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Prince Rupert Journal Aug 19, 1910

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 New Wellington
Coal
is the best
ROGERS ft BUCK
Sole Agents
Ptinu Hajari
nxmi
High-Class
Job Printing
In all Lines
VOLUME  1
Published Twice a Week
PRINCE  RUPERT,  B.  C.\   FRIDAY, AUGUST 19, 1910.
Price, Five Cents
XO 19.
GLAD WELCOME
WILFRID
A LIQUOR  CRUSADE
Authorities Are Making Move to Put
Down the Selling of
Intoxicants
Time of Police   Court   is   Occupied
With Bearing of Cases or
Alleged Iiifiuctioii
The police authorities have been
busy for several weeks past collecting evidence against what are commonly known as "blind-pigs." The
result has been that the time of
Police Magistrate Carss has been
quite fully occupied with the hearing of evidence relative to whether
liquor is being sold or not by alleged violators of the law.
On Wednesday morning evidence
was taken on informations laid
against Edward Morrison of "the
bowling ally on Second avenue, auu
against D. McRae of the Dominion
Hotel.
A. M. Manson appeared as the city
prosecutor, while L. W. Patmore appeared for the defence in each case.
The evidence was very contradictory. In the case of Morrison, the
evidence of the prosecution was that
a bottle of whiskey was procured
upon application, while the defence
put up was that the police officer
was a friend of the defendant and
he had got the liquor from a club
on Ihe officer stating he was not
feeling well.
In the case of the Dominion, the
evidence of the proprietor was that
he did not sell to the police officer
who swore he got it from him.*
Incidentally the strength of "beer-
Ine," which Mr. .McRae said was the
only drink lie sold, came up. This
was claimed to be non-intoxicating,
but the police magistrate doubted
whether under the act this could be
taken as warranting its sale. There
was a doubt In his mind as to
whether any alcoholic liquors could
be sold.
The decision of the police magistrate was deferred until this morning, when he found both guilty. In
the case of E. Morrison he inflicted
a fine of $5 and costs, with an ad-
(Continued on  Page Eight)
PURE MEAT CRUSADE
Medical Health Officer is to See That
Law is Enforced in
City.
Mayor  Stork   Does    Not  Think  the
Council Should Devise Ways of
Bringing in Food
The health officer of the city reported to the council on Wednesday
evening on the subject of ensuring
pure meat in the city. He explained
that being carried in the open on
ship board on the way here it soon
became tainted. He suggested as
one means of overcoming the difficulty that the meat dealers should
see that their was cold storage provided on the steamers carrying the
meat. Another way out of it would
be, t6 have the animals shipped In
alive and slaughter houses built here.
This might not be advisable in view
of the fact that there were not the
proper facilities for disposing of the
refuse.
His worship said that It was not
of much concern to the council how
meat was brought here. All that they
were concerned about was to see
that the meat sold was in good shape.
The bylaw was referred to and it
was found that food unfit for use
might be seized.
Aid. Hilditch suggested that the
health officer be Instructed that the
council expected the bylaw enforced.
Aid. Pattullo suggested that the
mayor take this up with the health
officer and suggest that the laws be
enforced on consultation with tin
city solicitor.
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SIR WILFRID LAURIER, G.C.M.G., PC.
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FARTHEST WEST WILL
GIVE ROYAL RECEPTION
Saturday, 2 p.m.—Sir Wilfrid Laurier
and party arrive at G.T.P. wharf,
.Saturday, 2.15 p.m.—Presentation of
addresses   in   front of Provincial
Buildings,
Saturday     evening — Banquet     at
Prince  Itupert  Inn.
Monday   forenoon—Sir   Wilfrid   will
Inspect railway as guest of G.T.P,
Monday, '2 p.m.—Open air address by
Sir   Wilfrid    Laurier   and    others
in front of Provincial Buildings,
Monday, S p.m.—Smoker in impress
theatre.
In a general way the programme
for Sir Wilfrid Laurier's reception
in this city will be as given above.
The general committees are meeting
again this evening for the last time
when the subject will be fully gone
into and all arrangements finally
completed.
It has been arranged that the D.
G. S. Kestrel, Capt. Newcombe, will
carry the reception committee to the
entrance of the harbor to meet the
Prince George. The other vessels
In the harbor will accompany the
Kestrel. Every craft available is
expected to be Ih commission. This
will include the launches as well as
Prince Rupert Citizens are Ready to Receive Canada's
Distinguished Son on His First Visit to the Embryonic Seaport of the Pacific Coast-
Will Spend Three Days
in the City.
the larger steamers. The Kestrel
will lead the way in the whole procession, moving slowly so that all
may  keep  In  position.
The G. T. P. wharf is to be kept
clear so as to avoid any trouble and
the public are asked to co-operate
with the committees in acceding (o
this request.
Upon arrival the party will be
taken to the point in front of the
provincial government buildings,
where the addresses will be presented. These are very brief. There
is the unique on from th city council, one equally novel from the
French Canadian residents of Prince
Rupert, a collection of views of the
city from the Daughters of the Empire, and an illuminated address
from the Indians.
The latter address, it is announced,
will be one iof the most unique of
all. Almost seventeen chiefs will be
presenl to take part In it ami the
greatest secrecy as to its character
is being maintained by the Indians.
Saturday evening the Prince Unpen Inn will be tbe scene of a grand
banquet in honor of t-'ir Wilfrid,
nnen 175 will sit down. Elaborate
preparations have been made by Mr.
Sweet for the occasion.
It is not yet known how Sir Wilfrid will prefer to spend Sunday,
which will be left open largely until
his arrival.
Monday morning as the guest of
the G. T. P., the Prime Minister and
party will Inspect the railway to
whatever point is desired by them.
Returning there will be a grand
open air meeting in front of the Provincial   buildings   when   the   public
will have the opportunity of hearing
Sir Wilfrid and other members of his
party,
In the evening there is to be a
smoker given in the Empress theatre
in honor of the occasion.
The decoration committee has
made elaborate preparations for the
visit. There bus been Bplendld cooperation mi the pari of the city, the
ti. T, P. and private Individuals, and
us n result siiiin- eye Bores on the
streets have been effectively wiped
out, The Bcheme of decoration Is
.i.iii|ci", yel effective and distinctively
charactorlsl le of a new c-ity.
The arches pul up by the city, the
French Canadians nnd the Indians
are highly creditable.
(liven a continuance of the good
weather that lias prevailed during
the past two months, the reception
will pass off In first class style for
there is yet to be heard a single
discordant note In connection with
the arrangements.
Tbe school children have been
carefully trained by Principal Hunter and Prof. Kauffman, and with the
assistance of an orchestra will take
part In the reception singing patriotic
verses.
ON HIS  WAY  HERE
Sir Wilfrid Has Busy Day in Victoria
Before Leaving For
North
Accommodation is All Taken l'p For
I lie Trip of the Prince
George
(Special to The .louranl)
Victoria, Aug. 19.—Sir Wilfrid
Laurier and party concluded their
visit to Victoria last night, leaving
on the Prince George for Prince Rupert during the night. Sir Wilfrid
is looking remarkably well after such
a long tour nnd it is evident that
the trip has done him good.
To Intimate friends he expressed
his pleasurable anticipation with respect to the voyage along the Pacific coast and the opportunity of seeing Northern  British Columbia.
Yesterday was a very busy one for
the Prime Minister. In the forenoon
he received a number of deputations
and later accompanied by Hon. Ceo.
P. Graham, Minister of Railways, and
E. M. MacDonald, M.P. for Picfon, attended the general conference of the
Methodist church where they were
heartily received. The visitors delivered brief uddreses.
cum-' 'ii Party
In the nf roc n a garden party
was given a: i~'.vernment House by
Hon. T. W. Paterson, the Lieutenant
Governor and .Mrs. Paterson. There
was a very large at tendance, ami Sir
Wilfrid took occasion during the afternoon at different times to remark
upon the delightful location,
Evening  Meeting
In the evening an immense crowd
thronged the Horn." show building at
the Exhibition i;:ounds where sir
Wilfrid adl'u--'.t tliein on subjects
of the day. Hf i'< alt with the Oriental Immigration question, defending
the action of his government. The
regulations now enforced he believed
were sufficient to effectually restrain
immigration and prevent danger
from that source.
The  naval  policy  of  his  government was also defended by him.
At   Parliament   Buildings
The reception In the parliament
buildings the night before was carried  out  on  a most  elaborate scale,
(Continued on Page Eight)
FIRST CONTRACTS
Street Grading and Plank Walks to Be
Done at Beach
Place.
Proposal to do Work  by  Day Labor
Did  Nol  Kind Favor With
the Council
Tiie contracts for the grading and
planking of Tenth nnd Eleventh
streets and Beach Place have been
awarded  by the city council.
Mr. Swanson gets the contract for
grading, while Mr, La Trace will (|0
the planking. Tbe former is for the
sum of (3,822, while the later con-
trad calls for $782.46,
The c-ity engineer In his report to
the council on Tuesday evening,
recommended the acceptance of these
tenders,
Aid. Hilditch again moved In favor
of the system of day labor. He con-
tended thai the $4,mm tender for
grading of the city engineer included
fifteen per cent for contingencies,
which might be cut off, leaving it the
lowest  tender.
Aid, Naden was not opposed to
trying tho experiment of day labor
on this small contract, though he did
not feel satisfied that it would be
cheaper.
The other members of the council
could not see it In that way and
favored the letting of the contract
which was done.
 -o	
.Miss Coral Barker returned from
a trip to Treadwell, Alaska, a few
days ago, where she has been visiting friends for a few weeks. 'IWPIH
THE   PRINCE   RUPERT   JOURNAL
Friday, August 19, 1910.
STRIKE RICH ORE
IN   DEFENCE OF LADIES
Another Mineral Area is Located Witiiin
Easy Reach of Hazelton and
the G.T.P.
The   Flowers   Sent   to   Dr.   Crippen
Might Be Used in Worse Way
ffiocher de Bonle Is iteported to Have
Shown Galena of Excellent
Character
The summer's prosperity in the
wieinity of Hazelton is being at-
Boded with most gratifying results
»»d next summer should see a derided rush into that section of the
province which will be easily reached then by rail. There has been an
ilwence of reports from the Hazelton country of fabulous finds which
tends to establish more confidence
ia the character of the ore. Its development must mean much for
Prince Rupert.
Quite a wave of excitement was
created when W, S. Sargent return-
osl to town from the hills with news
at finding a vein of galena ore on
Rocher do Boule mountains, seven
ar eight miles south of town and
throe or four miles from the railway Une, says the Omlneca Herald of
Hazelton. He said the ledge Is from
fftree to eight feet wide and appears
tor a thousand feet in length and
(thai pieces of ore similar to the samples brought to town can be broken
off at any point. He and his part-
aers have located a group of seven
afkums in a formation of quartzite
sod gra. He, i u ny oor>'Yry aik»n
lis soon as Sarg nt tcld of h's linrt
aeveial prospectors left foi til' scene
and that part of the :tinge will be
imoroughly looked over in the text
Hew weeks.
Frank Brown, returning Friday
wening from the scene of the new
.itrike, says it is one of the biggest
ttlngs in the way of a raw prospect
lihat he has ever seen. The vein fi 11-
cing has been worn away and the
rails left standing, granite on one
aodfi. and quartzite on the other. He
iaraversed the ledge for a thousand
tfeet and for the entire distance
where the ore was not covered by
nfebris, good galena could be broken
aff at any point. Brown considers
the indications favorable for more
iJiscoveries and looks to see a camp
nf importance opened up in that vl-
ctinity, providing always that the sil-
ccwr values are as good as the general
average throughout the district.
The ladies of Quebec are criticised for sending flowers to Dr. Crippen. The good women might do
worse, says the Vancouver News-Advertiser. If flowers exert any influence over the fugitive it should
not be a vicious influence. , There
may be in Quebec many persons snut
in poor homes who would appreciate
such gifts more than Dr. Crippen.
Perhaps also Dr. Crippen may misinterpret the gift as a tribute of
admiration and approval of all that
he is said to have done. But It is
possible thai Hie beauty and purity
of the flowers may bring bitter
thoughts and aspirations to the mind
of the prisoner, even though he be
guilty, and that some .ague regrets
for the past nay come upon him.
hi the open country the flowei>, are
made to bloom impartially fo* the
hardened criminal and the sain*, of
God. So let the women send them
to Dr. Crippen, but it would do well
not to forget others who cannoi go
abroad to see them, who have not
had the advantage of a spectacular
arrest and are not awaiting a sensational trial.
SPORTS
QUITS RING-SIDE
"The Jeffries-Johnson fight at
Reno was my last appearance as a
promoter," said Tex Rickard recently in San Francisco. "It isn't that I
love the fight game less, but I love
that coal mine of ours at Cons Bay
more. I'm coal mining now, you
know, and that will be enough for
me for some time.
TOR ENGLISH  DERB1
RELIC OF MOOSE BATTLE
Interlocked Antlers That Mutely Tell
of  a  Fight  to  the  Death
FINANCIAL   QUES1 IONS
91-oTince  Millies   Claim    lor  Repayment of Taxes
it the meeting of the city council
«n Wednesday evening a letter was
read from the Minister of Finance
asking that the claim of the province
against the city of Prince Rupert for
UIi;aT4:03 be paid. This Included
the taxes due the province upon the
Unds in the city up to the date of incorporation when the city took over
the conduct of affairs. It also Included the salary of Arthur Cuth-
Sert as assessor and incidental ex-
ijenses' connected with it.
Tins was referred to the finance
'aommittee.
Night Watchman's Pay
Tho finance committee recommended the payment of $227.80,
recommended by the Board of Trade
*s the amount due to the night
watchman, who had done duty before
the city took over the conduct of affairs.
Jtid. Pattullo with respect to the
iccounf presented by the Board of
Trade said that excellent work had
keen done by providing a patrolman
sefore incorporation. He had pleasure in moving that it he paid.
Aid. Hilditch said be raised objection purely on the ground of precedent. This patrolman was very
necessary lie admitted. He covered
i special part of tin- city, however,
mil In- did noi think thai the whole
city should he made to pay for It.
tld. Mobley objected to drawing
Mil line as elosi us Aid. Hildltch
suggested,   lie thought the account
rhould be paid. To «rrj I '.is io a
logical conclusion the frontage lax
»ould have to be introduced for
•everything in the way if Improvements, etc., In the city
Aid. Barrow wanted to know why
lfte patrol man continued under the
Board of Trade's instructlrn3 after
the city was Incorporated.
Aid. Pattullo thought It would
lave been better for the Board of
Trade to have dropped the employment of the man. It was overlooked,
lowever.
Aid. Hildltch said he did not ob-
jsct to the money being paid. He
iJd object to precedents being raised
an other ways and this being allowed
Hi pass.
U was decided to pay the account.
An extraordinary reminder of £.
fatal animal battle is shown by a
rare and unique trophy, a pair of
interlocked moose antlers, the result
of a deadly encounter between two
giant bull moose in the wilds of the
Cassiar mountains, British Columbia,
a year or so ago. Tois specimen Is
soon to be exhibited in die great collection of heads and horns now being brought together at the New
York zoological park, which comprises some of the largest game
heads of British Columbia, northern
Alaska and elsewhere.
During their duel the powerful
and enraged moose used their broadly palmated antlers as weapons of
offence and defence in a series of
tremendous charges and assaults
which they made upon each other. In
the course of the fierce encounter
the antlers became so firmly entangled and locked tint neither of
the combatants could ureak away.
A native hunter heard the I ,ud
clashing of the horns a half a mile
or so in the forest and star'ed for
the scene of the confilcf. At a distance, spellbound, he witnessed the
marvellous battle of tne two plants
battering and crashing into one another with the energy of two locomotives In a head-on collision. On
nearing the two antagonists he found
that one of the animals had broken
its neck during the struggle, and lay
dead on the ground, while the other
partly exhausted, was making Herculean efforts to release his horns.
The hunter then killed the living
moose, and tried by varloui, mechanical means, using a woodm wedge,
etc., to sepaiate the antlers, which,
however, was found to be i.n impossible task. He reported the duel between the moose to a neai-bj 'reding
post, and the two heads v/ere secured
and fortunately preserved. The animals were of gigantic size, probahly
ten or twelve years old, tie larger
pair of horns having a srread of
sixty-nine and one-half inches, and
the other sixty-two. This is said to
be the only instance where a pair of
giant moose antlers interlocked in
this wonderful manner have been
found and brought into civilization.
 o	
BOAT FOR STIKINE
Fo/ the first time in racing history
a British Columbia owner will be
represented in the English Derby,
Mr. Irving H. Wheatcroft, of St.
James Island, near Victoria, having
entered *wo yearlings for the 1912
Blue Ribbon of the turf. His entries
are being bred on the St. James
Stock Farm at Lexington, Kentucky,
and the strains from which they are
sprung are amongst the highest In
British racehorse blood. The entries are: King Broomstick, a chestnut colt, by Broomstick, out of Imported Esteem by Chtldwlck by St.
Simon; Queen Sain, a brown filly,
by Sain out of Ora Bailey by Hanover.
CRICKET TOURNAMENT
Ten teams have entered for the
fifth annual Pacific coast cricket
tournament, which will take place in
Victoria, commencing Monday, August 22, and continuing through the
week till the 27th, on which day the
championship final will be played.
The ten teams entered are: Vancouver (holders of the cup), Victoria,
Burrard, Seattle, Nanaimo, Albion,
Saanich and Strawberry Vale (combined), Kootenay, Portland and the
Work Point Garrison.
■ll»a\
TO TEACH CRICKET
The Winnipeg Cricket Association
are going to ask the educational authorities of the city to allow cricket
to be taught in the public schools.
The boys might be taught worse
things and they are now probably
ticcght, some not a hit more useful
o. of greater educational value. If
anything has to be dropped in order
to make room for cricket, of course
it will not be one of the esentials
like the three R's. and If one or two
of the ologles are knocked off the
curriculum, no harm will be done.
If the reyaest of the association Is
granted, it is not likely that cricket
will be made compulsory. It will
be one of the optional subjects.
BIG GAME HUNTERS
There has just been launched at
Seattle a tunnelboat for William J.
McNeill, of Wrangell, for sen ice on
the Stikine river, northern British
Columbia. The boat has been named
the "Telegraph," and it will ply between Wrangell, In Alaska, end Telegraph, B.C., on the Stikine river. The
craft is one of the few tunnelboats
ever to be built on this coast, and
has been specially designed io navigate in shallow stream.. By an ingenious boxlike contrivance en- igh
water Is provided to allow f propu-
son where the ordinary propeller
would be unable to work. !t will be
operated on the Stikine river, between Wrangell and Telegraph, and
will carry pasengers, mails and general freight. Her design will specially
fit her for navigating the shallow
reaches of the Stikine rher.
Col. Parry, D.S.O., commander of
the Denbighshire Yoemanry, North
Wales, is at present on the coast,
preparatory to visiting the Cassfar
district to hunt hlg game. The ascent of the Stickine river to Telegraph creek will be made from
Wrangel, Alaska. The colonel expects to be six weeks in the north,
and is most anxious to secure a number of good trophies, including a
moose head. Col. Parry has hunted
In Africa, Norway and New Zealand,
am: was decorated during the South
A rican war.
Among other hunters seeking
sport are Mr. J. Bosenburg, a Norwegian, who is going to the Cassiar
district this fall, and Mr. Eustis Red-
cliffe, a well known English sportsman, who is now hunting grizzly in
the Kenai peninsula of Alaska.
RUBBER   SUBSTITUTE
George Metcalf, of Ashburtoi N.
Z., claims to have Invented a substitute for rubber for cycle and motor
tires, more durable and cheape, than
rubber. He will go to London to
lay the process before capitalists.
TRIP TO ENGLAND
A great sui prise was sprung on
the Montreal lacrosse players when
they turned out for their final practice before their match aaginst Toronto on Saturday.
President Findlay told the playevs
after the practice that If they again
captured the N. L. U. title this year,
it would mean a trip to the old ,o n
try for them. This announcement
was a great surpise to all the boys,
and all stated that they would play
harder than ever to capture the prize
offered by Mr. Findlay.
Mr. Findlay stated that he had
the plan of the trip m his mind lor
some time, and had several talks
posed with Manager Davidson. If the
Montreal twelve won tha championship it Is proposed to stait on the
trip about the end of Mai ■ Games
will be arranged to covei tin. expenses,' and the team will return
early in May, so as to be in good
condition for their league matches.
FOULKES IN TENNIS
Capt. Foulkes, of Ottawa, who Is
coming to reside in Victoria permanently at an early date has successfully defended hts title as cup holder of
HAYNOR BROS.
I House Furnishers
Located temporarily, since the fire,
in  liuneiliii Block, corner of Second
"I     =    Avenue  and  Eighth  Street.
■   Some snaps in slightly damaged   goods  which  we  want  to  clear
S out  before moving into new quarters In Manson lllk., Third Ave.
I FUNERAL  FURNISHERS
%i«HH«iiiiiiiiMi«iiniiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiHi«H«in
I
the Canadian National Lawn Tennis
association. He formerly lived on
the coast and the following from the
Toronto World, In an account of the
match which ueclded the national
championship:—
"The shower which fell just as
the singles match was about to begin, by softening the court, helped
Foulkes' cut ground strokes to come
oft frequently, and puzzled Balrd,
who is accustomed to clay courts and
a fast-rising ball. However, after
the former had 2-0, Balrd assumed
the aggressive and took six straight
games, 18 aces to 8. The second set
was characterized by the resolute defence Foulkes offered, his great getting abilities and accuracy of return, and, towards the end, a lot of
clever net work with cross-court and
line volleys. In this set, Foulkes
6-2, the winner scored only 10 aces
to Balrd's 15. but put only one ball
each in the net and out of court.
The third set was the most beautiful, as well as the turning-point of
the match. Foulkes assumed the
aggressive, showing great generalship, getting to the net frequently,
and, though not smashing much, vcl-
leylng ^splendidly, his speed, direction and timing being admirable. He
had Balrd in difficulties frequently,
made the latter play his game, and
beat him at ".. He scored 18 aces to
Balrd's 10, with mistakes about even,
but scored when needed, winning at
6-2. It was now or never for Baird,
and he opened strongly with a lead
of 3-1. His overhead volleying now
was the best he showed, but Foulkes
proved a wenderful getter, refusing
to be beaten, and was returning
most of them safely, making it 3 all
and 4 all. Daird continued persistent smashing and took the next two
and the set at 6-4, Foulkes, when at
4-5 and 30-40, serving a double fault.
Aces were: Baird 16, Foulkes 7; two
sets all.
"It was during the critical set that
the prettiest net play was seen. Tbe
pace slowed down in an effort after
accuracy and the struggle for the net
was keen. Foulkes' generalship was
more apparent than ever, and his
patience, waiting stroke after stroke
for the exact moment to make a kill
was admirable, whereas Baird often
netted the ball in trying to kill off a
difficult stroke. The latter was plainly nervous, whereas the champion's
confidence was superb. One all and
two all were called, and after Baird
had 15 Foulkes scored 30 on two
lovely cross-courts, then Balrd
double faulted and Foulkes passed
him again, 3-2. From this on the
latter's ground-driving and his volleys ran him out the winner, 6-2, the
aces being even, but Balrd's mistakes
trebled the others. Keen as was the
disappointment, the applause for the
winner was general, and all appreciated the champion's remarks at the
prize-giving, that Baird was the best
player and sportsman he had ever
met."
 o	
THE ABSORPTION OF LIGHT
40 per cent of the light strikjng them
is thrown back. Dark green and rod
hangings eexreise precisely the same
Influence; they annihilate quite 85
per cent., only 15 per cent radiating
from them.
SALT IN BUTTER
For slightly salted butter salt Is
added by the process of brining
where the butter is made in small
quantities. Brine used In butter-
making Is usually made by dissolving one pound of salt In about one
gallon of clean water. A sufficient
quantity of brine is made and used
to thoroughly float the butter grains
In the churn, so that the latter may
be rotated several times without danger of the grains going together to
form a solid mass. Brine, when
freshly made, will be found to be
several degrees below the temperature of the water from which It was
made. This Is due to the salt absorbing heat from the water In dissolving. The low temperature of the
brine is a great advantage In reducing the temperature of the butter In
hot weather.
John P. Babcock, formerly deputy
commissioner of fisheries, who has
resigned his post with the govern
ment, has finally severed his connection with the province. He has left
for San Francisco to take up the Important position of superintending
the fisheries of California, a post in
which he will have 120 men under
him.
LINDSAY'S CARTAGE ft STORAGE
G. T. P. CARTAGE AGENTS
Office at H. B. Rochester, Centre St.
LADYSMITH COAL
is handled by us.  All orders receive
prompt attention.  Phone No 68.
NOTICE
The public of British Columbia and
visitors are cordially Invited to meet
the Right Honorable Sir Wilfrid
Laurier, G.C.M.G., P.C., Premier of
Canada, at a public reception to be
tendered by the Premier and Members of tbe Executive Council of the
Government of British Columbia, In
the Parliament Buildings, Victoria,
on Wednesday, the 17th instant, at
9 p.m.
HENRY ESSON YOUNG,
A15 Provincial Secrtary.
A late Issue of Die Bauwelt says
the color of paper hangings and
tapestry is far from being a factor
of minor Importance In the degree
of light that prevails in a room, and
Is closely related to the economic
use of the artificial Illumination alsi.
In accordance with their colir, such
fabrics throw back into the 130111 a
part of the light that Is falling upon
them while they annihilate another
part, or absorb it, as the technical
phrase is. As the power of absorption of light rises In such a fnbric
so naturally In less degree Is the
rocm brightened and less advantageous is the use of artificial Illumination, a part of the money spent for
the latter being wasted for l.'ibt annihilated by the hangings.
The latest investigation reveals
that the absorption of light depends,
in the first instance, on the co'or of
the hangings, and therefore on the
same color when the walls are painted with It, too. aNturally the most
favorable effect of color in thhi regard Is afforded by the white hangings and paints, but even these absorb 50 per cent of the light falling
upon them, while the other 50 per
cent radiates back Into the room
Following these in the effect of light
come the yellow hangings which
radiate 45 par cent and annihilate 56
per cent. TT:e next in order are the
bright green, of which the power of
absorption rises to 60 per cent, while
Some Rock
Bottom
Prices
See Ui For Investment
Rupert City Realty & Information Bureau, Ltd.
PRINCE RUPERT, B. C.
The Roland Rooms
Splendid Accommodations
Newly Furnished
Hot baths;  right down  town;  good
table board all  round
RATES, FIFTY CENTS AND UP
 LADYSMITH	
COAL
H. B. ROCHESTER,  -   Centre Street
Fred Stork
General Hardware
...Complete Line of...
VALVES
Pipe and Pipe Fittings
—THE—
Oliver
Typewriter
—FOR—
Seventeen Cents a Day
Please read the headline over
again. Then its tremendous significance will dawn upon you.
An Oliver Typewriter—the standard visible writer—the most highly
perfected typewriter on the market
—yours for 17 cents a day!
The typewriter whose conquest of
the commercial world ts a matter of
business history—yours for 17 cents
a day!
The typewriter that is equipped
with scores of such conveniences as
"The Balance Shift"—"The Ruling
Device"—"The Double Release"—
"The Locomotive Base"—"The Automatic Spacer"—"The Automatic Tabulator"—"Tbe Disappearing Indicator"—"The Adjustable. Paper Fingers"—"The Scientific Condensed
Keyboard"—all
Yours For 17 Cents a Day
We announced this new sales plan
recently, just to feel the pulse of the
people. Simply a small cash payment—then 17 cents a day.' That
is the plan in a nutshell.
Tbe result has been such a deluge of applications for machines
that we are simply astounded.
The demand comes from people of
all classes, all ages, all occupations.
The majority of Inquiries has
come from people of known financial
standing who were attracted by the
novelty of the proposition. An Impressive demonstration of the Immense popularity of the Oliver Typewriter. ■
A startling confirmation of our belief that the Era of Universal Typewriting is at band.
A Quarter of a Million People are
Making Money With
TQe.
OLIVER
Typewriter
The Standard Visible Writer
The Oliver Typewriter is a moneymaker, right from the word "go!" So
easy to run that beginners Boon get
in the "expert" class. Earn as you
learn. Let the machine pay tbe 17
cents a day—and all above that Is
yours.
Wherever you are, there's work to
be done and money to be made by
using the Oliver. The business world
is calling for Oliver operators. There
are not enough to supply the demand.
Their salaries are considerably above
those of many classes of workers.
"Au Oliver Typewriter In
Every  Home!"
That Is our battle cry today. We
have made the Oliver supreme In
usefulness and absolutely indispensable in business. Now comes the
conquest of the home.
The simplicity and strength of the
Oliver fit It for family use. It Is becoming an important factor In the
home training of young people. An
educator as well as a money maker.
Our new selling plan puts the
Oliver on the threshold of every
home in America. Will you close
the door of your home or office on
this remarkable Oliver opportunity?
Write for further details of our
easy offer and a free copy of the new
Oliver catalogue.    Address:
R. C. BEAN
Prince Rupert Agent
General   Offices:   Oliver   Typewriter
Building, Chicago, 111.
CANCELLATION OF  RESERVE
NOTICE Is hereby given that the
reserve existing on Crown lands In
the vicinity of Babine Lake, and
situate in Cassiar District, notice of
which bearing date June 30th, 1909,
was published in the British Columbia Gazette, dated July 2nd, 1908, Is
cancelled.
ROBERT A. RENWICK,
Deputy Commissioner of Lands.
Lands Department,
Victoria, B. C, June 16th, 1910
(First Insertion July 6.) Friday, August 19, 1910
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
**++++**±AAA+A1iAAAAAAAAW
*   Steel Production   I
A$AAAAAAAAAAAAAAA.-.t..:..:..j.AAAA
The growth of the pig Iron production In Canada, as well as that of
the Dominion corporation, since 1901
Is clearly shown In the following
table, Bays the Montreal Star:—
Prod, of
Total for Dominion
Canada.   Steel Co.
•    Tons.      Tons
1909       609,400     255,900
1908       686,800     262,800
1907       416,600     257,000
1906       585,400     210,100
1905       390,200     162,200
1904       277,700       06,600
1903       323,700     155,130
1902       348,600     191,000
1901       165,900     111,000
The above figures show the company has Increased its production of
pig iron from 111,000 tons in 1901
to 262,800 in 1908 and 255,900 in
1909, the slight loss in the latter
year as compared with 1908 being
due to the Inadequacy of thef uel su
due to the Inadequacy of the fuel
supply received from the Dominion
Coal company. The output of steel
ingots has bene as follows:
Prod, of
Total for Dominion
Canada.   Steel Co.
Tons.       Tons.
1909       570,600     296,750
1908       662,000     279,500
1907    606,500     269,000
1906       569,200     235,300
1905       300,400     163,150
1904       128,900        62,850
1903       260,600     135,300
1902       136,400        99,400
1901   ... i      33,300       	
The Dominon Company began to
turn out steel in 1902 when it totalled 99,400 tons, increased since then
to 296,750, an even greater gain than
that recorded In the pig iron production.
The government bounties on pig
iron and steel ingots expire on December 31 this year, and those on
wire rode, which were given in lieu
of tariff, on June 30, 1921. It is
thought that when the different
bounties are terminated they will be
replaced by a protective tariff, although the cessation of the bonuses
Indicates that the steel industry in
Canada Is thought to have establish-
er itself upon a firm and lasting
foundation.
To take care of future business,
the corporation has been carrying out
extensive plant alterations and Improvements, which will also materially reduce productive costs and increase the total capacity 50 per cent.
The first new work to reach completion Is the set of coke ovens which
embody all the Improvements of the
last ten years. There are 120 of
these, requiring the service of 5 6
men, and capable of turning out 720
tons of coke every twenty-four hours.
The 500 old ovens produce about
1,250 tons of coke a day.
Following these the open hearth
furnaces will be finished and will be
among the largest In the world, with
a capacity of 500 tons each. A new
power plant is under way, as well
as a finishing plant, which will consist of a continuous roughing mill
and  Belgain  train.
These improvements were provided for in the consolidated mortgage
bonds issued last year, about $2,-
285,000 of the $5,000,000 total being set aside for the purpose.
During the past four seasons, net
earnings have averaged about $2,-
327,715 a year, but after the different betterments have been completed the income account ought to show
a gain corresponding with the greater capacity.
countering a strong uncharted tide-
rip in 11 degrees 15 minutes north
latitude, 130 degrees 47 minutes
west longitude.
 o	
LOCATION OF THE
FIRE  ALARM  BOXES
No. 1.—Fifth street and Third avenue.
No. 2.—Sixth street and Third avenue.
No.  3.—Seventh street and Third
avenue.
No.   4.—Eighth    Btreet   and   Third
avenue. ,
No. 5.—Junction of First and Second avenues.
No.  6.—Dominion Hotel.
No.  7.—Eighth street and Second
avenue.
No. 8.—Seventh street and Second
avenue. -
No.   9.—Sixth   street  and   Second
avenue.
No.   10.—Centre  Btreet and  First
avenue.
No. 11.—G. T. P. dock.
No. 12.—Front of the Government
building.
No. 13.—Second street and Second
avenue.
No.  14.—First    avenue   and    Mr.
Bride   street.
No.   15.—Third   avenue   and   McBride street.
No. 16—Fulton Hotel.
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE -that Brenton
Brown, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation insurance agent, intends to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands in the vi-
vinity of the Kitwancool or Chean
Wein Valley:—Commencing at a
post planted at the north-east corner and about ten miles distant in
a north-westerly direction from the
north end of Kitwancool Lake,
thence south 80 chains, thence east
80 chains, thence north 80 chains,
thence west 80 chains to point of
commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
BRENTON BROWN.
James VV. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 1, 1910.     . Jy8
LAND PURCHASE  NOTICES
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte.
TAKE NOTICE that the Queen
Charlotte Whaling Company Limited,
of Victoria, British Columbia, occupation manufacturers, intend to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about fifteen
chains south of a small creek on the
west side of Rose Harbour, Moresby
Island, thence west forty chains,
thence north forty chains, thence
east forty chains, thence southerly
following the sinuosities of the foreshore line forty chains, to the point
of commencement.
Queen Charlotte Whaling
Company Limited,
Per Sydney Charles Ruck, Agent
Dated July 14th, 1910.
Rose Harbour, Q.C.I.       . A5
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Jessie Stead-
man, of Victoria, B. C, occupation
married woman, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following described hinds, in the vicinity of
Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-east corner and about 6%
miles distant in a north-westerly direction from the north end of Kitwancool Lake, thence south 80
chains; thence west 80 chains, thence
north 80 chains, thence east 80
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 640 acres, more or
less. JESSIE STEADMAN.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated  May 31,  1910. Jy8
SNOW  WHITE WATER
In a report made to the United
States hydrographlc office at Port
Townsend an Inexplicable phenomenon, declared to be without precedent,
Is described. The statement Is filed
by Capt. II. Samuelson, of the American barkentlnc Aurora, on arrival
from  Callao, Peru.
On June 27, In latitude 11 degrees
south and longtitude 80 west, according to the report, the vessel's course
brought her Into an area of snow-
white water. The expanse was so
large as to require nearly an entire
day's sailing to traverse.
Its merging with the natural ocean
was sharp and definitely defined In
color, creating a marvellous scene of
marine beauty. Investigation with
every means available failed to show
the phenomenon to be due to submarine volcanic eruption or other upheaval.
A bucket filled with the milk-white
liquid when left an hour on the bar-
kentlne's deck resumed a normal sea
water color.
The officers of the Aurora sighted
a derelict ship's life-buoy on the
track of vessels In the San Francisco-Honolulu trade, and report en-
Skeeua Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Reginald
Davey, of Vancouver, B. C., occupation machinist, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands, in the vicinity of
Citwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-west corner and about 6 %
miles distant In a north-westerly direction from the north end of Kitwancool Lake, thence south 80
chains, thence east 80 chains, thence
north 40 chains, thence west 40
chains, thence north 40 chains,
chains, thence west 40 chains to a
point of commencement, and containing 480 acres (more or less).
REGINALD   DAVEY.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated  May  30,  1910. Jy8
Coast Land District—District of
Skeena.
TAKE NOTICE that Elijah
Rounds, of Victoria, B.C., occupation
Stewart, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted one-half mile north,
and one-half mile east, of Nettie A.
Lairds N. E. corner of application to
purchase, and 300 feet east of Ana-
ham Lake trail, marked E. R.'s
south-west corner, thence 40 chains
east, thence 40 chains north, thence
40 chains west, thence 40 cnains
south to point of commencement,
and containing 160 acres, more or
less. ELIJAH  ROUNDS.
Vincent M.  Schibner,  Agent.
Dated May 25, 1910. jn2^
LAND PURCHASE NOTICES
Skeena Land District—District of
, Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that William
Hume Grant, of Stewart, B.C., occupation engineer, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a
post marked W.H.G.'s S.W. Cor., and
planted adjoining Alfred Malison's
corner post, thence SO chains north,
along W. N. Harrison's west line,
thense east 80 chains, thence soutii
0 chains, thence west 80 chains, following Alfred Manson's north line to
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
WILLIAM HUME GRANT.
Frank R.  Strolm, Agent.
Dated July 2, 1910. Jy22
LAND  PURCHASE  NOTICE
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that John Cherry,
of Victoria, B. C, occupation mattress maker, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described landB in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at'a post planted at the
north-east corner and about 14 miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence west 80 chains, thence
south 80 chains, thence east 80
chains, thence north 80 chains to
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
JOHN CHERRY.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 3, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassia
TAKE NOTICE that Bruce Older-
shaw, of Victoria, B. C, occupation
jeweller, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of the
Citwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at
he north-west corner and about 7%
miles distant in a north-westerly direction from the north end of Kitwancool Lake; thence south 80
chains, thence east 40 chains, thence
north 80 chains, thence west 40
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 320 acres, more or
less. BRUCE OLDERSHAW.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated May 31, 1910. Jy8
LAN!) PURCHASE NOTICES
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Sarah Ward,
of Victoria, B. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands In the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. E. corner and about 22 miler. distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kltwancool
Lake, thence north 80 chains, thence
west 80 chainB, thence south 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or :ess.
SARAH WARD.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 6th, 1910 Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that George Mc-
Bain, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
merchant, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. W. corner and about 26% miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north 80 chains, thence
east 80 chains, thence south 80
chains, thence west 80 chains to
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
GEORGE  McBAIN.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 8th, 1910. ,Iy8
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE ' NOTICE that Catherine
Welsh, of Vancouve., ti. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands in the vi-
vlnity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein
Valley:.— Commencing at a post
planted at the S. E. corner and about
17% miles distant in a north-westerly direction from the north end of
Kitwancool Lake, thence north 80
chains, thence west 80 chains, thence
south 80 chains, thence east 80
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 640 acres, more or
less. CATHERINE  WELSH.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 4, 1910. JyS
LAND PURCHASE NOTICES
LAM) PURCHASE NOTICES
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Frederick
Tutt, of Selkirk, Manitoba, occupation merchant, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. W. corner about 14% miles distant In a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north 40 chains, thence
east 40 chains, thence south 40
chains, thence west 40 chains to
point of commencement, and containing 160 acres, more or less.
FREDERICK   TUTT.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 3, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Henry Van
Wyck, of Vancouver, B. C, occupi-
tion hoiel keeper, intends to appiy
for permi. un to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein
Valley—Commencing at a post
planted at the northreast corner and
about 20 miles distant in a northwesterly direction from the north end
of Kitwancool Lake, thence south 80
chains, thence west 80 chains, thence
north 80 chains, thence east 80
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 640 acres, more or
less. HENRY VAN WYCK.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated  June  6th,   191U. JyS
Skeena Land District—District ol
PflRRiJi r
TAKE NOTICE that Leihl Cherry,
of Victoria, B. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply far
permission to purchase the follDW-hsf;
described lands In the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at tne
S. E. corner and about 21 mile3 d'K-
tant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north 80 chains, thenee
west 80 chains, thence south 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to tho
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
LEIHI   CHERRT.
James W. Smith, Agent
Dated June 6th, 1910. Jy»
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Minnie Clarke
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
X. \V. corner and about 28% miles
distant and in a north-westerly direction from the north end of Kitwancool Lake, thence south 40 chains
thence east 80 chains, thence north
40 chains, thence west 80 chains to
point of commencement and containing  320  acres,  more  or less.
MINNIE  CLARKE.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated  June  Sth,   1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District al
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that John Grievti,
if Vancouver, B. C, occupation
agent, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kltwancool or Chean Wien Valley.—
Commencing at a post planted at th*
S. E. corner and about 20 miles distant in a north-westerly directioa
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north 80 chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence south 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to
point of comemncement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
JOHN GRIEVE
James W. Smith, Agent
Dated June 6th, 1910. Jy8
m
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Echo Dudgeon, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
assistant dentist, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of the
Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-east corner and about 7 %
miles distant in a north-westerly direction from the north end of Kitwancool Lake, thence south 80
chains, thence north 80 chains,
thence east 80 .chains to point of
commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
ECHO DUDGEON,
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated May 31, 1910. Jy8
PHONE 138
FOR
LETTER HEADS ENVELOPES
BUSINESS CARDS
VISITING CARDS       STATEMENTS
Prince Rupert Journal
tm
m
Skeena Land District—District of
Po RRiH.r
TAKE NOTICE that William
Simpson, of Lindsay, Ont., occupation hotel-keeper, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of the Kltwancool or Chean Wein
Valley:—Commencing at a poBt
planted at the south-east corner and
about 7 % miles distant In a north
westerly direction from the north
end of Kitwancool Lake, thence
north 80 chains, thence west 80
chains, thence south 80 chains,
thence east 80 chains to point of
commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
WILLIAM SIMPPON.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated  May 31,  1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that The Canadian
Fish and Cold Storage Company, of
Vancouver, B. C, occupation mercantile and manufacturing, intends
to apply for permission to purchase
the following described lands: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-east corner of lot 34, Range 5,
Coast District, thence south 20
chains, thence east 40 chains, thence
north 25 chains more or less to the
shore line, thence following along
the shore line to the point of commencement and containing 90 acres,
more or less.
The  Canadian  Fish  &  Cold
Storage Company Limited.
J. H. Pillsbury, Agent.
Dated July 14, 1910. Jyl9
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that George Tutt,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation den-
Ist, Intends to apply for permission
o purchase the following described
anils In the vicinity of the Kitwancool or Chean Weln Valley:—Commencing at a post planted at the
north-east corner and about 8%
miles distant in a north-westerly direction from the north end of Kitwancool Lake, thence south 40
chains, thence west 40 chains, thence
north 40 chains, tnence east 40
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 640 acres, more or
less. GEORGE TUTT.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 1,  1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Edward Cas-
pell, of Cayley, Alberta, occupation
merchant, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of the
Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. W. corner and distant about 15%
miles in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence south 80 chains, thence
east 80 chains, thence north 80
chains, thence west 80 chains to
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
EDWARD CASPELL.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 3, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
{**o ocf ci T*
TAKE NOTICE that Charles Gei-
ger, nf Victoria, B. C, occupation
clerk, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Comemncing at a post planted at the
S. E. corner and about 19 miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north 80 chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence south 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
CHARLES GIEGER.
James W.  Smith,  Agent.
Dated June 4th, 1910. JyS
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE tliat Thomas Sills,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation machinist, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. W. corner and about 26% miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kltwancool
Lake, thence south 80 chains, thence
east 80 chains, thence north 80
chains, thence west 80 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
THOMAS SILLS.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 8th, 1910. ,Iy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Lome Thompson, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
dentist, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of the
Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:
Commencing at a post planted at the
south-west corner and about 8%
miles distant in a north-westerly direction from the north end of Kltwancool Lake, thence north 80
chains, thence eaBt 40 chains, thence
south 80 chains, thence west 40
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 320 acres, more or
less. LORNE THOMPSON.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 1, 1910. Jy8
Skeena. Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Sarah Cox,
of Monarch, Alberta, occtipac.'on marled woman, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the followl.T
described lands in the Kltwancool or
Chean Wien Valley:—Commencing a*
a post planted at the N. W. corne*
and about 4% miles distant .n a
north-westerly direction from the
north end of Kltwancool Lake, thence
south 80 chains, thence e: st 80
chains, thence north 80 chains,
thence west 80 chains to point of
commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
SARAH COX.
James W. Smith, Agent
Dated May 31st, 1910.
Skeena Land Diicrict—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that William Wallace, of Toronto, Ont., occupation
insurance agent, Intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
discribed lands in the vie' ilty of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Comencing at a post planted at the
N. E. corner and about 26% miles
distant in a north-westerly dlrocr on
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence south so chains, thenee
west 80 chains, thence north 80
chains, thence cast SO chains to the
point of commencement, containing
040  acres,  more or less.
WILLIAM  WALLACE,
.lames W. Smith, Agent.
Dated   June  Sth,   1910. JyS
Coast Land District—District of
Skeena.
TAKE NOTICE that I, George A.
Poole, of Prince Rupert, occupation
printer, intend to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted on the north-east shore
line of Smith Island, distant, about
one mile south-east from Lot 38, and
marked "G. A. P.'s North-west Corner Post," thence 20 chains south,
thence 80 chains east, thence north
to shore line, thence following shore
line to point of commencement, containing 160 acres, more or less.
GEORGE  ARTHUR  POOLE.
Dated Satrrday, July 2, 1910.
(First Insertion  July  5.)
Skeena Land  District-   District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Samuel John
McDIarmld, of Monarch, Alberta, occupation farmer, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following described lands in the Kltwancool or Chean Weln Valley:—Commencing at a post planted at the N.
E, corner and about I % miles In a
north-westerly direction from the
north end of Kltwancool Lake,
thence soutii SO chains, thence west
SO chains, thence north 80 1 lining,
thence east su chains to point of
commencement, mid containing 640
acres,   more  or less.
SAMUEL JOHN McDIARMID.
.lames \V. Smith, Agent.
Dated May :11st, 1910. JyS
Skeena" Land District     District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Annie Oowan,
of Victoria, B. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described landB in Hie vicinity of Kltwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencng at a post planted at the
,\". W, corner and about 23 miles distant In a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kltwancool
Lake; thence south SO chains, thence
east 80 chains, thence north 80
chains, thence west SO chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
ANNIE OOWAN.
James W.  Smith, Agent.
Dated June 7th, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE mat Alfred Si
Partington, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation broker, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of
Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley.—
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. E. corner and about 15 % mile*
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancoot
Lake, thence north 80 chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence south 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
ALFRED E.  PARK1NGTON.
James W. Smith, Agent
Dated June 3, 1910. Jjt
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that George Williams, of Winnipeg, Man., occupation
clerk, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool
or Chean Wein Valley:—Commencing at a post planted at the S. W.
corner and about 16% miles distant
in a north-westerly direction from
the north end of Kitwancool Lake,
thence north 40 chains, tbenot
east 40 chains, thence south 4d
chains, thence west 4 0 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 160 acres, more or less.
GEORGE WILLIAMS.
James  W.  Smith, Agent
Dated June 4,  1910. Jyf
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that John Reid.
of • Vancouver, B. C, occupatioi
broker, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley;—
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. W. corner and about 15% miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of kltwanron)
Lake, thence north 40 chains, thence
east 40 chains, thence south 40
chains, thence west 40 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 160 acres, more or less.
JOHN REID.
James W. Smith, Agent
Dated  June  3,   1910. JyJ
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Grace Cess-
ford, of Victoria, B. C, occupation
married woman, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity 0!
Kitwancool or Chean Weln Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at th*
N. E. corner and about 23 miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north ."id of Kltwancool
Lake, jnce south 80 chains, thence,
west 80 chains, thence north St
chains, thence east 80 chains to tht
point of commencement, and containing 640 ac.res, more or less.
GRACE CESSFORD.
James W. Smith, Agent
Dated June 6th, 1910. Jyl
Skeena Land District—District 0/
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Henry Hem-
ml'cg, of Victoria, B. C, occupation
hotel keeper, intends to apply for
permission 10 purchase the following
described land.- in Ihe vicinity of Kltwancool   or   Chean   Wein   Valley:	
Commencing al a post planted nf tht
X. E. corner ami about 21 miles distant, In a north-westerly dlrecfloi
from tbe north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence south SO chains, thenc*
west 80 chains, thence north 84
chains, thence cast so chains to the
poinl of commencement, nnd containing 640 acres, more or less.
HENRY   HEMMING.
James W. Smith, Agent
Dated June 6th, 1910. jyg
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Nelson
Oowen, of Victoria, B. C, occupation mining engineer, intends to ap-
I'ly for permission to purchase the
following described lands In the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wela
Valley:-—Commencing at a post
planted at the N, E. corner and about
19 miles distant in the north-westerly direction from the north end of
Mtwnncool Lake thence south 80
chains, thence weBt 40 chains, thenoe
north 40 chains, thence west 40
chains, thence north 40 chains
thence east 80 chains to point of
commencement, nnd containing 4g«
acres, more or less.
NELSON   GOWEN
JumeB W. Smith, Agent
Dated June 4th,  1910. jy|
'    ft
1- M PRINCE  RUPERT JOURNAL
Friday, August 10,
prince Uupcrt journal
Telephone   l:{8
Published twice n week on Tuesdays
and Fridays from the office of publication, ThirdjAvenue near McBride St.
Subscription rate to any point in
Canada, $2.00 a vein-; lo points outside
of Canada, $3.00 a year.
Advertising' rate furnished on application.
O. H. NELoON,
Editor.
Friday, August 19,  1910
THE RECEPTION
Tomorrow the city of Prince Rupert will have as its guest Sir Wilfrid Laurler, the Prime Minister of
Canada. There is no question as to
the heartiness of that reception.
When Sir Wilfrid haB seen Prince
Rupert he will have completed his
westward tour and the homeward
trip will commence. There can be
no question that the visit to this city
was one of the main objects of his
tour. His railway policy which
brought Into existence the G. T. P.
was responsible for the springing up
of a city here. It was but natural
that he should desire to see for himself the point selected by the company
and approved by his government as
the place for a terminal port.
When he sees the harbor and gets
some idea of the potentialities of the
territory tributary to this port there
can be no doubt that the Prime Minister will be more than satisfied with
the choice.
In Prince Rupert, the farthest
west, Sir Wilfrid will find the most
western type of the Canadian people.
Whatever may be said of the Prime
Minister in times of political warfare,
there is no denying the fact that he
is of Canada and for Canada always.
He will find that the men of the extreme west are big enough to recognize merit whether it is in their own
particular political party or on the
other side. He has been shown that
farther south in British Columbia in
the capital and in Vancouver. He
will find that spirit high in Prince
Rupert.
The reception to the city is from
the citizens of Prince Rupert, and
not once in the arrangements has
there been the first evidence of the
introduction of party feeling into it.
It is becoming that this should be so.
There are plenty of opportunities for
the display of party feeling. On the
visit of the Prime Minister It has
been wisely decided to forget all differences and make the occasion one
to be remembered. The prayer of
every resident of the city will be that
Sir Wilfrid may long be spared to
serve his country and that this may
not be his last visit to the port. May
he live to see the city when its harbor
Is filled with deep sea shipping and
when it ranks as one of the greatest
seaports and Industrial centres in the
north.
 o	
CLEAN UP THE CITV
the Mov scons
Gen. Baden-Powell Explains Wlinl i
Aimed  at  in  Organization
The suggestion has been made that
in view of the fact that there will,
during the remainder of this week
and the beginning of next, be a lot
of strangers in the city, it would be
advisable that there should be a general cleaning-up. There has been such
a'move made in various parts of the
townsite by civic and private corporations. There is still a lot to do
in a private way. It is not an easy
matter to keep a new city looking in
the best of shape, but it is possible
to do something along the line of
making it, appear to the best advantage, and this should be done at the
present time. Where the general
cleaning up has taken place the appearance has been enhanced very
materially. A little extension of the
campaign would further improve the
general aspect considerably.
 o	
DAUGHTERS OF THE EMPIRE)
The organization In this city of a
chapter of the Daughters of the Empire is a move on the part of the
ladies of the city that Is to becom-
mended. The objects of the organization are phllantrophlr and benefi-
cient. Further, it aims at breaking
down the barriers which may sometimes be found between the scattered parts of the Empire and uniting
in one organization the ladles of the
different, parts of that great nation.
The scope of the work In which the
organization can engage is wide
enough to adapt it to all parts and
with the patriotic principle always
kept to the front the effect upon tha
rising generations should he marked.
 o	
The governments of Italy and
Venezuela have salt monopolies and
prohibit the Importation or sale of
the commodity to private parties.
Pender Hall, Vancouver, was filled
to overflowing when Major-Geueral
Sir R. S. Baden-Powell was the guest
at luncheon of the Canadian Club a
few days ago. The general, who arrived with Commissioner J. A. May-
nes, was met by the officers of the
Canadian Club and a guard of honor
formed by the scout masters of Vancouver, and on entering the hall was
greeted with rounds of cheering and
applause.
"The boy scouts—those urchins
going around with poles, shorts and
cowboy hats—look like boys playing
a game," said the general, after acknowledging the exceeding warmth
of his reception. "So they are from
their point of view at first, but there
is a great deal underlying that game.
We don't try to make soldiers or
sailors of them. Our main object is
the making of good citizens. That,
you wil admit, is a larger object than
making soldiers, because It makes
them patriots In the first place and
soldiering and sailoring will come after that In their place.   •
"We try to make them good citizens by methods which appeal to the
boys themselves, and all the time we
are building up character.
"In the old country, he continued
"they sought to lift the children of
the slums from their surroundings,
to bring out their Individual value,
to save them becoming members of
the great army of unemployed and
unemployable which was now a canker at the heart of the Empire. They
encouraged hoys in the knowledge of
handicrafts, to lift them on the road
when they would become useful
members of society, with the ability
to use their wits and their hands.
In this country the need in that direction was not as great, but It was
acknowledged by their neighbors to
the south that what was needed in
the younger generation on this side
was discipline, and the boy scout
movement worked for that outside
of the school walls. They sought to
mould men—patriotic and chivalrous
men."
THE ISLAND PARE
Hon. Price Ellison Has Returned F.om
Trip to Crown Noun-
tain.
2
Minister of  Lands   and   His   Party
West First to Scale Peak—
Vast Reserve Placed
Personals
Miss Davies went south last night
on the Prince Rupert to visit in Vancouver and Victoria.
Mrs. William Manson, having moved into her new home near the corner of Third avenue and Sixth street,
will be at home every fourth Wednesday in the month.
* •    *
Mrs. L. W. Patmore and children
returned to the city last night on
the Princess Royal from Vancouver
where they met Miss Edith Siddall
from England. Miss Siddall will remain in the city for some time.
»    *     »
Mr. Ru'ss. Hildebrand, formerly
one of the leading hardware merchants of Dawson, arrived in the city
with his wife on the Prince Rupert.
He intends to reside in this city and
open up a first class hardware store.
* *     *
G. A. McNicholl, superintendent
of the G.T.P., with headquarters at
this point, is in the city again, having returned from Vancouver where
he was engaged in business for the
company for a few weeks.
* *     *
The Misses Barbeau, milliners, left
last night for the south where they
intend to pick up the latest Ideas In
fall and winter millinery. They will
return to the city In about three
weeks and will Immediately open up
their new store in the Helgerson
block.
* #     *
E. S. Busby, Inspector of customs, has returned from a trip to
Dawson, where he made an official
inspection of the various offices
along the route. He has also visited
.Masset and looked into conditions at
the office that exists there. Mr.
Busby Is now In Stewart where a
new office was opened by him a few
weeks ago. In the Yukon, where he
was formerly located, he found the
outlook very bright. The putting In
of a power plant at Coal Creek to
run the necessary machinery that Is
intended to supply electricity to the
different mining sections, Is looked
upon as sure to meet e decided want
and the most optimistic feeling prevails. It will mean cheap power, it
is felt, and will enable the individual
miners to again operate the properties they control.
For Job Printing of all kinds see
'lie Journal man.
Hon. Price Ellison, minister of
lands for British Columbia and party
have returned from a six weeks' trip
tftrough the interior of Vancouver
Island, during which the party
climbed Crown Mountain, the first
time this feat has been accomplished.
Referring to the trip, the minister of
lands said:—
"It Is the grandest scenery I have
ever seen. The Kicking Horse Canyon through the Rocky Mountains is
not to be compared with the lakes,
rivers, glaciers and mountains and
the awe-inspiring scenes witnessed
by us in our trip through the island
interior, where a tract containing
240 square miles has been reserved
by the government as a provincial
park."
The party entered the interior of
the Island by way of Campbell River,
from which point the members proceeded by trail to Mclvor's Lake,
some two miles above the great falls
where a company with a capital of
$2,000,000 will install a plant and
distribute power to all towns on the
island as far south as Victoria. It is
also reported that the E. & N. will
take power from this company and
electrify the island lines.
From Mclvor's Lake, Minister Ellison and party proceeded to Buttle
Lake, where quite a stay was made
waiting for the party of six under
Captain Roberts that was to go in by
way of Alberni and unite with the
Ellison party at this point. The Ellison party was tired of waiting and
had their packs ready for a start
when the Roberts party was found.
It was very fortunate for the party of
Captain Roberts that the one dog
belonging to the party barked as he
always did whenever the party made
a start on a day's journey, for the
Roberts party heard the dog and
speedily joined the main camp, almost famished, not having a scrap of
food'left/ ' .     '
Leaving his surveyors and their
men at Buttle Lake, where they are
now engaged In surveying t,he park,
Mr. Ellison, his daughter, and party
climbed Crown Mountain which from
recent surveys has been found to
be located within the limits of the
proposed park, and not within the
railway belt, as heretofore supposed.
Mr. Ellison's report to the government will favor the Immediate construction of a roadway in to the park
by way of Campbell River, and later
on, if found practicable, by way of
Alberni. The park will, says Mr. Ellison, be an asset to the province as
an attraction to tourists.
H'»fr'K"c>''>'M'l>'H''friH"M''fr»'**4HH'^
THE JOURNAL   I §
Is the Official Advertising
Medium for the City
of Prince Rupert
FOLLOW THE TREND OF THE CUTS
PROGRESS BY SUBSCRIBING
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Columbia River Navigation
Nelson.—Sir Wilfrid Laurier has
telegraphed to W. B. Farris, of Nelson, saying that when in Nelson on
August 29, in company with Hon.
G. P. Graham, minister of railways,
he will be willing to receive a deputation from the Portland chamber of
commerce regarding the proposed
deepening and rendering navigable
of the Columbia river. The Nelson
board of trade has forwarded an official invitation to the Portland
chamber. The scheme to make the
Columbia navigable as far as West
Robson has been endorsed by the
Nelson board of trade, which Is acting in conjunction with the Portland
and Spokane chambers of commerce.
New Cement Factory
Princeton.—Mr. L. W. Shatford,
M.P.I'., Mr. John George, capitalist.
Mr. J. A. Harvey, K.C., and Mr. L.
W. Stone, financier, made up a party
that visted here recently to look
over the property of the newly formed company to manufacture Portland cement In the suburbs of Princeton. AI these gentlemen are interested financially In the 'proposed
works, which will Involve an outlay
of $250,000. It Is understood a saw
mill will be put into commission to
supply the lumber for erectlve purposes and for mining.
Certificate of Incorporation will
soon issue, when further particulars
of public Interest will be known. It
is stated that the initial plant to
be erected will have a capacity of
1,000 barrels of cement per day, to
be doubled as the market demands.
A spur will be built from the main
line of the Great Northern to the
works, about a mile and a half.
A <'AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA.'tAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAff                    A
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% The Journal aims at keeping Prince Rupert                %
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* A
% it to your friends and any whom you wish to                %
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Teachers' Salaries
Victoria.—That the salaries paid
the local teaching staff of the public
schools is, in comparison with the
salaries 'paid in other cities of the
Dominion, inadequate, and that some
of the best local teachers have had
overtures made to them by outside
boards,' was the basis of the belief
held by Trustee A. B. McNeil that
salaries here will have to be raised
iii thfe near future if Victoria is to
secure' the best material in the teaching line.
Tnis question of salary arose at
the regular meeting of the school
board, when two appointments were
made to the teaching staff. Some
objection was made to the salary
which is was suggested should be
paid to one of the appointees. Trustee
McNeil pointed to the difficulty in
securing first-class teachers. At
present the teachers putting in applications for positions on the local
staff do not appear to be of as high
quality as formerly, and this he as-
scribed to the fact that other cities
have raised the salaries paid and
are attracting the best of the teachers looking' for positions, leaving
only the less qualified for the positions offering here.
This view was held by several
other members of the board, and
from the opinions expressed It looks
very much as If the question of
salary increases will be an Important
one when the board considers the
matter at the end of the year.
 o ■
A charge of being a frequenter of
a house of Ill-fame has been before
the police magistrate for several
days this week. The last of the evidence was heard this morning. Magistrate Carss deferred judgment until
Tuesday morning.
WATER NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that an
application will be made under Part
V. of the "Water Act, 1909," to obtain a licence In the Skeena Division
of Coast District.
(a) The name, address and occupation of the applicant is The Municipal Corporation of the City of
Prince Rupert, County of Atlin, B.C.
(If for mining purposes) Free
Miner's Certificate No.
(b) The name of the lake, stream
or source (if unnamed, the description Is), Cloyah Lakes.
(c) The point of diversion, at the
foot of the Lower Lake.
(d) The quantity of water applied
for (in cubic feet per second), 150.
(e) The character of the proposed
works, dam, pipe-line and power
plant.
(f) The  premises  on  which  the
water is to be used (describe same).
The Power site at mouth of Cloyah
River.
(g) The purposes for which the
water Is to be used. Power.
(h) If for irrigation describe the
land Intended to be irrigated, giving
acreage.
(I) If the water is to be used for
power or mining purposes describe
the place where the water Is to be returned to some natural channel, and
the difference in altitude between
point of diversion and point of return: Water will be returned at
mouth of Cloyah River, 55 feet.
(j) Area of Crown land Intended
to be occupied by the proposed
works.
(k) This notice was posted on the
thirteenth day of August, 1910, and
application will be made to the Commissioner on the fifteenth day of
September, 1910.
(1) Give the names and addresses
of any riparian proprietors or licensees who or whose lands are like'y
to be affected by the proposed works,
either above or below the outlet:
Owners of lots 130, 131, 632, and
972.
(m) The boundaries and area of
the Municipality are as follows:—
4. The said City of Prince Rupert
shall be bounded as follows:—
Commencing at a post on the shore
of Shawatlan Passage, in Range 5,
Coast District of British Columbia,
and being the southeasterly post of
Section 9, Prince Rupert Townsite;
thence along the boundary of Section 9 as follows: South forty-three
degrees forty-seven minutes (43deg.
47mln.) west astronomical, a distance of four hundred and fifty-one
and seventy-seven hundredths (451.-
77) feet; thence north eighty-three
degrees thirty-seven minutes (83deg.
37min.) west astronomical, a distance of one thousand five hundred
and seventy-two hundredths (1,500.-
72) feet; thence soutii twenty-seven
degrees twenty-three minutes fifteen
seconds (27deg: 23mln. 15sec.) west
astronomical, a distance of three
thousand four hundred and seventy-
three and seventy-five hundredths
(3,473.75) feet; thence south thirty-
five degrees fifty-eight minutes
thirty-four seconds (35deg. 58min.
34sec.) west astronomies', a distance
of two thousand and fifty-one and
twenty-five hundredths (2,051.25)
feet; thence north sixty-two degrees
sixteen minutes twenty seconds (62
deg. 16mln. 20sec) west astronomical, a distance of one thousand one
hundred and twenty-four and eight
hundredths (1,124.08) feet; thence
south forty-seven degrees twelve
minutes ten seconds (47deg. 12min.
lOsec.) west astronomical, a distance
of four thousand eight hundred
(4,800) feet, more or less, to a post
being the north-easterly corner of
Lot 1,194, Range 5,' Coast District;
thence along the southerly boundary of Lot 1,994 south fifty-nine degrees forty-two minutes thirtv-eight
seconds (59deg. 42mln. 38sec) west
astronomical, a distance of three
thousand eight hundred and six and
sixty-eight hundredths (3,806.68)
feet; thence soutii forty-seven degrees seven minutes five seconds
(47deg. 07min. OSsec.)  west astron
omical, a distance of two thousand
six hundred and three and seven-
tenths (2,603.7) feet; thence south
seventy-nine degrees forty-one min-
uates forty-three seconds (79deg. 41
mln. 43sec.) west astronomical, a
distance of one thousand three hundred and forty-one and twelve hundredths (1,341.12) feet; thence
south fifty-two degrees forty-six minutes twenty-four seconds (52deg.
46min. 24sec.) west astronomical, a
distance of two thousand two hundred and forty-seven and ninety-six
hundredths (2,247.96) feet; thence
south sixteen degrees one minute
nineteen seconds (16deg. Olmin. 19
sec.) west astronomical, a distance
of three thousand one hundred and
sixty-nine and ninety-eight hundredths (3,169.98) feet; thence
north seventy-nine degrees twenty-
two minutes (79deg. 22min) west
astronomical, a distance of five hundred and thirty and sixty-four hundredths (530.64) feet, more or less,
to a post on the shore of Prince Ru-
per Harbour; thence west astronomical one thousand three hundred and
twenty (1,320) feet; thence north
astronomical a distance of twelve
thousand nine hundred and thirty-
six. (12,936) feet; thence north
sixty-one degrees and thirty minutes
(61deg. 30min) east, a distance of
twenty-three thousand seven hundred
(23,700) feet to a point opposite the
centre point of Shawatlan Passage;
thence along the centre line of Shawatlan Passage to a point due west
of the point of commencement;
thence due west to the point of commencement; the land area contained
within said boundaries consisting of
about two thousand (2,000) acres
and being shown on the registered
plans of Prince Rupert Townsite,
registered at Prince Rupert Town-
site, registered at Prince Rupert.
(n) Approximately the number of
Inhabitants: Five thousand.
(0) The place of the proposed
reservoir for storing: The Clovah
Lakes.
(p) The means by which It is proposed to store the water: By a dam.
(q) The area or the reservoir site
or sites at each foot in depth above
the outlet: six square miles.
(r) How It is proposed to acquire
the land necessary for the purpose:
By purchase or otherwise.
(s) Approximately the number of
acre feet intended to be Impounded,
38,400.
(t) Whether it Is proposed to
lower the water in any natural lake
or standing body of water, and if so
then:—
(1) The anticipated extent of the
lowering.
(2) The means proposed to be
adopted to lower and refill.
(3) The nature and character In
detail, of the works proposed to be
constructed to provide for the discharge and penning back of the
water. Dam pipe-line and power
plant.
THE MUNICIPAL CORPORATION
OF THE CITY OF PRINCE
RUPERT.
By Its Agent, F. S. Clements..
A16. Friday, August 19, 1910
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
C. D. NEWTON
Real Estate
Money to Loan
Notary Public
Exchange Block
Corner 3rd Avenue and Sth Street
P.O. Box 226   Tel. 226
The
Washington Cafe
A PLACE TO EAT
Seats For Ladles
Everything Clean and Tasty
Prices Reasonable
IS NAVY PREPARED
Naval Expert  Expresses Opinion That
There are Short Comings
in Service.
Some of the Weaknesses Pointed Out
by Well Known Clitic of the
Old Land
W. F. CARPENTER, PROPRIETOR
Second Avenue, near Seventh Street
Hear
the
Truth
There's nothing about a set of
harness that requires such careful
attention, in both leather and workmanship, as traces and collars, there's
where tbe strain lies, there's where
we excel, though we are just as
watchful as to every other detail of
a complete set of harness, be it for
heavy or light work.
B.C. Saddlery Company
Limited
MANUFACTURERS OF SADDLERY
Jobbers of Leather, Harness, Saddles, Whips, Trunks and Valises,
Pads, Blankets, Rugs; Harness Soaps
and Dressings.
566 YATES STREET
VICTORIA, R.C.
Clarmont Rooms
Sixth Avenue near Fulton Street
Comfortable, Homelike Rooms; Newly Furnished Throughout; Bath
Rooms  with   Hot  and
Cold Water
Rates, $3.00 a Week   and   Upwards
Mrs.  Annie  McGrath,   Proprletoress
Municipal Notice
TENDERS FOR PLANK ROADWAY
AND GRADING
SEALED TENDERS endorsed
"Tender 1," and "Tender 2," will be
received by the City Clerk until Wednesday noon, August 24th, 1910: —
(1) For the construction of a 16-
foot plank roadway on Hays Cove
avenue, and Eighth avenue.
(2) Grading on Hays Cove avenue
and Eighth avenue. Plans and specifications may be seen, and form of
tender obtained at the office of the
City  Engineer.
The lowest or any tender not
necessarily accepted.
ERNEST A. WOODS,
WM. M. DAVIS, City Clerk.
City Engineer. A16-19
■LAND PURCHASE  NOTICE
Coast Land District—District of
Skeena.
TAKE NOTICE that we, George
Hie and Robert Corlett, of Little Canyon, B.C., occupation farmer and
farmer, intend to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted at the south-east portion of an island situated and lying
about two miles below Little Canyon,
near the south bank of the Skeena
river, Range V, Skeena Land District,
District of Coast, thence northerly,
thence easterly, thence southerly
around the shores of the Island back
to the point of beginning and inclosing 30 acres, more or less
GEORGE HIE,
ROBERT CORLETT.
Dated August 1,<1910. A19
Although the British public maintain an admiralty and a navy reputed
to be the finest and strongest n. the
world, and spend some forty millions
a year on their fleet, no organization
in this country yet exists to settle
how tbat navy Is to be used in time
of war, writes H. W. Wilson, In the
London Dally Mall. It,exists for no
other purpose than defending British
Interests by destroying the armed
forces of the enemy. Yet Just as
there is a right and a wrong way
of using a cricket bat or a golf club,
so there Is a right and a wrong way
of using a navy In war. And If the
navy Is used In the wrong way, instead of destroying It may be destroyed, -ji ''. i. i
In other navies special departments exist, known as admir&l. staffs,
general staffs or naval war staffs, for
tbe special purpose of determining
how these various fleets shall be employed In war. These departments
are freed from the routine work of
administration in time of peace, and
are given the time and liberty to
frame a plan of campaign after a
profound study of war and the possible enemy's forces. These are
usually modelled upon the German
general staff, which was the creation
of Scharnhorst and Clausewltz, the
heroes to whom Germany owes her
great military greatness, and which
was developed to the highest pitch
of efficiency by Moltke.
No Special Staff
The British navy has no such department, though even the navies of
both Sweden and Russia now possess
general staffs to frame plans for war.
The British admiralty is not the organization in question; rather Is it,
as Lieut. Dewar has said, a board of
directors whose entire time is taken
up with details of daily administration. We may look in vain through
the lists of our admiralty departments for an admiral staff or a
naval war staff, for an operations
bureau or for an historical section.
The germ of the thing we require
Is there. It Is true, in the department
of naval Intelligence. But It Is only
the germ. The fully developed organism is wanting.       ,
For want of this organization, the
British navy has been compared to a
body which has no brain.   The comparison Is a little unjust to a noble
service.    We should say, rather, that
the British navy Is a body with an
undeveloped  brain.    The politicians
rather than the navy officers are to
blame.    They still put their faith in
the glorious principle of "muddling
through," which is now peculiar and
sacred  to  the  Anglo-Saxon  peoples,
because  they  have not yet grasped
the overwhelming importance of or-
ganiaztion  for war before battle is
joined,  or  realized  that  no  human
precaution should be neglected, now
that the loss of a single war or even
a single battle may level in the dust
empires the growth of centuries.
Evading Enemy
Lest it be said that we are talking
Mildly in declaring that no one knows
how the British navy Is to be used,
some proofs  of  that statement  may
given.    The average man has a hazy
idea that on the outbreak of war the
British fleet will up anchor and attack   the   enemy.     What   should   he
say  if  he  knew  that  quite  recently
the plan of withdrawing all the Britisli  large  ships  from  the North  sea
lo  Lamlash,   on   the  west  coast  of
Scotland, was seriously discussed? It
was an  original  scheme.    To avoid
being hurt by hostile destroyers and
submarines, our battleships were to
get out of harm's way   instead    of
trying to hurt the enemy.    This was
not Nelson's Idea of war, not Napoleon's,  nor  Grant's,   nor    Moltke's.
Nelson did  not run  away and hide
in some remote part in the most critical moments of the Trafalgar campaign.    If he had so done he would
certainly   have   been   shot;   but,   of
course,  such  a  move on   his    part
would have been absolutely unthinkable. J
That it should have been discussed
instead of being laughed indignantly
out of court, Is proof that there Is
something wrong with our ideas of
naval war and our teaching of naval
strategy. But this Incident does not
stand alone. The first lord of the admiralty only this year declared that
the uses of the navy fell  under the
following heads:—Destruction of the
enemy's commerce; protection of
British commerce, convoying an invading army (only he added we had
none to convoy); and the protection
of our shores against a convoyed
force. In all this, not one single mention of the armed naval forces of
the enemy. "There would," he said,
"be no advantage in destroying ships
of war unless thereby we obtained
control of the commerce."
Teachings of Past
Yet the principle which shines
forth like a sun from the operations
of all past wars is that If you destroy the armed forces of the enemy
all other things shall be 'added to
you. If you leave the ap-med forces
of a strong enemy Intact .you will
fall In every point. 'j
Thus Mr. McKenna holds a doctrine of naval war entirely at variance with the teachings of the past,
entirely at variance with the teachings of the ablest British and foreign thinkers of today. It would be
unjust to blame him excessively for
such errors. He is an administrator,
so burdened with the conduct of daily
affairs as to have no time for a profound study of strategy. But what
an amazing state of affairs that there
is no organization at the admiralty
to supply him with tbe right principles, and how surprising that he
dees not at once create such a body!
Hbw disquieting the discovery that
the nominal chief of the navy does
not clearly understand for what purpose a navy exists!
Lord Chas. Beresford's Charges
A third piece of evidence that
there is no clear idea among naval
officers as to the use of the fleet in
war time. Is given by the report of
the cabinet committee which last
year examined the charges brought
stated that its members had been im-
by Lord Charles Beresford. It
pressed "with the differences of opinion among officers of high rank concerning strategy and tactics."
Strategy is the science of employing
fleets or armies before actual fighting begins; tactics is the art of conducting the fighting. Where there
should have been unity of sentiment
on these vital points there was
anarchy. Is a fleet in which professional anarchy obtains certain to win
in battle, or organized for war?
Fourthly, there is the fact that
Lord Charles Beresbord aserted In
1909 that the fleet In home waters
was not organized for war when he
assumed command of the channel
fleet, and that he was unable to obtain any strategical scheme or plan
for the disposal in war of the forces
under his command." It Is true that
the cabinet committee found against
him on these heads, but with some
uncertainty. For It admitted that
what plans existed were not Ideal.
Let us divorce from our minds the
idea that the conduct of affairs at
the admiralty.or the exercise of fleets
teaches the whole art of naval war.
The sea lords of the admiralty are
so overwhelmed with, work of all
kinds that they have not time to
study war, and we have seen that
they have no organization to give
them the help which they need. The
commanders of fleets have the help
of able staff officers afloat, but they
are without the guidance and assistance which an admiral staff would
give by working out and testing plans
of campaign and inspiring a sound
theory of war. Peace manoeuvres,
however realistic, must differ enormously from the "real thing," and
to win in the "real thing" our of-
ncers need the best theorists at their
tacks, strategists who have assimilated history.
Navnl War Staff
The cabinet committee last August
urged that a naval war staff should
be formed. Nothing has been done,
and for that the cabinet must be
blamed. But it is unfortunate to find
so able and distinguished a writer
on naval war as Admiral Sir Cyprian
Bridge, writing in the Naval Annaitl
what hasty readers will take to be
naval war staff. His words do not
an unsparing condemnation of a
really mean what they seem to Import. He Is inveighing against a
mere tame copy of a German Institution, and there we may agree
with him. And even he admits that
the admiralty Is not at present organized for war. Only his remedy
is to revolutionize the admiralty and
go back to the arrangements of a
century ago.
There will be many who will hold
that evolution Is better than revolution. There Is no reason why a war
staff should not be fitted into the
present admiralty, or why under the
first sea lord, and responsible to him,
should not be placed the various
sub-departments required, each other
a director—Intelligence of foreign
navies, operations, history, strategy,
material In its relations to war, war
college, etc. The chief of the staff
would be directed to draw up a plan
of campaign which would   be    sub-
LIGHTING   STREETS
City Council is Now Engaged in Deciding
Upon Best System to
Adopt.
Engineer Reports  Upon  tbe Cost—
Private Company Makes a
Proposition
In compliance with the request of
the city council, the city engineer on
Tuesday night submitted a report on
the expense of operating the temporary lighting plant In the city. The
report was as follows:—
"I have obtained from the proprietor of the sash and door factory
a proposal to rent the boiler and engine now In use at the factory to the
corporation for the purpose of generating power for electric lighting.
I estimate the cost of operating
the plant as follows:—
Rental of boiler and engine
for one year   $3,650
Fuel, 912% tons     7,300
Water, oil, waste, etc        200
Total   $11,150
Two engineers at $225  per
month     $2,700
One laborer     1,000
One superintendent       1,800
Maintenance of pole lines, etc
Depreciation   	
$5,500
250
331
" $581
Total cost  $17,231
Income
Assuming that 80 h.p. is available
the city could supply 600 carbon
lamps to consumers, or 100 Tungsten lamps. Time may be taken as
seven hours per day for the winter
months, and three hours per day for
summer months.
With a charge of 15 cents per k.w.
hour, the gross receipts for winter
months would be $11,497.50, and
for summer months $4,927.29 or a
total of $16,424.79, leaving a balance of $806.21 to be charged
against the street lighting account.
With reference to the plant to be
located at the foot of McBride street,
and estimated to cost $30,000: The
annual expense of operation, including depreciation, would be $18,272,
the installation of this plant would
require six months time so that little
revenue would be obtained the first
year. Assuming that 2,000 lamps
are In after the first year, the revenue would be about $32,000.
WM. MAHLON DAVIS,
City Engineer.
Aid. Smith said he had asked a
local men to be present and would
ask tbat he be heard. Mr. Durant, he
said, would offer, if given a 10-year
contract to give the city power delivered at the city limits, the city
being given an option to purchase
at the end of ten years at fifty per
cent of the cost.
Mr. Durant being asked to address
the council, said his company could
supply power within about four
months. He had Vancouver capital
interested and a gas producer plant
would be put in, starting with a
800 kilowatt plant, which might he
Increased. They could furnish power
at twelve cents per kilowatt hour.
Mr. Waller, representing the Vancouver interests, would he here next
week and he asked that the matter
be allowed to stand over until Mr.
Waller arrived.
A rate of 12c per k.w. hour would
represent a cost of 3c per 16 c.p.
lamp for five hours or \ery nearly as
cheap as the eastern cities. They
could also put in a low figure for
power to be used In the day time.
The city engineer was called In
and a full discussion followed.
Aid. Mobley moved that the engineer be instructed to compile data
as to the cost of tbe necessary machinery for distributing the electric
energy. The question of getting
fiower could be decided later but the
machinery must be had at any rate.
Aid. Lynch said that the engineer
should also take up the question of
installing  another   fifty   horsepower
boiler along side tbe one in the sash
and door factory now. That would
enable the city to use the full 125
horsepower engine in the factory.
Aid. Smith thought the proposition
submitted by Mr. Durant was worthy
of consideration. He would second
Aid. Mobley's motion.
Aid. Naden pointed out that It
would be necessary to put a bylaw to
the people to pay for the plant.
Aid. Mobley suggested that there
would be $9,000 left In the general
fund this year to pay for the electric
light plant.
Aid. Pattullo moved that the city
take steps at once to procure the old
pole line If It ts possible to get It
reasonably without going to arbitration.
Aid. Smith said the company had
already been asked to submit a proposition to the city, but they have
not yet done so.
The engineer was asked what the
cost would be per 16 candle power
lamp If the street lamps were put
In at the same price as the house
lamps. After he had figured It out
the engineer reported that it would
cost a little less than 8 cents per
k.w. hour, or about 4c per 16 candle-
power lamp per seven hours. This
would mean that the street lighting
would cost $9,395 per annum and
the revenue from the private consumers would be $7,836 per year.
 o—i	
THE WARD SYSTEM
Aid. Pattullo Introduces Bylaw to Divide
the City for Electoral
Purposes.
'il
Measure is Now Before the Council
—Will be Further Considered
In Committee
mltted to the first sea lord for his
approval. And to prevent the staff
from stlrlle theorizing, to give purpose and reality to its studies, It
should be clearly understood that In
war the chief of the staff will embark
with the main fleet and in person see
his plan carried out. We must never
forget that a council Imposed on
the Spanish Admiral Cervera in 1898
a plan which was simply suicidal-—
a plan of which this council would
never have dreamed bad It been called upon to carry It out; and that
precisely the same occurred with
Admiral Rojesvcnsky in 1904.
Aid. Pattullo at Wednesday evening's meeting of the city council
introduced a bylaw that foreshadows
the election. It is the bylaw to divide the city Into wards which Is a
necessary move before the next council is elected according to the municipal clauses act. Of necessity the
division now made must be only temporary as the centres of population
will change from time to time necessitating amendments to meet the altered conditions.
Aid. Pattullo explained In connection with his bylaw last night that
the act required that the wards
should be such that the assessed
value of the property In each was
approximately similar. If this were
not the case the council might be
called upon to amend the bylaw.
He had found It difficult to carry
this out on account of the heavy
assessment on some of the waterfront blocks. He had considered the
matter carefully and thought tbfe
system of two wards the best. Fulton street would, roughly speaking,
be the dividing line.
The line would leave the waterfront In the G.T.P. wharf section,
following Sixth street to Second avenue. It would continue along Second avenue to Fulton, follow that
street to Ninth avenue and pass
along the alley between blocks 42
and 43 in section five. Ward one
would be the section westerly of this
line, while ward two would be that
easterly of the line.
It was found difficult to make a division that would give equal assessment and yet be divided by a line
that could readily be designated
without considerable study. The assessment in this division he proposed
would be over $6,000,000 in ward
one and over $8,000,000 in ward two.
He proposed that there should be
three aldermen elected from ward
one and five from ward two, This
would be a fair division of the representation.
Aid, Mclntyre asked why McBride
street was not made the dividing
line.
Aid. Pattullo explained Hint if thai
were done there would be a wide disparity between the assessments of
the wards owing to the waterfronl
of the G.T.P. being placed so high.
Tbe bylaw was considered In committee at some length, after which
the committee rose and reported
progress.
 o	
John L. Sullivan, who held the
championship of the world for many
years, and was never defeated under
London prize ring rules, has decided
to retire from public life for good
and settle down on a small farm near
Boston, there to enjoy life with his
family. John L. has been touring
the country under the management
of Frank Hall the past few years,
doing a vaudeville stunt, and In that
time has accumulated a fortune. It
is just six years since Mr. Hall took
hold of Sullivan, and on July 1, 1911,
they will spcaratc as business
ners.
APPRECIATE WORK
Hans  Helgeson  Retires   From  Fishing
Department on the
Skeena.
Testimonial   to  His  Ability  Paid   by
Those Engaged in the Industry
On That River
part-
Hans Helgeson, who has been fishery overseer on the Skeena for about
ten years, has retired from that position. He visited Prince Rupert this
week and will leave shortly for Victoria.
At the borne of J. T. C. Williams at
Port Essington a few days ago, Mr.
Helgeson' was presented with a gold
headed cane and a purse of over $600
by those Interested In the fishing Industry In recognition of the valuable
assistance he had been to the industry. An address was presented
Mr. Helgeson in which the cannery-
men set forth their appreciation of
his work. The address was as follows:—
"We, the undersigned owners and
operators of canneries on the Skeena
River, wish on the eve of your retirement from the public position you
have held so long and honorably to
express our deep sense of appreciation of your unvarying civility and
willingness at all times to oblige,
your high sense of justice and in>
tegrlty. hu.,
"During your ten years of service
as fishery overseer for the Dominion
Government, you have acted with
the strictest Impartiality, giving all
of us a "square deal" and during
times of critical Importance to the
salmon fisheries of the Skeena river
your sound judgment has always
been much appreciated by us.
"We also wish to take this opportunity to express to you our sincere
thanks for the active and important
part you played in obtaining the
permanent prohibition of the Babine
barricades. We realize that through
your efforts combined with those of
the department this terrible engine
of destruction to the salmon was ob-
liberated for all time; consequently
with the strict enforcement of the
weekly close season an abundance of '
salmon is allowed to reach the
spawning grounds, enabling the1 Indians in tbe interior to obtain a more
abundant supply for their needs.
"And we are of the unanimous
opinion that the present magnificent
run of salmon, a run, we believe, unprecedented In the history of the
Skeena River canneries, Is due in a
great measure to the removal of the
celebrated Babine barricades, and we
trust that the department will continue to remove other obstructions
until they make the Skeena River
the grandest salmon stream on the
coast.
"We close our testimonial with
the sincere and earnest hope that the
evening of your long and useful life
will be spent In the peace and happiness which follows an honorable
career."
The testimonial was signed by:
B. C. Packers Association, per M. M.
English, representing four canneries;
Wallace Bros. Packing Co., Ltd.,
Peter Wallace, manager; British
America Cannery, per G. B. Baillle;
the Cassiar Packing Co., D. \l.
.Moore, manager; Oceanic Cannery
A, W. Carter, manager; Inverness
Cannery, R. G. Johnson, manager;
A. B, C. Packing Co., Ltd., North
Pacific Cannery, Victor Larsen, manager; Skeena River Com. Co., F. K.
Riidge, manager; Carlisle Cannery,
Thos. P. Lake, manager.
—. o	
TRADE WITH GERMANY
Removal   of   Surtax   Proves   to   be
Beneficial to Canada
Ottawa, Aug. 16.—Statistics have
been prepared by th" Departmenl of
Trade and Commerce showing the extent of Canada's trade with Germany
for three months subsequent to the
removal of the German surtax as
compared with tbe trade for the
three months previous to the removal
They show that for the three months
following the removal of the surtax
the imports totalled $1,902,723, an
Increase of $181,327 over the previous three months. On the other hand
there has been a decided betterment
In Canadian exports to Germany
since the removal of the surtax during the three months. Since the
new agreement came Into force they
totalled $803,734, as compared with
$411,008 In the previous three
months, an Increase of $392,228.
 o	
After measuring hundreds of prisoners, French scientists have found
thai the average criminal has arms
below the normal in length.
4
# PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Friday, August 19, 1910
PREMIER'S POWER
Some of the Characteristics of Sir Wil
frid Laurier That Have Made
Him Popular.
The City's Visitor is a Model Party
Leader, Understanding Political
Game   Perfectly
The visit of the Rt. Hon. Sir Wilfrid Laurier, G.C.M.G., P.C., to
Prince Rupert attracts attention to
the personality of the Prime Minister of Canada. The following Is of
special interest at this time: '
Sir Wilfrid Laurier has served his
country in its parliaments for thirty-
nine years. He entered the Legislature of Quebec on November 7, 1871,
as member for Athabaska. In 1874
he was elected to the House of Commons from ihe same district. Three
years later, October 8, 1877, entered
the cabinet with the portfolio of inland revenue. The following day he
presented himself for re-election and
on October 27, when the polls closed
It was found that he had been defeated by a majority of twenty-nine
votes. On November 28 he was returned from Quebec East, and has represented that constituency till this
day, writes Andrew McPhail.
On September 17, 187S, the government was defeated by a majority
of eighty-six. On October 9, Mr.
Mackenzie resigned office, and on
April 28, 1SS0, he retired from the
leadership of the opposition. He was
succeeded by Edward Blake, and he
in turn retired June 2, 1SS7. Sir
Wilfrid Laurler was unanimously
chosen leader on June 7, and has occupied that place for twenty-three
years. In 1896 the LiberalB were returned to parliament in the majority
and their leader became prime minister, a post which he still holds.
Sir Wilfrid Laurier was born on
November 20, 1841, at St-Lin, in the
county of Assomption. His father
was a land surveyor. His grandfather was a farmer, yet interested in
mathematics and the science of those
days. His mother was Marcelle Mar-
tlneau. Her only child was Wilfrid,
and she died when he was four years
old. On May 13, 1868, he married
Zoe Lnfontaine, of Montreal. That a
man Is born and is married—these
are two of Ihe four events of real Importance In hi* life,
The most notable servants of the
crown in the overseas dominions are
Sir Wilfrid Laurier and Mr. Louis
Botha, and neither is of English
birth. They are the most useful on
that account. In the first speech
which Sir Wilfrid ever delivered in
parliament he declared that, under
the B ii .sh constitution, we had freedom, privilege and power. It was the
finest under which men ever lived,
and especially fitted to unite citizens
of different races, nationalities, and
religions. These sentiments were uttered nearly forty years ago, and
the speaker has never since departed
from them. Unless one gains a close
apprehension of this central thought,
he can form no estimate of what Sir
Wilfrid Laurler has done for Canada
and for the world. Still less can one
follow the course which he has consistently pursued.
He is not an idealist. He Is a practical statesman who prefers to get a
thing done in the best way it can be
done rather than not get it done at
all. He Is not fond of the impossible. What he can not effect by persuasion be never attempts to do by
force. He is fully aware how complicated a business the world Is, how
selfish some men are and how foolish
all are. For both he has an Immense
toleration. He is always amused but
never annoyed; and with all his experience, his experience has not made
bis hopeless en- sad. lie is n man
or vision, of Imagination, and yet be
bus never brought himself to really
believe thai the men by whom he Is
Burrounded are angels, no matter
how faithfully hecmay defend them,
or thai his opponents are always
hopelessly In the wrong.
Possibly the education which he received in his youth may help to account for his sagacious and sympathetic attitude lowards all opinions
no matter how absurd they may
seem. The motherless boy attended
the elementary school of bis native
parisli till ho was twelve years old.
Then he spent n year at a Protestant
school at Xow Glasgow, and lived
with an Irish family. Much of bis
leisure was spent in the bouse of
John Murray, who was an elder In
the church of Scotland and bad been
educated for its ministry. In proof of
this surmise his own words may be
quoted: "The pure family life and
the godly conduct of the Murrays Impressed me and convinced me that a
Protestant can be an earnest, true
Christian, as well as a Catholic."
The next seven years were spent In
L'Assomption  College,   one  of  those
Institutions which are the last refuge
of education on the American Continent. In 1861 he entered McGill University, and graduated from the
faculty of law at the expiration of
his course. In the valedictory address
which he made to his fellow students
he charged them that their mission
was to cause justice to reign; to separate the true from the false; to
maintain the rights of citizens; to
preserve the general peace; to preserve for the family its inheritance,,
the Individual his honor, for the public the just repression of offences; to
hold within limits the audacity of the
powerful; and to relieve the wretchedness of the weak, without violence
to the one, or Indulgence to the
other.
He was brought up In a hard
school. Before he was yet 30 he was
in the thick of real political and religious strife. Politics Was not then
a question of awarding a contract or
filling an office. The issue was
whether free born men should govern
themselves, or whether they should
be governed by the terms of the
"Programme Catholique" which was
the last political expression of ultra-
montism, or by the "Protestant Defence Association," or by both.
Those were the days, tooj when
Canada was a congeries of widely
separated provinces with different or
hostile interests. The sound of the
"Papineau gun" had scarcely died
out; Lyon Mackenzie's efforts had not
yet fully decided if the executive was
to be subject to the control of parliament, or if it would surrender to the
people the privileges which it had
usurped and had insolently retained.
It is little wonder, then, that Sir Wilfrid learned how to handle himself
as he does in a debate over the production of some papers, we shall say,
or at an imperial conference where
the choicest wits of the empire are
assembled.
Sir Wilfrid Laurler came to the
scrutiny of British institutions with
a fresh eye; and he was quick to discover the high place which government by party holds. Before a party
can govern it must get Into power;
and if it would continue- to govern It
must stay in power. Sir Wilfrid never
forgets that, whilst he is prime minister, he is also leader of a party,
and he is as sedulous in performing
the duties of the one as of the other.
Anyone who supposes that he does
not understand the management of a
campaign will find himself sadly mistaken; and opponents who resort to
subtlery, adroitness, and skill in contriving are very likely to find themselves over-matched.
Sir Wilfrid Laurier always tells the
truth, or, rather, he never says a
thing which is not true. At times he
allows his opponents to remain in
doubt, or even as victims of their
own misconception. Yet one would
not say that he was entirely simple-
minded in political affairs. He can
manage a campaign or a debate in
parliament with equal ease, his favorite method being to encourage his
opponents to raise a cloud of dust In
which they cannot find their way.
That plan worked to perfection in
the debate upon the Naval Bill.
And yet, on the other hand, he has
i mind of extreme Innocence, directness, and—I had almost said—simplicity. He has the faculty of getting
hold of a thing by the right end, of
seeing into the heart of a matter, and
handling his material in the most natural and, therefore, easiest way. He
gives the impression which one receives upon beholding a practised
craftsman engaged in tasks which to
the inexperienced are Impossible or
done only with much labor.
It Is easy to know what he will do
in any given case. All one has to
do is to ask one's self, what Is the
common sense of the thing. Then
one knows what course the premier
will take, whether It be a question
of giving schools to Protestants or to
Catholics, making a treaty, building a
navy, sending armed forces oversea,
or providing for the consolidation and
defence of the empire. But be must
not be hurried. No one understands
belter the solving power of time upon  political problems.
No man In Canadian public life has
received more attention at the hands
of political culmlnators. He has
been blamed by Protestants for be-
Ing a good Catholic, and he has been j
accused by Catholics of being a bad I
Catholic. At one election it was
affirmed thai he was a Protestant
minister, apostate and a companion  of the ex-communicated,
The English have blamed him for!
speaking French;   and   his own  poo-i
pie   have   blamed   him   for   speaking'
French with an English accent.    All
of which means that he Is a man first
and a Catholic and Frenchman afterwards.    Even  the  crime of treason
has been laid  to his charge;  but all
the notice his detractors received was
a  sad  smile  and  a  few  chance reflections upon their foolishness rather than upon their wickedness.    In
forty years, however, no opponent has
been so base as to utter a slander
which touched his personal honor,
the purity of his private life, or the
righteousness of his character.
He has opponents but no enemies,
and that is the richest achievement
of a man who has been in public life
nearly all his days. In the tortuous
course of the political way, no matter how sudden the emergency, he
has never been known to utter an Ill-
natured expression and rarely a
harsh one.
His knowledge is so exact, his mastery of public affairs so great, and
the discipline of his party so firm
that parliament Is disposed to rely
more absolutely than It ought upon
the direction of one Individual. In
this Sir Wilfrid has the defect of
his quality.
To write the life of Sir Wilfrid
Laurier is to write the history of
Canada for half a century. This is
not the present Intention, especially
as the task has already been so admirably performed by Mr. Willison;
but rather to give a view from near
observation of the person of a great
and faithful servant of the people of
Canada and of the British corwn.
But no expanse of writing can convey a complete idea of his humorous
face, his expression which is more
than quaint and not quite whimsical,
his old-world way of standing and
moving, his gentle courteous bearing,
his affable, complaisant, winsome,
cheery manner, which may all be
summed up in the word, debonair.
Lady Laurier is no less interesting
a figure than her husband. She gives
one the impression of being in her
own home entertaining her neighbors. The friendly frankness of her
speech, the accuracy of her comment,
the shrewd wit, the justness of her
opinions, especially upon the conduct
proper to women is a refreshment,
the more especially when it is heard
in so high a quarter. Lady Laurier
would be a model premier in a parliament of women, though 1 fear the
deliberations would not be very prolonged.
The French have a word, non-
home, that is, a person who is in
possession of a bonhommie, which is
a mixture of good nature, honesty,
humor, wisdom and simplicity. Such
a person one may sometimes see sitting by his door in the evening of his
life having done good in his time and
quietly rejoicing in his labor. I
should say that this term, which was
one applied to him by Mr. Thomson,
more accurately than any other defines Sir Wilfrid.
LAND PURCHASE NOTICES
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Phillip Williams, of Sydney, Nova Scotia, occupation accountant, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kltwancool or Chean Wein
ley:—Commencing at a post planted
at the S. E. corner and about 16%
miles distant in a north-westerly direction from the north end of Kitwancool Lake, thence north 80
chains, thence west 80 chains, thence
south 80 chains, thence east 80
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 640 acres, more or
less. ' PHILLIP WILLIAMS.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated Jute 4, 1910. Jy8
Subscribe for The  Prince Rupert
Journal now.
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Annie Grieve,
of Victoria, B. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands In the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Weln Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. W. corner, and about 17% miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence south 40 chains, thence
east 40 chains, thence south 40
chains, thence east 40 chains, thence
north 80 chains, thence west 80
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 480 acres, more or
less. ANNIE GRIEVE.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 4, 1910. Jy8
LAND PURCHASE NOTICES
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Pearl Caspell
of Cayley, Alberta, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands In the vicinity of Kitwancool' or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. E. corner and about 15% miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kltwancool
Lake, thence south 80 chains, thence
west 40 chains, thence north 40
chains, thence west 40 chains, thence
north 40 chains, thence east 80
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 480 acres, more or
less. PEARL CASfELL.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 3, 1910. jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Oh rrih t*
TAKE NOTICE that John Cox, of
Monarch, Alberta, occupation farmer, intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described
lands, situated in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Weln Valley:-—
Comencing at a post planted at the
north-west corner and about five and
one-quarter miles distant in a northwesterly direction from the north end
of Kitwancool Lake, thence 80
chains south, thence 80 chains east,
thence 80 chains north, thence SO
chains west to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres,
more or less.
JOHN COX.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated  May  30,  19.10. Jy5
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that James Alexander McDonald, of Monarch, Alberta, occupation farmer, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands, situated In
the Kitwancool or Chein Weln Valley:-—Commencing at a post planted
at the N. E. corner about five and
one quarter miles distant in a northwesterly direction from the north
end of Kitwancool Lake, thence soutii
80 chains, thence west 8 0 chains,
thence north 80 chains, thence east
80 chains to point of commencement,
and containing 640 acres, more or
less.
JAMES ALEXANDER MCDONALD
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated May 30, 1910. Jy5
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE thai Mary Brown,
of Vancouver, B.C., occupation married woman, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity ol
the Kltwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—Commencing at a post planted
at the North-east corner and about
ten miles distant in a north-westerly
direction from the north end of the
Kitwancool lake, thence south 80
chains, thence west 40 chains, thence
north 40 chains, thence west 40
chains, thence north 40 chains
thence east SO chains to point ol
commencement, and containing 480
acres, more or less.
MARY  BROWN.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 1,  1910. Jy8
LAND PURCHASE NOTICES
Skeena Land District—District of
f fl. R R1 fl. I*
TAKE NOTICE that Ethel Welsh,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands In the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
south-east corner and about 10 miles
distant In a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north 80 chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence south 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to
point of commencement and containing 640 acres, more or less.
ETHEL WELSH.
James W. Smith, Agent
Dated June 1st, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that John Henderson, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
agent, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. ,W corner and about 25 miles distant' in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north 80 chains, thence
east 40 chains, thence south 80
chains, thence west 80 chains to
point of commencement and containing 320 acres, more or less.
JOHN   HENDERSON.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 7th, 1910. Jy8
NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that application will be made to the Legislative Assembly of the Province of
British Columbia at its next Session
for an Act to incorporate a company
with power to construct, equip,
maintain and operate a line or lines
of railway of standard guage with
any kind of motive power for the
conveyance of passengers and freight,
and with all the powers contained
in the "Model Railway Bill": Commencing from a point at or near
Port Simpson, or Work Channel, in
the Coast District, British Columbia,
by the most feasible, desirable and
practicable route to a point on tbe
Eastern boundary of the Province of
British Columbia, via the South-west
side of Work Channel to the Skeena
River; thence up the North side of
the Skeena River to a point near
Hazelton; thence to the Junction of
the Bulkley River; thence up the
right bank of this River eight (8)
miles to the Suskewa River; thence
uii this River by a low divide to the
head of Babine Lake; thence to the
north end of Stuart Lake; thence
north of McLeod Lake to the Mls-
nichinca River; thence up the Mis-
ntchlnca River by Summet Lake to
Pine River Pass; thence north-westerly to head of Pine River, and down
ibis River to Moberley Lake; and
thence by Ihe Peace River to the
Eastern boundary of the said Province of British Columbia; and with
power to construct, operate and
maintain all necessary bridges, roads,
ways and ferries; and to build, acquire, own and maintain wharves and
docks in connection therewith; and
to build, acquire, own, equip and
maintain steam and other vessels and
boats, and to operate the same on
any navigable waters; and with
power to build, equip, operate and
maintain telegraph and telephone
lines in connection with the said
Railway and branches, and to transmit messages for commercial purposes,' and to charge tolls therefor;
and to generate and to sell electricity
for the supply of light, heat and
power; and with power to expropriate lands for the purposes of the
Company; and to acquire lands,
money bonuses, privileges or other
aids from any Government, municipal corporation or other persons or
bodies; and to levy and collect tolls
from all persons using, and on all
freight passing over any of such
roads, railways, ferries, wharves and
vessels built by the Company; and
with power to connect with and make
traffic or other arrangements with
railway, steamboat, or other companies:
Dated at Victoria, B.C., this 11th
day of August, 1910.
BARNARD &  ROBERTSON,
A19.        Solicitors for the Applicants.
Coast Land District---District of
Skeena.
TAKE NOTICE that I, Ernestine
A. Roney, of Prince Rupert, occupation married woman, intend to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted on the north
bank of the Skeena River about half
a mils south of Geo. T. Church's preemption, thence west 10 chains,
thence north 40 chains, thence east
to the Skeena River; thence southwest following the bank of the
Skeena River to the place of beginning, and containing about 80
acres.
ERNESTINE A. RONEY, Locator.
W. A. Roney, Agent.
Dated July 7th, 1910. Jy22
Coast Land District—District of
Skeena.
TAKE NOTICE that I, J. Adolph
Perry, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation
book-keeper, Intend to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted on the north bank of the
Skeena River, about a mile west of
Lot 31, thence north 40 chains,
thence east 80 chains to lot 31,
thence south 40 chains to bank of
Skeena River, thence west about 80
chains following north bank of
Skeena River to point of commencement,    and    containing   about    320
&CF6S
J. ADOLPH PERRY, Locator.
Wm. A. Roney, Agent.
Dated July 16th, 1910. Jy22
Coast Land District—District of
Skeena.
TAKE NOTICE that I, Mary M.
Roney, of Stillwater, Minnesota, U.
S.A., occupation married woman, Intend to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands.
Commencing at a post planted on the
north bank of the' Skeena River at
the south-east corner of Lreo. T.
Church's pre-emption, thence north
4 0 chains, thence east 40 chains,
thence south to the bank of the
Skeena River, thence south-west following the Skeena River to the place
of beginning and containing about
120 acres.
MARY M.  ROENY, Locator.
W.  A.   Roney,   Agent.
Dated July 8th, 1910. Jy22
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Laura Gordon
of Victoria, B. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. E. corner and about 18 miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence south 40 chains, thence
west 40 chains, thence north 40
chains, thence east 40 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 160 acres, more or less.
LAURA GORDON.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated  June  4,   1910. jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cfl SKIRI"
TAKE NOTICE that Henry Welsh,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
printer, Intends to apply foi permission to purchase the following described lands In the vicinity of Kltwancool or Chean Weln Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. E. corner and 11 miles distant
in a north-westerly direction from
the north end of Kitwancool Lake,
thence north 80 chains, thence west
80 chains, thence south 80 chains,
thence east 80 chains to point of
commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
HENRY WELSH.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 2, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Frederick
Welsh, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation clerk, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following de-
scribe.d lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-east corner about 11 miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence south SO chains, thence
west 40 chains, thence north SO
chains, thence east 4 0 chains to
point of commencement, and containing 320 acres, more or less.
FREDERICK  WELSH.
James W. Smith, Agent
Dated June 2, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Walter Marke
of Toronto, Ont., occupation traveller, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands in the vicinity of Kltwancool
or Chean Wein Valley:—-Commencing at a post planted at the N. E.
corner and about 27% miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence south 80 chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence north 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to the
point of commencement and containing 640 acres, more or less.
WALTEP   MARKE.
James  VV. Smith, Agent
Dated June 8th, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
CclSSli
TAKE NOTICE that Marguerette
Burns, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission .o purchase the
following described lands in the vicinity of Kltwancool or Chean Weln
Valley:—Commencing at a post
planted at the N. E. corner and distant about 12 miles In a northwesterly direction from the north
end of Kltwancool Lake; thence
south 80 chains, thence west 20
chains, thenee north 80 chains,
thence east 20 chains to point of
commencement, and containing 160
acres, more or less.
MARGUERETTE  BURNS.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 2,  1910. Jyg
Skeena Land District—District of
f*»fl fi^l i A i*
TAKE NOTICE that Richard
Howie, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation dentist, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of
Kltwancool or Chean Weln Valley:—•
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. E. corner and about 24% miles
distant In a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kltwancool
Lake, thence south 80 chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence north 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
RICHARD HOWIE.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated  June 7th,  1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Violet Gelger,
of Victoria, B. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply,for permission to purchase the following described lands In tile vicinity of Kltwancool or Chean Weln Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. W. corner and about 23% miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kltwancool
Lake, thence south 80 chains, thence
east 40 chains, thence north 40
chains, thence east 40 chains, thence
north 40 chains, thence west 80
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 480 acres, more or
less. VIOLET GEIGER.
James W. Svnith, Agent.
Dated June  7th,  19r.O. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
On RRifli*
TAKE NOTICE that Sandford
Burton, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation mining engineer, Intends to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands In the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Welti
Valley:—Commencing at a post
planted at the N. E. corner and
about 23% miles distant In a northwesterly direction from the north
end of Kitwancool Lake, thence south
80 chains, thence west 80 chains,
thence north 80 chains, thence east
SO chains to point of commencement
and containing 640 acres, more or
less. SANDFORD BURTON.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 7th, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiui.
TAKE NOTICE that James Welsh,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation machinist, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lauds in the vicinity of Kltwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. W. corner and about 12 miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence south SO chains, thence
east 20 chains, thence north 80
chains, thence west 20 chains to the
point of commencement and containing 160 acres, more or less.
JAMES  WELSH.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated  June  2,   1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
f] Q c q 1 ri |»
TAKE NOTICE that Charles F.
Burns, of Moncton, New Brunswick,
occupation auditor, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands In the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Weln
Valley: — Commencing at a post
planted at the south-west corner and
about 12 miles distant in a northwesterly direction from the north
end of Kitwancool Lake; thence
north 80 chains, thence east, 80
chains, thence south 80 chains,
thence west 80 chains to point of
commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
CHARLES  F.   BURNS.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated   June   2,   1910 Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Norman Cle-
land, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation printer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands In the vicinity of Kltwancool or "Chean Wein Valley:—
Comencing at a post planted at the
S. E. corner and about 26% miles
distant In a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kltwancool
Lake, thence north 80 chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence south 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
NORMAN  CLELAND.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 8th, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that James Jar-
dine, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
merchant, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands In the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Weln Vallev: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. W. corner and about 13 miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from tiie north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence south SO chains, thence
east SO chains thence north "80
chains, thence west 80 chains to
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
JAMES JARDINE.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 2, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that John McDIar-
mid, of Lucknow, Ont., occupation
farmer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands In th« vicinity of the
Kltwancool or Chean Weln Valley:	
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. W. corner and about 13 miles distant In a north-westerly . direction
from the north end of Kltwancool
Lake; thence north 80 chains, thence
east 40 chains, thence south 80
chains; thence wast 40 chains to
point of commencement, and contaln-
Inf  320 acres.
JOHN  McDIARMID.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 2, 1910. Jy8
BtBHSBl /1-vvarv I
'
■ Friday, August 19, 1910
THE PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
CONSERVING RICHES
Waste in Various Directions is Common
Canadian Enterprises.
in
Some of the Most Common Ways in
Which Savings Might be
Effected
There are many ways in which
Canada is wasting her natural resources, and the means by which this
waste can be eliminated is one of the ■
most Important questions of the day.
As regards the mineral resources,
greater care should be taken to obtain the greatest possible value out
of tbe mineral deposits, as these,
once exhausted, can nerer be replaced. The mineral Industry Is
rapidly growing in Importance, the
output of the Canadian mines having increased from fourteen and a
half million dollars In 1889 to ninety
million dollars in 1909. The country's relatively high standing In tbe
production of the several metals was
shown last year in the fact that she
produced eleven per cent of tbe
world's production of silver, sixty-
three per cent of the world'B nickel,
and seventy per cent of the asbestos.
The waste In the coal mining Industry stood out very prominently, It
being estimated that up to the present date, for every ton of coal mined
one was lost. The briquetting of the
slack from the mines, the use of
coke ovens that would save the va'-
uable by-products, and the adoption
of the long wall method of mining,
which permits a saving of from nine
to twenty-four per cent of the quantity mined, would do a great deal to
eliminate these losses. The need of
more economy in the mining of coal
Is amply demonstrated in the rising
price of anthracite.
When the Cobalt mines began
operations, the low-grade ore was
thrown In vast heaps along with the
rocK and waste. Now many of the
mines are going to the expense of re-
handling these 'dumps" In order to
secure the silver contained In them.
The tailings from the 240,000 tons
mll'ed this year will carry nearly
one and a half million ounces of silver. By the end of 1910 there will
be upwards of 2,200,000 ounces In
the dumps, worth, at present prices,
upwards of one and a quarter million dollars. The continual Improvement in methods for utilizing low-
grade ores has shown the folly of
throwing away ore containing mineral content of any value.
The supply of timber In our forest
reserves has been found to have been
greatly overestimated, owing to the
assumption that the forests, containing high-grade timber, extended to
the far north. Prince Edward's
island has practically no timber, only
one-fourth of Nova Scotia's area Is
virgin forest, New Brunswick's timber lands have been devastated by
disastrous fires, and the pine in the
Ontario reserves, at the present rate
of cutting, Is estimated to last not
more than ten or twelve years. In
Northern Ontario, Northwestern
Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta and
British Columbia forest fires have
been responsible for extensive damages.
The problem of how to cope with
forest fires Is one that demands Immediate attention. Where railways
traverse the country, the locomotive
starts more fires than any other
agency. In the Adirondack forest reserve, the only railway that had been
free from fires had used oil fuel during the summer. Electrical operation through forest lands has been
proposed, but this, In most cases, is
too expensive. The number of forest fires started by railways would he
greatly reduced If the right-of-way
were cleared of inflammable debris.
Fires do not start In the forests of
Germany although railways run
through them. In Canada It would
be an Injustice to force the railways
to burn oil-fuel on account of the
high cost, bul It is not too much to
demand that they clear the right-of-
way and keep It clear; that, during
the fire season, they patrol their
tracks, following up the trains particularly where the heavy grades
necessitate a maximum draught, and
' that they Inspect their grates and,
stack screens at the end of each division. In dry weather an engine with
a defective grate or screen will set
scores of fires on every mile of line.
The land of the country deserves
most careful attention. Five hundred and thirty-three million dollars
represented the value of our field
crops last year, whl'e the agricultural exports amounted to fifty-one
per cent of Canada's total exports for
the year.     The average wheat yield
last year was twenty-one and a half
bushels to the acre, comparing favorably with the fifteen and three-quarters bushels per acre in the United
States, but, gratifying as it was, it
was due principally to the fact that
we are putting so much virgin soil
In operation each year, and not to
any improved methods of farming.
The people should not be blinded
to the absolute necessity of modern
methods in farming, to better crot
rotation and for methods of keeping
down noxious weeds and exterminating Insect pests.
The water powers of Canada have
not been appraised at their true
value. Roughly speaking, they have
been estimated at seventeen million
horsepower. Although only about
one-half million horse-power of this
has been developed, It nevertheless
provided power equivalent to one and
one-half times all the coal annually
used in Ontario. Extensive storage
basins are under way on the Ottawa
river and the Alberta irrigation enterprises will be the most important
feature in the agricultural development of tbat province.
What scientific medicine has done
to increase the length of life of the
average Individual Is shown by statistics covering the last four centuries.
In tbe sixteenth century the average
life span was twenty-one years, by
the eighteenth century It was Increased to thirty-three and one-half
years, and today It stands at forty
years. But there Is yet a tremendous work for preventive medicine
to do. There are at the present
time 250,000 people in Canada suffering from serious illness, of wrom
42,000 are consumptives. Probably
over half this Illness Is preventable.
Our annual mortality from tuberculosis is about 13,200, from other
diseases, commonly known as preventable, 26,000, and from other diseases now being recognized as preventable, 36,000.
Assuming that three-fourths of the
mortality from tuberculosis and
other preventable dis^s.ii- lan be
stopped, it has been estimated that it
would Increase our average length of
life over fifteen years. Assuming,
also, the value of each life lost to be?
$1,700, and the average wage loss
per Invalid to be $700 per annum,
the economic gain would be $140,-
000,000.
 o	
IMMIGRATION TO CANADA
STUDYING SALMON
SOCIKTV   OF   LITIOIUTl 111
Professor of Leland Stanford University
is Making Investigations Into
Life History.
He Will Prepart a Book on the Subject From Information Gathered
on Coast
Official of Department Speaks of the
Number Entering From V. S.
On a tour of the northern part of
the prairie provinces which he is
taking for the purpose of gathering
information at first hand with regard to prevailing crop conditions
and also with regard to the districts
which will offer the best inducements
to the American settler, W. J. White
of Ottawa, Dominion inspector of
American Immigration agencies,
visited Edmonton. The Information
gathered on his extensive Itinerary
In which he has been engaged dur-
Ing the past ten days and which It
will require as much more time to
complete, will be conveyed to the Immigration agents at the offices main
tained by the Dominion government
throughout the United States, and
will be used by them In their campaign to swell the influx of American
settlers Into the Canadian West.
"We are putting forth a greater
effort than ever before to Induce
American settlers to come to Western Canada," he said. "In conferenc
today with Mr. Oliver, the ministei
of the Interior, I secured permission
to place exhibits of farm products
from Western Canada at many fairs
and exhlbtions In American cities
which it has not hitherto been our
practice to visit. This is one step
toward making our immigration
campaign more effective."
With regard to the number of immigrants coming to Canada this year
from the United Stales, Mr. White
stated that between 140,000 and
150,000 would be a conservative estimate. Speaking of the reports that
are being circulated throughout the
Western States to the effect that
thousands of American i ettlers are
returning to the States c'issatisfled
with the Canadian West, he stated
that their only effect was to spur on
the officials of his department to
greater efforts to bring the setlters
in. "As a matter of fact," he said,
"very few settlers are returning to
the States. I don't know any reason
why they should go back. They certainly cannot find anything better
down home than we have In Western
Canada." He estimated the number
who have actually returned to the
States at about 300, and was of the
opinion that a large proportion of
these had no Intention of staying
when they came.
 o	
For Job Printing of all kinds see
'he Journal man.
Professor C. H. Gilbert of Leland
Stanford university, Palo Alto, Oil.,
has paid a visit to tbe coast siting of
British Columbia. Last year he accompanied Dr. David Starr Jordan,
president of tbe university, when an
International fishery conference was
held. He Is now In Seattle and the
different points on the American side
where salmon fisheries are carried
on.
Professor Gilbert stated that he
was inquiring in a general way as
to how many sockeyes had been
caught on the Fraser, as well as
other species. He was also gathering any Information possible about
the fishing Industry, both in British
Columbia waters as well as In Puget
Sound and the Skagit and other
rivers. He was investigating from
a scientific standpoint as professor of
zoology, as well as a member of the
International fisheries commission,
the age of the sockeye salmon. In
regard to this subject his results will
be published In book form in
due time, and concerning what he
had found In this enquiry he was not
In a position to discuss.
He Btated that at present there are
three ways of approaching the subject of the age of the sockeye. One
is that on the Fraser river, and on
no other river in the worlU, the sockeye pack is large every fourth year.
This was an extremely interesting
phenomenon that gave rise to some
interesting speculations. From this
fact many Investigators place the
age of the fish at four years. But
there were facts that did not fit in
with that theory. One was that the
sockeye came in ogether in a huge
run into the Straits of Juan de Fuca.
Then by some natural law the school
became split p. Some of 'the sockeye went to the Fraser, wo lie others
went to the Skagit river in the state
of Washington, and other rivers.
This is where a strange phenomenon
came into play—when the sockeye In
a fourth year were plentiful In the
Fraser river, their numbers were
about the same in the Skagit from
year to year. From old records of
the Hudson's Bay company the professor pointed out that the sockeye
were caught In large numbers every
fourth year. How this variation In
the size of the run ever originated
can only be guessed at. Neverthe
less It was a fact that such was tbe
case.
Another theory fixing the age of
the fish was from markings. Some of
tbe sockeye had been marked in the
hatcheries In Washington by having
a hole punched in their fins. Some
of these fish had been caught In later
years and their age was fixed at four
years.
The third way of determining the
span of life of the sockeye was a
method recently made public by Professor McMurrich of the University
of Toronto. He believes that the ear
bones of this species hold the clue
to their age, just as the rings of a
tree tell how many summers It has
seen, or the ridges on the teeth of a
horse.
The speaker said that the humpback salmon were plentiful" every
other season, thus differing from the
sockeye.
The work that had been done by
the employees In the Washington
State hatcheries in the matter of
marking fish had been imperfectly
carried out, for the same punches
had been used at different points Instead of different kinds of marks.
This led to confusion and defeated
the ends of science. When the marked fish were caught different hatcheries claimed them as ther own
fish.
In regard to the decisions that
might be arrived at by the International commission, he thought that
only such considerations as controlled the manner and time of fishing
for salmon were to be discussed. Opposition on the part of Washington
canners and fishers would probably
be met, but If the decisions that
might be arrived at were enforced
by the federal government of the
Unitd States and not by the Washin-
ton state government then they
would likely be more strictly enforced.
He thought that only about three
quarters as many licenses for fishermen had been issued in Washington
state as had been Issued last year.
Municipal Notice
Royal   Body   Formed   to   Maintain
Purity of English Language rt:Mii:'is Mm :vria.ri  t,\:\;»   ■
The joint committee appointed last
autumn by the Royal Society of
Literature and the Society of Authors to consider the best mode of
creating a permanent body which
may represent the Interests of pure
literature, without any regard to
commercial considerations, has completed Its labors, and has presented
Its report. In consequence of its
recommendations a body has been
constituted, within the Royal Society
of Literature, which has received the
title of the academic committee. By
the bylaws of the society, ratified
by the general anniversary meeting,
the academic committee shall consist of not more than forty members.
The twenty-seven original members,
whose names are given below, have
been elected at the nomination of
the joint committee of the Royal
Society of Literature and the Society
of Authors. All subsequent nominations and elections will be made by
co-operation of the now existing
members of the academic committee,
but so that their number shall never
exceed forty. For the better carrying out of the objects of tbe society,
the province and duties of the academic committee are thus defined:
(a) To take all possible measures
to maintain the purity of the English language, and to hold up a standard of good taste In style; (b) to
encourage fe'lowship and co-operation among those who are disinterestedly striving for the perfection of
English literature; (c) by "Discourses of reception" and "Obituary
addressee" to mark the current of
literary history in this country; (d)
to designate from time to time persons to become recipients of the
medals of'the society; (e) to make
awards of merit to particular literary
works.
The following are the names of
those who have been appointed
original members of the academic
committee: Alfrde Austin, Laurence
Binyon, Andrew Cecil Bradley,
Robert Bridges, Samuel Henry Butcher, Joseph Conrad, William John
Courthope, Austin Dobson, James
George Frazer, Edmund Gosse, Richard Bourdon Haldane, Thos. Hardy,
Henry James, William Paton Ker,
Andrew Lang, Sir Alfred Comyn
Lyall, John William Mackall, Viscount Morley, George Gilbert Murray, Henry NeWbolt, Edmard Henry
Pember, Sir Arthur Wing Pinero,
Walter Raleigh, George Macaulay
Thevelyan, Arthur Woollgar Verrall,
William Butler Yeats.' The secretary
Is Dr. Percy W. Ames.
A considerable number of those
above named were present. Tbe chair
was taken by Mr. S. H. Butcher, M.P.
The names of Maurice Hewlett and
Arthur Christopher Benson were
added to the roll of original members, Lord Morlty of Blackburn was
elected president, and Mr. E. H. Pember, K.C., perpetual secretary.
 o	
DISTRIBUTING DREDGES
SEALED TENDERS will be received by the City Clerk until SATURDAY noon, AUGUST 27th, 1910,
for the grading of Second avenue,
between McBride street and Eleventh
street.
Plans and specifications may be
seen and forms of tender obtained at
the office of the City Engineer.
The lowesi or any tender not necessarily accepted.
ERNEST A. WOODS,
Wm. Mahlon Davis, City Clerk.
City Engineer. A5-23
CANCELLATION  OF RESERVE
NOTICE Is hereby given that the
reserve existing on Crown lands In
the vicinity of Babine Lake, situate
In Range 5, Coast District, notice of
which was published In the British
Columbia Gazette, dated December
17, 1908, is cancelled In so far as
said reserve relates to lota numbered 1519, 1518, 1517, 1616, 1615,
1510, 1507, 1506, 1506A, 1503 1601,
1502. 1512, 1511, 1606, 1604, 1613,
1514, 1509, 1508, 1530, 1527, 1528,
1529, 1531, 1632, 1533, 1634, 1636,
1537, 1539, 1636, 1538, 1540, 1541,
1544, 1543, 1545, 1546, 1542, 1647,
1548, 1549, 1550, 1520, 1521, 1522,
1523, 1524, 1525, 1526, and 1561.
ROBERT A. RENWICK,
Deputy Commissioner of Lands.
Lands Department,
Victoria, B. C, June 16th, 1910.
(First Insertion July 6.)
COAL CLAIMS
Skeena  District—Queen  Charlotte
Islands.
To all to whom It may concern: —
NOTICE is hereby given that I, the
undersigned, Intend to apply for a
license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum upon the following lands
situate on Graham Island, one of the
Queen Charlotte Group, In the Province of British Columbia, and more
particularly described as follows, viz:
Commencing at a stake planted one
and a quarter miles west of the
north-east corner of Louis Inlet, and
marked "P. C. Coates' S. E. Corner
Claim No. 1," thence west 80 chains,
thence north 80 chains, thence east
80 chains, thence soutii 80 chains to
the place of commencement.
Staked June 14th, 1910.
Dated this 28th day of July, 1910.
P. C. COATES,
By his Agent, Wm. Edward Laird,
A9
The Dominion Government dredge
Fruhllng, which for some tl je past
has been employed In an endeavor
to open a channel between New and
Old Alberni, will be recalled from
Vancouver Island in the near future.
According to advices received by
Resident Dominion Engineer Keefer,
It appears that the Fruhllng Is unable to handle the work to which she
has been put. The bar which divides
Old and New Alberni has been found
to be composed of harder material
than had been anticipated, and many
snags are contained In the sand.
The residents of Alberni are boiling that the Vancouver office of the
department, of public works may see
fit to send the King Edward to undertake the work, but Mr. Keefer
i fates that he would not dare to send
the big flat bottomed dredge so far
as Alberni.
"If she met the big swell that rolls
In around Alberni,' said he, "and
I have scarcely ever gone up there
without meeting It, she would probably founder."
Mr. Keefer stated that it was possible that the dredge Ajax, now ;n
Victoria, might be fitted up for tin-
work at Alberni and sent up there.
As for the Fruhllng, .Mr. Keefer
stated that on Its return from Alberni It would not be possible to put
it at work at the mouth of the Fraser
river again until the fishing season
was drawing to a close. The Fruh-
ling worked on the sandheads for a
short time during the season last
year and a vast amount of trouble
was experienced with the nets. As
soon as possible the big dredge would
be put to work on the North Arm
which it Is the intention of the department to deepen throughout to
eight feet at low water, so as to
make It navigable for all olasse of
tugs during the coming low water
season.
Atlantic Steamship
 Agency	
Through  tickets and excursion
rates to
England, France, Germanv,
and all
Scandinavian Ports.
Call or write for rates to any
part of the world. I am also
agent for all American steamers
to and from Prince Rupert;
Northern Pacific Railway; Alaska Pacific Express.
J. H. ROGERS
General Steamship and Railway
Agent, Prince Rupert, B.C.
Canadian Pacific  R'y
Steamer, leave Prince Rupert for Vancouver,
Victoria, Seattle
Princess Beatrice,  every Monday at 1 p.m.
Princess May or Princess Royal
every Saturday morning.
Steamera leave Vancouver
Princess Beatrice every Thursday night.
Princess Royal every   Saturday
night at  11 o'clock.
Union Steamship Co'y
of B.C. Ltd.
COAL CLAIMS
Skeena  District—Queen  Charlotte
Islands.
To all to whom it may concern:—
NOTICE Is her.eby given that I, the
undersigned intend to apply for a
license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum upon the following lands,
situated on Graham Island, one of
tbe Queen Charlotte group, in the
Province of British Columbia, and
more particularly described as follows, viz:—Comemncing at a stake
planked at the S. E. corner of P. C.
Coates' Claim No. 1, and marked
"Wm. Penman's S. W. Corner, Claim
No. 1," thence east 80 chains, thence
north 80 chains, thence west 80
chains, thence south, 80 chains to the
place of commencement.
Staked, June 14th, 1910.
Dated this 28th days of July, 1910.
WM. PENMAN.
By his Agent, Wm.  Edward Laird.
A9
The new Steel Passenger Steamer
"Camosun"
PRINCE RUPERT every Sunday at 9 a.m. for Vancouver,
arriving Monday afternoon.
For Stewart City on arrival from
Vancouver Friday night.
Northbound, leaves Vancouver
Wednesdays at 9 p.m.
Steerage Fare $5.00
The "Camosun" is the only steamer
on tbe run having water-tight bulkheads and double bottom, thus ensuring safety of passengers in case of
collission or wreck.
J. H. ROGERS,   Ticket Agent
LAND   LEASE   NOTICE
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that The Canadian
Fish & Cold Storage Company Ltd.,
of Vancouver, occupation Mercantile
and Manufacturing, Intends to apply
for permission to lease the following described land:—Commencing at
a post planted at high water mark
on the westerly side of Prince Rupert Harbor and distant about 110
chains from the north-east corner of
Lot 443, thence west 20 chains,
thence soutii 20 chains, thence east
5 chains, more or less to high water
mark, thence following along the
high water mark to the point of commencement and containing 20 acres
more or less.
The Canadian Fish and Cold
Storage Company, Limited,
J. H. Plllsbury, Agent.
Dated June 20th, 1910. Jyl2
HAYNOR BROS.
FUNERAL  DIRECTORS
and
PROFESSIONAL  EMBALMERS
DR. W. B. CLAYTON
DENTIST
—o—
Office  In    the    Westenhaver   Block,
Over Orme's Drug   Store.
Prince Rupert
FOUND MAW FOSSILS
Ira M. Buell, n former Instructor
In   llelolt  college, was  made curator
I of the museum of the Wisconsin Institution   because  of   bis  success  In
' making a collection of fossils from
the pre-hlstoric naw of Rancho la
Brae, on Los Angeles's western out-
Bklrt. Buell, who has a record of
many years' important geological
work, part of the lime with the government survey, was commissioned
by the college three months ago to
delve into the antique treasures. He
secured the skeletons of .100 animals
and birds, either whole or In part,
which Is considered one of the greatest scientific finds of the generation.
He will be busy for a year In classifying and arranging the bones, which
include those of buffalo and saber-
tooth tigers.
"It Is a message from antiquity,"
is the way Buell characterizes the
great mine of relics In the Brea
bend. "From my observations of
what has been taken out already
and what appears to remain," he says
"1   believe   enough   bones  are   still
| buried to supply all the museums In
tbe world."
WM. S. HAl,L, L. D. S. D. D. S.
:-:    DENTIST   :-:
Crown and Bridge Work a specialty.
All dental operations skillfully
treated. Gas and local anaesthetics
administered for the painless extraction of teeth. Consultation free.
Offices, Helgerson Bk., Prince Rupert
J. H. PILLSBURV
CIVIL     ENGINEER
Surveying,   Designs,   Estimates,   etc..
Room   7,   Exchanse   Block,
Corner Third  Ave and  Sixth  Street
Prince Rupert
G. to. NIOKER80N & CO.
—o—
CUSTOMS AND MERCHANDISE
—o—
Brokers, Forwarding Agents,
Storage, etc.
J. W. POTTER
ARCHITECT     AND     STRUCTURAL
ENGINEER
Ite-liiforced Concrete a Specialty
—o—
Law-Butler Building - Prince Rupert
GRAHAM ISLAND— "The surest
sign of the progress of a town or
district Is Its newspaper—live, active, hustling." "The Masset Review,"  Masset,  Q.C.I.
The Thompson
Hardware Co.
-Second Avenue	
Paints. General Hardware,    • •
Oils, Stoves and Ranges.     ▼
"
J
u
V)
\ f
THE   PRINCE  RUPERT  JOURNAL
Friday, August 19, 1910*
c
MARINE NEWS OF THE COAST
MARINE   NOTES
The Port Simpson will be off tho
ways on Saturday and will immediately start loading freight, as she Is
expected to leave for Hazelton Sunday morning.
The steamer Hazelton left this
morning for Hazelton with a heavy
passenger list and a full cargo of
freight. The river boats are carrying more commercial freight this
year than ever before, nnd it is
doubtful whether all the freight will
be carried before the river closes for
navigation.
The Princess Beatrice has changed
her schedule and will not run to
Stewart any more for the present, but
will run to Skagway in place of tho
Princess May.
TENDERS  FOB  VESSELS
The British shipbuilding firms
seeking permission to tender fo; the
construction of vessels for the new
Canadian navy are Harlan & Wolff,
Swan & Hunter, and Vickers, Sons &
Maxim. Canadian firms who have
asked for the privilege of looking
over the British admiralty plans are
the Poison Iron Works, Toronto; the
British Columbia Marine Railway
Company, Victoria, and the Collingwood Shipbuilding Company.
When the admiralty plans are in
readiness, it is announced that the
agents of the companies desiring to
tender will be allowed to examine
the plans as proposed before putting
in their tenders.
MAY   BE  RATE WAR
There is much speculation among
Coast steamship officials, now that
the present Alaska excursion season
is drawing to a close as to bow long
the present rates to Southeastern
Alaska from Puget Sound will continue, and what bearing the action
of the Humboldt Steamship Company
announcing a continuation of the $50
rate to Skagway until early in October, will have on the policy of the
other lines.
The marine superintendent of the
SHIPPING GUIDE
from
To Arrive
Friday,    Aug.     19.—Venture
Stewart, Port Simpson.
Camosun from Vancouver.
Saturday,   Aug.   20.—Prince   Albert
from Skidegate.
Prince George from Vancouver.
Sunday,  Aug.    21.—Camosun     from
Stewart.
City of Seattle from Seattle.
Monday, Aug.   22.—Prince    George
from Stewart.
Humboldt from Seattle.
Cottage  City  from  Skagway.
•   Princess Beatrice from Vancouver.
Princess Royal from Skagway.
Tuesday,   Aug.   23.—Prince    Albert
from Masset, Port Simpson, etc.
Wednesday,   Aug.    24.—Prince Rupert from Vancouver, Victoria and
Seattle.
Thursday, Aug. 25.—Humboldt from
Skagway.
Prince Rupert from Stewart.
To Depart
Sunday, Aug. 21.—Camosun for Vancouver.
Prince George for Stewart.
City sf Seattle for Skagway.
Prince Albert   for    Masset,    Kin-
eolith, Port Simpson.
.Monday, Aug. 22.—Prince George for
Vancouver, Victoria, Seattle.
Humboldt for Skagway.
Cottage City for Seattle.
Port Simpson for Hazelton.
Princess Beatrice for Skagway.
Princess Royal for Vancouver.
Wednesday, Aug. 24.—Prince Albert
for Skidegate.
Prince Rupert for Stewart.
Thursday,   Aug .  25.—Humboldt for
Seattle.
Prince Rupert for Vancouver.
Pacific Coast Steamship Company, I.
N. Hlbbard, has been visiting Seattle
during the past few days, nnd while
the purpose of his visit has not been
disclosed, it is surmised that it has
to do with a readjustment of the
rates to Southeastern Alaska after
the end of the excursion season,
August 19.
Officials of the Alaska  Steamship
company,  which  has  ben  operating
steamers on a special excursion rate
since June, declared yesterday that
no plans have yet been made for the
balance of the  season.
The presence of Mr. Hubbard in
Seattle, and the approaching end ot
the excursion season of his line, gave
color to the statement that new rate
announcements will be forthcoming
in a few days.
General Manager Max Kalish, of
the Humboldt Steamship Company,
states that their rate of $50 to Skagway will be maintained until late in
September or October, regardless of
what the other steamship companies
may do.
CRUISER RAINBOW
The Canadian cruiser Rainbow,
Commander Stewart, is to leave
Portsmouth on Saturday, August 20,
for Esquimau, to form the nucleus
of the Canadian navy. The Rainbow
will be the first of Canada's new
naval craft to reach Canada waters.
A rumor was current that the vessel
might go first to Halifax to be stationed ther pending the repairs to
the cruiser Niobe which will not be
ready for service until October, a
statement to that effect having been
made by a prominent official of the
marine and fisheries department at.
Ottawa who recently visited this city.
It is understood, however, that this
programme will not be adhered to
and the Rainbow will proceed direct
to Esquimau.
The Rainbow was placed in commission at Portsmouth on August 4,
and soon afterward a silver service
bought by the government of British
Columbia for the cruiser was placed
on board. The cruiser will he In
command of Commander Stewart,
and the following officers have been
appointed to the vessel: Lieutenants
A. E. D. Moore, R.H.C., Halifax, R.
V. Holt and R. T. Edwards; Engineer Commander T. J. Morgan; Engineer Lieutenant R. H. M. Bury;
Artificer Engineer R. H. Hood; Staff
Paymaster R. A. Jenkins; Surgeon
T. A. Smith, and Gunners Mock and
Jehan. The admiralty called for
volunteers of 31 ratings of petty officers and men fdr the cruiser and
these will form a nnlcleus crew.
PROSPECTS ARE GOOD
Conditions on Copper River Please Mining
Men Who Have Examined
.    Them.
DAUGHTERS OF THE EMPIRE
Chapter Formed in Prince Rupert-
Presentation to Sir Wilfrid
Many Prospectors Invade the District
Dining  the  Past  Few-
Weeks
(Special Correspondence to Journal)
Copper City, Aug. 19.—Conditions
here are good and the greatest op-"
timism prevails with respect to the
future. There have been a lot of
prospectors up the Copper River during the past two weeks and they all
appear to have been well satisfied
with the outlook. The approach of
the railway line to a point opposite
here Is having Its effect In attracting those who look to the future development of the district to reach
here and make exploitations before
the line is carrying In its large quota
of passengers.
The ferry operating across the
river from here is proving a great
convenience. Although It Is not very
heavily patronized as yet the trade
Is growing and there Is reason to ex-
pei-t great things of It later.    It has
I ii     put     in     charge  of   Harvey
Creech,
SPAIN'S l\liEST
Chnplin Is to be Prosecuted for Aliened Seditious Sermon
On Wednesday afternoon a meeting was held in St. Andrew's hall for
the purpose of organizing a local
chapter of the Daughters of the Empire, an organization that is finding
favor In various parts of the world
where the British flag floats. The
results of the meeting was the reaching of a decision to from a chapter
and officers were accordingly elected.
The name adopted was the Queen
Mary Chapter.
The officers elected were as follows: Regent, Mrs. (Dr.) Eggert;
secretary, Mrs. J. H. McLeod; treasurer, Mrs. Wm. Manson; standard
bearer, Mrs.   (Dr.)  Mclntyre.
The objects of the organization
were explained, it is a body essentially loyal to the British flag and
among the ends aimed at is the aiding of wives and mothers of those
who are actively engaged in the empire's battles In time of war. In
peace the energies of tbe organization are directed along the line of
hospital and other pbilantrophic
works.
It was decided that1 In common
with all other chapters of the organization a presentation would bo
made to Sir Wilfrid Laurier on bis
visit here, A book of views of Prince
Ruperl will be made to the Prime
Minister on bis arrival.
RUSHING RAILWAY
1 S] iti 1 to The Journal)
Madrid, August 18,—The Spanish
government 1ms issued orders for the
lines"'hi inn of Chnplin Cilllln of the
Chapel Royal for u seditious sermon
recently delivered, in which he called
Premier Canalejas "A Little Clemen-
ceau."
Gorman shipbuilders are threatening to strike to try to force up their
wages to a figure somewhat nearer
the rate of wages In the United
Kingdom. The British worklngmen
arc not only much better paid than
the German, but they have very much
shorter hours. Recently, too, the
effects of protection and combines
In Germany have been to greatly Increase the cost of living, without any
compensating Increase of earnings,
and the men are becoming desperate.
A LIQUOR CRUSADE
(Continued from Page One)
dltlonal $150, the amount which
would have to have been paid for a
bottle license.
In the case of the Dominon the fine
was placed at $50 and costs, and
$500 additonal, the price of a liquor
license.
Another charge, that against C.
Hansen, was concluded this morning
and a fine of $50 and costs, with
$500 additional, the amount »f the
license was assessed.
There' are believed to be other
cases pending.
Subscribe  for The  Prince  Rupert
Journal now.
Another Section of Kettle Valley Line
is  Now  Under
Controi.
Xo Delay is Being Allowed in Connection With the Construction
Work
(Special to The Journal)
Vancouver, Aug. 19.—The contract for the extension of the Kettle
Valley line from Rock Creek to Ball
Creek on the west fork of the Kettle
River, a distance of thirty-five miles,
has been awarded to Rice & Company
of Vancouver and Seattle.
The building of the first twenty-
five  miles  of  the  same  road   from
Merrltt is now In progress.
 o	
ON HIS WAY HERE
(Continued from Page One)
and Premier McBride and the members of his government left nothing
undone that would show their respect
for the Prime Minister of the Dominion, Prominent Liberals were
given a prominent part in the proceedings and everything passed off
in a way that was highly satisfactory to all concerned.
Many Coming
Tho accommodation of tbe Prince
George Is all taken up on her trip
north by members of the Premier's
party and leading Liberals of the
province. They will make their
home on the steamer during their
stay In Prince Rupert.
Don't Forget
We have the stock and when you
want to select a Diamond Ring, a
Wedding Present, It Is no trouble for
you to find something that will suit
you. Our stock Is composed of the
best goods that the factories produce
and we guarantee everything sold
here.
Bring us your Watch and Jewelry
repairing If you want It p-crtrly
'lone.
C. B. WARK
Local News
All the stores will be closed tomorrow afternoon between one and four
o'clock to allow everybody to take
part in the reception. Monday afternoon is likewise to be observed as
a holiday.
* *    *
Col. Brown, of England, one of the
shareholders of the G. T. P., has
been spending a few days in Prince
Rupert. He was pleased with the
outlook for this city and during his
short stay covered the whole of the
townsite and in company with officials of the G. T. P. here made a
tour by launch about the harbor.
+    *    *
D. R. Young, editor of the Queen
Charlotte News, was In the city this
week, arriving from the south by
the Prince. Rupert and continuing
on his way home by the Bruno, the
same evening. He reports that there
Is a great amount of interest being
taken in the Queen Charlotte Islands
among residents in the south.
>l> * ,!,
The firm of J. S. Gray & Son,
jewellers, who have formerly occupied part of Mr. Kauffman's music
store on Third avenue, have removed
to their new premises In the Helgerson block. The store has been opened for some time now. Mr. Gray
has spared no expense In putting up
a  first class jewellery store.
* *       ,:,
Rev. J. W. Litch will preach in
the Baptist church on Sunday as
usual; morning at 11 a.m., "Work to
be Done, Mistakes to' be Slum." At
•I p.m. a meeting will be held for
women only; and at 7.30 he will
preach oil the subject "Little but
Great." An orchestra will be In attendance.
The G. T. P. party which is to arrive here on Wednesday will continue on to Stewart. Included in the
company with President Hays and
Vice-President Chamberlln, is A. W.
Smithers of London, chairman of the
board of directors. The opportunity
will be taken on the visit to the coast
to give "the latter the fullest Information on the possibilities and accordingly a trip farther north is planned.
* *    *
Dr. Ernest Hall, the celebrated
surgeon of Victoria, will give his
famous lecture on "The Social Evil
and Alcohol," on Sunday, August 21,
at 8.45 p.m. sharp in the Empress
theatre, Prince Rupert, to men only.
The lecture will be illustrated by
fifty or more magic lantern slides
specially provided, showing the diseases resulting to men from the
social evil and alcohol.
•   *    *    *
Mr. J. H. Rogers has just closed
a deal for eighty acres of land adjoining the new townsite of Ellison,
and is now subdividing It into town
lots. This addition is the first one
to be added to that place. Already
there is a heavy demand for lots
which are being bought up in Vancouver, Seattle, Victoria, Spokane
and Portland. Mr. Rogers expects to
have his surveys completed by September 15.
* *    *
The city clerk, A. E. Woods, received commendation at the meeting of the city council on Wednesday
evening. His Worship the Mayor
appeared somewhat surprised when
the minutes of the previous meeting
were read and stated that the clerk
was entitled to special commendation
He had been so busy during the day
that he (the mayor) did not expect
the minutes to be ready. It showed
wonderful Industry on the part of
the clerk that he should have them
ready.
* + *
The Publicity Club smoker next
Thursday should be a grand success.
The club has received such hearty
encouragement that It is now hound
lo give a first class entertainment In
return. The use of the Empress theatre, the lights, the music of a full
orchestra, the beer and even the beer
glasses have all been donated, the
latter by Mr. Hart, the furniture
man. The secretary of the club says
a large number have volunteered to
do "stunts" and it Is up to the entertainment committee to make- a
good selection.
 o	
CHOLERA  OUTBREAK
"WHERE  QUALITY IS KING.'
t GEO. D. TITE
I   Furniture Dealer
H    3rd. Avenue
Prince Rupert
An inspection of our stock
of House Furnishings will
convince you. For quality and
economy you will leave us a
satisfied customer.
Dining Room Furniture. Sideboards,
BulftU, Dining Tables, 6ft.
ind 8ft. Extension
Dlnlnf Room Chain, Quirteml Oik with
Leather Stats, Golden or Early English
finish. Prices ranging from
$22.50 to $50
tSSSid   Wicker Chairs and Rockers
Iron Beds, Springs and
Mattresses, all sizes
WINDOW BLINDS
Manufactured here io lit any
window   up   to  111   feet wide.
Tapestry and Lace Curtains,
Poles and Trimmings
Special orders for Upholstering
of any kind.
GEO. D. TITE,
fmaimmmt.
3rd Ave.
mmtrwmmmim
Province of Italy   is   Afflicted   AVith
Scournge
(Special to The Journal)
Bar!, Italy, Aug. 19.—Reports received here announce the outbreak
of Asiatic cholera In the province of
Barl Delle Puglle. The records
show thirty-three deaths from the
disease.
SHERWIN & WILLIAMS
COVER THE EARTH.
WE   are  soli;  AGKNTS
CARLOAD JUST ARRIVED
Ready Nixed Paints,
Paints Ground in Oil,
Paints Ground in Japan,
Varnishes, Shellac, etc.
Water Stains
and
Decotint
IN ALT. COLORS
Prince Rupert Hardware & Supply
Company, Ltd. thos. dunn, m.
BifoiEiefaiforafDra
The Westholme
Lumber Company,Ld.
"VVe carry the largest stock of
Building Supplies in the North.
Quotations given on short notice in all lines.
Rough and Dressed Lumber
Shingles and Lath
Mouldings and Cases
Doors and Windows
We handle Plaster and Lime at reasonable prices
Get our'qnotations for nll'clnsscs'of buildings,
FIRST AVENUE
OFFICE AND
WAREHOUSES
Grand Trunk Pacific  Steamships
For VANCOUVER, VICTORIA, SEATTLE.
Connecting   with   Eastbound   Trains
"Prince Rupert" sails every Thursday, 8.30 p.m.
"Prince  George"   sails  every Monday 8.30 p.m.
FOR STEWART:
"Prince Rupert" sails Wednesdays 8 p.m.
"Prince George" sails  Sundays at 8 p.m.
Steamer for Masset, Klncollth, Naas  Bay  and  Port  Simpson,  Sundays, I p.m.
For Skldegate,  Queen Charlotte City,   and   other   Moresby Island
points, Wednesday, 1 p.m., returning via Queen Charlotte City.
Tickets, reservations and Information   from _
A.IE. McMASTER
Freight and Passenger Agent, G. T. P. Wharf.

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