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Prince Rupert Journal Jun 23, 1911

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 ./V^'- '""      '> i
New Wellington
Coal
is the best
ROGERS & BUCK
Sole Agents
virtu Jttro^rt
High Class
Job Printing
in all Lines
VOLUME II
Published Twice a Week.
PRINCE RUPERT, B.  C, FRIDAY, JUNE 23, 1011
Price,   Five   Cents.
No. 2
HEAVY FRUIT CROP
LOCAL MAN PROFITS
Ten Thousand Gases of Strawberries Ex
pected to be Sent From Skeena
to City This Season.
Industry Is  Developing nnd Consul
enible Shipments Will Be
Made This Year
According to the reports received
from Prince Rupert's most Import
ant horticultural section at the pres
ent time, the Skeena valley, the
strawberry crop this year is to be
a good one and there will be a very
considerable amount of the fruit put
on the local market. There are in
stances where there are from five to
eight acres of land in strawberries
which in view of the yield that this
virgin soil gives will produce a very
heavy crop.
One grower, it is stated, has assured a local dealer that he will be
able to deliver this season 3,000
cases of the fruit, and there is a
prospect that there will be at least
10,000 cases put on the market here
before the season Is out, from the
valleys of the Skeena. A case con
tains 24 baskets, so that there is
good reason to be proud of the pro
duction of the district if the crop
reaches that amount when the short
time since the opening up of the in
dustry In this part is taken into ac
count.
It will mean that there will be
shipped to the city out of the fruit
growing areas on the Skeena nearly
a quarter million baskets of the luscious fruit. It will mean that at the
price of ten cents a basket alone,
there will be $24,000 go Into the
district from that one source alone.
The industry is but beginning.
In fact it is scarcely known yet that
there is an industry of that kind In
existence in the district. For several years to come the production
should more than double each succeeding year until in a very short
time Prince Rupert's needs alone
Will not be looked after but there will
be steady shipments from this port
to the south, of berries, after the
southern parts of the province have
seen their crop pass.
 o	
AN ACTIVE SEASON
D. R. Young of Queen Charlotte City
Expects Busy Year on Graham
Island.
Money,   He   Says,   Is   Available    foi
the Railway Proposition
in That  Part
D. R. Young, proprietor of the
Queen Charlotte News, was in the
City yesterday. He has just come
• from Queen Charlotte City, where
he has been looking after his inter-
ese.s there. Mr. Young expects to
see a decided boom in Graham Island this year. The money is forthcoming for vast development
schemes and work will be undertaken before the summer passes.
Among the propositions that will
be actively entered upon this summer Is the railway from Queen Charlotte City to Mussel Inlet. There is
now on hand the cash with which to
begin operations and there is abundance of capital ready to be put into
tbe enterprise, lu conjunction with
this there is to be development of
the coal measures which are in the
vicinity of Camp Robertson, the controlling interests are .old country
men and there is ample means available for the carrying of them to
completion.
With respect to some of the other
undertakings on the Island Mr.
loung speaks in the most optimistic
mood. With one of these he is himself prominently identified. It is
the black bass curing industry. He
has put an experienced man in
charge In the person of Mr. Ridous,
and with the buildings completed
and the machinery installed he is
ready to commence operations on a
commercial basis. The outlook all
round he says is the brightest, and
before the coming month is over
there should bo some important announcements in connection with tbe
Island.
Dr.   Clayton  Derives    Rich    Returns
from   an   Investment  in
Fruit   I.mills
RESIGNATIONS AT
CITY COUNCIL BOARD
Remarkable increases in fruit
land values In the Kootenay are
shown by the sale of H. M. Foser's
ranch on the Kootenay Lake to W.
G. Hunter, of the great English shipbuilding firm of Swan, Hunter, Wig-
ham and Richardson, of Newcastle-
on-Tyne. •
For fourteen and a half acres
$8,500 cash was paid, bringing the
value of the twenty-five acre block
which Mr. Foster purchased from
the government for one dollar an
acre In 1803 to $25,000, or $1,000
an acre, a thousand-fold increase.
Included In this block is the ranch
recently sold by Dr. Clayton for
$4,500. Another block sold for
$4,500 and a ranch conservatively
estimated   to   be  worth   $8,000.
 o	
AGAINST   SLATERS
Chief  Justice   Hunter   Decides  That
There  Is No Preferred Claim
for Shoe Company
Chief Justice Hunter, after a trip
to the end of the steel on the Grand
Trunk Pacific, is again hack to the
city  and  holding court.
The case of the Slater Shoe Co.
vs. Larkin has been disposed of by
His Lordship, judgment being given
for the defendant.
The action is of local interest,
arising out of the winding up of the
business of J. E. Larkin's shoe store
here. Among other goods carried
by Mr. Larkin were shoes made by
the Slater Company. The company
through their solicitor, A. M. Man-
son, claimed to have the right to
take back all the shoes of their
company before any disposition
could be made of the assets. The
other creditors objected and on the
advice of L. W. Patmore, took the
matter to court for a decision.
The result of the trial is that the
Slater Company is denied any preferred claim over tlie other creditors.
Rich Strike at Ikeda
A rich strike has been made at
the Ikeda mine. A four-foot vein
of copper ore has been uncovered in
a tunnel driven in from the bottom
level.
CELEBRATED THE DAY
The Coronation Event Was Kept in Mind
by a General Holiday Throughout the City.
Many  Citizens  Spout     the    Time  ut
Metlakatla—Concert in the
Evening
Coronation day was spent by tbe
citizens of Prince Rupert in a somewhat quiet way, in view of the fact
that preparations are well under
way for Dominion day to be fittingly observed. A number of picnic
parties were organized with the result that the city was depopulated lo
a large extent during (he day.
The Conservative Club provided a
launch service to Metlakatla, wliere
a monster picnic was held. The
Baptist Brotherhood likewise selected the Indian village for the gathering point for the day and the Presbyterian Sunday school made the
same place Its picnic grounds, With
a large number of launches In service and the Inlander carrying a full
complement to the grounds there
was a large representation of Prince
Itupert  at  Metlakatla.
The picnickers for the most part
joined together and passed the time
very nicely on the beach, returning
to the city early In the evening.
The concert given by the Over
Seas Club In the Knights of Pythias
hall In the evening was enjoyed by
all who attended. It was largely of
an Impromptu character, but excellent numbers were put on.
Later Mr. Gray put on a dance
that proved enjoyable.
Alderman Hilditch   Challenges   Alderman   Newton
Resign-Both Willing to Take the Step and Retire
if Necessary-Engineer's Department
Under Discussion-Condemnatory Report Defeated.
to
Special Meetings
The Salvation Army is holding
two special meetings on Sunday at
3 p. ni. and at 8 p. in. Special music
will be rendered by the newly-
organized orchestra and other special  features will be put on.
At Wednesday evening's council
meeting there was a large gathering
of citizens who appeared to expect
lively times. They were not disappointed, for from the start of proceedings until Aid. Newton withdrew
close to midnight, the battle between
Aid. Hilditch, chairman of the
streets committee, and Aid. Newton,
Aid. Morrissey and an occasional
helping hand from Aid. Douglas,
waged strongly. Aid. Hilditch was
backed up by the remainder of the
council and the vote upon the report
presented by Aid. Newton, in which
he proposed to cut off the official
head of Colonel Davis, the city engineer, was defeated with only the
three named voting for it.
Later in the evening the vote
upon the re-arrangement of the engineer's staff was taken, when it was
decided to make Mr. Lucas assistant
engineer at a salary of $200 a month
instead of $175 as recommended in
the original report of the engineer.
The other salaries remain as recommended.
The proceedings were made livelier by the verbal resignation of Aid.
Newton, towards the close of proceedings and the expressed readiness
of Aid. Hilditch to resign also and
test  public  opinion.
.Council Considers
His Worship said that he had secured copies of the report of the
special committee published In the
Empire and bad also had the city
engineer present a report on these
points. He proceeded to take the
report up clause by clause.
Clauses one and two, dealing with
the new officers and the saving to
be effected were allowed to stand
until the others were considered.
Clause 3, which cited that In
view of the fact that there were no
costly undertakings with the exception of the water works and the
hydro-electric system, with the early
completion of the existing contracts,
the expense of the engineering department   was   not   warranted.
Aid. Morrissey moved the adoption of this.
Aid. Hilditch said lhat far from
the work decreasing, the engineering department would call for increased work. Any man who talked
of decreasing it was talking nonsense. That kind of talk was all
right for an eastern town that increased 5,000 In fifty years. A
sewerage system was necessary. He
felt that the city was losing $500 a
month through the department being undermanned. The contractors
were not being properly looked after. He wanted to know if this was
a report of the committee or uf the
chairman.
Not  Unanimous
Aid. Kirkpatrick said that as one
member of the committee he eliel
nol agree with It. The engineer liael
appeared before the committee and
hud  made satisfactory explanations.
Aid. Newton though! it was "n
mighty queer thing" to hour such u
statement from Aid. Kirkpatrick, it
was understood that that report was
coming in by him.
lie objected to slighting references made to himself. He came to
the board without any intention of
indulging in wrangling. He objected
to the "jeering remarks" of Aid.
Hilditch.
Under the old regime, one of the
chief objections was to the heavy
expense not only in the engineering
staff, but the whole city hall staff.
He had set himself to this duty
without ill will to any one. He was
against any further increases if he
could not effect reductions. The
public works department had been
organized to relieve the engineering department. The work of the
hydro-electric system he felt would
be carried on much more easily and
with less supervision.
Wonted Retrenchment
Aid, Douglas, who seconded tbe
clause, said that while he did not
agree wit'   Aid. Newton all the way
through,   yet   he   agreed   with     this
idea of retrenchment.
Aid. Kirkpatrick said, "you would
not sign the report."
Aid. Douglas replied, "not all the
report." He believed the department could be run with less expenditure.
, Aid. Kerr said there were four on
the committee and all disagreed.
He had approved of this report coming in and having it fought out at
the board. Aid. Douglas was for retrenchment. That seemed to be all
he stood for. It was a fine\ word
but he never could find out whether
he wanted retrenchment with efficiency.
"That is efficiency," replied Aid.
Douglas.
Aid. Hilditch read from the engineer's report on this point in which
it was specifed that the introduction
of the day labor system increased
the work of the department. That
was easy to see, Aid. Hilditch
thought. He moved in amendment
that in view of the expenditure that
was to take place this year this
clause was erroneous.
The amendment was not considered necessary.
Station Work
Aid.!Newton objected to Aid. Hilditch trying to represent that he
was in favor of the day labor system for the hydro-electric system.
He would probably be found supporting a different system, that of
doing a large part of it hy station
work. The city engineer might be
sincere when he said that he could
not get along with less men. That
was no reason why another engineer
could not get more out of a staff.
As to the talk about the engineering
costing only 2 per cent on the work
he did not pay much attention to
them in view of some of his other
estimates.
Aid. Hilditch on this point pointed out that the work of grading
Section 1 as put forward by the
engineer last year was $400,000.
The actual cost had been $398,499.
He was tired of bearing a man talk
about figures not being carefully
prepared when it was shown that
the estimate on half a million dollars' worth of .work was within $500
of the actual cost.
Aid. .Miu-rissi'y's Views
Aid. .Morrissey contended that
there bad been special help engaged.
The time for this was past. There
was a demand on the streets for
changes. The council should listen
to these. He contended that the
people expected the grading to include Cutting the hills anil filling
the hollows. Yet it was found thai
the cost  was now to be $750,000.
Aid. Hilditch contended that this
was a misstatement. The figures
showed that the grading of Section
I would cost no such money. The
figures were available for these
members of the committee just as
much as ii  was for himself.
The section was voted down; Aid.
Newton, Aid. Morlssey and Aid.
Douglas only voting In favor of the
clause.
Section tour of the report, In
which it was specified thai as ('iiii-
sultlng Engineer Thomson had signified his willingness, without extra
cost to supervise the installation of
the proposed hydro-electric system,
was then considered.
Aid. Newton said that if tbe majority of the members of the council
had made up their minds to vote
against this, why should the whole
report not be voted upon at once.
Objected  to  Insinuation
Aid. Smith objected to any construction being put upon bis vote
that there was any compact to do
so. lie knew the department had
more work on its hands now than
ever before. As contracts were
closing, he knew from twenty-six
years' experience, the engineering
staff  had  more difficult  work.
Aid.  Newton said  he did  not  Intend to convey any such impression
as suggested.
Aid. Hilditch felt that this should
he threshed out thoroughly. Aid.
Newton had spread the report
broadcast by printing it in his
paper. He believed the conclusions
of the council on this should be
given as full publicity. He wanted
to see justice done to Colonel Davis.
He had prepared this report on the
water system. The consulting engil
neer, Mr. Thomson had agreed with
him on all engineering points. He
did not believe it fair to take the
work out of the hands of Colonel
Davis.
Aid.     Morrissey     thought     there
should  be no sympathetic considerations  introduced   in  the  matter.     It
was a question of gaining efficiency,
('barges Incompetency
Aid. Newton wanted to know if
any business man who had had it
shown that his departmental head
was incompetent, would place fur-
their work in his hands. The city
engineer was known to be thoroughly  incompetent.
His Worship pointed out that
while Mr. Thomson agreed to act in
a consulting capacity, he did not
think that this meant that he could
take charge of the work.
The section was voted down on
the same division.
Section 5 was lost also.
Section G, which recommended
the termination of the contracts
with the engineering staff, except as
enumerated in the first part of the
report, "before any more costly errors were made with hydro-electrical undertaking," was challenged
by Aid. Hilditch, who thought it was
due to Colonel Davis that Aid. Newton make specific charges. Colonel
Davis had a reputation. People not
living here did not know Aid. Newton, as they did here. Before such
cowardly references were made
there should be grounds given for
it.
Waxed Worm
Aid. Newton said he did not want
to introduce personal allusions. He
would not take all the dirty allusion of Aid, Hilditch. It would not
take him long to answer Aid. Hilditch.
Aid. Hilditch insisted that Aid.
Newton should confine himself to
alleged errors In the hydro-electric
system.
Some  discussion     followed     when
i Continued  un  Page Four)
 o	
MARKED THE EVENT
Children Assembled Before School Closed
and Heard Speeches and
Sang Songs.
Interesting Ceremony  Held  In  Con.
■lection  wiih tlie Coronation
—Pupils  Saluted   Mag
On Wednesday afternoon the pupils of the public school assembled
before dismissal and took part in a
coronation function. The trustees,
through the hearty co-operation of
the teaching staff, arranged for a
public gathering when the national
event could be brought prominently
to the attention of tbe children.
From II to 3 the gathering took
place. A platform had been erected
on the east side of the building,
and seats laid out for the pupils and
visitors. Quite a large number of
citizens assembled at the hour arranged and watched the proceedings.
I'pon the arrival of the visitors
the pupils were inarched out under
their teachers, passing a saluting
point where the Union Jack floated
from an improvised pole. As the
scholars passed they saluted the flag
and proceeded to their places opposite the speaking platform.
I). G. Stewart, the energetic chairman of the board of school trustees,
presided and with him on the platform were the other two members of
the hoard, C. V. Dennett and O. II.
Nelson. There were also Mayor Manson, Rev. C. R. Sing, Rev. Dr. McLeod, Rev. \Y. Cl. Kerr, Rev. Mr.
Du   Barries  and   Rev.   Mr.  .lames.
Opening with the singing of "God
Save the King" by the pupils under
the leadership of Miss Johnston,
short speeches were given by all
those on the platform, with patriotic
songs by the children interspersed,
including the "Maple Leaf," "Rule
Brlttanla."
With the singing of "God Save
the King," the exercises closed aud
the pupils marched back to their
rooms, saluting the flag again as
they  passed.
The school has closed for the
week and will resume on Monday
again.
A  NARROW  ESCAPE GRAND CELEBRATION
Powder   Explodes   on   Street  Causing
Damage to Clapp Block
Windows.
Preparations are Under Way for a Full
Day's Sports in the
City.
mliinalcly  No One  Was linn  As aIJuly   1   Will   Be Observed  in a  Me.st
Result—Caused   by
Spark
There was a very narrow escape
for dwellers in the Clapp Block, al
the corner of McBride street and
Second avenue, and to workmen and
others in the vicinity this afternoon.
A spark from the burning of stumps
near at hand is supposed to have
fallen upon sunn, powder sticks
used by the workmen on the streets.
A i lolenl explosion followed, .result
Ing in the breaking of ninny windows   in   tl pper   stories   of   the
Clapp Block.
Fortunately  no one  was hurt.
•'iiting Way by the Citizens
eet  Prince  Kiincrt
ItL'SHIXG   ROADS
It-   i ings   Returns   from   Inspei
linn  eil   Ihe  Trails,  e-lc,   in
Skeena    District
Robert Jennings, road supervisor,
Is back again from an inspection
tour up tlie Skeena. The weather
conditions, he reports, are good and
splendid progress is being made on
the roads.
On the way from Kiimangar there
is 70 miles of trail ready now for
pack horses tn be taken In over,
which facilitates the movement of
supplies for those who have, business
in  the country.
The other roads and trails are
also being pushed forward as fast as
possible. In the Lakelse. Bectlon
good progress Is heing made ami
Mr. Jennings looks forward to the
hot springs becoming quite a health
resorl   before   very   long.
After a few days in the city Mr.
Jennings will again leave on his duties.
Tin- preparations that are under
way for the sports in tbe city on
Dominion day assure citizens of the
best celebration that Prince Ruperl
lens ■ ■-.er seen, The committee Is energetically en work and ha e 'lee- arrangements well In hand.
Il    has   ll"e-ll   ili-ei,|e-il   this   year   ''I
hold the race .-, etc., on Sixth a\ en te
near the corner of McBride street. A
stand will he put up for the convenience and comforl of spectators,
nml with a long stretch of level
si reel there the races can he- in full
e lew of the crowd all the time.
Already   the local    ntie'e-te-s    are
busily  training   for  the  land  Bports
and on the- waters of tbe harbor I hi
oarsmen and power boat ownet
getting ready.
The aqual le sports «ill be put on
"ii the harbor, i ommeni Ing al 9 30
in the morning. The power boat
contest, always nn exciting one, le
for a cup nt presenl held by the- Ka
Yex, owned by J. ll. Kugler. Entries
are to be in for this not later than
the evening of June 28. These entries should he made to W. A. Petti-
grew.
The other aquatic races are—
Skiffs    I single |,      skiffs      (double),
mixed (doubles), canoes (single),
canoes (double), four-crew canoe
race, six-oared gig race, mixed
double canoes, crab race.
The  land  Sports start   nt   I   in   the
afternoon and Include the following 100 yards, 220 yards, 44n
yards, 880 yards, I mile, 3 miles. 10
miles, tug of war, running broad
Jump, running high jump, hop-skip-
and-jump, pillow sparring, obstacle
race,  boxing  in   barrels,   tilting   tl e
bucket, sack race, walking r  fat
" 's  team   race,    business    man's
rai •■  i 100 yards I. PRINCE  RUPERT JOURNAL
Friday, June 23, 1911
prince liupcrt journal
Telephone  l:58
Published twice a week on Tuesdays and Fridays from the office of
publication, Third Avenue, near
McBride Street.
Subscription rate to any point in
Canada, §2.(in a year; to points outside of Canada, $3.On a year.
Advertising rates furnished on
application.
0. H. NELSON,
Editor.
"siiips
Friday, June
ILL-ADVISED  MOVE
Tin. proposition thai Aid. Hllditch
and Aid, Newton should resign and
enter the electoral lists again in order to test the question as to whether the people endorsed the move for
the dismissal of the chief of the engineering staff, is not calculated to
attain the ends sought. It is idle to
think that should the two aldermen
enter a fight that tlie votes polled
would represent the views of the citizens on this question of tbe engineering department. There would
undoubtedly be many votes cast for
ami against Aid. Hilditch that were
cast from altogether different reasons to those connected with his
stand as to the engineering department. The same would apply to
Aid. Newton. The result could in no
sense be a test of public sentiment
on the subject. No good purpose
could thus be afforded by a move
like that.
We believe the element in the city
council who seek the bead of the
city engineer are exceedingly ill-
advised. No more inopportune time
could be selected for (bis. No city
has been placed/in such a peculiar
position with respect to engineering
as lias Prince Ruperl. It has been
planned and platted for a large population to be on the ground in a very
few years. From an engineering
standpoint the work is difficult and
costly. For several years to come
the city must of necessity be in the
bands of the city engineers to a
very large extent.
Colonel Davis has shown ability,
and has the work well In hand. His
dismissal would mean a very heavy
loss to the city at this time. He
has tbe water works in band and is
also grappling with the sewer question. Reports from the east where
he has before been engaged, show
that he is regarded as an expert on
sewer systems and sewerage disposal. ' His services should, therefore, be of great value along that
line in this city.
It is unreasonable to suppose that
Mr. Thomson, of Seattle, who offered his services in connection with
the hydro-electric system, would
give his time to that work In other
than a consulting capacity.
Colonel Davis has shown himself to- be a safe man. He is not
given to advising works along any
extravagant line so that the services
he is able to render the city are
doubly valuable for this reason.
posed to co-operate with Great Britain in a war similar to that which
vaged  in  the Crimea.
The energetic protests of the Con-
servatlve Opposition forced the Governmenl to revise the provision of
the Naval Bill undere which th
authority of Parliament was necessary to place the Canadian ships at
the disposal of the British Government. That authority was finally
vested in the Governor-ln-Councll,
but Sir Wilfrid Laurier made it
quite elear that Canada retained the
right to co-operate or nol cp-operate
with Great Britain in the event of
war according to her own sweet
will.
The same principle has now been
asserted at the Imperial Conference.
It says with blunt directness thai
Canada is of the Empire in peace,
but not necessarily of the Empire in
war. It declares that while Canada
desires to receive the protection of
the Empire under any and all circumstances she is prepared to contribute lo the Empire's defence
only  when  the  humor suits  her.
An intimation to the world at
large that Great Britain need not
rely on Canada in the event of war
can only be regarded as mischievous
and dangerous. It conveys the unmistakable inference that destructive forces are at work within the
British Empire and to that extent
must supply encouragement to the
nations which are directing their energies against the supremacy of
British sea power.
Such a relationship cannot, of
course, have anything but a short
and precarious existence, and if carried to its logical conclusion it must,
as the London Times asserts, detach
Canada from  the Empire.
rength   and   stability   through   tho  back of Tow Hill, where a new set-
UNWISB  WORDS
I RUT  PRODUCTION
Even bis own party organs, says
the Winnipeg Telegram, are finding
it difficult to explain Sir Wilfrid
Laurier's statement at the Imperial
Conference to the effect that Canada
eliel not propose to he committed to
Great Britain's wars. One of them
suggests that the cables have misrepresented   Sir   Wilfrid's  words.
This is a highly charitable view of
the situation created by a virtual
declaration of Canadian independence, but it will be found that the
fault is not with the. cables, but with
Sir Wilfrid Laurier himself. The'
fait is that there is nothing very
surprising in the words thai have
been credited to the Canadian Premier. He has said nothing thai he
has not said before, though It must
In- admitted thai the time and place
of his remarkable utterance could
not have been more unhappily
chosen.
Canadians would gladly believe
that the words credited to Sir Wilfrid Laurier were not spoken, but
■recent events indicate a strong
probability that they were actually
spoken. When provision was made
for the organization of a Canadian
navy it was stipulated In the first
place that the Canadian ships should
in the event of war be placed at the
disposal of Great Britain only on the
authority of the Dominion Parliament. It was explained in defence
of this condition that Great Britain
might engage In a war in which
Canada would not desire to participate. Sir Wilfrid Laurier himself
laid down the principle that Canada
was not necessarily at war when the
Empire was at war. Canada, he declared, could exercise her own discretion In the matter, and he illustrated his argument hy pointing out
that   his  country   would  not  be  dis-
The statement appearing in the
news columns of The Journal on the
authority of a dealer in this city,
that there is expected to be 10,000
cases of strawberries marketed from
the plantations of the Skeena valleys
this season in Prince Rupert, is most
gratifying information. It is an assurance that the fruit areas of the
adjoining sections of the province
are well adapted for production on a
large scale. It is only within the
past season or two that there has
been any attenton paid to this industry. The ground has been tested
and the evidence is forthcoming that
the country is well adapted to the
growing of the small fruits.
A visit to the districts which can
now be made by rail with little loss
of time is sufficient to warrant the
belief that it is only a very few-
years until among the largest producing areas for small fruits id the
province will be the Skeena. The
question of clearing the land in the
most of instances is costly and the
best methods of grappling with this
question  must  be  found.
The demand for timber is increasing at such a rate at present that
there is likely to be a lucrative market found for the mill timber on the
lands in the district. This will develop with the building of the line
of railway through to the prairies.
In the meantime large sections of
the land have to be cleared in order
to afford an opportunity for orchard
planting and other lines of horticulture. Those interested will have to
turn their attention to the work at
once.
**************************
* c
* News of the Province      *
* *
**************************
'UNEXPECTED MEETING
VANCOUVER— Running against
a man In Ihe street, Mrs. Har-
greaves, a resident of this city, was
stricken dumb with astonishment to
recognize her husband, Frank St.
Amour, whom she had last seen In
Kamloops In 1908, and on a story of
whose death In eastern Canada, she
had married a man named Har-
greaves, a roomer at her boarding
house. St. Amour, hearing his
wife's tale began proceedings for
divorce, and Mr. Justice Morrison,
with the consent of both parties,
elissolvcd the matrimonial tie, although he confessed doubt whether
there were legal grounds against
the wife, who had only remarried in
tlie belief that her husband was
dead. The parties had lived unhappily.
intervenlngs years, owing io the
business ability anil enterprising
spirit of the late proprietors, Mr,
Peter McQuade anil his two sons,
Edward A. and Louis G., all now
deceased. The firm are large importers and dealers In ship chandlery, steamboat, launch, yacht, mill,
mine- and logging, and fishermen's
supplies, paints, oils and varnishes—
wholesale and retail. The late proprietors built up the business on the
solid foundation of integrity and fair
dealing and the new firm settles
down to work with the determination to live up to the example set in
Ihe past. Th old firm name of Peter
McQuade & Son wi'l be used for the
present.
 o	
l\  POLICE COURT
CHANGE  IX  FIRM
VICTOITIA—III the course of a
few days the old established and
well known firm of Messrs. Peter
McQuade & Son will change hands,
the purchasers being Messrs. Leon
J. Camsusa, William J. Christie and
Arthur J. Peatt, all well known citizens of Victoria. The business of
this well known firm was established as long ago as the year 1S5S,
and   it   has  gone  on   augmenting  In
Attempted Suicide Charge" Is Heard
—Indians Celebrate Coronation
Coronation day bad its temptations for two Indians in the city and
they,had to answer before Police
.Magistrate Carss this morning. Eli
Fawsut, who lives here, had a broth
er visiting him from Ketchikan. The
evidence went to show that the
brother was very much intoxicated
and that Ell, who was alleged to
have been in a drunken condition
also, got into a row with him. Tbe
police were sent for and Sergeant
Phillipson answered  the call.
The men resisted arrest and assistance had to be called. Fred
Peters, K. C, prosecuted for the
city, while L. W. Patmore appeared
for Eli.
The police magistrate found the
two men guilty and fined them, the
fine and damage to clothing conse
quent on the fight bringing the
amount up to $36.
Tom Wilson, also charged with
breaking a window, was fined $4 or
seven days' imprisonment.
Frand Strig, on a charge of care
less blasting, had to pay a fine of
$10.
Homer Wood, charged with attempted suicide as a result of the
shooting affair at the Cold Storage
building a week or more ago, was
given his preliminary hearing preparatory to the case being heard in
the county  court.
 o	
FOR PLAINTIFFS
Plumber's Torch, It Is Held, Caused
Loss of Property in
the City
In the Supreme Court this morning, Chief Justice Hunter, heard the
case of Heibrower et al. vs. Hacker
& Jackson. A. M. Manson represented the plaintiff and C. V. Bennett the defendant.
The case arose out of the fire in
the Angle building some months
ago. The plaintiff, an occupant of
the building claimed damages
against the defendants on the
ground that the loss of property to
him was caused from the use of a
plumber's torch used by the defendants.
Tbe chief justice decided in favor
of the plaintiffs.
 o	
EXTENDING  BUSINESS
The  Continental   Trust   Company  Is
Opening a Branch at Kitselas
The Continental Trust Company, a
local monetary institution, finds It
wise to extend its operations for the
convenience of its patrons. It has
been decided to open a branch office
at Kitselas. It will be under the
charge of George E. Angell, who is
well known in the city.
In Mr. Angell the company has a
careful business man who may be
depended upon to look well after the
Interests of the company In his new
post.
ROADS  OX   ISLANDS
C. J. Gillingham, road superin
tendent, arrived at Queen Charlotte
after inspecting the various road
camps between Masset and Skide
gate Inlets, says the Queen Charlotte News. This season fifteen
camps, employing 130 men, are at
work building bridges, roads and
trails on the Islands. Mr. Gilllngham reports that the work Is proceeding very satisfactorily and with
the splendid weather of the past few
weeks good progress has been made.
The camps at Mayer Lake and
Kundls Slough are making a wagon
road 20 feet wide to connect with
Masset Inlet. Four bridges on this
road have been built. Work on the
Nadu River road is being pushed
ahead and a little Is being done at
the Woden River.
On the north end of the Island
tbe wagon road between Masset and
Cape Fife Is going ahead and a
wagon bridge, 220 feet long, across
the Satigun River has already been
built. A new trail is being put In
from White Creek to    tbe    country
tlement has sprung up of between
thirty and forty settlers. A bridge
is being built across tbe Hi-Ellen
River and the trail from that point
to Cape Fife has been put in good
shape.
On the east coast of the Island
at the Oeanda River, a new bridge
has been erected and one at Cape
Ball Creek. A new trail from the
Tl-El to connect with Gold Creek,
Cape Ball Creek and the Oeanda is
being made. Work on the Skide-
gate-TI-El road is progressing in
good shape and by the end of the
season It Is expected that the major
portion of this road will have been
completed. The north settlement
road at Lawn Hill Is finished for the
season and good work has been done
on this trail. Tbe west settlement
trail is now being improved and also
the one at Honna River. At the
Sand Spit a good wagon road has
been built around Shingle Bay and
extending towards Copper Bay.
■■infiiii
e9e * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *** * * * * * *
* *
Remember j
*
That we
Import    j
Our Wines 1
* direct from Europe;  and that
f no house in Prince Rupert can
* equal   them   for  quality.     No
* better can be bought anywhere
*
... in the Province.    We make a
* specialty  of
*
Family Trade
and guarantee satisfaction
* We  also  carry  a  complete *
* *
* stock of other *
Liquors
Try a glass of +
I
Cascade j
Beer
The best local  beer on  the f
market.
CLARKE BROS.
Christiansen & Brandt Bid.
*   Telephone 30        Third Avenue  *
*************************4
The British Columbia Company
LIMITED.
AUTHORIZED CAPITAL $100,000. ::   PAID UP CAPITAL $41,500
DIRECTORS:—Reginald C. Brown, President; J. C. Maclure, Vice-
President; H. E. Marks, Managing Director; Capt. E. Nash, William
McNair, R. A. Bevan, and F.  C.   Williams, Secretary.      :-:       :-:
INTEREST 4 PER CENT. DEPOSITS
This Company acts as Executors,  Administrators, Transferees and
Secretaries to Public Companies.    Commercial, Industrial and other
business propositions underwritten.    Issues  made  on  the
London and New York Stock Exchanges.
TIMBER, COAL, LANDS, and
COMPANY ORGANIZATION
Head Office for Canada, 203, 208, 210, 215 Carter-Cotton Building,
VANCOUVER, B.C.
The Staneland Co. Ltd
•IS THE-
Paint Supply House
of British Columbia
ALL GOODS ARE GUARANTEED
WRITE FOR PRICES AND SAMPLES
The Staneland Co. Ltd
836-840 Fort Street, VICTORIA, B.C.
Replenish
the
Pantry
| High-Class....
Grocery
Stock
to choose from
EVERYTHING CLEAN AND FRESH
Goods for the Table to Suit the Most
Fastidious  Housewife
S MERRYFIELD'S i
i
i
L.
CASH GROCERY      i
TIDES AT PRINCE iRUPERT, JUNE, 1911
iTE   AND   DAY
HIGH WATER      ||        LOW WATER
X>t
Timo| Ht| Time| Ht || Time
Ht | Tlme| Ht
1
Thursday.    .   .    .
3:58
20.9
17:24
18.5
10:44
2.6
23:00
8.8
0
4:58
19.5
18:27
18.0
11:40
4.0
3
Saturday  ....
6:08
18.0
19:30
17.8
0:10
9.2
12:41
5.3
4
7:24
16.9
20:30
17.9
1:25
9.1
13:46
6.4
5
8:40
16.4
21:24
18.2
2:40
8.4
14:50
7.2
6
9:50
16.4
22:11
18.7
3:48
7.2
15:48
7.7
7
Wednesday  .   .   .
10:49
16.8
22:52
19.3
4:44
6.0
16:35
7.9
8
Thursday.   .   .   .
11:38
17.2
23:28
19.8
5:29
5.0
17:17
8.1
9
Friday	
12:22
17.5
6:09
4.1
17:56
8.3
10
Saturday  ....
0:02
20.2
13:01
17.8
6:46
3.5
18:34
8.4
11
20.5
13:39
17.9
7:20
3.1
19:11
8.5
12
1:09
20.7
14:16
18.0
7:53
2.9
19:47
8.6
13
1:44
20.7
14:53
18.0
8:26
3.0
20:23
8.7
14
Wednesday  .   .   .
2:20
20.5
15:31
17.9
9:00
3.2
21:00
8.8
15
Thursday ....
2:58
20.1
16:10
17.7
9:36
3.7
21:40
8.9
16
Friday	
3:38
19.5
16:ol
17.5
10:15
4.3
22:25
9.0
17
Saturday  ....
4:23
18.6
17:36
17.3
10:58
4.9
23:18
9.1
18
Monday	
5:15
17 7
18:26
17 a
11:48
5 7
19
6:20
16.9
19:20
17.6
0:22
8.9
12:43
6.4
20
7:33
16.4
20:16
18.1
1:32
8.2
13:43
6.9
21
Wednesday  .   .   .
8:49
16.4
21:13
19.0
2:42
7.1
14:46
7.1
22
Thursday ....
10:02
16.9
22:07
20.1
3:49
5.5
15:48
7.1
23
Friday	
11:06
17.7
22:58
21.3
4:48
3.9
16:46
7.0
24
Saturday  ....
12:01
18.5
23:46
22.3
5:40
2.2
17:39
6.8
25
Sunday	
12:52
19.3
«:30
1.0
18:30
6.5
26
23.0
13:41
19.8
7:19
0.2
19:20
6.4
27
1:21
23.2
14:29
20.1
8:07
—.2
20:10
6.5
28
Wednesday  .   .   .
2:19
23.0
15:17
20.1
8:54
0.1
21:01
6.7
29
Thursday ....
3:00
22.2
16:06
19.9
9:40
0.9
21:54
7.0
30
21.1
16:56
19.5
10:27
2.1
22:49
7.3
The Time used is Pacific Standard, for the 120th Meridian west. It
is counted from 0 to 24 hours, from midnight to midnight.
The Height Is In feet and tenths of a foot, above the Low Water datum
adopted for the Chart. The Harbor datum, as established by the Grand
Trunk   Pacific  Railway,  Is  one -foot lower.
**************************
*
*
STORAGE
Household Goods and Baggage
given careful attention.
Forwarding,   Distributing   and
Shipping Agents
TRANSFERERS
Prince    Rupert    Warehousing
and   Forwarding   Co.
First  Ave.,  near  McBride  St.
r        DOUGLAS SUTHERLAND,     *
j. Manager. *
» P. O. Box 907     Phone 262 $
I *
**************************
NOTICE.
In the matter of an application for
the issue of a duplicate of the Certificate of Title for an undivided
one-half of Lot 883, Group I,
Cassiar District:
Notice is hereby given that it is
my intention to issue at the expiration of one month after the first
publication hereof a duplicate of the
Certificate of Title to the above
mentioned land In the name of William Jordan Larkworthy, which Certificate is dated the 30th day of September, 1910, and numbered 326R.
WILLIAM   E.   BURRITT,
Di-.trict Registrar.
Land Registry Office,
Prince Rupert, B. C,
May 26, 1911. J23 <
Friday, June 23,  1911
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
THE TARIFF QUESTION
How British Shipping is Being Affected
by the Free Trade Policy
of Britain.
Mr.   Welsford,  Who    Has    Become
Interested in Coast, Reviews
Subject as It Affects Trade
In English politics tbe prime issue
if Imperial Preference has been
somewhat obscured by other Issues,
but the question of free trade continues to be a burning question.
Especially lias it been argued by
free importers that shipping would
be adversely affected by any alteration in tbe fiscal system, therefore
upon this question the views of a
practical shipowner such as Mr. J.
H. Welsford. may be read with interest. Mr. Welsford prepared an
article upon the subject which lad"
attained much prominence in England.
Mr. Welsford has acquired a large
interest in the Union Steamship
Company of Vancouver. In England
he twice contested Crewe and was
one of the original members of Mr.
Chamberlan's Tariff Reform league.
In an introduction to that article
Rt. Hon. George Wyndham, M. P.,
states that in bis o'piuion Mr. Welsford destroys the only free trade argument that can still be called specious. Although it was no longer
possible to maintain that employment by agriculture and manufacturing industries had kept pace with
the growth of population, it was still
possible to assert that British preeminence in bunking and shipping
depended on adhering to the fiscal
system associated with the name of
Mr. Cobden. Those best qualified to
speak for bankers had disproved
that assertion as far as they were
concerned, and Mr. Welsford had effectively dealt with the declaration
that shipping would suffer from the
adoption of tariff reform.
Mr. Welsford, continued Hon.
George Wyndham, established five
propositions. First, that it was necessary to study the conditions of the
present time, so as to decide whether protection or free trade was the
best for shipping. Secondly, that the
system of free imports could only be
the best for shipping under circumstances which no longer exist. Thirdly, that Great Britain could obtain
countervailing advantages to replace
those she has lost, if she reserve the
carrying trade of her own Empire,
or at least, take the steps that are
necessary to secure an overwhelming preponderance for ships carrying
her flag in the traffic between all
the ports over which that flag files.
Fourthly, that he demonstrated this
cannot be effected by any other device than the adoption of Imperial
preference, and finally, that Mr
Welsford gives many sound reasons
for believing that shipping, by accepting this policy, and so leading
Great Britain's great industries, as
ever in the past, would derive an advantage from tliat communion which
could never accrue to isolated
efforts divorced from tbe general
trend of national welfare.
In the opening of his article, Mr.
Welsford states that England's shipping trade and commerce was being
excelled because of the organized
scientific competition of foreign
nations.
"If England had a free market for
her shipping all over the world, and
if the trades and ports of the world
were open, the case would be different. As it is, however, the governments of a large portion of the civilized world have closed their trades
to British shipping, and, consequently, our pre-eminence as carriers is
materially affected. Rightly or
wrongly, foreign nations, under protective systems, have developed mercantile marines which in the aggregate are today In excess of our tonnage. The Britisii shipowner, therefore, unless the sea coast of the
British Empire Is similarly secured
to him, can never be on equal terms
with the foreigner In the free markets.
"We are living in an age when
the conveyance of produce, manufactured goods or raw material, from
the producer to the consumer, Is reduced to a scientific art. If the
producer In any nation is to have
the best yield of his production his
government must see that his means
of communication to his markets are
not only the cheapest but the best."
The writer maintains that the cheapest and most effective shipping
transport can be best assured to the
nation which develops national production.
Mr. Welsford points out that in
the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries the Dutch Occupied practically
the leading position In the world's
commerce, being then the commercial shipping and banking power ot
the world. They observed the policy
of free trade to its fullest extent-
going so far as to make their ports
free. England wrested their position
from them under ya system of protection. Today history repeats itself. Under conditions similar to
those which beset the Dutch, England's manufactures, commerce and
shipping, even.her banking, were
seriously menaced by the intelligent
scientific tarffs which Germany and
America adopted. Both these coun-
tris, in common with every other
civilized nation, including the Over
Seas Dominions, had adopted protective tariffs, under which their populations and commerce had vastly
prospered. All the principal foreign
maritime countries of the world had
enacted coasting laws founded upon
those which Great Britain abandoned, and thereby developed mercantile marines. Today Britisii
shipowners were confronted with
the fact that France, Germany,
Russia, Italy, Spain, Portugal and
the United States had all reserved
for their own flag and their own
vessels the trades of their coasts.
No argument in favor of a reconstructed fiscal policy was more
Important than, the fact that the
mercantile fleet was out of all proportion to the present requirements
of the actual trade. The wise course
therefore, was for the latter to cultivate trade with the Over Seas Dominions, and the time had undoubtedly come for a decision to be
made whether Great Britain should
fall back upon the commercial "cul-
de-sac" into which she was fast being driven, or whether she would
consolidate the British Empire by
federation with the Over Seas Dominions, and retain those markets
and  ports  under commercial  union.
The writer maintains that national production is a better safeguard
for any nation's welfare than cheap
consumption, that welfare and
strength depending on the physical
well-being and happiness of the
greatest number. Thus was maintained the commercial credit of the
nation, so essential to success. "To
sustai nthis there must be earnest
co-operation of all classes, and confidence and security. The three
principles of success must be—fair
interest for capital, fair wages for
labor and fair prices for the consumer. That hse can be obtained
under the suggested process has
been demonstrated in our own Over
Seas Dominions, as well as other
countries. Protect the market from
unfair foreign competition, and then
the individual in that market must
stand or fall on his merits."
Urging that the Over Seas Dominions are wishful of closer commercial union with the Mother Country,
Mr. Welsford goes on to state that
"the time has come to consolidate
imperially, by a scientific tariff,
Great Britain with the self-governing Dominions and Crown Colonies.
By this means we would then keep
and develop our Britisii market, the
greatest by far in all the world."
"We could grow in one part or
another of the Over Seas Dominions
everything we need and everything
we purchase today from'foreigners
and send our capital and surplus
population to deve op and strengthen our own Empire instead of build
ing foreign states as we have done.'
The preference given to the foreigner in Britisii markets amounted
to $800,000,000 annually without
reckoning municipal taxation, which
came to a further similar sum, and
the amount of wages paid annually
to foreign labor In imported goods
was $400,000,000, all for the insane
craze of seeming cheapness. Great
Britain could do equally well under
scientific tariffs with Canada. Much
of the trade done with Russia could
be transferred to India. Part of the
trade with South America could be
gradually distributed between Canada, Australia, New Zealand and
South Africa. Certain It Is we have
the markets, the money, the men,
the ships and everything essential,
except, apparently, action and decision. Up to the present time there
has been great resistance on the
part of Canada against commercial
union With America, but, unless we
take action, that cannot last. If we
give Canada a preference, and we
have it in our power to do so, in return for the preference she has given us, we can keep th market for
British trade and British ships, and
the same applies to all our other
Over Sea Dominion markets. They
have stated that, in such case, they
will Increase their preference.
Therein is a good bargain for both.
"No free Importing nation can or
ever has been able successfully to
sustain an effective mercantile marine. The flag may be better said to
follow the trade. The nation with
the largest commerce will develop
the largest mercantile marine. History proves that this happened In
tbe case of England; first the commerce, hen the shipping. It is
proved today in the growth of Ger-
Anheuser-Busch's
«a
pSpfBJ
BUDVVIlSIJt
Budweiser
Has earned its reputation of being the most popular
bottled beer in the world solely because of its superb
Quality and Purity. Its absolutely in a class by
itself.
Bottled only at the
Anheuser-Busch Brewery
tt
%mm
■ f -m
St. Louis, Mo., U S. A.
The North British Columbia Liquor Co., Limited. Prince Rupert, B.C., Distributors
man shipping and shipbuilding;
American shipping and shipbuilding will likewise follow. It Is the
inevitable corollary of national sentiment.
"The question of tariff reform is
neither academic nor economic; It is
a question of business common
sense. The true and best solution
for the future of Great Britain and
the self-governing Dominions beyond the seas, is a proper and well-
conceived scientific tariff to divert
and extend all possible trade within
the Empire, in conjunction with a
modified re-enactment of the navi-
gatlo nlaws. Their future depends
upon this."
 .—o	
River Mail Service
Postmaster Mcintosh is able to
announce that from now on there
will be three mails a week to Hazel
ton and intermediate points on the
Skeena. The mail is to be carried
by the Inlander in addition to the
Hudson's Bay Company's steamers.
Skeena Land District—District of
of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that James G.
Crombie, of Prince Rupert, occupation auditor, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:— Commencing at a
post planted at the northwest corner, 55 chains east and 20 chains
south from northeast corner of Lot
1116 (Horry Survey), Coast Dist.,
range 5; thence 20 chains east;
thence 25 chains, more or less,
south to Angus McLeod Pre-emption; thence 20 chains west; thence
25 chains, more or less, north, to
post of commencement, containing
5 0 acres, more or less.
JAMES  G.   CROMBIE.
Fred Bohlen, Agent.
Dated June  14,  1911, 6-23
mm*
S.S. PRINCE GEORGE
Sails for Vancouver, Victoria and Seattle
Mondays 8 A.M.
Special over Sunday Excursion to Stewart
"PRINCE GEORGE"
Sails Sundays, 8 A.M.
Reduced Fare $0.50, Including'Meals and Berth
S.S.PRINCE ALBERT for Port Simps   Naas  River,  Masset and
Naden  Harbor,  Wednesdays, 1 P.M., and for Queen Charlotte
Island  points,   Saturdays,  1   P.M.
RAILWAY SERVICE TO COPPER     RIVER,    mixed    trains  from
Prince   Rupert   Wednesdays and  Saturday*, 1  P.M.;  returning  Thursdays  and   Sundays, 5:20 P.M.
THE GRAND TRUNK RAILWAY SYSTEM, connecting with
trains from the Pacific Coast, operates a frequent and convenient
service of luxurious trains over its DOUBLE TRACK route between
Chicago, Toronto, Montreal, Quebec, Halifax, Portland, Boston,
New York and Philadelphia.
Atlantic Steamship bookings arranged via all lines
Full information and tickets obtained from the office of
A. E. McMASTER
Freight and Pasenger Agent, G. T.  P. Wharf.
GRAND HOTEL
WORKINGMAN'S HOME
25c
Rooms 50 Cents
Spring Beds, Clean
White Sheets
Best In Town for the Money
FIRST AVE. AND SEVENTH ST.
J. Goodman, Proprietor
The Thompson
Hardware Co.
—Second Avenue-
Paints. General Hardware,
Oils, Stoves and Ranges.
FREDERICK PETERS, K. O.
Barrister, Solicitor and Notary Public
Office in
EXCHANGE BLOCK
WM. S. HAl,L, L. D. S. O. D.
:-:   DENTIST   :-:
Crown and Bridge Work a specialty.
All dental operations skillfully
treated. Gas and local anaesthetics
administered tor the painless extraction of teeth. Consultation free.
Offices, Helgerson 3k., Prince Rupert
NICKERSON-ROERIG COMPANY
CUSTOMS AND MERCHANDISE
Brokers, Forwarding Agents,
Storage, etc.
Excursions!
Let us tell you all about the cheap
ROUND TRIP EXCURSIONS
'h
to all Towns and Cities in Eastern
Canada and United States
Via
The Great Northern
Choice of Return Route
Tickets to the Old Country by all
Lines. Take any Steamer from
Prince Rupert.
ROGERS STEAMSHIP AGENCY
Phone 116 Second Ave
Prince Rupert.'B.C.
The Journal (twice a week), only
J2.00 a year.
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY GO.
B. C. Coast S. S. Service
A
Famous
Princess
Line
Princess Royal
JUNE 26
SOUTHBOUND FOR
Vancouver, Victoria,
AND
Seattle
Friday June 16,   at 9 a.m.
J. G. McNAIJ,
General  Agent.
ROGERS & BLACK
Wholesale Dealers in
BUILDING  MATERIAL,     CEMENT,
LIME,  HAIR-FIBRE PLASTER
COKE, BLACKSMITH COAL,
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For all kinds of help. Cooks, waiters, dishwashers, hotel porters, all
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FREE EMPLOYMENT OFFICE
GRAND HOTEL
Headquarters for Cooks and Walters
Hamblin's Bakery
Just Re-opened
Sole    counter    In    MERRYFIELD'S
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Family trade catered to.  Will supply restaurants and steamers.
Cakes and Confectionery of all
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J.  W.  POTTER
ARCHITECT     AND     STRUCTURAL
ENGINEER
Re-inlorced Concrete a Specialty
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Law-Butler Building - Prince Rupert
H.VYNOR   BROS.
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PROFESSIONAL   BMBALMERS
DR.   W.  II.   CLAYTON
DENTIST
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Office   In    the    Westenhaver   Block.
Over  Orme's   Drug   Store.
Prince Rupert
IHE WESTHOLME LUMBER CO.
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We handle all kinds of
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First Avenue Telephone 180
Corner Eighth and Fraser Street*
Clinton Rooms
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New Knox Hotel
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Proprietors
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For Neat Job Printing
see the Journal Man
Tel. 138
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The New Knox Hotel is run on the
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Board, $1 a Day — Beds, ,">Oc and no
First  Avenue    Prince  Rupert r*
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Friday, June 23,  1911
RESIGNATIONS AT
CITY COUNCIL BOARD
(Continued from Page One)
the mayor interpreted the words as
applying to errors made in other
work.
Aid. Newton contended that the
plans for work in Section 1 were estimated to cost $366,000. They cost
$630,000. Referring to the conference with the city engineer when retaining walls came up, he stated
that the engineer figured on retaining walls at $8,000, $25,000 or
$228,oou, according to the estimates
of the engineer. In those days, Aid.
Hllditch was the only critic of the
engineer. The engineer agreed that
the cost should not be greater than
$25,000. Yet u late estimate contained in the mayor's financial statement showed that these retaining
walls were to cost about $86,000.
Then the culverts and storm drains
cost $35,000. This would not be so
bad were they properly put in but
he did not believe they would stand
the strain. The culvert on Eighth
street was attacked. The retaining
wall on First street had become a
subject of ridicule.
Electric Lighting
The electric light system, he be
lieved was a botch. The city engineer had not a grasp of the engineering problems of the city. As an
instance of this he had discussed
the proposed replanklng of the
streets again. He (Aid. Newton)
expressed a pity that such a system
should be adhered to. Since the new
council came in the engineer was
waking up to the situation and was
endorsing tlie undertaking.
When he (Aid. Newton) had
brought up the Acropolis Hill reservoir proposition the city engineer
had said that this was of no pressing
need now.
It was absolute nonsense for the
bend of the department to make the
statement he did a short time ago,
when he said that the pole lines, the
sewers, etc., should not be placed in
the lanes.
Aid. Morrissey contended that a
professional man stood by bis record. The city had engaged a high-
priced man. He pointed out that
the engineer stated in bis own report that there should be detailed
plans prepared for every part of Section 1 before the work was proceeded with. The citizens' money was
at stake and they should not have
been recommended by the engineer
until the plans were prepared.
Council Responsible
Aid. Hilditch continued the report of the city engineer In which it
was set forth that in view of the
wishes of the council and the people generally it was deemed wiser
to proceed with Ihe work without
these plans. No one howled louder
than Aid. Newton and bis paper for
the work commencing.
Aid. Hilditch said that the estimate for rough grading was put at
$400,000. It was known to all that
retaining walls and the culverts
would have to be met in addition
to this. The council preferred to
have the work go on and take care
of the retaining walls as they came
to them. Ho firmly believed that
Aid,   Newton   understood   that     the
estimate iiiii not Include the retaining wall,
' As to the matter of the estimates
of the engineer for retaining walls,
Aid. Hilditch produced the reports
and asked them read. They showed
thai the first style, nf wall asked for
was a solid wall. It was to cost
over $200,000. This was deemed
ton high and was sent back to the
engineer throe times before a final
decision was reached em a dry wall.
Defended Engineer
,\s id the culver! on Eighth street,
Aid. Hileliie-h pointed oul thai iho
cedar culvert was pul in on Instruc
tors paper was not opposed to the
local Improiement plan. It was eic-
cided to adopt that system by last
year's council before Colonel Davis
reached here. In two months the
engineer had to get his plans and
specifications prepared for this. The
Empire was howling for the work
starting.
"That is untrue," said Aid. Newton.
When he (Aid. Hilditch) was advocating the day labor system it
was mighty little help he got from
Aid.  Newton.
In not one single instance did he
know where muskeg had been
dumped to the property line as alleged, lie did not approve of dumping muskeg on muskeg, but what
was the engineer to do. He had to
get rid of it. It was childish to
make such charges. He denied that
Colonel Davis was ever discourteous.
He had been in his office when two
nearly had a fight and yet the engineer was courteous to both. He regarded this criticism as a joke.
Saw Whitewashing
Aid, Newton could not see much
use in going on with this. It was
clear this was to be voted down
and the department was to be whitewashed. He was satisfied there had
been a  line-up on  this question.
Aid. Smith said he would take
exception to that statement. He
had not lined up with anyone. The
statement was untrue. He was sorry
to see so much unfair criticism of
Colonel Davis. He had been associated in such work for many years.
Colonel Davis was carrying on this
work, he believed, as efficiently as
any other engineer could do it. It
would be unwise to change now.
He was brought here as an expert
particularly on a water system.
That his plans had been passed on
so favorably by Engineer Thomson
supported the view that Colonel
Davis was all right.
There was no collusion in bis case
with other members of the council.
Denied Line-up
Aid. Kerr then denied any lineup. He voted independently. There
was a point with which he differed
particularly from the engineer's department; that was, on the size of
the sewers.
Mr. Thomson congratulated Colonel Davis when he was here upon
his report upon the water system.
Aid. Newton on the point of the
two reports contended that if the
engineer's report bad been accepted,
the city would have been committed
to $500,000 for water alone. If
the flnacial situation was such as
represented there would have'been
a tie-up.
He took exception to the view,
although expressed by His Worship,
that the two engineer's agreed. He
was of the opinion that huge sums
of money were being wasted and he
could nol sit at the council and see
it pass. He objected to this "boosting" of the department.
Question of Population
Aid. Smith pointed out that the
difference in cost between the two
reports was upon tho point that
Mr. Thomson based his upon a 30,-
000 population and Colonel Davis
upon a population of 60,000. Colonel Davis was asked to prepare bis
report upon that basis, When Colonel Davis prepared his report, the
matter of the electrical end was not
settled and ho was not asked to
pass upon it. If Aid. Newton objected (o "boosting" Colonel Davis,
il was really objectionable to take
the course of continually knocking
Colonel Denis. ito believed in
treating every  man  justly.
Aid, Douglas said that Aid. Hilditch had thai day showed lack of
confidence In tho engineer by proposing to have the committee go
out and   visit   work   reported  upon
by   Ceiliiliel   |ia\is.
"I   eliel   thai   tee   1
I'l'p
busy,'
tions from the council through  the1 said Aid. Hilditch,    li was th ily
halrman of the. streets committee, way   to   keep  a ml   ot   other
ex-Aid.  Lynch. trouble.
in the matter of   ihe    McMordie Retaining Walls
contract   under   force   account,   Aid.       .,j    .,
Hllditch said he had always opposed |
it. The engineer, it had been shown,'
was not responsible  for  it.    It bad
instead'of by*pa*yirig $6~for contract
work.
Aid. Morrissey denied this.
The section was voted down.
Urged Claims of Mr.   Lucas
Proceeding then  to the    appointments,  Aid.   Newton  strongly   urged
Mr.  Lucas  for  the  position  of  head
of   the   department.     He   was   thoroughly   competent   he   believed   and
was led to believe that many of the
recommendations  were  referred     to
that engineer.    If it was found that
he was not able to do all the work
he  felt confident  that an  engineer
could be got at the salary fixed.
Aid. Smith was glad to hear Mr.
Lucas eulogized. He was all right,
he felt, on the street work and on
the plans. He was without experl
ence on water works, he believed.
He did not think that Mr. Lucas
was quite the man for that position
at the present time. Colonel Davis
had prepared these plans and it
was but reasonable to have him
carry these out. In so doing he
felt it was doing the best for the
citizens of  Prince Rupert.
Aid. Morrissey had been some
what surprised to see Mr. Lucas put
in at the bead of the department
He had confidence enough in Mr
Lucas to know that he would make
good and fill the position. He bad
been associated with many important works. He had nothing personal
against Colonel Davis, but he objected to the method in which he
conducted his department. When
were young engineers to be given a
chance if they were to be turned
down in their own town. The
plans had been prepared by Mr.
Lucas largely.
Aid. Hilditch's View-
Aid. Hilditch had as much respect
for Mr. Lucas as had Aid. Newton
and Aid. Morrissey. The most of
the mistakes that bad been made in
the city were made, he felt, by
those in whom he placed confidence.
These were naturally Mr. Clements
and Mr. Lucas. Mr. Lucas was a
first-class draughtsman. He was in
favor of his being assistant chief.
He was not heavy enough for the
position. It was sometimes said
that Colonel Davis was not heavy
enough, and he felt sometimes that
that was right. He was prepared
tomorow to resign his position at
the council board together with Aid.
Newton and go to the people and
stand the test of who was standing
by the people's interests.
Aid. Newton said he was ready
to do this. There had been a disposition for some time to burk his
quiet attempts to effect changes that
he felt this council was elected for.
He had no desire to continue at the
board if there was no likelihood of
his gaining his ends. There had
been a studied effort to prevent
this. He did not come into the council to be a dictator or agree with all
that the majority introduced.
Willing to Retire
Aid. Hilditch felt that Aid. Newton was sincere. In fact that was
about all he gave Aid. Newton credit for. The engineering department
and the public works department
were in such a state of efficiency
that it could never be improved
uiion he felt. He was personally not
anxious to stay on the council board.
He had private business to attend to
and would be satisfied to drop off
the board if it would put a stop to
the bickerings which seemed always to prevail between Aid. Newton and himself. He was well satis-
lie-il to retire rather than continue
to put up with the constant trouble
from his two colleagues on either
side, indicating Aid. Morrissey and
Aid.   Douglas.
Aid.   Douglas  said   he  started   off
actively.    Whenever he went to the
engineer he found that the engineer
always backed up Aid. Hilditch.
He was under the thumb of Aid.
Newton and they worked together
all  the time.
Aid. Newton said he took no part
in the early criticisms of the department, while Aid. Clayton, Aid. Hilditch and others were criticising the
department. Later he felt there
was something in it and he tried to
bring it an intelligent head. He
found that Aid. Hilditch had turned
a somersault.
Aid. Morrissey asked Aid. Hilditch to name wherein they had disagreed In committee. Where they
failed to be unanimous a minority
report was brought In.
Report Defeated
Tbe proposed changes in the staff
consequent upon the dismissal of
Colonel Davis were then voted down.
Aid. Morrissey pointed out that
there had been Inconsistency inasmuch as some councillors said they
did not disagree with all the findings, yet the vote on each was the
same.
Aid. Kirkpatrick moved, seconded
by Aid. Hilditch, that the report be
filed.
Aid. Newton said that in view of
Aid. Hilditch's challenge, he tendered his resignation. He would
not run again, for he intended to
wash his hands of the business.
He did it because he felt that his
time was wasted in trying to introduce changes where there were combinations to burk such moves
against existing evils. He would not
sit and endorse any such proposition. He never sought assistance
from any one for any of his motions.
He made bis motions in the public
interests.
Before retiring be desired to return thanks for kindness shown on
numorous occasions. He had the
kindliest feelings to the members of
the board.
His Worship regretted that Aid.
Newton should take the step he did.
If he finally determined to do so it
would be necessary to put in his
resignation in writing. He would
prefer to see the members of the
board remain In their positions,
howevber. It was not always possible to get all that might be wished
for.
Would Retire from Office
Aid. Newton said be intended to
do as he said. Had Aid. Hilditch
not thrown out the challenge, he did
he would have remained.
Aid. Hilditch said that his challenge was thrown out in a friendly
way. He would not conduct a campaign. He had no time to do so,
It was a public question for the citizens to decide whether they had
confidence in their engineering department. If a contest were entered
into he would agree to conduct no
campaign but leave it to the citizens
to decide.
Aid. Newton said he only came
into the council to overcome what
he considered the most damnable
system that bad been introduced
into the city. If Aid. Hilditch
wished the contest along (he lines
indicated bo would agree to offer
himself again.
The mayor suggested that the
aldermen do nothing rashly but take
time to consider the situation carefully before deciding, and the matter dropped.
Mrs. A, M. Manson is entertaining
at a bridge party this afternoon at
her home on Fifth avenue.
Mr. and Mrs. Henry Reifel, of Nanalmo are in the city. Mr, Beifel
is the head of the Nanaimo Brewing Company and is here in connection with bis business.
o][o]|n][|](n]|o^^
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CARLOAD JUST ARRIVED
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Ready Nixed Paints,
Paints Ground is Oil,
Paints Ground in Japan,
Varnishes, Shellac, etc.
Water Stains
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in all roi.ous
Prince Rupert Hardware & Supply
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You Can Avoid This
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There are Many
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'SlZi    IT   IS   TO   YOUR   INTEREST
We do first-class work and
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and return It within 48 hours
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Should anything be loBt or misplaced we will make It satisfactory.
When your Laundry goes to the Chinks there are many drawbacks. When you send It to us your money helps pay WHITE
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PIONEER STEAM LAUNDRY
been decided upon by the council of
last year.
Aid. Newton complained of going
on with work on the streets without definite plans. Yet his proposition was to go ahead with a reservoir to cost $30,000 or $50,000 on
Acropolis Hill without plans and
without knowing at the time where
the money was to come from. This
was inconsistent on the part of Aid.
Newton
As to the point of putting pole
lines on the streets, Aid. Hilditch
read from the reports of the engineer's department to the effect that
as pavements were laid conduits
would be laid and tho wires put
underground.
Howling for Work
When tho work of Improving
Section  1  was discussed,  Aid.  Nr.w-
orrisscy said ho first took
exception to the engineer In the
matter of the retaining walls. The
engineer's report first brought in
specified  no  figure.
Objection was raised to this by
Aid. Hllditch, who contended that
this applied only to specifications
for private owners who were going
to put in walls.
Further, Aid. Morrissey contended that the engineer specified that
$8,000 would build the retaining
walls and it was now shown to have
cost  $86,000.
Aid. Hilditch thought that any
one who thought that the walls
could be built for that sum was not
fit to sit at the board. He contended that a wall was being built
for $1.44 a yard under day labor
that would stand for all time. Aid.
Morrissey had been concerned because they were getting a wall
huill   under   the   day   labor   system
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Local Agent—F. M. DAVIS
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• PRINCE RUPERT
We Require Listings of Inside Business Property
Also Residence Property at Right Prices
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Real Estate, Insurance and Investments,
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Box 275
PHONE 222
PRINCE RUPERT, B.C.
OFFICE  THIRD  AVE.
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Good, Sound Reasons for
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Monarch  Ranges are built so that they can
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For around every opening into the body there
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If these other ranges were built in this way
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Investigate this matter of rivet, construction
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Telephone 3
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FOR   SALE
BLOCK
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LOTS BLOCK
19 ..
11    1-2-3-4-5-6
11 9-10
12    22
13 21-22
18    1-2
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9    22-23
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COAL
ROCHESTER & MONROE, Phone 115

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