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Prince Rupert Journal Sep 15, 1911

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Legislat|ugo5^in*tk)j
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VOLUME  II.
Published  Twice  a  Week.
PRINCE   RUPERT,   B.   C.   FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 1911.
Price, Five Cents.     \, "*/(~.y, NO.  20.
'.^JonifA. p. -v.,,J...i.f
ELABORATE PLANS
FOR G.T.P. CHATEAU
Architect Visits City and Decides in Favor of First
Avenue Site-Company Will Proceed With
one of Best Hotels on the
Pacific Coast.
The visit to the city this week
.of F. M. Rattenhury of Victoria, one
of tlie best known architects in the
Dominion of Canada, has given an
assurance that the G. T. P. is to start
its new hotel at once. Mr. Rattenhury came nortli for the express purpose of going over the proposed sites
and making recommendations to the
officials in the matter and at the
same time look into local conditions
with respect to the designing of the
hotel that he is to lay out for the
company.
In the selection of Mr. Ratteubury
as the architect the G. T. P. has made
no mistake. He is one of the best
that can be found, which is proved
by the many buildings that ba've been
erected in the west from his designs.
He is the architect that prepared the
plans for the Parliament buildings in
Victoria. He likewise designed the
Empress Hotel for the C. P. R. in
Victoria and has designed all the late
hotels and chalets that that company
has built within the past few years.
"'"I.,.- of tne public buildings of Brit-
' e Columbia and the prairie prov-
ii .: - have been erected from his
plans, so that the G. T. P. has in
Mr. Rattenhury an architect that
. gives an assurance of the very best
of results.
On First Avenue
After going over the sites which
the officials of the company submitted to him as available for the grand
tourist hotel Mr. Rattenhury had no
difficulty in selecting the site on
First Avenue which was announced
in the Journal a few days ago as the
most likely site in view by the company.
The hotel will In common with the
other buildings put up for the purpose of theh company elsewhere in
the Dominion along the line of the
great transcontinental road will be
of the chateau type. Mr. Ratteubury, as is known to all who are
acquainted with him, is essentially
artistic In all his work and never
loses that feature in planning as well
as for utility. It is safe to say that
when completed Prince Rupert will
have one of the finest hotels on the
continent. In discussing the proposition during his visit here he stated
to the Journal that the plans of the
company called for one of the finest
hotels on the Pacific Coast. It would,
it fact, he excelled by none of them,
- The Empress in Victoria would be
\ excelled In every way and the city
would have a house that would reflect the greatest credit upon the
company and the city.
Large  Hotel
The day, he says, for the small
hotels that have been put up in the
pist is now over on this coast. Others
Whave made their mistakes in this
regard, and the G. T. P. is profiting
by these mistakes. In future, the
hotels to be erected must be more
on the scale of the big European
hotels, accommodating at least 400
or 500 guests. Such is the place
that the G. T. P. has In view here,
and he feels after a visit to Prince
Rupert that the project io warranted.
Mr. Rattenhury will recommend as
the location for the hotel the reserve
Included between McBride Street and
the house occupied by the general
superintendent, Mr. Mehan. All of
that area will be included in the
grounds, with the hotel occupying an
imposing central location. If the
company officials acquiesce In the
recommendation of Mr. Rattenhury,
which is practically assured as the
site is the one which they were most
favorable to, the work will go forward at once. To carry It out will
take probably two years or more
working fast time.
Sixteen Storeys
According to the rough plans the
building will rise about sixteen
Storeys above the level of First Avenue. It will be located near the
central part of the space allotted to
the hotel and the grounds, or about
opposite First Street. In order to
avoid as must as possible any excessive cost of excavation and at the
same time give the building as commanding a position as possible, ths
building will he see high on the lot.
Part of the lowest floor may therefore be planned to occupy a space
on a level with First Avenue. The
next storey may, however, in carrying out the general scheme, be placed
on a rock foundation a storey higher
than this. The plans are being prepared so that the hotel may be added
to without in any way marring the
original plan. For instance, the first
part to be erected will probably be
auout 100 feet In fromtage facing on
First Avenue. It will give space for
about 150 bedrooms, which is practically the same size that the C.P.R.'s
Empress in Victoria is at the present
time, and considerably larger than
that hotel when it was completed.
All the rooms in the local chateau
will face either over the water of
the harbor or on to First Avenue.
May  lie Extended
When it is felt that the time is
ripe for an extension there will be
provision made for two very large
wings on either side that may be
added to without the least inconvenience. These would extend back towards the waterfront, leaving a space
between these two main wings in the
rear of the central part. In this space
will be the palm room, rising from
the main floor a height of about one
storey only, thus allowing for a
glazed roof.
Built upon this plan, there would
be accommodation on the lowest
floor for the bar, the grill and some
other offices of the hotel, including,
perhaps, the billiard room. There
would be an imposing entrance in
the centre, with massive doorway and
foyer. In the early stages of the
city the space for tbe palm room
could be utilized as dining room
space with a temporary kitchen adjoining it. This kitchen would be
the only part of the structure that
CLEMENTS   POPULAR I CITY'S FAIR OUTLOOK
Liberals  Trading  on This Succeed in yisitors to This Place See Great Possi-
Drawing Large Crowd to bilitries in the Near
Meeting. puture
Knowing     Conservative     Candidate
Could   Not   lie   Present   Use
Is Made of Name
(Continued  on  Page Five)
 1 o	
MINISTER'S   VISIT
Hon.
Dr.  Young  Could  Not  Address
Meeting Here on Way
North.
He   Rvpoi'ts   that   British   Columbia
Will Go Solid for Conservative Party
Hon. Dr. Young, financial secretary and minister of education of
the provincial government was a passenger by the steamer Princess Royal
yesterday. It had been the intention
of the Hon. Dr. Young to address
a smoker here during the time the
steamer was in port but owing to
the fact that only about an hour was
spent here and that at a time of the
day when it was impossible to hold
a meeting the opportunity of hearing the provincial secretary was forbidden. The minister is on his way
to Atlln, his own constituency, wliere
he will spend a week.
Speaking of the political situation,
Dr. Young says the outlook for the
Conservative party is exceedingly
bright. British Columbia, it is expected, will now return the solid
seven in support of Mr. Borden. In
the southern part of the constituency
of Comox-Atlin the party Is looking
well after the Interests of Mr. Clements and he is gaining strength
every day as the reciprocity pact is
more fully understood.
With respect to the whole situation throughout the country the
Doctor says the reports are all that
Mr. Borden will carry the day. There
is little or no feeling of doubt in
that regard now, the reports received
from the east indicating that there
is a decided revulsion against the
party in power.
Henry Doyle of Naas River is in
the city.
 o	
D. C. Stuart and Mrs. Stuart have
returned   from   an   outing  on   Gold
celt in the interior.
Knowing that II. S. Clements, the
Conservative candidate, was in Hazelton and could not accept the challenge, the redoubtable Duncan Ross
last Tuesday issued a challenge to
that gentlemen to meet him on the
public platform in the Empress Theatre in order to discuss tlie questions
of the day.
Knowing that it was impossible for
Mr. Clements to be present, the local
Liberals advertised that the two candidates were to meet, and thus trading on the popularity of the Conservative candidate, who has made
hosts of friends here, the meeting
was packed.
Mr. Ross spoke along the same
lines as he introduced at his previous
meetings, reading scattered sentences
from a speech of Mr. Clements to
prove that the latter-was in favor of
reciprocity.
His  speech   was  not  received   as
well  as  his   previous   efforts,    due
either   to  the   fact  that  he   was   a'j
little off color  or his "wawa"  was
becoming somewhat old  to  him.
IRRECONCILABLE
When Sir Wilfrid was accused
by Sir Charles Tupper of being
in favor of reciprocity Sir Wilfrid replied:
"I have a right to refer to
what is now in the minds of the
Canadian people; and if we
know the hearts and minds of
our people at present, I think
I am not making too wide a
statement when 1 say that the
general feeling in Canada today
is not in favor of reciprocity.
There was a time when Canadians, beginning with the honorable gentleman himself,
would have given many things
to obtain the American market;
there was a time not long ago
when the market of the great
cities of the Union was the only
market we had for any of our
products. But, thank heaven,
those days are past and over
now. We are not dependent
upon the American market as
we were at one time. Our system of cold storage has given us
a market in England which we
had not before."
How does this agree with Sir
Wilfrid's statements of today?
*   *   *   *   *
*   *   *   *
FISHERIES ABUSES
How M Kelly Controls the Herring-
Business in Nanaimo and
Elsewhere.
Licences Worth $50 Are Sold for as
High   an $1,500,  It
Is Alleged
Speaking at a meeting in Vancouver a few evenings ago, H. H. Stevens, the Conservative candidate,
dealt at some length with the abuses
In connection with the fishing industry on this coast.
He showed how the white fishermen had been "frozen out" by the
Japanese and remarked that the
herring fishery at Nanaimo was in
the hands of "Bob" Kelly's friends.
Licences were now granted to Japanese, although the fishing in these
waters was the heritage of white
men.
•Licences which were worth $50
had been sold for $1,500. Eight
hundred white fishermen had been
unjustly displaced by Japanese by
theh Dominion government through
its local supporters. "And then,"
said the speaker, "Bob Kelly has the
exclusive right's for fishing in
Smith's Inlet."
When he (eMr. Stevens) got into
Parliament, he certainly would starl
an investigation into the fishery business and see that the white men
got their rights. He would certainly
hold on until justice was rendered.
FAILED IN ATTEMPT
TO INTERRUPT
Prince Ruperl Is Sintering Upon tlie
Really  Great   Period   of
Its History
The prospects of a decided boom
in Prince Ruperl and the new nortli
next spring or even earlier is everywhere manfest. Residents of this
place are frowning down everything
that looks like inflated prices and at
an ..nnatural development, realizing
that, only harm can come of it. There
is a healthy growth in the city, however, and this fall and winter gives
promise of being decidedly active.
.1, .M. Rattenhury, the architect,
who is to plan the G. T. P. hotel,
was amazed at what he saw here
and showed a decided desire to get
inside property, which is now becoming somewhat scarce owing to the
fact that so many have during the
past summer paid visits here and
quietly made purchases, awaiting the
time when it will become profitable
to erect substantial buildings on the
lots.
rihe G. T. P. is showing a disposition to avoid creating a boom, likewise, but, there is every evidence
that a decided rush will be experienced here. The company has in
view immense things for the port,
as is shown by the way in which
its plans are being unfolded. An
hotel to equal, if not surpass, anything on the Coast is to be erected
here to meet the demands of the
tourist trade. The officials of the
company realize that no time is to
be lost in furthering its plans and
anxious to get started without delay
so as to be ready for the line when
completed. Then Prince Rupert will
see a trade that will astonish everyone. Thousands will be anxious to
make *Iie trip over the new route
and experience the novelty which at
taches to such a trip. This city will
become, during the summer, at least
lhe transfer point for as many tourists as visit Vancouver and Victoria
today. Practically all who go there
will make the trip here, making one
direction over the G. T. P. and spending a few days at least in the wonderful new city of Prince Rupert.
Preparations for that time will
have to be made from now on If the
city is to be ready to receive the
immense numbers that are to flock
here. The G. T.P. hotel will play.
its part in handling this trade, but
only a part. Every hotel'in the city
will be taxed to its utmost.
From an investor's standpoint
there is nothing to compare with the
city of Prince Rupert and the territory tributary to it.
Political Visitors to Conservative Meeting Were Shown
That They Could Not do as They Liked
—They Must Act in Gentlemanly Manner
Fishery   Laws
Before Stipendary Magistrate J. H.
McMullIn today the hearing of a case
is proceeding concerning the interpretation of the fishing laws and
regulations on this coast. It is alleged that a boat belonging to Henry
Doyle, on the Naas, violated the regulations. L. W. Patmore is prosecuting for the fishery department, while
W. E. Fisher appears for the defendant.
THE   ISSUE
"I firmly believe," said Premier McBride before leaving to
hold campaign meetings
throughout British Columbia,
"that the present political issue
is one which, if carried out according to the views of the Liberal government, must lead to
the dismemberment of the British Empire and the fusion of
Canada with the United States.
This is an emphatic and very
serious statement to make. 1
hold office under the Crown. 1
want to be as true and consistent In my position as possible,
and I feel that in this crisis—
in this emergency—if I do not
exert every effort I possibly
can along the lines I have
marked out, I shall not be true
to the stewardship given me by
the electorate which I now
enjoy."
The Conservative party called a
j smoker in .Melntyre Hall last evening for the purpose of hearing Hon.
Dr. Young, who was expected to attend and address the meeting. Owing to the fact that the steamer sailings would not permit of his being
present, tlie meeting was addressed
by several local Conservative speakers. Tlie meeting was in every way
a decided success.
An outstanding feature of it was
the failure on the part of a party
representing the Liberals to gain control. The attempt was a most apparent one, but the tone of the gathering was decidedly against any such
iction and those who made the attempt were unmistakeably shown
that they were not masters of the
situation, as they vainly hoped to
be. They accordingly retired, after
making a disgraceful spectacle of
themselves.
M. M. Stephens, who presided, put
his foot down firmly on any rowdyism and refused the floor to any one
who would so far forget himself in
a meeting of that kind to act as had
Mr. Angers, the leader of the forces
that invaded the meeting to disband it.
The interruption came following a
speech of S. M. Newton, who dealt
with many aspects of the reciprocity
question. In concluding, he referred
to the fact that Sir Wilfrid Laurier
had himself, only a few years ago,
declared that while there had been
a time when the Canadians would
gladly have accepted reciprocity, that
time was passed in that Canada was
not dependent now as in the days
gone by upon the trade with the
United States.
The statement was at once met by
Mr. Angers, who was in the audience, who wanted to know who made
that statement.
Ik was told it was Sir Wilfrid
Laurier.
Mr. Arigers then became very excited and denied thai any such statement was ever made. lie wanted
tlie speaker to produce Hansard,
which he was told was a palpable
impossibility at the time, hut that
the statement was true and that it
had been never contradicted, although used time and time again
throughout the campaign.
Mr. Angers became still more excited, and amidst considerable tumult
contradicted the speaker and said he
would be heard on the platform.
After he had become quiet the
chairman stated that he would not
allow the platform to Mr. Angers,
whose action had shown that he was
not entitled to a hearing. At a gathering like that there were rules that
should be observed by any one who
expected to have the respect of any
audience.
Failing to gain possession of the
meeting, the disturber and a few of
his followers filed out, with threats
and cries of "cowards." The party
apparently misjudged the audience,
which, irrespective of any party feeling, was not prepared to stand for
anything that was not becoming gentlemen in a discussion of public affairs.
And so the studied effort to gain
possession of a Conservative meeting
utterly  failed.
Other speakers during the evening were O. H. Nelson, Aid. Hilditch,
G. R. T. Sawle and J. H. Swift.
Little *J:'iss (lray*during the evening gave a splendid exhibition of
Scottish  dancing.
The meeting closed with the singing of "God Save the King" and
cheers  for  Mr,   Clements.
RAMONA  IS  LOST
The Pacific Coast Steamship Company's
Steamer Sinks off Spanish
Island Reef.
GRANT TRANSFER
Licence Commissioners  Sit  nnd  Dispose of Windsor Hold
Application
No   Lives   Lost   bill   Vessel   Sinks   ill
Short   Time   After
Hitting   Hocks
Ou Tuesday evening the news was
received here by wireless that the
steamer Ramona was a total wreck.
The vessel is one of the Pacific Coast
Steamship Company's liners plying
between Seattle and Alaskan ports.
The local wireless station received
the news from the steamer Northwestern, on which the passengers
were  proceeding  south.
The message said that the Ramona
struck on Spanish Island reef on
Sunday evening about 8:30 p. m. She
slid off the rock, knocking her bottom clear out as she slid off and
settled In fifteen minutes after striking.
No lives were lost, but the ship
was a complete wreck.
There was {106,000 of AlaBka
gold on the steamer, wliich wao
southbound. The wireless on the
Ramona was out of commission five
minutes after the accident owing to
the engine room becoming flooded.
Captain Lafe, the chief steward,
the pilot and the chief engineer are
staying by the vessel, while the passengers and crew were taken on
board the Northwestern, and will
reach Seattle today.
May  Be Good  News
City workmen engaged on Third
Avenue today near the Journal office opened up a rapping of Iron
with very good showings in copper
ore beneath it. Several who have
seen the rock believe that with depth
there might be paying ore found, it
has been generally believed that
Prince Ruperl townsite would produce gooel mineral before II was fully
explored.
At a meeting of tlie- licence eoiii-
missioners of the city held Wednesday afternoon Aid. Smith and Commissioner .Merryfield were present.
The application for transfer of the
hotel licence for the Windsor Hotel
from Maurice Bondeaux to William
II. Wright was considered and every
thing heing In order the transfer was
granted.
The application of George Sutherland for a bottle licence was laid
over until a full board would be
present.
The meeting adjourned until September 27.
 o	
A GREAT COUNTRY
N.   Winslow   Returns   From   the
Interior  Delighted   With
the Prospects
10. N. Winslow of .]. II. Kugler &
Company has returned to Ihe city
from u trip to the interior. He went
as far as Aldermere on his tour and
returns full of hope with respect to
the whole of thai  district.  ,
He visited the townsite of New Hazelton and is more than pleased with
the location from every standpoint.
There is a rich country lo be opened
up In every direction, and the town-
site is ideally located, so lhat its
future  is  absolutely  assured.
The whole interior looks exceedingly good to Mr. Winslow, who predicts a very great future now that
the railway is invading the territory.
■ o 1	
Decision   In   Wind   I p
It having been decided by the
shareholders to wind up tlie affairs
of the Canadian Renard Road Transportation Co., Ltd., which wns organized a season or two ago to engage
in traction transportation over the
Cariboo roads, und .lames Hunt
Stanton having been appointed liquidator of the company, ;e special meeting' of ihe creditors is convened by
the liquidator, to he- hold In Vancouver on the ISth inst. PRINCE RUPERT JOLRNAL
Friday,  September   15,  1911.
*+*¥***++***¥*++****+***¥*
The Great Interior i
*
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An interesting report as to the extent and suitability for agricultural
purposes of the large area of country lying between Hazelton and the
Fort George country has just been
made to the department of agriculture by Messrs. Weir and Whyte, who
tliis summer traversed the regions
in question, conferring with the scattered settlers us to the best varieties
of cereals, roots and fruits for planting with prospect of success, and incidentally investigating conditions
generally for the information of the
department and of prospective settlers.
The two special representatives of
the department left Vancouver on
their mission on May 1 of last year,
continuing in the field until the 27th
ultimo, and meanwhile covering no
fewer than 1,200 miles on horseback,
Inclusive of side trips. Their tour
took them all through the valley of
the Upper Skeena, the Kispiox district, the Bulkley Valley, the Morice
River Valley, down thence to the
head of Francois Lake, the country
tributary to which both north and
south was carefully examined, on to
Burns Lake, back to Ootsa and Chas-
latta Lakes, from there to Fraser
Lake and the district continguous,
and through the surveyed townships
of the Nechaco, from which they
crossed to Stuart Lake and Fort S.
James.
It was found that from Hazelton
through the Bulkley Valley the country is more closely confined by the
mountain ranges, while the country
otherwise widens to high rolling plateau land, the characteristics of the
entire area being those of a mixed
farming country, not especially
adapted to dairying although the
keeping of a number of cows would
noturally form part of the policy of
settlers engaged in which is termed
mixed farming. The temperature of
the country traversed varies considerably, according to its especial location, while the railfall generally is
light. At Fort St. James, the only
point at which record has been kept
of thermometer readings and precipitation year by year, the rainfall
was given as but sixteen inches for
the year. In parts of the territory
visited, irrigation will in process of
time prove profitable; meanwhile,
the policy of the settlers should be
to get their ground in the "best possible condition and conserve the rainfall by simple measures.
As yet there is but a handful of
settlers in tbe district in proportion
to the number for which it is capable
of providing profitably, some 160
pioneers in all being visited during
the tour.
.Messrs. Weir and Whyte do not
look upon the country which they
have just visited as likely to prove
valuable for fruit growing on any
large scale although the settlers may
succeed in raising fruit enough to
provide an agreeable variety in their
own foodstuffs, hy planting hardy
varieties and giving them especial
care and protection from the frosts.
Cold, frosty weather follows so
quickly upon the September rains
that it is peculiarly trying upon the
young trees; while during the spring
months of April, May and June, the
days are warm—starting the flowing
of tlie sap—and the nights exceedingly chilly, another circumstance
which must afford the orohard'ist
considerable anxiety.
Turnips, carrots and other roots
grow famously, and while beets,
mangels, etc., have hardly had a
fair trial as yet, it is believed that
these will also do well. The settlers, at all events, will experience
no difficulty in growing sufficient
roots for the wlnterfeeding of their
cattle, an Importanl consideration,
In all parts Of the territory there
appears to be an abundance of water,
Mi hough the spring-feel creeks are
nol numerous, The country too, Is
lightly timbered and therefore easily
Cleared. The Investigators estimate
ihe- e-osl of clearing at from hut $20
ti $ 1 n0 per acre, from $5" to $00
beeiig a fair average. The foresla-
tioei is principally poplar, spruce and
jack-pine, with some Douglas fir
along Fraser and Stuart Lakes and
through the Nechaco Valley.
All through the pleateau land, the
hardier cereals should grow well, and
there will be a market for the crops
in the new towns which are certain
to spring up along the line of the
railway. Small fruits, too, grow well
in the Hazelton district, and for
Hazelton district, and for these the
market also must prove extensive and
profitable.
At present, owing to lack of transportation facilities, the cost of living in the district is exceedingly
high, everything having to be
packed In either from Hazelton on
the one hand or Quesnel on the other.
The standard price of sugar, beans,
rice, etc., in the interior, is thus 20
cents per pound; and that'of ham,
bacon, etc., 35 cenls, with flour
quoted at 511 per hundredweight.
Fort Fraser, situated midway between the two supply bases, represents the price summit of the country, 12 cents per pound being the
charge for packing from either direction. t   .
Certain of the settlers have shown
rare ingenuity in circumventing the
high packing costs, as is the case of
one Nechaco colonist, who has made
a practice or getting in his seed oats
by i parcel post, postage on his five-
pound packages being but six cents
per pound, whereas If brought In as
freight his oats would cost him double that sum in transportation
charges. Last season his one ingenious settler received by mail no
less than five hundred pounds of
oats, to the infinite dlsfust of the
mail currier, who happened also to
be the common carrier.
This season witnessed the importation of the first self-binder that
has been seen in the district, it having been introduced by "Billy" Milne,
the operator at Stoney Creek, who
cultivates a field of twenty-flveacres
as a side-venture. Naturally, the
modern implement excited the markedly curious Interest of the Indians,
who had never seen such a piece of
machinery before.
These natives, by the way, are not
yet convinced that the railway
through their country is to be an
actuality. They have experienced various rushes, during which their land
has been filled for a time by white
men. But these have faded away,
and the white men have left the land
again and again to its original inhabitants. First came the builders
of the old telegraph trail, which was
to give to the world wire communi-
I'ation by way of Alaska and the Bering Straits. Upon completion of the
Atlantic cable this undertaking was
suddenly abandoned—and the Indians still nave the great reels of
abandoned wire, which they find useful In various structural enterprises.
The Omineca and the Klondike
rushes also paid tribute in abandoned
freights—and the Indians are expectantly waiting for history to repeat itself, the contents of the railway camp storehouses eventually to
be their upoh the departure of the
white men and the relapse of the
land once more into its primeval
tranquility.
Of even greater interest to the local Indians that Mr. Milne's self-
binder was a drove of sheep imported via Chilcotin this season by the
hotel proprietor at Aldermore. Sheep
had never been seen in the country
before, and many and learned were
the aboriginal theories concerning
the animals and their habits. The
importer had the good fortune to
get through his band of 125 sheep
with a loss of only one. Mutton is
now in demand at Aldermere at 50
cents a pound.
 o	
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f +
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For the purpose of looking into the
possibilities of shipping goods to
Fort George with the opening of navigation next spring by way of the
G. T. P. from Edmonton through the
yellowhead Pass to Tete Juane
Cache, 40 miles beyond the summit,
and from there to their destination
by steamers on the Rraser River,
Russell Peden of the Northern Lumber Company at South Fort George
arrived in Edmonton and will leave
for the Yellowhead, says the Edmonton Capital. Mr. Peden left Fort
George some weeks ago and has
spent the intervening time in n number Of the coast I'itles. In Edmonton he will be poinet! by John II.
Gray of Victoria,'who has a number
eel survey parlies at work in Central
British Columbia, some of which are
surveying government lands while
others are laying out limber limits
for private Individuals.
Speaking to the Capital, Mr. Peden
said that the pe'Vle of Fort George
and the surrounding district arc looking forward eagerly to the time
when Edmonton will be their base
of supplies and it will be possible to
ship goods from h ere to Fort George
by way of the Te*e Jaune Cache and
the remainder of the distance by
steamers.
Anticipating the development of
this trade, Mr. Peden is making arrangements for the construction of
a large steamer at Tete Jaune Cache,
the machinery for which will be
shipped In over the G. T. P. This
.steamer will ply between Tete Jaune
Cache and Soda Creek, the terminus
of the 168 mile wagon road north
from Ashcroft. He said that It will
be possible to ship goods from Edmonton to Soda Creek, some distance beyond Fort George, far
cheaper than they can be hauled in
over the wagon road from Ashcroft.
Thus It Is to be expected that Edmonton is to be for a while at least
I  To Rush Supplies
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
SIR EDMUND WALKER, C.V.O., LL.D., D.C.L, President
ALEXANDER LAIRD, General Manager
CAPITAL, - $10,000,000        REST, - $7,000,000
DRAFTS ON FOREIGN COUNTRIES
Every branch of The Canadian Bank of Commerce is equipped to issue drafts on
the principal cities in the following countries without delay :
New Zealand
Africa Crete
Arabia _  Cuba
Argentine Republic Denmark
Greece
Holland
Iceland
Australia                   Egypt                        India
Austria-Uungmry    Faroe Islands          Ireland
Belgium                   Finland                    Italy
BrazU                      Formosa                  Japan
Bulgaria                    France                       Java
Ceylon                        Fr'ch Ce^chin China Malta
Cleife                               Germany                     Manchuria
China Great Britain Mexico 	
The amount of these drafts is stated in the money of the country where they are payable ; that is they are de-awn in sterling, francs, marks, lire, kronen, florins, yen,
taels, roubles, etc., as the case may be. This ensures that the payee abroad will
receive the actual amount intended. 233
J. M. CHRISTIE, Manager, Prince Rupert Branch
Siberia
Norway Soudan
Panama South Africa,
Persia Spain
I'.-ree    > Straits Settlements
Philippine Ishuids Sweden
Peertugal Switzerland
Roumania Turkey
Russia t"net,-.l Slates
Scrvia Uruguay
Siam West Indies, etc.
the base of supplies for all theh posts
along the Fraser River and Tete
Jaune Cache to Soda Creek and as
far beyond as the river Is navigable.
The people of the Fort George
country are tired of paying a toll of
seven cents freight per hundred on
all goods brought in from the outside world, according to Mr. Peden.
The excessive, freight charges necessitated by the long wagon road haul
from Ashcroft to Soda Creek and the
expensive and dangerous trip up the
Fraser River to Fort George has
made it almost impossible for those
who would engage in industries to
take any heavy machinery into the
country, and thus development work
is practically at a standstill until the
advent of the railway west from Edmonton to Tete Jaune Cache. Outfits to carry on mining, which is
expected to become one of the greatest industries of the Fort George
country, could be taken in at only
at a great expense and for this reason the people who have staked what
appear to be valuable claims are simply waiting for better transportation
facilities.
Only a few small lumber mills
have c ommenced operation in the
country, although there are immense
areas of timber bordering on the
watercourses. As yet, however,
there is only a limited market for
lumber in Central Britisii Columbia
and mill owners in equipping their
mills have to figure on the enormous
expense of transporting their machinery into the country.
"If the head of steel on the G.T.P.
does not reach Tete Jaune Cache this
winter it will at least get as far as
the upper end of Moose Lake," said
Mr. Peden. "With trains running to
this point it will be possible to ship
goods down the Fraser with very
little extra expense, as the G. T. P.
contractors have constructed a very
good tote road from the summit of
the pass to Tete Jaune .Cache. In
the construction of this roati they
have been aided by the British Columbia government, which has contributed half the cost of the road.
It was constructed at an expense of
$1,400 per mile."
Mr. Peden has great faith in the
future of the Fort George country,
believing that with good railway facilities it will develop into theh most
productive section of British Columbia. Sensational developments in the
mining industry are expected within
the next year or two, as prospectors
are fairly swarming into the country.
A large number of gold claims have
been staked at Willow Creek, a small
stream tributary to the Fraser River,
u short distance from Fort George.
These will be placer mining proposi-'
tions.
done for him and he died early the
following morning, four hours after
the accident. He was carrying some
$3,000 in bills and a sack of gold
and was on his way back to China
to see his wife. He had been up
at Stanley for the past twenty years.
The other passengers were Dr. J. W.
McKibbin and J. F. Coffman of Adams, Neb. At an inquest held on the
Chinaman by Dr. S. Mostyn-Hoops,
a verdict was brought in of accidental death, no blame being irt any
way attached to the driver.
NOTICE*  TO CONTRACTORS
AUTO   FATALITY
ASHCROFT—The Ashcroft Journal gives particulars of a fatal auto
accident nortli of le'iO-Mile House
which resulted in one death. Frank
Inknian was driving one of the B. C.
Express Company's autos on the return trip and was taking a bend in
the road, which was thick with mud
owing to the recent rains, when,
without any warning, the car skidded
and slid over to the side of the road
and over an embankment Into the
ditch, fifteen feet below. Another
car was following directly behind
and the passengers were able to render assistance to those who were injured in the wreck. Inman was pinned down beneath the- overturned
car, with a dislocated hip, and in
spite of the intense pain, told the
others how to raise the car in order
to liberate him, warning them not
to strike matches In case the gasoline had leaked from the tank in any
way. Two Chinamen were among
the passengers, one of whom escaped
without Injury, but the other was
thrown some twenty feet against a
rock. When found, the poor fellow
was suffering intensely and he was
finally removed to the Chinese section at Mile 150, where the other
Chinamen superstltlously avoided
the  dying  man.     Nothing could  be
Police Station, Naas River
SEALED TENDERS, superscribed
"Tender for Police Station, Naas
River," will be jeceived by the Hon.
the Minister of Public Works up to
noon of Tuesday, the 12th day of
September, 1911, for tHe erection and
completion of a timber-framed police
station at Naas River, in the Skeena
Electoral District.
Plans, specifications, contract, and
forms of tender may be seen on and
after the 17th day of August, 1911,
at the offices of the Government
Agent, Prince Rupert; C. P. Hickman, Esq., Provincial Constable,
Naas Harbour; and the Jepartment
of Public Works, Victoria.
Each proposal must be accompanied by an accepted bank cheque
or certificate of deposit on a chartered bank of Canada, made payable
to the Hon. the Minister of Public
Works, for the sum of $150, which
shall be forfeited if the party tendering decline to enter into contract
when called upon to do so, or if he
fail to complete the work contracted
for. The cheques or certificates of
deposit, of unsuccessful tenderers
will be returned to them upon the
execution of the contract.
Tenders will not be considered unless made out on the forms supplied,
signed with the actual signature of
the tenderer, and enclosed in the
envelopes furnished.
The lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted.
J. E. GRIFFITH,
Public Works Engineer.
Department of Public Works, Victoria, B. a, August 15, 1911. a22sl2
WATER NOTICE.
NOTICE is hereby given that an
application will be made under Part
V. of the "Water Act, In09," to obtain a licence in the Queen Charlotte Islands Division of Skeena District.
(a) ' The name, address and occupation of the applicant—Merton A.
Merrill, Masset, Q. C. I., B. C,
Prospector.
(If for mining purposes) Free
Miner's Certificate No	
(b) The name of the lake,
stream, or source (if unnamed, the
description is)—I-in-tsua Lake, Tsu-
Skundale Lake and Ain River.
(c) The point of diversion—At er
near the outlet of Tsu-Skuudale
Lake Into Ain River.
(d) The quantity of water applied for (in cubic feet per second)
—1,000.
(e) The character of the proposed works—Power Plant, Dam,
Flumes, etc.
(f) The premises on which the
water Is to be used (describe same)
■—At or near the mouth of the Ain
River.
(g) The purposes for which the
water Is to be used—Generating
power.
(h) If for Irrigation, describe
the land intended to be Irrigated,
giving acreage	
(1) If the water is to be used for
power or mining purposes, describe
the place where the water is to be
returned to some natural channel,
and the difference In altitude between point of diversion and point
of return—At or near the mouth of
the Ain River, about 100 feet below
point of diversion.
(J) Area of Crown land Intended to be occupied by the proposed
works—10 acres more or less.
(k) This notice was posted on
the 28th day of November, 1910,
and application will be made to the
Commissioner on the 1st day of
June, 1911.
(1) Give the names and addresses of any riparian proprietors or
licensees who or whose Iands are
likely to be affected by the proposed works, either above or below
the outlet—Don't know of any.
(Signature)
MERTON A.  MERRILL,
(P. O.  Address)   Masset,  B.  C.
NOTE.—One cubic loot per second is equivalent to 35.71 miner's
Inches.
PUBLIC HIGHWAYS
Province of British Columbia
NOTICE is hereby given that all
Public Highways in unorganized Districts, and all Main Trunk Roads in
organized Districts are sixty-six feet
wide, and have a width of thirty-
three feet on each side of the mean
straight centre line of the travelled
road. THOMAS TAYLOR,
Minister of Public Works.
Department of Public Works, Victoria. B. C., July 7, 1911.    Jyl8-ol8
CANCELLATION OP RESERVE.
NOTICE is hereby given that the
reserve of a parcel of land situated
on Graham Island, notice of which
appeared in the British Columbia
Gazette on the 25 th of February,
1909, being dated 23rd February,
1909, is cancelled to permit of the
lands being acquired by pre-emption
only and for no other purpose
ROBT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Department of Lands,
Victoria, B. C, April 5th, 1911.
4-14—7-5
NOTICE.
In the matter of an application for
the issue of a duplicate of the Certificate of Title for an undivided
one-half of Lot 883, Group I,
Cassiar District:
Notice is hereby given that It is
my intention to Issue at the expiration of one month after the first
publication hereof a duplicate of the
Certificate of Title to the above
mentioned land in the name of William Jordan Larkworthy, which Certificate is dated the 30th day of September, 1910, and numbered 326R.
WILLIAM  E.   BURRITT,
DI   rict  Registrar.
Land Registry Office,
Prince Rupert, B. C,
May 26,  1911. J23
NOTICE
In the matter of an application for
the  issue  of  a  duplicate  of  the
Certificate  of Title  for  Lot  361,
Range 5, Coast District:
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
it  is my  intention  to  issue  at  the
expiration  of  one  month   after  the
first publication  hereof a  duplicate
of the Certificate for the above described lands in the names of Truman S. Baxter and Albert D. Durham,
which  Certificate  of  Title  Is  dated
25th   November,    1909,   and   numbered 44 1.
WILLIAM  E.   BURRITT,
District Registrar.
Land Registry Office, Prince Rupert, B, C, August 14, 1911. Sl5-sl5
CANCELLATION OP RESERVE.
Notice is hereby given the the
reserve existing by reason of the
notice published in the British Columbia Gazette of the 27th December, 1907, over lands on Graham Island, formerly covered by 'limber
Licences Nos. Nos. 37055, 37056 and
37057, which expired on the 6th day
of November, 1909, and the lands
embraced within Timber Licence No.
37059, which expired on the 25th
day of January, 1909, is cancelled,
and that the said lands will be open
for pre-emption only under the provisions of Section 7 of the "Land
Act" after midnight on June 16th,
1911.
ROBERT A.  RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Lands Department,
Victoria, B. C, t
9th March, 1911.
WATER   NOTICE
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast, Range 5.
TAKE NOTICE that T. H. Hughes,
of Lakelse Valley, occupation farmer,
intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a rost planted at the southeast corner of Lot
4128; tbence 40 chains north; thence
40 chains east; ihenc3 40 chains
south; tlience 40 chains west to point
of commencement, and containing
160 acres, more or less.
TOM HUGH HUGHES.
Dated June 5, 1911.
Skeena  Land  District—District
of Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that Thomas Stewart, of Prince Rupert, occupation
accountant, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted 40 chains north from
the southwest corner of Lot 1733;
thence west 40 chains; thence south
40 chains; thence east 40 chains;
thence north 40 cliains to point of
commencement.
THOMAS STEWART.
John Klrkaldy, Agent.
Dated July 7, 1911.
WATER NOTICE
NOTICE Is hereby given that an
application will be made under Part
V of the "Water Act, 1909," to obtain a licence in the Queen Charlotte
Islands Division of Skeena District.
(a) The name, address and occupation of the applicant—Orland P.
Merrill; Massett, Graham Island,
B. C.J prospector.
(If for mining purposes) Free Miner's Certificate No	
(b) The name of the lake,
stream or source (if unnamed, the
description is)—Ain Lake and Ain
River.
(c) The point of diversion-
or near Ain Lake.
(d) The quantity of water
plied for (in cubic feet per second)
—700. .
(e) The character of the proposed
wor:.s—Dam, flume, pipe line and
power  plant.
(f) The rrerc'*es on -■ 'il !i ; .:•
water is to be used  (de.   ,ibe s
—Near moutli of Ain River.
(g) The purposes for which  *   ;
water  is  to    be    used—Cere	
power.
(h)    If for irrigation, describe-
land to be irrigated, giving acre:>c -
-At
ap-
(I) If the water is to be used for
power or for mining purposes, describe the place where the water is
to be returned to some natural channel, and the difference in altitude
between point of diversion and point
of return—Near mouth of Ain River
about 150 feet below point of diversion.
(j) Area of Crown land intended
to be occupied by the proposed
works— About 10 acres.
(k) This notice was posted on
the tenth day of June, 1911, and application will be made to the Commissioner on the fourth day of September, 1911.
(1) Give the names and addresses
of any riparian proprietors or licensees who or whose lands are
likely to be affected by the proposed
works, either above or below the
outlet—None.
(Signature)  ORLAND P. MERRILL,
(P. O. Address)   Masset, B. C.
George S. Mayer, Agent,
(P.  O.  Address)   Masset,  B.  C.
Note—One cubic foot per second
is equivalent to 35.71 miner's Inches.
I, Andrew Christian Skjelbred, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, occupation
farmer, give notice thnt on the 24th
day of September, I Intend to apply
to the Water Commissioner at his
office in Prince Rupert, for a licence
to take and use 8 cubic feet of water
per second from hot springs on the
border of Lake Lakelse in the Skeena
Land Division of Coast District. The
water is to be taken directly from
the springs and Is to be used on Lot
8279, for sanitarium purposes.
Dated August 24,  1911
AND.  CHRISTIAN SKJELBRED.
9-5 Prince Rupert, B. C.
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar
TAKE NOTICE that Marlon Mc-
Diarmid, of London, Ontario, occupation nurse, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described land:—Situated on the
Kitwancool River; commencing at a
post planted at the northwest corner and about 5 1-4 miles distant In
a northwesterly direction from the
north end of Kitwancool Lake;
thence south 80 chains; thence east
80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains to point of
commencement, and adjoining Lot
1878 to the north; and containing
640 acres, more or less.
MARION McDIARMID.
Daniel McDonald, Agent.
Dated July 24   1911. A-15
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE    NOTICE  that I,  John  Y.  ^
Rochester, of Prince Rupert, oceupa- tp
Hon broker, Intend to apply f>r per- ^
mission to lease the following    described land:— Commencing    nt?   a
post planted on the northerly end of
an island in the Skeena River about
Mile 45 on the Grand Trunk Pacific
Railway; thence    north    1000    feet
more or less to low    Water    mark;
thence westerly along the low water
mark    1000    feet    more    or    lesai
thence southerly 1000 feet more At
less; thence easterly 1000    feet    to
the place of commencement.
J. Y. ROCHESTER.
Dated May 30, 1911. 6-2
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that T. M. Turner,
of Lakelse Valley, occupation farmer, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands: ■— Commencing at a post
planted on the Omineca & Hazelton
right of way and adjoining the N. E.
corner of Lot 518; tlience west 17
chains to corner of Lot 3996; thence
north 20 chains; thence following
right of way to point of commencement.
T. M. TURNER,
John Klrkaldy, Agent.
Dated 14th June, 1911. 7-4
Skeena    Land    Notice—District    of
Coast—Range V
TAKE NOTICE that Daniel W.
Beaton, of Prince Rupert, B. C, occupation carpenter, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about five miles
up the Exchumslk River from Its
mouth, and on Its south bank; thence
east 40 chains; thence north 40
chains; thence west 40 chains;
thence south 40 chains to place of
commencement.
DANIEL  W.   BEATON.
Dated June  14,  1911. J-ll
. F
Friday,  September  15,  1911.
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
*jt*j*>Tp•;«•{• *jt >jt *j* *i« «j« *i« »*• **« *j» ■>*. *jt *;»*;*»!•*;•>»,«*i» ij* »*« -*• .*•
Hands out of Use
***************************
Sir Frederick Treves, the eminent
surgical authority, in a "Nineteenth
Century" paper, declares very emphatically that "it would seem that
the highest point of development in
the use of the hands has been already reached; has been, indeed,
passed, and that we have now entered upon a decline." Let us see to
what extent Sir Frederick's contention's can be supported.
Two of the commonest handicrafts
are those of writing and sewing, but
they are being now rapidly supplanted by the typewriter on the one hand
and the sewing machine on the other.
The finer use of the fingers Is thus
becoming lost, so far as these simple crafts are concerned. There was
occasion when penmanship was almost a fine art, and the writing master a power in the land. In these
present days of hurry there is no
time for elegant handwriting. The
script of the ordinary letter writer
is often ns hard to interpret as the
message on the Rossetta stone, and
as there is, coincldentally, no leisure
available for the deciphering of illegible writing the typing machine
becomes opportune.
Surgery during recent years has
made amazing advances. Should It
be asked if this progress has been
associated with, or dependent upon,
'corresponding development of the
handicraft of surgery, the answer is,
It has not. Before the days of anaesthetics the surgeon was operating
upon a conscious being. Rapidity of
movement was all essential; success
was gauged by the stop watch, every
unnecessary second meant unnecessary torture. The surgeon had to
be marvellously deft of hand, cool,
yet alert as a ferfeer; quick, yet as
Btire as a mattador. The combination
of qualities that made up a good
operating surgeon was rare, and so
in those days the perfect operator
was equally rare.
Now, with the; use of anaethetics,
the surgeon can proceed with easy
deliberation, every step can be ineas-
sured and judged; there is no call
to be brilliant; there is no element
of hurry, for in place of the flashing is an action as studied as a
movement on the chess hoard. The
result of it is this: Surgery, ns a
' pure handicraft, has undoubtedly
lost ground.
Some of the simpler crafts exhibit
in striking fashion tlie decay of cultivation In the use of the hands. Take
the very ancient occupation of spinning and weaving. In India it Is still
possible to see the whole lirocess of
making cloth carried out by hand.
The process involves a fine training
for the fingers—a training that has
made nimble and sensitive the hands
of thousands of men and women In
this country. But the handicraft has
vanished, the machine has replaced
it, and the skill produced by centuries of practice has been lost forever. Not so many years ago It was
possible to see in almost every fishing village half a dozen gossips
strolling about knitting stockings
and jerseys for men. The work was
not, perhaps, elaborate, but it was a
good training for the hands. Hand
knitting does not pay except as an
amusement.
The ancient art of embroidery—
as ancient as Babylon and Tyre—was
a craft of wide possibilities. The
handicraft is practically lost. It is
true that the finer work is still done
, by the hand, but the major part is
turned out of a machine with brutal
unconcern. There are advantages resulting from this which are easy to
appreciate, but at the same time a
thousand hands have lost their cunning and handicraftmnnshlp has
passed to a lower grade.
Lace making occupies a somewhat
' similar position. It Is probably the
most elaborate work which has ever
engaged the facile fingers of women.
Lnce making has engnged whole colonies of women, nnd has enabled
them to bring the culture of the hand
to a marvellous degree of perjectlbn.
This has assuredly been an object
worthy of attainment. But the days
of the craft are nearly over, and the
manual skill so laboriously attained
is—In spite of all attempts to revive
it—in process of being lost.
Probably the oldest domestic instrument Is the needle. The needle
maker was a master of craft. The
common needle is now made by a
series of machines, which turn the
implements out In pairs, two being
united, head to head. The process
involves manual skill, and In the
production of special needles something of the cunning of the past, but
the fact remains that n great means
for the culture of the hands has
passed away.
The carpenter with his primitive
art, is still with us, but he is not
tlie handicraftsman that he was.
There are sawing engines and planing  machines  for  boards   of   every
kind. The "four-cutter machine"
works all four faces of the wood simultaneously. Machines have been
produced for fashioning all kinds of
mouldings, for cutting dovetails, mortises and tenons, while the engine
known as the "universal jointer" is
a combination machine with superhuman powers. The "copying lathe"
produces objects of regular or irregular shape automatically from a pattern, and can turn out with equal
ease a gunstock or a broom handle,
a foot last or a toy horse. The sandpapering machine is almost uncanny
in its imitation of human movements, while the self-directing lathe
represents the callous absorption of
whole centuries of manual skill.
Sir Frederick Treves goes through
a long' list of occupations, arts and
accomplishments which formerly
called Into play great dexterity of
the hand and fingers, and which are
now done by machinery. Even piano
playing is included in the list. The
loss Is both great and regrettable.—
Glasgow Dally Herald.
 0	
WEALTHY  CITY
VANCOUVER—Although the available borrowing money for the civic
committees next year will be very
large, there is little doubt that there
will be an exceptional number of
applications for its expenditure in
the way of nei'essary city improvements. The borrowing power is calculated on the basis of 10 per cent
on the assessable property of the
two previous years. The assessable
property in 1910 amounted to $106,-
454,265 and that of 1911 to $136,-
023,045, making a total of $243,-
177,731, and as the bonded indebtedness of the city is roughly $14,000,-
000, the council, In making provision for money bylaws at the beginning of tlie year would have a margin of about $10,000,000. Amongst
the applications which are likely to
be brought forward is the suggestion
of Aid. Ramsay in connection with
his proposed submission of a bylaw
of $1,000,000 for a new city hall;
another for the extension of a water
main up Seymour Creek, and the
completion of the dam project, with
the construction of a new pipe up
the Capilano for Point Grey, and in
other parts of the city, running into
another $1,000,000; the Georgia-
Harris proposed new bridge at a
suggested cost of $550,000; and the
burrard Street bridge to Kitsilano
And, of course, there will be other
new suggestions for further propositions.
The Journal (twice a week), only
$2.00 a year.
**************** ***** *****
I   FOR RENT   %
.*. *
* Store     building     on     Second  ■*>
* Avenue    at    Seventh    Street.  '*■*
* Low   Rent. X.
% JEREMIAH H. KUGLER, LTD. |
I 75 x 100 Feet I
t ASK For Lease on Third |
I UNCLE Avenue at Ninth *
| JERRY Street }
| JEREMIAH H. KUGLER, LTD. f
* ****** * ** * * * * ** * * *** * ***** *
NOTICE is hereby given that on
the eleventh (11th) day of October
next application will be made to the
Superintendent of Provincial Police
for the grant of a licence for the sale
of liquor by retail in and upon the
premises known as The Copper City
Hotel, situated at Copper River,
Skeena DlBtrlct, upon the land described as Lot A, Block 312, Copper
City, Skeena DlBtrlct, B. C.
Dated September 11, 19il.        s-5
HARVEY CREECH,
Applicant.
New Knox Hotel
ARTAUD & BESNER
Proprietors
The New Knox Hotel la run on the
European plan. Flrst-clas service.
All the latest modern Improvements
THE BAR keeps only the best
brands of liquors and cigars.
THE CAFE is open from 6.30 a.in
to 8 p.m. Excellent cuisine; first-
class service.
Board, $1 a Day — Beds, 50c and on
First Avenu"   Prince Rupert
NOTICE.
A book Is kept in the City Clerk's
Office in which to enter the names
and addresses, etc. of citizens of
Prince Rupert desiring employment
on City work. All desiring employment should register ai once.
ERNEST A. WOODS,
City Clerk.
Skeena Land  bistrict—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the southeast corner of C.L. 4472; thence west 80
chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence south
80 chains to place of commencement.
AUSTIN M.  BROWN.
Dated July 17,  19U.	
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at"post planted
one mile east of the southeast corner of C.L. 4472; thence east 80
chains; thence nortli 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south
80 chains to place of commencement.
AUSTIN M.  BROWN.
Dated July  17,  1911.   	
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the northeast corner
of C.L. 4471; thence west 80 chains;
thence south SO chains; thence east
80-chains; thence north 80 chains to
l.lace of commencement.
AUSTIN  M.  BROWN.
Dated July 17,  1911.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
"'ARE NOTICE that th'rty days
from (late, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince tuipert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the northeast corner
of C.L. 4471; thence east 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence west
80 chf.ins; thence north SO chains,
to place of commencement.
AUSTIN M.  BROWN.
Dated July 17, 1911.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:-—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the south corner of
C.L. 441 0; thence north 80 chains;
thence west SO chains; thence south
80 chains; thence east 80 chains, to
place  of  commencement.
AUSTIN  M.  BROWN.
Dated July 17,  1911.
Skeena Land  District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a lirense
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the southeast corner of C.L. 4470; thence east 80
chains; thence north SO chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south
SO chains, to place of commencement.
AUSTIN M.  BROWN.
Dated July 17, 1911.
Skeena Land  District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, b. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the northeast corner
of C.L. 4469; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east
80 chains; thence north 80 chains,
to place  of commencement.
AUSTIN  M.  BROWN.
Dated July 17,  1911.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on nnd under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island' described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the northeast corner
of C.L. 4469; thence east SO chain.:;
thence south 80 chains; thence west
80 chains; thence north 80 chains to
place of commencement.
AUSTIN M.  BROWN.
Dated July 17, 1911.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows*.—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the southeast corner
of C.L. 447o; thence west 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence east
SO cnains; theuce south 80 chrins,
to place of commencement.
AUSTIN  M.  BROWN.
Dated July 17, 1911.
Skeena Land  District—District  of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 040 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the south corner of
C.L.4475; thence nortli 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence south
80 chains; thence west 80 chains to
place of commencement.
AUSTIN  M.  BRO..N.
Dated July 17, 1911.
Skeena  Land  District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE   NOTICE   that   thirty   days
from date,  I,  Austin  M.  Brown, ofe
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend  to apply to the Chief I
Commissioner of Lands for a license'
to prospect  for coal and  petroleum j
on and under 040 acres of land onl
Graham    Island    described    as    foi-1
lows:—Commencing at post planted i
one mile north of the northeast cor-j
ner   of   C.L.   4477;   thence,  west   80 j
chains;    thence    south    80    chains; !
thence east SO chains;  thence nortli j
80 chains, to ujaee of commencement..
AUSTIN  M.  BROWN.
Dated July  17,  1911. |
Skeena Land  District—District  of   e
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to th| Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on!
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted j
one mile east of the northeast corner!
of C.L. 4474; thence east 80 chains; |
thence soutli SO chains; thence west
80 ehains; thence north SO chains, to
place of commencement.
AUSTIN M. BROWN.
Dated July  17,  1911. 	
(tkeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Henry Edenshaw, of
Masset, B. C, occupation storekeeper, intend to apply to the Chief Commissioner of Lands for a license to
prospect for coal and petroleum on
and under 640 acres of land on Graham Island described as follows:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
west shore of West River, one mile
easterly from the mouth of said river; thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence north 80
chains; tlience west 80 chains to the
place of commencement.
HENRY EDENSHAW.
Dated July  17,  1911.
Skeena  Land  District—District of
Queen Charldtte
JAKE NOTICE that thirty dayB
from date, I, Henry Edenshaw, of
Masset, B. C, by occupation storekeeper, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 64o acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:
--Commencing at a post planted on
the west shore of the West River,
about one mile easterly from the
mouth of said river; thence east 80
chains; thence nortli 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south
80 chains, to place of commencement.
HENRY EDENSHAW.
■    Dated July 17,  1911.
Skeena    Land    District—District   of
Queen  Charlotte  Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Charles Lamb
of Blair, Nebraska, V. S. a., occupation farmer, intends to apply for
permission to purchase tlie following
described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 4 miles west and
4 1-2 miles north from the southwest corner of Lot 99i; thence south
SO chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; t-.ence east
80 chains to point of commencement;
containing 640 acres.
CHARLES LAMB.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated July  16,  i911. A-15
Skeena    Land    District—District    of
Queen  Charlotte  Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Hattie Sutherland of Blair, Nebraska, U. S. A.,
occupation housewife Intends to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about 5
miles west and 2 1-2 miles north
from the southwest corner of Lot
991; thence west 00 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence* east 60
chains; thence south 80 cliains, to
point of commencement; containing
about 480 acres.
HATTIE SUTHERLAND.
George S. .Mayer, Agent.
Hated July  16   1911. A-15
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows'—Commencing at post planed
at the southeast corner of C.L. 4477;
thence east 80 chains; thence north
SO chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 cliains, to place of
commencement.
AUSTIN M. BROWN.
Dated July 17,  1911. 	
Skeena   Land    District—District   of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that Edward H.
Port, of Prince Rupert, B. C, occupation farmer, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following described lands:— Commencing
at a post planted in the South West
Corner, on the shore line of Lake
Lakelse; thence 20 chains East, to
Soutli West Corner of Lot 684;
thence 30 chains North, following
along the West line of Lot 684 to
post; thence South, following along
the shore line of said Lake to point
of commencement, containing about
40 acres.
EDWARD H. PORT,.
By C.  N.  Pring, Agent.
Dated  June 26, 1911. 6-26
6-26
Skeena Land  District—District  of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
at the southeast corner of C.L.447S;
thence north SO chains; uience east
SO chains; e..ience south SO chains;
thence west SO chains, to place of
commencement.
AUSTIN  M.  BROWN.
Dated July 17,  1911.	
Queen Charlotte Land District—District of Skeena
PAKE NOTICE that S. Barclay
Martin, Jr., of New Westminster,
occupation engineer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted at the
northeast corner of ungazetted lot
1428, said lot being T.L. 39979
thence north and following the
westerly shore of Massett Inlet 80
chains; thence west 20 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east
40 chains, more or less, to the point
of commencement, and containing
240 acres, more or less.
S.  BARCLAY MARTIN, Jr.
Dated  July  21,  1911. 8-8
Skeena Land uistrict—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Miriam Hal-
ler of Blair, Nebraska, U. S. A., occupation housewife, Intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted abor* 5 miles
west and 1 1-2 miles north from
the southwest corner of Lot 991;
thence east 80 chains; thence north
80 cnains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south SO chains, to point of
commencement; containing 040
acres.
MIRIAM  HALLER.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated July  16.  1911, A-15
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 040 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
at the southeast corner of C.L. 4467;
thence north 80 chains; thence east
SO chains; thence soutli SO chains;
thence west SO chains, to place of
commencement.
AUSTIN M.  BROWN.
Dated July 17, 1911.	
Skeena Land   District—District of
Queen Charlotte'
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
at the southeast corner of C.L. 4465;
thence north 80 chains; thence east
SO chains; thence south 80 chains;
tlience west 80 chains, to place of
commencement.    ,
AUSTIN  M.  BROWN.
Dated July 16, 1911.	
Skeena   Land   District — District   of
Queen   Charlotte  Islands
TAKE NOTICE lhat W. G. McMorris of the City of Vancouver in
the Province of British Columbia,
occupation, broker, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted on an island
In Skidegate Inlet about 500 yards
east from the mouth of Slate Chuck
Creek, separated from the mainland
of Graham Island at high tide;
thence south three chains; thence
east ten chains; thence nortli three
chains; thence west ten chains to
point of commencement, containing
two acres, more or less.
W. G. McMORRIS,
Dated   July   20,   1911.       Locator.
Skeena Land  District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Henry Edenshaw, of
Masset, B. C, by occupation storekeeper, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleure
ou and under u-iO acres of land oi
Graham Island described as follows
Commencing at a post planted on the,
bank of west River, about one mile1
easterly from the mouth of said river; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence no**th 80 chains, to
place of commencement.
HENRY EDENSHAW.
Dated July 17, 1911. 	
Skeena Land District—District of
of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that James G.
Cromble, of Prince Rupert, occupation auditor, Intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:— Commencing at a
post planted at the northwest corner, 55 chains east and 20 chains
south from northeast corner of Lot
1116 (Horry Survey), Coast DIst.,
range 5; thence 20 chains east;
thence 25 chains, more or lesB,
soutli to Angus McLeod Pre-emption; tlience 20 chains west; thence
25 chains, more or less, north, to
post of commencement, containing
50 acres, more or less.
JAMES  O.   CROMBIE.
Fred  Bohlen, Agent.
Dated  June  14.  1911, 6-23
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Abram Sutherland of Blair, Nebraska, U. S. A.,
eccupation insurance agent, intends
to apply for permission to purchase
the following described lands: —
'omrneneing at a post planted abotK
- miles west and 2 1-2 miles north
from the southwest corner of Lot
991; thence east SO chains; thence
north 80 cnains; thence west 80
ehains; thence south SO chains, to
point of commencement; containing
640 acres.
ABRAM SUTHERLAND.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated July  16,  1911. A-15
Skeena    Land    District—District    of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that James Mullin
of Murdo, South Dakota, occupation
farmer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 4 1-2 miles west
and 1 1-2 miles north from the southwest corner of Lot 991; tnence east
40 chains; theuce south SO chains;
tlience west 40 cliains; thence north
SO chains, to point of commencement; containing 320 acres.
JAMES MULLIN.
Georgo S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated July  10    1911. A-15
Skeena    Land    District—District    of
*       Queen  Charlotte Islands
TAKE NoTICE that Belle Lamb
of Blair, Nebraska, occupation housewife, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following de-
scribed lands:—Commencing at a
post planted ahout I miles west and
4 1-2 miles north from tlie southwest comer of ken 991; the nee north
80 chains; thence wesl 80 chains;
thenco south SO chains; them-,- ,-a-t
80 cliains, to poinl of commencement;  containing 640 acres
BELLE  LAMB.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated  July  16,  1911. A-15
Skeena    Land    District—District    of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that I, Charles
Percy Hickman, of Naas Harbour,
occupation constable, Intend to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:— Commencing at a post planted on the
east shore of Naas Bay, about two
miles in an easterly direction from
Lot 3, marked C. P. II., S. W. corner; thence east 20 cliains; thence
nortli 40 chains to the shore; ihence
along the shore line to the place of
commencement, containing 40 acres,
more or less.
CHARLES PRECY  HICKMAN.
Dated June 7,  1911. 6-30
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Henry Edenshaw, of
Masset, B. C, by occupation storekeeper, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum on
and under 640 acres of land on Graham Island described as follows: —
Commencing at a post planted on the
west shore of West River, about one
mile easterly from the mouth of said
river; thence north SO chains; thence
west SO chains; thence south 80
chains; thence east 80 chains, to
place of commencement.
HENRY EDENSHAW.
Dated July 17,  1911.
Skeena   Land    District—District   of
Const    Range  V.
TAKE NOTICE that I, Joseph
Pastl, of Watson, Sask., occupation
farmer, intend to apply for permission to purchase tlie following described lands:-- Commencing at a
post planted about 30 c, alns in a
northerly direction from the N. E.
corner of Lot No. 2662 or T. L. No.
32598 at Lakelse Lake; thence north
20 chains; thence east 40 chains;
thence soutli 20 chains along shore
of Lakelse Lake; thence west 40
chains to point of commencement,
containing 120 acres, more or less.
JOSEPH PASTL.
George Hlr, Agent.
Dated  May  5,  1911. 6-2
Prince  Rupert   Private   Detective
    Agency
\. McDonald, Mannger
All kinds of legitimate detective work
handled   for  companies  and   Individuals.    Business strictly confldentl*!.
P. O. Box S»!l — Phone 210
Skeena  Land  District—District
of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that Victor H.
Reynolds, of Hull, Massachusetts, occupation chauffeur, Intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described land:—Commencing at a post planted at high water
mark on the northerly side of the
entrance to a small unnamed cove on
the west coast of Pitt Island, about
one-quarter mile south of the entrance to Kltkatla summer village;
thence east forty chains: thence
south twenty chnins; thence west
forty chains; tbence north ten
chains more or less to high water
mark; thence following along high
water mark around the head of the
cove back to the commencement, and
containing sixty (60) acres more or
less.
VICTOR II. REYNOLDS.
J. H. Plllsbury, Agent.
Dated Feb. 18th, 1911.
LINDSAY'S CARTAGE a STORAGE
G. T.  P. CARTAGE AGENTS
Office at II. II. Rochester, Centre St.
LADYSMITH  COAL
hi handled by us.   All orders receive-
prompt attention.   Phone No   68. '•RINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Friday, September 15, 1911.
prince Bupert journal
Telephone  138
Published twice a week on Tuesdays and Fridays from the office of
publication, Third Avenue, near
McBride Street.
Subscription rate to any point in
Canada, $2.00 a year; to points outside of Canada, $3.00 a year.
Advertising rates furnished on
application.
O. H. NELSON,
Editor.
Friday,  September  15,  1911.
ALASKAN TRADE FALLACIES
put on the market in Alaska as well
as in Prince Rupert and other Canadian centres within reach. The cold
storage plan was planned and started long before any thing of a reciprocity agreement was mooted. The
company is prepared to deal in its
line of trade, duty or no duty.
QUESTION OF LOCKS
Duncan Ross, the Liberal candidate in Comox-Atlin, In his speeches
before the people of Prince Rupert,
makes much of the opportunities for
trade with Alaska if reciprocity carries. In his speech he said: "What
does Alaska consume? it needs cattle, beef, mutton, hay oats, produce
of all kinds, draft horses, provisions
—in fact, Alaska is an importing
territory for all stuffs. Prince Rupert is three days nearer Alaska than
Seattle, If Prince Rupert wants that
Alaska trade it is absolutely necessary to break down the tariff wall
between Canada and Alaska."
Now, the News, in common with
the other Libera! papers, preaches
the doctrine in season and out of
season that reciprocity should be
adopted because it means increased
prices to the Canadian producer for
cattle, beef, mutton, hay, oats, produce of all kinds. Within the same
article the Canadian consumer in
general and the Prince Rupert consumer in particular is admonished
that reciprocity means for the consumer cheaper meats, fresh or refrigerated, bacon, hams, beef, pork,
wheat flour, oatmeal, vegetables and
fruit.
Duncan Ross and his northern
spell binders have posed as logicians
in the north country. They are nothing of the sort. They are magicians
—sleight-of-hand  performers.
We are to secure the Alaskan trade
because we can supply the food stuffs
cheaper to that part of the United
States; we are to get higher prices
for these same foodstuffs in the
United States; we are to get cheaper
food ourselves from the United
States.
Are the people of this constituency
to be influenced by such humbug.
Prime Rupert, we believe, will become the great market for Alaska,
but it will mean enterprise and business ability on the part of tlie residents of Prince Rupert. An example
is afforded in the ease of Seattle and
the Yukon. When the Yukon opened
up for trade Vancouver, Victoria and
Seattle all made bids for that trade.
Vancouver and Victoria had the advantage of being nearer markets and
free from what is now described as
the iniquitous tariff wall,
Seattle, owing to the energy of
its merchants and business men,
cleaned up the big bulk of. the trade
and held it, with the result that
Seattle was built up, the tariff wall
offering no obstacle to the trade.
Prince Rupert, backed up by the
aid which the Q. T. P. will be able
to afford it in the way of Improved
roadbed over- other lines and the
transportation facilities, must be advantageously placed to secure that
trade and already is preparing for
it, bul there will have to be enterprise shown by its business men if
it is to lie secured.
in preparation for the Alaska
trade, In common with tbe other
branches of the trade that is to be
built up, we have in Prince Rupert
nn Immense cold storage plant building, The purposes of the Canadian
Fish and Cold Storage plant is met
to handle fish alone, it will purchase e-ggs and butter In Alberta and
wherever else they can be ecnomlcally
obtained when the u. T. P, is finished and through lines of steamers
from Australia. New Zealand and
elsewhere are running. These will
lee- put lii cold storage'. In chilled
storage,  and   otherwise  treated  and
Sir Wilfrid Laurier is not the only
Liberal who is appealing to the country on his white hairs. Dr. Lewis
Hall of Victoria in introducing Hon.
William Templeman a few evenings
ago improved upon Ihe "white
lilume" talk. He expressed pleasure
of attending a meeting "to show that
we are in favor of our old war-horse
whose locks have grown white in the
service of his country and his party."
Caught in the Current
The history of this reciprocity compact goes back a few years. Foundations of the treaty were laid in 1907,
when Mr. Fielding and Mr. Brodeur
negotiated the commercial treaty
treaty with France. It cost the country much money to pay the cost of
the demonstration when the Canadian dredging fleet, lighthouse tenders and other craft were decorated
and supplied with solid and liquid
refreshments to lead off in the spontaneous welcome of the people when
Mr. Brodeur returned from Paris.
This treaty collapsed. The.e Senate of France refused ratification on
tbe ground that Mr. Fielding and
Mr. Brodeur had given them wrong
information about favored nations.
Mr. Fielding has a habit of going into
tariff negotiations without necessary
information. So the Canadian diplomat went back to France and signed an amended treaty, in which the
only items which could be useful to
Canadian export trade were struck
out. This time Mr. Brodeur's department did not work up a spontaneous public demonstration.
When the damaged French treaty
I'ame before tlie Canadian Parliament
Mr. Foster pointed out that it might
make trouble with the United
States, which would demand the concessions given to France. Mr. Fielding was haughty and d'ignified. He
declared proudly that Capada was a
nation and did not have to consult
the United States when she made
treaties with France.
These were the days when Sir Wilfrid was thanking heaven that Canada did not want reciprocity, declaring that we should go no more to
Washington, pointing out that the
only way to be on good terms with
the United States was to be independent of them, showing that our vast
railway expenditure would turn trade
eastward, and protesting that he was
now for England altogether **as
against the United States.
At Washington an able politician
smiled over these protests, and got
ready a retaliation scheme. When
il was ripe Sir Wilfrid and Mr. Fielding took notice. There was a sudden journey to Washington, where
Mr, Taft was ready to negotiate. The
United States proposed that Canada
remove or reduce the duty on fifty
or more articles imported from the
Stales. "What duties will you reduce?" asked the Canadians. "None, '
was the reply. "We will pay you
by not increasing the tariff against
you." The offer was accepted, and
that was Mr. Fielding's first reciprocity treaty after the declaration
thai there would be no more reciprocity visits io Washington,
But this was not quite all. Mr.
Taft, still remembering the Laurler-
Flelding boast that they would go
no more to Washington, and that
Canada would henceforth look lo
England and he independent of the
United states, concluded that the cup
eei' repentance ami humiliation should
supply another drink, He exacted a
pledge, thai If the Canadian Parliament could be made to accept ihis
treaty Mr. Fielding would come back
and   make another  and   wider one.
This time he proposed that Canada
should break or weaken the Imperial
bond. Again the government which
declared that It would go no more
to Washington went to Washington.
This time Mr. Taft demanded a
free interchange of raw materials,
access to the Canadian public domain,
a free market for United States fruit
and vegetables, a freer market for
certain manufactures and sundry
other concessions. "May we have
any return this time?" was the Canadian question. The gracious answer
was that a Congress was in power
determined to abolish some duties
and reduce certain others. In return
tor the Canadian tariff concessions,
surrender of independence, and destruction of the Imperial band the
Untied States would make the tariff
changes that Congress Intended to
make if there were no treaty. This
was accepted and so the second
treaty  was  made.
Such is (lie result of two visits to
Washington by ministers who declared they would go there no more.
The people of Canada have not only
to pass their opinion on this diplomacy, and to decide whether the last
treaty shall stand, but they must
detrinine whether they shall authorize more visits and dealings of the
same kind. It is clear that whatever the president and the leader of
the Democrats want from Ottawa
they get. It also appears that they
have far more comprehensive designs
in the future. Our government
seems to have been caught in some
fatal diplomatic current tnat is carrying into Canada grave trouble. Now
is the time for the country to escape.
 o —-
HUDSON'S BAY STORES
Announcement Made That Vigorous
Policy Will Be Fpllowed
by the Company
At a recent annual meeting of the
Hudson's Bay Company in London,
Richard Burbidge, director of retail
stores, was asked to make a statement in regard to the company's
stores, many shareholders expressing
disappointment at the smallness of
the dividend by reason of £400,000
being held back to be invested in
sites for stores.
Mr. Burbidge made it clear that
the company intends to pursue a very
vigorous policy in connection with
its stores department. In the course
of his reply he said:
"I feel it a great privilege to be
called upon to say anything in connection with the trading department
of the Hudson's Bay Company. When
I went to Canada first, two or three
years ago, to he followed up by another visit last year, I was anything
but pleased with what I saw as far
as the company's sale-shops in that
country were concerned, having regard to the style of business I was
accustomed to at home. I quite understood that it was impossible to
bring them up to the same high pitch
London and the other different trading communities here. But what I
felt sure was that there was a good
deal of stock there which it was unnecessary to carry in a country like
Canada. It might have been good
value at one time, but it was out of
date, and it was necessary that the
stock should be realized before we
put in a fesh and ever-new stock
which would be the means of drawing customers to the stores.
"This slaughter was brought about
at the commencement of the last
financial year.* But it was not all
done even then. There will be some
this year, and we must ask you to
bear with us until we get that on
a solid foundation, and if there 1b
anything to he realized it is in the
best Interests of you, as shareholders,
and of ourselves, as directors, that it
should be done with as little) delay
and loss as possible. 1 feel sure
that the (jading of the Hudson's Bay
Company in future has its high-water
mark to attalu to.
"1 have not the slightest doubt,
providing you arc prepared lo find
the capital nnd lo carry on the litis-
Iness thai the trading of the shops
will be ns profitable as any other portions of the business, it requires
time and patience, and we must have
the money to do it with. I will add
that I have nothing to do with the
big carry-forward oilier than as one
****** ********************
* *
Remember
That we
Import
Our Wines
direct from Europe; and that
no bouse In Prince Rupert can
equal them for quality. No
better can be bought anywhere
in the Province. We make a
specialty  of
Family Trade
and guarantee satisfaction
* We also  carry a  complete *
* stock of other *
* *
Liquors       f
t Try a glass of **
1 I
I Cascade I
* *
I   Beer   1
* *
* *
X       The best local  beer on  the X
V *
X   market. *
* *
* *
* *
! CLARKE BROS.I
Christiansen & Brandt Bid.
*    Telephone 39
*
Third Avenue  *
*
*
« *
**************************
of your directors, but I quite concur
that it is the right thing to do for
the future of the company."
 o	
Amusement for Divorcees
The members of the "Divorce Colony" at Reno, Nev., have found a
new diversion to relieve the tedium
of waiting for the accommodating
law to break their marital chains.
The new amusement makes everybody feel at home, It is glove fighting. To celebrate the progress of
the divorce suit brought by L. A.
Dalrymple Percival, president of the
Amalgamated Paint Company of
New York, he entertained, forty feminine divorce seekers at his quarters.
He put on the gloves with Nnnkie
Parrell, a local pugilist, and, amid
applause by the ladles, fought several rounds, filled with jabs, jolts,
swings and hooks. ,
LAND  FOR   SALE
TAKE NOTICE that I will receive
tenders for the parcel of land known
as Lot 1105, Range 5, Coast District,
Province of Britisii Columbia. This
is one of the choicest pieces of land
lying along the Skeena River and
contains about 155 acres. The land
is Crown granted. Terms cash. Tenders must be in before the 5th day
of October, 1911. The highest or
any tender not necessarily accepted.
For further particulars apply to the
undersigned,
I).   G,   STEWART,
Assignee of H. C. Breekenridge.
Box   225,   Prince  Rupert, s-15
The British Columbia Company
LIMITED.
AUTHORIZED CAPITA! $100,000.::  PAID UP CAPITAL $41,500
DIRECTORS:—Reginald C. Brown, President; J. C. Maclure, Vice-
President; H. E. Marks, Managin g Director; Capt. E. Nash, William
McNalr, R. A. Bevan, and F. C.   Williams, Secretary.      :-:       :-:
INTEREST 4 PER CENT. DEPOSITS
This Company acts as Executor-   Administrators, Transferees and
Secretaries to Public Companies,   commercial, Industrial and other
business propositions underwritten.    Issues made on the
London and New York Stock Exchanges.
TIMBER, COAL, LANDS, and
COMPANY ORGANIZATION
Head Office for Canada, 203, 208, 210, 215 Carter-Cotton Building,
VANCOUVER,   .C.
The Staneland Co. Ltd
•IS THE-
Paint Supply House
of British Columbia
ALL GOODS ARE GUARANTEED
WRITE FOR PRICES AND SAMPLES
The Staneland Co. Ltd
836-840 Fort Street, VICTORIA, B.C.
The Graham Island Oil Fields, Limited.
CAPITAL   STOCK,   $1,000,000.00
We are offering for sale a very limited amount of shares of stock
25 CENTS PER SHARE; PAR VALVE, &1.00
These shares are going quickly, and will soon be off the market
The Mack Realty & Insurance Co.
SELLING AGENTS
i
Replenish
the
s
•«J
Pantry
High-Class....
Grocery
Stock
to choose from
EVERYTHING CLEAN AND FRESH
Goods for the Tuhle lo Suit the Most
Fastidious   Housewife
1 MERRYFIELD'S S
i
i
i
L,
CASH GROCERY
I
I
2nd Avenue
Prince Rupert,
B.C.
Real
Estate
INVESTMENTS
Real
Estate
List Your
Properties
with
Uncle Jerry
JEREMIAH H. KUGLER   -
He Sells Buildings He Sells Contracts
He has Houses to Rent
He Buys Lots He Builds Homes
He Buys Leases He Loans Money
He Has Farms for Sale
He Sells Houses He Rents Stores
tmm
JEREMIAH H. KUGLER
Special Bargains in
KITSELAS LANDS
FRANCOIS LAKE LANDS
LAKELSE LANDS
HAZELTON   DISTRICT   LANDS
BULKLEY  VALLEY LANDS
KISPIOX   VALLEY LANDS
PORCHER   ISLAND  LANDS
KITSUMKALUM   LANDS
SAND,   GRAVEL  AND  MARBLE  DEPOSITS Friday, September  15,  1911.
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
ELABORATE PLANS
(Continued From Page One)
would have to be.removed when the
extensions were made to the building. The side wings would afford
the space for the main dining room.
Steel Frame
In construction the hotel will be
of the most improved type. It will
be a steel frame faced with brick or
store in accordance with the general
scheme to be carried out in the design.
Mr. .Rattenhury, after a visit to
Prince Rupert, is decidedly taken
with the city. It pontradlcts so many
of the reports that he had heard regarding it and was on theh contrary
so delightfully situated that he is
preparing to invest substantially
here.
City Hall Site
He could not understand why the
Market Place siie for a city hall was
not secured the minute the govern
ment made the offer it did.. It was
an ideal place, he thought, foi it,
and whoever blocked its being taken
over will in years to come, he felt
sure, be held up to condemnation for
such a short sighted policy.
The broad minded way in which
the G. T. P. was pursuing its policy
towards the city appeals to Mr.. Rattenhury. Its steamers were something that the company could well
feel proud of and promised well for
the future of the railway company's
operations on the Coast. The way
in which the officials were grappling
with the hotel proposition here
showed that they were alive to the
immense possibilities of the line.
It is safe to promise that the
G.T.P. will have its plans for the
hotel here very quickly. Mr. Rattenhury is known to be an inveterate
worker when an ytask is assigned to
him and be will proceed without delay, as it is understood tlie company is anxious to begin work as
quickly as possible.
NEW AGREEMENT
Revision of Treaty With Britain Not
Welcomed in All Quarters
in Japan
The recent revision of the Anglo-
Japanese agreement and its extension lor a further term of years came
with no little surprise to Japan,
though among the more observant
and thought it was not wholly unexpected. The revised version has
been formally reived with favor by
the offifjial classes as well as a large
number of leading men, but expressions of satisfaction are not so uuan
imous among the, rank and file of
the nation, including some prominent
jurists, publicists and statesmen. The
detection of the article obliging
Great Britain to come to the assistance of Japan in the event of attack
from a third party, except in case
where Great Britain may not have
entered into an arbitration treaty
with such party is looked upon by
the Japanese as placing them completely at the mercy of the United
States in'regard to their future relations in China.
It is contended that Japan had
been depending altogether upon this
feature of the alliance for the security of her position in Manchuria,
and now that this protection is withheld, the backbone of the allience is
broken, it may not be known iu
the west, but for some time the opinion has been freely expressed in
Japan that the nation's lease of territory in China cannot be regarded
as in exactly the same position as
that of a personal lease of property
that can come to an end at a certain
definite time, it is asserted that
territory leased by u nation, and Involving a vast expenditure of money
and lhe establishment of permanent
interests, cannol be Immediately
abandoned at i lie moment the lease
determines,  anil  Unit  In  the  trouble
that  Is   likely   lo  arise   with   China
in   the  selllenie'iil   of  this  aspect   of
Japan's  position   In  Manchuria,  tlie
United   Stales   may   be  expected   to!
take  the  side   of  China,   ai   which
time,  according  to  tlie new  Anglo-!
Japanese agreement; Japan will have
io   stand   alone   and   fight   her   own!
batiles, her only hope being an alII- I
ance with Russia.
Professor Suihiro of theh Imperial:
University, Kyoto, expresses the con-j
viction that as Great Britain could
not be expected to take up arms
against her nearest of kin for the
sake of Japan, the alliance has, to
this extent, always been unreliable.
Professor Suihiro thinks that in case
Japan and theh United States should
have to cross swards, England would
most probably have taken the stand
sue took with Persia In 1S2G, when
she refused to interfere with Russia's
invasion of that country though she
had an agreement with Persia obliging her to assist Persia against a
third party. Another prominent
jurist avers that In the new agreement  with Great Britain the United
States gains most, England a little,
and that Japan loses to the extent
that these two powers have gained.
Among the more aggressive opponents of the new agreement is the
Hon. K. Oishi, a Nationalist member
of the Imperial Diet, who thinks that
the revision of the Anglo-Japanese
alliance represents the complete diplomatic triumph of the United States
over Japan. This opiltician says that
for some time there has been a growing fear among the people of Great
Britain that the relations between
Japan and the United States might
become So strained as to drag Great
Britain into a defence of Japan
against her own kith and kin, and
ns such a move would prove unpopular In England, the BriUsh government bus been looking for some
means Of obviating the possibility,
and, therefore, grasped at the opportunity afforded by an arbitration
treaty with the United State*:. Mr.
Oishi seems to agree with those who
say that secretly the AnglorJapancse
alliance was fostered by the influence of Germany with the hope of
entangling Great Britain in the Far
East and weakening her position at
home, as well as turning American
influence in the direction of Germany, and that Great Britain was
only anxious to put herself right
with the American people again.
 o	
NATIONALIZATION OF RAILS
delivered in January, 1913, and will
start from the Clyde, via the Suez to
the Orient, to start their service
from Hongkong. The Empress Van
Home, as the first is to be called,
and her sister liner, will have speed
of eighteen knots, and this speed,
maintained between Yokahama and
Victoria would allow of the passage
bein made in 9 days 18 hours and
26 minutes. The record for the run
now is 10 day, 10 hours, made by
the Empress of Japan eleven years
ago. The new Empresses will differ
in appearance from the Atlantic Empresses, having two pole masts and
three funnels. The clipper bow of
the present Pacific Empresses has
been done away with. They will
have seven decks and wil be modern
in every respect. The plans show a
cruiser stern.
Blink (the wholesaler)—Well,
how many orders did you get yesterday?
Gink (the salesman)—I got two
orders ire one store.
Blink—What  were they?
Gink—One was to get out and the
other was to stay out.
A young woman promine'nt in a
certain social set tells of a young
man who had not familiarizsed himself with the forms of polite correspondence to the fullest extent.
When, on one occasion, he found it
necessary to decline an invitation,
he did so in the following terms:
"Mr. II. Blank declines with pleasure
Mrs. Wood's invitation for the nineteenth, and thanks her extremely for
having given him the opportunity of
doing so."
4 Per Cent 4
On a Checking Account
is what our depositors receive.   Start saving today by open-
ins an account with us.
$1.00 is enough to begin with
The Continental Trust Company, Limited
Second Avenue, Prince Rupert, B.C.
British   Government  Is   Considering
This Move to Prevent Recurrence of Strike Trouble
"Nationalization of the railroads"
is to be the remedy of the English
government against the recurrence of
the recent great strike. The cabinet
today has a scheme prepared by experts. This ■ will be submitted to
the next session of Parliament. The
present time offers an opportunity
for which administrations have been
seeking for many years. The shareholders are also favorable to the national control of railroads. They
say that to be "bought out" at this
time would mean rich fortunes, because the roads have been making
much money. This would mean that
the government would be forced to
pay fabulous prices.
The Britisii taxpayer could afford
almost any burden because strikes
like the last one are ruinous to the
country and force prices to the sky.
Another big railroad strike lasting
a week would paralyze the country
as much as a hostile invasion. No
one believes that the present truce
between the railroads and their
workers is more than temporary.
Government ownership of the roads
would operate them so satisfactorily
that strikes would be at an end, according to general opinion.
Military authorities have for years
been urging that the government acquire the railroads from the point
of view of national defence and military transportation in time of war
Lord Haldance, secretary of war, is
unremitting in bis advocacy, and his
influence with the cabinet is great.
Present intentions are to give the
shareholders a choice—either to be
bought out for cash or to take government stock. If the former method is chosen it will mean that a
large loan will have to be floated,
but the second alternative would cost
the nation realitively little.
 o	
THREE FUNNEL LINERS
YOU ARE SURE OF
Engine Reliability
IF YOU RUN A
Fairbanks - Norse Marine Engine
OVER 125,000 IN USE THROUGHOUT THE WORLD
TWO
CYCLE
FOUR
CYCLE
!' Hi
Sal
Kp;           IP«'
Ml
HEAVY
DUTY
MEDIUM
DUTY
Runabout
Type
MOST  COMPLETE  LINE OF GASOLINE ENGINES IN
THE WORLD
Write for Catalog P10
The Canadian Fairbanks Co., Ltd.
101-107 WATER STREET
Local Agent—F. M. DAVIS
VANCOUVER, B. C.
• PRINCE RUPERT
mm
Double Weekly Service
S.S. PRINCE RUPERT & S.S. PRINCE GEORGE
Sail for Vancouver, Victoria and Seattle
Mondays and Fridays at 8 a.m.
For STEWART Thursdays 8 a.m.
S.S.
Naas River, Masset and
, and for Queen Charlotte
PRINCE  JOHN   for   Port   Simpson,
Naden Harbor, Wednesdays, 1 P.M.
Island  points,  Saturdays, 1 P.M.
RAILWAY SERVICE TO COPPER    RIVER,    mixed    trains from
Prince  Rupert  Mondays,   Wednesday and  Saturdays,  1  P.M.;
returning Tuesdays, Thursdays and .Sundays, 4 P. M.
THE GRAND TRUNK RAILWAY SYSTEM, connecting with
trains from the Pacific Coast, operates a frequent and convenient
service of luxurious trains over its DOUBLE TRACK route between
Chicago, Toronto, Montreal, Quebec, Halifax, Portland, Boston,
New York and Philadelphia.
Atlantic Steamship bookings arranged via all lines
■ Full information and tickets obtained from the office of
A. E. McMASTER
Freight and Pasenger Agent, G. T. P. Wharf.
The new Empress liners being
constructed for the trans-Pacific service of the C. P. R. will be the first
three funnel ocean liners on the Pacific. The steamers, which have capacity for  1,300  passengers,  will be
Dent Gloves
We have secured, direct
from the manufacturer, the
selling agency for this very
superior line of Gloves, thus
saving the jobber's profit, and
can sell them very much
cheaper than they are ordinarily sold for. A portion of
our stock has just arrived, including Men's Tan Dressed and
Mocha Undressed Kids, both
lined and unlined.
Cadet Tan and Mochas,
Suede and Full Dress in men's
sizes, as well ss a complete
line of Wool Lined and Wool
Gloves and Mitts for winter
use. Remember, we buy these
direct and sell them for
less thiin they are> ordinarily
sold  l'(ii,
SLOAN & CO/
IN THE COUNTY COURT OF ATLIN
HOLDEN AT PRINCE RUPERT
In the matter of "Official Administrators  Act"
And
In the matter of the estate of Patrick
Kennedy deceased Intestate.
TAKE NOTICE that by order of
His Honor Judge Young, made the
17th day of June 1911, I was appointed administrator of the estate
of the said Patrick Kennedy, deceased, and all parties having claims
against the said estate are hereby
required to forward same properly
verified to me on or before the 4th
day of September, 1911; and all
parties indebted to the said estate
are required to pay the amount of
their indebtedness to me forthwith.
Dated August 18, 1911.
J. A. FRASER,
Official Administrator
Atlin,  B. C.
IN THE COUNTY COURT OF ATLIN
HOLDEN AT PRINCE RUPERT
In the niatten of the "Official Administrator's Act"  .
And
In the matter of the estate of George
McLeod deceased intestate.
TAKE NOTICE that by order of
His Honor Judge Y'oung, made the
28th day of July, 1911, I was appointed administrator of the estate
of tlie said George McLeod deceased,
and all parties having claims against
the said estate are hereby required
to forward same properly verified to
me on or before the 4th day of September, 1911; and all parties indebted to the said estate are required to
pay the amount of their indebtedness
lo  me forthwith.
Dated August IS, 1911.
JOHN H. McMULLIN,
Official Administrator.
Prince Rupert, B. C.
Sixth St. Alder
PRINCE RUPERT
llll-
1N THE COUNTY COURT OF ATLIN
HOLDEN AT PRINCE RUPERT
In  the matter  of the  "Official Administrator's Act"
And
Iu the matter of the estate of John
Bowman deceased intestate.
TAKE  NOTICE  that  by  order  of
His Honor Judge  Y'oung,  made the
16th day of June,  1911, I was appointed  administrator  of  the estate
of the said John Bowman deceased,
and all parties having claims against
the said estate are hereby required
io forward same properly verified to
erne on or before the 4th day of September, 1911; and all parties indebted, to (he said estate are required to
pay  the  amount  of their  Indebted-
j ietss to me forthwith.
lilted  August   18,  1911.
JOHN  H,  McMULLIN,
I Official Administrator,
f'rince Rupert, B. C.
IN    THE    SUPREME    COURT    OF
BRITISH  COLUMBIA
In  the matte* of the  "Official Administrator's Act"
And
In    the   matter   of   the   estate    of
. Thomas Smith deceased intestate.
TAKE NOTICE  that by order of
His  Honor  Judge  Lampman,  made
the 16th day of August, 1911, I was
appointed administrator of the estate
of the said Thomas Smith deceased,
and all parties having claims against
the said estate are hereby required
to forward same properly verified to
me on or before the 4th day of Sep
tember, 1911; and all parties indebted to the said estate are required to
pay the amount of their indebtedness
to me forthwith.
Dated August IS, 1911.
JOHN H. McMULLIN,
Official Administrator.
Prince Rupert, B. C.
m
^^
Low Rates! Finest Equipment!
Eastern Excursions
Only a few dates left.   Final return limit Oct. 31,1911
For full particulars apply to J. G. McNAB, Gen. Agent, (ith St.
**************************
! storage!
TO  WATER  TAKERS
On account of scarcity of water
the supply will be cut off between
the hours of 9 p. m. and ~> a. m.
during tlie dry weather.
WM.   MAHLON   DAVIS,
tf Supt. of Water Works.
The Thompson
Hardware Co.
Household Goods and Baggage
given careful attention.
Forwarding,   Distriouting   and
Shipping Agents
TRANSFERERS
Prince    Rupert    Warehousing
and   Forwarding   Co.
First Ave.,  near  McBride  St.
DOUGLAS SUTHERLAND,
Manager.
P. O. Box 907 Phone 203
t* *5*> *2* C* *** *J* *I* *I
TENDERS WANTED
-SrccON'D AVENUE-r
Paints. General Hardware,
Oils, Stoves and Ranges.
Sealed tenders will be received by
the Building Committee of tne Methodist Church of Prince Rupert, B. C.,|
until  12 o'clock noon, August  22nd,,
1911,  for the erection and  comple- j
tlon   of  a   Church   building,   to   be j
erected on Sixth Avenue, in the City
of   Prince  Rupert,   B.   C.,  according!
to plans and specifications prepared j
by  G.   L.   Proctor,  architect,   Prince I
Rupert.    A certified check, equal to'
ten (10)  per centum of the amount j
of the tender drawn in favor of thei
Treasurer  or  Trustee   Board,   which j
will be forfeited if the party tender-1
ing declines to enter into a contract
when called upon to do so;  or if he
or his heirs or executors fail to com-1
plete  the  contract.    The  lowest  or
any   other    tender   not    necessarily j
accepted.
Plans  and   specifications  may  be I
seen at the office of P. McLaughlin,
Third  Avenue,  after noon,  Tuesday,!
August 16th, 1911.
Excursions!
Let us tell you all about the cheap
ROUND  TRIP EXCURSIONS
to ail Towns and  Cities in  Eastern
Canada and  United States
Via
The Great Northern
Choice of Return  Route
Tickets to the Old Country by all
Lines. Take any Steamer from
Prince Rupert.
ROGERS STEAMSHIP AGENCY"
Phone 110 Second Ave
Prince Rupert, B.C.
GRAND HOTEL
WORKWOMAN'S HOME
25c
Rooms 50 Cents
Spring Beds, Clean
White Sheets
Best in Town for Ihe Money
FIRST AVE. AND SEVENTH ST.
J. Goodman, Proprietor
Free Employment
Office
Job  Printing  of all  kinds  neatly
executed at the Journal Office.
.;..;..;. .*..;. .*..;..;.*.;,.;..
*
*
*
*
*
*
GROUND
Floor Space For Rent
IN THE
HART BUILDING
Corner of Second Avenue and Sixth Street
The Best Business Corner in
Prince Rupert
Jermiah H. Kugler. Ltd.
For all kinds of help. Cooks, waiters, dishwashers, hotel porters, all
kinels of laborers or mechanics, call
up   ITS  or call  at  the
FREE EMPLOYMENT OFFICE
GRAND HOTEL
Headquarters for Cooks am) Walton
ROGERS 8c BLAt)K
Wholesale Dealers In
BUILDING  MATERIAL,    CEMENT,
LIME, HAIR-FIBRE PLASTER
COKE, BLACKSMITH COAL,
COMMON BRICK, PRESSED BRICK
SHINGLES AMI LATH
NEW   WELLINGTON   COAL
All   orders  promptly   filled—see  us
for prices.
imio.m: no phone un
:•**** PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Friday,  September  15,  1911.
I******************************* ft**********************
THE OLIVER CHARGES
***********•**•*****•'
At a meeting held in Centre York
at Thunder Bay, on the outskirts of
Toronto, Daniel McGIIlicuddy, formerly editor of the Goderich Signal,
then a government employee at Ottawa and lastly pubisher of the Calgary News, discussed his charges
charges against Hon. Prank Oliver,
minister of the interior. The meeting drew a large crowd and was
marked by disorderly interruptions,
resulting In two men being ejected.
Defends Oliver
At the opening of the meeting
John Galbraith, once a candidate for
the Alberta legislature and who has
declined the Liberal nomination for
South York, was permitted to speak
in defense of Mr. Oliver, lie said
that two Yankee carpetbagging
crooks had gone to Alberta and secured a charter for a bogus road, the
Alberta Ac Great Waterways Railway.
Mr. Oliver's criticism had resulted
in an intervention which drove Hon.
Mr. Rutherford and C. Cross out of
office. Mr. Cross was taking his revenge and Mr. McGIIlicuddy was one
of his tools. Mr. Galbraith explained that the trust account to Mr. Oliver's credit in the bank to which
Mr. McGIIlicuddy had referred had
probably been part of the Liberal
campaign fund to be distributed by
the minister, among the party workers. Mr. Galbraith's remarks that
Mr. McGIIlicuddy had been selected
to do Mr. Cross' dirty work caused a
tumult during which one man was
thrown  out.
Slush Fund
Mr. McGillicuddy opened by stating that there was a Liberal "slush
fund" raised in New York and the
assistant superintendent of the Pink-
erton agency had learned that Mr.
Oliver had $50,000 placed to his
credit. Of this $6 000 was used to
change the Lethbridge Herald from
a weekly to a daily. On September
28, 1908, $18,000 was checked out
to Frank Oliver, personally.
At this statement there was another disturbance in the hall and a
second man was ejected.
Mr. McGillicuddy stated that the
teller of the bank was prepared to
swear to the payment to Mr. Oliver
had the enquiry gone on.
In September of last year $500 of
the fund was paid to the Alberta
Herald. Later $500 each was paid
to Dr. and Mrs. Hyslop respectively,
son-in-law and daughter of Mr.
Oliver.
"Now, gentlemen, if you were a
jury," said Mr. McGillicuddy, "and
you had these facts laid before you,
what would you say?"
"Guilty," cried many voices, and
"hang him," added others.
Mr. .McGillicuddy said an item of
$747.S7 had been paid out of tlie
trust fund. This, he explained, was
a personal Oliver item a legal ac-
count.
"What about reciprocity?" asked
an elector.
"As far as I am concerned,' was
the reply, "I am not going to speak
abou reciprocity and as far as you
are concerned your best market is
right next uoor. What the deuce do
you want with reciprocity?"
Mr. McGilliciidy read a letter
written by Sir Wilfrid Laurier on
July 8th last while ihe latter was
en route from Saskatoon to Strathcona. After referring to some of
Sir Wilfrid's statements in the House
on the matter and pointing out that
Sir Wilfrid had been in error in saying that he had no comniniunication
for some years with the writer, Mr.
McGIIlicuddy, In the letter, proceed'
ed to refresh the premier's memory
regarding some incidents of their
conversation.
"I showed you," writes Mr. McGll
licuddy, "a photograph of items con
tained in Mr. Oliver's bank account
thai totalled nearly $70,000; the ox
aci ;> in on ti t was (69,860, deposited In
the Imperial Bank within a certain
I erlod, and told that part Of it had
been distributed for election purposes and part to pay off Mr. Oliver's
personal accounts, and lhat It was n
boodle and graft  fund."
Mr. McGillicuddy went on to remind' Sir Wilfrid that he had stated
that In addition to the account with
the Imperial Bank at Edmonton, Mr.
Oliver had another "Oliver trust
fund" with the Union Bank there,
and one son-in-law .Mr. Anderson,
Was manager, und another, Dr. Hyslop, was dlshurser. Mr. McGIIlicuddy
bad told the premier that Mr. Oliver,
since entering the cabinet, had acquired funds and collateral worth
fully a quarter of a million dollars,
while some persons put It at four
times that sum. Sir Wilfrid's answer, writes Mr. McGillicuddy, was
"he appears to have done almost sib
well as Sifton."
Sir Wilfrid said further that If Mr.
Oliver were retired from the cabinet he would join with Sifton and
make   trouble   for   the   government,
*******************************
and Mr. McGillicuddy had answered:
"Sifton, without patronage, does
not pull a pound and Oliver is a far
weaker man."
Mr. McGillicuddy, in his letter
goes on to tell Sir Wilfrid that the
latter, In the House, had sought to
confine the evidence before the proposed special commission to the point
whether $50,000 obtained by Mr.
Oliver from 30 Wall Street, New
York, was deposited at Edmonton
by the Mackenzie & .Mann  interests.
i\lr. McGillicuddy had said, however, to Sir Wilfrid Laurier that It
would not be difficult to establish a
motive on the part of the Mackenzie
eSt Mann interests, if the dealings
connected with a certain order in
council in May, 1907, were investigated. This order in council enabled
Mackenzie & Mann to select 65,000
acres of Saskatchewan lands instead
of Manitoba lands originally stipulated as a subsidy for the construction of 106 miles of Manitoba &
South Eastern Railway which was
completed in 1899, or 12 years before
Mackenzie & Mann secured the road.
"This is the crux of the whole question," says Mr. McGilllcuddy's letter.
Mr. McGillicuddy alsho recalled a
decision by Mr. Oliver which enabled
Mackenzie & Mann to select 557 000
acres from the reserve of the Qu'Appelle, Long Lake & Saskatchewan
Railway, a decision the minister of
justice pronounced illegal. After reminding Sir Wilfrid that he, the premier, had remarked of Mr. Oliver,
"God helup him if he is deceiving
me," Mr. McGillicuddy addresses the
premier asi follows in his letter:
"Why bless your innocent soul, Sir
Wilfrid, Oliver has been deceiving
you almost ever since the day you
called him to your cabinet. He deceived you when on November 23,
1905, some .seven months after his
appointment he used the prestige of
ilie office you  had  conferred  upon
him to bolster up the tottering fortunes of his newspaper at Edmonton by getting $15,000 from a well
known corporation closely allied with
the government of Canada. He deceived you again, when, three months
later, on February 19, 1906, he added $20,000 from another source to
the Bulletin bank account."
Mr. McGillicuddy went on to instance the orders in council before
mentioned as other deceptions practiced by Mr. Oliver upon the premier, "by which transactions," he
says, "the country lost millions of
dollars and Mackenzie & Mann were
enriched to that extent. Is it to be
wondered at that the two members
of this firm have become multi-millionaire during the life of the Laurier government?" ,
Mr. McGilllcuddy's letter closes
with a quotation from the Liberal
convention platform of 1891, which
condemned the government for retaining a minister who accepted election funds from a railway which was
receiving government subsidies.
Mr. McGillicuddy charked that D.
R. Wilkie, general manager of the
Imperial Bank, had constiiuted himself an apologist for Mr. Oliver and
after a flying visit to Toronto by Mr.
Oliver the books of the Edmonton
branch had been ordered to Toronto.
Mr. Wilkie had insinuated that the
photograph of the bank book was a
forgery, but he did not dare to say
so openly. He denied it was a fac-
similie of an Imperial Bank account
before that bank had ever been mentioned. Although Mr. Oliver had not
deposited the funds to the savings
account, he demanded, and received,
$1,800   interest.
 o	
Defeat of Minister
The defeat of the Hon. W. S. Fielding in Queens-Shelburne is practically assured. The minister's organization has collapsed, the newspapers
are turning against him and his former followers are forsaking him. Mr.
Fielding is not the only cabinet minister in this position. Most of the
others are compelled to stick so
closely   to   their   own   constituencies
that the premier is travelling about
alone. Hon. George German ip facing defeat in Broekville, Hon. Wm.
Paterson in Brant, and Hon. Mackenzie King in Waterloo. The defeat
of every Liberal candidate in Manitoba is within the bounds of probability.
, o ■	
"Every time that man approaches
me I seem to have a chill."
"You are very foolish. Better
warm up to him. His father is president of one of our leading ice companies."
J. L. PARKER
MINING ENGlNEI'It
Prince Rupert, B. C,
Open for Consultation nnd Mine
Examination
Temporary Address: —
Prince Rupert Inn
Skeena   Land   uistrict — District   of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Burton Vivian
Brewer, of Vancouver, occupation
clerk, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about two miles north
from the northeast corner of Lot
993; thence west 80 chai»s; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains, to
point of commencement; containing
640  acres.
BURTON VIVIAN BREWER.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated July 31, 1911.
FREDERICK PETERS, K. C.
Barrister, Solicitor and Notary Public
Office in
EXCHANGE BLOCK
WM. S. HAi-,L, L. D. S. O. D. S.
:-:   DENTIST   :-:
Crown and Bridge Work a specialty
All dental operations skillfully
treated. Gas and local anaesthetics
administered for the painless extraction of teeth. Consultation free.
Offices, Helgerson Bk., Prince Kuperi
Thee Se»y S&tl&l&ctoeyitienge
Good, Sound Reasons for
• MONARCH Economy
Monarch Ranges are built so that they can
never have "air leaks"—
For around every opening into the body there
is a   Malleable   Iron frame to which the
steel is riveted. i    •
No putty is needed in such joints.    They are
air tight when new and slay air tight.
If these other ranges were built in this way
they might be economical too.
Investigate this matter of rivet construction
versus stove bolts and  stove putty.    It's
important  to  every  one  using  or  buying
a range.
SOLD AND GUARANTEED BY THE
Kaien Hardware Co.
Telephone 3 Third Avenue
FOR SALE
Lot 56, Blk.
Lots 33 ani
34, Sec. 1,
34, Blk 5,
$5,000,
Sec.  1,
1-3 cash, bal. 6 and
$4,000;  half cash.
12 months.
NIOKERSON-ROERIG COMPANY
CUSTOMS AND MERCHANDISE
Brokers, Forwarding Agents,
Storage,  etc.
J.  W.  POTTER
ARCHITECT    AND    STRUCTURAL
ENGINEER
Re-inforced Concrete a Specialty
—o—
Law-Butler Building - Prince Rupert
H. Gordon Munro   W. Nicholson Lailey
MUNRO & LAILEY
ARCHITECTS
PRINCE RUPERT, B. C.
P. O. BOX 14
PRINCE RUPERT
HAYNOR BROS.
n-UNERAL   DIRECTORS
and
PROFESSIONAL   BMBALMERS
DR. \V. B. CLAYTON
DENTIST
Office   in    the    Westenhaver   Block
Over Orrne's  Drug   Store.
Prince Rupert
 LADYSMITH	
COAL
ROCHESTER It MONROE, Phone 115 j
FOR RENT
STORES, OFFICES AND DWELLINGS
FIRE INSURANCE iii old English, Canadian and American
companies, at tariff rates. Policies good as collateral at All Banks,
and all written in our own office. PLATE GLASS, ACCIDENT
and  MARINE  INSURANCE
M.M. Stephens & Co. Ld.
REAL ESTATE
Phone  222
LOANS        INSURANCE
Office: Third Avenue
INVESTMENTS
P. O. Box 275
a][3[D][31g@@[5]@@@[§@@[^
HOTEL
ENAMELWARE
HAVE JUST RECEIVED A SMALL SHIPMENT OF HOTEL
ENAMELWARE ESPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR USE IN
HOTELS, RESTAURANTS AND CAMPS. WE GUARANTEE
THEM TO LAST TWICE AS LONG AS ORDINARY ENAMEL
WARE.
A CALL IS SOLICITED
Prince Rupert Hardware & Supply
Company, Ltd.
third 'avenue "    phone 120
o1Id1|51|5I|d1(51(51|d1|51I5^
THE WESTHOLME LUMBER CO.
LIMITED
We handle all kinds of
Building Supplies
First Avenue Telephone 180
Corner Eighth and Fraser Streets
Clinton Rooms
Newly   remodelled   and    furnished.
Board   and   lodging.   Home cooking
a  specialty.    Mrs.  Anderson,  Prop.
Rooms, 93 Per Week
Skeena  Land   District — District  of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Harry Martin, of Vancouver, B.'O, occupation
artist, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted two and one-half miles
north of the northeast corner of Lot
993; thence eaBt 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains, to
the point of commencement; containing 640 acres, more or less.
HARRY MARTIN.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated July 31, 1911.
Skeena  Land   uistrict -— District  of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Allan Orr, of
Masset, B. C, occupation carpenter,
Intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted three and one-half mlleB north
and ofte mile west from the northwest corner of Lot 992; thence west
80 chalnB; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence south
80 chains, to point of commencement;  containing 640 acres.
ALLAN ORR.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated July 31, 1911.
Skeena   Land   District — District  of
Queen    ..arlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Edgar J.
Young, of Vancouver B. C, occupation painter, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted two and one-half miles
north of the northeast corner of Lot
993; thence west 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; containing 640 acres.
EDGAR J. YOUNG.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated July 31, 1911.
Skeena  Land   District — District  of
Coast, Range v.
TAKE NOTICE that Alice Munro,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted on the west shore of
Lakelse Lake and about one and one-
half miles distant in a southwesterly direction from the southwest
corner of Lot 3982, Skeena Land
District, District of Coast, Range 5;
thence west 40 chains; thence north
40 chains; thence east 60 chains,
more or less to the shore of Lakelse
Lake; thence following the shore of
said lake to point of commencement;
containing 200 acres, more or less.
ALICE MUNRO.
Dated  August  12,  1911.
Skeena   Land   District — District   of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Margaret
Merrill, of Chicago, Illinois, U.S.A.,
occupation housewife, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about three
miles west, and one-half mile north
from the southwest corner of Lot
991; thence west 40 cliains; thence
south 60 chains; thence east 40
chains; thence nortli 60 chains, to
point of commencement; containing
24 0 acres, more or less.
MARGARET MERRILL.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated August 7, 1911.
Skeena   Land   District — District   of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Arthur W.
Nelson, of Chicago, Illinois, U.S.A.,
occupation clerk, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 3 miles west and
one-half mile north from the southwest corner of Lot 991; thence east
80 chains; tlience south 60 chains;
thence west SO chains; thence north
60 chains, to point of commencement; containing 480 acres, more or
less. ARTHUR W. NELSON.
George S. Mayer, Agent'.
Dated August  I, 1911.
Skeena   Land   District — District   of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Frank Gray,
of Blair, Nebrasaka, U.S.A., occupation farmer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 2 miles west and
'■2 mile north from the southwest
corner of Lot 991; thence east SO
chains; thence north 80 cliains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south
80 chains, to point of commencement;  containing 640  acres.
FRANK   GRAY.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated July 29,  1911.
Skeena   Land   District — District  of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Norman
Hurst, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation clerk, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about three and one-
half miles north and one mile west
from the northwest corner of Lot
992; thence east SO chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains thence south 80 chains, to
point of eommencement; containing
640 acres. NORMAN HURST.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated July 31, 1911.
Skeena   Land   District — District  of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE thnt C. Verne
Brewer, of Vancouver, occupation
clerk, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted tliree and one-half miles
nortj and one mile west from the
northwest corner of Lot 992; thence
east 80 chains; thence south 8»
chains; thence west SO chains; thence
north 8 0 chains, to point of commencement; containing 640 acres.
C. VERNE BREWER.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Datedo July 31, 1911.
Skeena   Land   District — District  of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that John Henry,
of Vancouver, occupation contractor,
intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted two and one-half miles north of
the northwest corner of Lot 992;
tlience west SO chains; thence south
40 chains; tlience east 80 chains;
thence north 40 chains, to point of
commencement; containing 320 acres.
' JOHN HENRY.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated July 31,  1911,
Skeena   Land   District — District  of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Wirt A.
Stevens, of Chicago, Illinois, U.S.A.,
occupation civil engineer, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about two
miles west and one nnd one-half
miles north from the southwest corner of Lot 991; thence east 80
chains; tlience north SO chains;
thence west SO chains; thence south
80 chains, to point of commencement;  containing  640  acres.
WIRT A.  STEVENS.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated July 29, 1911.
Skeena   Land   District — District  of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Christina Orr,
of Masset, B. C, occupation housewife, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted about four miles west and three
and one-half miles north from the
northwest corner of Lot 992; thence
west 80 chains; thence north 80
chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains, to point of commencement; containing 640 acres.
CHRISTINA ORR.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated August 7, 1911.
Skeena  Land   District — District  of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Ellen Ives, of
Masset, B. C, occupation housewife,
IntendB to apply for permission to
purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted about four miles west and three
ond one-half miles north from the
northwest corner of Lot 992; thence
east 80 chains; thence north 80
chains; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains, to point of commencement; containing 640 acres.
ELLEN IVES.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated August 7, 1911.
Skeena  Land  District — District  of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Joseph C.
Merrill, of Chicago, Illinois, U.S.A.,
occupation retired, Intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about four and
one-half miles west and one-half mile
north from the southwest corner of
Lot 991; thence north 20 chains;
thence west 60 chains, more or less,
to the Ain River; thence following
Bhore of river in a southerly and
easterly direction to point of commencement; containing 120 acres,
more or less.
JOSEPH   C.   MERRILL.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated August 2. 1911.
Skeena   Land   District — District   of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that William Robert Little, of Vancouver, B. C., occupation mason, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about two nnd one-half
miles north from the northwest corner of Lot 992; thence east 80
chains; thence south 40 chains;
tlience west SO chains; thence north
4 0 chains, to point or commencement;   containing 320  acres,
WILLIAM ROBERT LITTLE.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated July  31,  1911.
Skeena   Land   District — District   of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Fred Jackson,
of Vancouver, B. C. occupation painter, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted about two-miles north from the
northeast corner of Lot 993; tlience
west 80 chains thence north 40
ehains; thence east SO chains; thence
south 40 chains, to point of commencement; containing 320 acres.
FRED JACKSON.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated July 31, 1911.
Skeena   Land   District — District   of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Stanley Hol-
brook, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation clerk, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about two miles north
from the northeast corner of Lot
993; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 40 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south 40 chains, to
point of commencement; containing
320 acres.
STANLEY HOLBROOK.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated July 31, 1911.
Skeena   Land   District — District  of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Patrick O'Connor, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
foreman, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about two miles north
from the northeast corner of Lot
993; thence east 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence west 80
cliains; thence north 80 chains, to
point of commencement; containing
640    acres.
PATRICK O'CONNOR.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated July 31, 1911.
Skeena Land District — District of
Coast, Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that William H.
Hargrave, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation banker, Intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted on the west shore of
Lakelse Lake, and about one and one-
half miles distant In a southerly
direction from the southwest corner
of Lot 3982, Skeena Land District,
District of Coast, Range 5; thence
40 chains west; thence 8u chains
south, more or less, to the Bhore of
Lakelse Lake; thence following the
shore of said lake to point of commencement; containing 160 acres,
more or less.
WILLIAM H. HARGRAVE.
Dated Aug-.. Friday, September  15, 1911.
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Among the Politicians
Has Lost Confidence
Because he cannot see how the
reciprocity pact will be of any material benefit to Canada, and because
as a loyal Canadian.he can see nothing in it but a weakening of the
Imperial tie, E. H. Riley of Calgary,
former member for Gleichen, has definitely announced his opposition to
the government in this election. "I
think it is prettey well understood
now that I have left the Liberal
party on the question of reciprocity.
As a loyal Canadian, I can't see how
this pact is going to benefit Canada. Sir John A. Maedonald's position with regard to reciprocity with
tbe United States has been misquoted, and circumstances have changed
materially since the time be discussed
It. If Sir John were alive today
advocating reciprocity, I would ac-
utmost confidence that the interests
of Canada would be well taken care
of, because It would not be the same
kind of an agreement. I "cannot take
it from the hands of a government
which, as Hon. Clifford Sifton said
in a recent speech, have turned their
backs upon all their previous professions."
Liberals Leaving
The latest Liberal bolter in Hon.
George Graham's riding is Thomas J.
Storey of the Canada Carriage Company. In Ottawa City two Conservative gains are promised. The action
of Messrs, J. R. Booth, theh lumber
king, and W. H. Rowley of the Eddy
Company in declaring against reciprocity has great influence in the
Capital.
No National Message
Sir Wilfrid Laurier and Hon. W. S.
Fielding addressed a great meeting
in Halifax on August 30. All the
conditions were present to make the
affair a magnificent demonstration.
There was an audience of between
7,000 and 8,000 people. The Liberal
campaign managers had perfect arrangements to welcome the first minister, the people ot Halifax had, as
elsewhere, lively interest in Sir Wilfrid and in Mr. Fielding, a Nova Sco-
tlan representative, to call forth a
demonstration. But the opportunity
was not taken advantage of by Sir
Wilfrid and his colleague. They utterly failed, states the Halifax Herald, in a fair report, to rouse what
was a magnificent audience. Sir Wilfrid Laurier spoke without amina-
tion; there was no ring of victory in
bis voice or manner; he seemed to
speak as a man over whom there
bung a cloud, the shadow of defeat.
Mr. Fielding, hoarse, make a labored
speech. It was significant that at
the mention of the name of R. L.
Borden and Hon. Clifford Sifton, by
Sir Wilfrid tremendous applause
broke out, and the Liberal premier
had to patiently wait until the pro-
longer cheering died away.
Reading Sir Wilfrid Laurier's
speech in his own party organs
pretty well explains why he did not
rouse a representative audience to
enthusiasm. He had no national
message for them. He apologized, it
might be said, for the reciprocity
pact. If the United States should
claim that the agreement precludes a
preference to Britain, he said, that
country could be told that Canada
is ready to release the United States
from further adherence to the agreement. One would think it was hardly
a businesslike arrangement to enter
Into a treaty that changed the whole
course of Canada's trade and then
finding it involved the question of
Britisii preference suggest as a remedy that the treaty might be denounced. Mr. Fielding declared that
Nova Scotia Industries would be safeguarded, but neither Sir Wilfrid nor
Mr. Fielding explained to the people
of llalirax how the grain export trade
was to be regained for .Maritime
pons, how the National Transcontinental was lo be the shipping line
for western grain or how millions of
bushels were to be shipped to Hall-
fax to build up a great railway terminal there, If Jim Hill's lines were
to be favored.
There was no promise about dou-
ble-trai'king the Intercolonial in
order to carry millions of bushels
of grain to Halifax. No, the new
Liberal policy was to send grain aud
other freight to Buffalo, Chicago,'
Portland, to build up American
ports.
Hnultuin'8 Stand
Hon. F. W. G. Haultaln, Conservative leader, entered the Dominion
campaign tonight, says a Regina despatch, speaking at Frances In support of C. S. Lake. He came out
flat-footed against reciprocity. He
explained that since he made his
memorable speech In the legislature
last March he had made a careful
study of the pact, and found In It
so many subtle dangers that he had
been compelled to modify his views.
As a western man, the pact had
appealed to him at first, and he had
spoken without complete consideration of the question.
As a matter of fact, he was advocating tariff reduction, but an analyzing the subject had come to the
conclusion the pact did not materially
reduce the tariff. The Liberals had
made much campaign material out of
his speech on that occasion, but had
been careful only to quote portions
of it. Mr. Haultain also roundly
scored the government for maladministration. He was given an ovation.
What Do You Think?
The followers of Frederick D.
Monk, half Scottish, half French,
wholly Canadian, are they who have
changed the sentiment of Quebec
against Sir Wilfrid Laurier, for so
many yeare that provine's hero. This
is what Monk thinks of reciprocity:
In m county farmers are largely
engaged in vegetable culture; they
are opposed to the free entry of
American vegetables, which cause
them a most unfair competition at
the very periods of the year when
they should look forward to the realization of fair profits.
How often have I heard Mr. Fielding assure this class of farmers that
their protection against the foreign
competition would never be taken
frcm them, and when that protection
was Increased the farmers of my
county and of the neighborhood of
Montreal expended milions in improvements.
A tariff convention without bene
fit for anybody would be something
quite unheard of. 1 am bound to
tay, however, that i have not found,
iu my researches, that agricultural
products in the States command
tempting prices; these prices are
often lower than our own.
It is said: But you have a market
of ninety millions. These ninety millions have also our Canadian market they are stronger than we are
and they are great exporters of farm
products.
1 am entirely opposed to the exportation of our raw material.
I say this: Let those who wish to
utilize our vast stores of raw material come and do so within our
own country, so as to benefit our
own Canadians. The aim of the
Americans is to get hold of our natural resources, of our pulp wood, our
forests, our minerals and everything
else.
Canada for the Canadians, that has
always been my motto.
As a Canadian, can you disagree
with me?
 o	
TRADE WITH BRITAIN
Imperial   Trade   Commissioner  Says
British Manufacturers Have Strong
Hold in Markets of Canada
Grigg speaks, to to say, from the
inside centre, and his blue book is
a valuable manual of British trade.
He draws a valuable distinction on
the very first page of his report.
Everybody knows something of the
swing of the commercial pendulum,
how seven good years are followed
by seven lean years, but in addition
to this ordinary oscillation of trade
there is in Canada a vast expansive
current which flows on and increases
in volume in spite of the increase
or decrease of the small eddies on
its surface." „
The Daily Mall, with its enormous
circulation, devoted the famous third
column of Its editorial page to a
review of it.    It said:
"Here is a blue book that ought
to be studied by every merchant and
manufacturer in the British Empire.
There is not one of its eighty odd
pages that does not carry a message
of supreme interest and importance
to every workman, every employer,
every citizen and every politician in
the United Kingdom. It Is sane and
concrete and appeals to practical
men. We cannot within the limits
of an article repeat its advice, but
we can at least indicate its general
lines and insist on the supreme necessity of a detailed study of the
report by every merchant and manufacturer, and every politician and
capitalist in the United Kingdom.
"Nearly five years ago, Mr. Grigg
went to Canada as special commissioner to the Board of Trade. In
1907 he made his first report. It
is a statesmanlike survey of the conditions and prospects of trade and
industry in the Dominion, and we
regret that many parts of it have
not been reprinted in the report
wliich has just been issued."
"The outcome of this report has
been most encouraging to me," said
.Mr. Grigg. "My office at the Board
of Trade Building, Montreal, has
been besieged with capitalists, manufacturers and business men in general, anxious to get into Canadian
business. The advice I give them is,
'Go through the country and see for
yourselves. Do as the Americans
have been doing, establish branches
of your industries.' I think that we
may look for great developments' in
this way now. Canada is a wonderful, a marvellous cmountry and a
true appreciation of its greatness i3
coming home to the Britisii mind."
Speaking of the present status of
British-Canadian trade, Mr. Grigg
said it was in a very healthy condition and steadily increasing. British anufacturers had a strong hold
in Canada markets in certain lines,
and he thought that they would hold
and increase their trade in them.
They were alive to the fact that the
high standard of their goods, which
had gained them markets, must be
maintained. As regards Canadian
exports, Britain would always be a
great market for them, for people
must eat.
..Form of Notice  (Section  34)
Skeeua   Land   District—District   of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that Edward Chesley, of the City of Prince Rupert,
B. C, occupation trainman, intends
to apply for permission to purchase
the following described land:—Commencing at a post planted about half
way between Mile Post 77 and Mile
Post 78 op the Main Line of the
Grand Trunk Pacific Railway from
Prince Rupert and about fifty (50)
feet west of the right-of-way of the
said Railway; thence north eighty
(80) chains; thence west forty (40)
chains; thence south eighty (80)
chains; tlience east forty (40) chains,
to the point of commencement; and
containing three hundred and twenty
(320) acres more or less and which
land was located by me on the 26th
day of August, A. D. 1911.
EDWARD CHESLEY.
Dated August 28, 1911. s6
Form of Notice (Section 47)
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that George W.
Kerr, of the City of Prince Rupert,
occupation butcher, intends to apply
for permission to lease the following described land:—Commencing at
a post planted about three hundred
(300) yards west of Mile Post 79
on the line of the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway track from Prince Rupert; thence south eighty (80)
chains; thence west forty (40)
chains; thence north eighty (80)
chains; thence east forty (40) chains
to the place of commencement, and
containing three hundred and twenty (320) acres more or less, and
which land was located by me on
the 26th day of August inst. A. D.
1911.
GEO.   W.   KERR.
Dated August 2S, 1911. s5
Form of Notice (Section 47)
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that George A. Mc-
Nicholl, of the City of Prince Rupert, railway superintendent by occupation, intends to apply for permission to lease the following described
land:—Commencing at a post planted about three hundred (300) yards
west of Mile Post 80, on the line of
the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway
track from Prince Rupert; tlience
north eighty (80) chains; thence
west forty (40) chains; thence south
eighty (80) chains; thence east forty
(40) chains to place of commencement and containing three hundred
and twenty (320) acres, and which
land was located by me on the 26 th
day of August, A. D. 1911.
GEORGE A. McNICHOLL.
Philip T. Chesley, Agent.
Dated August 29, 1911. s5
Hazelton  Land  District—District  of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that John Gabriel,
of Aldermere, B. C, Prospector, intends to apply for a licence to prospect for coal and petroleum over the
following described l.-nds:—Commencing at a post planted five miles
east and one mile south from the
mouth of Kitnayakwa River; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80
cliains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains, to point of
commencement.
JOHN GABRIEL   Locator.
Dated July 10,  1911.
Hazelton  Land  District—District  of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that Vivian
O'Brien of Copper City B.C., prospector,
intends to apply for a licence to
prospect for coal and petroleum over
the following described lands: —
Commencing at a post planted four
miles east and four miles north from
the mouth of Kitnayakwa River;
thence south 80 chains; tlience east
SO chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains, to point of
commencement.
VIVIAN O'BRIEN, Locator.
Dated July  10,  1911. sl
Hazelton   Land   District—District   of
Coast. Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that John Gabriel,
of Aldermere, B. C, Prospector, intends to apply for a licence to prospect for coal and petroleum over the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted 4 miles
east and 2 miles north from the
mouth of Kitnayakwa River; tbence
south 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; tlience north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains, to point of
commencement.
JOHN GABRIEL, Locator.
Dated July 9,  1911. sl
Hazelton  Land  District—District of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that John Gabriel,
of Aldermere, B. C, Prospector, intends to apply for a licence to prospect for coal and petroleum over the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted four miles
east and four miles north from the
mouth of Kitnayakwa River; thence
west 80 chains; thence south 80
chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains, to point of commencement.
JOHN GABRIEL, Locator.
Dated July 10, 1911.
Hazelton  Land  District—District of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that Vivian
O'Brien of Copper City B.C., prospector,
intends to apply for a licence to
prospect for coal and petroleum over
the following described lands: —
Commencing at a post planted tliree
miles east and three miles north
from the mouth of Kitnayakwa River; tlience south SO chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence north 80
ehains; thence east 80 chains, to
point  of commencement.
VIVIAN O'BRIEN, Locator.
Dated July 9, 1911. sl
Hazelton   Land   District—District  of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that John Gabriel,
of Aldermere, B. C, Prospector, intends to apply for a lieence to prospect for i'oal and petroleum over the
following described lands:—Com-
meni'ing at a post planted 4 miles
east and 2 miles north from the
mouth of Kitnayakwa River, thence
south SO chains; theuce east SO
chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains, to point of
commencement.
JOHN GABRIEL, Locator.
Dated  July  9,  1911 sl
Hazelton   Land   District—District  of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that Vivian
O'Brien of Copper City B.C., prospector,
intends to apply for a licence to
prospect for coal and petroleum over
the following described lands:—■
Commencing at a post planted 4
miles east and 2 miles north from
the mouth of Kitnayawka River;
thence north SO cliains; thence west
80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains, to point of
commencement.
VIVIAN O'BRIEN, Locator.
Dated July  9,  1911. sl
"The object of my work is to bring
about an increased knowledgee of
Canada to the Britisii public and
give accurate information concerning Canada to those who seek It. In
brief, it Is a work of education," said
Richard Grigg, Imperial trade commissioner, when interviewed at Winnipeg.
Probably there is no man today
who knows more of Canada's resources and possibilities than Mir.
Grigg, and since his appointment as
commissioner, his reports to the Im
perial government have received the
closest attention, not only from the
people of the Britisii Empire but
from continental governments and
people.
His report published . in 1907 was
translated into French, German, Austrian and Italian and widely circulated in those countries. So great
was the demand for it that when
the time came for the publication of
the 1911 report the Ilritish government, had an immense number of blue
books printed, thinking that they
would surely have sufficient to suii-
ply the demand. In this they were
mistaken as the reporl Is already out
of print.
The 19,11 report, received everywhere the most appreciative comment from the press throughout the
Empire. Country Life, a very high
class publication with a large circulation among the landed and moneyed classes, in reviewing It, said:
"We take It that the trade commissioner owes a great deal to the
famous speech of the king when It
will be remembered the phrase,
'Wake up,' was used. Mr. Grigg has
been endeavoring to 'wake up' the
English trader to the Dominion of
Canada and his report is a fascinating document because it seems to
bring the material reality of Canada so very close to English eyes.
Most of us see the Dominion at a
very long perspective. We have a
vague Idea of its great forests, the
vastness of its territory, of Its Immense wheat producing powers, but
as a striving, energetic, busy factor
in the work of the world we have not
a  cloBe  acquaintance  with  it.     Mr.
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
„Keena.
TAKE NOTICE that the Canadian
Canning Company, Limited, of 224
Winch Building, Vancouver, B. 0.,
occupation salmon caners, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted adjoining
a post marked W. N. about 300 feet
Soutli of Wallace's wharf, Naas Harbour, B. C; thence east 20 chains;
thence south 20 chains; thence west
20 chains; thence following the
coast line in a northerly direction
back to the point of commencement
and containing forty acres more or
less.
CANADIAN CANNING CO., LTD.
Per G. H. Leslie, Agent.
Dated  6th  June,  1911. 6-26
Form of Notice (Section 47)
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that Philip T.
Chesley of the City of Prince Rupert,
occupation prospeotor intends to apply for permission to lease the following described land, bounded as
follows:—-Commencing at a post
planted on the south bank of the
Shamos River I sometimes called the
Shames River) about three-quarters
of a mi.'e west from the Grand Trunk
Pacific Railway and on the soutu
bank of the said river; thence north
eighty (80) chains; thence west
forty (40) chains; tlience south
eighty (SO) chains; thence eart forty
(40) cliains to point of commencement, and containing tliree hundred
and twenty (320) acres more or less,
and which land was located by me
on the 25th August, A. D. 1911.
PHILIP T.  CHESLEY.
Dated August 28, 1911.
Form of Notice (Section 47)
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that John A. Kirkpatrick, of the City of Prince Rupert, dry goods merchant by occupation, intends to apply for permission
to lease the following described land:
bounded as follows:—Commencing
at a post planted about three hundred (300) yards west of Mile Post
79 on the line of the Grand Trunk
Pacific Railway track from Prince
Rupert; thence north eighty (80
chains; thence west forty (40)
chains; thence south eighty (SO
cliains; thence east forty (40)
chains to place of commencement,
and containing three hundred and
twenty (320) acres more or less, and
which land was located by me on the
26th day of August A.D. 1911.
JOHN A. KIRKPATRICK.
Philip T. Chesley  Agent.
Dated August 29, 1911. s5
Form of Notice (Section 47)
Skeena    Land    District—District    of
Coast, Range 6
TAKE NOTICE that Alexander
Faulds, of the City of Vancouver,
B. C, occupation mining engineer,
intends to apply for permission to
lease the following land, bounded as
lease the following described
land, bounded as follows: —
Commencing at a post planted
on the south bank of the
Shamos River (sometimes called
Shames River) about three-quarters
of a mile west from the Grand Trunk
Pacific Railroad and on the south
bank of said river; thence south
eighty ISO) chains; tlience west forty
(40) chains; thence north eighty
(80) chains; thence east forty (40)
chains to the point of commencement,
and containing three hundred and
twenty (320) acres more or less, and
which land was located by me on the
25th day of August, A. D, 1911.
ALEXANDER FAT LI IS.
Philip T. Chesley, Agent.
Dated August  26,  1911,
Hazelton  Land  District—District of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that John Gabriel,
of Aldermere, B. C, Prospector, intends to apply for a licence to prospect for coal and petroleum over the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted three miles
east and three miles north from the
mouth of Kitnayakwa River; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains, to point of
commencement.
JOHN GABRIEL, Locator
Dated  July 9,  1911. . sl
Hazelton  Land   District—District  of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that John Gabriel,
of Aldermere, B. C, Prospector, intends to apply for a licence to prospect for coal and petroleum over the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted 3 miles
east and one mile north from the
mouth of Kitnayakwa River; thence
north 80 cliains; thence west 80
chains; tbence south 80 chains;
tlience east 80 chains, to point of
commencement
JOHN GABRIEL, Locator.
Dated July 9,  1911. sl
Hazelton   Land   District—District  of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that Vivian
O'Brien of Copper City B.C., prospector,
intends to apply for a licence to
prospect for coal and petroleum over
the following described lands:—■
Commencing at a post planted 4
miles east and 2 miles nortli from
the mouth of Kitnayakwa River;
thence north 80 chains; tlience east
SO cliains; thence south 80 chains;
tlience west 80 cliains, to point of
commencement.
VIVIAN O'BRIEN, Locator.
Dated   July   9,   1911. sl
Hazelton   Land  District—District  of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that John Gabriel,
of Aldermere, B. C, Prospector, intends to apply for a licence to prospect for coal and petroleum over the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted 4 miles
east and one mile north from the
mouth of Kitnayakwa River, thence
soutli SO cliains; thence west 80
cliains; thence north SO chains;
tlience east 80 chains, to point of
commencement.
JOHN GABRIEL, Locator.
Dated July  10,  1911. sl
Hazelton Land District—District of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that Vivian
O'Brien of Copper City B.C., prospector,
intends to apply for u licence to
prospect for coal and petroleum over
the following described lands: —
Commencing at a post planted three
miles east from the mouth of Kitnayakwa River; thence north so
chains; theni'e west SO chains!
thence south SO chains; thence east
80 chains, to point of commencement.
VIVIAN O'BRIEN, Locator.
Daled July 9, 1911. sl
Hazelton   Land  District—District   of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that Vivian
O'Brien of Copper City B.C., prospector,
Intends to apply for a licence to
prospect for coal and petroleum over
the following described lands: —
Commencing at a post planted 4
miles east and one mile north from
the mouth of Kitnayakwa River!
thence south 80 chains; tlience east
80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west SO chains, to point of
commencement.
VIVIAN O'BRIEN, Locator.
Dated July  10, 1911. sl
Hazelton   Land   District—District  of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that John Gabriel,
of Aldermere, B, C, Prospector, Intends to apply for a lieence to prospect for coal and petroleum over thee
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted three miles
east from the mouth of Kitnayakwa
River; tlience soulh SO chains;
ihence west Su chains; thence north
SO chains; thence east 80 chains, to
point of commencement.
JOHN GABRIEL, Lee.aim
Dated July 9,  1911.
Hazelton   Land   District—District  of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that John Gabriel,
of Aldermere, B. C, Prospector, intends to apply for a lieence to prospect for coal and petroleum over the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted i miles
east from the mouth of Kitnayawka
River; tlience south SO chains;
thence east so chains; thence nortli
SO chains; thence west SO chains, to
the point of commencement.
JOHN Gabriel, Locator.
Dated   July   10,   1911. sl
Form of Notice  (Section  34)
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that Philip T.
Chesley, of the City of Prince Rupert, B. C, occupation prospector,
intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described
land:--Commencing at a post planted
about half-way between Mile Post
77 and Mile Post 78 on the main line
of the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway
from Prince Rupert, and about fifty
(50) feet west off the said right-of-
way of the said railway; thence
south eighty (80) chains; thence
west forty (40) chains; thence north
eighty (80) chains; thence east forty
140) chains to noint of commencement, and containing thee hundred
and twenty (320) acres more or less
and which land was located by me on
the 26th day of August, A. D. 1911.
PHILIP  T.   CHESLEY.
Dated August 28, 1911,
Hazelton  Land   District—District of
Coast, Range 6
TAKE NOTICE Ileal Vivian
O'Brien of Copper City B.C., prospector,
intends to apply for a licence to
prospect for coal and petroleum over
the following described lands: —
Commencing at a post planted five
miles east and two miles north from
the mouth of Kitnayakwa River;
tlience south 80 chains; thence east
80 chains; tbence north 80 chains;
tlience west 80 chains, to point of
commencement.
VIVIAN O'BRIEN, Locator.
Dated July 9, 1911. sl
Hazelton   Land   District—District  of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that John Gabriel,
of Aldermere, B. C., Prospector, intends to apply for a licence to prospect for coal and petroleum over the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted five miles
east and two miles north from the
mouth of Kitnayakwa River; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence- south 80 chains;
tlience west SO chains, to'point of
commencement.
JOHN GABRIEL, Locator.
Dated July 9, 1911. sl
Hazelton Laud District—DlBtrlct of
Coast, Range G
TAKE      NOTICE      that      Vivian
O'Brien of CopperClty B.C., prospector,
Intends to apply for a licence tee
prospect for coal and petroleum over
the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted four
miles east and one mile south from
the mouth of Kitnayakwa River;
thence south SO chains; Uience west
SO chains; thence north SO cliains;
tlience east SO chains, to point of
commencement.
VIVIAN O'BRIEN, Locator.
Dated  July  9,  1911. sl
Hazelton   Lund   District—District  of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that Vivian
I O'Brien of Oopper City B.C., prospector,
i intends to apply for a licence to
prospect for coal and petroleum over
the following described lands:—
Commencing al a post planted four
miles east from the mouth of Kitnayakwa River; thence south 80 chains;
thence wesl 80 chains; thence north
su chains; thence fast 80 chains, to
i point of commencement,
VIVIAN O'BRIEN, Locator,
Dated July 10, 1911.
Hazelton   Land   District—District  of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that John Gabriel,
of Aldermere, B. C, Prospector, Intends to apply for a licence to prospect for coal and petroleum over the
following described lands:—Commencing at u post planted four miles
east and one mile south from the
mouth of Kitnayakwa River; thence
east 80 chains, ihence south 80
chains; thence -.vest 80 chains;
thence north 80 ehains, to point of
commencement.
JOHN GABRIEL. Locator.
Dated July 9, 1911. sl
Hazelton  Land  Districl    Districl  eef
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that Vivian
O'Brien of Copper City B.C., prospector,
Intends to apply for a licence to
prospect for coal and petroleum over
the following described lands: —
Commencing at a post planted five
miles east from the mouth of Kitnayakwa River; thence east 80 chains;
ihence soutli Sn chains; tlience west
SO chains; thence nortli SO chains,
to point of commencement
VIVIAN O'BRIEN, Locator.
Dated July 10, 1911. sl
Hazelton   Land   District—District  of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that John Gabriel,
of Aldermere, B. C Prospector, intends to apply for a licence to prospect for coal and petroleum over the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted 5 miles
east from the moutli of Kitnayakwa
River; thence north SO chains;
thence east SO chains; thence south
80 chains; thence west 80 chains, to
point of commencement,
JOHN GABRIEL, Locator.
Hated July  10, 1911, sl PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Friday,  September  15,  1911.
THE HUB OF THE HAZELTON DISTRICT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
ON THE MAIN LINE OF THE GRAND TRUNK PACIFIC
REGISTERED TOWNSITE
THE PROSPERITY OF EVERY GREAT CITY IS DUE TO ITS GEOGRAPHICAL LOCATION
CO
-a
ed
1=1
ed
cu
S3
eo
o
CD
egeC!
tji
to
The most important Townsite! The most talked of Townsite along the line of the GRAND TRUNK PACIFIC RAILWAY
NOTICE
New Hazelton Townsite Section 1
Now being offered for sale Is Not a
Grand Trunk Pacific Promotion
Townsite. NEW HAZELTON Town-
site was selected by the experts of
a syndicate of successful men as the
geographical location for a big city.
They bought the land, realizing the
wonderful resources of the Hazelton
District, the -Mines, the Distributing
Centre for hundreds of miles, and
many other reasons.
We ask you to investigate in your
own way all of the statements in this
advertisement. Should you join us
by buying lots you will know that
your investment is guarded by every
means known to human foresight,
and the judgment of a body of successful  men   known  to  you  all.
Your profits should eclipse the
story of Edmonton, Calgary, Regina,
Moose Jaw or Prince Rupert.
Don't be classed among the failures who will say, "I wish I had
known." Don't stand idly by and
see your neighbors reap the profits
oil Real Estate while you reap
nothing hut your salary. I'm your
savings to work in that sure coming
City—NEW HAZELTON.
NEW   HAZELTON   is   out   of   the
damp belt, and many people who
spend the whole year in the district
say the winters are not severe—
plenty of sunshine and dry air.
Taken from Official Bulletin, B.C.,
No. 22, Page 23: —
"On the Upper Skeena, about a
distance of 50 miles, there are large
tracts of land on both sides of the
river, which, as far as soil and climatic conditions are concerned, I
would consider ideal for successful
growing of fruit as well as for other
branches of agriculture. Potatoes,
and all garden produce, grow to perfection."
HAVE VOU CONFIDENCE OP
MERCHANTS ON THE GROUND?
Many Lots already purchased by
the keenest business men of Hazelton (Old Town). You can safely
follow the judgment of such men.
NEW HAZELTON should be the
centre of a busy population of thousands within a year. Why not? During the past year there was an average of over two new towns created
in the Canadian West every week.
We are all here to share In this
most wonderful prosperity.. We offer
you an opportunity to'participate in
the progress of the best town for
investment on the line of the Grand
Trunk  Pacific.
NEW HAZELTON Railroads Open
New Country.
Railroads have been the great
feature in the growth of Western
Canada.
NEW HAZELTON, located on the
Grand    Trunk    Pacific    Railroad    is
attracting the attention of the whole
world, as all important towns do on
the main line of the Grand Trunk
Pacific Railroad.
Stores are going up. Newspaper
plant now moving on the Townsite.
Two or three General Merchandise
Stores, Drug Store! Bank, Restaurants, and in fact many lines of trade
are now arranging to open in NEW
HAZELTON, Section One. Activity is
in that part of the Townsite known
as Section  One.
The story of NEW HAZELTON is
well known to the public. It is a
Townsite being offered to the public
by successful business men. There is
positively no Railroad Company or
Townsite Promoter financially interested in the land. Tne owners have
undertaken to make NEW HAZELTON a city of importance in Britisii
Columbia. NEW HAZELTON promises to be the most profitable city
to the Grand Trunk Pacific along its
main lines.
Offices of Foley, Welch & Stewart,
contractors building Hie Grand Trunk
Pacific Railroad, will be located in
NEW HAZELTON. The Chief Clerk,
Paymaster and Purchasing Agent are
preparing to, and will, build homes
in NEW HAZELTON, Section One.
NEW HAZELTON, the hub of the
Hazelton District, will be the natural
headquarters for what promises to
be the most active and sensational
new city ill the fastest growing part
of the world' today on account of
the wonderful Lead, and Zinc Mines,
the Groundhog Mountain Coal Fields,
the Vast Agricultural Country tributary to the coining principal city in
Britisii Columbia on tlie Grand Trunk
Pacific Railroad.
The Grand Trunk Pacific Railroad
is now running regular trains over
100 miles out of Prince Rupert. The
G. T. P. Officials, and also the
G. T. P. Contractors, say that the
Railroad should be running to Mile
164 this winter, and will reach NEW
HAZELTON next summer. Grading
is now under way as far along the
line as 30 miles east of NEW HAZELTON. The grading is about finished from Prince Rupert to NEW
HAZELTON. Many mines are getting ready to ship ore. Some of the
mines being developed are:—Silver
Cup, American Boy, Silver Standard,
Sunrise nnd Sunset, Lead King, Erie
Babine.     Most of  the  ore  in  NEW
INVESTMENTS
Made in towns with the
RIGHT KIND OF COUNTRY
RIGHT KIND OF RESOURCES
RIGHT KIND OF PEOPLE
will surely be big paying
investments. This is the
kind  of town you find at
New Hazelton, B.C.
HAZELTON mines is high grade
Silver-Lead, similar to ore in the
Siocan District in East Kootenay,
B. C, and similar to some ores found
at Leadville, Col.
Buy Lots
TERMS ARE  EASY
Look them over again, and think
of this money making investment.
OCT OF CITY INVESTORS
Can reserve one or more Lots by
wire or letter. State price of Lots
and number required, and we will
make the best available reservation
for you.
Remember NEW HAZELTON is
not a gift Townsite and when yon
buy a lot in it you are investing your
money on (he business judgment of
the most successful men in Ilritish
Columbia.
NEW HAZELTON Townsite had over
a Quarter of a Million Dollars Invested by a few Business Men before
the Lots were offered for sale. NEW
HAZELTON is a Business Man's
Townsite. All the G. T. P. and Local
History was carefully considered.
The Engineer's Reports as to grades,
opportunities for Side Tracks necessary to handle the thousands of
freight cars were examined. Then
they Invested In NEW HAZELTON.
They paid in Cash for NEW HAZEL
TON   and   nearby   Lands   over   Two
Hundred and Fifty Thousand Dollars.
That is a wonderful sonnet written
by John .1. Ingalls on the' subject of
Opportunity, but the real fact Is,
Opportunity does not knock once on
each man's door. Opportunity plays
a continual anvil on every man's portals—but, of course, if lie is knocking at the lime lie will not hear
Opportunity when she knocks.
Clipping from Omineca Herald,
Saturday, September 9, 1911: —
OUST  ONE   NEW  HAZELTON
THE  SPOKANE  OF  CANADA
AH Interests Combine to lloost the
New Town—Campaign Has Started—Natural Resources Guarantee a Big Population—Contractors' Headquarters.
The New Hazelton campaign has
started. For the next few months
the very best efforts of some of the
greatest advertising men and real
estate firms In British Columbia will
be devoted to Boosting New Hazelton. The different interests have
combined to make this town one of
the foremost in the province. A careful study has been made by experts
and they are all agreed that there
cannot be too much boosting. The
natural resources are Here and they
are now being developed in a way
heretofore unknown. Everything is
now on the move. Mining has this
week had a stimulation that waB not
dreamed of. During the two previous
weeks several big deals were put
through which meant the bringing in
of mining men known the world
over. Agriculture has been very successful this year and the* farmers
have had bigger crops than ever.
They are all getting on their feet
and buying machinery as fast as it
can   be   brought  into   the   country.
This week Charles S. Meek, president of Standard Securities, Ltd.,
Vancouver was in town and completed   arrangements  with   the  sur-
PRICES:
BUSINESS LOTS
33x120 (according to location)
Terms one-third cash, balance 1 and 2 years, at 6 per   cent.
$350 to $500 per lot
Prices on Residence lots
$100 to $300
Terms $10 cash; i?10 per month; No interest; or one-third cash; balance 1 and 2 years at 6 percent.
Make Cheques, Drafts, Money or Express Orders payable to Northern Interior Land Company, Ltd.
veyors to lay out his company's
property. This work has already
been started and it will be finished
in another ten days.
It is on the Northern Interior
Land Co.'s property that so many
of the old Hazelton business men
have purchased lots and are prepared
to build, many this fall. It is from
this point that the business section
will start and grow, and where high
values will prevail.
There    will    be    the    one    town
instead of several as might have
been. This means a great deal; In
fact, many hundreds of dollars to
the people of the old town, who have
been wondering wliere the town
would be. From now on New
Hazelton will be introduced to the
world in a manner that no other
town   can   equal
The gentlemen associated In the
homing of this New Townsite they
now call NEW HAZELTON, paid out
in actual cash before a lot was sold
Over ii Quarter of a Million Dollars.
NEW  HAZELTON
Where the Grand Trunk Pacific
Railroad has Sixty Acres of right-of-
way and track grounds.
NEW HAZELTON is reported by
Engineers to be the only available
spot in the Skeena or Bulkley Valleys
for many miles each way where it
would be possible to have Railroad
Yards large enough to handle the
Hazelton District's business.
NEW HAZELTON affords a long,
nearly level stretch of land suitable
for Immense Yards, which will be
required to handle the thousands of
cars of ore and coal that will be
shipped from the mines in the
Hazelton District.
TheCT.P.
Capital of Grand Trunk Railway
and the Grand Trunk Railway Systems, $447,808,932.
Over 50,000 Stockholders, G. T.
and G. T. P. Millions of people boost
for Grand Trunk Pacific Townsites.
Maximum grade of G. T. P. is 21
feet to the mile, one-fifth of any
other Trancontinental Railroad in
Canada or the United States.
NEW HAZELTON is the Town
that everybody is talking about, and
there are no two opinions as to its
opportunities for investments. The
reason is obvious.
NEW HAZELTON Is Situated near
the junction of the Skeena and
Bulkley Valleys.
The Northern Interior Land Co.
Ltd., paid rash for and own (Section One) NEW HAZELTON TOWN-
SITE and guarantee to deliver to
purchasers of lots an Indefeasible
Title upon receipt of final payment.
ADDRESS ALL CORRESPONDENCE TO
NORTHERN INTERIOR LAND CO., Ltd.
Prince Rupert, B.C., P. 0. Box 1515
PRINCE RUPERT OFFICE FOR SALE OF LOTS
JEREMIAH H. KUGLER. LTD.
2nd Avenue Between 5th and 6th Streets

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