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Prince Rupert Journal Aug 25, 1911

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Array The Journal
$2.00
a year   '
Ptinct Ulnpttt
/
High Class7
'Job Printing
in all Lines
VOLUME   II.
Published   Twice  a  Week.
PRINCE   RUPERT,   B.   C.   FRIDAY, AUGUST 25, 1911.
Price,  Five Cents
NO. 20.
WILL REINSTATE MEN
Liverpool    Street   Railway   Company
Reach Settlement With the
Employees.
Sympathetic   Strike   Involved   About
Sixty-Eight Thousand
Men
London, Aug. 25.—The municipal
street railway company of Liverpool
will reinstate the strikers, thus ending the labor troubles In that city.
Sixty-eight thousand men were on
strike awaiting the decision of the
street railway company. The settlement will afford intense relief to
the business men generally, though
the shipowners art. fearful It will only
influence further demands on the
part of the strikers.
 o	
POSTPONE CASE
Man Accused of. Forgery Will  Have
Charge Gone on With
Next Week
The preliminary hearing in the
charge of forgery preferred against
Fred Clarke has been postponed until Monday in order to secure further
evidence for the defence.
The evidence has to do largely
with the question of handwriting.
The accused and his brother lived
with Wormnld, having come from
Toronto together. One post office
box was used by them. A sum of
money was sent to Wormald from
England which he did not receive
and his suspicions against Clarke
were only aroused some considerable
time afterwards when he received a
letter from England complaining
that he had not acknowledged the
receipt of  the money.
Investigation at the post office resulted in the discovery that the order
had been signed duly but the officials
at the post office failed to remember
anything as to signed for it after
the lapse of time.
Specimens of the writing of Clarke
were obtained and on these the prosecution against him base their case
largely. Fred Peters, K. C, is prosecuting, while Alex. Manson is defending the accused.
EXCELLENT MEETINGS!
H. S. Clements Well Received in South
End of Comox-Atlin Constituency.
He   Will   Reach   Prilfce   Rupert   on
Monday.  September 4, and Will
Knter  Upon   Local   Campaign
(Special to The Journal)
Cumberland, August 25.—Enthusiastic meetings have been held In the
interests of H. S. Clements, the Conservative candidate in Comox-Atlin,
In Wellington, Parksville, Alberni,
Union Bay and Denman. On Saturday night Mr. Clements will hold a
meeting in Courtenay.
In all the riieetings, the government at Ottawa is denounced in
fighting speeches which had splendid effect.
The attendance at these gatherings
was the largest ever held in connection  with  political  meetings.
The Liberals in the south end, of
the riding are disatisfled with the
nomination of Duncan Ross.
Mr. Clements will arrive in Prince
Rupert on Monday, September 4, and
will enter upon a vigorous campaign
In the north. ,
A victory for the Conservatives in
Comox-Atlin  is  conceded.
BARGE IS WRECKED
Feared Tug With Captain  and  Crew
Has Been Sunk
Mil.   BRUTINEL'S  VIEWS
He
Says    Negotiations    With    City
Council Await Reply From
.Mr. Thomson
R. Brutinel of the Prince Rupert
Hydro-Electric Company, who is here
in connection with the work going
on at Kahtada, when asked if the
Prince Rupert Hydro-Electric Corn-
par y was still negotiating with the
city council, stated that he has had
several conversations with the mayor
and the council. These conversations
were merely an exchange of views,
and can hardly be called negotiations. They were, however, very
useful, because they demonstrated
the futility of the attempts to reach
any understanding until the city secures the technical advice and recommendation of their consulting engineer.
Mr. Manson being in Victoria
when Mr. Brutinel was in Vancouver, it was suggested that they meet
Mr. Thomson together and talk
things over informally. Mayor Man-
son, Mr. Thomson and Mr. Ross (the
city engineer and the superintendent
of the electric system of Seattle), R.
Brutinel and R. F. Hayard (consulting engineer of the Prince Rupert
Hydro-Electric Company) were present. The views of the city and of
the company were fully explained.
Mr. Thomson asked the representatives of the Prince Rupert Hydro-
Electric Company to submit in writing a full outline of their proposal
regarding their entrance within the
city for the sale of industrial power;
this proposal he will minutely study,
and after full consideration he will
give his advice and opinion to the
city.
Mr. Brutlnel's company has a force
of about fifteen or twenty men at
work putting up the houses and doing othr preliminary work at Kahtada.
 o	
With the presence In the city of
a large number of Indians, Special
Constable Philllpson of the Indian
department has been kept busy looking after Infractions of the act. Several Indians and a number charged
with supplying were brought before
C. C. Perry, the Indian agent, and
fined  during  the  week.
Albatross    Lost    on    Georgian    Buy
Near French River—Those on
Board Escnpe
(Special to The Journal)
Bynge Inlet, Ont., Aug. 25.—The
barge Albatross of Midland foundered in Georgian Bay off French River
on Monday night and it is feared
that the tug C. C. Martin of Midland,
Captain Vent, which liad the barge
in tow, was dragged to the bottom
when the barge sank. The tug carried besides the captain aud his wife
a crew  of eight.
Those on the barge reached
Bynge Inlet yesterday.
 o	
Mrs. Stitt, who has been on a visit
to her sister, Mrs. J. E. Merryfield,
for several weeks, left this morning
for  Vancouver.
 o	
W. R. Brock, the director of the
geological survey at Ottawa, arrived
In the city by the Prince Rupert and
proceeded to the Hazelton district.
 o e—
IS INVESTING HERE
Sir George Doughty it is Reported Has
Made Purchases in This
District.
Financiers See In the North Opportunities   for   Investment
Private advices received from London, England, state that Sir George
Doughty, M. P. for Grimsby, and
owner of a big fleet of steam trawlers, has decided to engage In the fisheries In Northern Britisii Columbia.
He has acquired control of a Victoria company which owns an ollery
on Skidegate Inlet as well as valuable fishing privileges on Graham
and Moresby Islands of the Queen
Charlotte group. It is proposed to
float a company in London and proceed with the establishment of fishing stations and cold storage plants
during the coming fall, with the object of starting operation there next
spring.
Sir George visited Prince Rupert
last summer, and expressed himself
as deeply impressed with the possibilities of the industry in the North
Pacific. His company will handle
all kinds of edible fish as well as
manufacture fertilizers from other
varieties, including dogfish and
sharks.
 o	
Vernor Smith of Foley, Welch &
Stewart has returned from a trip to
Hazelton and vicinity.
WILL RETIRE FOREVER
Sir Wilfrid Laurier Announces Before People
of Quebec That he will Leave Politics if Defeated This Time.
(Special to The Journal)
St. Johns, Que., Aug. 25.—In yesterday's speech here, at the conclusion of a most vehement attack upon
the 'Nationalists in which he repudiated  the statements that service in
the navy would be obligatory and
that the navy bill was just another
scheme to win him more honors from
England, Sir Wilfrid Laurier startled
his audience by announcing that if
defeated in the coming election
he would retire forever.
INTERESTED IN CITY
J. H. Kugler Found  Investors in the
South Looking to Prince
fc Rupert
There Should .He Considerable Money
Put  Into  This  Place  During
Next   Few   Months
J. H. Kugler, who has just returned from the south, is more than
ever satisfied with investments in
Prince Rupert. He looks to an early
invasion of this city by investors on
a large scale, finding in the south a
spirit of the greatest optimism with
respect to the city.
The old disposition to "knock" the
city he finds is dying out and in its
place there is a spirit of inquiry
springing up. All are anxions to
know what the opportunities are in
the place.
With the harvesting of an immense
crop of grain on the prairies there
are going to be immense sums of
money put in circulation this fall and
Prince Rupert, so much in the public
eye, cannot well fail to derive a large
benefit from the movement.
Mrs. Kergin of Stewart is visiting
at the home of her father, Captain
.McCoskrie,  Fourth  avenue.
LARGE PULP MILL
Ocean Falls Will Have One of Largest
Enterprises on the
Coast.
Splendid  Provision   Has   Been  Made
for.the Employees at the
New Town
Within a short distance of Prince
Rupert and easily within the circle
which will find its outlet in a shipping way by Prince Rupert is the
largest pulp mill In the west being
installed. This is at Ocean Falls.
Already there Is a large pay roll
there and the works are being put
In in the most up-to-date manner.
When completed In November this
mill at Ocean Falls will have a daily
capacity of 150 dry tons of mechanical pulp. The mill is arranged
In units of 50 tons each, and all provisions are made In the hydraulic
development and pulp mill plans for
a further Installation lo bring the
capacity up to 800 dry tons per day.
When this is done, It will be the
largest mechanical pulp mill In Canada, if not In the world.
It has taken the best part of two
years to transform Ocean Falls from
a deserted spot into a scene of bustling activity. By the time all the
operations are completed, in the beginning of the new year, there will
be nothing lacking to make the camp
the most comfortable, from the point
of view of the workmen, anywhere in
existence. The hotel, which Is being, constructed specially for them,
will contain 80. bedrooms, plunge
baths, amusement and reading rooms,
library and special drying rooms for
men's clothes, while the kitchen will
include steam and electric cooking
utensils even not excepting the' patent potato peelers used on the latest steamships. Altogether, all the
appointments will be of the most up-
to-date character, and will be something whicee nas e.itherto been undreamed of in such a connection.
DECIDE  IN OCTOBER
Granby Company Will Not Locate Smelter Before Meeting This
Fall.
Mr. Sylvester Has Gone South Aftei
Inspection of the Work at
Hidden Creek
ROAD TO  SIMPSON
Proposition is Hade to Have Means of
Land Communication
Established.
Short   Line   Can   Be   Opened   From
Opposite   Side   of   Harbor   by
Georgetown Mill
J. W. Sylvester of the Granby company went south this morning after
an inspection of the Hidden Creek
mine at Goose Bay. He says work
is going along there steadily, the
force employed being engaged in
blocking out the ore ready for a
large production when the occasion
arises.
As to the decision in the matter of
the location of the smelter, Mr. Sylvester says this will not be reached
until the meeting of the company in
October. There is no necessity for
hurrying the matter. The mine is
being'steadily worked and the smelter is not yet necessary.
Experts are on the ground gathering information as to the prospective
production at various points in the
north and the company will have a
vast fund of information within the
next few weeks which will materially
help e.e reaching a decision.
 o	
C. B. Sword of New Westminster,
factory inspector, has been in the
city this week.
A move is on foot again to have
a roadway opened through the pass
between the mountains opposite the
city to Georgetown and on to Port
Simpson. There is a very easy route,
it is pointed out by those advocating
the road, at a point on the harbor
directly opposite to the wharlves. A
plank roadway can be constructed
which will proceed practically level
the whole distance of ten or eleven
miles to Port Simpson, affording a
means of communication that the
advoncates contend would be taken
advantage of by many. The road
need not be a wide one, it is contended, but only of such width as
to allow pedestrians to pass along.
The route would run directly past
the Georgetown mi'l and conduce to
trade with Prince Rupert according
to the claims put up by the advocates of it.
The proposition is not an entrely
new one, having been advocated some
time ago. •
MINING MEN HERE
G. G. S. Lindsay of Toronto Heads a
Party of Old  Country Investors
to Investigate Properties.
Well     Known     Toronto     Financial'
Arrives in Prince Itupert and
Proceeds   Up   River
CANDIDATES'   VIEWS
H. S. Clements is Strongly Opposed to
the Reciprocity Pact Proposed by Government.
In Interview He Expresses His Opinion on Subject—Regards It
As a Blind
GOOD SALMON RUN
Northern Canners Have Had   a' Large
Pack During the Season
Just Closed
The Naas Is Still Taking Great Quantities of Fish—Skeena
Is  Full
The cannery season in this northern district is drawing to a close
because the provision in the way of
tins has all been consumed. The
season has been a good one as far as
the Skeena has been concerned, and
the Naas has had a phenomenal run
of salmon, the canners being still
busy there finishing up the pack.
They are having difficulty in taking
care of all the fish taken. This
with the good prices prevailing will
make the year one of the best on
the Naas.
On the Skeena some of the canneries have closed down for the yenr,
having their entire pack put up. In
others where additional tins are being obtained they are continuing to
put up the fish
The sockeye run on the Skeena
has not been as large as In some
years previous but In the lower
grades there has been a very abundant run. With the price so high
for all classes of salmon this year
the returns of the Skeena canneries
will be excellent.
The only point In the north where
there has been anything like a partial falure has been at Rivers Inlet.
In the south the Fraser River has
been practically a failure this season, some canneries putting up next
to nothing. The traps on the U. S.
side have had whatever catch there
was, seeming to take the whole of
the Fraser River run.
G. U. S. Lindsey, K. C, of Toronto,
one of the best known mining in-
I vestors in Canada, reached the city
by the Prince Rupert on Wednesday
accompanied by R. Reyeasback and
H. F. Marriott, mining investors from
London, England. They are inspect
ing properties in this part of the
province with the object in view of
investing  here.
Mr. Lindsey is interested, among
other tilings, with a Toronto syndicate in the coal mines at Groundhog .Mountain. He left shortly after
arrival here for a trip up the Skeena,
having little to say at present as to
his movements. Later he will return
lo Prince Rupert.
 r—O ■	
C. Peck returned last night from
a trip to Goose Bay and the Naas
by the Venture.
GOING  INTO FISH
Dr. R. II. Winter, who has been
at Van Anda, Texada, passed
through here this week on his way
to Queen Charlotte City, where he
will take charge of the hospital
there.
Mackenzie & Mann  Interests are Purchasing Canneries in This
Part of Province.
Mr. II. S. Clements, the Conservative candidate for Comox-Atlin, is
expected to reach here very early In
September, probably about Labor
Day. Mr. Clements is not a stranger
to the constituency or to parliament.
He spent some of his early years on
this coast. Mr. Clements was born
In Dover, Kent ounty, Ontario, forty-
four years ago. He was educated at
Chatham, and was at one time a
member of the school board of that
city. He was for some years a successful farmer in his native county,
and also had farming interests in
.Manitoba. In 1904 Mr. Clements
was elected to the House of Commons by the riding of West Kent, a
constituency created by the last redistribution. He immediately came
to the front as an active and vigorous working member, taking part in
the principal dlscussons and performing his full share of routine and
committee work. At the last election he was defeated by the small
majority of 85. The Conservatives
of the riding desired to nominate
Mr. Clements for the coming contest, but he declined on the ground
that he had taken up his residence
in Britisii Columbia, and he could
not adequately represent an Ontario
constituency.
interviewed in Vancouver a few
days ago, Mr. Clements said:
"1 see no reason for the reciprocity
pact; it is an absolute farce from the
Canadian standpoint. The Republican party in the United States is
pledged to lower the tariff on Canadian goods and if Canada is content
to wait until the next general election on the other side of the border,
tariff revision In favor of the Canadian producer will come without necessitating tlie giving away of any
of our national resources. What we
need most is reciprocity within tlie
Empire, for the proposed pact will
suceed only In diverting trade north
and soutli, instead of east and west.
"Sir Wilfrid Laurier and his government have never to my knowledge
mentioned reciprocity as a possibility
prior to 1908. In fact, Sir Wilfrid
has frequently stated In the House
that reciprocity with the United
States was a tiling of the past. When
the Conservative members did vote
to give a substantial reduction em
farm implements coming into tlie
northwest froi.l the States, it was Sir
Ir Wilfrid who refused to let his
party pass the measure. The reciprocity agreement is simply a cloak
covering the naval policy, which is
unpopular in Quebec, and other measures viewed broadcast with disfavor,
measures that really are the main
ones   in   tills   campaign    and    which
He Will   Filter  Into the Fishing
dusiiy With Headquarters
Here
J would bring about the defeat of the
| government were they full understood.
"Il would seem that Sir Wilfrid is
wittingly sacrificing the fruit, fishing
and lumbering interests, particularly
i In   British   Columbia,   for   no   other
Interests   Closely    Identified    with 1^ Umn   ,()  Bp ^  ^  n(||.t])_
Mackenzie & Mann have shown a dls-1 wes, farmers for his previous failure
position to invest heavily In the; to grant them a lower tariff em in-
north.   Mackenzie & Mann as lnvw- coming  agricultural   machinery,    I
tors are more than railway builders. Pell6ve "l;"  the (M'Ul*  i,"l"s,r*v  ln
! Canadian waters should be preserved
They are awake to enterprises of va- L, ,.„„,„,,„„ tuhermen,   Tll(, ,*nlt„a
'State's must  provide fish  as a cheap
j food  for their people and  they must
come to us for their supply regardless of any reciprocity pact.    No one
will assert that the British Columbia
rlous characters in the matter of get
ting   a   sane    Investment.      Millions
upon   millions  of  dollars  have  been j
introduced Into Canada by these two i
men  within  the  past,  few  years.    It!
has been diverted  In different chan-1
nels  and  the  latest  seems  to  be  In
the fishing industry.
About a year ago A. D, McRae,
one of the men who is Identified with
the Mackenzie &. Mann Interests in
the province, visited this northern
part of the province. He was taken
about the Skeena River and other
points near here, looking Into Ihe
prospects of the fishing and other Industries.
Since that one of the largest canneries on the Skeena has been taken
over by these interests, and It Is reported that these same Investors
have their eyes upon others in the
north. This Indicates that tlie north
is remaining very mtii'h In the public
eye as a field for capital.
fruit grower can hope to enter into
competition in the American market
with the Washington, Oregon and
California  producers.
"On the question of Asiatic labor
In Canada, I believe strictly in its
suppression, and I condemn strongly,
nor am I alone In this, the action
of the Laurier government for tlie
conditions existing In this province
after 1907, when the prime minister
promised that not more than ten
Japanese residents would be admitted monthly under the new Canadian-
Japanese arrangement, Statistics
show that from January to October,
following the new treaty, the Japanese government settled 11,1.36 people In this' country through the port?
of  Vancouver  and   Victoria."
r PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Friday, August 25, 1911.
PRESS OPINIONS
FRUIT  AND   RECIPROCITY
The Victoria Times is confident
that the Province of Britisii Columbia can never produce enough fruit
to supply this province and the prairie country, and should therefore favor the free importation from the
United States. it may be worth
while to' remind Mr. Templeman of
the fact that in the fiscal year 1910
apples to the value of $1,359,454
were exported from the port of Hall-
fax. This fruit was practically all
grown in a'strip of country along the
Cornwallis and Annapolis Valleys, between the North and Soutli Mountains
of western Nova Scotia. This valley
is from five to fifteen miles wide
and less than a hundred miles In
length. The Inhabitants are general
farmers, but arc going more and
more into fruit growing. The. area
of orchards has doubled In less than
a decade, and will be woubled several times more before the valley is
fully planted. When we consider
that this district supplied a large
part of the fruit market of Eastern
Sanada and ships half a million barrels of apples to Canada, we may
form some kind of an idea of the
possibilities of Britisii Columbia,
with an area of natural fruit lands
many times larger than the fruit belt
from which Nova Scotia draws her
export supply. We may tell Mr. Templeman that all the apples imported
in their natural condition into Canada last year were less in value than
one-quarter the apple exports from
Halifax alone. There is no manner
of doubt that British Columbia will
at the present rate of progress overtake in a few years the whole present local and prairie demand, and
will have to denpend upon the increased population and the export
trade for a market. The fruit growers of Britisii Columbia have less
protection than the persons who supy-
ply them with the things they have
to buy. Under reciprocity they will
be taxed on their clothing, their machinery and tools, fertilizers and
other necessities. But they will be
exposed to the free comeptition of
foreign producers, who have determined to make the Canadian prairie fruit market their own.—News-
Advertiser.
JUSTIFIED BY EVENTS
Whatever doubt may have heretofore existed in the minds of skeptics
as to the effect of R. L. Borden's
western trip upon the reciprocity situation in that part of the country,
it should not be set at rest for all
time.
When Mr. Borden announced his
tour of the west there were plenty
of people who ridiculed the Idea. So
well had the campaigning of the Liberal manipulators of the Grain Growers' Association been done that the
impression was general that the
whole west was a unit for reciprocity, and that for tlie Conservative
leader to attempt to preach any other
policy lo the westerners would be
like putting his head in the lion's
mouth.
Well, Mr. Borden went west, and,
while there, was met everywhere by
Grain Growers' deputations, each
with its stereotyped reciprocity resolution, provided from Liberal headquarters. To them all the Conservative leader had the one story to tell.
He was unalterably opposed to reciprocity, and was prepared to, and
did, give reasons for his opposition.
And so logical and straight-forward
was his attitude on the question that,
before he had met many audiences,
there was a decided change in the
current  of  public  opinion.
What   that   changed   current   has
been acomplishing since Mr. Borden's return to the east may be
understood from an official state
ment of the Grain Growers' Asocia-s
tlon. Where once the reciprocity
enthusiasts of the west were so strong
for closer American connection that
they talklned running Dominion candidates of their own, they now announce that, there will be none. The
organ of the association says that
it will take no official part In the
election, and expresses soreness that
the contest was called by Laurier
for so early a date. Members of
the association are urged to attend
his own party convention and exert
influence to have candidates named
"favorable to farmers'  interests."
The noteworthy thing about this
official statement is that it contains
no words of reciprocity, showing con-
cluslvely that there lias arisen such
a difference of opinion in the association's ranks on this subject that it
was not deemed advisable to make
special reference to it in the communication to members. And the
effect of this will be all to the benefit
of the Conservative cause in the west
on election day. Mr. Borden's western trip was well worth while, as
events are proving.—Hamilton Spectator.
. o	
FEWER SHIPS IN WORLD
It will surprise many people to
learn that there are fewer ships in
the world than there were a few
years ago. Lloyd's Register now
gives the total as 30,087, whereas
the figures for 1907-8 was 30,203.
The explanation is simple. The
carrying trade of the globe s done
in bigger ships, because it is more
profitable. The Olympic, for example, only counts as one vessel, whereas her 45,000 tons would in the old
days have spread over quite a respectable fleet. Again, sailing ships
have largely disappeared. A single
steamer replacing three of them is
at least as effective. All the same,
the world's tonnage keeps growing.
The 30,087 ships represent 43,147,-
154 tons, whereas the larger number of a few years back stood for
39,438,917—a growth of 3,700,000
tons In four years. The vessels registered in the United Kingdom have
fallen off, despite shipbuilding activity; but there is, nevertheless, an
increase in tonnage.
The red ensign is customarily
spoken of as covering the pick of the
mercantile marine. It also floats
over nearly half the world's tonnage.
The following figures respecting the
merchant fleets of the principal
countries are suggestive:
Tons  gross.
Britisii        19,418,824
United States      5,158,279
Germany      4,446,880
Norway         2,154,331
France         1,976,862
Italy            1,340,508
Japan         1,203,220
Holland          1,058.287
The Britisii figures include the
overseas dominions, which own just
a millon and a half tons. The United States occupies second place,
merely because the tonnage of the
Great Lakes is included. The German figures have gone up by about
350,000 tons dulling the past four
years, as compared with an increase
in our own case of nearly 1,1000,000
tons. The merchant navies of Norway and France have each grown
by about 200,000 tons.
 o	
Visitor (who has been going for
the last half-hour)—You know, I'm
not physically strong, but I've good
staying powers.
Hostess (wearily)—Yes, we noticed that.
You Can Avoid This
by sending your Clothes to the
PIONEER   STEAM  LAUNDRY
There are Many
Reasons Why
I   j'J    IT   IS   TO   l'OUR  INTEREST
We do first-class work and
are careful with your Garments. We can do your work
and return it within 48 hours
If necessary. We call for your
i.aundry and return It to you.
Should anything be lost or misplaced we will make tt satisfactory.
When your Laundry goes to the Chinks there are many drawbacks. When you send It to us your money helps pay WHITE
LABOR.
PIONEER STEAM LAUNDRY
HOY   SCOUT   MOVEMENT
Ideals of Founder Carried Out and
Extended in Many
Nations
No apology need be made for
drawing attention to the movement
of the Boy scouts, says the London Standard. Each generation Is
apt to give but scant notice to these
movements, which are really the
most significant. The Wesley revival was largely a subject of derision to our forefathers, to whom
battles and sieges, now long forgotten, appeared vastly more important.
The revolution which announced the
birth of a new Japan occupied very
few lines in the English newspapers;
a speech from Mr. Gladstone was
worth many columns. Yet Mr. Gladstone does not concern us greatly
now, while the Japanese Empire possesses a most practical interest for
the whole world. In the same way
succeeding generations may very
possibly regard the birth and development of the Boy Scout movement
as quite one of the most Important
events of the early twentieth century. The growth of the idea has
been altogether phenomenal. It was
less than four years ago that Sir
Robert Baden-Powell held his first
camp in Doret. Twelve lads were
then taught how to play at being
Red Indians and Knights of the
Round Table. They were taught certain saveage virtues and accomplishments—how to bear fatigue wHh
cheerfulness, how to recognize trees
and shrubs, how to tear the secret
out of a footprint on the grass or
a displaced tuft of moss, how to
tell and imitate the calls of birds
them; and their pleasure told the
teacher how much there was In his
idea. A little later the Boy Scout
scheme was published to the world,'
and in six months some 80,000 boys
had given themselves up to the joys
of scouting. Now there are 145,000
Boy Scouts in the United Kingdom
alone.
The moral effects of the training
have been extraordinary. No doubt
the Scouts are occasionally a nuisance to sober middle-aged people,
and the sight of a uniform' may
repell that class, so numerous in
Great Britain, that regards anything
approaching discipline as something
mysteriously wicked, savoring of the
bogey of "militarism," though, as
a matter of fact, the movement Is
essentially non-military. But the
most carping critics must admit that
during the last year or two there
has been a great improvement in
the manners and deportment of our
town and country boys; and for this
improvement the Scout discipline
can fairly claim the chief credit.
The Scout creed is that of manliness; and is altogether inimical to
the lounging, loafing, cigarette smoking ideal that seemed at one time
to have fascinated the rising generation in our crowded centres of population. It also supplies the great
advantage of a code of honor, the
want of which has hitherto been
theh chief defct among that vast
class of boys for whom the rough
discipline of a public school exists
in vain. In a physical sense the
movement has excellent results. By
teaching the boys to use their eyes
in the way Nature intended it fights
the tendency to myopia, Induced by
a close study of school books or
penny dreadfuls; it makes for a general handlness that may be invaluable in a colonial life, and Is not
out of place even In London; and
the outdoor exercise tends to give
vigor to the limbs and color to the
face of even the most pallid town-
bred lad. The movement has been
in existence too short a time for the
full scope of its effects to be adequately recognized, but it may well
be Imagined that employers of the
future in way of boy labor will attach a just value to the prellnmary
lessons In honesty, activity and Intelligence which the Scout training
affords.
General Baden-Powell has pointed
out how hapldly the methods of his
organization are being adopted by
foreign countries. In Russia, the
Czar has inaugurated a system of
training for boys which may have
a considerable effect on the future
political history of that country. The
aim is to' Instill the spirit of true
manliness and patriotism, which Is
apt to be wanting after the drill-
sargeant and his methods have done
their best. General Nogi and Admiral Togi have been investigating
the Scout movement during their
visit, and see In it a possible means
of maintaining that spirit of "bush-
ido" which was the Inspiration of
the old warrior class, but which Is
showings signs of withering under
the influence of the Europeanized
civilization. Norway, Italy, Belgium,
Holland and the South American
states have all taken up the system,
and   In  the  United  States  and the
Oversea Dominions there are hundreds of thousands of Scouts. Should
nothing unforeseen happen to check
the expansion of the Idea, we may
expect in a few years notable results. The happy touch of barbarism
in the training is a pleasant antidote to the Iistlessness born of over-
civilization, and should do much to
counteract certain tendencies on
which the thoughtful hove looked
with grave anxiety. It is a great
work, and General Baden-Powell
may still be famous as the originator
of tne Boy Scout movement at some
period when the defence of Mafeking
has almost ceased to be a memory.
Skeena Land  District—District of
Cassiar
TAKE NOTICE that Marion Mc-
Dlarmld, of London, Ontario, occupation nurse, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described land:—Situated on the
Kitwancool River; commencing at a
post planted at the northwest corner and about 5 1-4 miles distant in
a northwesterly direction from the
north end of Kitwancool Lake;
thence south 80 cliains; thence east
SO chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains to point of
commencement, and adjoining , Lot
1878 to the north; and containing
640 acres, more or less.
MARION  McDIARMID.
Daniel McDonald, Agent.
Dated July 24   1911. A-15
NOTICE  TO CONTRACTORS
Police Station, Naas River
SEALED TENDERS, superscribed
"Tender for Police Station, Naas
River," will be received by the Hon.
the Minister of Public Works up to
noon of Tuesday, fhe 12th day of
September, 1911, for the erection and
completion of a timber-framed police
station at Naas River, in the Skeena
Electoral District.
Plans, specifications, contract, and
forms of tender may be seen on and
after the 17th day of August, 1911,
at the offices of the Government
Agent, Prince Rupert; C. P. Hickman, Esq., Provincial Constable,
Naas Harbour; and the Department
of Public Works, Victoria.
Each proposal must be accompanied by an accepted bank cheque
or certificate of deposit on a chartered bank of Canada, made payable
to the Hon. the Minister of Public
Works, for the sum of $150, which
shall be forfeited if the party tendering decline to enter into contract
when called upon to do so, or if he
fail to complete the work contracted
for. The cheques or certificates of
deposit of unsuccessful tenderers
will be returned to them upon the
execution of the contract.
Tenders will not be considered unless made out on the forms supplied,
signed with the actual signature of
the tenderer, and enclosed in the
envelopes furnished.
The lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted.
J.  E. GRIFFITH,
Public Works Engineer.
Department of Public Works, Victoria, B. C, August 15, 1911. a22sl2
PUBLIC HIGHWAYS
Province of British Columbia
NOTICE is hereby given that all
Public Highways in unorganized Districts, and all Main Trunk Roads in
organized Districts are sixty-six feet
wide, and have a width of thirty-
three feet on each side of the mean
straight centre line of the travelled
road. THOMAS TAYLOR,
Minister of Public Works.
Department of Public Works, Victoria. B. C, July 7, 1911.    Jyl8-ol8
WATER .NOTICE.
NOTICE is hereby given that an
application will be made under Part
V. of the "Water Act, 1909," to obtain a licence in the Queen Charlotte Islands Division of Skeena District.
(a) The name, address and occupation of the applicant—Merton A.
Merrill, Masset, Q. C. I., B. C,
Prospector.
(If for mining purposes) Free
Miner's Certificate No	
(b) The name of the lake,
stream, or source (if unnamed, the
description is)—I-in-tsua Lake, Tsu-
Skundale Lake and Ain River.
(c) The point of diversion—At W
near the outlet of Tsu-Skuudale
Lake Into Ain River.
(d) The quantity of water applied for (in cubic feet per second)
—1,000.
(e) The character of the proposed works—Power Plant, Dam,
Flumes, etc.
(f) The premises on which the
water Is to be used (describe same)
—At or near the mouth of the Ain
River.
(g) The purposes for which the
water is to be used—Generating
power.
(h) If for irrigation, describe
the land Intended to be irrigated,
giving acreage	
(1) If the water is to be used for
power or mining purposes, describe
the place where the water Is to be
returned to some natural channel,
and the difference in altitude between point of diversion and point
of return—At or near the mouth of
the Ain River, about 100 feet below
point of diversion.
(j) Area of Crown land Intended to be occupied by the proposed
works—10 acres more or less.
(k) This notice was posted on
the 28th day of November, 1910,
and application will be made to the
Commissioner on the 1st day of
June, 1911.
(1) Give the names and addresses of any riparian proprietors or
licensees who or whose lands are
likely to be affected by the proposed works, either above or below
the outlet—Don't know of any.
(Signature)
MERTON A.  MERRILL,
(P. O. Address)  Masset, B. C.
NOTE.—One cubic loot per second is equivalent to 35.71 miner's
Inches.
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE.
NOTICE Is hereby given that the
reserve of a parcel of land situated
on Graham Island, notice of which
appeared in the British Columbia
Gazette on the 25th of February,
1909, being dated 23rd February,
1909, Is cancelled to permit of the
lands being acquired by pre-emption
only and for no other purpose
ROBT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Department of Lands,
Victoria, B. C, April 5th, 1911.
4-14—7-5
NOTICE.
In the matter of an application for
the issue of a duplicate of the Certificate of Title for an undivided
one-half of Lot 883, Group I,
Cassiar District:
Notice is hereby given that It is
my intention to issue at the expiration of one month after the first
publication hereof a duplicate of the
Certificate of Title to the above
mentioned land in the name of William Jordan Larkworthy, which Certificate is dated the 30th day of September, 1910, and numbered 326R.
WILLIaM   E.   BURRITT,
Di'.rlct Registrar.
Land Registry Office,
Prince Rupert, B. C,
May 26,  1911. J23
NOTICE
In the matter of an application for
the  Issue   of  a  duplicate  of  the
Certificate   of  Title  for  Lot  361,
Range 5, Coast District:
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
it  is  my  intention  to  issue at  the
expiration  of  one  month  after  the
first publication  hereof a duplicate
of the Certificate for the above described lands in the names of Truman S. Baxter and Albert D. Durham,
which  Certificate  of Title  is  dated
25th   November,   1909,   and   numbered 44 1.
WILLIAM  E.  BURRITT,
District Registrar.
Land Registry Office, Prince Rupert, B. C, August 14, 1911. al5-sl5
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE.
Notice is hereby given the the
reserve existing by reason of the
notice published in the British Columbia Gazette of the 27th December, 1907, over lands on Graham Island, formerly covered by 'limber
Licences Nos. Nos. 37055, 37056 and
37057, which expired on the 6th day
of November, 1909, and the lands
embraced within Timber Licence No.
37059, which expired on the 25th
day of January, 1909, is cancelled,
and that the said lands will be open
for pre-emption only under the provisions of Section 7 of the "Land
Act" after midnight on June 16th,
1911.
ROBERT A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Lands Department,
Victoria, B. C,
9th March, 1911.
WATER NOTICE
I, C. N. Pring, of Prince Rupert,
B. C, occupation broker, give notice
that on the 12th day of July I intend tho apply to the Water Commissioner at his office In Prince Rupert, for a license to take and use
2.8 cubic feet of water per second
from Hot Springs on border of Lake
Lakelse in the Skeena Land Division of Coast District. The water Is
to be taken directly from the Springs
and is to be used on Lot No. 3983,
for sanitary purposes.
Dated June 12th, 1911.
C. N. PRING,
6-13-lm Prince Rupert, B. C,
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
oKeena.
TAKE NOTICE that the Canadian
Canning Company, Limited, of 224
Winch Building, Vancouver, B, C,
occupation salmon caners, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Com
mencing at a post planted adjoining
a post marked W. N. about 300 feet
South of Wallace's wharf, Naas Harbour, B. C; thence east 20 chains;
thence south 20 chains; thence west
20 chains; thence following the
coast line in a northerly direction
back to the point of commencement
and containing forty acres more or
less.
CANADIAN CANNING CO., LTD.
Per G. H. Leslie, Agent.
Dated 6th June, 1911. 6-26
Job Printing of all kinds neatly
executed at the Journal Office.
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast, Range 5.
TAKE NOTICE that T. H. Hughes,
of Lakelse Valley, occupation farmer,
intends to apply • for permission to
purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted at the southeast corner of Lot
4128; tlience 40 chains north; thence
40 chains east; theno 40 chains
south; thence 40 chains west to point
of commencement, and containing
160 acres, more or less.
TOM HUGH HUGHES.
Dated June 5, 1911.
Skeena  Land  District—District
of Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that Thomas Stewart, of Prince Rupert, occe-pation
accountant, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted 40 chains north from
the southwest corner of Lot 1733;
thence west 40 chains; tlience south
40 chains; thence east 40 chains;
thence nortli 40 chains to point of
commencement.
THOMAS  STEWART.
John  Kirkaldy, Agent.
Dated July 7, 1911.
WATER NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that an
application will be made under Part
V of the "Water Act, 1909," to obtain a licence in the Queen Charlotte
Islands Division of Skeena District.
(a) The name, address and occupation of the applicant—Orland P.
Merrill; Massett, Graham Island,
B. C;  prospector.
(If for mining purposes) Free Miner's Certificate No	
(b) The name of the lake,
stream or source (if unnamed, the
description Is)—Ain Lake and Ain
River.
(c) The point of diversion—At
or near Ain Lake.
(d) The quantity of water applied for (In cubic feet per second)
—700.
(e) The character of the proposed
works—Dam, flume, pipe line and
power plant.
(f) The premises on w'll h te e
water is to be used  (describe s:e.    i
■—Near mouth of Ain River.
(g) The purposes for which ■ .■
water is to be used—Gene :.: • ■:
power.
(h) If for irrigation, describe ! •■
land to be irrigated, giving acres-*!*
(I) If the water Is to be used for
power or for mining purposes, describe the place where the water is
to be returned to some natural channel, and the difference in altitude
between point of diversion and point
of return—Near mouth of Ain River
about 150 feet below point of diversion.
(j) Area of Crown land intended
to be occupied by the proposed
works— About 10 acres.
(k) This notice was posted on
the tenth day of June, 1911, and application will be made to the Commissioner on the fourth day of September, 1911.
(1) Give the names and addresses
of any riparian proprietors or licensees who or whose lands are
likely to be affected by the proposed
works, either above or below the
outlet—None.
(Signature)  ORLAND P. MERRILL,
(P. O. Address)   Masset, B. C.
George S. Mayer, Agent,
(P.  O.  Address)   Masset,  B.  C.
Note—One cubic foot per second
is equivalent to 35.71 miner's inches.
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that I, John Y.
Rochester, of Prince Rupert, occupation broker, intend to apply fir permission to lease the following described land:— Commencing at a
post planted on the northerly end of
an island In the Skeena River about
Mile 45 on the Grand Trunk Pacific
Railway; tlience north 1000 feet
more or less to low water mark;
thence westerly along the low water
mark 1000 feet more or less;
thence southerly 1000 feet more or
less; thence easterly 1000 feet to
the place of commencement.
J. Y. ROCHESTER.
Dated May 30, 1911. 6-2
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that T. M. Turner,
of Lakelse Valley, occupation farmer, Intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands: — Commencing at a post
planted on the Omineca & Hazelton
right of way and adjoining the N. E.
corner of Lot 518; thence west 17
cliains to corner of Lot 3996; thence
north 20 chains; thence following
right of way to point of commencement.
T. M. TURNER,
John Kirkaldy, Agent.
Dated 14th June, 1911. 7-4
Skeena    Land    Notice—District   of
Coast—Range V
TAKE NOTICE that Daniel W.
Beaton, of Prince Rupert, B. C, occupation carpenter, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about five miles
up the Exchumslk River from Its
mouth, and on its south bank; thence
east 40 chains; thence north 40
chains; thence west 40 chains;
thence south 40 chains to place of
commencement.
DANIEL  W.   BEATON.
Dated June 14,  1911. J-ll ^1^—
Friday, August 25, 1911.
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
HISTORY REPEATED
R. L. Borden's Campaign Opened at Historic Point With Respect to
Reciprocity.
Lender of Opposition Makes His Position Very Clear With Respect
to the Proposed Pact
By a curious coincidence, R. L.
Borden, leader of the Conservative
party, delivered his first campaign
address to an Ontario government
in opposition to the anti-British
policy of the Laurier government at
London, the city in which Sir Wilfrid Laurier made one of his earliest
and most fervid speeches in favor
of a mutual preferential trade within the British Empire. In those days
the premier was fighting Sir Charles
Tupper, and he announced with
many protestations of loyatty to the
Mother Country, that like his great
opponent he stood for the principle
of imperial preferential trade and
was capable of securing its adoption.
The gathering was a representative one, and was marked by a feeling of confidence in the leader and
his cause and an assurance of victory
on September 21. Liberals of this
city have so far searched mainly for
a candidate willing to en*ar the j
arena. Major McGattie, Mr. Gray,
who presided, and Hon. Wm. Beck,
chairman of the Hydro-Electric Power Commission of Ontario, all expressed admiration for Mr. Borden as
a man and as a leader, and their
concurrence inhls policy of pposi-
tion to the Taft-Fieldlng agreement.
Mr. Borden's address occupied an
hour and a half In delivery. It was
carefully prepared it reached the
points of eloquence and evoked frequent outbursts of cheers and applause. Mr. Borden opened by reference to the early closing of Parliament on July 29 while there were
serious charges pending against Hon.
Frank Oliver, and then turned to reciprocity.    He said in part:
"The prime minister has Issued a
manifesto to the people of Canada
which contains some remarkable and
unusual statements. He makes a
feeble attempt to misrepresent the
attitude of those who attacked this
agreement from a higher national
standpoint. In effect, he alleged that
they doubted the loyalty of the Canadian people. That loyalty Is not to
be doubted. It would be equally
undoubted If he proposed in plain
and unequivocal terms to vest the
complete and immediate control of
our tariff in the gonvernment and
Congress of the United States. That
course, however, could have but one
result, and he knows well what that
result would be; indeed, in 1891, he
was willing to concede that by breaking down the commercial barriers
between the two countries, the winning forces of, commerce and their
attractive institutions might make
the great continent of North America one nation. Did he then doubt
the loyalty of Canadian people?
"Why, after pursuing, some forty
years, a path which has led us toward so splendid a goal should the
government of Canada seek an agreement that brings.us to the parting
of the ways and that seeks to divert
us to an untrodden path, which may
have seemed attractive forty years
ago, but the dangers of which we
see today with clearer vision? Had
there been any mandate of this from
the people of Canada? There had
been none. Had there been any discussion of such qustions upon public
hustings? There had been none for
twenty years. Was there any apparent abatement of our progress, or
had we lost confidence In our ability
to develop resources of.our country,
and strengthen rather than weaken
our connection with the BrltlBh Empire? What Induced the government to abandon a path of prosperity and to seek a new and unknown path?
"Are they to be found in the cross-
examination of the prime minister in
1910 by the western farmers, upon
promises which he had made so lavishly In 1904 to slay protection and
to establish free trade as it is in
England? Are they to be found in
the desire of the prime minister to
create an issue that would submerge
and conceal that naval policy which
he found exceedingly distasteful to
the people?
Fielding's unfortunate admission
that Canada, although buying from
the United States more than double
the amount she sold to that country
and maintained customs tariff little
more than half that of the United
States, and imposing on United
States goods on an average rate of
duty less than that Imposed on Brit
ish goods, was nevertheless discriminating against the United  States?
"Those who advocate this compact, whether in the United States
or in Canada, look clearly forward to
a complete reversal of Canada's past
finance policy. This agreement is
said to be the thin edge of the wedge,
and there can be no doubt that this
is the aim and intention. Unrestricted continental free trade is the goal.
It is a remarkable coincident that in
the United States this agreement is
authoritatively regarded as the commencement of such relation, and that
the ultimate goal of unrestricted continental free trade is confidently predicted and anticipated. The American market was free to the Canadian producer under the agreement,
but in a more practical and important sense, it will not be open. That
market cannot be open to our producers, which is already overflowing.
"Prospects of a free Canadian market, open to this enterprising competition, may be alluring to the
prime minister, but hardly to the
farmers of Canada. Let It be remembered that those countries, although their shores lie distant across
the ocean, are at our very doors
from the standpoint of transportation. For the purposes of competition the shores of Argentina and
Denmark and ui Australia and New
Zealand, might as well asmost touch
the shores of Canada by reason ol
the relatively low cost of transportation."
Mr. Borden went on to speak
about President Taft's "parting of
the ways," asking If Sir Wilfrid
could tell what Mr. Taft had Un
mind. "Was the premier observant
of the way in which Canada had
hitherto proceeded and which has
brought our country to its pretent
status of power and influence within the Empire of which she forms
part and to which she is bound by
ties closer than he imagines. Had
the premier in consideration another
path which would merge our destiny in that of the United States and
which would make Canada first a
commercial and afterwards a political appanage of the great repblic.
If Mr. Taft had not this in mind
what are the two ways in which he
designated to the people of Canada
in these words of pregnant Import?
But that is not all. . The bond uniting the Dominion with the Mother
Country, said Mr. Taft, is light and
almost imperceptible. Consider these
two declarations together. Canada
stands at the parting of the ways
and the bond uniting her with the
Mother Country is light and almost
imperceptible. Is it a new way to
be provided along which we shall
proceed to the end that this light
and almost imperceptible bond shall
cease to exist?"
The Conservative platform is as
follows: ,
1. A thorough reorganization of
the method by which public expenditure is supervised. Increase in what
is known as ordinary controllable
expenditure from $21,500,000 in
1896 to nearly $74,000,000 in 1911
is proof of extravagance beyond any
possible  defence.
2. Granting of their natural resources to the prairie provinces.
3. Construction of the Hudson
Bay Railway and Its operation by
an independent commission.
4. Control and operation by the
state of terminal elevators.
5. Necessary encouragement for
the establishing and carrying on a
chilled meat industry.
6. Establishment of a permanent
tariff commission.
7. Granting of substantial assistance towards the improvement of our
public  highways.
8. Extension of free rural mail
delivery.
9. Extension of civil service reform.
10. Granting of liberal assistance
to the provinces for the purpose of
supplementing and extending the
work of agricultural education and
for the Improvement of agriculture.
11. A course of policy and administration which will maintain Independent and unimpaired control of
our own affairs by the Parliament
of Canada, a policy which, while
affording no just cause of complaint
to any foreign nation, will find its
highest ideal in the autonomous development of Canada as a nation
within  the  British  Empire.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty, days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on, and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the southeast corner of C.L. 4472; thence west 80
cliains; [hence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence south
80 chains to place of commencement.
AUSTIN M. BROWN.
Dated July 17, 191L	
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, Intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the southeast corner of C.L. 4472; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains;
tlience west 80 chains; thence south
80 chains to place of commencement.
AUSTIN M. BROWN.
Dated July  17, 1911.	
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the northeast corner
of C.L. 4471; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east
80 chains; thence north 80 chains to
1-lace of commencement.
AUSTIN M. BROWN.
Dated July 17, 1911.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
"AKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince n.upert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the northeast corner
of C.L. 4471; thence east 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence west
80 chains; thence north 80 chains,
to place of commencement.
AUSTIN M. BROWN.
Dated July 17, 1911.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the south corner of
C.L. 44(0; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south
80 chains; thence east 80 chains, to
place of commencement.
AUSTIN M.  BROWN.
Dated July 17, 1911.
,   Skeena Land District.—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that ehlrty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C., by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the southeast corner of C.L. 4470; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains: thence south
80 chains, to place of commencement.
AUSTIN M.  BROWN.
Dated July 17, 1911.
"I thought you said there were
fish around here," said the disappointed sportsman.
"There are," replied Farmer Corn-
tossel, "but they are experienced
fish. Moreover, they're kind and
considerate."
"I haven't had a nibble."
"Well, you don't think they'd bite
at that brand-new fancy tackle, do
you? They'd stand off and admire
it, but they'r never take a chance
on gettln' It mussed up."
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, ti. C, by occupation
sadler, Intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the northeast corner
of C.L. 4469; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east
80 chains; thence north 80 chains,
to place of  commencement.
AUSTIN M.  BROWN.
Dated July 17, 1911.
Skeena Land  District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE Hint thirty dayB
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, Intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the northeast corner
of C.L. 4469; thence east 80 chain.*;
thence south 80 chains; thence west
80 chains; thence north 80 chains to
place of commencement.
AUSTIN M. BROWN.
Dated July 17, 1911.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the southeast corner
of C.L. 4475; thence west 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence east
80 chains; thence south 80 chrins,
to place of commencement.
AUSTIN  M.  BROWN.
Dated July 17, 1911.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the south corner of
C.L.4475; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence south
80 chains; thence west 80 chains to
place of commencement.
AUSTIN M.  BRO.vN.
Dated July FT, 1911.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE   NOTICE   that  thirty   days
from date,  I, Austin  M.  Brown,  of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham    Island    described    as    follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile north of the northeast corner   of   C.L.   4477;   thence   west   80
chains;    thence   south    80    chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence north
0 chains, to place of commencement.
AUSTIN M. BROWN.
Dated July 17, 1911.	
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Henry Edenshaw, of
Masset, B. C, occupation storekeeper, intend to apply to the Chief Commissioner of Lands for a license to
prospect for coal and petroleum on
and under 640 acres of land on Graham Island described as follows:—
Commencing at a post planted on the
west shore of West River, one mile
easterly from the mouth of said river; thence south 80 chains; thence
east 80 chains; thence north 80
chains; thence west 80 chains to the
place of commencement.
HENRY EDENSHAW.
Dated July 17, 1911.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to tl*| Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the northeast corner
of C.L. 4474; thence east 80 chains;
thence soutli 80 chains; thence west
80 chains; thence north 80 chains, to
place of commencement.
AUSTIN M. BROWN.
Dated July 17^ 1911.	
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows*—Commencing at post planted
at the southeast corner of C.L. 4477;
thence east 80 chains; thence north
80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains, to place of
commencement.
AUSTIN M. BROWN.
Dated July 17, 1911.	
Skeena Land   District —District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Henry Edenshaw, of
Masse-1, B. C, by occupation storekeeper, intend to apply to th» Chief
Commissioner eel Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
draham Island described as f.illows:
—Commencing at a post planted on
the west shore of the West River,
about one mile easterly from the
mouth of said river; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south
80 chains, to place of commencement.
HENRY EDENSHAW.
Dated July 17, 1911.
Skeena   Land    District—District    of
Queen  Charlotte  Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Charles Lamb
of Blair, Nebraska, U. S. .v., occupation farmer, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 4 miles west and
4 1-2 miles north from the southwest corner of Lot 99i; thence south
80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
tlience north 80 chains; t .ence east
80 chains to point of commencement;
containing 640 acres.
CHARLES LAMB.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated July  16,  i911. A-15
Skeena   Land    District—District    of
Queen  Charlotte  Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Hattle Sutherland of Blair, Nebraska, U. S. A.,
occupation housewife Intends to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about 5
miles west and 2 1-2 miles north
from the Bouthwest corner of Lot
991; thence west 60 chains; tlience
north 80 chains; thence east 60
chains; thence south 80 chains, to
point of commencement; containing
about 480 acres.
HATT1E SUTHERLAND.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated July 16   1911. A-15
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE   NOTICE   that   Edward   H.
™fL0LFr^ EZe£\^ S^t I Commencing at a post planted about
&£?J£  £' £SfiL  «,tP1Swr 6 Niles west and 2  1-2 ""'es north
nprmlHRtnn   to   reeernnflsp   tho   rminw-1 _
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Abram Sutherland of Blair, Nebraska, U. S. A.,
occupation insurance agent, Intends
to apply for permission to purchase
the    following    described    lands:
permission to purchase the following described Iands:— Commencing
at a post planted in the South West
Corner, on the shore line of Lake
Lakelse; theuce 20 chains East, to
South West Corner of Lot 684;
thence 30 chains North, following
along the West line of Lot 684 to
post; thence South, following along
the shore line of said Lake to point
of commencement, containing about
40 acres.
EDWARD H. PORT,
By C. N.  Pring, Agent.
Dated Tune 26, 1911. 6-26
6-26
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, By occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
at the southeast corner of C.L.4478;
thence north 80 chains; inence east
80 chains; mence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains, to place of
commencement.
AUSTIN M. BROWN.
Dated July 17, 1911.	
Queen Charlotte Land District—-District of Skeena
TAKE NOTICE that S. Barclay
Martin, Jr., of New Westminster,
occupation enginee , Intends io apply for permission to purchase the
following describe'l lands:—Commencing at a pos planted at tbe
northeast corner of ungazetted lot
1428, said lot being T.L. 39979;
th ■ ce north and following the
westerly shore of Massett Inlet 80
chains; thenco .west 20 chains;
thence S'.iuth 80 chains' thence east
■10 chainp, more or less, to he point
of commencement, and containing
240 acres, more or less.
S. L'ARCLAY MARTIN, Jr.
Dated Ju'y  21,  1911. 8-8
from the southwest corner of Lot
991; thence east 80 chains; thence
rcrth SO cnains; thence west 80
cliains; thence south 80 chains, to
point of commencement; containing
640 acres.
\BRAM SUTHERLAND.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated July 16, 1911. A-15
Skeena   Land   district—District   of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Miriam Hal-
ler of Blair, Nebraska, U. S. A., occupation housewife, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted abort 5 miles
west and 1 1-2 miles north from
the southwest corner of Lot 991;
thence east 80 chains; thence north
80 cnains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains, to point of
commencement; containing 640
acres.
MIRIAM  HALLER.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated July  16,  1911. A-15
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, Intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
at the southeast corner of C.L. 4467;
thence north 80 chains; thence east
80 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains, to place of
commencement.
AUSTIN M. BROWN.
Dated July 17,  1911.	
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, Intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
at the southeast corner of C.L. 4465;
thence north 80 chains; thence east
80 chains; tlience south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains, to place of
commencement.    ,
AUSTIN M.  BROWN.
Dated July 16, 1911.	
Skeena Land  District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from dato, I, Henry Edenshaw, of
Masset, B. C, by occupation storekeeper, Intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for n license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on nnd under uiO acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:
Commencing at a post planted on the
bank of west River, about, one mile
easterly from the mouth of said river; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence no-th 80 chains, to
place of commencement.
HENRY EDENSHAW.
Dated July 17, 1911.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Henry Edenshaw, of
Masset, B. C, by occupation storekeeper, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum on
and under 640 acres of land on Graham Island described as follows: —
Commencing at a post planted on the
west shore of West River, about one
mile easterly from the mouth of said
river; thence north 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence south SO
chains; thence east 80 chains, to
place of commencement.
HENRY EDENSHAW.
Dated July  17,  1911.
Skeena   Land   District — District  of
Queen  Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that W. G. McMorris of the City of Vancouver in
the Province of B.Itlsh Columbia,
occupation, broKer, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at u post planted on an Island
in Sk'degate Inlet about 500 yards
east f**om the mouth of Slate Chuck
Creek, separated from the mainland
of Graham Island at high Mde;
then, e . iuth three chains; tlience
east ten chains; thence north three
chain*; taence west ten chains to
point of commencement, containing
two acres, more or less.
W. G. McMORRIS,
Datel  July   29,   1911.       Locator.
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that James Mullin
of Murdo, South Dakota, occupation
farmer, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 4 1-2 miles west
and 1 1-2 miles north from the southwest corner of Lot 991; tlience east
40 chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 40 chains; thence north
80 chains, to point of commencement; containing 320 acres.
JAMES   MULLIN.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated July  16,  1911. A-15
Skeena    Land    District—District    of
Queen  Charlotte Islands
TAKE NoTICE that Belle Lamb
of Blair, Nebraska, occupation housewife, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 4 miles west and
4 1-2 miles north from the southwest corner of Lot 991; tlience nortb
80 chains; tlience west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east
80 chains, to point of commencement;  containing 640  acres.
BELLE  LAMB.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated July  16,  1911. A-15
Skoena   Land   District—District   of
'7oast—Range  V.
TAKE    NOTICE that    I, Charles
Percy   Hickman,   of   Naas   Harbour,
occupation  constable,   intend  to  apply for permission to purchase the
following  described   lands:—  Commencing  at  a  post  planted  on   the
east shore of Naas Bay, about two
Skeena Land District—District of
of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE    that    James    G.
Crpmble, of Prince Rupert, occupation auditor, intends to    apply    for
permission to purchase the following
describe'I lands:- - Commencing ai a     ___        m
post planted at the northwest cor- j nTles'Tn* an" ea"s7e"rlv"di7ec1ion from
ner, 55 ehains east and 20 chains Lot 3, marked C. P. H., S. W. cor-
south from northeast corner of Lot ner; thence "nst 20 chains; thence
1116 (Horry Survey), Coast Dlst , „-jrth 40 chains to the shore; ihence
range    6;    thence 20    chains   east; laloug tiie shore line to the place of
thence 25 chains, more or less,
south o Angus McLeod Pre-emption; thence 20 chains west; thence
25 chains, more or less, north, to
post ol commencement, containing
50 acre", more or less.
JAMES  G.  CROMBIE.
Fred Dohlen, Agent.
Dated  June 14, 1911. 6-23
commencement, containing 40 acres,
more or less.
CHARLES  PRECY  HICKMAN.
Dated June  7,  1911. 6-30
Skeena
•nd   District—District
of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that Victor H.
Reynolds, ot Hull, Massachusetts, occupation chauffeur, Intends to apply
for permission  to purchase the fol-
Ske sna    Land    District—District   Of
Cob-'     Range  V. H	
TAKE NOTICE that I, Jo.-»ph i lowing described iand:—Commenc
Pastl, of Watson, Sask., occupation hng at a pos,>. planted at high water
farmei Intend to apply for permis-1 mark on thi northerly side of the
sion I purchase the following de- ;ntrance to a small unnamed cove on
scribed .ands:— Commencing at a the west coast of Pitt Island, about
post planted about 30 c.alns in a one-quarter mile south of the en-
northerly direction from the    N. B.Jtrance to Kitkatla summer village;
corner of Lot No. 2662 or T. L. No.
32598 at Lakelse Lake; thence north
20 chains; thence east 40 chains;
thence south 20 chains along shore
of Lnk-lse Lake;; thence west 40
chairs to point of commencement,
contain'ng 120 ncres, more or less.
' JOSEPH PASTL.
George Hir, Agent.
Dated May 5, 1911. 6-2
Prince Rupert   Private   Detective
Agency 	
N. McDonald, Mnnnger
All kinds of legitimate detective work
handled  for companies and  Individuals.    BuslnesB strictly confidential
P. O. Hox 893 — Phone 210
thence east forty chains: thence
sout'i 'v inty chains; Ihence west
forty .'rniis; thence north ten
chains more or less to high water
mark; tnence following along high
water mark around the head of the
cove back to tbe commencement, and
containing sixty  .'60)  acres more or
VICTOtfl-I. REYNOLDS.
J   H. Plllsbury, Agent.
Dated Feb. 18th, 1911.
LINDSAY'S CARTAGE ft STORAGE
G. T. P. CARTAGE AGENT8
Office at II. II. Rochester, Centre 8t
LADYSMITH  COAL
is handled by us.   All orders receive
prompt attention.   Phone No  68. PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Friday, August 25, 1911.
prince ISupert journal
Telephone   138
Published twice a week on Tuesdays and Fridays from the office of
publication, Third Avenue, near
McBride Street.
Subscription rate to any point in
Canada, $2.00 a year; to points outside of Canada, $3.00 a year.
Advertising rates furnished on
application.
O. H. NELSON,
Editor.
Friday, August 25, 1911.
THE COAL TRADE
The local Liberal organ has been
giving a great deal of attention to
the stimulating effect which reciprocity will have upon the coal trade
on the B. C. coast. The Vancouver
Island collieries are pictured as awakening to life in order to meet the
demand that is to be created. It
will be news to the i'oal mine owners
to learn that they have trouble in
finding a  market  at  present..
For years the best market that
the Vancouver collieries had for its
output was San Francisco. The superior quality of the coal of the province gave it first place in that market. The only shock it ever received
waft when oil was discovered in California and began to work changes
in fuel consumption.
In recent years, however, a local
demand has sprung up in the province and the coast collieries have not
needed to enter into very active competition with one another in order to
secure a market for their output.
I*. S. eonl has been brought in at
times but in spite of the price being
somewhat lower the quality of the
B. C. output has given it the advantage.
It is safe to say that the coal
mine owners are not concerning
themselves about the reciprocitj
agreement. Coke has not been made
to any great extent at the coast collieries because the market in the
more profitable commodity of coal
has been too good. Only at Comox
have coke ovens been opened and
then only to use what would otherwise have been waste. The ovens
there have never attempted to even
meet the local demand, let alone export coke. The picture of an immense impetus to the coal mining
industry as a result of the 5 cents
a ton reduction by the U. S. is good
enough for campaign literature but
it. will  lieu  work  out   in  practice.
allow that part of their output to
be shipped to Canadian points,
Surely some other argument In
favor of reciprocity can be found
than the one just put forward on
halibut that it is necessary to remove
the duty so that halibut caught in
Canadian waters—it is supposed to
be caught in the open sea and would
be if the Canadian government would
properly look after the protection of
the fishing banks—and cured In
Canadian ports shall be available for
anadian users without their having
to pay the duty after they have been
shipped   to  the  United   States.
Such a condition, if it exists, is
something altogether independent of
tariff laws. It is a comercial proposition that should be righted In
some other way than by removing
the duty. Even if the effects were
secured that Mr. Ross prophecises it
is not desirable that the Canadian
users of halibut should secure their
fish as he pictures them doing.
THE BYLAWS
A   CURE   ALL
The Victoria Times, reporting the
speech of Duncan Ross given in Victoria, has the following:
"Referring to the halibut Industry Mr. Ross told how the New Eng-
lanel Fisli Company now shipped halibut in bond to Boston and reshipped
it intei Canada, the people of Canada
paying a one cenl per pound duty
for the privilege of using their own
fisli coughl In their own waters. Last
year, saiel Mr. Ross, while Ihe fish
were taken from Canadian waters,
2,000,000 pounds of it were imported
from America. With the duty removed, he said, Canada would have
a  free  market,  for  its  own  fish  and
90,000,    of   American   people   to
sell  to."
Now great things have been promised by tbe Liberals for tbe reciprocity pact but it remains for Duncan
Ross to find the most original results with respect to its working on
the fishing trade.
According to this statement of Mr.
Ross tbe Canadian users of halibut
prefer to get their fish In the round
about way of allowing it to go to
New England states and then import
it from the United States, paying
the duty on It. To advocate reciprocity as ti cure for what Is poor
business enterprise Is surely a new
aspect of the I'ase.
The New England Fish Company
Is supposed to take part of their
catch In Canadian bottoms and thus
The city council is asking the electors to pass upon two bylaws a week
from tomorrow. The one ratifies
the agreement entered into with the
G. T. P. relative to taxation. The
other authorizes the expenditure of
a sum not exceeding $550,000 on a
hydro-electric system.
The G. T. P, agreement will appeal
to all as a proposition to be endorsed
by the property owners. It brings
to a conclusion a source of trouble
between the company and the city
that has had anything but a stimulating effect upon investments here.
This agreement was so good from
the city's standpoint that the provincial government as a one-quarter
owner In certain lands with the
G. T. P. hesitated about signing it. It
gives the city possession of many
valuable parcels of land in fee simple. These lands properly administered by the city will bring in many
thousands of dollars. There will be
benefits directly and indirectly from
the possession of these. The lands
,may be sold, thus producing revenue,
or in some instances they may be
used for public purposes, thus overcoming the necessity of purchasing
lands th'at might be required. . The
settlement with the G. T. P. is looked
upon generally as a wise act, and
tiiere is little question but what it
Weil   be   endorsed.
In the matter of the hydro-electric
scheme there can be no doubt that
teie city stands in need immediately
of an adequate water supply. A city
..niiout a plentiful supply of water
in these days Is seriously handicapped in the race. An early start ou
the bringing in of water from Wood-
worth Lake would be a double advantage to the city, inasmuch as it
would produce a pay roll which
would assist materially in a commercial  way  In  the place.
On the electrical end of the
scheme there has been some little
difference of opinion. Some citizens
....,e itit inclined to eliminate tnat
part of the bylaw relating to the
supply of electricity and allow a pri-
.iiee company to supply that branch
of the service.
lues branch oi the city supply is I
lather difficult for a layman to fully |
understand off-hand, dependence having to be placed upon experts for Information on the subject. It is pointed out that tliis win be a revenue
producer for tbe city and coming as
it does in conjunction with the water
supply the initial cost is reduced.       j
Mr. Brutinel's company, which
was at first strongly opposed to the '
scheme, is now prepared, according
to -Mr. Brutinel, to offer no opposition to the scheme, being ready to
provide the main supply of electricity
ve'.iLii a demand is created for it.
The city council has gone very
fully into the question with Mr,
Thomson of Seattle and before reaching a conclusion the ratepayers
woulel be ailing wisely to await the
presentation of the case by the council. Tills will be done, doubtless, In
a public way and the voters will be
In a position to weigh tiie matter
anil   decide  intelligently.     If  at   all
**************************
| 75 x 100 Feet j
* ASK.    For Lease on Third I
* UNCLE      Avenue at Ninth      f
| JERRY Street |
t JEREMIAH H. KUGLER, LTD. *
vvv->*jv->^*;«>*>*:'^,>-i'C«-;»:«'j<j'<''';<.:..:«:-i:
> «fr ♦ *■> ♦>♦> ♦*-*> *-> *5» ♦♦♦♦♦♦ ♦♦-!»■♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦
FOR RENT
*
*
*
Second  *
Street.  *
* Store     building     on
* Avenue    at    Seventh
* Low   Rent. |
1 JEREMIAH H. KUGLER, LTD. |
* *
**************************
favorable, the proposition should receive the hearty endorsation of the
people, and as early a start as possible should be made. An adequate
supply of water is needed her at
once and a cheaper supply of electee Ity than is afforded by a steam
plant.
THOSE LIBERAL DISSENTERS
We do not find much force in the
plea of the Victoria Times and some
other government organs, that the
eighteen Liberal business men of Ontario who make protest against reciprocity "represent the interests."
Every person represents some interest, and those for which these Liberals speak are necessary to the country. Sir Wilfrid Laurier and Mr,
Templeman also represent an interest. Theirs a political and official
interest, which is no more unselfish,
and certainly no closer to the great
body of the people than those to
wliich the eighteen belong.
Sir Edward Walker and Mr. Som-
ers are presidents of banks, and
others of these eighteen are bankers. But do not the banks desire
the prosperity of the country? They
suffer from the depression; they
gain by the expansion of business.
Increased production and better
prices are good  for the banks.
John L. Blakie, E. D. Wood, W. T.
White and others are concerned in
land, loan and trust companies. They
are interested in the development of
the country, the prosperity of the
farmers and the general welfare. W.
D. Matthews is a grain dealer and a
director of the Canadian Pacific. In
both capacities he is deeply interested in the progress of the Dominion and especialy of the west.
W. K. George, R. S. Gourley and
R. .1. Christie are manufacturers,
carrying on large industries of different kinds. The duty on their
products is not seriously afected by
the treaty; but they are afected in
and concerned for the common good
as all producers must be in the nature of the case. Hugh Blain, James
II. Allen, and John C. Eaton of T.
Eaton & Co., are wholesale and retail traders. Whatever benefits the
purchasers and consumers helps
them. If reciprocity were good tor
the mass of the Canadian people it
would be good for the dealers. Mr.
Somervllle and Mr. Goldman are
managers of insurance companies,
They desire good times as much as
the politicians. We may say the
same for the president, and vice
president, and ex-president of the
Toronto Board of Trade.
Why should the reciprocity makers cast slurs on banks, the loan
and land companies, the railways, the
insurance interests, the manufacturers, the commercial men and the
boards of trade? Don't we want
these activities among us? Don't we
want more manufacturers, more investors, more traders? Is it not the
desire of the citizens that Vancouver
and Victoria should be greater Industrial, commercial, financial and
transportation centres? Why then
should we slur these activities as if
they were outlaws, unworthy of confidence and regard, or treat them as
hostile interests proper to be sup-
pressed?
It seems to this journal that if the
bankers, the manufacturers, railway
people, ihe investing companies, the
*****************
Remember
That we
Import
Our Wines
direct from Europe; and that
no house in Prince Rupert can
equal them for quality. No
better can be bought anywhere
in the Province. We make a
specialty  of
Family Trade
and guarantee satisfaction
We  also  carry  a   complete *
*
stock of other *
' *
*
Liquors       I
Try a glass of
Cascade
Beer
*       The best local  beer on  the *
X   market. t
"fe V
! CLARKE BROS.I
* *
*. *
* Christiansen & Brandt Bid.       .;.
* *
* *
* Telephone 30       Third Avenue  *
* *
* *
* *
* *
* *
K* * * * * * * * •»' * * * * * * *»• *»* * ••* *e* *•* * ***
wholesale and retail traders are so
strongly opposed to a public proposition that they desert their party in
order to oppose it, that proposition
is more likely to be dangerous than
beneficial.—News-Advertiser.
British National Debt
A graphic history of the British
debt for the last 120 years, which
shows at a glance both the course
of the debt and the price of consols,
has been compiled by the Statist,
London. The diagram shows that In
1792 the debt of Great Britain was
about 260,000,000 poundb, and in
1815 was within a few thousand of
895,000,000 pounds. The rate at
wliich the debt was repaid was very
slow for the next forty years, owing
in part to the heaviness of the interest charged. In 1853 the debt was
790,000,000 pounds, a reduction of
only 105,000,000 pounds in thirty-
eight years, or an average of less
than 2,80 000 pounds a year. In
1856 the debt was raised to 821,-
000,000 pounds, and between 1863
and 1898 the debt was reduced from
rather less than $21,000,000 pounds
to 635,000,000 pounds, a total of
175,000,000 pounds in thirty-five
years, an average of about 6,000,000
pounds a year. The loans raised In
connection with the Boer War and
for military and naval works then
Increased the debt by 163,000,000
pounds to 798,000,000 pounds. For
two or tliree years after the close of
The British Columbia Company
LIMITED.
AUTHORIZED CAPITAL $100,000.::  PAID UP CAPITA1 $41,500
DIRECTORS:—Reginald C. Brown, President; J. C. Maclure, Vice-
President; H. E. Marks, Managln g Director; Capt. E. Nash, William
McNalr, R. A. Bevan, and P. C.   Williams, Secretary.      :-:      :-:
INTEREST 4 PER CENT. DEPOSITS
This Company acts ai Executors, Administrators, Transferees and
Secretaries to Public Companies.   Commercial, Industrial and other
business propositions underwritten.    Issues made  on  the
London and New York Stock Exchanges.
TIMBER, COAL, LANDS, and
COMPANY ORGANIZATION
Head Office for Canada, 208, 208, 210, 21S Carter-Cotton Building,
VANCOUVER, B.C.
*
DURESCO
The King of Water Paints
FIRST IN THE FIELD:
FOREMOST EVER SINGE
-SOLE AGENTS IN WESTERN CANADA:
The Staneland Co. Ltd
836-840 Fort Street, VICTORIA, B.C.
-i
Replenish
the
«J
Pantry
High-Class....
Grocery
Stock
to choose from
K\ ERYTH1NG CLEAN AND FRESH
Goods for the Table to Suit the Most
Fastidious  Housewife
S MERRYFIELD'S !
j       CASH GROCERY       S
L...—............J
the Boer War very little debt was
redeemed, but in six years, from
190.r> to 1911, the amount was reduced from 796,736,000 to 733,072,-
000 pounds, or by less than 63,662,-
000, an average of 10,610,000 pounds
a year. If the recent rale of redemption Is maintained, the British
nation will bring back Its debt to
the figure at which It stood prior
to the Roer War In nnotber nine
years.
"Is  Mr.  Macpherson  likely  to be
fishing tomorrow?"
■ "I hae ma doots."
"How Is that? Is he away from
home?"
"I dlnna ken whaur he is."
"Not ill, Is he?"
"I  hae not heard."
"Then what makes you think he
won't  be ftshlng?"
"1 dldna say he wouldna be fishing. I said I hae ma doots. He's
dead nigh on a year."
2nd Avenue
Prince  Rupert,
B.C.
Real
Estate
INVESTMENTS
Real
Estate
List Your
Properties
with
Uncle Jerry
JEREMIAH H. KUGLER
He Sells Buildings He Sells Contracts
He has Houses to Rent
He Buys Lots He Builds Homes
He Buys Leases He Loans Money
He Has Farms for Sale
He Sells Houses He Rents Stores
JEREMIAH H. KUGLER   -
Special Bargains in
KITSELAS LANDS
FRANCOIS LAKE LANDS
LAKELSE LANDS
HAZELTON  DISTRICT  LANDS
BULKLEY VALLEY LANDS
KISPIOX VALLEY LANDS
PORCHER  ISLAND LANDS
KITSUMKALUM   LANDS
SAND,   GRAVEL   AND   MARBLE   DEPOSITS Friday, August 25, 1911.
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
By-Law
BYLAW OF THK CITY OF PRINCE RUPERT TO PROVIDE FOR THE
CONSTRUCTION OF A HYDRO-E LECTR1C SYSTEM TO SUPPLY THE
CITY OF PRINCE RUPERT WITH WATER, ELECTRIC LIGHT AND
POWER AND TO CREATE AND SECURE A DEBT FOR THE
PURPOSE OF CONSTRUCTING THE SAID SYSTEM AMOUNTING
TO $550,000.00.
WHEREAS, by the Municipal Clauses Act and Amending Acts, the
City of Prince Rupert is authorized to construct, operate and maintain
works for supplying for any or all purposes, water, water power, electric
light, and electric power to the inhabitants of the said city and localities
adjacent thereto, and for regulating rates, conditions, and terms under
which such works are to be completed and used.
AND, WHEREAS, it has been considered expedient for the City of
Prince Rupert to construct and maintain works to obtain a permanent
supply of water for the use of the inliabitants of the said city, and any
persons, who may be adjacent to the pipe lines, constructed hereunder,
such water to be used for all purposes for which the said City may legally
supply water, such works to be so constructed as to furnish electric power
to be used by the said City for all purposes for which the said City is
authorized by statute to apply the same.
AND, WHEREAS, the water from Woodworth Lake, situated on the
Tsimpsean Peninsula, can be utilized for the purpose of obtaining a good
and sufficient supply of water for the said City, and also for the purpose
of supplying electric power for the use of the said City.
AND, WHEREAS, instead of constructing two separate systems, one
for the supply of water, and the other for producing electric power, the
Council have concluded that a combination of the two systems ill one
will be much more economical and equally as efficient.
AND, WHEREAS, in order to effect such a combination, it will be
necessary to install mains from the point of diversion to the point, where
the power plant is to be constructed, of sufficient diameter to carry water
for both purposes, which will be much more than would be required for
either the water supply or the electric system alone.
AND, WHEREAS, Considering the above recited facts, the Council
have determined to treat the whole scheme ns a joint undertaking and to
provide for the construction of the same ns such.
AND, WHEREAS, the general description of the proposed Hydro-
Electric System is as follows:—
A dam to be erected at a suitable point near the outlet of Woodwortli
Lake; from Hint point the water to be piped down to a point at or near
the head of Shawatlans Lake, the said pipe to be of a capacity large enough
to carry sufficient water for the supply of the City of Prince Rupert, and
also to operate at or near the head of Shawatlans Lake, a plant for the
purpose of generating electricity; and after leaving the head of Shawatlans
Lake the water will be piped into the City of Prince Rupert, and there
be distributed by a proper distribution system, and the electric power
will be brought into the said City by transmission lines from the head
of Shawatlans Lake.
AND, WHEREAS, the amount of the debt necessary to be incurred
by the City of Prince Rupert for the construction of the said Hydro-Electric
Plant, and the necessary distribution system connected therewith, is the
sum of $550,000.00.
AND, WHEREAS, the total amount which will have to lie raised
annually for the purpose of paying tlie s aid debt and interest will be
S28, 048.54.
AND, WHEREAS, the said Hydro-Electric System cannot be completed
before the first day of Septembei A. D. 1012, and, therefore, the amount
of rates, charges, and rentals for the use of water or electric power will
during this present year be nil.
AND, WHEREAS, no money is already charged against the rentals,
rates or charges to be derived from the said Hydro-Electric System.
AXI), WHEREAS, the estimated amount of rentals, rates, and charges
that will be derived from the said Hydro-Electric System after the same
is completed is the sum of $72,500.00.
AXI), WHEREAS, the sum necessary for the payment of interest
during the currency of the debentures to be issued hereunder is $24,750.00
per annum.
AND, WHEREAS, Hie sum to be set aside annually lo discharge the
debt, authorized to be created by Ihis bylaw, is the sum of $4,108.54 per
annum, and it is proposed to set aside such annual sum by depositing the
same annually nt interest in a chartered bank or trust company in Canada
or by the purchase of the debentures of the said City at a price not above
par or by both such modes of Investment, or by investing the same in any
manner which a  Municipal corporation may legally adopt.
AXI). WHEREAS, the amount to lie raised annually for the payment
or the said debt is arrived at by estimating the interest to bo derived from
tlhe .annual investment of such sum at the rate of three and a half per
cent (:tJa % ) per annum.
AXI), WHEREAS, the total amount of rateable land and Improvements
in the City of Prime Rupert, according lo the last revised assessment roll
is as follows:—
Land, $12,22:1,041.00; Improvements, $407,005.
AND, WHEREAS, it is estimated lhat after the said Hydro-Electric
System is completed, the rentals, rates, and charges to be collected therefrom will be sufficient to pay the annual amounts required to pay the**!
interest and sinking fund required to be raised under this Bylaw, and that
there will be no deficiency to be made up under the guarantee to lie given
by the City ns hereinafter provided.
AND, WHEREAS, the City intends to issue debentures for the amount
of the said debt, being $550,000, by the sale of which to realize the moneys
necessary foi* tlie suid purposes, the said debentures to extent for a period
of fifty (50) years and to be secured upon the rentals, rates, and charges
to be derived from the said Hydro-Electric System for the supply of water
and electric light and power, and also to be secured by the guarantee of
the Olty at large.
AND, WHEREAS, tlds Bylaw cannot be altered save with the consent
of the Lieutenant-Governor In Council.
Xl)W, THEREFORE, the Municipal Council of Ihe City of Prime
Rupert enacts as follows:—
1. This Bylaw shall take effect on the 18th day of September, A. I).
11)11.
2. So soon as conveniently may be after Ihe coming into force of this
Bylaw, the Corporation of the City of Prince Rupert shall construct the
works mentioned in the recitals hereinbefore contained nccardlng lo
plans and specifications to be prepared, and signed by the City Engineer,
and approved by Hie Municipal Council of the City of Prince Rupert, under
the seal of Ihe said City, aud duly filed with the Clerk of the City; which
plans may be from lime to time altered and amended' or added to during
the construction of the said work, if the Municipal Council shall see fit;
in any of which cases, plans of such alterations, amendments, or additions
shall be approved, signed, sealed and filed as above provided for the
original plans, the intent of this Bylaw being that the City in constructing
the work hereby authorized shall have full authority to do everything to
make the said Hydro-Electric System complete in every particular and
detail.
3. For the purpose of paying for the construction of the works hereby
authorized, the City of Prince Rupert is hereby empowered to create a debt
of 9550,000.00, which debt shall be payable in fifty (50) years from Hie
date when this Bylaw comes In force; namely, the 12th day of September,
A. D. 1011, for which debt debentures shall be Issued to be secured in
manner hereinafter appearing.
4. The sum of $24,750.00 is necessary for tho payment of interest
each year during the currency of said debentures, and the sum of $4,108.54
is necessary to be set aside annually during the currency of the said de
bentures for the purpose of forming a sinking fund, with which to pay Hie
said debt and debentures at maturity, the said sum of $4,108.54 to be raised
annually as a sinking fund, being such that together with the profits
accrued from the investment thereof at the interest rate of three and a
half (3)s>) per cent per annum, during the currency of suid debentures,
will be sufficient to discharge the said debt when due.
5. The said sum of $24,750.00 Is necessary for the payment of interest
during the currency of tbe debentures, and Hie sum of $4,108.54 necessary
to be raised annually as a sinking fund shall be raised as follows:—From
the annual rates accruing from the Hydro-Electric System und estimated
at $72,500.00 shall be withdrawn and set apart from Hie general revenue
of the City, the sum of $28,048.54, and the said sum shall be placed in a
separate account by the City Treasurer, known as the "Hydro-Electric
System Account," and iu case the annual receipts from said charges shall
be less than tiie said sum of $28,048.54 the difference shall be raised and
levied in each year, during the said period of fifty (50) years, and currency
of the debentures by special rate sufficient therefor on all the rateable land
in the City of Prince Rupert, and shall be collected by tlie said City as
municipal taxes, and placed in the said "Hydro-Electric System Account."
0. The said sum of $4,108.54, to be raised annually as sinking fund,
shall be invested annually by the City Treasurer upon the recommendation
(Continued on Page Seven)
YOU ARE SURE OF
Engine Reliability
IF  YOU  RUN  A
Fairbanks - Norse Marine Engine
OVER 125,000 IN USE THROUGHOUT THE WORLD
TWO
CYCLE
FOUR
CYCLE
if
WML
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HEAVY
DUTY
MEDIUM
DUTY
■
Runabout
Type
MOST  COMPLETE  LINE OF GASOLINE ENGINES IN
THE WORLD
Write for Catalog P10
The Canadian Fairbanks Co., Ltd.
101-107 WATER STREET
Local Agent—F. M. DAVIS
VANCOUVER, B. C.
- PRINCE RUPERT
THE CONTINENTAL TRUST COMPANY, LIMITED
Authorized Capital     $500,000
Officers:
WILLIAM T. KERGIN, M. D., Pres. DAVID   H.   HAYS,  First Vice-Pres.
M. J. HOBIN, 2nd Vice-Pres. & Mgr. JAY   KUGLER,   Secretary-Treasurer
C.  B. PETERSON,  Ass't Manager
Executor and Administrator Receiver or Assignee
Fiscal Agents Trustees-
Real Estate and Insurance
Registrar and Transfer Agent Farm Iia,,ds and M,nes
Agent for Care of Real Estate Escrow Agents
Trustee Under Mortgages and Deeds of Trust Collections
SAVINGS DEPARTMENT
4 per cent on Deposits        SAFE DEPOSIT VAULT AND BOXES
We will be pleased to answer any inquiries regarding investments in
Prince Rupert and Northern British Columbia.
THE CONTINENTAL TRUST COMPANY, LIMITED
SECOND AVENUE
PRINCE  RUPERT,   B.   C.
IN THE COUNTY COURT OP ATLIN
HOLDEN AT PRINCE RUPERT
111 the matter of "Official Administrators  Act"
And
In the matter o'f the estate of Patrick
Kennedy deceased intestate.
TAKE NOTICE that by order of
His Honor Judge Young, made the
17th day of June 1911, I was appointed administrator of the estate
of the said Patrick Kennedy, deceased, and all parties having claims
against the said estate are hereby
required to forward same properly
verified to me on or before the 4th
day of September, 1911; and all
parties indebted to the said estate
are required to pay the amount of
their indebtedness to me forthwith.
Dated August IS, 1911.
J. A. FRASER,
Official Administrator.
Atlin, B. C.
IN THE COUNTY COURT OF ATLIN
HOLDEN AT PRINCE RUPERT
In   the  matter   of   the   "Official   Administrator's Act"
And
In the matter of the estate of George
McLeod deceased  intestate.
TAKE NOTICE that by order of
His Honor Judge Young, made the
28th day of July, 1911, I was appointed administrator of the estate
of the said George McLeod deceased,
and all parties having claims against
the said estate are hereby required
to forward same properly verified to
me on or before the 4 th day of September, 1911; and all-parties Indebted to the said estate are required to
pay the amount of their Indebtedness
to me forthwith.
Dated August 18, 1911.
JOHN H. McMULLIN,
Official Administrator.
Prince Rupert, B. C.
IX THK COUNTY COURT OF ATLIN
HOLDEN AT PRINCE RUPERT
In   the  matter  of   the   "Official   Ael-
inlnlstrator's Act"
And
In the matter of the estate of John
Bowman deceased intestate.
TAKE NOTICE that by order of
His Honor Judge Young, made the
16th day of June, 1911, I was appointed administrator of the estate
of the said John Bowman deceased,
and all parties having claims against
the said estate are hereby required
to forward same properly verified to
me on or before the 4 th day of September, 1911; and all parties indebted to the said estate are required to
pay the amount of their indebtedness to me forthwith.
Dated August 18, 1911.
JOHN   H.   McMULLIN,
Official  Administrator.
Prince Rupert, B. C,
IN    THE    SUPREME    COURT    OF
BRITISH  COLUMBIA
In  the matter  of the  "Official Administrator's Act"
And
In   the   matter   of   the    estate   of
Thomas  Smith deceased  intestate.
TAKE  NOTICE  that  by  order  of
His  Honor   Judge  Lampman,   made
the 10th day of August, 1911, I was
appointed administrator of the estate
of the said Thomas Smith deceased,
and all parties having claims against
the said  estate are hereby required
to forward same properly verified to
me on or before the 4th day of September, 1911; and ah parties indebt-'
ed to the said estate are required to
pay the amount of their indebtedness
to me forthwith.
Dated August IS, 1911,
JOHN II. McMULLIN,
Official Administrator.
Prince Rupert, B. C.
VT8S8&
Double Weekly Service
S.S. PRINCE RUPERT & S.S. PRINCE GEORGE
Sail for Vancouver, Victoria and Seattle
Mondays anil Fridays at 8 a.m.
For STEWART Thursdays and Sundays 8 a.m.
Special reduced fare Sunday's bom J9.50
return,   Including   meals   und   berths.
S.S. PRINCE JOHN for Port Simpson, Naas River, Mnsset and
Naden Harbor, Wednesdays, 1 P.M., and for Queen Charlotte
Island points, Saturdays, 1 P. M.
RAILWAY SERVICE TO COPPER RIVER, mixed trains from
Prince Rupert Wednesdays and Saturdays, 1 P.M.; returning   Thursdays   and   Sundays,  5:20 P.M.
THE GRAND TRUNK RAILWAY SYSTEM, connecting with
trains from the Pacific Coast, operates a frequent and convenient
service of luxurious trains over 4ts DOUBLE TRACK route between
Chicago, Toronto, Montreal, Quebec, Halifax, Portland, Boston,
New York and Philadelphia.
Atlantic Steamship bookings  arranged via all lines
Full information and tickets obtained from the office of
A. E. McMASTER
Freight and Pasenger Agent, G.  T.  P.   Wharf.
sjsjjsjHHHSjsjojsjHnniiBaaBI
;•*♦*******•:
*********
STORAGE
Household Goods and Baggage e
given careful attention.
Forwarding,   Distrinuting   and  .
Shipping Agents
TRANSFERERS
Prince     Rupert     Warehousing
and   Forwarding   Co.
First   Ave.,   near   McBride   St.
DOUGLAS SUTHERLAND,
Manager.
P. O. Box 007 Phone 202
GRAND HOTEL
WORKINGMAN'S HOME
25c
Rooms 50 Cents
Spring Beds, Clean
White Sheets
Excursions!
Let us tell you all about the cheap
ROUND TRIP EXCURSIONS
to all Towns and  Cities  in  Eastern
Canada  and  United  States
Via
The Great Northern
Choice of Return  Route
Tickets to the Old Country by all
Lines. Take any Steamer from
Prince Rupert.
ROGERS STEAMSHIP AGENCY'
Phone 110 Second Ave
Prince Rupert, B.C.
Best In Town for the Money
FIRST AVE. AND SEVENTH ST.
J. Goodman, Proprietor
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY CO.
IS. C. Coast S. S. Service
A
TO  WATER TAKERS
On account of scarcity of water
the supply will be cut off between
the hours of 9 p. in. and u a. m.
during the dry weather.
WM.   MAHLON   DAVIS,
tf Supt.  of Water Works.
<i ee
The Thompson
: Hardware Co.
—Second Avenue—
e >   Paints. General Hardware,
Oils, Stoves and Ranges.
TENDERS WANTED
Sealed tenders will be received by
the Building Committee of tne Methodist Church of Prince Rupert, B. C,
until 1 2 o'clock noon, Annus! UHml.
1911, for the erection and completion of a Church building, to be
erected on Sixth Avenue, in the City
of Prince Rupert, B. C, according
to plans and specifications prepared
by G. L. Proctor, architect, Prince
Itupert. A certified check, equal to
ten (10) per centum of the amount
of the tender drawn In favor of the
Treasurer or Trustee Board, which
will be forfeited if the party tendering declines to enter Into a contract
when called upon to do so; or If he
or his heirs or executors fall to complete the contract. The lowest or
any other tender not necessarily
accepted.
Plans and specifications may be
seen at tlie office eel P, McLaughlin,
Third Avenue, after noon, Tuesday,
August 16th, 1911,
Famous
Princess
Line
Princess Royal
Monday, Aug. 28,  9  a. m.
SOUTHBOUND FOR
Vancouver, Victoria,
AND
Seattle
J. G. McNAB,
General  Agent
Free Employment
Office
j      GROUND
•T
t
|   Floor Space For Rent
IN THE
HARTBUILDING
Corner of Second Avenue and Sixth Street
The Best    usiness Corner in
Prince Rupert
For all kinds of help. Cooks, waiters, dishwashers, hotel porters, all
kinds of laborers or niochnnica, call
up   178  or call  at  tbe
FREE EMPLOYMENT OFFICE
GRAND HOTEL
•>   Headquarters for Cooks and Waiter*
I   ROGERS & BLACK
" Wholesale Dealers in
* BUILDING  MATERIAL,    CEMENT,
I       LIME,  HAIR-FIBRE PLASTER
* COKE,  BLACKSMITH COAL,
;*;   COMMON BRICK, PRESSED BRICK
| SHINGLES AND LATH
% NEW   WELLINGTON   COAL
£ ! All   ordets   promptly   filled—see   us
* ; for  prices.
* PHONE 110 PHONE 118
| Jermiah H. Kugler, Ltd. I
* •:•
*****************************************************
r
\
For Neat Job Printing
see the Journal Man
Tel. 138
y
J PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Friday, August 25, 1911.
Q
^-#-***-$*$***^-#*#**#*-**#****
X      The Past of Reciprocity      %
* *
**************************
There is enough truth in the statement that the Conservatives and
their greatest leader were always in
favor of reciprocity to make It a
handy plea for one class of government orators, says the News-Advertiser. There is more than enough
falsehood in the claim to make it
useless as an appeal to intelligent
and practical people. Reciprocity
was last an issue in Canada in 1891,
Sir John A. Macdonald's final contest, or as he himself declared In
the closing words of his campaign
address:
"My last effort for the unity of
the Empire and the preservation of
our commercial and political freedom."
Speaking of the reciprocity platform of the party then led by Sir
Wilfrid Laurier, Sir John said in that
last address of his:
"It would , in my opinion, inevitably result in the annexation of this
Dominion to the United States. The
advocates of unrestricted reciprocity
on this side of the line deny that
it would have such an effect, though
its friends in the United States urge,
as the chief reason for adoption, that
unrestricted reciprocity would be the
first step in the direction of political
union.  .   .   .
"I command these issues to your
determination and to the judgment
of the whole people of Canada with
an unclouded confidence that you
will proclaim to the world your resolve to show yourselves not unworthy of the proud distinction that
you enjoy—of being numbered
among the most dutiful and loyal
subjects of our beloved queen. A
British subject I was born—a Britisii
subject I will die. With my utmost
effort, with my latest breath, will
I oppose this veiled treason, which
attempts, by sordid means and mercenary proffers, to lure our people
from   their  allegiance."
It will be admitted that the writer
of these words was not in agreement
with Sir Wilfrid's reciprocity programme of that day. But It is alleged
that he favored some form of limited
reciprocty. In fact, the party had
left for years on the statute book,
a vague offer of reciprocal exchange
and was constantly accused by opponents of refusing to give effect to
it when opportunity arrived. Conservatives do not deny that the party
has changed its attitude toward reciprocity. The Liberal admits that it
also has changed.
Forty years ago both parties in
Canada desired reciprocity. Possibly
both would have accepted the unrestricted article. Twenty years ago
the official Liberal leaders, but not
their whole party, had advocated
commercial union, and were promoting unrestricted reciprocity. They
and their programme were con.
demned by the Conservatives in the
language quoted above, and the
policy denounced in equally strong
language by Mr. Blake and other
loyal Liberal revolters. Conservatives had not yet abandoned all idea
of reciprocity, though their fiscal
policy led in the opposite direction.
Another twenty years finds the
Laurier government openly refusing
even to consider President Taft's
offer of unrestricted reciprocity, but
accepting the reciprocity treaty now
before the country. We find the
Conservatives, by a corresponding
national and imperial advance, rejecting reciprocity trade entanglements with \he United States. Their
attitude is such as Sir Wilfrid Laurier four years ago in London attributed to the Canadian people generally. The premier told the Imperial Conference in 1907 that there
was a time when the people of Canada wanted reciprocity. This was
true. He added the statement that
we had said good-bye to that trade
and put our hopes on Britisii trade.
This also was true. The Conserva-
' tlve party stands by the declaration
while Sir Wilfrid nnd his colleagues
are trying in vain to turn the people
back toward the old attitude.
We see that unrestricted reciprocity is at least temporarily abandoned by everybody, and that all
kinds of reciprocity ties are con-
demned by a large body—we believe
by a large majority of the Canadian
people. There are good reasons for
this development. In forty years we
have come Into possession of our
country. We have our own transcontinental highways. We have established a national policy and attained industrial independence. We
have found the prairie country, attracted vast immigration, obtained
a Britisii market exceeding our wildest dreams, established magnificent
direct, steamship services with Europe and Asia, formed commercial
alliances within the Empire, watched
the development of the Imperial
trade idea in Great Britain, witnessed the creation of two other British
confederations   like   our   own.     We
have heard the United States people
lament the devastation of their natural wealth, and now understand the
necessity of preserving the Canadian
natural resources and raw materials,
which once we were agreed in begging our neighbors to take from us
on their own terms. Moreover, we
have found that any advantages
which reciprocity would give are
open to us without it, and that the
things which we formerly were too
anxious to seel the United States
they are now still more anxious to
obtain.
It is not particularly the Canadian
Conservatives who have changed. As
Sir Wilfrid told the conference, the
Canadian conditions have changed
and so have the desires of the people. United States conditions and
people have changed. The British
Empire and the Dominions within
it have changed. For Canada to go
back on reciprocity would be like
England going back to the Heptarchy.
Had Canada obtained reciprocity
forty years ago we should never have
had the national policy, or our own
Pacitic railways, or the industrial
and comemrcial development which
we have seen. Had Canada en-tj
dorsed unrestricted reciprocity In
in 1891 we should never have had
a British preference or built up the
existing British trade. In either case
Canada would today have been a
tributary and subsidiary organization, under foreign control commercially, industrially, financially and in
consequence politically. We have
been delivered from all this and happily guided in another direction. It
would be an unpardonable offence
against the Dominion and the Empire to turn back and destroy all
that has been accomplished.
 o	
* * * * ** * * •»**»* ** ** * *****\* ** ***'
I   LAST CHIEF FACTOR   f
* *
**************************
With the retirement from the service of the Hudson's Bay Company
of Archibald McDonald, chief factor
at Fort Qu'Appelle, there disappears
the last officer of the old company
to bear the title with which readers
of books of northern travel and of
northwest history are so familiar.
As for many years there have been
no resident commissioners of the
Hudson's Bay Company, so, in ful-
ture, there will be no chief factors.
They will be known in future as
managers or agents. Mr. McDonald
is a veritable pioneer among pioneers. He is believed to have lived
longer in the region which is now
known as the Province of Saskatchewan than any other white man now
living, and as such was accorded special honor at the inauguration of the,
new province. He is also the oldest
member of the Manitoba Club, Winnipeg, having joined it in 1874, the
year of its formation. Mr. McDonald
Is a native of Inverness, Scotland,
and came to Canada by way of Hudson Bay fifty-seven years ago. He
was on the site of what is now the
city of Winnipeg in the winter of
1854, and before the beginning of
the "sixties" had travelled all over
the trade routes in the far west.
Before 1870 he made thirteen trips
with York boats from Lake Winnipeg
to York Factory on Hudson Bay,
taking down furs for export to England and carrying back supplies for
the posts along the Saskatchewan
and in the Red River Valley. When
Wolseley's expedition went out to
the Red River settlement in 1870,
to put down the first Riel uprising,
Mr. McDona.-. was already considered an "old-timer," and his services
in keeping the Indian tribes in the
Qu'Appelle Valley quiet were acknowledged.
When General Middleton, in 1885,
organized at Qu'Appelle the little
force with which h3 smashed Riel's
last rebellion he naturally depended
much for advice upon the old chief
factor at the H. B. C. fort, and the
veteran s advice was sound. Mr. McDonald has always exercised great
influence over the Indians, to such
an extent, In fact, that Lord Strathcona is credited with having remarked that Mr. .McDonald's presence at
Qu'Appelle was worth 1,000 additional men In the field. Mr. McDonald was present at Fort Qu'Appelle In 1874, when Treaty Number
One was negotiated with the Indians.
This was the first of the Canadian
treaties with the natives of the northwest, and considerable diplomacy
was necessary to obtain the consent
of the Indians, for the Dominion government was an unknown institution
to them, and the treatment meted out
to their brothers in the United States
made them suspicious of everybody,
but the British government and the
H. B. C. They were assembled at
Fort Qu'Appelle to discuss this treaty
no less than 5,000 Indians, and the
Canadian commissions were Lieuten-
int Governor Morris of Manitoba
and the Hon. Dave Laird, after,
wards governor of the Northwest Ter-
THE
PRINCE RUPERT
JOURNAL
Office  is equipped for all kinds of
Job Work.    Prompt attention given
to all orders,  and work handled by
the most competent printers.
-LADYSMITH
COAL
ROCHESTER & MONROE, Phone 115
THE WESTHOLME LUMBER GO.
LIMITED
We handle all kinds of
Building Supplies
First Avenue Telephone 180
J. L. PARKER
MINING ENGINEFR
Prince Rupert, B. C.
Open for Consultation and Mine
Examination
Temporary Address:—
Prince Rupert Inn
FREDERICK PETERS, K. C.
Barrister, Solicitor and Notary Public
Office in
EXCHANGE BLOCK
WM. S. HAi^L, L. D. S. D. D. 8.
-..■   DENTIST   :•:
Corner Eighth and Fraser Streets
Clinton Rooms
Newly   remodelled    and   furnished.
Board   and   lodging.   Home cooking
a specialty.    Mrs.  Anderson, Prop.
Rooms, $3 Per Week
NOTICE.
A book is kept in the City Clerk's
Office in which to enter the names
and addresses, etc. of citizens ol
Prince Rupert desiring employment
on City work. All desiring employment should register at once.
ERNEST A. WOODS,
City Clerk.
ritories. The Northwest Mounted Police had not yet been organized, and
as an escort for the commissioners a
portion of the Canadian permanent
corps then in garrison at Garry,, was
marched across the prairie. That
the treaty was successful was largely
ascribed to the influence exercised
over the Indians by Mr. McDonald
and his brother chief factor, J. W.
McLean, The territory ceded by the
Indians under this treaty Included
the western part of Manitoba, and
practically the whole of the present
Province of Saskatchewan. Surely
Mr. McDonald is entitled to be
classed among tlie makers of the
Canadian West.
"What's the matter with your face,
man?"
"Sure I went to the zoo hunting
for the big African apes they said
were there. Somebody told me to go
to the apiary to find them, and that's
where 1 was stung."
"What did he have to bring the
ball back for?" asked Ethel inno-
e'ently of her companion.
"Why, don't you know, you little
goose? ' answered the other damself
pityingly. "Of course, it's because
be got an encore!"
Crown and Bridge Work a specialty.
All dental operations skillfully
treated. Gas and local anaesthetics
administered tor the painless extraction of teeth. Consultation free.
Offices, Helgerson 3k., Prince Ruperi
NICKERSON-ROERIG COMPANY
CUSTOMS AND MERCHANDISE
Brokers, Forwarding Agents,
Storage, etc.
J. W. POTTER
ARCHITECT    AND    STRUCTURAL
ENGINEER
Re-inforced Concrete a Specialty
—c—
Law-Butler Building - Prince Rupert
HAYNOR  BROS.
FUNERAL  DIRECTORS
' . and
PROFESSIONAL  EMBALMERS
DR. W. B.  CLAYTON
DENTIST
Office   In    the    Westenhaver   Block.
Over Orme's  Drug   Store.
Prince Rupert
New Knox Hotel
ARTAUD & BESNER
Proprietors
The New Knox Hotel Is run on the
European plan. Flrst-clas service.
All the latest modern Improvements
THE BAR keeps only the best
brands of liquors and cigars.
THE CAFE is open from 6.30 a.m.
to 8 p.m. Excellent cuisine; first-
class service.
Board, $1 a Day — Beds, 50c and nn
First Avemi"   Prince Rupert
The Journal
$2.00 a year.
(twice a week), only
To the Ladies of Prince Rupert
Did you ever stop to think how much easier it would be for you,
if at the end of each month, you could pay all household bills
by check? We solicit your account and have special facilities
for handling It. Private writing rooms are provided for the use
of customers and individual attention Is given each depositor.
We allow 4% on Deposits and the use of checks.
The Continental Trust Company, Limited
 SECOND AVENUE	
Tl*"St»y Satisfactory' Jt&lefi*
Good, Sound Reasons for
MONARCH Economy
Monarch Ranges are built so that they can
never have "air leaks"—
For around every opening Into the body there
Is a   Malleable   Iron frame to which the
steel is riveted.
No putty is needed in such joints.   They are
air tight when new and stay air tight,
if these other ranges were built In this way
they might be economical too.
Investigate this matter of rivet construction
versus stove bolts and stove putty.    It's
important to every  one using or buying
a range.
SOLD AND GUARANTEED BY THE
Kaien Hardware Co.
Telephone 3 Third Avenue
HOTEL
ENAMELWARE
HAVE JUST RECEIVED A SMALL SHIPMENT OF HOTEL
ENAMELWARE ESPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR USE IN
HOTELS, RESTAURANTS AND CAMPS. WE GUARANTEE
THEM TO LAST TWICE AS LONG AS ORDINARY ENAMEL
WARE.
A CALL IS SOLICITED
Prince Rupert Hardware & Supply
Company, Ltd.
THIRD AVENUE
PHONE 120
EEEEEEEEEEEEEBEEEEEEEEEBEE
FOR SALE
Lot 56, Blk. 34, Sec. 1, $5,000; 1-3 cash, bal. 6 and 12 months.
Lots 33 and 34, Blk 5, Sec. 1,    $4,000;  half cash.
FOR RENT
STORES, OFFICES AND DWELLINGS
FIRE INSURANCE in old English, Canadian and American
companies, at tariff rates. Policies good as collateral at All Banks,
and all written in our own office. PLATE GLASS, ACCIDENT
and MARINE INSURANCE
M.M. Stephens & Co. Ld.
REAL ESTATE
Phone 222
LOANS        INSURANCE
Office: Third Avenue
INVESTMENTS
P. O. Box 275
TIDES AT PRINCE RUPERT, AUGUST, 1911
|      HIGH WATER
LOW WATER
DATE AND DAY
Tlme|  Ht| Tlme|  Ht<|  Time|  Ht | Time|  Ht
Tuesday   .
Wednesday
Thursday   .
Friday   .   .
Saturday   .
Sunday   .   .
Monday   .
Tuesday    .
Wednesday
Thursday   .
Friday    .    .
Saturday .
13 jSunday . .
14 uiondny . .
15 iTuesday .
16 I Wednesday
17 Thursday .
18 |Friday . .
19 i aaturday .
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
"28
29
30
31
Sunday
Monday  .   .
Tuesday  .   .
Wee-enesday
Thursday   .
Friday   .   .
Saturday   .
Sunday   .   .
Monday  .   .
Tuesday   .
Wednesday
Thursday   .
6:13
7:26
8:44
10:04
11:12
12:00
0:01
0:39
6:14
7:45
9:18
10:35
11:40
0:16
1:06
1:54
2:39
3:22
4:05
4:49
5:37
6:35
16.5118:38
15.2 19:38
14.5
14.6
16.0
16.0|23
.... 12
19.1
19.7
20.2
20.5
20.5
20.2
19.7
18.7
17.6
16.3
15.5
16.6
16.6
17.e)
22.0
22.5
22.5
21.9
21.0
la.7
i8.2
16.6
15.2
0:11
1:04
2:27
3:40
4:44
5:34
6:12
6:46
i:18
7:49
8:19
8:49
9:20
9:55
10:34
11:17
0:14
1:28
^:52
4:06
5:08
6:02
6:50
7:33
8:14
8:52
9:28
10:03
10:40
11:20
0:24
C.8
7.3
7.4
7.0
6.3
5.4
4.0
S.S 18
3.3J19
2.9|19
2.8120
2.9
3.3
4.1
6.1
6.4
5.8
5.9
.re.4
4.2
2.9
1.7
0.9
0.7
1.1
2.0
3.3
4.9
6.6
8.4
0.9
13
03
06
2 0
28
22
04
:4t
161
50!
:25|
01
40
25
16
12:06   9.f
7.5
9.1
10.3
10.7
10.6
10.1
9.3
8.5
7.6
6.*!
6.1
5.6
5.3
5.2
5.5
7.7
8.9
9.3
8.8
7.6
6.3
5.1
4.2
3.7
8.1
4.1
4.9
5.9
The Time used is Pacific Standard, for the 120th Meridian west.    It Is
counted 0 to 24 hours, from midnight to midnight.
The Height Is in feet and tenths of a foot, above the Low Water datum
adopted for the Chart.   The Harbor Datum, as established by the G. T. P.
Railway, is one foot lower. Friday, August 25, 1911.
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
(Bylaw Continued From Page Five)
of the Council in such securities, 6r in such manner as is permitted by
law, including those hereinbefore recited investments.
7. There shall be issued any number of debentures to be made for
such sums as may be required for tiie raising of said sum of $550,000.00
and said debentures may be either for currency or sterling money, payable
In gold coin for not less than $100.00 currency and £20 sterling each, and
not exceeding the whole sum of $550,000.00 and the said debentures shall
be duly prepared, executed, and sold for the purposes aforesaid.
8. The said debentures shall be deemed to have been properly executed by being signed by the Mayor and the Treasurer of the said City,
and shall be sealed with its corporate seal.
0. The said debentures shall bear the date of 12th day of September
A. D. 1011, being the date on which this Bylaw takes effect, and shall
contain a promise to pay the principal of the said debentures nnd also the
Interest thereon at the rate of four and a half (4}£) per cent per annum,
payable half-yearly on the 1st duy of January and the 1st day of July In
each year, nnd mny be with or without coupons attached thereto for the payment of said interest, and In ease coupons shall be attached to said debentures, said coupons shall be equivalent to one-hulf year's interest at the
said rate of four and a half ( I'el) per cent per annum, upon the amount
of the debenture to which they shall be respectively attached, one coupon
being made payable each six months from and after the date of the said
debentures.
10. The said coupons shall be deemed to have been properly executed
by each one having written, stamped, printed, or lithographed thereon, the
names of the Mayor and Treasurer of the said City. Each' coupon shall
be numbered witli the number of tbe debenture to which it is attached.
11. The said debentures shall be made payable at any place in
England, the United Stntes, or Canada therein set out.
12. The amount of the said coupons, namely: the interest, shall be
payable at any of the places in England, the United States, or Canada
therein set out,
13. The said debentures when issued ond sold, and any coupons
attached thereto when the debentures aforesaid have been issued and sold,
shall be deemed a vnlid and binding charge upon the rates and charges
accruing from the said Hydro-Electric System, and upon the said City of
Prince Rupert severally as aforesaid.
14. The amount of the debt authorized by this Bylaw is subject to
consolidation with the amount of any other debt authorized by any Bylaw
or Bylaws of the said City passed for the issue and sale of Debentures,
and nolhwillistuiiding anything herein contained authorizing and directing
the issue and sale of debentures for the pnyment of the debt thereby
created; the City of Prince Rupert Consolidated Stock may be issued in
the place and stead of the debentures to the amount of such debt. This
section shall apply only in so far as the City may be empowered by law
to do so.
15. It shall be lawful for tlie Council, during the construction of the
works, hereinbefore provided for, to borrow money from any bank, at
interest to be agreed on, willing to advance the same for the purposes of
paying for the said works, or any part thereof, and for snch loans to hypothecate the debentures to be issued hereunder, provided that such loans
with tlie interest agreed to be paid to such bank, shall be prepaid out of
^e sum of money to be realized upon the sale of the said debentures.
10. The Council may sell the said debentures at less than par, if It
Is found advisable so to do.
17. Notwithstanding anything hereinbefore contained it shall be
lawful for the City in any year to expend out of the net revenue of the said
Hydro-Electric System for the purpose of betterments of, or additions to,
snch system, a sum up to twenty (20) per cent of snch net revenue, net
revenue to mean for the purpose of this section, the gross receipts less
running expenses nnd ordinary repairs, but nothing herein contained shall
In any way do away witli the liability of the City In each year either out of
the profits or by rate to provide the full amount necessary to pay Interest
nnd sinking fund ns before provided.
PASSED THE MUNICIPAL COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF PRINCE
RUPERT THE 21ST DAY OF AUGUST A. D. 1011.
WM. MANSON, Mayor.
W. D.  VANCE,   Acting   City   Clerk.
RECONSIDERED AND FINALLY ADOPTED BY THE SAID COUNCIL
THE       DAY OF A.D. 101. .
MAYOR.
TAKE NOTICE that the above is a true copy of the proposed Bylaw
upon which the Vote of the Municipality will be taken at the Police Court
Room, Third Avenue, in the City of Prince Rupert on the second day of
September A. D. 11)11 between the hours of 0 A. M. and 7 P. M.
Dated 22nd day of August A. D. 1011.
' W. D. VANCE,
Acting City Clerk.
PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given to the electors of the Municipality
of the City of Prince Rupert, that the presence of the sold electors is
required at tlie Police Court Room, Third Avenue, on Saturday, the 2nd day
of September A. D. 1011, between the hours of 9 A. M. and 7 P. M. for the
purpose of voting upon the Bylaw above set forth, being a Bylaw to provide
for the construction of a Hydro-Electric System to supply the City of
Prince Rupert with water, electric light ond power, and to create and
secure a debt for the purpose of constructing the said system amounting
to $550,000.00.
M. M. STEPHENS,
Returning Officer.
By-Law
A BYLAW TO CONFIRM AN AGREEMENT MADE BETWEEN THE
MUNICIPALITY OF THE CITY OF PRINCE RUPERT OF THE
FIRST PART, THE GRAND TRUNK PACIFIC RAILWAY COMPANY
OF THE SECOND PART, THE GRAND TRUNK PACIFIC DEVELOP.
MENT COMPANY LIMITED OF THE THIRD PART, AND HIS
MAJESTY THE KING IN HIS RIGHT OF HIS PROVINCE OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA OF THE FOURTH PART.
V'HEREAS, on the 8th day of June, 1011, an agreement was entered
into between the parties therein mentioned, which agreement was and Is in
the words and figures following:—
MEMORANDUM OF AGREEMENT made in quadruplicate this 8th day
of June, In the year of Our Lord, one thousand idne hundred and
eleven,
BETWEEN
THE MUNICIPALITY OF THE CITY   OF   PRINCE   RUPERT    (herein-
after called the "City," of the first part),
THE GRAND TRUNK PACIFIC RAttWAY COMPANY (hereinafter called
the "Railway Company," of the second part),
THE GRAND TRUNK PACIFIC DEVELOPMENT COMPANY, LIMITED,
(hereinafter called the "Towns':te Company," of the third part),
and
HIS MAJESTY THE KING, in his right of Ills Province of British Columbia, herein represented and acting by the Honorable William
R. Ross, Minister of Lands qt the said Province (hereinafter
referred to as "The Province," of the fourth part).
WHEREAS, differences have arisen  regarding  the taxation  by  the
City of the lands belonging to the Railway Company situated within the
limits of the City of Prince Rupert, and certain other matters as hereinafter appearing, and Ihis agreement is made for the purpose of settling
such differences.
"AND, WHEREAS, the Townsite Company is the owner of an undivided three-quarters interest nnd the Province of an undivided one-
quarter Interest In the lands referred to in paragraphs one (1), four (4)
and five (5) hereof, and are severally interested in securing nn adjustment of tlie said difference, and as part of such adjustment have severally agreed-to transfer and lease such lands us hereinafter provided:
NOW, THEREFORE, THIS AGREEMENT WITNESSETH, that in
consideration of the covenants and agreements on the part of the several
parties herein contained, the parties hereto have agreed with each other
ns follows:
1. The Townsite Company will, with the concurrence of the Province, ns testified by the Province joining in this agreement and the conveyance to be made hereunder, convey to the City iu fee simple all
those certain parcels of lands indicated on the plan hereto annexed as
numbers three (8), eleven (11), thirteen (18), fourteen (II), eighteen
(18), twenty (20), twenty-two (22), twenty-three (23), twenty-nine
(29), 'thirty-eight (88), forty (40), forty-one (41), fifty-six (50), fifty-
eight (58), fifty-nine (50) and sixty-two («2).
2. The Railway Company will convey to the City in fee simple the
westerly one hundred (100) feet of Waterfront Block E, as shown
in pink on attached plan on condition that the said waterfront shall
not unless upon the consent of the Company given under its Corporate
Seal be used for other than strictly municipal purposes.
8. The Province will convey to the City in fee simple the easterly
one hundred (100) feet of Waterfront Block D, ns shown in pink on the
attached plan, on condition that tho said waterfront shall not unless
upon the consent of the Province be used for other than strictly municipal purposes.
4. The Townsite Company will, with the concurrence of the Province testified ns aforesaid, grunt to tlie City a lease for the term of nine
hundred and ninety-nine (009) years of the several parcels of land indicated on the plan hereto annexed ns numbers five (5), fifteen (15), seventeen (17), twenty-one (21), twenty-four (24), twenty-five (25), twenty-
six (20), twenty-seven (27), thirty-one (81), thirty-two (32), thirty-
three (33), thirty-four (34), thirty-five (35), thirty-seven (37), thirty-
nine (39), ilorty-two (42), forty-three (43), forty-four (44), forty-
five (45), forty-six (40), forty-seven (47), forty-eight (48), forty-nine
(49), fifty (50), fifty-one (51), fifty-two (52), fifty-three (53), fifty-
five (55), sixty (00) and sixty-one (61). The said leuse to be ut a nominal rental of one dollar ($1.00) per annum and upon the following conditions, that is to say:
(a) The lease is not to be assigned or sublet without leave of the
Townsite Company and  the Province;
(b) The lands nre not to be used for any other than park, boulevard, or other purposes having for their object the beuutlfying of the
City, without the consent of the Townsite Company and the Province;
(c) No buildings or structures other than statues or monuments
are to be erected upon the said parcels or any of them without tbe like
consent.
5. The Townsite Company will, with the concurrence of the Province testified as aforesaid, grant to the City a lease for the term of
nine hundred and ninety-nine (099) years of the several parcels of land
indicated on the plan hereto annexed as numbers two (2), four (4), six
(6), seven (7), eight (8), nine (9), ten (10), twelve (12), sixteen
(10), twenty-eight (28), thirty-six (30) and fifty-four (54). The said
lease to be at a nominal rental of one dollar ($1.00; per annum, and
not to be assigned or sublet without leave of the Townsite Company and
the Province, except as hereinafter provided with respect to Parcel two
(2):—
(a) Parcel two (2)—This land shall be used for cemetery purposes
only, and shall be laid out and developed accordingly, maintaining a
parkiike effect throughout. It is understood that the City may assign or
sublet individual plots In this area to persons desiring to use the same
for burial purposes without obtaining the leave hereinbefore provided;
(b) Parcel four (4)—This land shall be used only for the establishment of n reservoir and waterworks connected therewith; the erection of buildings of a public character and possessing architectural merit;
and in other respects for general park purposes;
(c) Parcels six (0), seven (7), eight (8), nine (0) and ten (10)
—These lands shall be used only foi* the purpose of public buildings,
having a grouped effect architecturally with parklike surrounding^;
(d) Parcel twelve (12)—This land shall be used only for public
park purposes or for the erection of school, college, seminary or other
public buildings;
(e) Parcel sixteen (10)—This land shall be used ns a public recreation ground and for the erection of public buildings of real architectural
merit, tlie entire development to be such as shall produce a parkiike effect. In addition to the above, it shall be lawful for the City to con-
struct nnd maintain upon this parcel one or more reservoirs in connection with the City waterworks system,to making for this purpose the necessary connections therewith upon the said parcel;
(f) Parcel twenty-eight (28)—This land shall be used for a general
public park and is to be developed to that end. Without iu any way
lessening the duty of the City to preserve the parkiike features of this
parcel, it is understood that for a distance of one thousand (1,000) feet
to the north of a road connecting McBride Street and the Prince Rupert
Boulevard, the natural parkiike features of the land are to be retained;
(g) Parcel thirty-six (30)—This land shall only be used for buildings of a public character possessing real architectural merit, tlie grounds
surrounding same to be suitably graded'and planted;
(h) Parcel fifty-four (54)—This land shall only be used for public
buildings of architectural merit, provided, however, thnt the City may
construct and maintain a reservoir thereon. In tho development of this
parcel, the general parklike features shall be adhered to.
Pending the development of any of the said parcels as in this clause
provided, the City shall not do or permit anything to be done which
will detract from the existing natural parkiike features.
0. The conveyances provided for in the preceding clauses shall lie
executed by the parties hereto of tlie first, third and fourth purls, und
shall contain apt clauses embodying the conditions hereinbefore set
forth, so ns to ensure that the lands mentioned in clauses two (2) nnd
three (3) hereof shall be used only for the purposes defined in this agreement.
7. The Railway Company will, at the request of the City, grant such
easements over Its property within the city limits as mny be necessary for
sewers, water mains, gns mains, electric light, telegraph wires, telephone wires, or other similar civic utilities, subject always to Ihe approval of the Railway Company's engineer, whose opinion in all cases
must be treated as final, without prejudice to the right, if any, which the
City may by law possess to expropriate an easement for any of the above
purposes.
8. The Railway Company will, within a period of three months from
the date of the ratification of this agreement by the Legislature, commence the erection of its works within the city limits, consisting of permanent station, roundhouse, engine works, machine shops and other
structures and accessories Incidental to the establishment at Prince Rupert of the Pacific Terminus of tlie Railway Company, nnd complete
the same with all reasonable dispatch, retaining within the City the payrolls in connection with such works, so far as it may be feasible to
do so.
9. The Townsite Company will, within a period of two years from
the date of the ratification of this agreement hy the Legislature, commence the erection of a first-class hotel of modern design nnd appointments,  and prosecute the construction thereof with due diligence.
10. The Railway Company will commence the construction of a dry
dock at Prince Rupert In conformity with the agreement respecting the
same between the Railway Company and the Government of the Dominion of Camilla.
11. The Railway Company will pay to the City annually on or before the 1st day of November In each year for and during the period in
the succeeding clause mentioned, by way of taxation, a total fixed sum
of Fifteen Thousand Dollars ($15,000), in respect of all its property, real
or personal, within the City Hints; provided, however, that the said sum
shall not include local improvement taxes, which may be imposed by
the City for the improvement of public streets upon wliich the Railway
Company's land ubuts in Sections One (1), Six (0), Seven (7) and Eight
(8), and which streets or portions of streets may be enumerated as follows:
Water Street
Eleventh Street
First  Avenue,  opposite  blocks 13 and 14
First   and   Second  Avenues From Eighth to Second Street
All in Section One (1)
Fourth Avenue, opposite blocks (t and 7, in Section Six
Overlook Street, opposite Block 4
Seal Cove Circle, opposite Block  7
Kelliher Street, opposite Blocks 25 and 50
All in Sestion Seven   (7)
Kelliher Streel, opposite Block 12
Morse Loop, opposite Blocks  II, 13 and   II
Eleventh Avenue, opposite Block 31
Edward Avenue, opposite Block 1
All in Section Eight  (8)
Provided, however, that the Railway Company's share of such local
improvement   taxes,   shall   not  exceed one-half of the  total  cost of any
such local improvement.
12. The City agrees with the Railway Company to accept the said
sum of Fifteen Thousand Dollars ($15,000) per annum, together with the
said local improvement taxes mentioned in Clause 11 hereof, in lieu of
all municipal taxes, rates and assessments of every kind whatsoever to
be levied by the City against the Railway Company and upon or in resjiect
of the lands of the Railway Company, und nil buildings, structures or
other improvements thereon or 'therein, and all the personal property of
the Company within the City limits, for a period of ten years from the
1st day of January,  1911.
13. The City will accept the sum of Fifteen Thousand Dollars
($15,000) in full of nil taxes due by the Railway Company to the City
for the year 1910.
14. It is understood by and between the parties hereto that this
agreement shall not become operative or binding unless and until the
same shall have been approved by the ratepayers of the City nnd ratified
by the Legislature of the Province of British Columbia; the parties here-
to severally agreeing to co-operate in taking all steps und doing nil
things necessary to obtain such ratification at the next session of tlie
snid Legislature.
15. This agreement shall extend to and be binding upon the succes.
sors and assigns of the parties hereto respectively.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF this agreement has been duly executed by
the parties hereto.
THE MUNICIPALITY OF THE CITY
OF PRINCE RUPERT.
[Seal.] By
Win. Munson, Mayor,
And
Ernest A. Woods, City Clerk.
GRAND   THINK    PACIFIC    RAILWAY COMPANY.
[Seal.]
Chas.  M. Hays, President.
Henry Philips, Secretary.
In Presence of
Fred Peters.
D'Arcy Tate
THE GRAND TRUNK PACIFIC DE-
VELOPMENT COMPANY LTD.
[Seal.]
(has. M. Hays, President.
Henry Philips Secretary.
THK   GOVERNMENT   OF   BRITISH
COLUMBIA.
[Seal.]
Henry    Ksson    Young,    Provincial
Secretary for the  Province of Brit-
*- ish Columbia.
AND, WHEREAS, it is desirable to pass a Bylaw ratifying and confirming the snid recited agreement so that the same may be submitted
for the approval of the ratepayers of the City of Prince Rupert pursuant
to Clause 14 of said Agreement:
NOW, THEREFORE, the Council of the Municipal Corporation of the
City of Prince Rupert enacts as follows:—
1. The said hereinbefore recited agreement is hereby confirmed and
ratified in every particular.
2. The said Council shall take all necessary steps to have this Bylaw
submitted to Ihe ratepayers of the City of Prince Rupert for their approval.
3. The said Council shall, if this Bylaw is approved by the ratepayers of the City of Prince Rupert, take all necessary steps to obtain
ratification of said recited agreement by the Legislature of the Province of
British Columbia, and for that purpose, are hereby authorized to spend
any money that mny be necessary nnd proper in obtaining the passage of
said Legislation.
4. Tho plan referred to in the said recited agreement shall be kept
on file as a record In the office of the City Clerk of the City of Prince
Rupert.
5. The Council of the City of Prince Rupert shall endeavor to have
inserted in the Statute confirming tills agreement u clause authorizing the
filing of the said recited agreement, and the plan therein referred to,
iu the office of the Registrar of Deeds at the City of Prince Rupert.
6. This Bylaw shall take effect immediately the passing thereof.
PASSED THE MUNICIPAL COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF PRINCE
RUPERT THE 21ST DAY OF AUGUST A. 1). 1911.
WM. MANSON, Mayor.
VV. Be VANCE,  Acting  City  Clerk.
RECONSIDERED AND FINALLY ADOPTED BY THE SAID COUNCIL
THK    DAY OF    A. D. 191 . .      .
TAKE NOTICE that the above is a true copy of Ihe proposed Bylaw
upon which the Vote of the Municipality will be taken atlhe Police Court
Room, Third Avenue, In the City of Prince Rupert on the second day of
September A. I). 1911 between the hours of 9 A. M. and 7 P. M.
Dated 22nd day of August A.D.  1911.
W. D. VANCE,
Acting City Clerk.
NOTICE is hereby given to the electors of the Municipality of the City
of Prince Rupert, that the presence of the said electors Is required at the
Police Court Room, Third Avenue, in the City of Prince Rupert, on Sntur-
day the 2nd day of September A.D. 1011, between the hours of 0 A.M.
and 7 P. M. for the purpose of voting on the above Bylaw, being :i Bylaw
to confirm tlie agreement made between the Municipality of the City of
Prince Rupert, of the First part, the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway Company
of the Second part, the Grand Trunk Pacific Development Company Limited
of the Third purl, and His Majesty the Ring In his right of his Province
of Britisii Colombia of the Fourth part.
M. M. STKPHENS.
Returning Officer.
Prince Rupert, H. C, August 22nd, Hill. PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Friday, August 25, 1911,
BRITISH  CAPITAL
Sir William Mackenzie Tells ol Invest
ments Made by Old Country
Financiers.
He Also Speaks of tbe Immense Harvest That the West Is to
Produce
"The wheat yield In the west will
easily total 225,000,000 bushels, a
figure in excess of tbe usual estimates, and this fall and the coming
year will probably be the most prosperous period, taking it all around,
ever experienced by the people of
Canada," is tbe opinion of Sir William Mackenzie.
"The crop outlook in the prairie
provinces is excellent—that scarcely
describes my meaning, as I have seen
equally good grain in other seasons,
but never so large a crop or one so
uniformly  good.
"This all means that western pros
perity will react on the east, stimu
late wholesale trade and make the
factories hum day and night. And
the same conditions will be experienced througuout Britisii Columbia
The settlers who came in this year
represent the best type that ever
went to the Canadian provinces."
That Britisii capital favors Canadian investments is again confirmed
by Sir William. Speaking on this
subject, he said: "The position of
this Dominion occupies in the eyes
of the Britisii people was never so
high as just now. It signifies that
they are coming round to the Idea
that it is better to invest their surplus funds within the Britisii Empire than in foreign countries. Without overestimating the figure I
should say that British capital of
between $30,000,000 and $40,000,-
ffDO has been invested during the
past two years in aCnadian propositions in which I am interested.
"Now, my point of view does not
necessarily reflect on other coun-
tries, the United States, for instance.
It is simply this, that Canadians now
get the English capital to develop
Canadian resources. The Britisii
capitalists gets a good return on his
money and the enterprising Canadian
also wins a share of the profits for
his energy and enterprise. It will
De observed that Americans seldom
make investments In Canada unless
they can handle the propositions
themselves. They take their profits
across the line. Canadians displaying the same enterprise keep British
capital within the Empire; in fact,
reinvest it in their own country."
TAFT ON RECIPROCITY PACT
Says It  Will Give States  Possession
of Canada's  Natural   Resources
nml Manufactures
In Leslie's Weekly, President Taft
personally defends the reciprocity
agreement which he succeeded in
foisting upon Mr, Fielding and Mr.
Peterson. The president declares
that the convention will enlarge the
American farmers' market in Canada, that it will not reduce the cost
of living anywhere, and that in the
long run it will give the United
States complete possession of the
Canadian markets, not only in so
far as natural resources are concerned, but for manufactures of every
kind as well. Mr. Taft proceeds:
"We have a people numbering 90,-
000,000, occupying the best part of
the North American continent, with
the widest variety of products and
with an unexceller fertility of soil.
To the north of us are a people just
like ourselves, in descent, in wealth
per capita, In education, in traditions,
In ambitions and aspirations. They
have a country nearly equal to ours
in area, not so fertile generally and
certainly nol so rich In the wide
variety of agricultural 'products."
These paragraphs also occur In the
president's manifesto: "The United
States exports to Canada a great
many more horses than she imports
from Canada. She sends to Canada a much larger amount of potatoes than she receives from her.
The United States exports to Canada
about fifteen times as much of meat
and dairy products as Canada exports to the United States."
Regarding the flour milling Industry the president says: "If, now, the
duty Ib to be taken off wheat and
the Canadian wheat can come to the
millers of Minneapolis and other
places, It can and will be made Into
flour, because the capacity of the
American mills is 33 per cent greater
than is needed to mill the wheat of
this country. Canadian wheat can
be Imported and ground Into flour
without materially reducing the demand for or price of American
wheat, and the surplus will bo sent
abroad as flour. The price of Canadian   wheat   will   doubtless    be    in
creased a few cents by the access
to the market nearer at hand, but
the access to the market nearer at
hand will not reduce the price of his
wheat to the American farmer. A
very material benefit to all the farmers of the country, especially the
stock and cattle raisers and the dairy
farmers, will be the by-products of
bran and shorts from the flour mills
like'y to follow the free export of
wheat from Canada to those mills.
These by-products are now so scarce
that many farmers are unable to
procure them."
The president notes that the cost
of living is not higher In the United
States than in Canada. If this is
so, how is the Canadian producer of
general farm products to benefit by
access to the American market Further on the chief executive officer
of the Washington government frankly admits that "one of the great
objects of the present treaty is the
conservation of our natural resources. It is perfectly evident from
the statistics that our general lumber supply and our supply of spruce
wood are being rapidly exhausted."
Further on he says: "The provinces
of Canada have control over the
crown lands, in which nine-tenths of
the pulp wood is grown, and they
have imposed restrictions and export
duties of various kinds upon the
pulp wood in the crown lands, in
order to prevent the export of the
wood except in the form of paper.
In order to induce the Canadian
provinces, over whom the Dominion
can exercise no control, to lift the
restrictions upon the exportation of
their pulp wood it is provided in the
agreeineent that when paper is made
in Canada from wood grown on land
noi under export restrictions, the
paper may come into the United
States free; and it is hoped that the
difference of $5.75 between the duty
on paper from restricted wood and
no duty on paper made from unrestricted wood will Induce the provinces to lift their restrictions."
 o	
STUDYING CONDITION
**************************
l   MARINE NEWS   I
* *
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *** * * * * * * •;. *
STRANDING OF MAY
Rev. Dr. Chown General Superintendent
of Nethodist Church Has Paid
Important Visit.
He   Is   Studying   the   Needs   of   the
Church  in  the  West  During
Trip Trough This District
Rev. Dr. Chown, general superintendent of the Methodist Church iu
the west, returned to the city last
evening after a visit to Stewart,
Goose Bay and other points on the
northern coast, following a conference at Port Simpson of those associated in the Indian missionary work,
when the whole question of that
branch of the church's operations
was gone into.
Last night the head of the church
met Rev. Mr. Sing and the members
of the quarterly official board and
discussed with them the whole project of building here.
Dr. Chown is one of the most practical of men and has a reputation
throughout the Dominion for his
sound judgment in sociological questions. On his present tour of the
Pacific Coast, especially in this newer part of the province, he has given
a lot of study to the various aspects
which church work presents apart
from the purely theological side and
the conclusions reached by him will
doubtless have an important bearing
upon the policy of Methodism in the
west.
He will make calls at different
points along the coast on the way
south.
REFITTING  WINDSOR
New Proprietor Will Have Hotel Put
in First Class Shape
for Trade
W. Wright, who has just taken
over theh Windsor Hotel, on the corner of First avenue and Ninth street,
is refitting the house throughout. He
is preparing to cater to a very large
trade and will be equipped in every
line.
The Windsor has accommodation
for a large number of guests and
Mr. Wright expects to conduct the
house in such a manner that it will
be full all the time.
The new proprietor is well known
in the city and will command a first
class trade.
 o	
Hubby—I'm afraid I'm becoming
cross-eyed, my dear.
Wifey—The idea! Why do you
think that?
Hubby—This thing of trying to
look at my ini'ome and our expenses
at the same time is slowly but surely
getting   ils   work   in.
At the investigation of the stranding of the Canadian Pacific steamer
Princess May, presided over by Mr.
Justice Martin, Captain Richardson
of the steamer Cetriana, and pilot
on the May at the time of the stranding, testified that the accident was
due to a haze obstructing the sight
of the rocks so that the sharp points
could not be seen till the vessel was
almost on them, and it was too late
for the steamer to be stopped.
There were five witnesses: Captain
McLeod, master of the Princess May;
Second Officer A. B. Robson, Quartermaster Frank Gest, Captain Richardson, and Captain Troup, superintendent of the Canadian Pacific Coast
Service. Mr. Justice Martin was assisted by Captain Reed, R. N. R., and
Captain Stanley Collinton, assessors.
At the conclusion of the enquiry,
Mr. Lawson, representing the C.P.R.,
requested the court to include in its
findings a clause asking that in future investigations should be called
more promptly, inasmuch as more
than a year had elapsed since the
stranding of the Princess May, and
the memory of a witnes was apt to
become somewhat dim in such an
interval. The presiding judge agreed
with the counsel.
Captain Richardson was the chief
witness. He said that the steamer
Princess May left Skagway at 9
o'clock on the evening of August 4
for Vancouver with about 80 passengers and a crew of 86. The vessel
went south at a speed of about 12
knots and was going at this rate
when she struck. Captain McLeod
had been on the bridge when she
left Skagway, but the witness had
relieved him before the accident.occurred, and was alone in the pilot
house. The water was as smooth
as glass and the night was clear,
but somewhat hazy, and steam obstructed the view.
The witness said the strike happened at 2 o'clock in the morning.
The walls of the channel were precipitous and the waterway deep and
in many places narrow. Sentinel Island was situated about four miles
northeast of Shelter Island. The island was a jagged rock about 250
yards long and with long reefs projecting at the north and soutli ends.
It was on one of these that the vessel stranded. The witness testified
that he had frequently made the voyage before in the same vessel. At
the time of striking he was fully
awake and aware of the responsibllty
upon him of steering the vessel with
its human freight.
Captain McLeod testified to leaving the pilot house in charge of the
pilot and going to his berth. He had
full confidence in Pilot Richardson.
Quartermaster Frank Gest said that
he was on watch at the time, and
told the story of the wreck and the
saving of the passengers, not one of
whom was injured. Mr. Robson also
gave details of the wreck and of the
susequent attempts to raise the vessel. Captain Troup gave evidence as
to the condition of the vessel at the
time of the stranding.
and will have a tonnage of about
18,000. They will be equipped with
engines of from 16,000 to 17,000
horsepower and will be required to
maintain an average speed of eighteen knots per hour and develop on
their trial trips a speed of twenty
knots an hour.
In size, a trifle larger than the
Atlantic Empresses, the new boats
will have acommodation for thirteen
hundred passengers and will also
have a huge freight carrying capacity.
The new boats will be literally floating palaces. They will be luxuriously
finished and will undoubtedly materially decrease the running time between Britisii Columbia ports and the
Orient. The boats will be ready in
January, 1913, and will cost over
£2,500,000,  fully completed.
NORTHERN   SPRUCE
The Britisii admiralty recnetly
gave to the Moresby Isldan Lumber
Company of Queen Charlotte Islands
an order for 200,000 feet of white
spruce. The material will be used
in the manufacture of oars for the
rowboats of the warships. J. E. Corlett, general manager of the company, when interviewed, said: "The
superior quality of the white spruce
grown in the Queen Charlotte group
was discovered years ago by British
naval officers on the North Pacific
station. This kind of timber was
found to be ideally adapted for making oars and it is now used exclusively for that purpose in all his majesty's vessels throughout the world.
The same material is being used for
making bobbins in cotton factories.
Recently we shipped ten carloads to
a Boston firm. Experiments made
in California and Australia have demonstrated that white spruce is superior to any other kind of wood for
making fruit boxes and butter tubs
because it will not taint. The demand
promises to assume large proportions.'
NOTICE TO MARINERS
Among the latest notices to mariners is the following:
Captain P. C. Musgrave, C. G. cur-
veying steamer Lillooet, has made an
examination of the locality of the
rock reported by. Captain J. Johan-
sen ot the steamer Chicago, as described In Notice to Mariners No. 49
(121) of 1911, and reports that the
least water obtained in the vicinity
was 27 fathoms, a little to the eastward of the line given, 9 cables south
of Marble Rock, with a depth of 25
fathoms between this position and
the short.
The area sounded extends from
Marble Rock to the shore on the
eastern side of a line from Marble
Rock to Steep Point on the south
and for a distance of one and a half
miles to the southward to the 90-
fathom line, and for 3 cables to the
northward of the same line into deep
water.
TRANS-PACIFIC STEAMERS
It has been officially announced
that the Canadian Pacific Railway
has placed an order for two new
steamships for Its Vancouver-Victoria-Hongkong service. This step has
been under contemplation for some
time, the C. P. R. s rapidly Increasing freight and passenger traffic on
the Pacific Ocean necessitating the
securing of increased transportation
facilities.
The contract for the new boats has
been let to the Fairfield Shipbuilding
Company of Glasgow, one of the
largest  firms along the Clyde.
The new shipsw ill be of the most
modern construction In every respect.
They will be 595 feet long over all,
CAUSE OF SEASICKNESS
Ye who have hung over the rail,
fearful one day lest ye die and fearful the subsequent day ye would not,
hearken.
When you thought your stomach
had rebelled against the evil of
spending money in foreign lands and
was making you feel the ills of mal
de mer, you did au injustice to an old
friend. For your stomach does not
cause seasickness at all.
Prof. Alexander Dalikinik, world
famous specialist of the University
of Vienna, says that seasickness is
due to the irritation of the semicircular canals of the ear. . All medical Europe is discussing the discovery, but while it is accepted as a
solution of the question as to the
cause, no progress has yet been made
toward a remedy.
"The semi-circular canals of the
inner ear,' says the professor, "have
the function of enabling us to maintain our equilibrium. Irritation of
the canals causes nausea, vomiting
and loss of balance. The doctors
found in their experiments that a
deaf child in whose ears the canals
had been destroyed could not be made
seasick, and that animals, although
whirled in swings and given deep
sea treatment, did not get the seasickness."
Then the doctor went on to say
that the ancient and accepted idea
that one might prepare the system
for a voyage by dieting was all a
foolish whim. No matter how much
the stomach might be treated by a
thorough plumbing, refitting, and
housecleaning and no matter how
much or how little food be used, the
result would not reach seasickness.
NEW   IMMIGRATION   RECORDS
Thousands of New Settlers Will Make
Their Homes in Manitoba—Vigorous Campaign On
That this year's Immigration
would far surpass anything that
Western Canada has ever seen and
that a large portion of these people
were coming to stany in Manitoba,
was the announcement made by
Bruce Walker, commissioner of immigration for the Dominion government.
That the valuable and desirable
homesteads which Manitoba has to
offer to the settler were being taken
up with a readiness that surprised
everyone, was another announcement
made by Joseph Burke, provincial
immigration   officer.
For the first six months of the
year it can therefore be said that
Manitoba has fared exceedingly well
and to make the demand for Manitoba's farms a lasting one, large
posters have been printed calling attention in moderate terms to the
many advantages of water and timber which these parts of Manitoba
open for settlement abundantly en-
Joy in comparison with other lands
in the provinces farther west.
Commissioner Walker made the
statement that an approximate total
ofthe immigration into the country
during February, March, April, May,
June and July would figure 140,000
and that the immigration for the
whole year would be at least a quarter of a million and perhaps might
reach three hundred thousand. This,
of course, applies only to the western provinces and does not include
any settlers stopping east of Winnipeg where Mr. Walker's jurisdiction
commences.
This increase has been largely
among the British immigration,
states Mr. Walker and the American
immigration from across the border
has maintained the same steady level
that It has always stood at since the
farmers of the middle west found
out the good things that waited on
them across the line in Canada.
As evidence that the tide of Immigration is nol diminishing, Mr. Walker produced a report showing that
650 people had just arrived from
Glasgow. From this on, however, the
lists will grow less until Christmas,
when the tide will be going the other
way.
When Joseph Burke, provincial superintendent of immigration, was
seen he was quite as optimistic as
Mr. Walker. As proof that Manitoba
was doing its share in advertising
its possibilities he pointed to a monster poster in letter six Inches high,
which will be distributed along the
railway lines throughout the entire
length and breadth of Canada so
that the colonist as soon as he enters
the new land will be confronted with
a list of Manitoba advantages. It
reads: "The province of Manitoba
offers homes to millions. Thousands
of homesteads within 200 miles of
the great city of Winnipeg; within
twenty-five miles of railway lines in
operation. Plenty of good water and
timber. Both land and homestead
seekers will get all information at
provincial immigration headquarters
in Montreal, Toronto and from Joseph Burke, superintendent of immigration, at 178 Logan avenue, Winnipeg. By order of the Minister of
Agriculture  and  Immigration.'
With this advertising at their back,
says Mr. Burke, the largest amounts
of advertising of farther west lands
done by interested parties will be
discounted and Manitoba will receive
the recognition,
 o	
CHINESE   IMMIGRATION
SPORTS
The Victoria Times in its issue of
July 4 had a report of the speech of
Hon. Wm. Templeman at the Cic-
toria Theatre the previous evening.
An examination of that report shows
that the minister made the following
reference to the matter of the proposed abolition of the Chinese head
tax:
"The Chinese have been coming in
in considerable numbers of late and
the question is what shall we do as
to the $500 head tax . . .As to the
increase in the head tax I do not
say that I would be prepared to say
it should be done . . .1 would very
much prefer to see an agreement
which would limit to a very reduced
number the Chinese coming here,
somewhat on the lines of our agreement with Japan."
Mr. Justice Murphy, the commissioner appointed by the Laurier government to investigate the fraudulent entry of Chinese at British Columbia ports, embodied in his report
the following recommendation:
"The commission, therefore, recommends that If practicable an arrangement be made with the government of China similar to that now
in force with Japan, whereby a fixed
number of Chinese only be allowed
to enter Canada In each year, the"
Chinese government in issuing permits to give preference to merchants.
In return, the Chinese Restriction
Act to be made inapplicable to subjects of China.
"A similar arrangement to be
made with any other government
having Chinese subjects, and the act
likewise to be thereupon Inapplicable to such persons."
The people of British Columbia
will, therefore, see from the above
that there Is a very real danger of
the head tax being abolished should
the Liberal government be returned
to power. The Colonist has already
pointed out that the government at
Pekln is such an unstable body that
any such agreement would hardly be
worth the paper It is written on, but
more than that, even were the Chinese government in a position to enforce the terms of such agreement
there is not the slightest guarantee
that British Columbia would not be
flooded with hlnese who would reach
the country by a round about route.
It is well known that while the Japanese government has made a bona
fide effort to regulate immigration
to Canada many Japanese reach this
province illegally by way of Mexico.
That the Chinese would do the same
thing goes without saying. Mr. Templeman, on the question of Chinese
immigration, undoubtedly speaks
with the authority of the government
of Sir Wilfrid Laurier.—Colonist.
ROYAL   BLUES   DEFEATED
in the auditorium last night Cor-
Iey's invincibles went down to defeat
at the hands of the Quill Drivers in
one of the most exciting games of
the series, the score being 33-9. Bert
Blake, who was the shining star of
the Quill Drivers, met with an accident in sliding to third base and will
be confined to his room for a few
days. A large number witnessed the
game.
YOUNG   PLAYERS SPOILED
While It Is the natural and quite
laudable ambition of nearly every
young man who starts playing professional baseball to climb into the
ranks of the major league and participate in a championship series before his career is over, it is not wise
for a young played to break into the
charmed circle of big leaguers too
soon.
Perhaps this does not mean Calgary of Western Canada League players, yet it has taken place even in
this league. Collins of Winnipeg was
taken over by Comiskey, but let loose
without a trial and he came back.
Skeels had a smiliar experience with
Detroit. Perhaps Wally Smith and
Wilson are exceptions, for they are
still with the big league teams that
purchased them. Si Pieb was bought
but came back, and Helnrichs also
had a look at a major league manager, but he was let out before he
knew he had arrived.
Occasionally a player conies into
the big league practically from nowhere and develops into a star. Seini-
occasionally a younster comes into
fast company without much experience and manages to acquire enough
ability to become one of the average
performers who form so great a part
of the major league array of talent.
More often a good player and perhaps a star of the first magnitude
is ruined by a too early accession to
the perquisites of a major league uniform.
The young player is inclined to believe that whenever he is offered a
major league contract to sign his future is Assured. His friends tell him
so and no one else tells him any
differently. In a few days he Is
likely to receive a note from the
owner of the team to which he is
signed, or the manager may call him
to one side and tell him briefly that
he has been disposed of to this or
that minor league team, and that he
can get his railway ticket and berth
at the office to the town in which
that team is playing.
This comes as a painful surprise
to the young man, and his friends
cry out against the injustice of letting him go without a trial. The
player does not know, neither do his
friends, that when he signed a major league contract the club owner
who signed him probably had in
mind already the minor league destination for which that payer was
determined. They do not know that
he was slgneed to a contract on the
1000-to-l chance that he might
prove one of these once-in-a-decade
tinds that need no gradual development. They do not know that the
manager or the club owner, and perhaps the club's scout, have watched
him in practice and have discovered
in a few minutes faults of style or
inexperience which cannot be eradicated except by the slow school of
experience.
Gasoline Bouts on  the River
Gasoline motor boats have at last
Invaded the upper Skeena River and
they are thus far working satisfactorily. Last week Mr. LaTrace of
Prince Rupert arrived with the first
gasoline boat on board the Indaner,
says the Omineca Herald. He had It
put Into the water at once and has
since been running between Hazelton
and Sealey, and up to date they have
had very little trouble In bucking the
rapid waters of the Skeena. Wlggs
O'Neal of Rupert Is also on his way
up the river with his tunnel boat
the Klt-e-ehen. He successfully navigated the Little Canyon under his
own power and the first of the week
he intended to hit the Big Canyon.
He has 100 cases of gasoline on board
and should arrive here today or tomorrow if he has no mishaps. Gasoline boats on the Skeena is an advancement of some importance as up
to the present there has been nothing
for local travel except the old time
Indian dug-outs.
"Do you know the 'Brave Old
Dukee of York'?" she inquired of
him at the musical "at home."
And he responded quietly: "No-
er-can't say I do. Fact is, I've only
been into one or two pubs in the
neighborhood."
And you could have cut the silence
that followed into thick solid chunks.

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