
west    so ciiniiis,    thence
rilie-el lands in the vicinity of Klt-
Iwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing ai ;i post planted at the
v, E. comer and aboul -1 miles distant, in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kltwancool
Lake, thence south 80 chains, thence
v.c-st 80 c-lmins. thence north so
chains, thence east 80 chains to the
n'oitli "so 'l"J'"' "' commencement, and contaln-
cbains, thence e-ast su chains to tbe
point of commencement, containing
040  acres, more or less.
WILLIAM   WALLACE,
.lames W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 8th,  1910. Jy8
Skeena Lund District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Annie Gowan,
of Victoria, B. C, occupation married woman, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of Kltwancool or Chean Weln Valley: —
Commencng at a post planted at the
N. W. corner and about 23 miles distant In a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kltwancool
Lake; thence south 80 chains, thence
cast SO chains, thence north SO
chains, thence west So chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 040 acres, more or b-ss.
ANNIE  GOWAN.
.fames W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 7th, 1910. Jy8
1 ing 640 acres, more or less.
HENRY   HEMMING.
.binics  W.  Smith, Agent.
Iint.-cl June 6th,  1 910. Jy8
Skeena Lund  Histric-t     District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Nelson
Gowen, of Victoria, B. O, occupation mining engineer, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands In the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Weln
Valley:—Commencing at a post
planted at tbe N. E. corner and about
19 miles distant In the north-westerly direction from the north end of
Kitwancool Lake thence south 80
chains, thene-o west 4 0 chains, thence
north 40 chains, thence west 40
chains, thence north 40 chains,
thence east so e-lialns to point of
commencement, and containing 480
acres, more or less.
NELSON   GOWEN.
.lames W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 4th,  1910. JyS
B
m PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Friday, July  22,  1910
prince ftupcrt journal
Published twice-a week cm Tuesdays
and Fridays rrom the office of pulilica-
tion, Third Avenue near McBride St.
Subscription rate to any point in
Canada, $-.00 a year; to points outside
of i fanada, <93.00 a year,  •
Advertising rate furnished on appli-
cai ion.
ii. ii. NELoON,
-■ > Knn
Friday,  July  22,   1910
bouses to what is absolutely essential. This is a step that is rendered
absolutely   necessary   In   the  city   to
c  wit li the situation as it exists.
Th ■ city is meeting a situation for
wliic-h no one, perhaps, is to blame
i: Is the penalty of a quick growth
on i be pari of the place. The council had to start with a community
developing very fast, with all the
- ■ ds that goes with thai condition.
To provide for the situation requires
i I-i! of carel'i . thought and also re-
uires time. Citizens should nol be
unreasonable,
—""■THIBVTYTini
Published Twice a  Week
Third Avenue and McBride St.
hi the development of a city or a district the newspaper plays a most important pari. The Journal is prepared to take its full share in building up Prince Rupert
and giving publicity 1i> the resources and riches of tho country which is being opened
up by the (1. T. P., and of which the city must be the great distributing centre. As a
means to litis end a special offer is made :
I
VOTE  l-'Of!  IJYLAW
On August S ilic property-owners
of the city will have an opportunity
of expressing approval or the , 11>;■ <>-
siiicni for taking over tin- telephone
system by the city. There lias been a
good deal ol' discussion on Hie question ami some little ill feeling engendered as a result of the preliminary slops which were taken in connection with this. Tiie citizens who
believe in tbe public ownership of the
telephone system will now have an
opportunity to express approval of
the scheme of public ownership and
should make the vote a substantial
one. It would thus show the city
council exactly the mind of the people on such a question.
It is an opportunity to register a
decision which the property-owners
should all embrace.
 o	
IMPORTANT PORT
There is no place in Prince Rupert today for the pessimist. The
attention which the place is attracting from the outside world is sufficient to make everyone who has an
investment in the city congratulate
himself. The outlook is nothing if
not promising. D. D. Mann is enamored of the northern country on this,
his first visit to it, and will assist
in the work of bringing it to the attention  of the Investing world.
Tbe visit of Mr. Mann is but one
of tbe evidences this week that the
north is prominently in the public
eye. Capt. Bartlett of the Holt liner
Belleropbon was also a guest here
and bis visit is if anything of greater
importance than that of the railway
magnate. ('apt. Bartlett comes as
the representative of one of the greatest shipping houses in the world. He
comes as tbe special emissary of the
Holts to examine into the possibilties
of this port, the object in view being
the placing of this port among those
to be catered to by the company In
its carrying trade around the world.
There can be little question that
the Holt liners, in common with the
vessels of all the big companies operating on the North Pacific Coast, will
arrange for trade here. As the nearest port of call on the route from
the Orient, there will be a decided
advantage in tbe steamers calling
hete and transhipping their cargo for
interior points over the present system of hauling it all the way to Vancouver as the Holt liners do. In
point of time there would be a vast
saving. By unloading at Ibis port
the goods would be In Winnipeg possibly as soon as they would be in
Vancouver or Seattle by the present
routes. There is also the saving in
fuel unel other advantages that in
these days of keen competition are
watched closely by the big companies.
It is idle lo expect that the port of
Prince Ruperl will put .shipping
ports like Seattle and Vancouver out
of business. Willi the rapid development em the coast these ports will
not he- appreciably affected by the
rise of the new port in the north.
Prince Rupert will rise to u shipping
point ranking with these without at
the same time appearing to hurt the
rivals.
THE PRINCE GEORGE
The new Bteamer Prince George
which should reach lien- on Sunday
'ill he- as heartily welcome to the
porl as her sisie-r ship, tiie Prince
Rupert, although there will not be
Hie snine pomp and sp.'endor in connection witli her reception here. It
was but fitting that the first of the
• I. 'I'. I'. steamers should be given a
hearty reception. That reception was
as much Intended for Hie Prince
George as for the Prince Rupert and
the officers of the newer steamer may
so accept It.
In connection with the naming of
steamers, it is remarkable how a
sentiment is engendered as a result
of the simple naming. Thus it will
be no surprise if on the part of residents here a little warmer feeling
is always felt towards the Prince Rupert on account of its bearing the
name of the city. This has been observed in connection with the C.P.R.
steamer Princess Victoria. Bearing
the same name as the capital city of
the province tbe people of Victoria
always show a warm feeling towards
that vessel. The arrival of the Princess Charlotte, a larger and in some
respects better steamer than the
Princess Victoria, failed to win the
general public in Victoria away from
the first steamer. When tests of speed
were made it was always more popular in the capital for the Princess
Victoria to he the victor.
A similar sentiment may attach to
the Prince Rupert in this city. Other
vessels may come better equipped
and faster probably, in the years to
come but the first steamer of the
G. T. P. coasting service bearing the
name of the terminal city will always
find a warm place in the hearts ot
residents here.
Till: WATER PROBLEM
rince Rupert
.. Journal..
Advertisers
will find the Journal
the best publicity medium in the new B. C.
All eyes are at present
turned towards this
part of the Province.
Keep your business before the public by advertising in the Journal. It will bring you
quick returns
$1.50
Per     Year
You Can Aid
Do you wish to keep
some friends informed
as to the development
of Prince Rupert?
Place their names on
the mailing list of the
Journal at the low subscription rate and keep
them interested i n
Canada's greatest port
on the Pacific.
During July a special rate of $1.50 for the year will be charged for the Journal.
Subscriptions must be received at the office of publication before July 30, in order that
advantage may be taken of this offer. This rate is applicable to subscribers outside
of Prince Rupert as well as residents of the city.    Remember this is only for July.
Subscribe early and take advantage of the low rate.
Prince Rupert has its water problem to solve, There are no citizens
Who realize this more than the members of the city council. According
to present indications there is no danger of the council wasting any time
in solving the question. It. is being
grappled with in a decisive way. In
the meantime the public are asked to
co-operate in avoiding any unnecessary waste of water so that there
may be no danger of any serious
shortage. With the present dry
weather the lack Is aggravated and
the citizens should show public spirit
in dealing with a situation which
could not well be avoided.
In the matter of a water supply,
no time is being wasted to secure
for the city an adequate service. The
engineering department is at work
on the proposition and according to
all indications, Col. Davis will not allow any time to be lost In delivering
the Woodwortli Lake supply to the
city.
On the recommendation of the city
engineer the council has decided to
grant no further extensions of the
redistribution system in the city and
to limit the further connections for
%        A Great Canadian        %
* #
♦j, »j» »j, .5. »j« »j« »j. .j. »j« .j. .j. .j. .j. .j. .j* .j. »j« »j. »f> .j. .j. »j. .j. ,j. .j. .j,
Goldwin     Smith     was     seventeen
years past the Psalmist's limit, and
be died  because he was just tired,
says Collier's Weekly.    He  lost  part
of his grip on life when he laid down
his pen  as  "The  Bystander"  a year
ago, and a still more vital part of it
when his wife, his faithful companion
for forty years, died last September.
To  the  last he was  surrounded  by
friends,   but   tbe   dear   ones   of   his
bosom   had   all   gone   before.     The
accident by which he broke his thigh
may have hastened his end, but his
chief disease  was old age.     He met
cleatli     lige    a   philosopher,   adding
nothing to those wistful doubts of a
hereafter  which  he  had  written  in
many books and pamphlets.    Toronto  will  miss  the  tall  bent  figure  in
Hie family barouche, behind the sleek
horses,  with  the gray    old    family
coachman   on  the  box,    which     was
Goldwin  Smith's picture   when     ho
took  an  outing   on    an     afternoon.
Everybody knew by sight the sad old
gentleman  with the dropping mouth
and  the  wan, Inscrutable  eyes, and
some   wondered   why,   with   all   his
honors and riches, he should not look
happy.     They   did   not   understand,
perhaps, that the riddle of existence
weighed  heavily on  him.    Those in
his   circle   will   dwell   on    bis     old-
fashioned courtesy and his delightful
table  talk,  in  which  wit  and  learning and comradeship with  the great
men and great events of three countries came as naturally to the sur-
face as bubbles on a  deep pool.   Ha
conferred  distinction on Toronto by
setting   aside   all   the   English   and
American cities he might have chosen
from  to  live In  it.     His home, Tho
Grange—It becomes now, by his gift,
the property of the city he loved—
was a fitting frame for a fine old English     gentleman     who    was  also   a
scholar and  a  historian.     It  seemed
only  right  that  a  house  which  had
seen a hundred years of history and
made   some   of   it   should   harbor   a
man who could interpret history un-
dlstracted by the clamor of the times
Anyone who has examined  Goldwin
Smith's lighter efforts will regret that
lie did not do more for belles lettres.
Like  Macaulay,  he could  have  been
a great novelist or a great poet, but,
like Macaulay, his sense of duty called him to sterner work.    He wrote
history    and   political  economy  because he thought he could  do more
good that way, and, at that, he sacrificed  part  of  his  fame  by  writing
on topics of purely current Interest.
A present wrong to be righted, a
present error to be combated, a present cause to de helped—any of these
called more loudly to Goldwin Smith
than the far-off tributes of posterity.
But what he could do in the way of
a monumental work he showed In
"The United Kingdom." Although
bis fancy leaned to the primrose path
of literature, he put it away from
him and, of late years, did not even
read the rising authors of fiction. To
a reporter who asked him if he liked
William de Morgan, he said: "Who
is William de Morgan? You see,
we're a little bit out of the world
here." And he was vastly curious
about the old man of seventy who
could write four three-deckers all in
a row. But otherwise the facts of a
long life spent in observing provided
his mind with what comedy and tragedy it needed to feed on, as indeed
it does most old men's.
Goldwin Smith spent most of his
literary energy on journalism. He
had to have a paper or a magazine
as other rich men have to have a
yacht or a shooting preserve. The
paper was the quickest, surest way
of reaching the people. Being an
eager champion ow what he thought
right, Goldwin Smtih took the short
cut. He did not wait to publish his
views on a live question in a book,
six months after the subject might
be dead. His career as a publicist
in Canada is bound up with five
papers in which he was the leading
spirit. The last one was the "Weekly
Sun," a high-class farmers' paper,
in which Goldwin Smith's "Bystander" column was the front-page feature. Surely never did the farmers of
Canada have such a guide before!
George III wrote for an agricultural
paper on farm topics as Mr. Robinson, but Goldwin Smith, applying the
philosophy of history to the events
of today, is even more notable. Another reason why Goldwin Smith had
to have a newspaper of his own was
that many of the things he thought
he could not get into the Canadian
newspapers. It was his fate to hold
many opinions which ran counter to
popular feeling. The trouble was that
he was a philosophical historian, using cold, white logic, and the other
people were patriots or politicians,
swayed by interest and sentiment.
Without going back one iota on his
spoken views on any of the great
questions, Goldwin Smith outlived
the rancor he had aroused and won
the love and esteem of those who had
once made his name a hissing. There
was no strife or bitterness to mar
his sunset. He came to be regarded
as the Admirable Crichton of Canada,
but not as a political Influence. He
did much to dignify and elevate the
newspaper profession In Canada.   He
practised courtesy of debate, and
that, in time, had its effect. With
the ease and money to follow a writing itch, he never wronged the workers in hodden gray by doing anything for nothing. He asked and
took the market price for his output
and then gave it away royally in
charity. Goldwin Smith was a champion of liberty and democracy. It
will stand to him for more merit
that he was the champion of the oppressed, the life-long friend of the
"under-dog." He was the greatest
citizen of Canada. It is a pity that
so much wisdom, learning and high
character should be hid away in the
grave.
 o	
RICE RECIPES
Some of the following recipes are
rather new and some are old: —
Rice Pudding Without Eggs—
Four tablespoonfuls of rice, four
tablespoonfuls of sugarfl one quart of
milk, one cupful of raisins. Bake
rice, sugar and milk for one and one-
half hours, then add raisins and bake
another half hour    Stir occasionally.
* *    *
Cream of Rice Pudding—Three
cupfuls of milk, thre tablespoonfuls
of rice, one-half cupful of sugar, and
nutmeg or vanilla flavoring. Wash
the rice, put it with two cupfuls of
cold water on back of stove until it
comes to boiling point, then add the
three cupfuls of milk, the sugar, and
flavoring, and place pan in slow
oven for three or four hours. Every
lime a crust forms on top stir it
until just before taking from tbe
oven. Eat hot or cold and without
sauce.
* *     *
Rice Snow Ball.—Cook six tablespoonfuls of rice until tender. Sweeten with two tablespoonfuls of sugar
and add a pinch of salt. Pile on a
low, flat dish. While hot have the
white of one egg beaten with one
tablespoonful of sugar. Spread over
the rice. Set in the oven to glaze but
not brown. The sauce: Stir together
the yolk of one egg, one teaspoonful
of flour, two tablespoonfuls of sugar
thinned with one tablespoonful of
water, then beat to a cream. Stir
this into one cupful of boiling milk
and flavor to taste.
* +    *
Poor Man's Pudding.—One-half
cupful of boiled rice, two eggs, one-
half cupful of sugar, one tablespoonful of butter, two cupfuls of milk.
Place butter In pudding dish and melt
it. Beat eggs, sugar and salt together, add milk and rice, mix thoroughly, pour into pudding dish, and
bake until firm and browned slightly.
Serve warm or cold as preferred.
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«S» »5>
%   Refuses Rhodes' Bequest   %
•:• •••
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Tbe old adage that you may lead
a horse to the water, hut cannot
make him drink, recurs as one reads
the news that General Botha, the
first premier of the United Colonies
of South Africa, has refused to avail
himself of the bequest which was
made by Cecil Rhodes of a mansion
at Cape Town to be occupied by the
holder of this office. Possessed of
an intense desire to see the map of
the sub-continent tinted red, and to
link up the Cape and Cairo under
British influence, Rhodes foresaw
the union of the four colonies, and
anticipating that which today is an
for an official residence at Cape-
accomplished fact, made provision
town.
In one of the prettiest suburban
districts in Cape peninsula, over all
of which towers the majestic Table
Mountain, lies the estate of Groote
Schuur, skirting the slopes of the
mountain. The name (meaning
"large granary") and the style of
architecture of the house are both
Dutch. The homestead, with its picturesque, red-tiled roof, Its curiously
shaped chimneys and white gables,
its cool tesselated stoep, and dazzling
white pillars, captivated the fancy
of the great South African magnate
and statesman, who after renting it
for some time, acquired it for his
permanent use when at the Cape.
Bit by bit, the Hon. Cecil Rhodes
added to the estate, until at the time
of his death, it comprised the finest
part in South Africa. Inspired at all
limes by a sense of his stewardship,
Rhodes shared his estate with the
people and gave free access thereto.
When the estate was being laid out
he Issued two thousand keys which
were to be presented to reputable
citizens, but when the gates and locks
were all provided, he Issued a yet
more generous order, to the effect
that the gates were not to be lockd.
So the inhabitants of the Cape came
into the enjoyment of pleasure
grounds which meant as much as
Regent's Park with its zoo to the
Londoner, or the Park of St. Cloud
to the Parisian. Stalking about on
the slopes, separated from the visitor
only by wire fences, are to be seen
the zebra, the giraffe, the ostrich,
the eland, and other animals which
are there on their native heath; In
fact the only caged one Is the king
of beasts.
The residence is situated near the
entrance from a main road and, traversing a magnificent avenue of stately pines, the gables of the building
are visible between the trees.
The mansion is not large as com
pared, say, with the White House,
but it is of that solid type such as
many a "Mynheer'' of the Dutch East
India Company would have built. It
possesses that necessary adjunct to
all South African homes, stately or
humble, a stoep—a word which is
retained by the English colonists.
This stoep is tiled and columned, and
being deep, affords a cool retreat
when the sun's rays beat down pitilessly.
The interior of the house suggests
the individuality of its founder.
Everything is substantial; halls and
corridors are flagged; the ceilings,
b ams aud panels are mostly constructed in teak, and the furniture
includes old Dutch "kists" (chests)
for which Mr. Rhodes paid fabulous
prices.
Amongst many interesting souvenirs of the history of the land are
to he seen relics from the famous
Zimbabye ruins, the elephant seal
used by Lobengula, the Chartered
Company's flag that Dr. Jameson
carried through the first Matebele
campaign, and an old drinking cup
used by the directors of the Dutch
Hast India Company.
Unfortunately, in 1S9B a fire broke
out and destroyed a portion of the
house, as well as some valuable oil
paintings, and Mr. Rhode's chest of
papers. However, the damaged portion was re-constructed and the
original scheme of design was adhered lo, and now the roof has been
tiled instead of thatched.
Over the portals of Goote Schuur
Is a striking bronze panel representing in relief, the arrival of Van Rie-
beck, the first Governor of the Cape.
Tbe entrance of the first Premier—
also a Dutchman—would then have
proved a happy association of ideas,
and It is to be hoped that General
Hot ha will allow wiser counsel to
prevail.
 o	
KING   GEORGE'S   ALLOWANCE
Parliament has been considering
alterations in the civil list of His Majesty King George. It Is customary
at the beginning of a new reign for
a select committee of parliament to
consider the financial needs of the
Crown. This has just been done and
the outcome of deliberations Is given
in the announcement made that the
sum of $3,170,000 yearly will be pro- '
vided for the maintenance of the
royal family. This is an increase of
$65,000 over the allowance made for
King Edward for his household.
The report also recommends an appropriation of $275,000 to be spent
in placing the royal palaces in a fit
condition for the occupation of the
king and queen.
* I
Friday, July  22,  1010
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Atlantic Steamship;
 Agency	
Through tickets and  excursion
rates to
England, France, Germany,
and all
Scandinavian Ports.
Call or write for rates to any
part of the world. I am also
agent for till American steamers
to and front Prince Rupert;
Northern Pacific I Jail way; Alaska Pacific Express.
J. H. ROGERS
General Steamship and Railway
Agent, Prince Rupert, 13.C.
Canadian Pacific  R'y
Steamers leave Prinee Rupert for Vancouver,
Victoria, Seattle
Princess Beatrice, every Monday at 1 p.m.
Princess May or Princess Royal
every Saturday morning.
Steamers leave Vancouver
Princess Beatrice every Thursday night.
Princess May or Princess Royal
every Saturday night at 11
o'clock.
Union Steamship Co'y
of B.C. Ltd.
The new Steel Passenger Steamer
"Camosun"
PRINCE RUPERT every Sunday at 9 a.m. for Vancouver,
arriving Monday afternoon.
For Stewart City on arrival from
Vancouver Friday night.
Northbound, leaves Vancouver
Wednesdays at 9 p.m.
Steerage Fare $5.00
The "Camosun" is the only steamer
on the run having water-tight bulkheads and double bottom, thus ensuring safety of passengers in case of
collission or wreck.
J. H. ROGERS,   Ticket Agent
HAYNOR   I5ROS.
FUNERAL   DIRECTORS
and
PROFESSIONAL  EMBALMERS
DR.  W.  15.  CLAYTON
DENTIST
Office   in   the   Westenhaver   Block.
Over  Orme's  Drug    Store.
Prince Rupert
WM. S. HAi..L, L, D. S. D. D. S.
:-:    DENTIST    :-:
Crown and Bridge Work a specialty.
All dental operations skillfully
treated. Gas and local anaesthetics
administered for the painless extraction of teeth. Consultation free.
Offices: Rooms 10 and 20, Alder
Block, Prince Rupert.
J. H. P1LLSIU ItY
CIVIL     ENGINEER
Surveying,   Designs,   Estimates,
etc,
Room  7,  Exchange   Block,
Corner  Third  Ave  and   Sixth   Street
Prince Rupert
G. W. NIOKERSON & CO.
—o—
CUSTOMS AND .MERCHANDISE
Brokers, Forwarding Agents,
Storage,  etc.
.1. W. POTTER
ARCHITECT     AND     STRUCTURAL
ENGINEER
Re-inforced Concrete a Specialty
Law-Butler Building - Prince Rupert
GRAHAM ISLAND — "The surest
sign of the progress of a town or
district Is Its newspaper—live, active, hustling." "The Masset Review," Masset, Q.C.I.
♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦■
The Thompson
: Hardware Co.
-Second Avenue—
■ •
______
<■
< >    Paints. General Hardware,
Oils, Stoves and Ranges.
♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦
Fred Stork
General Hardware
..Complete Lino of..
VA
Pipe and Pipe Fittings
. ♦;♦ ►;.»;«»> .;• •>»;«.;.■>♦*»
Personals
REPRESENTS CANADA
The
Washington Cafe
A PLACE TO EAT
Seats For Ladies
Everything Clean and Tasty
Prices Reasonable
W. F. CARPENTER, PROPRIETOR
Second Avenue, rear Seventh Street
Some Rock
Bottom
Prices
See Ol For Investment
Rupert City Realty & Inform
ation Bureau, Ltd.
PRINCE RUPERT,
B.C.
CANCELLATION  OF  RESERVE
NOTICE is hereby given that the
reserve existing on Crown lands in
the vicinity of Babine Lake, situate
in Range 5, Coast District, notice of
which was published in the British
Columbia Gazette, dated December
17, 1908, Is cancelled in so far as
said reserve relates to lots numbered 1519, 1518, 1517, 1516, 1515
1510, 1507, 1506, 1506A, 1503 1501,
1502, 1G12, 1511, 1505, 1504, 1513,
1514, 1509, 1508, 1530, 1527, 1528,
1529, 1531, 1532, 1533, 1534, 1535,
1537, 1539, 1536, 1538, 1540, 1541,
1544, 1543, 1545, 1546, 1542, 1547,
1548, 1549, 1550, 1520, 1521, 1522,
1523, 1524, 1525, 1526, and 1551.
ROBERT A. RENWICK,
Deputy Commissioner of Lands
Lands Department,
Victoria, B. C, June 16th, 1910.
(First insertion July 5.)
DISSOLUTION   OF   PARTNERSHIP
TAKE NOTICE that the verbal
partnership heretofore subsisting between the undersigned, Arthur F.
Rowe who was to furnish the
Planer, and P. E. Cowell who was to
furnish the Power, at the site of the
B. C. Tie & Timber Company's saw
mill at Seal Cove, in the town of
Prince Rupert, B.C., has this day
been mutually dissolved, A. F. Rowe
collecting all accounts and paying
only expense of labor since installation   of  plant.
Dated this ninth day of July, 1910.
ARTHUR F. ROWE
FRED  E.  COWELL.
For  Diamonds,
Wedding Rings, Wedding
Presents, High-Class
Jewelry, and all makes
of High Grade Watches, go to
C. B. WARK
The Reliable Jeweler.
Watch Repairing a Specialty
*
*
*
%   HON. L. P. BRODEUR, MINISTER OF MARINE AND FISHERIES
*•:•>:••:••:-•>•:••:■ •:••:••:• >:• .:..;..;.•:••:••:••;••:••:«•:<•> *•>•:•>:•**•>•£'*•:>•:••:••:••:•*•:• •:•*•:•* •:••:•** *>:••:.•:••:•
PRINCE GEORGE NOW
New G.T.P. Steamer to Leave Vancouver
Tonight for This
Port.
Vessel is Close'   Copy   Of the Prince
Rupert Now on the linn From
the  South
Municipal Notice
TAKE NOTICE that the Council of
the Municipal Corporation of the City
of Prince Rupert, intends to make
tbe following local  improvement:—■
A sixteen-foot plank roadway along
Hays Cove Avenue, from its intersection with Sixth Avenue, thence
along Eighth Avenue to Kelliher
Street.
Also
The necessary grading to reduce
cut between Immanuel and Kelliher
Streets to sub-grade; and to assess
the final cost thereof upon the property fronting or abutting thereon, or
to be benefitted thereby, and that a
statement and diagram showing the
lands proposed to be so especially assessed for the said improvements, or
work, is now filed in the office of the
City Clerk, and is open for inspection
during office  hours.
The estimated cost of the wora is
$31,600.00.
Dated at Prince Rupert this 22nd
day of July,  A.D.   1910.
ERNEST A.  WOODS,
Ty22 City Clerk.
The Prince George, the sister ship
to the Prince Rupert, will leave Van
couver tonight on her initial run to
what will be regarded as her home
port, Prince Rupert. With two
steamers like those of the G. T. P
service on the run from the south, the
residents of Prince Rupert should
feel grateful. Never in the history
of tbe world has there been provided
for the convenience of a city the size
of this port anything like the service
that the G. T. P. is putting on in
these two vessels.
It shows the faith the company
has in the future of this as a shipping
centre and likewise is a promise of a
most progressive policy on the part
of the company.
The Prince George is expected to
reach here Sunday at noon.
Like her sister ship, the Prince
George is one of the handsomest vessels which will ply on this coast.
She is a twin screw steamship and
is rigged after the fashion of a fore-
and-aft schooner with three smokestacks, straight stem, and cruiser
stern.
On the shelter and shade decks
are long steel houses, giving accommodation for first class passengers,
along with elaborately decorated
public rooms, which are a special
feature of the vessel. The upper
deck house is designed so as to give
ample space for promenading at the
sides and  around  the ship.
The bull is fashioned with remarkably fine lines forward and a clear
run aft so as to obtain the highest
speed commensurate with the power
of the engines.
A cellular double bottom is fitted
for a considerable distance amidships, divided into eight compartments, and these, together with the
specially arranged iriming tanks of
huge capacity, enable the vessel to
carry more than 000 tons of water
ballast, besides affording increased
security against grounding.
The bull is diveded by watertight
bulkheads into nine compartments
so that the safety of the vessel in
the event of any compartment being
damaged is assured. Steel bulkheads, extending to the main deck
completely separate the freight space
from the parts of the ship occupied
by the passengers and crew.
There are five decks, lower, main,
shelter, shade and boat decks. The
main and shelter decks are of steel
sheathed with wood for a considerable length amidships, the other
decks are of wood with steel tie
plates.
A complete instalaltion of an Ice
and refrigerating plant Is fitted In
conjunction with cold storage chambers of about 4,500 utiolc feet capacity for carrying ship's provisions.
The life saving aquipment and fire
fighting apparatus have received special attention.
A system of wireless telegraphy
capable of being operated from storage batteries independent of the dynamos also has been Installed, so
that constant communication can be
kept up with stations on the shore.
Tiie  length   of  the Prince  George
over all is 320 feet; breath, extreme
42.3 feet; depth molded to shelter
deck, 25 feet; gros. tonnage, 3,380
tons; deadweight carrying capacity
1,100 tons; water ballast, 606 tons
She is equipped with twin screw
engines, triple expansion four cylinders and cranks, balanceu on the Yarrow Schilick and Tweedy system to
ensure smooth running without
vibration. Her indicated horsepower
is 6,000.
The Prince George has two large
double-ended and two large single-
ended uoilers of 180 pounds working
pressure. The speed derived from
the engines is eighteen and one-half
knots. Her passenger accommodations are i::.'-. ;'.-. ■--.. i.nj i_<j2
second-class, Iwth promenade space
for 1,500 excursionists.
.Mr. and  Mrs. George  Morrow and I
family  returned  from  Vancouver on
i lie Prince Rupert.
* C*     =;c
.Mr. Cue, a well known mining en-
gineer of Victoria, is in the city. Helms been up the Skeena as fur as
Haezlton looking over the prospects.
W. .1. Goepel, Inspector of offices
under the provincial governmc in.
was in tin- city this week, lie- lias
now gone to the- Queen Charlotte
Islands.
Judge Young has gone to Haezlton
to hold court. W. F. Fisher, crown
prosecutor, and Chief Constable
Wynn of the provincial police, are
also in attendance.
* *     *
J. A. Anderson, auditor general of
the province, reached the city by the
Prince Rupert on a tour of inspection. He will, after inspecting the
books at Stewart, return to this city,
* *    *
Mr. and Mrs. Jack Chisholm left
for the south is morning on the
Prince Rupert. They will upend several weeks vacation with friends In
Washington and Oregon.
* *    *
Miss Warren, daughter of Capt.
Warren, the founder of the Boscowitz Steamship company, was a
passenger on the Venture on her last
trip.
Universities to Confer
Oxford, Cambridge and London
universities are inviting representatives of several universities of the
empire to join them in a conference
in London in 1912.
Mrs. (Dr.) Ernest Hall, of Victoria, acoempanied by her two sons,
was a passenger on the Venture this
week. She will pay a visit to Port
Simpson and later spend some time
with friends in Prince Rupert.
#    #    *
William Stevenson, pastor of the
Emmanuel Baptist, church in Victoria, was a visitor in Prince Rupert
for a few hours Wednesday evening.
He was a passenger on the steamer
Venture and continued on the trip
north from here. Mr. Stevenson is
a very matter of fact clergyman. He
has broad views anil takes an intense
interest in the affairs of the world.
Prince Rupert was full of interest for
liim and be covered as much of the
place as lie could in the limited time
as his disposal, lie is lull of faith
regarding the future of this city and
the whole of Northern British Columbia.
:<***•> **♦* >:•*•:• ***•:••:• >:••:.•:.•:
, »> .;* .;« »;. .j. ♦;. ,J. ,J. ,;« ,;, .;.,;, ... ,j,...,»,,
Hon. W. S. Fielding Will Attend International Congress on Navigation
in Brussels.
il,  1..  P.  liroileiii- Finds it   Inipos-
sible to lie Present—Will Visit
tile   Great    Lakes
Ottawa, July 22,- Item. 1.. 1'. I'.io-
clc'ur will lea - earlj nexl month on
a tour of insp- ctton of the Great
Lakes, going as far as  Port Arthur.
lie will thus he unable to intend
tin- International Congress on Navigation which is to meet in Brussels
ut the end of July.
Hon. W, S. Fielding will atte-nd
the convention as the representative
of Canada and will support the delegates from the United States to have
the next congress held In Philadelphia in 1912. He will also extend
an invitation to the congress to visit
Canada's maritime navigation channels.
— 0———
SPORTS
SHOOTING   SEASON
HON. W. s. FIELDING, MINISTER <H   FINANCE
••:••:••:•**•:••:••:••:••;
TITLE OP  PEACEMAKER
It  Was  Firs)   Bestowed  on   Edwnrd
VII. by Aider Anderson in  1004
sen- Magazine for February, 1904, by
Alder Anderson, on '"I'be Millinery
of tin- Law,'' there is the following
sentence:
"When King Edward, the Peacemaker, paid the first of Hint historic
re.unci  nt   usits  last  year, tbe  Portu-
The title of "Peacemaker," which
so advirably   synthetlzes    the    late
King Edward Vll's beneficent influ- guese court, in order lo do honor to
ence on the march of human progress its great, elec-ieleel in put all the coast-
—a title by which there is no doubt men into curly while wigs, and no
he will be remembered as long as less than forty-four of these aids to
history lasts—appears to tune been ! dignity were dispatched In hot niisvn
first bestowed upon him by Alder An-   to Lisbon  from Star Yard."
A little over a month and the hunting season will be on. According to
the 1910 game laws the first legal
day of shooting ducks, geese and
snipe will be on September 1. This
regulation refers to the mainland,
but on Vancouver Island the season
will not open until two weeks later.
Except in the Cowichan electoral
district and in the Islands electoral
district, with tbe exception of the
municipality of North Saanich, it is
against the law to shoot cock pheasants throughout the province.
Columbian or coast deer shooting
will he legal on the mainland on and
after September 1, but in some portions of Vancouver Island tlie season
will open two weeks later.
Following are the regulations under the Game Act for the open and
close seasons during 1910:
Grouse of all kinds may be shot
on Vancouver Island, the islands adjacent thereto, and the Islands electoral district, between 15th September and 31st December, both days
inclusive, with the exception of willow grouse in the Cowichan electoral
district. Blue and willow grouse in
tbe Richmond, Dewdney, Delta, Chilliwack and in that portion of the
Comox, electoral districts on the
mainland, and islands adjacent thereto, on Texada island, and in that portion of Kent municipality situate in
Yale electoral district, between the
loth October and 31st December,
botli days inclusive. All kinds in the
Fernie and Cranbrook electoral districts may be shot only during the
month of October. Blue and willow
grouse and ptarmigan may he shot
throughout the remainder of tbe
mainland between 1st September and
31st December, both days Inclusive,
Prairie chicken may lie shot
throughout the province during tbe
month of October.
I nicks, geese and snipe may be
slim throughout the mainland and
tin.- islands adjacent thereto between
1st September and 28th February,
both days Inclusive, Dick of all
kinds and snipe may be shot cm Vancouver Island and islands adjacent
thereto, and in tin- islands electoral
district, between 15th September,
1910, ami 28th February, 1911, both
days Inclusive, tiie geese in any time,
Columbian or coasl deer may be
slim cm Vancouver Island, tin- Islands
adjacent thereto, ami ihe Islands
electoral disire t, bet ween September   15th   and   I ember   15th,   both
days Inclusive. Throughoul ihe remainder c.i i ii.- proi in. e, except the
Queen Charlotte Islands, they may lie
slim between September isi and December   loth,  I.oili  clays  inclusive.
Wapiti lire nol allowed to be shot
anywhere in tic pro\ Ince.
Sale of game Columbia or coast
deer may In- sulci cm ihe mainland
only between September 1st and November  16th,  both  clays  inclusive.
Ducks, geese and snipe may be
sold throughout tbe province during
the months of October and November only.
Nothing contained In the regulations affects Walen Island, the Yala-
koni game reserve In tbe Lillooet district or the Elk river game reserve
in the Fast Kootenay district.
 o ■
PROVINCIAL  TAXES
derson, late editor of the Grand
Magazine, who came into intimate
contact with His Majesty during the
memorable visit to Paris in May.
1903.
Mr. Anderson can flatter himself
thai his trouvaille did not fall upon
deaf ears.
For Job  Printing of ul
In an article in the London Wind- the Journal mini.
kinds see
Victoria.—Provincial taxes paid
before the- expiration of the special
discount period amounts to nearly
$1,600,000, Tiie recopits from Victoria alone amounted  to  $332,000.
_ -
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Friday, July 22,  1910
A NATIONAL DANGER
Sir Byron Walker Sounds Warning to People of Canada.
LAND PURCHASE NOTICES
In a message to the people of Canada in the Toronto Globe, Sir Byron
E. Walker, president of the Canadian
Bunk of Commerce, says:
We are becoming accustomed to
the idea tliat.,we possess the area of
cultivable sail and other natural resources necessary to support one of
the largest of the nations in the western half of the world. We are receiving new population at a rate quite
as large as we can care for, having
regard to those already in Canada.
We are told that we are to feed
nations whose food supply will become exhausted, and we are to supply, if we will, raw materials in order that the wheels of other countries may not be idle. We also have
the water power, the raw material
and the quality of labor which will
make us one of the greatest of the
manufacturing countries in the western world. We have a climate fit to
produce a great race physically. We
are rapidly conquering the difficulties of transportation on our own
land and water, and we are linking
ourselves with the rest of tbe world
across the various oceans. We have
a sound system of law, a system of
education doubtless inadequate to our
needs, but improving, an excellent
banking system, and our national
credit is so great as to be a possible
source om danger. If we can but
conserve our resources we are, there
fore, assured of material prosperity.
Indeed, it seems so sure that we shall
be one of the richest of the newer
nations that we are rapidly becoming
a vain and self-satisfied people.
But while tnese brilliant prospects
are well founded, is it all right with
us as a nation? I am sure that all is
not right. We have seen a democracy
which began with almost the noblest
principles ever declared in a national
manifesto, and which certainly was
far from believing that money was
a measure of national greatness, become by too much devotion to money
making, a vast nation of discontented
people ruled by a few plutocrats.
Is this to be our future? Is not
our measure of success today largely one of money? What is the use of
denying that we are at present too
much in love with material prosperity? But we are not so grossly in
love with it as our friends to the
south. We can still recall the time
when a large part of our people bad
other ambitions. We still recognize
that no nation built on material prosperity alone can endure.
When we find a man who has devoted his life only to making money,
and who has not created anything
worth while in doing so, who cannot
read books, enjoy beautiful things
or indulge in sport, we know that
he has thrown his precious life away.
What, then, must be the fate ot a na
tion which does not give due place
to the intellectual and the artistic in
life?
The writer has spent nearly fifty
years in a business in which money
is the chief concern. He has spent
much of his life in the study of our
industries and in the acute study of
the balance sheets of industrial concerns. He certainly does not undervalue industrial effort of the money
arising from it. It was Kate Green-
away in one of her poems for children
who said the wise think about money
"It's bad to have money; it's worse
to have none"—bad to have too much
and  worse to have too little.
One of the greatest aids in our
nation-building will be our industrial
prosperity, but let us remember that
this prosperity should be like three
meals a day to a workingman. It
should merely give us a basis on
which to do the real work of the nation. And the real work is to build
up the intellectual life of our people;
to create teachers, jurists, legislators,
philosophers, scientific investigators
and artists; military leaders and
soldiers for our national defence;
great administrators of public trusts;
and generally, men who whether on
the platform, in the counting house,
or in the market place, are not
ashamed to urge the supreme importance  of character.
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Phillip Williams, of Sydney, Nova Scotia, occupation accountant, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein
ley:—Commencing at a post planted
at the S. E. corner and about 16%
miles distant in a north-westerly direction from the north end of Kitwancool Lake, thence north 80
chains, thence west. 80 chains, thence
south 80 chains, thence east 80
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 640 acres, more or
less. PHILLIP WILLIAMS.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 4, 1910. Jy8
LAND PURCHASE NOTICES
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Annie Grieve,
of Victoria, B. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands In the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. W. corner, and about 17% miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence south 40 chains, thence
east 40 chains, thence south 40
chains, thence east 40 chains, thence
north 80 chains, thence west 80
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 4S0 acres, more or
less. ANNIE GRIEVE.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 4,  1910. Jy8
TAKING THE CENSUS
The next census of Canada will
be taken under date of June 1, 1911,
and will embrace the subjects of
population, mortality, agriculture,
manufactures, mineral, fisheries and
dairy products.
Population will be recorded under
the heads of residence and personal
description; citizenship, nationality
and riligion; profession, occupation,
and trade or means of living; wage-
earning and insurance; education and
language spoken, and infirmities.
Every person living on June 1 will
be entered on the schedule of population by name, as member of a
family, institution or household, together with place of habitation, Bex
relationship to head of the family or
household, and whether single, ma--
riedfi widowed, divorced or legally
separated. The month of birth, year
of birth and age at last birthday will
also be recorded.
Entries will be made for each person to show the country or place of
birth, year of immigration to Canada
if born elsewhere, year of naturali lotion if formerly an alien, and also
racial or tribal origin, nationaiity
and religion. Every person of alien
birth who has become a naturalised
citizen is a Canadian by nationality,
and every British subject with residence in Canada, as well as eve* ••
native of Canada who has acquired
citizenship by birth or naturalization
is also a Canadian by nationality.
But there is no Canadian by racial or
tribal origin, unless the Indians are
so counted.
Every person having an occupation
or trade will be entered for it, but if
employed in the census year at some
other  occupation  for part or whole
time he will be so recorded also.
If the person is working on his own
account, the entry will be so made.
An entry is also required to be made
showing where the person is employed, as on farm, in woolen mill, at
foundry shop, at drug store, etc.
Wage-earners are entered to show
the number of hours employed in
1910 at chief occupation or trade;
at other than chief occupation, if
any; the hours of working time per
week at chief occupation, or at other
occupation, if any; the total earnings in 1910 at chief occupation; the
total earnings at other than chief occupation, and i.e rate per hour when
employed by the hour.
Entries are required to be made
for each person showing the amount
of insurance held at date of the census upon life, as weil as against accident or sickness, together with the
cost of such insurance in the census
year.
Under uie heading of education
and language records will be taken
for every person of five years of age
and over, showing the number of
months at school in 1910, and if the
person can read and write, and the
language commonly spoken by each
person. The cost of education in
1910 for persons over 16 years of
age at college, convent or university
it also called for.
The last question on the schedule
of papulation relates to infrmities.
It calls for a record of each person
having an infirmity. If blind, deaf
and dumb, crazy or lunatic, idiotic
or silly, a record uiereof will be made
in the proper column, and the age at
which the infirmity appeared is required to be specified.
J   Increasing Navy    |
|ii.;..;..;..»,.»..;,.;..»,,;..;..;. ,J..;..;..;. .j..;..;, »•.,;. .3. .*,.........
During tbe next few weeks a large
number of ships will be added lo the
effective Btrength of tin- British navy,
and many others will pass Important
stages in  their construction.
The sixteen torpedo-boat destroyers of the Beagle type ai onfidently
expec-lecl   In  lie   in  coin in issicm   by   the
end of August.   Several have already
run their preliminary trials.    These
first  protected  cruisers  to  be  added
to the navy since 1902.
On July 20 the unarmored cruiser
Blonde will be launched at Pembroke dockyard; on August 6 the
great Dreadnought cruiser Lion will
be launched at Devonport dockyard;
and it is believed that Ihe battleship
Orion--the first British ship to have
all her turrets on the center-line—
will in- launched on the snnie day at
Portsmouth. She will certainly be
launched in the first fortnight of
August.
Further towards Hie end of the
year tin- battleship Neptune mid the
Dreadnought    cruiser    Indefatigable
I'-.s.-ls  vary   in   displacement  from will be passed Into commission.    We
890 to 940 tons (thai is to say, from
220 to 270 tons larger than the
heaviest German destroyer yet commissioned).
The contract speed is 27 knots,
but f viftness has been deliberately
sacrificed in order to secure good sea-
keeping qualities and long staying
powers. They will carry 160 tons of
fuel, compared with the 75 to 100
tons of the 33 knot Tribe class.
Five new fast protected cruisers
are also nearlng completion, these
being the Newcastle. Liverpool, Glasgow, Gloucester and Bristol. The
first-named will be commissioner in
August   and   the   others   will   before
shall then have a complete squadron
of Dreadnoughts in home waters.
All previous records at Messrs.
John Saul White & Co.'s yard at
Cowes have been beaten by the rapid
building of the new ocean-going destroyed Redpole, which was launched
yesterday. Despite the fact that the
firm are busy with two similar vessels, it has been completed in a little
over six months.
TO  SCALE .MOUNT ROUSON
Messrs. Munim and Collie, of London, Eng., will make a second attempt to scale Mount Robson, the
highest peak in the Rockies, this
sumemr. They reached Edmonton
with a Swiss mountain guide and will
go west on the G. T. P. They expect
to be away seven weeks. Mount
Robson is in the heart of the Yellow-
head Pass, and the undertaking is
beset with dangers.
Only one successful attempt has
been made to scale the peak and that
by a Canadian, Rev. Mr. Kinney, of
British Columbia, last year, who
risked his life many times and nearly starved, taking two days to make
the trip to the summit and back.
Mount Robson can be easily seen
from the projected line of the G. T.
P., and according to Mr. Kinney and
others who have so examined it, is a
magnificent sight. It will be one of
the many scenic attractions along the
line of the G. T. P. through British
Columbia.
Skeena Laud District—District of
Ol ec! 5VV
TAKE NOTICE that John Cox, of
Monarch, Alberta, occupation farmer, intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described
lands, situated in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Comencing at a post planted at the
north-west corner and about five and
one-quarter miles distant in a northwesterly direction from the north end
of Kitwancool Lake, thence SO
chains south, thence 80 chains east,
thence 80 chains north, thence 80
chains west to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres,
more or less.
JOHN COX.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated May  30,  1910. Jy5
Skeena Land District—District of
C*$\ ^^ifl i*
TAKE NOTICE that James Alexander McDonald, of Monarch, Alberta, occupation farmer, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands, situated in
the Kltwancool or Chein Wein Valley:—Commencing at a post planted
at the N. E. corner about five and
one quarter miles distant in a northwesterly direction from the north
end of Kitwancool Lake, thence south
80 chains, thence west 80 chains,
thence north 80 chains, thence east
80 chains to point of commencement,
and containing 640 acres, more or
less.
JAMES ALEXANDER McDONALD
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated May 30, 1910. Jy5
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Pearl Caspell
of Cayley, Alberta, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. E. corner and about 15% miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence south 80 chains, thence
west 40 chains, thence north 40
chains, thence west 40 chains, thence
north 40 chains, thence east 80
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 480 acres, more or
less. PEARL CASPELL.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 3, 1910. jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Mary Brown,
of Vancouver, B.C., occupation married woman, Intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following described lands In the vicinity ol
the Kitwancool or Chean Weln Valley:—Commencing at a post planted
at the North-east corner and about
ten miles distant in a north-westerly
direction from the north end of the
Kitwancool lake, thence south 80
chains, thence west 40 chains, thenci)
north 40 chains, thence west 40
chains, thence north 40 chains
thence east 80 chains to point ol
commencement, and containing 4 80
acres, more or less.
MARY   BROWN.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 1, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that John Henderson, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
agent, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. ,W corner and about 2 5 miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north 80 chains, thence
east 40 chains, thence south 80
chains, thence west 80 chains to
point of commencement and containing 320 acres, more or less.
JOHN   HENDERSON.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 7th, 1910. Jy8
LAND   LEASE   NOTICE
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that The Canadian
Fish & Cold Storage Company Ltd.,
of Vancouver, occupation Mercantile
and Manufacturing, intends to apply
for permission to lease the following described land:—Commencing at
a post planted at high water mark
on the westerly side of Prince Rupert Harbor and distant about 110
chains from the north-east corner of
Lot 443, thence west 20 chains,
thence south 20 chains, thence east
5 chains, more or less to high water
mark, thence following along the
high water mark to the point of commencement and containing 20 acres
more or less.
The Canadian Fish and Cold
Storage Company, Limited,
J. H.  Pillsbury, Agent.
Dated June 20th, 1910. Jyl2
LAND PURCHASE NOTICES
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Reginald
Davey, of Vancouver, B. O, occupation machinist, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands, in tiie vicinity of
Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-west corner and about 6*4
miles distant in a north-westerly direction from tbe north end of Kitwancool Lake, thence south SO
chains, thence east SO chains, thence
north 40 chains, thence west. 40
chains, thence north 40 chains,
chains, thence west 40 chains to a
i.oint of commencement, and containing 4SO acres  (more or lessl.
REGINALD  DAVEY.
James w. Smith, Agent.
Dated   May  80,   1910. Jy8
Thomson—I see that some genius
has invented a musical motor ear.
Robinson—I wonder what tunes It
will play?
Thomson — Oh,    breakdowns,    I
the end  of the  year.     They are tbe think.
Coast Land District—District of
Skeena.
TAKE NOTICE that Elijah
Rounds, of Victoria, B.C., occupation
Stewart, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted one-half mile north,
and one-half mile east, of Nettle A.
Lairds N. E. corner of application to
purchase, and 300 feet east of Ana-
ham Lake trail, marked E. R.'s
south-west corner, thence 40 chains
east, thence 40 chains north, thence
40 chains west, thence 40 chains
south to point of commencement,
and containing 160 acres, more or
less. ELIJAH  ROUNDS.
Vincent M.  Schlbner,  Agent.
Dated May 25, 1910. jn21
Coast Land District—District of
Skeena.
TAKE NOTICE that I, Ernestine
A. Roney, of Prince Rupert, occupation married woman, intend to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted on the north
bank of the Skeena River about half
a mile south of Geo. T. Church's preemption, thence west 10 chains,
thence north 40 chains, thence east
Co the Skeena River; thence southwest following the bank of the
Skeena River to the place of beginning, and containing about 80
acres.
ERNESTINE A. RONEY, Locator.
W. A. Roney, Agent.
Dated July 7th, 1910. Jy22
Coast Land District—District of
Skeena.
TAKE NOTICE that I, J. Adolpb
Perry, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation
book-keeper, intend to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted on the north bank of the
Skeena River, about a mile west of
Lot 31, thence north 40 chains,
thence east 80 chains to lot 31,
thence south 40 chains to bank of
Skeenft River, thence west about 80
chains following north bank of
Skeena River to point of commencement, and containing about 320
acres.
J. ADOLPH PERRY, Locator.
Wm. A.  Roney, Agent.
Dated July 16th, 1910. Jy22
Coast Land District—District o"f
Skeena.
TAKE NOTICE that I, Mary M.
Roney, of Stillwater, Minnesota, U,
S.A., occupation married woman, intend to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands.
Commencing at a post planted cm the
north hank of tbe Skeena River at
the squtb-cast corner of Geo. T.
Church's pre-emption, tlie-nce north
40 chains, thence oast 40 chains,
thence soulli to the bank of the
Skeena River, thence south-west following tbe Skeena River to the place
of beginning and containing about
120 acres.
MARY  M.  ROENY,  Locator.
W.   A.   Roney,   Agent.
Dated July 8th, 1910. Jy22
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Laura Gordon
of Victoria, B. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—•
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. E. corner and about 18 miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence south 40 chains, thence
west 40 chains, thence north 40
chains, thence east 40 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 160 acres, more or less.
LAURA GORDON.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 4,  1910. jy8
LAND PURCHASE NOTICES
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Ethel Welsh,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
south-east corner and about 10 miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north SO chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence south 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to
point of commencement and containing 640 acres, more or less.
ETHEL WELSH.
James W. Smith, Agent
Dated June 1st, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Henry Welsh,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
printer, intends to apply fot permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. E. corner and 11 miles distant
in a north-westerly direction from
the north end of Kitwancool Lake,
thence north SO chains, thence west
80 chains, thence south SO chains,
thence east SO chains to point of
commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
HENRY WELSH.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 2, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Frederick
Welsh, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation clerk, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-east corner about 11 miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence south SO chains, thence
west 40 chains, thence north 80
chains, thence east 40 chains to
point of commencement, and containing 320 acres, more or less
FREDERICK WELSH.
James W. Smith, Agent
Dated June 2, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Walter Marks
of Toronto, Ont., occupation traveller, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool
or Chean Wein Valley:—Commencing at a post planted at the- N. E.
corner and about 27% miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence south 80 chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence north 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to the
point of commencement and containing 640 acres, more or less.
WALTER MARKE.
James  W.  Smith, Agent
Dated June 8th, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Richard
Howie, of Vancouver, B. O, occupation dentist, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of
Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. E. corner and about 24% miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence south 80 chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence north ,,80
chains, thence east 80 chainB to the
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
RICHARD HOWIE.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 7th,  1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar,
TAKE NOTICE that James Welsh,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation machinist, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool   or   Chean   Wein   Valley	
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. W. corner and about 12 miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the nortl end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence south 80 chains, thence
east 20 chains, thence north 80
chains, thence west 20 chains to the
point of commencement and containing 160 acres, more or less.
JAMES WELSH.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 2,  1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Violet Geiger,
of Victoria, B. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kltwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. W. corner and about 23% miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence south 80 chains, thence
east 40 chains, thence north 40
chains, thence east 40 chains, thence
north 40 chains, thence west 80
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 4S0 acres, more or
less. VIOLET GEIGER.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June  7th,  1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Sandford
Burton, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation mining engineer, Intends to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands In the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Weln
Valley:-—Commencing at a post
planted at the N. E. corner and
about 23% miles distant in a northwesterly direction from tbe north
end of Kitwancool Lake, thence south
80 chains, thence west 80 chains,
thence north 80 chains, thence east
SO chains to point of commencement
and containing 640 acres, more or
less. SANDFORD BURTON.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 7th, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Norman Cle-
land, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation printer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of Kltwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Comencing at a post planted at the
S. E. corner and about 26% miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kltwancool
Lake, thence north 80 chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence south 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
NORMAN   CLELAND.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 8th, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Marguerette
Burns, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission .o purchase the
following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein
Valley:—Commencing at a post
planted at the N. E. corner and distant about 12 miles in a northwesterly direction from the north
end of Kitwancool Lake; thence
south 80 chains, thence west 20
chains, thence north 80 chains,
thence east 20 chains to point of
commencement, and containing 160
acres,  more or less.
MARGUERETTE  BURNS
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 2, 1910. jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles F
Burns, of Moncton, New Brunswick
occupation auditor, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein
\ alley: — Commencing at a post
Planted at the south-west corner and
about 12 miles distant in a northwesterly direction from the north
end of Kitwancool Lake; thence
north 80 chains, thence east 80
chains, thence south 80 chains
thence west 80 chains to point of
commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
CHARLES  F.   BURNS.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated   June   2,   1910 Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that James Jar-
dine, of Vancouver, n. c, occupation
merchant, intends to apply for permission to purchase tiie ' following
described lands In the vicinity of Kit-
wancool or Chean    Wein    Valley:	
Commencing al a post planted at the
N. W. corner and about 13 miles distant In a north-westerly direction
from the north end of KIMvpncool
Lake, thence south so chains, tii >nce
east 80 chains thence north so
chains, thence west 80 chains to
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
JAMES JARDINE.
James W. Smith, Agent
Dated June 2, 1910. jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that John McDlar-
mid, of Lucknow, Ont., occupation
farmer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in tha vicinity of the
Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:	
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. W. corner and about 13 miles distant In a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kltwancool
Lake; thence north 80 chains, thence
east 40 chains, thence south 80
chains; thence west 40 chains to
point of commencement, and containing 320 acres.
JOHN  McDIARMID.
James W. Smith, Agent
Dated June 2,  1910. JyS ft
■
Friday, July 22, 1910
THE   PRINCE   RUPERT  JOURNAL
THE ELECTRIFICATION OF
RAILWAYS	
"The Electrification of Railways,"
is the title of an exhaustive and valuable paper by Mr. George Westing-
bouse, which, as president of the
American Society of Mechanical Engineers, he has prepared fcr tbe joint
meeting of that body and the British
Institution of Mechanical Engineers,
to be held in England during the
present month. The purpose of the
paper is to recommend to the consideration of railway engineers and
those in authority, the pressing need
of a prompt selection of those stan-
ards of electrification which will render possible a complete Interchange
of traffic in order to avoid difficulties
and delays declared to be certain
to arise unless some common understanding is arrived at very shortly.
"Having been Identified with railway operations for over forty years,
and with the development of the electrical Industry for twenty-five years,
I feel the time is ripe for the selection of an electrical system for universal application," says Mr. West-
inghouse.
"But the great difficulty in the
electrification of standard railways
is no longer the engineering problem,
it is the financial question, requiring a combination of the highest engineering  and  commercial  skill.
"To insure interchange ot traffic,
the fundamental requirements so far
as the operation of a steam railroad
Is concerned, with full regard for
safety, speed and comfort, are few In
number, and are covered by the following: A standard gauge of track;
a standard of interchangeable type
of coupling for vehicles; a uniform
interchangeable type of Drake apparatus; interchangeable heating apparatus; a uniform system of train
signals. The additional fundamental
requirements for electrically operated
railways are: A supply of electricity
of uniform quality as to voltage and
periodicity; CDnductors to convey this
- electricity so uniformly located with
reference to the rails that, without
change of any kind, an electrically
fitted locomotive or car of any company can collect its supply of current when upon the lines of other
companies; uniform aparatus for con-
. trol of electrically fitted locomotives
or cars from different lines can be
(Iterated together from one locomotive or c,ar»
Different Systems
Three important electrical systems
for the operation of railways have
been put into practical operation, all
using alternating current in whole,
or in part. These systems are: The
continuous or direct current system,
usually spoken of as the "third-rail"
system, which employs alternating
current for transmitting power when
the distance is considerable; the
three-phase alternating current system with two overhead trolley wires,
and the single phase, alternating current high tension system with a single
overhead  trolley  wire.
"The complete electrification of a
railway will necessitate a rearrangement of ideas and practices in regard
to operations. Coaling and watering
places will not be needed; passenger
trains will be differently composed,
some classes being of less weight;
and will operate more frequently,
thus promoting travel; other trains
will be heavier than at present, or
will operate at higher speeds; and
branch lines, by the use of electrically fitted cars, can be given a thorough
service not now enjoyed.
"The movement of freight will undergo great chances, due to the fact
that electric locomotives can be constructed with great excess of capacity
enabling them to move longer trains
at schedule speed on rising gradients.
"The large percentage of shunting
operations due entirely to the use of
steam locomotives will not longer be
required.
Co-operative Plan
"The railway companies can combine upon some co-operative plan for
the generation of electricity, thereby
effecting large savings in capital expenditures; and can utilize their own
rights-of-way for the transmission of
the current, not only for the operation of trains, but for many other
useful purposes.
"Notwithstanding the fact that
great strides have already been made
in cheapening the cost of generating
electricity by steam engines, I foresee, from the progress made in the
development of gas and oil engine
power, a still further reduction in
cost which will accelerate the work
of electrifying existing railways.
"One important aspect of this
great, question will engage the
thoughtful consideration of every
government, namely, the military
necessity for uniform equipment in
time of war.
"The most important installation
of the single-phase system is that of
the New York, New Haven & Hartford railway, leading out of New
York city. Practically all the railroad service between New York and
Boston, as well as the New England
States, is over the four tracks of this
railroad. The trains pass into the
Grand Central station in New York
over the lines of the New oYrk Central & Hudson River railroad, which
is electrically equipped with tbe third
rail system for operation by direct
current at 650 colts. Selection of
the system for the New Haven railroad was restricted by the necessity
of operating the New Haven trains
over the New York Central tracks,
but the decision was in favor of the
single-phase system, nothwithstand-
ing the limitation that the locomotives must operate successively both
by single phase current and direct
current.
Now in Use
"The trains of the New Haven system leaving the Grand Central station pass over twelve miles of the
tracks of the New York Central system, operating from the third rail by
direct current. They then pass to
the New Haven tracks at full speed,
receiving alternating current at 11,-
000 volts from the overhead trolley
wires which extend twenty-one miles
to Stamford, a total distance of
thirty-three miles from New Ytrk,
this being the end of the initial installation of the single-phase system.
"The power house is located near
the Stamford end of the electrified
section, and contains four 11,000-
volt turbo-generators, having an aggregate capacity of over 16,000 kw.
The current passes directly from the
generators to the trolley wires.
"There are forty-one locomotives
in regular operation, and also four
motor cars, with trail cars operating
on tl.p multiple unit system in 'suburban service. The alternating cur-
"t-iii 'l- taken from the overhead trol-
ley wire by a pantagraph, which
presses a shoe against the wire. The
direct current on the New York Central zone is obtained from the third
rail by means of ordinary sliding contact shoes. Both the pantagraph
and the contact slioes are manipulated by compressed ail
"For reasons of economy in operation the locomotives were built under
the requirement that each should be
capable of hauling a 200-ton train
from New York to New Haven, making all Btatlon Btops in accordance
with the regular schedules, or an express train of 250 tons', and that the
locomotives should be so arranged
that two or more could be operated
by a single engineer for the movement of heavier trains. The particular size selected permits about 75
per cent of the trains to be operated
by a single unit.
Dufticulties Overcome
"The early fears as to difficulties
in commutation of current have been
dispelled by the records of performance, as many of the motors have
operated over 100,000 miles without
turning or even sandpapering the
commutators and the brushes show
an average life of 40,000 to 45,000
miles. These locomotives have been
making regularly an average of about
four and one-half trips of thirty-three
miles per day, hauling trains twenty-
five to fifty per cent heavier, or even
more in the case of express trains,
than the locomotives were guaranteed to handle. Most of the locomotives have run about 100,000 miles,
but there is seldom more than one
out of service for repairs, a record
said by the officials of the company
to be much better than for the steam
locomotives which were replaced.
These officials also say that the cost
of maintenance per mile and the
number of miles run per electric locomotive are far more favorable than
with steam locomotives, even with
the present very short run of thirty-
three miles.
"The cost of maintenance of the
distribution system is relatively
small compared with that of the low-
voltage third-rail system. The delays
due to the transmission lines and
overhead construction, though few In
number, Include those brought about
by extraordinary conditions, such as
steam from switch engines and by
wrong operation of switches.
"In considering the capability of
the single-phase system for continuous performance the record of the
six single-phase locomotives in service at the St. Clair tunnel of the
Grand Trunk railway is worthy of
mention. These locomotives have
now been running two years and have
made about 70,000 miles each averaging about 100 miles per day, or
twenty-five trips of four miles. It
bus not been necessary to use a steam
locomotive since the regular electric
service was started  (May, 1908) and
FIELD FOR STI.'DV.
Many Species of Lower Life Are Not
Fully   Understood
Considering the nuinber of species
of animals, A. E. Shipley, in a British Assocation paper, has pointed
out that most species of large animals—especially of mammals—are
probably now known, but that insects
and small animals in general still offer a vast field for exploration. A
few years ago, Gtienther showed that
the number of known species of all
kinds had increased from 73,588 in
1830 to 311,653 in 1881. In the half
century, the known species of mammals had grown from 1,200 to 2,300,
birds, from 3,600 to 11,000; reptiles,
643 to 3,400; fishes, 3,500 to 11,000,
mollusks, 11,000 to 33,000; moss
animalcules, 40 to 120; Crustacea,
1,290 to 7,500; arachnids (spiders,
etc.), 1,048 to 8,070; Myrlapods
(centipedes, etc.), 4o0 to 1,300; insects, 49,100 to 220,150; echlnoder-
mata (sea urchins, star fishes, etc.),
230 to 18,043; worms, 372 to 6.070;
coelenterata, 500 to 2,200; fora-
minifera, 50 to 400; and protozoa,
305 to 3,500. The new species discovered since 1881 have probably
averaged 12,000 annually, making
the total number now known by
Sharpe in 1895 at a quarter of a mil-
Ion species, and he concluded that
ten times as many remained to be
found.
 o	
PRAYED AGAINST  TIME
Humorous   Story   Regarding   United
States House of Representatives
Speaking against time is common
enough in most parliaments, but
praying against time is something
new. The Washington Times, however, tells of such an occurrence,
which once happened in the United
States capital: —
Members of the House, who had
congregated in the cloak room during the general debate on the tariff,
were discussing the recent prayer of
the Rev. Mr. Coudrey, the House
chaplain, deploring muckrakisg.
"For some reason," said one of
the veteran members, "the chaplain's prayer reminded me of the
most amusing incident I ever saw
during my entire service in the House
of Representatives. The incident occurred many years ago, so I have
forgotten the names of the actors,
but there are still members of the
House who recall it.
"One day the journal clerk rushed
into the House while the chaplain
was praying. He looked through the
drawers of his desk In a hasty manner and then hustled to the side of
the chaplain.
" 'Keep on praying,' he urged earnestly.    'We can't find the journal.'
"Mr. Chaplain was so startled
that he faltered In his prayer, but
after a moment he seemed to grasp
the situation. He bowed his head
still lower and continued to pray. The
usual time devoted to prayer in the
House is about a minute. Members
began to shift uneasily on their feet,
to look at their watches, and, instead of bowing their heads in reverence, they looked at the Speaker,
pleadingly. The Speaker, evidently
had been informed of the difficulty
and, realizing that the business of
the House could not proceed without the journal, he was willing that
the members get plenty of prayer.
After ten minutes' solid praying the
preacher showed signs of getting
nervous. He knew the members were
getting restive and he looked down
to one of the clerks.       ,
" 'Don't stop,' pleaded the clerk,
'We haven't found it yet.'
"The preacher did not stop until
he had been praying for fifteen minutes, at the end of which time the
journal clerk rushed into the House
bearing the precious book under his
arm.
" 'Amen,' said the chaplain with a
sigh of relief, and the Speaker
promptly ordered the clerk to read
the journal of the preceding day's
business."
 o —
GEOLOGICAL  SURVEY
Stall'  is Too  Small    For   the   Work
Required of It
That the staff of the geological
survey branch of the department of
mines is too small to cope with the
pressing work waiting for it, is one of
the statements made in the annual
report of Director Brock, which has
just been issued. To overcome this
difficulty outside experts had to be I
engaged.
The geological division is stated
to be scarcely larger than that assigned by the United States to cover
Alaska alone, and the topographical
division is too small to allow of satisfactory work being done.    Great dif-
F.B. Deacon
Real Estate
WE ARE OFFERING SOME
SPECIAL SNAPS ON 8th
AVE, SECTION 5. ALSO IN
SECTION 7 AND 8.
INSURANCE
Life. Accident, Health and  Fire
See Us For Rates.
F. B. DEACON
OPEN EVENINGS
Centre Street
Acuity is being experienced  in procuring properly qualified men.
Some discoveries made by members of the staff of the survey during the year are reported. During
the past season Mr. D. D. Cairnes
discovered a new occurrence of coal
in the White Horse district in British Columbia, and Mr. D. R. Dowling
found a new and apaprently important coal basin in A Iberta, reaching
north from the Saskatchewan to the
sources of the McLeod River. Mr.
W. H. Collins has reported on the
Montreal River district, which incliif
es the Gowganda and Maple Mountain districts. He states that the outlook of the district as shown by recent work appears to be satisfactory,
though nol, equal to sanguine expectations. The widespread distribution of ore offers serious disadvantages to economical mining.
In regard to the Larder Lake district, Mr. M. E. Wilson reports that
the gold values are confined almost
entirely to stringers of quartz, which
in many instances contain no gold
or too little for profitable mining.
Mr. W. R. Brock, the director, also
reports on visits made by him during
the year to British Columbia and the
Klondike, as well as Prince Edward
Island, while the possibilities of oil
deposits in Alberta, of interest in
connection with the recent exposure
of two alleged mining companies
operating there, are stated.
 o	
LEATHER MERGER
SURVEYS COMPLETED
Gangs Are Now Working on the Main
Road And up Bitter Creek
Eastern Firms of Canada Join Interests to Control Canadian Trade
during the last twelve months the
service has been responsible for but
one train  delay—of eight minutes."
The organization of a leather merger that will control 75 per cent of
the leather used in Canadian boot
and shoe, bag and trunk and harness
trades, will be announced shortly. Its
capital will be $15,000,000 stock and
$5,000,000 bonds of 6 per cent, or
$20,000,000. There is to be an immediate issue of $13,500,000 stock
and $4,000,000 bonds by this new
concern, which is to be known as
tbe Canadian Leather Company, Ltd.
There is to be $8,500,000 cumulative preference share . per cent stock
of which the immediate issue is to
be $7,500,000. The common stock
will amount to $6,ot)0,000, with an
immediate issue of $6,000,000. Therb
is to be 150,000 shares at $100 pat
value, out of which this $13,500,000
is to be secured. There Is to bo
$5,000,000 first mortgage bond 6 pel
cent sinking fund gold bonds due In
1940, of which $4,000,000 is to be issued immediately.
Seven of the bouses interested In
the merger have branches in Montreal and live In Quebec. Among
the houses In tin- iicger are: Anglo-
Canadian Leather Company, Limited
lluntsville, Bracebridge, Toronto and
Montreal; Charles S. ilynuin & Co..
London; Robson Leather Company,
Ltd., Oshawa and Montreal; C. Gall-
bert, Son & Co., Montreal; A. Pion &
Co., Quebec; Duclos & I'ayan, St. Hyacinths and Montreal; Wickett &
Craig, Ltd., Toronto; and Paul Gall-
bert, Montreal. There are also seven
smaller concerns, whose identity will
be lost In the consolidation. Tho
turnover of the firms interested ia
daid to have been last year close up-
jn $10,000,000 and the net earnings
approximately $1,000,000. Under tha
saving effected by the merger and
.ne financial arrangement, there will
;asily be $250,000 available for divi- j
elends on the ordinary shares.
Rudolph  Forget, of Montreal, will
nave charge of the financial arrangement,     and    Edmund   Bristol,   M.P., I
Toronto, the legal end of It.
 . o	
Subscribe for The Prince Rupert
Journal now.
Sometime next week the surveys
for the roads and trails covering the
appropriations for the Stewart section
now being made for the government
by W. C. Casey, of this city, will be
completed. To date the survey of the
main road up the Bear River is finished as far as the forks of American Creek, with a three mile stretch
up Bitter Creek, making a total of
sixteen miles.
As far as Bitter Creek the route
laid out by the engineer is practically the old road and trail. From Bitter Creek the road follows a tangent
to Bear Lake, thence again following the old trail to Muddy Gulch,
which will be corduroyed and put in
first class condition. From this point
the survey is through new country
to Bear River following the east bank
of the river to the forks of American Creek. Here a bridge crosses the
Bear River, and another crosses
American creek, completing the route
laid out for the season.
Foreman J. N. McPhee has some
60 men working under him on the
roads and trails and has completed
the new trail on Glacier Creek. He
is now building the road up Bitter
Creek and has camps at both the
mouth of this stream and at Bear
Lake. Good headway is being made,
notwithstanding adverse climatic
conditions.
It is understood that the government has appropriated an additional
$4,000 for expenditure on the roads.
—the—
Oliver
Typewriter
—FOR—
Seventeen Cents a Day
Please read the headline over
again. Then its tremendous significance will dawn upon you.
An Oliver Typewriter—the standard visible writer—the most highly
perfected   typewriter  on   the   market
-yours for  17 cents a day!
The typewriter whose conquest of
the commercial world is a matter of
business history—yours for 17 cents
a day!
Tbe typewriter that is equipped
with scores of such conveniences as
"The Balance Shift"—-"The Ruling
Device"—"The Double Release"—
"The Locomotive Base"—"The Automatic Spacer"—"The Automatic Tabulator"-—"The Disappearing Indicator"—"The Adjustable Paper Fingers"—"The Scientific Condensed
Keyboard"—all
Yours For 17 Cents a Day
We announced this new sales plan
recently, just to feel the pulse of the
people. Simply a small cash payment—then 17 cents a day. That
is the plan in a nutshell.
The result has been such a deluge of applications for machines
that we are simply astounded.
The demand comes from people of
all classes, all ages, all occupations.
The majority of inquiries has
come from people of known financial
standing who were attracted by the
novelty ot the proposition. An impressive demonstration of the immense popularity of the Oliver Typewriter.
A startling confirmation of our belief that the Era of Universal Typewriting Is at hand.
A Quarter of a Million People are
Naking Honey With
TT)e.
►> ♦;♦ ♦ »> «2* "i* <« »> ►> »> ♦ ♦ •$• ♦ »:* ♦ ♦ <* *> •$• »;■• # <•
* Oatmeal Recipes *
.j. .j..;,.;. .j..;«.;«.;. .♦. .j..;..;..;. ►;..;..;..;..;..;, .$..;. .*.,;, ,j,.;, .3.
Oatmeal Nectar—To one-fourth
pound of finely ground oatmeal add
three tablespoonfuls of sugar, the
juice of half a lemon, and mix to a
paste with a little warm water, then
pour over it two quarts of boiling
water and stir well together.
Oatmeal Jelly—Boil one-half cupful of Scotch oatmeal in one quart
of salted water, adding more water
as it bolls away. Boil all day in a
double boiler, and at night strain
through a sieve. It should be as
stiff as will go through a sieve. Mold
it in glasses that have been wet in
cold water, and serve when firm,
with cream and sugar, or witli 0
sauce made of melted fruit jelly.
Oatmeal Blanc .Mange—Add a
pinch of salt, to one pint of boiling
water,   unci   sprinkle   in   slowly   one-
h.'tir cupful of oatmeal; let it boil tor
three-quarters of un hour, stirring
occasionally with s fork, When clone,
add sugar  to taste-, unci   the juice of
hnir a lemon, if it is liked. Pour it,
boiling hot, upon a well-beaten e-gg,
beating with a fork until thoroughly
mixed. Return to the saucepan and
let It come to a boll, then pour Into
Individual molds wet with cold water
When firm turn out on a glass dish
and serve with whipped cream.
Oatmeal Fluff—Oatmeal may be
eaten by one with a very weak stomach if cooked in this way. To one
quart of hot but not quite boiling
water, add a little salt and sift In one
cupful of finely ground oatmeal or
rolled oats. Stir for a few minutes
without its boiling hard, that the
flour of the oats may be soaked out
Into the water as much as possible,
Let cook thoroughly then stir
through 11 wire strainer to remove the
hulls. Tiie resulting light, fluffy
article is delicious served witli sugar
and cream.
OLIVET?
T^peWri-fer
The Standard Visible   Writer
The Oliver Typewriter Is a moneymaker, right from tbe word "go!" So
easy to run that beginners soon get
in the "expert" class. Earn as you
learn. Let the machine pay the 17
cents a day—and all above that is
yours.
Wherever you are, there's work to
be done and money to be made by
using the Oliver. The business world
is calling for Oliver operators. There
are not enough to supply tbe demand.
Their salaries are considerably above
those of many classes of workers.
"An Oliver Typewriter in
Every   Home!"
That is our battle cry today.    We
have   made   tbe   Oliver   supreme   in
usefulness  and  absolutely   indispensable   in   business.     Now   comes  the
onquest of tbe home.
The simplicity and strength of the
Oliver lit ii for family use. It is becoming an important factor In tlie
home truining of young people. An
educator as well us a money maker.
Our   new   selling   plan    puts     tlie
Oliver cm the   threshold    of    every
ome   in   America.     Will   you   close
tbe door of your home or office on
this  remarkable Oliver  opportunity?
Write' for further details of our
easy offer and a free copy of the new
Oliver catalogue.    Address:
R. C. BEAN
Prince Rupert Agent
General   Offices;   Oliver   Typewriter
Building, Chicago, 111.
CANCELLATION  OF   RESERVE
NOTICE is hereby given that the
reserve existing on Crown lands In
the vicinity of Babine Lake, and
situate in Cassiar District, nollce of
Which bearing date June 30th, 1909,
was published in the British Columbia Gazette, dated July 2nd, 1908, Is
cancelled.
ROBERT A. RENWICK,
Deputy Commissioner of Lands.
Lands Department,
Victoria, B. C, June 10th, 1910.
I First insertion July 5.) I •'
THE   PRINCE   RUPERT  JOURNAL.
Friday, July 22, 1910
SEEKING POWER FOR
PURPOSES OF CITY
Marine News of the Coast {
Council and Engineer Will Make Trip to Hocsall River and
Wolf Creek in Effort to Solve Question of Supplying
City With Light Plant This Winter—Discussion Develops
Opposition to Gasoline as Means of Providing for Light
The city council has turned its attention to the power question In a
concrete form. Tomorrow the members of tiie council, accompanied by
the city engineer, will visit prospective sites for water power to supply
tbe city's needs. Early in the year
the subject of steam power as a
temporary means of supplying light
In the city was investigated. This
proved too expensive a method and
other and more permanent sysUms
are being investigated.
There has been urged upon the
council that a pressing need exists
for tbe initiation of a power system
that will meet the Immediate needs
of the city in the matter of light.
This was made all the more pressing
in view of the fact Hint it is felt in
the city by many that the system of
lighting by gasoline it attended with
danger.
A proposition has been made to
tbe council to furnish power from
two separate sources. These are the
Hocsall River which enters the
Skeena near Port Essington, and the
other is the Wolf Creek, which, while
much smaller, has the advantage of
being very much closer to the city
and could be made, it is reported, to
serve the needs of the city for some
little time to come. In connection
with both of these streams there Is
a considerable power capable of being developed. The capacity of each
has been investigated by the Interests that control them and a concrete proposal is ready to be put
forward.
Tomorrow the members of the
council will Investigate both of the
power sites and will then be in a
better position to intelligently discuss them when they come up for
consideration.
At Tuesday evening's meeting of
the city council, when the subject of
the visit to the Hoesall River and
Wolf Creek was suggested a very free
discussion followed.
Aid. Hilditch thought it was a very
wise move on the part of the engineer
to visit the places and go into this
question. He had reasons for believing that if the city got right to work
it a plant could be installed to supply light in Prince Rupert by November. It might cost a little more
to hurry the work so, but the citizens
wanted it and they should have it.
Aid. Mclntyre was also strongly
in favor of acting as quickly as possible.
Aid. Pattullo said that If any one
could show how they could get the
light, it was his duty to do so. What
was wanted was action and not merely talk. If it could be shown how the
light could be got here by November
he would like to hear it.
Aid. Mclntyre felt that the turning
down of the original proposition was
a wise move. Two months had been
wasted since that time, however, and
an early start should be made so
that electric light could be introduced and the gasoline systems done
away with.
Aid. Lynch could not see how they
could hope to have the work done
before the first of the year.
Aid. Naden could not see why the
council should lie rushed off its feet
in connection with these matters.
They should he carefully considered.
They     should     not   he   rushed   into
schemes that they would repent of
later.
Aid. Pattullo said there was no use
generalizing. If there was any
scheme to put forward it should be
done.
Aid. Mclntyre believed that a system could be put In for about $5,000
that would supply a temporary lighting system in the business sections
nnd thus put away the danger of loss
from fire. There had been a lot of
time occupied with the consideration
of bylaws which had prevented the
consideration of these other matters.
His Worship objected to aldermen
using the expression "if the council
wns in earnest." The council was
working bard to provide for the
needs of the city. He lamented the
fact that the city had allowed so
much time to go by in considering
a scheme of lighting that was later
found to he impracticable.
Aid. Hilditch was perfectly satis-
lied that the light could be in here
by November 1. It might entail a
little heavier expenditure, but it was
u matter for the council to consider
whether this was worth while. The
discussion would do good, he believed, as it might bring forward action.
The engineer, he felt, could get the
power by November 1, provided no
special machinery was needed.
Aid. Mobley held that there had
been no loss of time. The second
tenders were called for in connection
with the steam proposition in ar effort to spar for time. The question
of the rate of taxation had a bearing on this. There had really been
no loss of time. To instal temporary
plants would be only adding additional danger.
Mayor Stork said that although the
insurance companies tolerated these
gasoline lighting plants, he believed
they were dangerous. He would head
a movement to have them removed.
These plants, in some cases, had been
allowed to stand unused during the
summer and had corroded. As they
were lighted up additional danger
would follow.
Aid. Naden was afraid of gasoline
plants. If the council was of the
opinion that these were a menace to
the community, the council could
shut them off.
Aid. Lynch thought that the fire insurance companies had made a study
of the subject and should be better
qualified to judge of these matters
than the council.
Aid. Pattullo did not believe that
the rules laid down by the Insurance
companies were complied with.
His Worship thought there were
some machines that were perfectly
safe. The necessary competition had
resulted in cheaper machines being
made that rendered the situation
dangerous. He did not lige to take
such a drastic step but he would be
prepared almost to abolish the gasoline system of lighting in the city.
Aid. Pattullo suggested that the
engineer be asked to give an estimate of the cost of putting in a light
system which found general favor.
Aid. Barrow thought that instead
of considering the question of a substitute system of lighting the propositions should he considered independently.
Aid. Lynch thought the council
should proceed slowly before refusing to allow a system that was allowed in Vancouver and other cities,
INDIA'S    TAXES
Sir Guy   Fleetwood    Wilsoi    the
< ondltioiis in Thai  <lolony
RIVER   REPORT
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« *j. »j. .j. *j. *j« »j» »j. .j. »j* **. .j. .j. »j. .j. .j. .j. .j. »j. .j..;, »*,.,
TELEPHONES TO SUBMARINES
The French minister of marine has
requested the port authorities of Toulon to draw the attention of the local
shipbuilders to the question of finding out without loss of time whether
it is possible to equip submarines
with an apparatus which shall enable them to detach telephone buoys
at will from the outside of the boat
when It is submerged, and even when
the boat is inclined in either direction
to an angle of forty-five degrees.
If such an apparatus can be devised it is to be attached to the submarine boats now being built at Toulon, Bizerta and Rochefort. It Is
intended to introduce three telephone
buoys complete, with their posts; one
buoy will be amidships and one of
the other two will be placed fore and
the  other will  be  placed aft.
JAPANESE AGGRESSIVE
Anticipating the opening of the
Panama Canal, the communications
department of the Japanese government will shortly send representa-
ti\o to investigate proposals for the
extension of subsidized lines on the
Pacific to the eastern coast of the
United States and Brazil, the Argentine and other South American countries. The department has also in
view proposals for a subsidized service to South Africa via Honghong
and India.
conferred a decoration. This was
the medal for long service in the
Royal Naval Reserve and the presentation was made on behalf of the
late king by Rear Admiral Lyon on
board H. M. S. Tartar at Hongkong.
PRINCE   RUPERT'S  TRIP
LAST DECORATION
Captain A. O. Cooper, R.N.R., chief
officer of the R.M.S. Empress of
China, was the last man upon
whom his late Majesty King Edward
The G. T. P. steamer Prince Rupert reached port late on Wednesday
evening with a large number of passengers on board, including quite a
few distinguished travellers. There
were about 180 passengers and the
prospects are very bright for an increased travel for this route.
Tiie delay in reaching port was due
to the Prince Rupert having to lay
off Rivers Inlet on account of a dense
fog. This was early Wednesday morning. Otherwise the trip was a delightful one, all the passengers being
in ecstacy over the scenery of tbe
route.
ENTERS   PRIVATE   BUSINESS
C. S. Munroe, who for the past two
years has been a member of the G. T.
P. staff here, has enured private
business, resigning his position with
the G. T. P.. lie has joined Harry B.
Rochester in a general steamship
agency, brokerage and manufacturers' agency business. Already Mr.
Rochester has a large business developed and needed assistance to
properly carry it out. By the entry
of Mr. Munroe into partnership with
him the firm gains two most popular
citizens who are most favorably
known on the waterfront.
In the resignation of Mr. Munroe
the G. T. P. loses an efficient and
obliging member of its staff.
PEACE RIVER DISTRICT
Millions of Canadian farmers will
in the future locate in the thousand
miles of country that stretches from
Fort Vermilion to the Rockies and
that embraces the Grand Prairie and
Paddle River districts. This is the
opinion of W. G. Ibbotson, of Edmonton, who has been trading there,
his post being located twenty miles
from Fort Rae on the north arm of
the Great Slave lake. He has been
al lover the Peace River valley and
states from personal observation that
this country, for a thousand miles
east and west, presents the best
stretch of mixed farming land that
has ever been opened to agricultural
industry in Canada.
Mr. Ibbotson is convinced that the
three great railway systems of Canada—tne C.P.R., the C.N.R., and the
G.T.P.,-—will all eventually have
branches in that rich valley. One
railway no doubt will strike the valley by way of the Little Slave lake,
while a second will start northward
from one of the main lines nearer
the Rocky mountains. He did not
think that the main lines of the
transcontinental systems were more
than three hundred miles at any
point west of Edmonton from the
Peace River valley, and no very
great engineering difficulties would
have to be overcome.
Regarding  the   proposed   railway
from Edmonton to Fort McMurray
which caused the fall of the Rutherford government, Mr. Ibbotson said
that although a great blunder had
been committed, he thought the project would still be carried out under a new form, as a great deal of
the country through which the proposed railway will run is already
settled, especially for the first hundred miles north of Edmonton, and
probably the rest was rich in minerals as well as oil.
"Of course," said Mr. Ibbotson,
"when all that country is taken hold
of by the public works department
at Ottawa the question of improving
the waterways so as to make navigation possible almost without interruption down the Athabasca and up
the Peace for two thousand miles and
mire, will be a very interesting study,
but in the meantime the railways will
be extended across country, touching
the Peace at different points and
bringing the district into direct railway communication with the older
sections of the Dominion."
As for the thousand mile stretch
west of Fort Vermilion, Mr. Ibbotson
said he had seen corn ripen in the
Roman Catholic mission gardens
there. He is sure that the time will
come when the entire valley will
bloom like the rose.
NORTHERN VOLCANO
Steamer Montana Passed by Rare and
Wonderful Sight at Uniinak
"I did not sow the storm, but I am
reaping the whirlwind" Is the concluding sentence of Sir Guy Fleetwood    Wilson's   Introduction to the
financial state nt and budget of the
Governmenl of India. "No right-
minded man," he says. In the Blue-
book just printed for the House of
Commons, "can impose additional
taxation on India with a light heart,
u large prooprtion of its people being poor and an appreciable proportion very poor."
Tbe "whirlwind" referred to above
means extra taxation to the amount
of £1,133,000. The loss owing to the
gradual diminution of the export of
opium to China, amounting to £871,-
000, accounts for a large portion of
this increase.
Mart .1. Stewart was among the
nrrlvals on the Prince Rupert this
week on bis way to Stewart.
Foley, We-b-h eC.- Stewart's report
from Kitselas today is as follows:—
Al 8.00 it.m. it is cloudy, c-ciol and
calm. The water is one foot, eleven
inches above zero. The river is rising.
The Inlander is al Kitselas, and
leaves for Hazelton al  9.80 a.m.
The   Skeena   is   by   Clearwater
S. 1 r. a.m., en route to Kitselas.
The   Hazelton   is   at    Kitselas
route to Prince Rupert.
The    steamer       Operator    is
Sheady's at 6.10  a.m., en route up
the river.
The Conveyor is'en roule to Prince
Rupert.
The Distributor is by McHugh's
camp, en route to Kitselas.
The Omincca is about at Bostrom's
en route up the river.
at
en
by
Mr. Vaugban, representing Wilson
Bros., of Victoria, has returned to
the city after a trip up the Sk/ ?na
river.
Flames hundreds of feet high
bursting through the snowcap of
Mount Shisbaldin, on the eastern end
of t'nimak Island, was the phenomenon observe 1 by those on board the
freight steamship Montana, which
recently arrived al Seattle from Nome
and  St.  Micbat I.
The Montana Brsl sighted tbe
burning mountain on the mot nlng o!
i li-- !'i li, when I I'e Bleu mer en. et ed
Unimak pass. The sea was turbulent,
as if elisi in lied hy some sc-ismic- movement. The flames were remarkably
clear and free from the usual smoke
cloud.
After passing through Unimak
pass, Capt, .1. (). Farrls turned tiie
\essel east so as to pass along to
the soulli slioie of the island. When
titty miles away from the volcano the
officers of the ship could see through
the glasses that there was snow tl
within n few feet of the edge or the
Flame, and that turbulent streams
of water, made by the rapidly melting snow, were tearing channels in
the steep sides of Hie mountain,
Later in the day smoke began to
ccc li-li forth with Hie flames. The
snow became blackened with the de
posit.     Fog concealed  the  glare  of
the flames  during  the night.
Aside from a few Indian fishermen,
the only men on Unimak Island are
two lighthouse keepers at Scotch
Cup. The lighthouse tender Armeria
will not bring news from them for
a month.
 o	
WANT MORE PAY
The longshoremen have refused
work until the pay is Increased from
40 cents to 50 cents a hour. As a
result of the misunderstanding the
Belle of Scotland's cargo is not being
handled today.
Oilier vessels that   have    arrived
 LAD YSMITH	
COAL
H. B. ROCHESTER,   -   Centre Street
Clarmont Rooms
Sixth Avenue near Fulton Street
Comfortable, Homelike Rooms; Newly Furnished Throughout; Bath
Rooms   with   Hot  and
Cold Water
Rates, SU.OO a Week   nnd   Upwards
Mrs.  Annie  McGrath,   Proprietoress
'WHERE   QUALITY IS KING."
GEO. D. TITE
Furniture Dealer
3rd. Avenue
Prince Rupert
An inspection of our stock
of House Furnishings will
convince you. For quality and
economy you will leave us a
satisfied customer.
Dining Room Furniture, Sideboards,
Bolfetf, Dining Tables, Bit.
and 8ft. Extension
Dining Room Chairs, Quartered Oik with
leather Seats, Golden or Earl; English
finish. Prices ranging (ram
_______     $22.50 to $50
tSfiSSL'rf  Wicker Chairs and Rockers
Iron Beds, Springs and
Mattresses, all sizes
WINDOW BLINDS
Manufactured here to lit any
window   up  to 10  feet wide.
Tapestry and Lace Curtains,
Poles and Trimmings
Special orders for Upholstering
of any kind.
GEO. D. TITE,
3rd Ave.
SHERWIN & WILLIAMS
PAINTS
COVER THE EARTH.
WE   ARE   SOLE   AGENTS
CARLOAD JUST ARRIVED
Ready Nixed Paints,
Paints Ground in Oil,
Paints Ground in Japan,
Varnishes, Shellac, etc.
Water Stains
and
Decotint
IN ALL COLORS
Prince Rupert Hardware & Supply
Company, Ltd. thos. dum, m*.
The Westholme
Lumber Company, Ld.
We carry the largest stock of
Building Supplies in the North.
Quotations given on short notice in all lines.
Rough and Dressed Lumber
Shingles and Lath
Mouldings and Cases
Doors and Windows
We handle Plaster and Lime at reasonable prices
Get our quotations foe nlljchisses of buildings.
SSSSo^Sb ........ FIRST AVENUE
have had  to  discharge  and  take  on
cargo by means of their own crew.
LAND PURCHASE NOTICES
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that William
Hume Grant, of Stewart, B.C., occupation engineer, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a
post marked W.H.G.'s S.W. Cor., and
planted adjoining Alfred Malison's
corner post, thence 80 chains north,
along W. N. Harrison's west line,
thense east 80 chains, thence south
80 chains, thence west 80 chains, following Alfred Manson's north line to
point of commencement, and containing G40 acres, more or less.
WILLIAM HUME GRANT.
Frank  R.  Strolm, Agent.
Dated July 2, 1910. Jy22
LAM) PURCHASE NOTICES
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that The Canadian
Fish and Cold Storage Company, of
Vancouver, B. C, occupation mercantile and manufacturing, intends
to apply for permission to purchase
the following described lands: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-east corner of lot 34, Range 5,
Coast District, thence south 20
chains, thence east 40 chains, thence
north 25 chains more or less to the
shore line, thence following along
the shore line to the point of commencement and containing 90 acres,
more or less.
The  Canadian  Fish  &  Cold
Storage Company Limited.
J. H. Pillsbury, Agent.
Dated July 14, 1910. Jyl9

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