BC Historical Newspapers

BC Historical Newspapers Logo

BC Historical Newspapers

Prince Rupert Journal May 28, 1912

Item Metadata

Download

Media
prj-1.0311791.pdf
Metadata
JSON: prj-1.0311791.json
JSON-LD: prj-1.0311791-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): prj-1.0311791-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: prj-1.0311791-rdf.json
Turtle: prj-1.0311791-turtle.txt
N-Triples: prj-1.0311791-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: prj-1.0311791-source.json
Full Text
prj-1.0311791-fulltext.txt
Citation
prj-1.0311791.ris

Full Text

Array The Journal
$5.00
a year
i^GISUTTV^1
tim^lXnpet
High Class
Job Printing
in all Lines
VOL.  I.
PRINCE   RUPERT,   B.   C  TUESDAY, MAY 28,  1912.
Price, Five Cents.
NO.   151.
WATER SITUATION
IS WELL IN HAND
City Engineer Reports Upon it at Council Meeting-Medical Health Officer Finds that the
Supply is free from all Contamination and is in Good Condition
for Use-Pains will be
Taken to Avoid any
Pollution.
The city water situation Is well
In hand by the engineer and there
is no immediate danger of trouble.
Later there may require to be a
curtailing of the hours during which
it may be used. Moreover, Dr. Red-
die, the medical health officer, says
the water is good for use. His
analysis given at the council meeting
last night Bhowed that there were
no impurities in the water used by
the city and it was absolutely safe
for use.
The  city  engineer   presented   the
following report:
To  the  Chairman   and  Members  of
the Waterworks Committee.
Gentlemen—Re water (mpply, I
beg to report on the supply of water
at the present time.
It was necessary to start the Morse
Creek pump on May 10 to help out
the gravity supply, and suice that
time the gravity supply has been
too small to be of any practical service. About ten days ago the flow
over the waste weir of Morse Creek
dam ceased and since that time the
supply has been taken from the
Morse Creek reserve, the level of the
water falling eighteen inches. On
May 22, the Morse Creek pump was
stopped and the gasoline pump at
Mays Creek started. The level of
water in Morse Creek dam Is now
slowly rising. The draught from
Hays Creek exceeds the amount coming in, and as the reserve in Hays
Creek Is very small it will be impossible to continue for very long
to obtain the entire supply from this
source.
I estimate the daily wat;er eon-
sumption at 300,000 gallons, and the
inflow to the Morse Creek dam,
150,000 gallons.
So long as the monthly rainfall
keeps up to the minimum rainfall
of which we have a record, viz.,
3.67 inches, in August, 1911, there
will be sufficient water for all pur
poses, but so far in May there has
only been 2 inches, while in May,
1911, the monthly rainfall was 4.53
inches.
One thousand tons of cast iron
pipe have been shipped and should
reach here early In June. With this
shipment is sufficient 18-inch pipe
to extend from Shawatlans Passage
to the corner of Frederick Street and
Eleventh Avenue.
The steel pipe for the section from
Shawatlans Lake to Shawatlans
Passage should reach here before the
end of June. The flexible jointed
pipe for the submarine work will
be in the next shipment. By having
this flexible jointed pipe shipped by
rail across the continent six weeks
would be gained in the time of delivery and enable the completion of
the line of Shawatlans Lake to Eleventh Avenue, where a temporary
wood pipe line, 1,000 feet long,
could be laid to connect with the
existing 3-inch wood pipe on Eighth
Avenue. I do not consider, however, that this would be of much
advantage, for it would be of no
use for fire protection on account
of the small sized existing main. It
would, therefore, be impossible to
move the Morse Creek pump and' a
new pump would be necessary, to
procure which would require considerable time and money.
Under  the circumstances,  if rain
does  not  come,  In  my  opinion  the
j best course to pursue is to continue
i pumping from  Hays  Creek as long
i as the supply will permit; when this
j source    is    exhausted,    pump    from
Morse   Creek.     When  the  level   of
the water in  the Morse Creek dam
is two feet below the crest the use
of water should be curtailed;  first,
by  pumping only  at  night,  and  if
the  dry  weather  continues  it  may
even    be   necessary  to  restrict  the
f Continued on Last Page)
REDUCING THE STAFF
City Engineer's Department will be Relieved of Draftsman Parker at
End of Month.
Alderman Montgomery Not satisfied
With the Way This Is Being Done
—Thinks It Inconsistent
The city engineer's staff Is being
reduced in compliance with the
promise made some time ago by the
head of the department that he
would be able to reduce it. J. J.
Miller has retired and Colonel Davis
reported that Mr. Parker could also
be relieved of duty.
Alderman Bullock-Webster moved
the adoption of the report.
Alderman Montgomery could not,
see that a consistent course was being followed. He referred to the
star chamber meeting and the action
agreed upon there. He thought
they should follow some course.
The mayor explained that this had
come iu as a result of a discussion
he had with the city engineer, when
he suggested that if there were any
reductions that could be made it
should be done.
In reply to Alderman Morrissey,
the city engineer said that Mr. Hewitt would take over the work of the
drafting room.
Alderman Morrissey said there
were Inconsistencies. There had
been a report from the engineering
office recommending an increase all
round.
The mayor said there was no such
report read.
Alderman Montgomery thought it
SUCTION TWO TENDERS
* Tenders   will   be   called   for *
* the work of improving Section *
* Two as asked for by those con- *
* cerned.    Alderman Kerr moved *
* that tenders be called  for and *
* that   the   city   engineer   tender *
* also.    The motion carried.
was not fair to Mr. Parker. They
had reached a decision to* call for
the resignations of all the staff and
should abide by that.
The  motion  to  adopt  the  report
carried.
ALBERTA  ELECTIONS
Government  Members  in Bye-Elections
Net with Success Yes
terday.
Members   of   reconstructed   Ministry
Endorsed by tlie Electorate on
Appeal to People
Edmonton, May 27.—In . the by-
elections here today Hon. Charles W.
Cross, the government supporter in
Edmonton, was elected by 500 of a
majority.
The government candidate is leading in Sedgwick, and Studgeon in
Cardston will probably be elected.
The only constituency In doubt Is
Claresholm, where Hon. Mr. McKen-
zle is leading but is having a hard
fight owing to his personal unpapu-
larity.
WANT TO SEE ROLL
Real Estate Exchange Requests Privilege of Taking Copy of Assessors Figures.
The Mayor and the Chairmen of the
Different Committees Will Go
Into  the  Whole  Subject
The Prince Rupert Real Estate
Exchange has asked the council for
permission to examine the rolls of
the assessor for the purpose of ascertaining the assessed value of each
lot. This came up last night at the
council meeting on a letter from R.
White, secretary of the exchange.
It was decided to refer the matter
to the mayor and the chairmen of
the different committees.
When the matter came up the
mayor said that this had been before
the finance committee. That committee had decided against granting
the request. The matter was now
before the whole council.
Alderman Clayton felt that the
roll was open to the public. As long
as the time of the officials was not
interfered with he was agreeable to
allow the privilege. He moved that
the request be granted upon the conditions he referred to.
Alderman Bullock-Webster said
that if the Real Estate Exchange
was entitled to this, in common with
other citizens, he was agreeable to
giving it. He did not want to see
any special privileges allowed.
Alderman Douglas thought that
there were going to be special privileges to one class.
Alderman Kerr pointed out that
the exchange was willing to take any
time that was allotted to it. The
result of this would be that the city
would be well advertised.
Alderman Dybhavn was opposed
to granting this privilege, as it
would embarass the assessor.
Alderman Clayton said he was not
in favor of doing anything that
would interfere with the assessor's
work. He asked to hear from the
assessor.
Mr. McLennan said that he felt
that the cutting off of the real estate
men from his books worked some
hurt to the real estate men. There
were real estate men who had nearly
as much information as he himself
had. He did not want to keep back
any information. He suggested that
if a committee took this up some
solution might be found.
Alderman Bullock-Webster moved
in amendment that the mayor and
chairmen of the committees should
consider the matter, being given
power to act.
The vote resulted in a tie, which
was broken by the mayor voting in
favor.
Rent  for Poles
The Prince Rupert Hydro-Electric
Company will be charged $5 a month
for the use of the telephone poles
belonging to the city along which
they will carry a private telephone
line.
 o	
To Deliver Pipe
Tenders are to be called by the
city for delivering 1,000 tons of water pipe at the trenches. The mayor,
believing this was a proposal for
ordering new pipe, advised caution
on the start, until he found it was
only delivering pipe ordered. Tiie
city engineer will be asked to submit an estimate on the work, but
not to tender owing, as Alderman
Clayton pointed out, to the facl thai
he was not In a position to compete
as he would have to go out and
hire teams.
PUNISHED   REBEL
Member of one of Chief Families  of
Mexico Put to Death by
Federals.
Millionaire Is Executed  for Treason
by the Governing Section  of
Mexican Republic
Mazatlan, Mexico, May 27.—Roberto Alameda, a millionaire member
of one of the chier families of Sin-
aloa, was executed last night by the
federals for treason.
THE COLD STORAGE
George H. Collins in Victoria Tells of
What His Company is
Doing Here.
He Will Have His Trawlers at  Work
on the Coast  This  Fall  to
iSegiii   Operations
George H. Collins, managing director of the Prince Rupert Fish and
Cold Storage Company, which has
established at the Grand Trunk terminals one of the largest cold storage plants In the world, was in the
city on business, says the Victoria
Times. Mr. Collins, who was the
prime mover in the big enterprise
to which Prince Rupert points with
no little pride, recently returned
from England, where he was in consultation with prominent financial
interests relative to an amplification
of the company's plans which may
result in other extensive fisheries'
plants along the northern British
Columbia coast.
To a Times representative last
evening Mr. Collins said the company's outlay to date was about
three-quarters of a million dollars.
This included $400,000 for the enor-
mour reinforced concrete cold storage buildings at Prince Rupert, four
steel trawlers ordered in England
some time ago, and other essential
equipment. The trawlers, each of
which will have a capacity of 300,,-
000 pounds of halibut, will be here
in November or December, and the
enterprise will be started in full
swing about the beginning of next
year. In addition to the trawlers
there will be six wooden fishing
boats which are to be constructed
on  the coast.
The cold storage establishment has
a capacity of 14,000,000 pounds of
halibut, which, Mr. Collins says, is
not equalled by any single cold storage warehouse in the world. Halibut, for which there Is an illimitable
market, particularly in the New England States, will be the principal
fish shipped, but much is expected
of the cod fisheries. "You will be
surprised to learn," Mr. Collins observed, "that the grey cod catch in
England last year exceeded in value
the whole salmon pack in British
Columbia." There Is a. boundless
market for cod in Russia. Pending
the completion of the Grand Trunk
Pacific Railway the company will
make other arrangements for the
transport of their fish, but there Is
no doubt that when the new transcontinental is ready to receive
freight one of its most important
feeders will be the immense enterprise of the Prince Rupert Fish and
Cold Storage Company. Steam will
be turned on at the big plant shortly
and the company will manufacture
ice during the summer months. ' A
fertilizer plant will also be established at Tuck's Inlet; lumber and piles
have been ordered for the wharf to
be  constructed  there without  delay.
Mr. Collins has been working on
this big fisheries enterprise for several years. He made numerous trips
to the east and the Old Country,
and succeeded in enlisting the cooperation of powerful financial interests who were quick to appreciate
the immense possibilities of the British Columbia deep-sea fisheries. Mr. |
Collins also submitted an appllcn- ;
tion to the Dominion government for
the subsidy provided for the encouragement of the cold storage industry,
and this was granted. He will Boon
have the satisfaction of Beeing In full
operation the result ol nis tireless
efforts, :>ii enterprise which will nol
have its counterpart on this continent at least.
FIGURES RELATING
TO MONEY BYLAWS
How the Money has Been Expended on the
Electric Light and Telephone Systems-
Aid. Montgommery Objects to the
way the Telephone Extensions
are Being Paid for-Mayor
Reflects on Past
Councils
The necessary 10 per cent of the
assessable property in the city has
been represented on the signatures
to the petitions for the three bylaws which are now to be submitted
to the people to provide $35,000 for
tne city hall, $66,000 for addition
to the electric light and $20,000 for
the telephone extensions. The bylaws were introduced last night at
the council meeting and put through
the council for submission to the people. . It was very late in the evening
when these measures were brought
forward and several of the council
left before they were disposed of.
Alderman Douglas, as the father
of the bylaws—triplets, no less—had
for  his   guidance   figures  submitted
Arc   lights   . . .         535.45
$93,791.23
Amount authorized by the
present  bylaw    $66,000,00
Amount  in excess of that
authorized     $27,791.23
Capital charges and additions proposed by Mr.
.Matthews    $37,570.00
$65,361.28
On this total estimate it is proposed to raise $66,000 by the new
bylaw.
On the telephone construction the
expenditure is put as follows:
VOTING ON BYLAWS
* The vote on the bylaws will •
* be on June 20 at the new city *
* hall with City Clerk Woods re- •
* turning officer.
by the heads of the departments
which showed the financial situation
with respect to the electric light department and the telephone. These
figures show that in the light department there were the following
capital charges:
Salaries     $      597.33
Pole  line    '.. .   35,35*2.80
Advertising      133.02
Miscellaneous      2,166.95
Power,  etc         163.82
Plant and equipment ..'. 45,619.66
Supplies, miscellaneous . . 100.76
Tools  and   appliance   . • .        505,00
Real estale        5,000.00
Plank   roadway              975.86
Connections            442.05
Street   lighting         1,311.70
Meters             599.20
Freight   cartage,  etc.   . . .        173.35
Tools and applia
Miscellaneous
nces  . .
$      176.90
Fixtures and equ
Switchboard   . .
ipment.
492.02
5.075.55
4,968.13
3,934.03
Freight, cartage
etc.   . .
3,916.60
31.87
8,000.00
|
Amount author!?
ed by by
$47,994.83
.$40,000.00
Amount in excess of authorized   expenditure. .$  7,994.83
Amount   Manager   Love's
estimate    $  9,482.65
$17,477.48
In connection with the telephone
bylaw, Alderman .Montgomery raised
objection to the way in which it was
being financed. It was proposed to
put $1,000 into extensions. To that
extent, the borrowing power of the
city would be affected. The benefits
from the telephone were confined to
that part of the public that used the
(Continued on Page Two)
*********
GOVERNMENT MONEY
At   the   council   meeting   last •
night    the    provincial    govern- •
ment  filed a formal request  for •
$132,615.71  due from  the city. •
The  mayor  referred   it   to   the •
finance committee, "with power *
to act,"  he added. *
Alderman      Kerr     suggested *
that  before  this  was  paid  the *
government   might  be  asked   to •
repair   some   sewers   built    by •
them.
The   mayor  said   there   were '
a   good   deal   of   repairs   to   be
made   and   government   lots   to ,;
be sold. •
FIRE IN THEATRE
ENGAGING JANITOR
Council Discusses at Length Method of
Securing Caretaker for New
City Hall.
It  Has Been  Decided lo Have a Call
Made by Placing Notice on Bulletin Hoard in the Untitling
Eighty  Persons Lo;:e Lives  in Spanish
Play   House  Following
Explosion.
WAINWRIGHT   FIRE
New Divisional Point on  the G. T. P.
Suffers from Flames
Yesterday.
Loss   of   Property   Is   Estimated   ul
$100,04)0—Conflagatjon in tlie
Business  Section  of City
.Moving   Picture   Machine   Exploded
With   Fatal   Results   Last
Niglil   in   Spain
Castellon, Spain, May 7.— Eighty
persons were killed tonight fit a fire
iii ii theatre al Vlllareal caused by
tlie explosion of a rinciiintogniplie.
Winnipeg, Mny 27.—The south
side of Second Street, In the business
section of Walnwright, Alberta, was
swept by Tire today with a loss of j
$100,000. The town hall, Union
Bank, the fire hall and other buildings were destroyed. t
Tenders for Sand
Tenders for sand were opened at
the council meeting last night for
use at the reservoir al Acropolis
Hill. The Westholme company bid
$2.75, while Belllngham & Craig offered It for $1.40 on the scow at
the wharf. The lenders were referred to the city engineer for report.
Some considerable time was given
at the council meeting last night to
the question of what was the best
way to get a janitor for the new
building. The mayor suggested that
perhaps the police could supply the
labor to tin it, presumably by prla-
ioners, li was finally decided to gel
| :i permanent janitor, applications to
be called for by ;i notice on the hill-
board outside the hall. The question en mi. up upon the receiving of
additional applications,
Alderman Clayton asked when it
waB supposed thai the question of a
janitor would come up. He asked
thi.- simply for information.
The mayor said there was the possibility thai after the police moved
Into the hall thai they might be able
to ilo this work.
, Alderman Kerr said that his experience had been that the system
! of having a place looked after other
; than by a regular janitor was un-
I satisfactory. He moved that the
council proceeu to select a janitor.
Alderman Clayton agreed that It
I would be belter to have a regular
i janitor.
Alderman Bullock-Webster suggested that they advertise for a jani-
j tor before allotlng the post.
(Continued   on   Last  Page.) PRINCE RDPBRT JOURNAL
Tuesday, May 28, 1912.
r
prince iKupcvt journal ;
Telephone   138
LOWER LICENSES
Office: 128 Third Avenue East,
near McBride Street. Telephone 138.
P. O. Box 607.
()   H. wELSON, Editor.
DAILY  EDITION.
Published   every   morning   except
Monday.    Delivered by canier in the I
city at the following rate if paid in
advance: —
One Year $5.00
Six Months $2.50
Three   Months $1.25
One  Month $  .50
WEEKLY EDITION.
Published every Frldaj for circulation outside the city of 1'rinee
Ruperl in. $2.00 :; year addressed to
points In Canada or $3.00 a year to
ail I'Oints in the United Kingdom,
the United Stnies or other foreign
countries.
Advertising Bales  Upon Application.
Tuesday,  May  28,  1912.
THE   .JAUNDICED   EYE
In the organ of the Progressives
last evening appeared a letter purporting to have been written by W.
Sibbald insinuating all kinds of evil
In connection with the new post office buildings. Lest there might be
some misconception with respect to
the matter, we give some of the
chief facts in connection with that
building.
When the Conservative Executive
■of this city, in line with the expressed desire of many of the public bodies of the city and citizens
generally, requested the removal of
the post office from the present site
and asked for a location more in
the heart of the business section
of the city, they found in the sitting member, Mr. Clements, a ready
worker in their interests. There
was an expressed desire that the
removal should not be delayed until
the permanent office was erected for
that would, it was felt, be too long
to wait. The member for the district was met with the expressed
willingness on the part of the government to accede to the request
provided a building were obtained
at a reasonable rent. In turn, this
phase of. the situation was passed
on to Prinse Rupert and the situation had to be faced that there was
no building that could be obtained
that would serve the purpose.
After some delay a proposal was
made by the company that has erected the post office building that they
would construct the building and do
it to suit the needs of the department. The facts were communicated to Ottawa, and that done, the
work of the Conservative Executive
ended. The matter was then one
of negotiations between the owners
of the proposed building and the officials of the department at Ottawa.
Terms wore agreed upon and the
building pul up on a rush order and
ii; ,i manner thai does credll to the
builders of it.
The matter of rent was purely a
departmental mutters and the returns
that are being obtained from the
building in the matter of rents are
anything but unreasonable. Had
they not been reasonable there is
no doubt whatever that the building
would never have been rented to the
government.
But to the jaundiced eye all things
are yellow and there are those who
can see in the enterprise that
prompted the erection of a building
like that put up nothing but graft.
It is only reasonable to expect that,
however, from sources that expect
graft. The new building reflects
credit upon those who undertook its
erection. It is lo be hoped that it
will be a financial success and that
there may be more such structures
erected In the city.
The holders of liquor licenses
in the city last night wrote the
council requesting a reduction
in the license fees in view of the
fact that, the hours of selling
had been curtailed! that the
license fee was tlie maximum
and the returns were not what
they had been.
Alderman Montgomery moved
to refer tills to the finance committee for report. In explanation, he said that he was not
In favor of the hotels but he
fell there should be a reduction
in the license when tlie hours
were shortened. He was not in
favor of taking much from the
hotels.
The motion carried.
cry had been ordered by last year's
council, and in reply to Alderman
Montgomery as to how the council
expeeied to have it paid for, Alderman Clayton suggested that it was
probably by bylaw—that was the
only  way  it conltl  he  done.'
The city solicitor acquiesced in
this.
Alderman Montgomery wanted to
know why a bylaw was not floated
before expending the money.
The mayor said the policy of past
councils was to expend money first
and float the bylaws later. That
was why the present council was
loaded with these debts.
The bylaws carried, awaiting only
the vote of the people to be finally
adopted.
TRADES   AND   LABOR
Interest in  Organization  Is  Increasing—Will Meet Once a Month
During Summer
At the Trades and Labor Council
last evening a number of question
affecting local labor conditions
were brought up and ably dealt with
by the members present. The council is being well attended and a number of new organizations will soon
be  sending  in  delegates.
At the meeting last evening the
council decided to meet once a
month only during the months of
June, July and August. The meeting night will be the fourth Monday  of  the  month.
Football Tonight
This evening at 8 o'clock the Caledonian football club will play a team
picked from the carpenters. An
eight a side team will be chosen.
.Members of the Callies will meet in
their club rooms at 7:30, when the
team will be picked. The match will
take place on Second Avenue. A
business meeting of the club will be
held In the club rooms after the
match.
I ltd 'BES   RELATING  TO
MONEY BYLAWS
(ConlInued  Prom  Page Om i
illume. He fell thai This shoiififall
be paid by the profits from the system. Instead of that, they were
borrowing on the credit of the city
for something that benefitted the
few.
The city solicitor explained thai
the bylaw would not create n charge
upon the general revenues. On the
contrary, It was expected, from the
past record of the system, that tho
profits would pay the Interest and
sinking fund.
Alderman Clayton explained that
tho Intention was to devote 20 per
■cent of the profits to extensions, but
no more.
Later on Alderman Montgomery
asked what last year's council did
In the matter of Increasing expenditures In the electric light.
It was explained that the macliin-
CONTRACTs  AWARDED
Tlie contracts for lead wool for
connections in tlie water pipe were
awarded last night by the council.
The tenders as received had been
referred to the engineer, who found
that Crane & Co. were $88 lower on
the whole quantity. H. H. Clarke,
the next, asked $8, while Crane <*.
Co. asked $7.80. Later, Mr. Clarke
In a message received offered to
supply it for $7.70.
Alderman Morrissey felt that this
offer of Mr. Clarke's could not be
received, as the tenders were all in
before.
Alderman Clayton favored the
Clarke offer, The tender of $8 could
be accepted and then a rebate allowed.
The city solicitor pointed out the
difficulty   that   lay   in   the   way   of
Mr.   Clarke's  offer,   not   being  such
as he could be held to, as his stated
' prices might change.
Alderman Dybhavn thought the
only thing Hun could be done was to
accept the offer of Crane iims.
Alderman Maitland said it would
not be business to do otherwise.
Aid, Bullock-Webster thought the
public would not sanction giving It
In such a way as was suggested
should be done in the matter of the
Clarke  bid.
Alderman Montgomery moved to
accept Crane & Co.'s tender.
Alderman   Clayton   felt   thai   $88
of a difference even, having In view
the  fact  that  It would  go  to local
| men,   was   not   too   much   to  expect
should the rebate not be allowed.
Alderman Montgomery felt that
; personal feeling could not be taken
! Into account.
The offer of Crane & Co. was ac-
j cepted.
On the pig lead, where the dif-
| ference was $35 only, It was decided
'to give the contract to Crane & Co.,
I although Howe & McN'ulty were the
i next  tenderers.
|    FOREST FIRES    f
* »:• •:•*<? »> * * *:• »> .> •%>»:«£ »:• >:• * * * »:* # * # ♦ •> •j.
In the past forest fires have generally been regarded as acts of Providence, which could not be prevented,
but must be accepted in a spirit of
more or less patient resignation.
More recently, however, it has been
shown conclusively that forest fire
damage can be practically prevented
if proper measures are taken. The
rapid rise in timber values has made
owners less willing than formerly to
submit to unnecessary loss, and this
is in turn is bringing about the adoption of protective measures not only
by railroads but by owners of tim-
ber'ands. The latter are in pari inspired by the desire to save their
own property mid in part to eliminate carelessness which might result
in damage sails by neighboring owners. The rigid enforcement of the
law of responsibility for carelessness In setting forest fires will perhaps go further in preventing damage from this source than any other
measure. As long as it is cheaper
to containue careless methods than
to take proper precautions, fires
will continue to devastate our forests.
An example along this line is the
suit recently heard before the supreme court at Vancouver against
the Paterson Timber Company, for
$10,230 damages caused by fire
spreading from the defendants lands.
The court held the company liable
and the amount of damages to be
recovered will be determined at a
future hearing. The responsibility of
railroads for fires spreading from
their right of ways is clearly established fn two cases also recently
heard in British  Columbia.
In Clarkson vs. Nelson & Fort
Shephard Railway is involved the
largest claim for damages ever entered in a British Columbia timbei
case. The original claim for $375,-
000 Involved 8,320 acres of timber
limits, and now another area of
4,210 acres has been brought into
the case, in respect of which, additional damages of $408,000 are
claimed. The defendant company has
been held responsible for the fire,
but the award for damages has not
yet been made.
The suit of the King Lumber
Mills, Limited, located near York,
B. C, against the Canadian Pacific
Railway is similar in principle. The
amount claimed in this case Is $140,-
000. The jury was unable to determine positively the source of the
fire, which spread from the company's right of way. It found, however, that the company was negligent In failing to maintain a clear
right of way, and in falling to properly attend the fire when reported
by its employees. It also finds that
the railroad did not take reasonable
precautions to prevenl the fire
spreading. The ajmount of damages
to he paid to the plaintiffs has yet
to be decided by the supreme court.
A few such cases as those will go
further toward preventing the occurrence of fires than any amount of
legislation.
 o	
METHODIST     MINISTERS
Stations   Allotted   to   tlie   Different
Preachers in This Part of
the Province
At the recent conference of the
Methodist Church held in Victoria
the following was the list of stations
as far as this district Is concerned:
Port Simpson—Geo. H. Raley.
Japanese Mission—To be supplied.
Prince Rupert—Charles R. Sing,
B.D.
Porcher Island—To be supplied.
Skidegate, Q. C. I.—John C. Spencer, M.I).
Graham Island—To he supplied,
under superintendent of Skidegate.
Jedway, Q. C. I.—To be supplied.
Stewart—To  be  supplied.
Port Esslngton—Wm. II. Pierce.
Kltse'ae —To  be  supplied   IL.E.).
Kltsolas Canyon and Copper River—To be supplied. (P. M. Hartley.)
Kitzeguela—George Edgar.
Hazelton—To   be  supplied.
Hazelton Hospital—Horace C.
Wrinch,  M.D.
Bulkley—Chas.  E. Batzold.
Kishpiax—Robert   \V.  Lee.
Hartley Bay—Under superintendent of Kitimaat.
Kilimaat—To   be  supplied.
Kitimaat West—To he supplied.
Kltlope—To  be  supplied.
China Hat—Lay Agent. (G. R.)
Kimsquit—To  be supplied.
Bella Coola—To be supplied. (W.
H.   Gibson.)
Bella Bella—To be supplied. (S.
C. S„ M.D.)
Ocean Falls—William Deans.
Rivers Inlet—To be supplied.
I Port Simpson.)
Granby—To   be   supplied.
Eastern Excursions—Low Rates
PRINCE   RUPERT   TO   ALL
Points East
Montreal   and   Re
turn
$130.00
Toronto     and     Return   . . .$125.50
New York  and Return   . . .$112.50
Chicago     and     Re
turn
..$100.50
St.   Paul   nnd   Return   .... $04.00
St;   Louis   and   Return   . . .$101.00
Frequent   Selling  Dates—Final   Return Limit October 31st.
EQUALLY LOW RATES TO OTHER POINTS
TRAYEI, SOUTH
via •
The Famous "Princess Line"
S. S. Princess   Royal—6   p.   m.  Sunday.
S. S. Princess -May—0 a. in. Sunday  morning.
J.  G.  McNAB,  General Agent. PRINCE RUPERT
Agency for all Atlantic Steamship Lines.
iiiiiiiiiiwiinTniii'iiii umii iiiMi urn i inn ii m»imim n—niiiii mum im
C. D. NEWTON
REAL    ESTATE
To Rent front offices in Exchange Block, lately occupied by Carss & Bennett.    Also inside offices;
 STEAM   HEATED  	
Exchange Block
P. O. HON 220.
3rd Ave and 6th St
PRINCE RUPERT, E. C.
CONTRACTORS, and MINING MACHINERY, and SUPPLIES, BUILDING MATERIALS, Gasoline Engines, Marine Engines, CONCRETE
MACHINERY, Rails, Wheels, Axles, etc. CANADIAN RAND CO.'S
PRODUCTS, Motor Vehicles & Trucks, Wire Rope, Steel, etc. Boilers, Agricultural Implements, Hoists, Teaming & Dump Wagons.
Third Avenue "^SSTS^ Ph»»",31
P.O. Box 436 prince rupert, r. c. Blue 326
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
SIR EDMUND WALKER, C.V.O., LL.D., D.C.L., President
ALEXANDER LAIRD, General Manager
CAPITAL, - 310.000.000 REST, -   $8,000,000
DRAFTS ON FOREIGN COUNTRIES
Every branch at Thm Canadian Bank of Commerce ifl equipped to issue drafts on
the principal cities in the foUowios; countries without delay '
Afrit";
Arabia
Argentine I
Australia
Austria-Huacmry
Belgium
Brazil
Bulgaria
Cevlon
Chili
China
Cuba
Holland
Faroe Ii
rinks*
Poioioaa
France Java
Fr ch Cochin China Malta
Germany^   _ Man;
Great Britain Mexico
India
Ireland
Italy
New Zca
Norway
Panama
Persia
Peru
Philippine Istnads
Portugal
Koumaaia
Russia
SerTia
Siam
Siberia
Soudan
South Africa
Spain
Straits Settlement*
Sweden
Switzerland
Turkey
United State*
Uruguay
West Imfiee, eU.
The amount of these drafts is stated in the money of the country where they are payable ; that is they are drawn in sterling, franca, marks, lire, kronen, florins, yen,
taels, roubles, etc, as the case may be. This ensures that the payee abroad will
receive tlie actual amount intended. A233
J. M. CHRISTIE, Manager Prince Rupert Branch
GASOLINE ENGINES
McINTYRE BLOCK
ASK US ABOUT THEM
PHONE 245
CANADIAN GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY, LTO. Crahtirney
S   See our MAHOGANY BEDROOM FURNI-
f   TURE with Sanitary Mahoganized Brass
Bedsteads to match   -   -   •
NEW  SHOW ROOMS  ON  SECOND AVENUE
In every branch of house furnishing we are well equipped.    Call
and  see  our stock.
The Big Furniture Store
2nd   Avenue
Corner of 2nd Ave.  & 6th St.
an{Hl«HKHKI«HKIWKHmtlWW»OB (WSKKKKll- gfl 0 Vg00«O CWJKWHJa0
Sw^nWMW»W(IWWJOODO«li) ckkhhkkhkumi CKHJDO t>D CHK>
For all kinds of
- - good - -
Insurance
SEE
GEO. LEEK
018 Third Ave.        Phone 200
Prince   Rupert
JEREMIAH H. KUGLER, Limited
SECOND   AVENUE
Prince Rupert, R. C.
ftOffWKHKHmBKWXHWKHKHKI*
The Club
g   Au    up-to-date    Barber    Shop
3   which caters to the fastidious.
$   The most modern shop north
of  Vancouver
Six Chairs Experienced
liaths Barbers
THE WESTHOLME BLOCK
Seond Avenue
"DOC"  DEMERS, Mgi.
Q^»MH*ttfrftiraa{H«hKH*gWtttHh»
Skeena .Land   District—District   of
Coast
TAKE NOTICE that Robert Un-
ger, of Eibenstock, Germany, occupation Farmer, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted on the east bank of the
Hocsall River and situated about
three-quarters of a mile in a northerly direction from the northeast corner of Lot 121; thence 20 chains In
a southerly direction following the
shore line of the Hocsall River;
thence 80 chains east; thence 20
chains north; thence 80 chains west
to point of commencement; containing 160 acres, more or less.
ROBERT UNGER.
By Emil Unger, Agent.
Dated April  18,  1912. a26
Skeeua   Land   District—District   of
Cassiar
TAKE NOTICE that I, George W.
Kerr, of Prince Rupert, B. C, occupation Butcher, intend to apply for
permission to pYospect for coal and
petroleum over the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted on the left, hank of Panorama Creek about one mile east of
the northeast corner of Claim No. 6,
being the southwest, corner of Claim
No. 10; thence north SO chains;
thence east SO cliains; thence south
80 chains; thence west 80 chains to
the point of commencement; containing 640 acres.
GEORGE  W.  KERR.
Date located April 6, 1012.      mlO
Skeena   Land    District—District   of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that I, Filippo
Panvinl, Engineer, of Prince Rupert,
B. C, intend to apply for a licence
to prospect for coal and oil on the
west coast of Graham Island, on the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted one mile
east from the northeast corner of
coal licence 5582; thence 80 chains
east; thence 80 chains south; thence
80 chains west; thence 80 chains
north, to the place of beginning; containing 640 acres.
m3 FILIPPO  PANVINI.
Located March  16, 1912.
NOTICE TO LEASE
Skeena. Land District—District of
Coast, Range Five
TAKE NOTICE that we, Geo. A.
Young and Fred E. Juggins, Intend
to apply for permission to lease the
following described foreshore: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
northeast boundary of Lot 992, on
Ice Berg Bay, Naas River, and about
two thousand feet north of Chamber's Creek; thence south 60 chains,
following high water mark; thence
east 10 chains; thence north 60
chains, following low water mark;
thence west 10 chains to point of
commencement.
GEO. A. YOUNG and FRED E. JUGGINS.
Located April 15, 1912. m3
THE IDEAL
Men's
Furnishing Boot
House
and Shoe
Subscribe  for  the  Prince  Rupert
Weekly Journal, J2.00 a year.
Harry Smith,
3rd and 7th Streets
*
*
*
*
* Corliss Coon Collars.   Everything *
t for the Working Man *
* *
••*••**•••*••*■*•■*•*••*•***
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that I, Filippo
Panvinl, Engineer, of Prince Rupert,
B, C, intend to apply for a licence
to prospect for coal and oil on the
west coasl of Graham Island, on the
j following described lands:—Com-
menclng at a post planted one mile
east from the northeast corner of
coal licence r>fiS2; thence SO chains
north; thence 80 chains east; tlience
80 chains south! thence 80 chains
west, to the place of beginning; containing 640 acres.
m3 FILIPPO   PANVINI.
Located March 16, 1912.
HAYNER BROS
Pioneer Funeral Directors and
Embalmers.     Open   Day   and
Night.     Ladies'    Assistant    in
Attendance
PHONE 86.    710 THIRD AVE.
Skeena    Land    District—District    of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that I, Filippo
Panvinl, Engineer, of Prince Rupert,
B. C., intend to apply for a licence
to prospect for coal and oil on the
west coast of Graham Island, on the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner of coal licence
6092; thence 80 chains north; thence
80 chains west; thence 80 chains
south; thence 80 chains east, to the
place of beginning; containing 640
acres.
ra3 FILIPPO   PVNVINI.
Located March 16, 1912. Tuesday, May 28,  1912.
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
SPORTS
GILL1S AND MARATHON
Vancouver athletic circles are in a
condition of "flurry" following the
statement made by Dune Gillis that
he will be unable to partake in the
Olympic trials at Montreal on June
8, says the News-Advertiser. To put
It less modestly than In the words
of the famous athlete, he will be
unable to compete in the great
weight events at Stockholm this
July. Air. Gillis has commenced business as a real estate broker. He
feels that to make a business a success It must be sent off to a good
start, and he thinks that were he
to absent himself from Vancouver
for several weeks, it might be a big
setback to him. However, there is
another point of view worthy of Mr.
Gillis' consideration, and there can
be no doubt that it will receive his
attention—at least Dr. Davidson,
president of the B. C. A. A., is endeavoring to make it as convincing
as possible.
Those who follow athletics in Vancouver, and they number some of
the most prominent business men
In the city, have a high regard for
Mr. Gillis. They wiBh to Bee him
successful in his business. But
everybody wishes to see him go to
Stockholm and win a glorious victory for British Columbia and Canada. Then, again, would a few
months abroad be disadvantageous
to this popular athlete's business career? Surely not. A man who
snatches high honors from Olympus
must surely be regarded as one
whom the Gods of Fortune specially
delights to cherish. Sherring, who
won the Marathon at Athens, was a
brakesman on a railroad operating
in Ontario. Behold him, returned
from Athens but a few months, a
prosperous business man. Everybody
wished to meet him. Had Sherring
had a thousand lots to sell it is
safe to say he would have disposed
of every one. This spring Mr. Gillis throw the hammer a distance of
190 feet. The record for the Olympic games is 174 feet. Dune Gillis
is the great hope of Canada for this
event. He is the one outstanding
figure of all our aspirants to Olympic honors. Canada hopes to win
many other events. Vancouver will
probably send two—at least one runner—to Stockholm. But, then, there
are many oth)Br runners, whereas
there can be but few formidable rivals of Dune Gillis in the weight
events. His throwing of the hammer Is phenomenal. He is nearly
as much at home with the discus
and it will be a tremendous disappointment to his many friends if he
does not reconsider his decision and
decide to go to Montreal. Mr. Gillis
will he on hand for the Olympic
trials at Brockton Point, and it is
to he hoped that he will decide there
and then to leave his business for a
few weeks in the hands of his capable partner, and go right after the
big prizes.
IMPERIAL   ATHLETES
British athletes will make a great
effort to redeem their somewhat impaired prestige at the Olympic games
iu Stockholm at the end of June.
This attempt will take the form of a
closely unified imperial struggle; in
other words the athletes of the
Mother Country are going to train
and fight together. Hitherto they
have' trained quite separately and
made no effort to ecrate an imperial
athletic esprit de corps. This year
teams representing Australia, Canada
and South Africa are going to England considerably in advance of the
Stockholm games to train with the
athletes' in England and go to
Sweden in company with them. They
will not be permitted to compete as
one team but they will have the
satisfaction of flying one flag and
comparing notes as to methods, li
is expected that they will draw a
grout deal of useful stimulus from
the comradeship.
Great Britain is without any athlete al present who stands head and
shoulders above his fellows. Nevertheless, the average of the men is
high and they an; oxpected on the
whole to make n much more brilliant
record than they did four years ago.
Lord Desboroug'.i is of the opinion
that the change of balance in the
world of athletics resulting from the
contests in 1908 when Americans
and others scored many victories
over Englishmen, is not due to deterioration of the English, but to
the remarkable progress recently on
the part of foreigners; that is to
say, the English are as good as ever,
but the foreigners are much better
than they were formerly. "
One of the bitter facts of the ln-
ternation struggle of 1908, from the
point of view of the English, was
the loss of the Marathon race. They
deemed themselves peerless as long
distance runners, but they were
beaten by the visitors. They are
determined to do their utmost to
capture the Marathon at Stockholm
and are arranging a big Marathon
tryout open to all comers, from
Windsor Castle to private grounds.
Swimmers, wrestlers and cyclists are
also on their mettle and those who
win over the English this year will
probably be forced to excel the performances at the late Olympiad.
Two steamers have beeu chartered
to carry the British entrants to
Stockholm in two large parties. Each
competitor will wear an overcoat and
straw hat like those of each of the
others so that the British contingent
will present a harmonious picture on
the opening day.
BAILEY IN TRAINING
if Joe Bailey, who is going to battle with Billy Allen for the Canadian
lightweight championship on June
29 at Bassano, Alta., does not "bring
back the bacon" it will not be for
want of hard drill and careful, intelligent attention to his physical
condition, says the Victoria Colonist.
Since Joe entered the professional
boxing game lie has learned a lot.
He is now what the ring fans call a
"wise guy." Since it was defintely
assured that Tommy Burns had succeeded in making him a match with
Allen, who holds the Flanagan belt,
the title, and all those other ornaments for which the Victoria whirlwind pines, the latter has made a
hermit of himself. His place lot
seclusions is the Four Mile House.
Here his friends may see him if they
call, or talk to him if they telephone.
But Joe's familiar figure is never
seen about the streets. He has left
all his old haunts, temporarily cut
out his comrades and well-wishers,
and is bending his will and devoting
his time to putting himself in condition to win next month's battle.
"How are you feeling?" was the
query shot at Joe over the telephone
yesterday. "Fine," was the cheery
reply.
"Do you find country life dull?"
"Too much to do to think about
that," was the chirpy answer. "I
get up at 6 o'clock and spend an
hour or two on the road. A little
skipping, some more running, shower
baths and rubbing, In addition to
three squares, fills up my day. I'm
not doing any sparring on account
of my,hand. It seems to have healed perfectly but I'm taking no
chances. There will be lots of time,
I figure, to put on the gloves during
the couple of weeks I will spend in
Calgary before the mill.
"Weight?     Oh,   I   don't   need   to
worry about that.    I've got my $200
forfeit  up,  But as I am  below the
1133 pound mark, I guess I'll collect
! that along with the purse."
It is not so much what Joe is go-
, ing   to    get  out  of  this  particular
match that he is thinking about.   He
knows   tl'.at,   if   he   does   not   make
good now, it is the lathing business
again for him. If he wins lie realizes
, better than anyone else, for he has
given    the   matter   a  lot  of  intent
! thought, what it will mean.    He will
j have his foot on the ladder to pug-
1 ilistic  fame.    Matches will come as
i thick  as  blackberries  in  July,  and
they all mean coin of the realm, and
that is what Joe, quite sensibly, is
thinking about.    He thinks   once he
gets rid of Allen and has that championship   safely  stowed   away,   that
the rest will come easy.   As has been
shown, he is not going to allow anything  to   remain  undone  that  will
help in bringing the title to the west.
ESTERDAY'S  BASEBALL
Northwestern    League
Vancouver, 0; Tacoma, 9.
Spokane, 7; Seattle, 2.
Portland, 8; Victoria, 11.
American League
Boston,  6;  Philadelphia,  12.
Washington, 5; New York, 10.
National League
New York, 6;  Brooklyn, 2.
;   St.   Louis,   6.'
Phildelphia,   0
Pittsburg,
Boston,   4
game.)
Boston,   I!
ond game.)
( First
Philadelphia, 0.  (Sec-
C. Gillinghani is leaving for Goose
Bay and other points today. He is
taking some crews to put on work
on the trails in that part of the district.
WM. S. HA^L, L. D. S. O. D. S.
:-:   DENTIST   :-:
Crown and Bridge Work a specialty.
All dental operations skillfully
treated. Gas and local anaesthetic;
administered for the painless extraction of teeth. Consultation free
Offices, Helgerson °.k., Prince Rupen
H. P irdon Munro   W. Nlcfcolson Lalley
MUNRO & LAILEY
ARCHITECTS
PRINCE RUPERT, B. C.
P. O. BOX 14        PRINCE RUPERT
M. M. STEPHENS & CO., LTD.
Offer   the   following   subject   to
prior sale without notice:
Section One
Lots 7 and 8, block 5; $6,000;
$2,000 cash; 6, 12 and 18 months.
Lots 3 and 4, block 8; $10,000; one-
third cash;   9  and  15  months.
Lot 4, Block 9; $6,500; $1,500 cash;
1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 years at 6 per cent.
Lots 30 and 31, Block 29; $6,000;
one-third cash; 6, 12 and 18
months.
Lot 46, block 29; $6,250; half cash;
6 and 12 months.
Section Two
Lots 50 and 51, block 12; $1,100
each;  $415 cash;  balance G. T. P.
Lot 26, block 12; $1,800; $675 cash;
balance G. T. P.
Lot 1, block 15; $1,050; $650 cash;
balance G. T. P.
Section  Five •
Lot 39, block 22; $1,600; $800 cash;
6 and 12 months. Has house rented for $12 per month.
Lots 41 and 44, block 27; $750 each;
half cash;  6 and 12 months.
Lot 8, block 29; $600; $350 cash;
6 and 12 months.
Lot 6, Block 13; $2,000; $500 cash;
1, 2, and 3 years at 6 per cent.
Section Six
Lot 38, block 22;  $950;  half cash;
6 and 12 months.
Lot 27, block 29; $1,000; half cash;
6 and 12 months.
Lot 30, block 29; $1,100; half cash;
6 and 12  months.
Section Seven
Lots   11   and   12,   block   5;   $1,000;
half cash;  6 and 12 months.
Lot 27, block 5;   $750;  half cash;
6 and 12 months.
Lots   5   and   6,   block   11;    $1,500;
half cash;  6 and 12 months.
M. M. STEPHENS & CO
Phone   222 Office  623%  Third Ave.
Lots   3   and   4,   block   19;   $1,700;
half cash; 6 and 12 months.
Lot 18, block 30;   $600;   half cash;
6 and 12 months.
Lot 16, block  35;   $800;  half cash;
6 and 12 months.
Section Eight
Lot  10, block  4;   $600;   $200 cash;
6 and 12 months.
Lot 31 and 32, block 15;$600 pair;
half cash; 6 and 12 months.
Lots 29 and 30, block 15; $650 pair;
half cash;  6 and 12 months.
Lot 13, block 27;  $550;  $450 cash;
balance 6 months.
Lots 29 and 30; block 46; $750 pair;
half cash; 6 and 12 months.
FOR SALE
Steam laundry with buildings, machinery and two lots; complete and
In first class condition; $9,000; one-
third cash; balance 1 and 2 years.
A bargain for the right mini.
FOR LEASH
50   feet,  Second  Avenue,  between
First and  Second Street.
50  feet Third Avenge.
FOR  RENT
Steam heated offices In the Stephens  Block.
Offices in new Post Office Block,
now under construction.
FOR  RENT
The best steam heated apartments
in the city; 5 rooms, bath, private
hall, and all modern conveniences,
in Campbell Block. Walls are deafened. Excellent marine view. $50
and $45, with range and hot water
equipment.
FOR   SALE
160 acres finest land in Kitsum
kalum Valley, $12.50 per acre.
See our lists.
Insurance written in all Its
branches. See our new B. C. Life
policy.
LTD.
P.  O. Box 276
P.O. Box 436
Phone 131
Office Requisites of Every Description.
"UNDERWOOD" TYPES«!
 Typewriters for Hire
"MAPFY"   Inter-Inter Filing Systems
1 IftVLl M. 0ffice Furniture
Call or Send for Catalogue.
C. H. HANDASYDE, Jr.,   Third Avenue,  Prince Rupert, B.C
OUR   BEST   LEADER
Rexall Glycerine Soap
15c the Cake.   Yon will come back for more
REMEMBER THE GUARANTEE
C.H. ORME, The Pioneer Druggist
Telephone 82      The ^OXClCC Store
SURANCE
Fire Insurance in Board Companies.— We Never Handled Any Other
Norwich Union Fire Ins. Society, Ltd., of Norwich, Eng. (Founded 1797.)
London Assurance Corporation, of London, Eng. (Founded 1720.)
Alliance Assurance Company, Ltd., of London, Eng. (Established 1805.)
Caledonian Insurance Company, of Edinburgh, Scotland. (The oldest Scottish Company. Founded 18 24.
Canadian Fire Insurance Company—as its name implies, purely Canadian.
Ask about our new policies in the British Columbia Life. They are
unequalled.
Our Accident policies pay  triple benefits of accidents in travel.
EMPLOYERS  LIABILITIY
Phone 222
M. M. Stephens & Co., Limited
Office; 6 3 1-2 Third Ave.
LIGHT AND POWER
To supply all coming soon. Estimates given for supplying and fitting for
Light, Power, Bells, Phones, water Heaters, Etc. Stock of Lamps
Shades and General Electrical Supplies carried.
W. R. LOVE,   Electrical Contracting
P. O. Box 957
Fulton St. and Third Ave.
Phone 41
| WESTHOLME LUMBER CO., LTD. j
f COMPLETE LINE  OF J
B UILDING S UP PLIES
*
*
*
*
*
*
+
■	
* *
+ *
t First Avenue Telephone 186   5
t- *
*****************************************************
COAL! Ladysmith COAL! \
$8.50 PER TON DELIVERED J
■'■ DAILY "V
MEMORANDUM
'OPEN EVENINGS UNTIL 9 o'clock"
LET US LOAN
You the Money at
PER
HOTEL CENTRAL
ALL MODERN' CONVENIENCES
The largist, best app inted Hotel
in Prince Rupert. First Class
:". European and American
i.lan. Best accommodation iu tow«.
Suni dinner a specialty. Ask for
■ iv >   io the Cellar."
PETER BLACK, Plop.
First Avenue and Seventh Street.
TO HIV
TO BUILD
PAX OFF MORTGAGES
OP IMPROVE REAL ESTATE
SEE on: PLAN
WRITE,  PHONE OH  CALL
The
Canadian Home
Investment
Co., Ltd.
Branch Office       Phone 365
Mclntyre Block
F. E. IBBOTSON, Supt.
GRAND HOTEL
WORKWOMAN'S HOME
Free Labor Bureau in Connection
GEO. BRODERIUS, Prop.
Phone 178 1ft Ave. and  "th St
New Knox Hotel
BESNER .V BESNER
Proprietors
THE NEW KNOX HOTEL is run
on the Eu-opean plan, First class
service. All the latest modern improvements.
THE BAR keeps only the besf
brands  of  liquors  and   cigars.
THE CAFE is open from 8:30 a.m.
lo 8 p.m. Excellent cuisine. First
class service.
Rooms 50c and up.
P1RST AVE. PRINCE RUPERT
FOR   SALE
PONY EXPRESS
Systematic Merchants' Delivery Service. Baggage, Storage and Forwarding Agents.   For Rigs or Motor Car
DAY OR NIGHT
7th Ave. and Fulton Phone 301
Northern B. C.
Liquor Co.
The Leading Wholesalers of
Northern British Columbia
Exclusive Agents for
Budweiser  Beer
New Wellington
COAL
FREE FROM DUST
DOES NOT CLINKER
ROGERS & BLACK
SECOND AVENUE
PHONE 110 PHONE 1 in
Pioneer Steam Laundry
WHITE  LABOR  ONLY
DO AWAY  WITH THIS!
Prompt Service:      Reasonable  Rates
Qoodti Called tor and  Delivered
i':n.,u   i i*
TO WAII.i; CONSUMERS
For the preseni thu blgh water
pressure "ill be on frcm I!! o'clock
noon to I p. ni il 'ily, Watoi consumers will tlieiclore take precautions to i,:<i• Ide '•>'■ 'i suaply al otl er
timer-. W..I.    ' WILGN  DAVIS,
Superintendent Water WorkB,
E & FIFTH   4
TAIL TRADE }
PHONE 17 THIRD A\
WE MAKE A SPECIALTY OF BOTTLED GOODS FOR RETAIL
When replenishing your larder don't forget
The Family
Wine and Liquor Store
A complete IRk   of all the best   Wines   and   Liquors   -'--;•.,
stock.    All orders delivered.
J. A. SMITH,
PROPRIETOR
in
A. FAULDS, M.I. M.E.
Consulting  .Mining   Engineer
Examinations   and   development  on
Coal, Metal, Oil, etc.
70!l DuuamulT SI       Vancouver, B. C.
RITCHIE & AGNEV,
..ivil   Engineers
Dominion nnd British Columbia Land
Surveyors.  Mine Surveyors.  Reports,
Estimates and  Surveying
OFFICE:   Rand   Bldg,   Second   Ave.
TRY  .\   WANT Al)
High Class Bell Piano Player
lAutonola); practically new; iu first
class condition. Can be seen at 618
Fifth  Avenue  East.
LINDSAYS CARTAGE a STORAGE
G. T. P. CARTAGE AGENTS
Office at H. B. Rochester, Centre St
LADYSMITH  COAL
It handled by us.   All orders receive
prompt attention.  Phone No. 68.
BOWLING, BILLIARDS AND POOL
4 Alleys, 7 Tablos. A good exercise.
A clean sport. Ladles every afternoon. Newman Block, between 6th
and 7 th Streets.
TED   MORRISON
Proprietor and Manager
\ Customs Broker ?
STORAGE
Forwarding,   Distributing   and
Shipping   Agent
Special attention given to storage  of   Household   Goods   nnd
liaggage
DOUGLAS        SUTHERLAND
First   Ave.   Near   McBride   St.
P. O. Hoy 007 Phone 202
:• •:• :• •:• •:• •:• •:■ •:• * •:• * •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• •:• * •:• •:• * * * * •>
,). W. POTTER, L.R.I.B.A.
ARCHITECT  AND  STRUCTURAL
ENGINEER
Re-inforced Concrete a Specialty
—o—
P. O. Box 271
E. L. FISHER
Funeral  Director & Embnlmer
CHARGES   REASONABLE
317 THIRD AVE.   PHONE 350
OPEN DAY AND NIGHT
J. H. HILDITCH
Contractor and Builder
Estimates given on a.I c asses of
work, whether sin 'I or large,    Per-
xonnl attention given to evory Item.
PHONE GREEN 321.
FREDERICK PETERS, K. O.
Barrister, Solicitor ind Notary Public
Office in
EXCHANGE  BLOCK
J. W. SHIRLEY
Locator, Timber Cruiser, Valuator
P, o.  Box (IDS
A  few  choice  Farming  Location!
left close In.
LAND   CLEARED   BY   CONTRACT.
Choice  Nursery  Stock  for  sale.
Taylor St. Prince Rupert
J. L. PARKER
MINING ENGINEm
Prince Rupert, B. C.
Open for ('on. ulntion and Mine
Examination
Temporary Address: —
Prince Rupert Inn
I PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Tuesday, May 28,  1912.
THE WHITE PLAGUE
f
r
,
Crusaije Against Tuberculosis in Canada
is Being Waged with
Success.
It   Is   Pelt  That   Local  Treatment  of
the Disease Is of Decided Advantage in the Fight
Tuberculosis is a disease that is
frequently co-incident with poverty.
The treatment necessary is generally
expensive, and the patient is often
for long periods of time incapable ot
doing any work. It is not surprising, therefore, that the charitably
inclined should take a deep interest
in the crusade against the disease.
In Canada a number of institutions and organizations have been established for the care of the tuberculous. Most of these have been
brought into existence by social
workers, Sometimes, however, provincial governments have provided
sanatoria, either wholly or in part
at their own expense. In other instances, the provinces—notably Ontario—have assisted in erecting
buildings as well as in their maintenance when completed. Still another class are what might be called
municipal sanatoria—this, they are
erected and supported largely by local municipalities. Some of these
only accept patients from the contributing municipalities; while
others accept pay patients whether
residents of the municipality or not.
With such a variety of institutions
to support, it is not surprising that
various means have been devised for
raising funds. Nor is it surprising
that there has grown up confusion
amongst would-be contributors as to
how their subscriptions should be
directed.
In order to avoid such confusion,
and at the same time to co-ordinate
the efforts that are being made for
the suppression of the disease, It is
essential that the situation be clearly understood. In the first place,
tuberculosis is a communicable disease, and as such comes directly
under the purview of the municipal
health authorities. In any attempt
at co-ordination, therefore, the work
must centre around the municipal
health officials. If this is not done
there will be overlapping and consequent waste of effort.
In the second place, it should be
remembered that locally managed tuberculosis work commands the confidence and support of municipal organizations. This is true, because
the good results can be dally demonstrated, thus proving a valuable
educational advantage to the ratepayers. Not only that, but the local
sanatorium makes it possible for Ihe
patient to see his friends frequently,
which is a very important factor. It
has been very truthfully stated that
fresh air, sunlight, and good food
are the chief needs of the tuberculous. The two former can be found
anywhere in Canada, and the latter
can be provided by any well managed   local   sanitorium.
In the third place, it should be
dearly understood that this important work cannot be directed solely
by any -one charitable organization.
The province, the municipality and
the individual contributor have each
to be considered. But in any case,
if confusion is to be avoided, the
chief authority must be vested in
the medical officer of health.
There are many examples of effective municipal anti-tuberculosis
work lo be found in Canada. This
is perhaps particularly true of Ontario. Ottawa possesses a sanitorium
and dispensary, the work of whicli
is encouraged In every way by an
appreciative local interest. It is managed by an association of men and
women who have slrnng local interests. Patients are received only from
municipalities thai contribute io the
maintenance of the sanatorium.
There are now four Btich Institutions
in Ontario, all of which me doing
excellent work. Al leasl four others
will be established In Clie near future, and In time the whole province
will be covered with similar local
sanatoria.
both creeks from pollution, I would
recommend having this district patrolled for a time by the police.
Respectfully submitted,
WM.   MAHLON   DAVIS,
City Engineer.
Alderman Morrissey was afraid
city was going to be up against stagnant water in view of the outlook
for  a  dry  summer.
Alderman Clayton said the best
was being done. If any alderman
had a solution lo improve the situation it should be put forward. Was
it safe to take the large pump to
Shawatlans? The city had to take
chances one way or the other. To
put in a new pump would cost perhaps  $12,000.
Alderman Montgomery said that
the city was taking no chances. The
matter was well in hand by the engineer.
In reply to a question of Alderman Bullock-Webster, the city engineer said that it was proposed to
have police patrol part of the water
source to see that no contamination
was allowed to exist. Someone
without knowledge of the situation
had allowed cows to run near part
of the watershed. Prosecutions
would follow if the offence was repeated.
Alderman Morrissey suggested
that a committee of citizens should
be  called  in.
Alderman Clayton said the citlr
zens would then properly say:
"What, in heaven's name, are those
fellows there for? We always
thought they were no good. Why
don't they get out of office and
allow the election of honest and
capable men?"
The report was adopted.
ENGAGING  JANITOR
(Continued From Page One)
WATER SITUATION
IS  WELL  IX   HAND
(Continued  From  Page One)
time of pumping to two or three
hours per day.
This restriction of the use of water will cause more or less Inconvenience to manufacturers and
others, but it may not be possible
to avoid it, and by adopting prompt
and strict measures to economize the
reserve of water, any suffering by
other consumers for want of water
will be  prevented.
In order to protect the supply on
Alderman Douglas agreed with
this move.
Alderman Bullock-Webster formally moved in the matter of advertising.
Alderman Morrissey thought they
could ill afford to advertise this.
Alderman Maitland said if the city
was too poor to advertise for a janitor a notice might be put on the
bulletin  board  outside the hall.
Alderman Bullock-Webster, not
getting support on his motion, altered the amendment to one of putting a notice outside'"the city hall.
The motion was declared lost by
the mayor, only three voting for
it, although Alderman Montgomery
did not vote at all. The original
motion was then declared carried,
Alderman Montgomery again not
voting, and being counted as in the
affirmative. The point was taken
up that Alderman Montgomery had
not been so counted on the vote on
the amendment. After some discussion of the ruling it was decided to
take the vote again, when the
amendment to advertise on the bulletin board carried.
City   Switchboard
The question of installing a
switchboard in the city hall at a
cost of about $80 instead of bringing
a cable to the hall from the central
station will be considered by the
finance  committee.
Laying the
Corncr-Stonc
The first deposit, with which
you begin aSavings Account,
is as important an event as
the laying of the corner-stone
of a fine building. You are
laying the corner-stone of
your position in the world, of
your circle of business
acquaintance, of eventual
success.
Can you afford to postpone
that first deposit?
THE BANK OF
British North America
76 YEARS IN BUSINESS
Capital and Reserve Over $7,500,000
Prince Rupert Branch,
F. S. LONG, Manager.
TENDERS WANTED
Tenders for the tearing down of
the present post office building will
be received by the undersigned.
The building Is to be vacated Monday. The tearing down of it must
be done immediately following the
vacating of It without delay.. Information can be obtained at the
post office.
ROBT.   L.   McINTOSH.
eoa
Double
Weekly
Service
Double
Weekly
Service
S. S. "Prince Rupert" and "Prince George"
for Vancouver,  Victoria, Scuttle,   Mondays  nnd   Fridays,   0  a.   in.
S. S. "PRINCE JOHN"—Weekly   service  to   Port   Simpson,  Naas,
Stewart, Granby Bay and Queen  Charlotte Islands.
Trains   leave   for   Vanarsdol   Mondays, Wednesdays, Saturdays at
1 p. m.    Frequent connections with river steamers for Hazelton.
For full information apply  to
A. E.  McMASTEK,  General Agent.
Office on Centre Street.
Agent Atlantic Steamship Lines.
The British Columbia Company
Limited,
authorized capital $100,000.:: paid up capital «41,500
DIRECTORS:—Reginald C. Brown, President; I, C. Maclure, Vice-
President; H. E. Harks, Maaagln g Director; Capt. E. Nash, William
McNair, R. A. Bevan, and F. C.   Williams, Secretary.      :-:      :■:
INTEREST 4 PER CENT. DEPOSITS
This Company acts at Executors,  Administrators, Transferees and
Secretaries to Public Companies.   Commercial, Industrial and other
business propositions underwritten.    Issues  made on the
London and New York Stock Exchanges.
TIMBER, COAL, LANDS, and
COMPANY ORGANIZATION
Head Office for Canada, 203, 208, 210, 215 Carter-Cotton Building,
VANCOUVER, B.C.
EVERY PACKAGE OF
BurrelVs White Lead and
Linseed Oil
IS MARKED "WARRANTED GENUINE" and is *
guaranteed absolutely pure.
Sole Agents in Western Canada
The Staneland Co. Ltd
836-840 Fort Street, VICTORIA, B.C.
IWWKHKH»JKHKHK8WBKHKH^^
Royal Bank of Canada
HEAD OFFICE:  MONTREAL BSTABLISHED  1869
Surplus        $7,200,000
Capital         $0,200,000 a
Total Assets 9100,000,000 g
Savings   Bank   Department—$1 Will Open an Account
2    Branches Throughout Canada and  Banking  Connections With  All
5 Parts ot the United States
S Agents Throughout the World
5 H. P. WILSON, Manager Prince Rupert Branch
5
ttttKHWKKKHKHWWOrKHKHKBKHKHJ^^
Real Estate
Offering
Lot  on  Second  Avenue,  Section   1,
?2,500.
Lot on Beach Place, $1,900.
Modern house and lot on Fraser St.,
Block 32,  $5,500.
Lot  on  Second  Avenue,   Section   2,
$1,500.
Two lots on Sixth Avenue, Section 5,
$2,250 each.    Easy terms.
Two lots  on  Summit  Avenue,  $530
each.
House and lot on Seventh Avenue for
$1,800.    Easy terms.
Double   corner  on   Seventh   Avenue,
Section  6,  $3,600.
Lot 9, Block  10,  Section  0,  $2,700.
Easy terms.
Lot  8,  Block   8,   Section   6,   $1,265.
$715   cash.
Two lots on Eighth Avenue, Section
6, $950  each.    Easy terms.
Lot on Sixth Avenue, Block 15, Section 7, $1,275.    Easy terms.
Lot 14, Block 7, Section 7, $635.
Lots 2  and  3,  Block  40, Section  7,
$1,800 pair.    Easy terms.
FOR RENT
Furnished  house  In  Section  1,   $50
per month.
Furnished house on  Borden Street.
$60 per month.
Four-room house with bath, Section
6, $25 per month.
Terrace
We are sole agents in Prince Rupert
for Terrace townsite lots.
Ten-acre   tracts   adjoining   Terrace
on easy terms.
INSURANCE.
McCaffery & Gibbons
THIRD  AVENUE
FOR  SALE
Household goods, and house for
rent. 919 Ambrose Avenue. Phone
ureen  321.
L.O.L.
Meets second and fourth Friday in
each month In K. of P. Hall.
Helgerson, Blk., 3rd Ave and 6tb Jfl.
Recording Secretary, Box 324.
Phon?  150
THE INSURANCE PEOPLE
Fire
Life
Marine
Accident
Plate  Glass
Employers'   Liability
Contractors  &  Personal  Bonds
Policies    Written    Direct
The Mack Realty & Insurance
P.S.-
COMPANY
-Houses and Rentals
Coast    Land    District—District    of
Skeena, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that William
Nicholson Lailey, of Prince Rupert,
B. C, occupation Architect, Intends
to apply for permission to purckas'
the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
southeast corner of Lot 76; thence
60 chains east; thence 20 chains
north; thence 60 chains west; thence
20 chains south to point of commencement; containing 120 acres,
more or less.
WILLIAM NICHOLSON LAILEY.
D.  C. Whiteford, Agent.
Dated  January  27,  1912. '       f2
TRY A WANT AD
ROYAL     NAVAL     COLLEGE     OF
CANADA, HALIFAX, N. S.
The next examination for the entry of Naval Cadets will be held at
the examination centre of the Civil
Service Commission in November,
1912; parents or guardians of intending candidates should apply to
the Secretary, Civil Service Commission, Ottawa, for entry papers before
1st October next.
Candidates must be between the
ages of 14 and 16 on 1st October,
1913.
Cadets are trained for appointment as Officers in the Naval Service, the course at the College being
two years, followed by one year In
a Training Cruiser, after which
Cadets are rated Midshipmen.
Further details can be obtained
on application to undersigned.
G. J. DESBARATS,
Deputy Minister, Department of the
Naval  Service. n-12
Department   of   the   Naval   Service,
Ottawa, May 6th, 1912.    —22868
NAVAL SERVICE OF CANADA
Sale by Tender of Steamer
"Kestrel"
SEALED TENDERS addressed to
the undersigned and accompanied by
a certified cheque for $500 will be
received up to noon on Wednesday
the third day of July, 1912, for the
purchase of the Canadian Government Steamer "Kestrel," lately employed Fishery Protection duties on
the British Columbia Coast and now
lying at H.M.C. Dockyard, Esquimau,
B.  C.
Forms of tender, conditions of sale,
full particulars of the Steamer and
permission to inspect her may be obtained on application from the Officer in charge, H.M.C. Dockyard, Esquimau, B. C.
Unauthorized   publication   of   this
advertisement will not be paid for.
G.  J.  DESBARETS,
Deputy Minister.
Department   of   the   Naval   Service,
Ottawa, May 3, 1912. —22725
MAIL CONTRACT
SEALED TENDERS, addressed to
the Postmaster General, will be received at Ottawa tint'; noon, on Friday, the 9th August, 1912, for the
conveyance of His Majesty's Mails,
on a proposed Contract for two (2)
years, fortnightly each way, between
Aiynansh and Kitsumkalum, from
the Postmaster General's pleasure.
Printed notices containing further
Information as to conditions of proposed   Contract   may   be   seen   and
bland forms of Tender may be obtained  at  the  Post  Offices  of  Kitsumkalum,  Terrace,  Prince  Rupert,
Naas   Harbour,   Kincolith,   at   Mrs.
Ross' Dominion Telegraph Office, at
Rev. J. B. McCullough, Alyansh and
at the office of the undersigned.
E. H. FLETCHER,
Post Office Inspector.
Post  Office  Inspector's  uffice,  Victoria, B. C, May 10, 1912.
FOR RENT
Desirable four-room suite in Rand
Block, corner Fifth Avenue and Fulton Street. Also large airy store and
offices on Second Avenue. Very reasonable rent.
O.  D. RAND
311  Second Avenue
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that I, Filippo
Panvlnl, Engineer, of Prince Rupert,
B. O, intend to apply for a licence
to prospect for coal and oil on the
west coast of Graham Island, on the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted om mile
east from the northeast corner of
coal licence 5582; thence 80 chains
west; thence 80 chainB south; thence
80 chains east; thence ,80 chains
north, to the place of beginning;
containing 640 acres.
m3 FILIPPO  PANVINI.
Located March 16, 1912.
Skeena   Land    District—District   of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that 1, Filippo
Panvlnl, Engineer, of Prince Rupert,
B. C, intend to apply for a licence
to prospect for coal and oil on the
west coast of Graham Island, on the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted one mile
east from tho northeast corner of
coal licence 5582; thence 80 chains
north; thence 80 chains west; thence
80 chains south; thence 80 chains
east, to the place of beginning; containing 640 acres.
m3 FILIPPO   PANVINI.
Located March 16, 1912.
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Coast, Range Five
I, J. A. M. Faulds, Passenger
Agent, Vancouver, B. C, Intend to
apply for permission to lease 320
acres of land, bounded as follows:—
Commencing at a post planted 40
chains south and 80 chains west of
southwest corner post of Lot 3997,
on the northern bank of the Skeena
River; thence west 40 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence east
40 chains; thence south 80 chains to
point of commencement; containing
320 acres, staked by me on the
sixth  day of  April,  1912.
J. A. M. FAULDS.
Alexander Faulds, Agent.
Dated April 6, 1912. a9
SYNOPSIS OF CANADIAN NORTH.
WEST   LAND   REGULATIONS.
Any person wiio is the sole head ot
a family, or any male over 18 years
old, may homestead a quarter section (160 acres more or less) of
available Dominion land in Manitoba, Satskatchewan or Alberta. The
applicant must appear in person at
I lie Dominion Lands Agency or Sub-
Agency for the district. Entry by
proxy may be made at any agency,
on certain conditions, by father,
mother, son, daughter, brother or
sister of intending homesteader.
DUTIES.-—SU month's residence
upon and cultivation of the land in
each of three years. A homesteader
may live within nine miles of his
homestead on a farm of at least 80
acres solely owned and occupied by
him or by his father, mother, son,
daughter, brother or sister.
In certain districts a homesteader
in good standing may pre-empt a
quarter section alongside his homestead. Price $3.00 per acre. Duties.—
must reside six months in each of
six years from date oi homestead
entry (including the time required to
earn homestead patent) and cultivate fifty acres extra.
A homesteader wno nas exhausted his homestead right and cannot obtain a pre-emption may take
a purchased homestead in certain districts. Price $3 per acre. Duties.—
Must reside six months in each of
three years, cultivate fifty acres, and
erect a house worth $300.
W. W. CORY,
Deputy  of  the  Minister  of  the  Interior.
N. B.—Unauthorized publication
of this advertisement will not be
paid for
"CTVIL SERVICE ACT"
The qualifying examinations for
Third-class Clerks, Junior Clerks and
Stenographers will be held at the
following places, commencing on
Tuesday, the 2nd July next:—Ann-
strong, Chllliwack, Cumberland,
Duncan, Golden, Grand Forks, Kam-
loops, Kaslo, Kelowna, Ladysmith,
Nanalmo, Nelson, New Westminster,
Peachland, Prince Rupert, Penticton,
Revelstoke, Rossland, Salmon Arm,
Summerland, Vancouver, Vernon, and
Victoria.
Candidates must be British subjects between the ages of 21 and 30,
if for Third-class Clerks; and between 16 and 21-, if for Junior Clerks
or Stenographers.
Applications will not be accepted
if received later than the 15th June
next.
Further information, together with
application forms, may be obtained
from the undersigned.
Section 7 of the "Civil Service Act"
provides that temporary clerks and
stenographers, who have not been
regularly appointed by Order in
Council, must pass this examination.
P. WALKER,
Registrar, Civil Service.
Victoria, B. C, May 1, 1912. jyl7
NOTICE
Lot Owners Attention
Acting under instructions from
the City Council, I call attention to
the necessity of lot holders, under
agreement from the Grand Trunk
Pacific Development company, to
complete their titles, and have the
same registered in the Land Registry
office before July 1st next. Owners
whOBe lots are not registered by that
time run the risk of being unable to
vote in Municipal matters, or being
eligible for the office of Mayor or
Alderman. The Council considered it proper that this question should
be brought to the notice of the whole
public.
' ERNEST A. WOODS,
8-14 City Clerk.
COMPANIES ACT
Re Grand
Trunk Development Com-
puny,   Limited
NOTICE Is hereby given that after
one month after the first appearance of this notice, the above named
company, Grand Trunk Development
Company, Limited, will change Its
name to "THE OHRISTIANSEN-
BRANDT  COMPANY,  LIMITED."
Dated at Vancouver, B. C, tills
23rd dnv of April, A.D. 1912.
CRAIG, BOURNE & McDONALD,
Solicitors for Grand Trunk Development Company, Limited. m2-lmo.
NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that the
Northern   British   Columbia   Liquor
Company, Limited, Intends to apply
one month after the date hereof to
the Registrar of Joint Stock Companies at Victoria, B. C, to change
the name of this Company from the
"Northern British  Columbia Liquor
Company, Limited," to "The Prince
Rupert   Importing   Company,   Limited." '
Dated this 25th day of April, 1912
J. COOPER,
Secretary   of   the   Northern   British
Columbia Liquor  Company,  Limited. a27-m27
_

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.prj.1-0311791/manifest

Comment

Related Items