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Prince Rupert Journal Aug 1, 1911

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Array ii-0*
New WelliBftoi
Coal
is the best
ROGERS t BUCK
Sole Agents
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VOLUME   II.
Published   Twice  a  Week.
PRINCE   RUPERT,   B.   C.  TUESDAY, AUGUST 1,  1911,
High Class
Vftjlthb Printing
i^/jn 4J1 Lines
HURRY AGREEMENT
Mayor Manson May go South and Have
it Taken up With the
Premier.
City  Council   Pusses  an   Easy  Night
us the Board Deals With
Routine
il was an uninteresting meeting
that the city council held last night.
Only once did there come a ripple
over the smooth run of affairs. The
meeting was given over for the most
part to routine business.
A report was read from the city
solicitor on the gambling case which
was very similar to the one he gavet
verbally the week before.
It was received and filed.
Street Improvement
A. J. Prudhomme wrote calling
attention to the condition of Fifth
street, Fraser street and Sixth
street, and asking that attention be
given to it.
It was referred to the streets committee.
,    Want Sidewalk
A petition was presented asking
for a sidewalk, on Second avenue between Sixth street and Eighth street.
This also was referred ' to the
streets committee.
After the Dogs
Aid. Douglas suggested that in
view of the fact that there were so
many dogs wandering about the city,
the tax should be enforced.
It was pointed out that there
would have to be machinery provided to impound the Vlogs and to take
care of them after taken.
The matter, on motion of Aid.
Smith, was referred to the streets
committee.
Assessment Agreement
His worship called attention to the
fact that the assessment agreement
with the G. T. P. had not been assented to by the provincial government yet. According to reports, Premier McBride would be in Victoria
very soon. It occurred to him that
the council might consider whether
it would be advisable for him to go
south and meet the premier and
have the agreement dealt with at
once upon his arrival. There wou'd
be a lot of business awaiting Mr.
McBride and wh..e he might give
immediate attention to it there was
the danger that it might be delayed
a little time. He felt it was important to get that agreement signed
up as soon as possible and get it
before the people.
Aid. Hilditch felt that if the time
could be shortened for the signing
of the agreement he would favor the
mayor going south. The assessment
roll could then be closed up.
Aid. Smith felt that it was wise
to have the mayor go south and have
this taken up.
Aid Douglas wanted to know if
this could not be attended to without anyone going south.
His worship pointed out that while
this might receive prompt attention,
yet there was the danger that there
might be an accumulation of other
of other business that might delay
this being concluded at once.
Aid. Newton wanted all haste used
to complete the agreement.
It was decided to have his worship go south If deemed expedient.
The hydro-electric proposition
came up on a motion to have the
committee to deal with and get In
shape for presentation lo the people.
Aid. Newton, who moved in the matter, suggested that perhaps the works
committee and the water committee
might Jointly go Into the matter and
report.
Aid. Newton said there were a
lot of citizens who were anxious to
know how this hydro-electric would
It being done under the day labor
system or by paying 45 cents an hour.
Others were opposed to the contract
system on the ground that that might
be followed by a repetition of the
work on the streets at present by
which the money went largely to nonresidents.
He thought these divergent views
might be brought together. His own
view was that perhaps a plan could
be carried out by which the city engineer might declfle upon a 'fair
price for the work. The workers
might then have the chance to select
parts of the work.
Ald», Hilditch felt that this was a
question that should go to committee of the whole. It was in committee of the whole that It would have
to be considered before this was settled.
Aid. Douglas was fivorable to the
matter going to committee of the
whole.
Aid. Hllditch moved that the matter be referred to committee of the
whole, stating that he did so because
he felt that the finance committee
should not shirk responsibility in
this.
This statement called for a display
of some warmth by Aid. Newton, who
protested against his trying to shirk
any responsibilty. He unbraided Aid.
Hllditch for such a line as he pursued.
The amendment carried,
 0—	
Aid. J. A. Kirkpatrick has returned to the city after a holiday spent
In Victoria. Mrs. Kirkpatrick remained in the Capital wliere she is
recovering strength gradually.
 0 ;—
BRIDGE ON   SKEENA
Settlers Confer With Member for District
Relative to This
Question.
They Select Point Which They Feel
Would Be the Bost Suitable
' Place
POLITICAL CAMPAIGN
HAS BEEN OPENED
Government Takes Dissolution and Fixes Election for
September 21—Are Commencing an Active
Fight Throughout the Dominion—
Where Gains are
Expected.
On Saturday, Wm. Manson, M.P.P.,
took a trip up the Skeena as far as
Kltsumkalum, where he met the settlers from various points in that vicinity and discussed with them the
question of a bridge across the Skeena. The settlers are anxious to have
a bridge put over the river, and
at their request Mr. Manson visited
the place and heard the representations.
The gathering was a very representative one, settlers coming from Lakelse and Copper City, on the bank
opposite the railway, and the whole
country from Kltsumkalum to Kitselas being also represented*
After a full discussion the meeting decided to recommend that
Hellsgate be the point where a bridge
should be erected. This is near the
Little Canyon and within easy reach
of Kltsumkalum also. It is likewise
about half way between the Lakelse
and the Copper River valleys.
Another recommendation made by
the meeting was that the government
should be asked to take over the
ferry, now operated as a private enterprise, from Copper River station
on the G. T. P., to Copper City, on
the opposite side.
This ferry is serving a good purpose but the delegates feel that it
should be in the hands of the government. With the development of
the Copper River valley there is no
doubt but the ferry will become a
very important means of communication and it will have to be enlarged very considerably to meet
these increasing demands.
In the matter of the bridge, it i»
possible that the public works engineer will visit the location as soon
as possible and go into the whole
matter on the ground in order to
ascertain the practicability of the
suggested and at the same time Investigate any other points.
 o	
Telegraphic Connection.
Superintendent Phelan of the Dominion government telegraph service
is still !n the city superintending the
completion of the Stewart line. He
expects to have it ready In a very
few weeks now. The difficulties to
be encountered are great but they
are being overcome. Connection by
wire Is now established with Goose
Bay.
 o
The May Roberts Company closed
its present engagement at the Empress Theatre last evening, playing
before a crowded house. The company will, after a trip north, return
to Prince Rupert and put on another
engagement with new plays.
(Special to The Journal)
Ottawa, Aug. 1.—To get a verdict
from the people of Canada on the
reciprocity treaty with the United
States, the Canadian parliament was
dissolved Saturday. Sir. Wilfrid
Laurier's government will go before
the people in September.
Nominations for the election will
take    place   September  14   and  die
polling will come on September 21.
Campaign Is On
What is to prove a hot campaign is now on. R. L. Borden
yesterday conferred with Hon. Robert Rogers of Manitoba and Hon. F.
Cochrane, minister of lands and
mines in Ontario. The latter is to
direct the Ontario campaign, to begin with a monster picnic in Toronto
next Saturday.
Neither Mr. Borden's nor Sir Wilfrid Laurier's itinerary is yet ready.
The former will spend three weeks
in Ontario, then hold a few meetings
in Quebec and go to the lower provinces. Sir Wilfrid Laurier will tour
Ontario and Quebec.
It is rumored that Clifford Sifton
will direct the campaign generally
for the Conservatives.
The Opposition counts on heavy
gains in the lower provinces and expect to sweep Ontario, Manitoba and
British Columbia. They think Bourassa will divide Quebec against Sir
Wilfrid.
Conservative   Gains
Toronto, Aug. 1. — Mayor Geary,
president of the Cenral Conservative
Association, Toronto, said yesterday:
SETTLEMENT MAY COME
* (Special to The Journal)
* Fernie, August 1.—The sltua *
* tlon  regarding  the  strike  here *
* remains quite, but that there Is *
* a strong under current running *
* toward  a  favorable  vote being »
* the result of next Friday's vote •
* upon  the question of accepting *
* the findings of the report of the  *
* conciliation board, seems to be *
* conceded by many who profess *
" to he in close touch with the *
- mining communities,
#*******.******
"The prospects are excellent in this
province for gaining probably twelve
seats or more.
"In the west, I am glad to learn,
that Mr. Borden's trip made such a
strong impression, and if one can
judge from the views of Conservative members, it is by no means a
certainty that a majority of the members from there will not be Conservatives.
"Premier McBride told me today
he considered that British Columbia
will send practically the solid Conservative representation."
Grain  Growers'  Stand
Winnipeg, Aug. 1.—The Grain
Growers of Western Canada have decided at a meeting in Brandon that
in the approaching election separate
candidates will not be nominated for
parliament to represent that powerful agrarian society. Instead, a resolution was adopted that members exert all their Influence in the party
with which they affiliate to have
candidates named who will be favorable to the principles advocated by
the Grain Growers' Association. This
decision is expected to govern the'
situation in the three prairie provinces, though it is not necessarily
binding. The political activity of
this powerful organization of farmers threatened to seriously complicate the political situation in the
west if they placed separate candidates in the field. This decision will
be a relief to the old party leaders,
for it means no third party men, a*
least for the present. ,
?u^
TO RAISE OLD SCHOOL
[HTflrSTERS  FIGHT
Trustee Boanl Takes Steps to Have
the  Work   Done  At
Once
The school board, at a meeting
held a few days ago, took into consideration the question of getting the
old school on Second avenue put in
shape for the reopening. It will be
raised to the street level and will be
otherwise overhauled to suit the
needs of opening one room In it.
An application for increased salary
from one of the teachers was received. The board resolved to allow
the salaries to remain as at present.
J. E. Davey made a proposition
with respect to the teaching of singing and voice culture in the schools.
The matter is left over for the
present.
 o	
LOCATES SALT WELL
Tom ft-
NO.  13.
Rumor That Fielding and Oliver Came
to Blows at Cabinet
Meeting.
Within Forty-Four Miles of This City
There Has Been a Flowing
Spring Found.
Investigations  Will   Be  Carried  Out
to  Discover Commercial
Values
Chief Justice
Columbia is
nowhere   bet-
PLANS BIG WORKS
R. Brutinel is Here to Conduct Negotiations With the City for Installing Plant.
He Expects  to Commence Work  on
Large Scale in Near
Future
Raymond Brutinel of the Prince
Rupert Hydro-Electric Company arrived In the city by the Prince
George. Interviewed as to the object of his visit In the city, Mr.
Brutinel made the following statement:
"I come to Prince Rupert to meet
the people again and to try to reach
satisfactory agreementsi concerning
the establishment of gas works and
the sale of industrial power.
"As I have stated often, our company does not intend to deal In light
nor in small power business; those
two branches of the electric business
are better looked after by the municipality, •
"We wish it to be understood that
our negotiations with the city are lo
be on the basis of a producer to a
consumer; In other words, we propose to develop power for sale to
large consumers nt a lower price
than the consumers can produce
themselves under any given conditions—the city being one of those
consumers. It Is obviously to the
advantage of both parties concerned
that their relations be friendly and
and also that they act In close cooperation.
"I understand that the city is Investigating the development of electric power In conjunction with the
establishment of their water supply.
We are convinced that we can supply wholesale power to the city
cheaper than the city can generate
It, and we feel that the council will
go carefully into the matter of cost
and adopt the scheme most advantageous to the people.
"The work of development will be
started right away and within a week
a large force of men will be at work
establishing a permanent camp on
tlie Khtada River. During the next
three or four years from 300 to 400
men will be on the payroll of the
company.     This  means that  a  large
BONDS PROPERTY
Rich Property on Alice Arm Has Been
Taken Over by Syndicate.
Captain  John   Irving   Hns  Interested
Himself in This Part  of
Province
Ictuul   Hostilities   .Are   Denied   But
Violent Altercation Took
Place
The mineral claims of Frank
Roundy on Alice Arm have been
bonded to a syndicate represented by
Captain John Irving of Victoria. The
sum involved is reported to be about
$16,000. In the securing of the
property it is believed that one of
the most promising In the north lias
been taken over.
The ore body In the Roundy claim
bears a very close resemblance to
that that was found In the famous
Cotnstock mine, it is, in fact, so
similar that old miners who have
seen both say that it would be impossible to distinguish the dlffer-
enes and that ore from the northern
mine might easily be taken as coming from tiie old Conistock.
 o	
WAR CLOUD PASSES
The statement of
Hunter that British
a surprise parcel is
ter proved to be a correct statement
of the situation than in Northern
British Columbia. The latest manifestation of the surprise parcel is
seen in the location of salt springs
right on the G. T. P. within a few
miles of Prince Rupert. These are
at Mile 44 and the original spring
is on the right-of-way of the railway,
which makes it exceedingly valuable
should the springs be found in sufficient quantity to make the enterprise
a commercial one.
During construction days the
spring, which is a quite a strong one
bubbling up out of the earth at that
point, was discovered by one of tiie
cooks in the camp.. He took the |
necessary steps to secure the location and since then experiments
have been carried out. The brine
is so strong that it is not difficult
in a crude way to collect considerable quantities of good quality of salt
from evaporation.
On   Saturday   J.   Y.   Rochester  of
this city, whose interest in the location had been aroused, when out to
the place and secured  samples.    He
Will investigate the matter thoroughly with the object in view of seeing
whether the discovery is not of commercial   value.      Investigations   will
I be carried on to see if the salt water  cannot   Ue  obtained   there  so  as
e to make the erecting of regular evap-
Iorating works worth while.    It is bc-
I lieved  by many who have seen  the
; location   that  this   will   not   be   unlikely, and  that  before long Prince
Rupert  Will  have  within  easy  reach
the   only   salt   wells   found   in   the
province.
—o ■—
(Special to The Journal)
Ottawa, Aug. 1.—At a meeting of
tlie cabinet on Saturday, it has leaked
out that there was a most unusual
scene, and two members of the cabinet are reported to have exchanged
blows. These were Hon. W. S. Fielding and Hon. Frank Oliver.
The immediate cause of the falling
out is not made public but it Is believed to be the final act to a succession of differences that has existed between the ministers, Mr. Oliver being well aware of attempts to
discredit him and some members of
the cabinet wishing to relieve the
administration of what they regard
as too great a load to carry through
the approaching election owing to
Mr. Oliver's unpopularity in the
west.
Denies Fight
The Ottawa Journal publishes an
interview with Frank Oliver in which
the latter denies that blows had been
exchanged between himself and the
minister of finance at the cabinet
meeting on   Saturday.
There seems to be no question but
that there was a wordy altercation
between the two ministers and that
Mr. Oliver withdrew from the meeting.
IN  POLICE COURT
Women    From    Restricted    District
Are Brought Before the
Magistrate
HACK   FROM  CRUISE
Capt. McCoskrie Is Kept Busy Looking  After Timber
Interests
No Further Trouble in Connection With
the Moroccan Dispute is
Expected.
British   Stand   in  the  Matter   Hail  it
Very (j lifting
Effect
('apt. McCoskrie limber Inspector,
lias returned lo the city again after
a short cruise in some of the nearby
waters In an effort to see Hint the
i laws are. being respected.
Tin. territory which the captain
has lei cover is a very wide one anil
reei ii ire's him to be on the move
most of the lime lo see that the
law as to rutting on timber limits is
compiled with.
The police court has been occupied for the last two days with the
hearing on information laid against
denizens of Comox avenue. In the
absence of Police Magistrate Carss
the bench was occupied by J. H, Mc-
iviullin.
Two informations were laid, one
against Gypsy Hamilton, and the
other against May Adams, both being charged with being keepers.
Fred Peters, K, C, prosecuted for
the city, while the former was defended by Alex. Manson, the latter
by L. W. Patmore.
Some argument ensued between
counsel as to whether the Hamilton
woman had been accorded the protection of the court when giving evi-
ilence in a former case whirh might
incriminate her and evidence was
accordingly put in that no .protection
was given and that she had admitted
keeping a bawdy house.
An adjournment was taken until
this morning in the Adams case, Mr.
Peters admitting that in view of the
unsatisfactory character of semee of
the evidence given by women in tlie
case he might alter the charge to
one of vagrancy, This morning the
charge was withdrawn.
The magistrate withheld his derision ur til Friday.
FURNITURE SALE
(Continued on Page Pourl
WAR CLOUD PASSES	
London, Aug. 1.—The Franco-
German dispute over Morocco has
been settled ecept for xa few formalities which soon will be amicably settled.
There Is practically no fear of any
further trouble in connection with
the question. The determined stand
taken by the British foreign office
has had Its effect.
 o	
Fred Cullin of Victoria, who has
been In Dawson on electrical Installation connected with Ihe Guggenheim
operations there, is visiting Ills
brother, Frank E. Cullin. in this city.
WILL  SUPPORT  MONK
(Special to The Journal)
Montreal, August 1.—Henri
Bourassl announces thai despite
persistent rumors to the contrary he will not be a randidate
at the mining election. He states
that Mr. Monk's attitude on the
reciprocity question and the naval bill are satisfactory to him
and he has accepted him as his
leader nnd will fight for Ihe success ol' Mr. Monk and a "Third
Party" both on the plat form and
through tin' pages of his newspaper.
George Tlte is offering Special  Inducements to House
Furnishers
As   will   be   learned   by   consulting
Hie advertising columns of this issue,
George Tiie Is offering special Inducements  to  house  furnishers  fur
the next five weeks.
Mr. Tlte has now hud his store
brought down to the streel level and
is again easy of access. He has a
large stork ordered and coming and
must make room for il. There are
many bargains, therefore, awaiting
the seekers after furniture and house
furnishings.
In the line of baby cartages he has
a specially well selected stock to
make a choice from. The early pur-
eehnser gets the better variety to draw
from.
 o	
Seeing tin- West
Dr. Slocum has secured the Thenlx
Theatre for two evening and Is putting on the interesting and Instructive series of moving pictures showing a trip from Vancouver to Calgary, the reception to Sir Wilfrid
Laurier In the west, and the Coronation parade in Victoria, B. C. The
views are of the highest order. They
were shown lasl evening and will be
presented in the Phenix again tonight. PRINCE RUPERT JOLRNAL
Tuesday, August 1, 1911.
ty****************************************************
I WOMEN'S APPAREL  I
* * * * * * * * * * * •
;, * **** * *** * * ** * * * * *** * * * * * * * * * * ** * *
The exigencies of fashion during
the last few seasons have completely revolutionized the style of women's underclothes. The modish woman of today wears fewer underclothes
than the woman of a year or two ago,
and those she does wear are less
aggressively self-assertive, finer
daintier, and—alas—more expensive.
The combination in one form or another is the favorite undergarment
and the woman who has worn it finds
It hard to go bark to separate corset covers and drawers or underskirts, with their multiplicity of
waitbands always shrinking out of
place in the laundering and their
troublesome fastenings, writes Florence Fairbanks of New York.
Not that corset covers, separate
drawers and separate underskirts
are not worn. They are, and many
women who need to consider laundering economies will find the separate garments better, since often one
needs changing when another does
not. But the fact remains that the
combination is in high favor, and
that it does away with awkward fulness at the waistline and is far more
trim and neat than are the separate
pieces as a rule.
Along with the combination skirts
and corset covers, chemises have
come slipping back into favor, but
they are modified chemises, making
concession to the law against obtrusive fullness in undergarments.
They are not tight fitting, but they
are shaped somewhat to tne curves
of the body and do not fall from
the top in full folds as they once did.
The material is so soft and sheer
that what little fullness there is to
be disposed of about the waist is not
noticeable under a frock.
The combination corset covers and
skirts, or corset covers and drawers,
if made with a waistband at all, are
so cut that there is but little fullness to shirr into this waistband,
and the princess models in which the
waistband is eliminated entirely are
very popular. These, like the chemises, do not fit closely but follow
the curves of the figure easily.
Nether Gnnnents
in place of the circular drawers,
which, even in the softest lingerie
stuffs have a certain fullness at the
bottom which may be perceived
through one of the extremely narrow
and soft frock skirts, French women
have taken up drawers of narrower
and straighter shape, fastening in
like knickers at the knee or left
open but quite narrow. In many
cases silk tights are worn by fashionable women. To avoid every suggestion of fullness the trimming
upon undergarments has been reduced to a minimum. Frills and
flounces have been altogether abandoned and lace insertion or other
flat  trimming alone is used.
Double skirts have been revived,
and the regime of the hobble skirt
and similar atrocities seems to be on
the decline. Perhaps we owe the
double skirt to the bordered fabrics
that have been introduced during the
early part of the season. At any
rate, they can be used advantageously, their colored edges forming parallel rows of decoration at the knees
and ankles.
Double Skirts
Many double skirts are slashed up
at the left side, showing the underskirts, that should be of contrasting
color. Some underskirts are pleated,
while the overskirt is plain, slashed
and edged with fringe, insertion or
headwork.
Double skirts are appearing of the
cloth suits of light weight materials,
such as checks, striped serges and
challls. There is not much fullness
at  the  hips, a comfortable  width  at
the bottom, and altogether a sensible
rebound from the extreme narrow
styles of the spring. The straight
line of the silhouette however, is
preserved, as well as the flatness of
the back, usually emphasized by a
loose panel or by a flat sash.
The new jabot and side frills are
so large that tney almost cover the
front of the waist. The new side
frill extends far out over the shoulder, graduating to about two inches
at the bottom, and extends almost
froym shoulder to shoulder. It is of
hand made tucket net, with trimmings of real Mechlin lace, with a
tiny bow of narrow velvet at the
throat and a fold of velvet at the
throat and a fold of velvet at the
top edge of the stock. Another Is
a triple tab jabot attached to (he
stock. The material used is a fine
net with a small embroidered ring
dot, and the tabs are edged with
Valenciennes lace and are of different length. The stock is finished at
the top with a fold of black satin,
a tiny bow of the net being placed
at the throat.
One of the new side frills is made
of wide maline lace attached to an
insertion of hand embroidered net.
A narrow frill of plain net finishes
the othr edge. This frill is attached
to a high stock of embroidered net
edged with black velvet. Tiny black
velvet buttons adorn the central
piece of insertion.
One unusual design is a side frill,
instead of being attached to a
straight piece of insertion, has the
double pleated frill joined to a triangular piece of pleatd handkerchief
linen. The frill Is attached to the
stock collar by means of narrow Valenciennes isertion two inches long.
Whn worn the uppr point of the frill
is pinned at the left shoulder, while
the lower corner is fastened over the
right side, the entire frill curving
from the upper right to the lower
left and suggesting the fichu.
There is not particularly much to
say about the new shapes of hats
displayed by Paris modistes. A new
sailor shape, with rounded crowno
on top and broad brim has lately
made its appearance, trimmed solely
with a five inch bias band of velvet,
neatly affixed on the left side by a
bow and turn-under of velvet. These
hats, generally white with some vivid
color trimming, have a band of straw
to match, the garniture enframing
the brim about a couple of inches
In breadth, and will make pretty
morning and seaside hats, shady and
smart or chic and servlcaeable at the
same time.
For very hot weather, fashionable
women return to the pongee coat.
This year these are made with the
sa.ne round buttons, a large round
or square collar and reverse either
of the ponge itself or else of silk
of some contrasting color.
Woolen flowers on the sheerest
frocks have come into unusual importance. They are circular disks
of crochetei work, gathered Into a
centre and in many sizes. The smallest ones are one inch In diameter
and are used with embroidered stems
on the edges of sashes. Large ones
form patches on the bodice or girdle.
Fringe is the favorite trimming
for chic frocks of changeable silk.
It also finishes the majority of separate sashes.
Boleros are Oriental in style. The
Greek, Byzantine, Egyptian and Persian embroideries are used to simulate the bolero line on many dresses.
Wide  elastic  belts,   woven   In  all
colors  to  match  the  toilet,  are  all
the rage in Paris. ,
 o	
Emperor—I do not care to hear
your    proposition,    sir.    Everything
You Can Avoid This
by sending your Clothes to the
PIONEER   STEAM   LAUNDRY
There are Many
Reasons Why
IT   IS   TO   YOUR   INTEREST
We do first-class work and
are careful with your Garments. We can do your work
and return it within 48 hours
if necessary. We call for your
i.aundry and return it to you.
Should anything be lost or misplaced we will make It satisfactory.
When your Laundry goes to the Chinks there are many drawbacks. When you send-it to us your money helps pay WHITE
LABOR.
PIONEER STEAM LAUNDRY
PUBLIC HIGHWAYS
Province of British Columbia
NOTICE is hereby given that all
Public Highways in unorganized Districts, and all Main Trunk Roads In
organized Districts are sixty-six feet
wide, and have a width of thirty-
three feet on each side of the mean
straight centre line of the travelled
road. THOMAS TAYLOR,
Minister of Public Works.
Department of Public Works, Victoria. B. C, July 7, 1911.    jyl8-ol8
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE.
NOTICE Is hereby given that the
reserve of a parcel of land situated
on Graham Island, notice of which
appeared In the British Columbia
Gazette on the 25£h of February,
1909, being dated 23rd February,
1909, is cancelled to permit of the
lands being acquired by pre-emption
only and for no other purpose
ROBT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Department of Lands,
Victoria, B. C, April 5th, 1911.
4-14—7-5
NOTICE.
In the matter of an application for
the issue of a duplicate of the Certificate of Title for an undivided
one-half  of    Lot  883,     Group  I,
Cassiar District:
Notice is hereby given  that it
my intention to issue at the expiration ' of  one  month  after   the  first
publication hereof a duplicate of the
Certificate of    Title to  the    above
mentioned land In the 'name of William Jordan Larkworthy, which Certificate is dated the 30th day of September,  1910, and numbered  326R.
WILLIAM   E.   BURRITT,
Di'rict Registrar.
Land Registry Office,
Prince Rupert, B. C,
May 26,  1911. J23
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE.
Notice is hereby given the the
reserve existing by reason of the
notice published in the British Columbia Gazette of the 27th December, 1907, over lands on Graham Island, formerly covered by Timber
Licences Nos. Nos. 37055, 37056 and
37057, which expired on the 6th day
of November, 1909, and the lands
embraced within Timber Licence No.
37059, which expired on the 25th
day of January, 1909, is cancelled,
and that the said lands will be open
for pre-emption only under the provisions of Section 7 of the "Land
Act" after midnight on June 16th,
1911.
ROBERT A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Lands Department,
Victoria, B. C,
9th March, 1911.
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that Prince Rupert Sand & Gravel Company, Ltd.,
of Prince Rupert, occupation Industrial Company, Intends to apply for
permission to lease the following described land:— Commencing at a
post planted at the Witness post on
the southerly boundary of Lot 4124;
thence southerly following the sinuosities of the shore line 60 chains
more or less to southerly end of the
Island; tlience easterly 10 chains
more or less to low water mark;
thence northerly 60 chains more or
less along low water mark; thence
westerly 10 chains moro or .ess to
the point of commjneement.
PRINCE   itUPLRT SAND  &
GRAVEL Co., LTD.
Per J. Y. Rochester, Agt.
Dated May 30, 1911. 6-2
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that I, Joseph
Pastl, of Watson, Sask., occupation
farmer, Intend to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:— Commencing at a
post planted about 30 cains in i
northerly direction from the N. hi.
corner of Lot No. 2662 or T. L. No.
:i25fl8 at Lakelse Lake; tlience north
20 chains; thence east 40 chains;
thence south 20 chains along shore
of Lakelse Lake; thence west 40
chains to point of commencement,
containing 120 acres, more or less.
JOSEPH PASTL.
George Hlr, Agent.
Dated  May  5,  1911. 6-2
that is submitted must first be put
through the prime minister.
Subject—Nothing would please me
better. I wanted to show you the
new bayonet which I have invented
for army use.
 o	
In a recent examination paper for
a boy clerk's post was this question:
"If the premier and all the members of the cabinet should die, who
would officiate?"
Robert, a boy of fourteen, thought
for a time, trying in vain to recall
who came next in succession. At last
a happy inspiration came to him, and
he answered:
"The undertaker."
WATER NOTICE
I, C. N. Pring, of Prince Rupert,
B. C, occupation broker, give notice
that on the 12th day of July I intend tho apply to the Water Commissioner at his office in Prince Rupert, for a license to take and use
2.8 cubic feet of water per second
from Hot Springs on border of Lake
Lakelse in the Skeena Land Division of Coast District. The water is
to be taken directly from the Springs
and is to be used on Lot No. 3983,
for sanitary purposes.
Dated June 12th, 1911.
C. N. PRING,
6-13-lm Prince Rupert, B. C.
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast, Range 5.
TAKE NOTICE that T. H. Hughes,
of Lakelse Valley, occupation farmer,
intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted at the southeast corner of Lot
4128; thence 40 chains north; thence
40 chains east; thence 40 chains
south; thence 40 chains west to point
of commencement, and containing
160 acres, more or less.
TOM HUGH HUGHES.
Dated June 5, 1911.
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that John Kir-
ualdy, 6f Lakelse Valley, oocupation
farmer, u... i to apply for permission to purchase tht following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 120 chaius south
from the south end of Herman
Lake; thence west 80 chains; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains.
JOHN  KIRKALDY.
Dated April 11, 1911. 5-5
Skeena   Land    District—District   of
Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that I, V. W.
Smith, of Prince Rupert, occupation
contractor, intend to apply for permission to lease the following described foreshore:—Commencing at
a post planted about 2 miles in a
southerly direction from Port Simpson; thence northerly along high
water mark 25 chains and containing all foreshore between high and
low water mark.
V. W.  SMITH,
Locator.
Staked 31st May, 1911. 6-6
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE, that I, Minnie
Meredith, of Victoria, B. C, occupation a married woman, intend to
apply for permission to purchase the
following desoribed lands:—Commencing at a post planted about 40
chains distant and in a South direction from the Southeast corner of
Lot 1733; thence east 40 chains;
thence south 40 chains; thence west
40 chains; thence north 40 chains
to point of commencement, containing 160 acres more or less.
MINNIE  MEREDITH.
John Klrkaldy,
Agent.
Dated  February  20th,  19J1.
Skeena Land  District-
of Coast.
-District
TAKE NOTICE that Joseph Edward Merryfield, of Prince Rupert,
occupation merchant, Intends to apply for permission to lease the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about 10 chains
nortn from the northeast corner of
Lot 33; thence west 1500 feet to
shore of Smith's Island; thence following shore in a southerly direction
1200 feet; thence east to shore of
De Horsey Island; thence following
shore in a northerly direction to
point of commencement.
JOSEPH EDWARD MERRYFIELD.
E. Spro, Agent.
Dated April 4, 1911. 4-7
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast Range 5.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles
James Gilllngham, of Prince Rupert,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply for permission to purohase the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner of Lot 992 and
marked C. J. Gillingham's N. E.
Corner Application for Purchase; I,
C. J. Gilllngham, Intend to apply
for permission to purchase 320 acres
of land bounded as follows:—Commencing at this post; thence 80
chains south; thence 40 chains west;
thence 80 chains north; thence 40
chains east to place of commencement.
CHARLES JAMES GILl INGHAX
Robert Osborn Jennings, Agent.
Dated January 5, 1911.
Skeena   Land    District—District   of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that I, Charles
Percy Hickman, of Naas Harbour,
occupation constable, intend to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:— Commencing at a post planted on the
east shore of Naas Bay, about two
miles In an easterly direction from
Lot 3, marked C. P. H., S. W. corner; thence east 20 chains; tlience
nortli 40 chains to the shore; thence
along the shore line to the place of
commencement, containing 40 acres,
more or less.
CHARLES PRECY HICKMAN.
Dated June  7,  1911. 6-30
Skeena   Land   District —District   of
uKeena,
TAKE NOTICE that the Canadian
Canning Company, Limited, of 224
Winch Building, Vancouver, B. C,
occupation salmon caners, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted adjoining
a post marked W. N. about 300 feet
South of Wallace's wharf, Naas Harbour, B. C.J thence east 20 chains;
thence south 20 chains; thence west
20 cliains; thence following the
coast line in a northerly direction
back to the point of commencement
and containing forty acres more or
less.
CANADIAN CANNING CO., LTD.
Per G. H. Leslie,  Agent.
Dated  6th  June,  1911. 6-26
Skeena Land  District—District
of Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that Thomas Stewart, of Prince Rupert, occupation
accountant, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted 40 chains north from
the southwest corner of Lot 1733;
thence west 40 chains; thence south
40 chains; thence east 40 chains;
thence north 40 chains to point of
commencement.
THOMAS STEWART.
John  Kirkaldy,  Agent.
Dated July 7, 1911.
WATER  NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that an
application will be made under Part
V of the "Water Act, 1909," to obtain a licence in the Queen Charlotte
Islands Division of Skeena District.
(a) The name, address and occupation of the applicant—Orland F.
Merrill; Massett, Graham Island,
B. C;   prospector.
(If for mining purposes) Free Miner's Certificate No	
(b) The name of the lake,
stream or source (if unnamed, the
description is)—Ain Lhke and Ain
River.
(c) The point of diversion—At
or near Ain Lake.
(d) The quantity of water applied for (in cubic feet per second)
—700.
(e) The character of the proposed
evorks—Ham, flume, pipe line and
liower   plant.
(f) The  premises on  v.'ii li   {:■
.rater is to be used   (d        ''.' s
—Near mouth of Ain River.
(g) The purposes * for which
water  is  to    be    used—General1'
power.
(h)    If for irrigation, describe t
land to be irrigated, giving acre:e"
(1) If the water Is to be used for
power or for mining purposes, describe the place wliere the water is
to be returned to some natural char
nel, and the difference in altitude
between point of diversion and point
of return—Near mouth of Ain River
about 150 feet below point of diversion.
(J) Area of Crown land Intended
to be occupied by the proposed
works— About 10 acres.
(k) This notice was posted on
the tenth day of June, 1911, and application will be made to the Commissioner on the fourth day of September, 1911.
(1) Give the names and addresses
of any riparian proprietors or licensees who or whose lands are
likely to be affected by the proposed
works, either above or below the
outlet—None.
(Signature) ORLAND P. MERRILL,
(P.  O. Address)   Masset, B. C.
George S. Mayer, Agent,
(P.  O. Address)   Masset, B. C.
Note—One cubic foot per second
is equivalent to 35.71 miner's inches.
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Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that I, John Y.
Rochester, of Prince Rupert, occupation broker, intend to apply fir permission to lease the following described land:— Commencing at a
post planted on the northerly end of
an island In the Skeena River about
Mile 45 on the Grand Trunk Pacific
Railway; thence north 1000 feet
more or less to low water mark;
thence westerly along the low water
mark 1000 feet more or less;
thence southerly 1000 feet more or
less; thence easterly 1000 feet to
the place of commencement.
J. Y. ROCHESTER.
Dated May 30, 1911. 6-2
Skeena Land District—District ot
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that T. M. Turner,
of Lakelse Valley, occupation farmer, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands: — Commencing at a post
planted on the Omineca & Hazelton
right of way and adjoining the N. E.
corner of Lot 518; tlience west 17
chains to corner of Lot 3996; thence
north 20 chains; thence following
right of way to point of commencement.
T. M. TURNER,
John Kirkaldy, Agent.
Dated 14th June, 1911. 7-4
Skeena    Land    Notice—District    of
Coast—Range V
TAKE NOTICE that Daniel W.
Beaton, of Prince Rupert, B. C, occupation carpenter, Intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about five miles
up the Exchumsik River from Its
mouth, and on Its south bank; thence
east 40 chains; thence north 40
chains; thence west 40 chains;
thence south 40 chains to place of
commencement.
DANIEL  W.  BEATON.
Dated  June  14,  1911. J-ll
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PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Skeena Land District—District  of
Queen Charlotte
TAKri NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, Intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under G40 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the southeast corner of C.L. 4472; thence west 80
chains; thence nortli 80 chains;
thence east 80 cliains; tbence south
80 chains to place of commencement,
AUSTIN  M.  BROWN.
Dated July  17,  1911.	
Skeena Land  District—District  of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of LandB for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the southeast corner of C.L. 4472; thence east 80
chains; tlience north 80 chains;
thence west 80 cliains; tlience south
80 chains to place of commencement.
AUSTIN M.  BROWN.
Dated July 17, 1911.	
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty flays
from date, 1, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the northeast corner
of C.L. 4471; thence west 80 chains;
thence south SO cliains; thence east
80 chains; thence north 80 chains to
I lace of commencement.
AUSTIN M. BROWN.
Dated July 17, 1911.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
"ARE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince ivupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the northeast corner
of C.L. 4471; thence east 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence west
80 chains; thence nortli 80 chains,
to place of commencement.
AUSTIN  M.  BROWN.
Dated July 17, 1911.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of laud on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the south corner of
C.L. 44i0; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south
SO chains; thence east 80 chains, to
place of commencement.
AUSTIN M.  BROWN.
Dated July 17, 1911.
Skeena Land  District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, 1, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler. intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the southeast corner of C.L. 4470; thence east 80
cliains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south
80 chains, to place of commencement.
AUSTIN M. BROWN.
Dated July 17, 1911.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, Intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under G40 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one. mile east of the northeast corner
of C.L. 4469; tlience west 80 chains;
tbence south 80 chains; thence east
80 chains; thence north 80 .chains,
to place of commencement.
AUSTIN  M.  BROWN.
Dated July  17,  1911.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, 1, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C„ by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the northeast corner
of C.L. 4469; thence east 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence west
80 chains; thence north 80 chains to
place of commencement.
AUSTIN M.  BROWN.
Dated July 17, 1911.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, Intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the southeast corner
of C.L. 4475; thence west 80 chains;
thence north SO chains; thence east
80 cnains; thence south SO cliains,
in place ot commencement.
AUSTIN  M,  BROWN,
Duted July  17, 1911.
Skeena  Land  District—District  of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the south corner of
C.L.4475; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; tlience soutli
80 chains; thence west 80 chains to
place of commencement.
AUSTIN M.  BRO.eN.
Dated July 17, 1911.
Skeena Land  District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile north of the northeast corner of C.L. 4477; thence west SO
chains; thence south 80 chains;
tlience east 80 chains; thence north
80 chains, to place of commencement.
AUSTIN  M.  BROWN.
Dated July 17,  1911.
Skeena  Land  District—District  of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Henry Edenshaw, of
Masset, B. C, occupation storekeeper, intend to apply to the Chief Commissioner of Lands for a license to
prospect for coal and petroleum on
and under 640 acres of land on Graham Island described as follows: —
Commencing at a post planted on the
west shore of Uest River, one mile
easterly from the mouth of said river; thence south 80 chains; thence
east SO chains; thence north 80
chains; thence west 80 chains to the
place of commencement.
HENRY EDENSHAW.
Dated July  17,  1911.
COAL MIXES ACT
Skeena Land  District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to V I Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—-Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the northeast corner
of C.L. 4474; thence east 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence west
80 thalns; thence nortli 80 chains, to
place of commencement.
AUSTIN M.  BROWN.
Dated July  17,  1911.
Skeena Land  District—District  of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Henry Edenshaw, of
Masset, B. C, by occupation storekeeper, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:
—Commencing at a post planted on
the west shore of the West River,
about one mile easterly from the
mouth of said river; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south
SO chains, to place of commencement.
HENRY EDENSHAW.
Dated July  17,  1911.
Skeena    Land    District—District    ot
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, ii.tends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Commencing at post planted 6%
miles N. E. of the mouth of the
White River and the junction of the
Naas, marked Chas. J. Gillingham's
S. E. Corner; th"nce SO chains
North; thence SO chains West;
thence 80 chains South; thence 80
chains East to point of commencement and containing C40 acres more
or less
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles M. Huff, Agent.
Dated March 4,  1911. 4-18
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows*—Commencing at post planted
at the southeast corner of C.L. 4477;
thence east 80 cliains; thence north
80 chains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains, to place of
commencement.
AUSTIN M.  BROWN.
Dated July 17, 1911.	
Skeena Land  District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, By occupation
sadler, Intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
at the southeast corner ofC.L.4478;
thence north 80 cliains; uience east
80 chains; e.eence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains, to place of
commencement.
AUSTIN M.  BROWN.
Dated July  17,  191L	
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
at the southeast corner of C.L. 4467;
thence north 80 chains; thence east
80 chains; tlience south SO chains;
thence west SO chains, to place of
commencement.
AUSTIN  M.  BROWN.
Dated July 17, 1911.	
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
at the southeast corner of C.L. 4465;
thence north 80 chains; thence east
SO chains; tlience south 80 chains;
thence  west  80   chains,   to   place  of
commencement,   ,
AUSTIN  M.   BROWN.
Dated July 16, 1911.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlote Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Wirt A. Stevens, of Chicago, III., U. S. A., occupation civil engineer, intends to
apply for permission to purchase
the following described lands:—
Commencing at a post planted on
the shore of Masset Inlet about one
mile northeast of the mouth of the
Ain River; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 40 chains more or leBS
to the eastern boundary of T. L.
35413; thence south along the
boundary of T. L. 35413 and
T. L. 35414, a distance of 80 chains;
thence east 40 chains, more or leBS,
to point of commencement, containing  320  acres  more or less.
WIRT   A.   STEVEiNS.     '
G. S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated Feb.  24th, 1911.
Skeena   Land    District—District   of
Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that I, Roy.
Chrisman, of Port Esslngton, B. C.
occupation prospector, intend to apply for permission to lease the following described land:—Commencing at a post planted about five
miles distant and in a southwesterly
direction from the point at the entrance to Captain Cove, Petrel
Channel, and on the northeast side
of McCauley Island; thence west 20
chains; thence south 40 chains,
thence east about 20 chains to shore
of Petrel Channel; thence northerly
along shore line of Petrel Channel
to point of commencement and containing eighty acres more or less.
ROY CHRISMAN.
Dated April 11, 1911. 4-25
Skeena   Land    District—District   of
Cassiar.
TAK.J NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land:—-
Comencing at a pc-t planted 7 miles
N. E. of the mouth of the White
River and the junction of the Naas,
marked Chas. J. Gillingham's S. E.
Corner; thence 80 chains North;
thence SO chains West; thence 80
chains South; thence 80 chains East
to point of commencement and containing 640 acres more or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles M.  Huff, Agent.
Dated March 5th, 1911. 4-18
thence SO chains North; thence 80
'■hains west; thence SO chains
South; thence 80 chains East to
point of commencement and containing 640 acres more or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles M. Huff, Agent.
Dated March 4th, 1911. 4-18
Skeena    Land    District—District    of
Cassiar.
TAKE     NOTICE   that  Charles  J
Gilllngham, of Prince Rupert, B. C. j
occupation    contractor,    intends    to i
apply  to  the  Minister  of Lands  for i
a license to prospect   for Coal  and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land:—j
Commencing at e. post planted about
8 miles N. E. of the mouth of White
River and the junction of the Naas
River, marked Chas. J. (iillingham's
S.  E.  Comer;     theuce    8u    chains
North;   thence    SO     chains    West;
thence  80  chains South;  thence 80
chains East  to point of commencement and containing 640 acres more
or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles M.  Huff, Agent.
Dated March Oth, 1911. 4-18
of
Skeena   Lj.nd   District—District    of
On Qfi 1H.T*
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Commencing at a post planted 7 Vi
miles N. E. of the mouth of the
White River and ;he junction of the
Naas and marked Chas. J. Gillingham's S. E. Corner; thence 80
chains North; thence 80 chains
West; thence 80 chains South;
thence 80 chains East to point of
commencement and containing 640
acres more or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
fiharles M. Huff, Agent.
Dated March oth, 1911. 4-18
Skeena   Land   District—District
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Commencing at a post planted about
8 miles N. E. of th? mouth of White
River and the junction of the Naas
River, marked Chas. J. Gillingham's
S. E. Corner; thence 80 chains
North; thence 80 chains West;
tlience SO cliains South; thence 80
chains East 1.0 point of commencement and containing 640 acres mo: i
or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles M. Huff, Agent.
Dated March 6th, 1911. 4-18
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that W. H. Ferguson, of Prince Rupert, B. C, occupation civil engineer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about one
mile southerly, following the sinuosities of the shore line from the
southwest corner of Lot 104, Range
V; thence 20 chains west; thence 20
cliains south; thence 20 chains west,
thence 20 chains south; tlience 20
chains west; thence about 40 chains
south; thence along shore northerly
to point of commencement.
W. H. FERGUSON.
G. Hansen, Agent.
Dated April 22nd, 1911. 4-25
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Commencing at a post planted 7V2
miles N. E. of the mouth of the
White River and the junction of the
Naas, marked Chas. J. Gillingham's
S. E. Corner; thence 80 ehains
North; thence 80 chains West
thence 80 chains South; thence 80
chains East to point cf commencement and containing 640 acres more
or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles M. Huff, Agent.
Dated March  5th, 1911. 4-18
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gilllngham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for a
license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Commencing at a post planted about
8 miles N. E. of the mouth of the
White River and the junction of the
Naas, marked Chas. J. Gillingham's
S. E. Corner; thence 80 chains
North; thence 80 chains West;
thence 80 chains South; thence SO
chains East to point of commencement and containing 640 acres more
CHARLES  J.   GILLINGHAM.
Charles M. Huff, Agent.
Dated March 6th, 1911. 4-18
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that George Stanley Mayer, of Masset, B. C, occupation farmer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted on the east shore of
Tsu Skundale Lake; thence east 80
chains; thence south 40 chains, more
or less, to the north boundary of
T. L. 35413; thence west and south
along the boundaries of T. L. 35413,
to the shore of the Ain River; thence
northerly along the shore, back to
the place of commencement, containing 500 acres, more or less.
GEORGE STANLEY MAYER.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 28, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Robert Cross,
of Masset, B. C, occupation farmer,
Intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted on the east shore of Tsu Skundale
Lake; thence east SO chains; thence
north 80 chains, to or near to the
S. E. corner of Lot 35; thence west
40 chains, more or less; thence
soutli 40 chains, more or less; thence
west 40 chains more or less, following the southern boundaries of Lot
35; thence south to the shore; thence
southerly along the shore back to the
place of commencement, containing
500 acres, more or less.
ROBERT  CROSS.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov.  28,  1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Christina Orr,
ol Masset, B. C, occupation married,
intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described
lands: — Commencing at a post planted about 40 chains »>'Qith and 3 miles
east of the N. E. co.ner of Lot 35;
thence south 40 chains; thence west
80 chains; thence north 40 chains;
thence east 80 chains, containing 320
acres.
CHRISTINA ORR.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 25, 1910.
Skeena
-District   of
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast
TAKE NOTICE that F. T. Saunders, of Vancouver, occupation master
mariner, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands:— Commencing at a
post planted about 6 miles northwest of Love Inlet on the north
east shore of Pitt Island; thence
south 20 chains; thence west 40
chains; thence north to shore;
thence following shore in a southeasterly direction to point of commencement , containing 80 acres
more or less.
FRANK TAUNTON SAUNDERS,
Locator.
W. Hamilton, Agent.
Staked 17th, Feb., 1911.
Skeena  Land  District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE   NOTICE   that   thirty   days I
from   date,   1,   Henry   BJdenshaw,  of I
Masset,   B.   C,   by   occupation   store-1
keeper, Intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to  prospect  for coal  and  petroleum
on and under nil) acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:
Commencing at a post planted on the
bank of west  River, about one mile
easterly from the mouth of said river;   thence  west  80   chains;   thence
south   80   chains;    thence   east   80
chains;   thence north   80  cliains,  to
place of commencement.
HENRY EDENSHAW.
Dated July 17,  1911.        	
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Henry Edenshaw, of
IVIasset, B. C, by occupation storekeeper, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum on
and under 640 acres of land on Graham Island described as follows: —
Commencing at a post planted on the
west shore of West hever, about one
mile easterly from tlie mouth of said
river; thence north SO chains; thence
west 80 chains; thence soutli SO
rhains; Ihence east 80 cliains, to
place of commsneement.
HENRY 0DENSHAW.
. , ,   1 :) 1 1 .
Skeena Land District—Distrlot of
Queen Charlotte Island.
TAKE NOTICE that Robert Fraser Ogilvie, of Vancouver, occupation banker, Intends to apply for
permission to purchase the folowing
described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 2 miles west of
the southwest corner of A. P. 12-
037; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains to
point of commencement, containing
640 acres.
ROBERT FRASER OGILVIE.
Arthur  Robertson,  Agent.
Dated Dec.  9, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that James G.
Crombie, of Prince Rupert,' occupation auditor, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:— Commencing at a
post planted at the northwest corner, 55 chains east and 20 chains
south from northeast rorner of Lot
1116 (Horry Survey), Coast Dist.,
range 5; thence 20 chains east;
thence 25 chains, more or less,
south to Angus McLeod Pre-emption; thence 20 rhains west; thence
25 chains, more or less, north, to
post of commencement, containing
50 acres, more or less.
JAMES  G.  CROMBIE,
Fred  Rohlen, Agptit.
Dated June 14, 1911. 6-23
^^^^   Land   District- 	
f**Q CM] fl T*
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Commencing at a post planted 6 \t
miles N. E. of the mouth of the
White River and the junction of the
Naas, and marked Chas. J. Gillingham's S. E. Corner; thence 80
chains Nortn; thence 80 cnains
West;    thence    80    chains    South
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Ort QC| QT*
TAKE NOTICE thi.t Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, Intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for a
license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Commencing at a post planted about
8 miles N. E. of the mouth of the
White River and the junction of the
Naas, marked Chas. J. Gillingham's
S. E. Corner; thence 80 chains
North; thence 80 chains West;
thence 80 chains South; thence 80
chains East to point of commencement and containing 640 acres more
or less.
CHARLES  J.   GILLINGHAM.
Charles M. Huff, Agent.
Dated  March  6th,  1911. 4-18
Skeent Land District—District Of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Clara Orr, of
Masset, B C, occupation spinster,
Intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted about 40 chains south and 80
chains east of the N. E. corner of
Lot 35; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence north
80 ehains; thence east 80 chains, containing 640 acres.
CLARA ORR.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated Nov. 25, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Merton A.
Merrill, of Masset, B. C, occupation
prospector, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted at the S. W. corner of
T. L. 40787; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south
80 chains, more or less, to the shore
of Masset Inlet; thence easterly along
the shore back to the place of commencement, containing 640 acres,
more or less.
MERTON A. MERRILL.
Dated Nov. 25, 1910.
WATER NOTICE.
NOTICE is hereby given that an
application will be made under Part
V. of the "Water Act, 1»09," to obtain   a  licence  in   the  Queen  Char-
     __     ._..,___ lotte Islands Division of Skeena Dis-
thence 80  chains    East to point ofjtrict.
commencement  and  containing   640!     (a)     The name, address and  00-
acres more or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles M.  Huff,  Agent.
Dated March 4th, 1911. 4-18
Skeena
-District   of
^^^    Land    District- ^^^^^^
Cassiar.
TAKE     NOTICE  that  Charles  J.1
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C.,l
occupation    contractor,    intends    to
apply to the Minuter of_ Lands for | ^ £to Xin'kiver.
cupation of the applicant—Merton A.
Merrill, Masset, Q. C. I., B. C,
Prospector.
(If for mining purposes) Free
Miner's Certificate No	
(b) The name of the lake,
stream, or source (if unnamed, the
description is)—-I-in-tsua Lake, Tsu-
Skundale Lake and Ain River.
(c) The point of diversion—At T
near  the   outlet     of     Tsu-Skuudale
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 64 0 acres of land: —
Commencing at a post planted about
8 miles N. E. of the mouth of White
River and the junction of the Naas
River, marked Charles J. Dillingham's S. E. Corner; thence 80
chains North; thence 80 chains
West; thence 80 chains South;
thence 80 chains East to point of
commencement and containing 640
acres more or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles M. Huff, Agent.
Dated March 5th, 1911, 4-18
(d) The quantity of water ap
plied for (in cubic feet per second)
—1,000.
<e) The character of the proposed works—Power Plant, Dam,
Flumes, etc.
(f) The premises on which the
water is to be used (describe same)
—At or near the mouth of the Ain
River.
(g) The purposes for which the
water Is to be used —Generating
power.
(h) If for irrigation, describe
the  land   Intended   to     be  Irrigated,
Skeena    Land    District—District    ofl*1*',1"8  '"'■"''"K*
Cassiar.
TAKE     NOTICE   that  Charles   J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation    contractor,    intends    to
apply to the  Minister of Lands  for
a  license  to  prospect   for  Coal  and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Commencing at a post planted  6'V — <*^ -j — ;,—
miles N.  E.  of  the mouth  of White'
River and tha junction of the Naas
(1) If the water Is to he used for
power or mining purposes, describe
the place where the water Is to be
returned to some natural channel,
and the difference in altitude between point of diversion and point
of return—At or near the mouth of
the Ain River, ahout 100 feet below
(j)    Area of Crown  land lntend-
marked Chas. J. Gillingham's S. E. ed to be occupied by the proposed
Corner; thence 80 chains North; works—10 acres more or less.
thence 80 cliains West; thence £0 <k» ™s notice was posted on
chains South; thence 80 chains East lhe 2811; day of November 1910,
to point of commencement and con- •>■"• application will he made to the
taining 640 acres more or less. Commissioner  on   the   1st    day    of
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.       ■■unf'   "-J1*   ., ,     ..
Charles M.  Huff,  Agent, j     <•'    c'lve the names and address-
Dated  March  4th, 1911. 4-18 !es  of   any   riparian   proprietors     or
licensees   who   or   whose  lands     —
Skeena   Land   District—District Tf! llkely to  he affected by    the    nro-
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect   for Coal and
posed  works,  either above or below
the outlet—-Don't know  of any.
( Signature I
MERTON   A.
1 P.   O,   Address)
NOTE.  -One  cubit
.MERRILL, •
Masse- ,   B.   (.'.
eont   p^r   sec-
15,71    miller's
Petroleum over 640 acres of land:— end is equivalent  to
Commencing at a post planted    bIx Inches.
tulles N. E. of the mouth of White ——————_—
River and  the- junction of the Naas       ,,,,.,- ,    ,,   , ,
River  on   Canyon    Creek,    marked      Job  Pr-nt*nB  (>f a11  klnils '•'■at»
Chas.  J.  Gillingham's S.  E.  Corner; executed at the Journal Office.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Carl Nelson,
of Chicago, 111., U. S. A., occupation
draughtsman, Intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 80 chains east
and 120 chains north of N. E. corner of Lot 35; thence south 80
chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence west
80 chains, containing 640 acres.
CARL NELSON.
M. A. Merrill, Agent.
Dated, Nov. 26, 1910.
Skeena    Land    District—District   of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that Freadrlck
Madden, of Seattle, Wash., occupation laborer, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described land:—Commencing at a
post planted about two hundred feet
east of mile 77 on the south side of
Q, T. P. Right-of-way; thence west
40 chains following the said Right-
of-way; thence soutli to bank of
Skeena River; thence east following
the sinuosities of said river until
due south of said post; tbence north
to point of commencement, containing 130 acres more or less.
PRBADRICK  MADDEN.
Thos.  L. Fay, Agent.
Dated April 27, 1011,
5-16
NOTICE.
A book Is kept In the City Clerk's
Office In which to enter the names
and addresses, etc. of citizens of
Prince Rupert desiring employment
on City work. All desiring employment should register ni once.
ERNEST A.   WOODS,
City Clerk.
Prince   Rupert   Private   Detective
Agency
N. McDonald, Manager
All kinds of legitimate detective work
hnudled  for companies and  Individuals.     Business  Btrlctly  confidently'..
P. O. Box HIM — Phone 210
If you Hunt the honey
That comes  from tlie hive
Take up (lie phone' nml
Cnll our, double five. PRINCE  RUPERT JOURNAL
Tuesday, august 1, 1911.
-prince iRupert journal
Telephone   138
Published twice a week on Tuesdays and Fridays from the office of
publication, Third Avenue, near
McBride Street.
Subscription rate to any point in
Canada, $2.00 a year; to points out-
side of Canada, $3.00 a year.
Advertising rates furnished on
application.
O. H. NELSON,
Editor.
back—Cordial greetings, grateful
appreciations and best wishes from
American  Medical  Association.
Signed:   Murphy,   Gorgas,   Jacobi,
Welsh,  Mattison.
CANADIAN* NAVY
Details of the Arrangements Entered
Into at Conference Regarding
Defense
Tuesday   August 1, 1911.
ELECTION   i.S  CALLED
Sir Wilfrid has decided lo take
an appeal to the people with the
West anything but properly represented. In doing so he seeks to put
the responsibility upon the opposition, which is manifestly unfair. Sir
Wilfrid as leader of the government
is in com nil of the House and the
dissolution must be charged up to
him.
Mr. Borden expressed a readiness
to assist in getting a redistribution
bill through the House but would
not consent to let the reciprocity pact
go through without the will of the
people being tested.
The election now, within three
years since the last election and on
the old distribution of seats, leaves
at least about one half of the West
not represented in the new Parliament.- Had jSir Wilfrid wished to
give them »'e ee franchise he had
but to say-so and the Opposition
would have assisted in seeing the bill
through the House. The government
however, seemed determined to have
an appeal on the old arrangements
of seats and accordingly advantage is
taken of the situation created to >*,3t
to the electorate without redistribution, thus, givirig an unfair representation to the detriment of the West.
EUROPEAN   SITUATION
The results in the Moroccan trouble would seem to indicate that again
British diplomacy has shown
itself ready to grapple with
any situation that may arise. The
foreign office, it would appear, had
exact Information as to the whole
chessboard of international politics.
Following the traditions of that office, a bold front was presented just
at the right time and peace has resulted. As a consequence of the
manoeuvre the prestige of the Empire has been Improved throughout
the world while the opposite effect
must follow as far as Germany is
concerned.
During a delicate time in diplomatic circles the world has been
shown, as has been the case so often
before, that Britisii public men can
rise above all party feelings, cast
aside the opportunities for party advantages and unite in securing for
the country its fullest advantages.
The memorandum of the conference between the Canadian and Australian representatives with the British admiralty on the status of the
overseas dominion forces has been
tabled by Sir Wilfrid Lauria at Ottawa.
The main features ot the agreement are that the dominion navies
will be exclusively under the control
of their respective governments, but
that training will be generally uni
form with the navy of the United
Kingdom. Naval stations are set
apart for Canada and Australia. Canada has the North Atlantic and part
of the North Pacific. The Australian
station covers the South Pacific and
extends to the Antarctic circle.
The dominion navy vessels will
carry the white ensign at the stern
and their distinctive flag at tne jack
staff. Detailed provisions are made
for the control of the vessels of the
dominion forces when off their stations in other parts of the Empire
or in foreign ports. In international
affairs colonial officers will be under
the control of the admiralty, and in
time of war, "when the naval service
of a dominion has been put at the
disposal of the Imperial government,
it will form an integral part of the
British fleet."
The Canadian Pacific naval station
will include the waters north of 30
degrees north latitude, and east of
meridian 180.
Accidental  Death
In the coroner's inquest held last
night concerning the death, of
George Lichtenauer a verdict was
reached by the jury that his death
was accidental. The funeral of the
unfortunate man took place yesterday under the charge of the Fraternal Order of Eagles, of which he
was a member.
HIGH   RECOMMENDATION
Medical Association Goes on Record
Concerning  Mr.   Busch's
Production
The following rabies were sent by
the American Medical Association to
the Globe-Democrat  of St.  Louis.
The American Medical Association
recently in session here has sent by
cable two messages to Adolphus
Busch at his German villa In recognition of his liberality in promoting
the alms and Interests of the association.    The first one reads:
Adolphus Busch, Langenschwal-
barh—The president, Dr, Mattison,
the loral committee and 34,000 members of the American Medicine Association send liearly greetings and
best wishes and a rising vote of
thanks for your generosity to the
American Medical Association, your
donations to the scientific advancement anil your contribution to its
personal coin fort.
JOHN   II.   MURPHY,
President.
The seiiinil  onp  is as  follows:
Adolphus    Busch,    Langenschwal-
"Why are you so reluctant to in
troduce me to your father?" a young
lady asked her sweet heart. "Are
you  afraid  he won't  like me?"
"On the contrary, my darling,"'' was
the reply. "He will like you so much
he will want to marry you himself."
.;. * * * * * .*« .;. .*. * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * •;■
* *
%     News of the Province      $
* *
**************************
INVESTORS  COMING
VANCOUVER—"British capital is
looking with sympathetic interest to
Canada, and especially British Columbia, as a very desirable and profitable field for investment, and British mil'Ions are ready to pour into
our section of the country as soon as
the solidity of the enterprises can
be satisfactorily established to the
investors, but we must safeguard
ourselves against 'wild cat' schemes
that would only close to us the money markets of the old world and thus
retard our hopeful future," was the
pleasing news given out recently by
John Hendry, ex-president of the
Canadian Manpfacturers' Association,
in an Interview. Mr. Hendry, who is
frequently referred to as British Coi
leimbia's most Influential captain of
Industry, and whose rare sagacity
and wonderful business acumen have
made .him a commanding figure In
the affairs of this province and ot
the Dominion, had, perhaps, a better
opportunity than any other Canadian
capitalist to feel the pulse of British
capital while mingling with the leading financiers of London.
"The situation in London, regarding  financial  exploitations,   is  most
favorable to Canada, and particularly
British Columbia, and a greater commercial bond between the two countries seems to be assured through
the fact that British financiers are
devoting more serious study and
perusal to all matters tending to enlighten them on topics Canadian, and
Britisii Columbia is looked upon by
them as the most favorable place for
profitable investments, as they realize the wonderful future of our great
northwest and its relative importance to the grain growing regions
lor which i": is practically the only
western outlet," said Mr. Hendry in
discussing the subject. "British capital prefers chiefly commercial opportunities, such as investments in
factories, railroads and all industries
that are contributory to the development, and assure the stability of this
country."
BRONZE MEDALISTS
VICTORIA—The result of the urban high school entrance examinations show that out of a total of
1,437 candidates writing 848 were
successful. Honors this midsummer
rest with Miss Bessie Smith of Chil-
liwack, who obtained 869 marks, the
highest in the province. The bronze
medals donated annually by his excellency the governor general have
this year been awarded as follows:
Chilliwack, Bessie Smith; Cumberland, Marion Gray; Grand Forks
Linda McRae; Kamloops, W. J. E.
Wylie; Kelowna, W. S. McKeown;
Ladysmith, Marguerite Austin; Nanaimo, Dora Critchley; Nelson Myrtle E. Palmquist; New Westminster,
Ruth E. Agar; Revelstoke, Muriel
Fleetham; Rossland, Gladys M.
York; Vancouver, Madge Gill; Vernon, Carrie E. Sowles; Victoria,
Edith  L.  Harris.
 .—o	
RENEWS CHARGES
Tom Mclnnes is Not Prepared to Submit
Quietly to Finding of
Commission.
He  Repeats Allegations Against the
Government and Certain
Officials
T. R. E. Mclnnes, whose name figured prominently in' the report of
Mr. Justice Murphy on Chinese Immigration and opium smuggling in British Columbia, has made a statement
to an Ottawa paper, replying in detail to the commissioner's findings.
Mr. Mclnnes said in part: "(1)1 say
that the first four statements or findings made by this commissioner in
summing up his report are irrevel-
ant, truckling, malicious and cowardly and In so far as Officer Foster, Gordon Grant, David Lew and
myself are concerned, they are absolutely unwarranted by the evidence.
(2) I say that the Dominion government permitted fraudulent entries
of Chinese to continue without any
attempt at preventing them for at
least two years after its attention had
been drawn thereto. (3) I say that
the Dominion government permitted
fraudulent entries of Chinese to continue without any attempt at preventing them for at least two years
after its attention had been formally
drawn thereto. (3) I say that the
Dominion government deliberately
delayed criminal proceedings aainst
guilty Chinese indicated by its commissioner. Mr. Justice Murphy, for
two months in order to allow them
to escape from justice. (4) 1 say that
If It was to me that Sir Wilfrid Laurier referred in his statement in the
House on Friday when replying to
R. Le. Borden, then Sir Wilfrid Laurier deliberately mis-stated the
racts."
 o ■
PLANS BIG WORKS
(Continued  From   Page One)
amount of money will be expended
in wages and supples.    It Is needless
*»;..;.»;. **** ***** * ** * *********
iRetnemberl
I %
j That we
Import
*       * *
I Our Wines 1
* direct from Europe;  and that
X no house in Prince Rupert can
* equal   them   for  quality.     No
* better can be bought anywhere
*
* in the Province.    We make a
.;. specialty  of
Family Trade
and guarantee satisfaction
* We  also  carry  a  complete #
* *
* stock of other *
Liquors
*   market.
Try a glass of
Cascade
Beer
The best local beer on  the |
*
CLARKE BROS.
Christiansen & Brandt Bid.
*
*
*
*
i
*    	
*
||   Telephone 30
*
*
*
Third Arenue  *
*
+
 ■ *
* *
**************************
to say that Prince Rupert, being the
trading point of the camp, most of
the money will circulate freely in
the city.
"The company has purchased the
"Strongheart," and in the near future will charter other boats for the
transportation of their men and supplies.
"Mr. Hayward director of the.com-
pany, is also the general manager,
and the construction work will be
under his able guidance. Mr. Hayward is an engineer of wide reputation, having designed and built the
hydro-electric plants in the City of
Mexico, Salt Lake City and elsewhere, and is now building the Western Canada Power Company's plant,
which will eventually have a capacity
of over 100,000 horsepower.
Clark Durant of this city, formerly
with the Canadian General Electric
Company, has been appointed general superintendent.
"A first unit-of 3,000 kilowatts
will be installed with all necessary
speed In order to meet the demand
next year."
Speaking about Industrial development, Mr. Brutinel stated that
probably before leaving Prince Rupert he will be able to make an
announcement concerning the building of a large manufacturing plant
contemplated by interests closely allied wltn the Prince Rupert Hydro-
Electric Company. In round figures,
Ihis plant will require the expenditure of about  $1,000,000,  and  will
The British Columbia Company
LIMITED.
AUTHORIZED CAPITAL $100,000.::  PAID UP CAPITAL $41,500
DIRECTORS:—Reginald C. Brown, President; J. C. Maclure, Vice-
President; H. E. Marks, Managin g Diroctor; Capt. E. Nash, William
McNair, R. A. Bevan, and F. C.   Williams, Secretary.      :-:      :-:
INTEREST 4 PER CENT. DEPOSITS
This Company acts as Executors, Administrators, Transferees and
Secretaries to Public Companies.   Commercial, Industrial and other
business propositions underwritten.    Issues  made  on  the
London and New York Stock Exchanges.
TIMBER, COAL, LANDS, and
COMPANY ORGANIZATION
Head Office for Canada, 203, 208, 210, 215 Carter-Cotton Building,
VANCOUVER, B.C.
DURESCO
The King of Water Paints
FIRST IN THE FIELEEEEFOREMOST EVER SINCE
-SOLE AGENTS IN WESTERN CANADA:
The Staneland Co. Ltd
836-840 Fort Street, VICTORIA, B.C.
High-Class....
Grocery
Stock
to choose from
EVERYTHING CLEAN AND FRESH
Goods for the Table to Suit the Most
Fastidious  Housewife
g MERRYFIELD'S I
]       CASH GROCERY      ]
consume not less than. 2,000 horsepower.
Mr. Brutinel also added that many
large Industries Including a smelter,
have been making inquiries at the
head office as to when the company
will be able to deliver power and
as to sites avai'ah'e for them.
Mr. Brutinel has met the mayor
and city solicitor and while no an-
noiiniement is made by either side
It Is understood that arrangements
amicable to both sides may yet be
arrived at.
The Thompson
Hardware Co.
—Second Avenue—
Paints. General Hardware,
Oils, Stoves and Ranges.
2nd Avenue
Prince  Rupert,
B.C.
Real
Estate
INVESTMENTS
Real
Estate
List Your
Properties
with
Uncle Jerry
JEREMIAH H. KUGLER
He Sells Buildings He Sells Contracts
He has Houses to Rent
He Buys Lots He Builds Homes
He Buys Leases He Loans Money
He Has Farms for Sale
He Sells Houses He Rents Stores
JEREMIAH H. KUGLER
Special Bargains in
KITSELAS LANDS
FRANCOIS LAKE LANDS
LAKELSE LANDS
HAZELTON   DISTRICT   LANDS
SAND,   GRAVEL   AND   MARBLE   DEPOSITS
BULKLEY VALLEY LANDS
KISPIOX VALLEY LANDS
PORCHER  ISLAND LANDS
KITSUMKALUM   LANDS if
ii .
rjt M.OIVI*.
Tuesday. August 1, 1911.
PRINCE RUPERf JOURNAL
K>************************.i
|   Shipping Report   J
* By Dominion WlKlcn. |
*************************.i
August 1—Noon
Ikeda—Clear; wind northwest;
barometer 29.91; temperature 65;
light swell.
Skidegate—Clear; wind southeast;
sea smooth.
Triangle—Foggy; wind northwest,
45 miles; barometer 29.45; temperature 49;   dense.
Estevan—Overcast— wind southeast; barometer 29.54; temperature
51; sea smooth.
Point Grey—Clear; clam; barometer 29.95;  temperature 69.
Cape Lazo—Clear; wind northwest; barometer 29.95; temperature
66; sea smooth; Prince George
south  bound at noon.
PRINCE! JOHN AND SERPENT
The new steamer Prince John,
bought on the Clyde for the Grand
Trunk Pacific service between Prince
Rupert and the Queen Charlotte Is-
lands to relieve the Prince Albert,
arrived at the coast from Glasgow
after a good passage. The Prince
John left Glasgow on May 16, and
calls were madde for coal at St. Vincent, Punta Arenas and Coronel.
Captain Davis, who brought out
the new steamer, brought the Prince
Rupert from Newcastle-on-Tyne.
Captain McKenzie, who came out as
chief officer, was in command of the
Barcore when the survivors of the
Great Admiral were rescued off Cape
Flattery in the storm in which the
Colnia was lost, her crew being saved
owing to the heroic work of the late
Mrs. Paterson.
Captain Davis and his ship's company brought a sea serpent story.
Man and boy, the ship's company says
it will take its solemn affidavit that
when near Point Reyes, on Sunday
morning last, a whale was seen lashing the sea in evident distress amidst
a big school of thirty or more whales.
When the steamer was brought
abreast the school at a distance of
less than 100 yards they saw a great
neck with a snake's head lifted ten
feet above the water and they saw
the sea serpent with its body wound
around the whale. The stories told
describe the thing as striped with
bands of brown and slaty colors—
and they all say there was not a
drain of anything stronger than tea
on the vessel.
The Prince John Is a fine three-
masted passenger steamer, 185 feet
long, 30 feet beam and 13.3 feet
deep. She is equipped with wireless
telegraphic apparatus.
To the Prince John belongs the
distinction of being the first of the
G. T. P. boats to bear on her stern
the name of Prince Rupert as her
home port. All of the other vessels
of the fleet are soon to change their
port of registry to the new terminal.
Throughout, the John has been fitted
in a manner which is pleasing to the
eye. Everything has worked out to
a nicety and she is just the boat
for her run.
There is a great deal of passenger
accommodation aboard the vessel and
she will be able to handle the travel
on the run ou which the Prince Albert now operates. She^s a three-
masted ship with a length of 185
feet, 30-foot beam and a depth of
13.3 feet. The vessel which was
built by Scott & Sons, Bowling, Eng.,
in 1910, is constructed of steel and
is class 100 Al with a star at Lloyds.
Every provision has been made to
guide against sinking in case of an
accident. She has seven water tight
bulkheads with a double bottom.
The first class accommodation
aboard is excellent with a very neat
and comfortable smoking room done
In fumed oak with leather upholstery,
and a buffet In connection. This is
accessible only from first class quarters. The dining saloon, seating 44,
Is done In mahogany, with crimson
uphostery and draplngs, and It situated on the shelter deck, and attached to it is a large pantry and galley
conveniently laid out and fitted with
al lmodem equipment necessary to
a first class service.
The dining room is reached by a
mahogany stairway leading from the
lounge to the shade deck into a well
proportioned and airy vestibule, also
paneled and decorated. The principal stateroom accommodation is situated on the shelter deck, and consists of eighteen two-berth staterooms
of large size, well ventilated, all having outside windows. These rooms
are furnished with folding lavatories,
spring berths, hair mattresses, and
the standard linens of the company.
Forward of this is a very neat
semi-circular observation room, with
' large plate glass windows, done in
white and gold, furnished with wicker chairs. This room will be the
most attractive feature of the steamer. Above this Is the pilot house,
and texas for the officers' quarters.
She Is propelled bya single screw,
driven  by  triple  expansion  engines,
with cylinders of 17, 28 and 45
inches, with a 33-inch stroke. Steam
is supplied by two Scottish multitubular boilers and when at full
speed she can make 14 knots an
hour. She has a gross tonnage of
662 tons and a registered tonnage of
44 6 tons.
In connection with the Prince
John, Captain Nicholson, superintendent of the company, said at Victoria: "The Prince John is quite up
to my expectations and we have secured the right boat for the run.
By purchasing the Prince John we
got a suitable vessel quicker than if
we attempted to build one. She is
modern in every respect and is
strongly built so that she can stand
any kind of weather. This is one
quality which is necessary for all
vessels navigating Hecate Straits. I
am indeed well pleased with the
Prince John."
When the Prince John tied up at
the Victoria wharf anyone would
have thought that she had Just completed a trip from the north, as everything was spic and span. Great
credit is due to the officers who kept
the vessel in such fine shape during
the long passage. These are as follows: Master, Captain Davies; Chief
Oficer McKenzie, Second Officer Mc-
Kernon, i^hief Engineer J. Dunn,
Second Engineer Te Drummond,
Third Engineer L. McKenzie, Wireless Operator F. Cannon and Chief
Steward S. Jackson.
The Prince John is to be overhauled at once and placed or. the Islands
run, relieving the Prince Albert;
which will engage in the service now
carried on by the Henriette. The
bringing of another vessel into the
coasting trade shows that the business between here and northern
ports is Increasing rapidly. The
G. T. P. is keeping pace with the
growth and Its fleet engaging in the
northern business now consists of
five fine vessels.
 o	
CROP PRODUCTION
YOC ARE SURE OP
Engine  Reliability
IF  YOU RUN  A
Fairbanks - Norse Marine Engine
OVER 125,000 IN USE THROUGHOUT THE WORLD
TWO
CYCLE
FOUR
CYCLE
|':':i;":;BjB
j$||fl
HEAVY
DUTY
MEDIUM
DUTY
Runabout
Type
MOST  COMPLETE  LINE OF GASOLINE ENGINES IN
THE WORLD
Write  for Catalog PIO
The Canadian Fairbanks Co., Ltd.
101-107 WATER STREET      .
Local Agent—F. M. DAVIS      -
VANCOUVER, B. 0.
- PRINCE RUPERT
THE CONTINENTAL TRUST COMPANY, LIMITED
Authorized Capital     $500,000
Of fi cei*s:
WILLIAM T. KERGIN, M. D., Pres.  DAVID   H..   HAYS,  First Vice-Pres.
M. J. HOBIN, 2nd Vice-Pres. & Mgr.  JAY   KUGLER,   Secretary-Treasurer
C. B. PETERSON, Ass't Manager
Executor and Administrator Receiver jr Assignee
Fiscal Agents Trustees
Real Estate und Insurance
Registrar and Transfer Agent Fmm Lands a,,d M,nes
Agent for Care of Real Estate Escrow Agents
Trustee Under  Mortgages  and  Deeds of Trust Collections
SAVINGS DEPARTMENT
4 per cent on Deposits        SAFE DEPOSIT VAULT AND BOXES
We will be pleased to answer any inquiries regarding investments in
Prince Rupert and Northern British Columbia,
THE CONTINENTAL TRUST COMPANY, LIMITED
SECOND AVENUE PRINCE   RUPERT,   B.   C.
of
The World's Outlook is Very Favorable
This Season for Heavy
Harvest.
Canada     Has     Exceptionally
Promise  for  the  Fall
Harvest
Good
Official reports ot foreign crops re
celved by the department of agriculture at Washington and announced
recently indicate that generally favorable conditions existed abroad
during June.
The condition In Canada all over
most of the Dominion are pronounc
ed flattering; of the 10,500,000 acres
under cultivation this season, only
9,500,000 having been tilled last
year.
In the spring wheat province,
Saskatchewan, the Increase in area
amounted to 1,200,000 acres. Ever
since the seed went into the ground,
the spring wheat Iands have been
saturated by opportune rains, and
with some exceptions favored by forcing culture.
In Europe, winter wheat and rye
on the whole have fully maintained
their former promise. The wheat
crop of the United Kingdom on an
increased area is regarded likely to
furnish an average yield. France,
with diminished area under both
wheat and rye, promises a medium
outturn for the former, and a less
satisfactory of the latter.
Good Spanish  Crops
Spain is reported to have exceptional crops, the area officially estimated putting wheat at 157,0000,-
000 bushels, a high mark. The crop
of Germany Is probably not quite up
to the usual standard, and rye is
expei'ted to show a considerable
shortage. The Hungary wheat crop
Is officially estimated at 163,000,000
Skeena   Land   District—District
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that Edward H.
Port, of Prince Rupert, B. C, occupation farmer, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following described lands:— Commencing
at a post planted in the South West
Corner, on the shore line of Lake
Lakelse; tlience 20 chains East, to
South West Corner of Lot 684;
thence 30 chains North, following
along the West line of Lot 684 to
post; thence South, following along
the shore line of said Lake to point
of commencement, containing about
40 acres.
EDWARD H. PORT,
By C. N.  Pring, Agent.
Dated June  26, 1911. 6-26
6-26
LOCAL  IMPROVEMENT  NOTICE
bushels, and rye at 5,000,000 bushels. In Roumanla and the Balkan
states, the prospects are much better
than in average years.
In Russia, there is much conflict
of expression. The weight of public
opinion seems, however, to be in medium results. In Italy, better yields
than last year are anticipated, but
heavy rains may later show their
effects on the quality. In Argentine, the newly sown wheat, oats and
flax are said, under the Influence of
plentiful moisture, to have germinated well, the areas are believed to
be heavily Increased. Popular opln.
ion puts the surface under wheat
5 to 10 per cent over the 15,5000,000
acres sown last year. The 1910
wheat crop in Chile is reported in
sufficient for home needs, and im
ports are being made from Australia.
Monsoon in Force
The monsoon, the Indispenslble
procuror of a favorable seed time on
unrated soil in Britisii India, broke
in full force In mid-June, and heavy
rains have already fallen over wide
areas. Late reports, however, indicate partial cessation of the rainfall.
Cotton planting is progressing In
some  localities of the Empire.
The harvest in progress on the
north cost of Africa is said to promise well in Algeria. In the much less
important producers, Tunis and Morocco, only a small rate outcome is
expected. According to the June
official reports, the yield on the
125,000 acres of wheat in Egypt was
likely to be good in Upper Egypt,
but in Lower Egypt not quite up to
the standard.
TAKE NOTICE that the Municipal
Corporation of the City of Prince Rupert intends to make the following
local improvements:
A seventeen foot plank sidewalk
on the north and south sides of 2nd
avenue between centre line of 4th
street and 8th street, and to assess
the final cost thereof upon the property fronting or abutting thereon, or
to be benefitted thereby, and that a
statement and diagram showing the
lots to be so especially assessed for
the said improvement or work Is now
filed in the office of the City Clerk
and is open for inspection during
office hours.
The estimated cost of the work
is $5,090.96.
Dated at Prince Rupert this 28th
•day of July, 1911.
ERNEST A. WOODS,
City Clerk.
Wm. Mahlon Davis, City Engineer.
8-1
WW
iTe-RJlSk
Double Weekly Service
S.S. PRINCE RUPERT & S.S. PRINCE GEORGE
Sail for Vancouver, Victoria and Seattle
Mondays and Fridays at 8 a.m.
For STEWART Thursdays and Sundays 8 a.m.
Special reduced fare Sunday's boat $9.50
return,   includine;    meals   and   berths.
S.S.PRINCE ALBERT for Port Simpson, Naas River, Mnsset and
Naden Harbor, Wednesdays, 1 P.M., and for Queen Charlotte
Island points, Saturdays, 1 P.M.
RAILWAY SERVICE TO COPPER RIVER, mixed trains from
Prince Rupert Wednesdays and Saturdays, 1 P.M.; returning  Thursdays   and   Sundays,  5:20 P.M.
THE GRAND TRUNK RAILWAY SYSTEM, connecting with
trains from the Pacific Coast, operates a frequent and convenient
service of luxurious trains over its DOUBLE TRACK route between
Chicago, Toronto, Montreal, Quebec, Halifax, Portland, Boston.
New York and Philadelphia.
Atlantic Steamship bookings arranged via all lines
Full information and tickets obtained from the office of
A. E. McMASTER
Freight and Pasenger Agent, G. T. P. Wharf.
LOCAL IMPROVEMENT NOTICE
CITY  OF  PRINCE  RUPERT
Parties requiring dumping grounds
for excavated material are requested
i-i forward application to the City
Engineer, before August 1, stating:
1st. The location of lot to be
graded.
2nd. Estimated quantity of rock
excavation.
3rd. Estimated quantity of earth
excavation.
4th. Date at which it is proposed
to erect building on excavated lot.
Applicants who have buildings already erected and those contemplating building in the Immediate future
will receive preference.
WM. MAHLON DAVIS,
City  Engineer.
E. A. Woods, City Clerk. 7-28
TAKE NOTICE that the Municipal
Corporation of the -City of Prince
Rupert intends to make the following local improvements:
A twelve foot plank sidewalk on
the  north   and   south  sides  of   3rd
avenue between McBride street and
centre   line   of   4th   street,   and   to
assess    the final cost thereof upon
the   property   fronting   or   abutting
there on,   or to  benefitted  thereby,
and  that  a  statement and diagram!
showing the lots to be so especially
assessed   for   the  said   improvement
or work is now filed in the office
of the City Clerk and is open for inspection during office hours.
The estimated cost of the work Is
$3,692.93.
Dated at Prince Rupert this 28th
day of July, 1911.
ERNEST A.   WOODS,
City Clerk.
Wm. Malhon Davis, City Engineer.
8-1
Excursions!
J. L. PARKER
M1NING ENGINEER
Prince Rupert, B. C.
Open for Consultation and Mine
Examination
Temporary  Address: —
Prince Rupert Inn
******* ** **** * ************************ •:••:• ********* ***•:■
GROUND
Floor Space For Rent
IN THE
HART BUILDING
Corner of Second Avenue and Sixth Street
The Best Business Corner in
Prince Rupert
LOCAL IMPROVEMENT NOTICE
TAKE NOTICE that the Municipal
Corporation of the City of Prince
Rupert intends to make the following
local  improvements:
A seventeen foot plank sidewalk
on the north side of 2nd avenue between McBride street and the centre line of 4th street, and to assess
the final cost thereof upon the property fronting or abutting thereon, or
to be benefitted thereby, and that a
statement and diagram showing the
lots to be so especially assessed for
the said Improvement or work is now
filed in the office of the City Clerk
and Is open for Inspection during
office hours.
The estimated cost of the work is
$2,729.02.
Dated at Prince Rupert this 28th
day of July, 1911.
ERNEST  A.   WOODS,
City Clerk.
Wm. Malhon Davis, City Engineer.
8-1
Let us tell you all about the cheap
ROUND TRIP EXCURSIONS
to all Towns and Cities in Eastern
Canada and United States
Via I'lVf
The Great Northern
Choice of Return Route
Tickets to the Old Country by all
Lines.      Take    any    Steamer    from
Prince Rupert.
ROGERS STEAMSHIP AGENCY
Phone 116 Second Ave
Prince Rupert, B.C.
LOCAL IMPROVEMENT NOTICE
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY GO.
B. C. Const S. S. Service
TAKE NOTICE that the Municipal Corporation of the City of Prince
Rupert intends to make the following
local improvements:
A seventeen foot plank sidewalk
on the south side of 2nd avenue
between McBride street and centre
line of 4th street, and to assess the
final cost thereof upon the property'
fronting 'or abutting thereon, or to
be benefitted thereby, and that a
statement and diagram showing the
lots to be so especially assessed for
the said Improvement or work is
now filed In Ihe office of the City
Clerk and Is open for Inspection during office hours.
The estimated cost of the work
is  $2,734.23.
Daled at Prince Rupert this 28 day
of July, 1911.
ERNEST   A.   WOODS.
City Clerk.
Wm. Malhon Davis, City Engineer.
9
Famous
Princess
Line
Princess Royal
Saturday, July 29, 8 a. m.
SOUTHBOUND FOR
Vancouver, Victoria,
AND
Seattle
j. G. McNAn,
General  Agent.
Free Employment
Office
! storage!
Jermiah H. Kugler, Ltd. |
^**********^***************^************************
LOCAL IMPROVEMENT NOTICE
TAKE NOTICE that the Municipal
Corporation of the City of Prince
Rupert Intends to make the following local Improvements:
A twelve foot plank sidewalk on
Ihe north and south sides of 3rd
avenue between Ihe renlre line of 4th
street and Sth street, and to assess
the final cost thereof upon the property fronting or abutting thereon or
to be benefitted thereby, and that a
statement and diagram showing the
lots to be so specially assessed for
the said improvement or work Is now-
filed In the office of the City Clerk
and is open for Inspection
office hours.
The estimated cost of the work Is
$3,677.39.
Dated at Prince Ruperl this 28th
day of July, 1911.
ERNEbT A. wool>s,
City Clerk.
Wm, Malhon Davis, City Engineer. \
8-1
luring ! loved
hie"
* Household Goods and Baggage
* given careful attention.
* Forwarding.   Distributing   and
X Shipping  Agents
% TRANSFERERS
* Prince    Rupert    Warehousing
J and   Forwarding   Co.
T First   Ave.,   near   McBride   St.
* DOUGLAS Sl'l -1ERLAND,
* Manager.
* p. o. Box hot Phone •JifJ %
* *
->■!•»> •:• ■:• * •:- ■:• •> * -:• * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
One of the best repartees ever
credited to a habitual maker of happy
phrases was that made by the be-
Autocral of the Breakfast Ta-
a certain social occasion.
Going tei (line, with a lleistem neighbor. Dr. Holmes was met by her with
an apology:
"I could not ge-t another man. We
are- [our women, and you will have
tee tllkc us all in"
"Forewarned la four-armed," said.
For all kinds of help. Cooks, waiters, dishwashers, hotel porters, all
kinds of laborers or mechanics, call
up  178 or call at the
FREE EMPLOYMENT OFFICE
GRAND HOTEL
Headquarters for Cooks and Walters
I   ROGERS & BLACK
•:•
* I Wholesale Dealers In
* \ BUILDING   MATERIAL,     CEMENT,
* I      LIME,   HAIR-FIBRE PLASTER
* |        COKE,  BLACKSMITH COAL,
-COMMON BRICK, PRESSED BRICK
SHINGLES AND LATH
NEW   WELLINGTON   COAL
All  orders  promptly   filled—see   us
for prices.
PHONE 1111 PHONE 11(1
lw
lib a bow.
F"r Neat Job Printing
■ the Journal Man
Tel, 138 PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Tuesday, August 1, 1911.
Third
Avenue
Third
Avenue
k-SLd
August
FURNITURE
••dale**
Our large stock of House Furnishings complete in all lines
is at your command, with
Big Reductions in all grades.
WHERE QUALITY
IS KING
August
FURNITURE
• •
Sale..
20 AND 25 PER CENT DISCOUNT FROM REGULAR VALUES FOR CASH
Iron Beds
Regular Value of IRON BEDS,
$5.00.    Sale Price, any size . . ..$3.50
This same reduction given to all
Iron Beds in our large assortment.
20 different designs BRASS EXTENSION RODS. At Cut in Two
Prices.
Dining Room
Chairs
All our stock of DINING ROOM
CHAIRS from High Grade No. 1
Leather Upholstered, to Medium and
Cheap Grades receive the special
Reduction of 25*%.
Regular Value Quart«r-Oak DINING CHAIRS, Leather Seats, $40.00.
Sale Price   $:$0.00
Jo other design:; receive like re-
duction,
Music and
Parlor Cabinets
Mahogany   MUBIC   and   PARLOR
CABINETS; A-l.    Prices cut in two.
For the
Bath Room
MEDICINE CABINETS wltn Mirrors—can also be used for Gentlemen's Shaving Outfit—at our Special
Sale Prices	
Folding
Go-Cart
Regular Value $12.50 and $13.50.
Sale Price   $8.50
Carpet Ends
100 CARPS*] ENDS, Tapestry and
Hrussels; I \t. yuril lengths. Get In
early while they last. Sale Price,
each    50  cents
Chamber Sets
SO only, CHAMBER SETS; 5
Pieces, All White. Special Sale
Price     $1.25
■»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦
Draperies
Draperies
Ten Thousand Yards — MADRAS,
MUSLINS, CRETONNES, SATEENS,
NETTINGS, for your window treatment to be offered at this Daring
25% Discount.
Some lines of DRAPERIES where
we have overstocacd at prices cut
in two.
CARPET SQU-RE, RUGS, MATTINGS, CURTAINS, COUCH COVERS, POLE AND TRIMMINGS. In
fact our ENTIRE STOCK at your
disposa' during August at Sale Prices
for Cash.
■+-+-
Kitchen
Tables
ALL KINDS
Regular  Value KITCHEN TABLE
without   drawer,   $3.00;  Sale  Price
 $2.00
Regular Value KITCHEN TABLE
with drawer, $3.50; Sale Prlce.$2.50
Regular Value KITCHEN TREASURE, Bake Board, Drawer and Two
Flour Bins, $7.00; Sale Price. .$4.75
Office
Desks
and
Chairs
A full line of OFFICE DESKS—
Roll Tops, Flat Tops and Type Writing Desks; also Office TILTER'S
CHAIRS, TYPE WRITING CHAIRS
Golden Quarter Oak Finish. In fact,
we have them at all prices to suit
your special purposes.
ROLL TOP DESKS from $30.00
to $80.00, Regular Values which we
now offer during August at 25% Reduction.
Dining Tables, Etc
DINING TABLES BUFFETS, CHINA CABINETS, CHIFFONNIERS,
Large Easy CHAIRS, Leather Covered; PARLOR TABLES and
COUCHES to meet all requirements
at Special Sale Reductions.
Dressers and
Stands
DRESSERS and STANDS, Surfaced
Oak. Regular Value $18.50. Special Sale Price    $14.50
IB other different designs to receive this reduction.
DRESSERS, Solid, Quarter-Cut,
Oak, Golden Mahogany and Early
English receive our Special 20% Re-
elllelion.
Complete House Furnisher
THIRD AVENUE
GEO. D. TITE
Complete House Furnisher
THIRD AVENUE s0,   .»
n
n/t //"V/5*t*»_
Tuesday, August 1, 1911.
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
FIGHT   CONSUMPTION
Typographical Union Have Sanitarium at
Colorado Springs for White
Plague.
How   Printers    Affected    With    the
Disease  Are  Treated in
Tills Home
In connection with the fight
against the great white plague, no
institution is doing more efficient
work than the Typographical Union.
Put of a small beginning they now
have at Colorado Springs one of the
best equipped and most useful Institutions in America. The sanitarium
is affiliated with the home for aged
and helpless printers, which is located in tbe same district.
The hospital building at the Union
Printers' Home is located just south
of the main structure, covering a
space of 50x110 feet, and is three
stories in height. Ten tents were
at first erected near the hospital
building, in 1904, for the use of tuberculosis patients. ihey proved
such a valuable acquisition to the
hospital service in the treatment of
lung trouble that ten more were added in 1907. In shape, the tents are
octagonal with a frame worm as substantial as that of a house, are securely anchored on four sides, and
withstands the most severe winds.
The tents are steaniheated, lighted
by electricity and have a system of
electrical call bells by which the tenters can immediate'y summon a
nurse.
With twenty tents and the hospital
given up to tuberculosis residents,
there was need of a central building.
To supply this want a central building, called the solarium, was erected in 1907. The experimental stage
in oper air treatment for tuberculosis has long since been passed.
Fully 50 per cent of the patients
who have the advantage of "tent
life" and the regenerating rays of
the Colorado sun have recovered
health and strength and have been
enabled to again assume business duties. There are many tent colonies
in Colorado, but few of them compare with the Tuberculosis Sanitarium at the Home.
The laundry and heating plant is
located about ninety feet east of the
main building and hospital, and covers 6,100 square feet. The dimensions of the laundry are 30x59 feet.
Its machinery equipment is ample,
and of the latest design and best
quality. The sterilizing and disinfecting apparatus in use reduces to
a minimum the chances of contagion
through the medium of clothing, etc.,
used by the sick.
To the south of the laundry is the
engine room. The room is large
enough to accommodate two dynamos should the Home install an electric .lighting system. Two 151-horse
power water tube boilers have recently been installed to take the place
of the two 40-horse power boilers
which were originally purchased
when the Home was first established.
The second story contains fifteen
large sleeping rooms with necessaty
lavatory accommodations. These
rooms are used by the male help of
the institution.
The institution has a splendid library of 3,000 volumes, donated by
employing printers. The facilities afforded hy the institution are as complete as money and modern science
can make them and the climate Is
said to be unexcelled
The main building is of white lava
stone, with red sandstone trimmings.
The main edifice Is 144 feet long by
44 feet wide, with a wing to the rear
of the nortli end 85 by 40 feet.
Porches extend from the wing to the
sound end of the building on the
first and second stories, affording
easy access lo any part of the building from the rear. Each story contains a central hall the entire length
of the bul'ding, every room opening
into the main hallway, in addition
to having outer windows. A broad
stone stairway, protected by heavy
balustrades, leads up to the massive
archway of the portico. From the
vestibule the open portals of the
main entrance Invite to spacious parlors, reception rooms and chambers
on either side of the main hall. Above
the portico, in the second story cap
course of sandstone, in raised gothic
letters, are the words: "Union Printers' Home."
The building is in great demand
and upwards'of 1,200 patients are
being treated  there.
Jones fpoud of his lineage)—Well,
if you can run in tomorrow evening,
I'll show you m family tree.
Smith—Sorry, but I've promised
to look at Brown's cabbages.
%
RECIPROCITY NO BENEFIT   §
**************************
"A general election in September
and October," is the prediction for
the Old Country of the Hon. T. W.
Cochrane, who was a member of the
last Conservative ministry, on a visit
to Victoria! Mr. Cochrane has for
eighteen years sat In the British
House of Commons, and in a useful
and distinguished career of public
service has acted as Joseph Chamberlain's secretary throughout this
statesman's tenure of office as colonial secretary, and hllmself held office as under secretary for home affairs in the last Conservative government between 1902 and 1906. Mr.
Cochrane is now visiting Victoria
party In his capacity of the world-
famous Nobel Explosives Company
and director of the Canadian Explosives Company, and partly on a pleasure visit of Inspection of the progress
and general condition of the Dominion. He is an ardent imperialist and
one of Canada's most enthusiastic admirers and champions in the House
of Commons.
"We in England cannot see why
Canada should go in for American
reciprocity," he said. "We are not—
as our enemies have said—jealous of
her trade with the United States;
but jealous for her. If the Motherland through Canada would benefit
from reciprocity with the States,
every Unionist and Conservative
would give the campaign his earnest
support. But none of us in England
can see how of where Canada can
hope to benefit. If she holds her
hand, the United States will have
nnyliow to take off the duty on her
lumber and natural resources. Canada will Mien be left free with her
moderate tariff for revenue purposes
unaltered, and will then be in an
unassailable position in which she
will get any advantages that may
accrue from being able to export her
natural products to the United States.
With regard to the political Intentions that are said to be behind the
American agitation in favor of reciprocity, any one after reading Mr.
Champ Clark's speech must, to say
the least, regard it as an unfortunate
slip for such a prominent politician
to have made. He has, it is true,
since protested that it was said 'pour
lire,' but that was after he saw how
seriously his unguarded statements
had been taken."
Asked his opinion on the augment
ed rate of influx of British capital
Mr. Cochrane replied that "If industries are promoted on a sound financial footing, giving a fair prospect of
reasonable returns to the investor,
and regular employment for British
labor, there will be no lack of British capital out here, nor any lack of
the best type of British workmen—
a need which seems to even exceed
that of capital. "I look forward to,"
he continued "to seeing this coun
try become the home of the best type
of old boys from our British public
schools. We know that Canada has
been unfortunate in years past In
having been the dumping ground of
the odd wastes and failures, but there
is, I find now, an increasing number
of the most Intelligent and useful
of our public school men coming out
here; and there can be no finer type
of men found for public service in
Canada than those who are true to
their training In our universities and
public schools."
"No one can put a limit to the
future of British Columbia," added
Mr. Cochrane, with genuine enthus-
ism. "The most roseate hopes for
this island are based on a sound
foundation. I was much struck with
what I saw in the east, but British
Columbia, with Its Incomparable climate and Its vast mineral, farming
and timber resources—promises to
be the home of many millions of the
British race."
FURS FROM FAR AWAY PLACES
It is not generally known that ermine has been the emblem of royalty
almost since royalty began. In Russia, until very recently, its use was
forbidden to those not of royal birth.
As a writer in Everybody's Magazine points out, ermine is nothing
more than the weasel or common
stoat in its northern coat, for, like
other arctic and subarctic animals,
the weasel turns white in winter in
order that it may be as inconspicuous as possible in its environment of
ice and snow. Yet so abnormally
keen of sight are the Canadian and
Siberian trappers that they can distinguish at almost incredible distances the little black tip of the
ermine's tail as it whisks across the
dazzling plains.
It Is very shy, is the ermine, and
special snares must be devised by
the trapper to avoid injuring the
delicate skin.    Even the smallest of
i B,
;   :
THE JOURNAL
$2.00 a Year
I Job Printing j
If you want your printing
handled   expeditiously   by
thoroughly trained and ex
perienced printers have it
done at the Journal Office.
m
THE JOURNAL
$2.00 a Year
^m
the steel traps are too heavy for
such tiny animals as there, and here
It is that the trapper's fertility of
resource is most strikingly displayed.
Smearing a little grease on his hunting knife, he lays it across the succession of dots and dashes that show
him that an ermine has passed that
way. Along conies the tiny white
form on its erratic course again. The
grease appeals to it, and it begins
to lick the knife blade, and its tiny
tongue is instantly frozen to the
steel as though as with glue. The
knife being too heavy for the little
animal to carry off it can only wait
until the trapper comes upon his
lady has a muff of snowy unmarred
skins.
So difficult to obtain has sea otter
become that Russian sable, long a
synonym for-all that Is expensive and
luxurious, Is now almost pleblan In
comparison, and In all the long list
of furs none is so redolent of romance. When the Biirvlvors of Vltis
Bering's ill-fated expedition found
their way back to Siberian shores
with a new fur that was neither
heaver nor otter, but larger than
either and of a finer sheen than
sable, and sold the pelts to Chinese
merchants for 500 rubles each, the
effect was as startling as the discovery of a gold mine. The new fur
was sea otter, as peculiar to the
Pacific as the seal, and destined to
lead Russian, Cossack and Siberian
adventurers in a wild stampede to the
Aleutians.
The slaughter of sea otter become
so Indiscriminate and relentless that
the annual catch has dwindled from
150,000 to scarce 400 skins a year.
So great was the demand among Chinese nobles and Chinese mandarins
for this rare fur, so fabulous are the
prices they are willing to pay, that
scarce fourscore skins reach the United States each year. In the days
when the sea otter were plentiful
in calm weather, as they showed
their heads above the surface of the
THE CANADIAN  BANK
OF COMMERCE
SIR EDMUND WALKER, C.V.O., LL.D., D.C.L., President
ALEXANDER UMRD, General Manager
CAPITAL, - $10,000,000        REST, - $7,000,000
DRAFTS ON FOREIGN COUNTRIES
Every branch of The Canadian Bank of Commerce is equipped to issue drafts on
the principal cities in the following countries without delay :
Africa Crete Greece
Arabia Cuba Holland
Argentine Republic Denmark Iceland
Australia Euypt India
Austria-Hungary Faroe Islands Ireland
Belgium Finland Italy
Brazil Formosa Japan
Bulgaria France Leva
Ceylso Fr'ch Cochin China Malta
Chili Germany    a Manchuria
China Great Britain Mexico
Ihe amount of these drafts is stated in the money of tbe country wliere they are pay-
awe } that is they arc drawn in sterling, francs, marks, lire, kronen, (lorins, yen,
tacls, roubles, etc., as the case may be. This ensures that the payee abroad will
receive the actual amount intended. 233
J. M. CHRISTIE, Manager, Prince Rupert Branch
New Zealand
Norway
Panama
Persia
Peru
Philippine Islanels
Portugal
Roejmanea
Kueteeea
Servia
SI;
Siberia
Soudan
South Africa
Spain
Straits Settlements
Sweden
Switzerland
Turkey
I'eu'tcei States
t'rujfuay
West Indies, etc
sea to breathe; but today they must
be hunted in the wildest Alaska gale.
Waiting until the violence of the
storm has driven the animal to seek
refuge among the rocks, the Aleutian
hunter, plying his double-bladed paddle from where he sits in the manhole of his fragile skin-covered
kayak, rides at express train speed
on the crest of the seething rollers
to those barren reef-girt islands
where the otters hide from their pursuers with their heads buried in the
tossing wave-washed seaweed. Heach-
Ing his skiff, the hunter darts from
rock to rock, slipping on the Ice,
beaten by the wind, in constant danger of being caught by the waves
and hurried to death, until with a
blow of his gass pole, he has won
out of the tempest the material of
that marvelous opera cloak which
will deck the shoulders of some millionaire's wife.
There Is no denying that tlie seal,
the sea otter, and, indeed, several
other of the native fur bearing an-
FREI1ERICK PETERS, K. C.
Barrister, Solicitor and Notary Public
Office in
EXCHANGE  BLOCK
WM. S. HAl,L, L. D. S. D. D. S.
:-:    DENTIST   :-:
Crown and Bridge Work a specialty.
All dental operations skillfully
treated. Gas and local anaesthetics
administered for the painless extraction of teeth. Consultation free.
Offices, Helgerson 3k., Prince Rupert
iinals of the United States and Canada, promise lo disappear as completely as the buffalo. No country
was ever blessed with an animal of
value for such manifold purposes as
the buffalo, and no country was ever
so criminally negligent in permitting
the extinction of a Bpecles. Today all
that is left of those once vast herds
beneath whose hoofs the earth trembled day and night, is a few score
head of mangy bison carefully tended In zoological gardens and national
parks.
Twenty years ago no western man
was so poor that he could not afford
a buffalo coat; today those coats are
Iso  rare  that   a   perfect   one   would
bring its weight in silver.    An order
ifor a set of perfect buffalo robes Is
lone   at   which   the-  greatest    of    tlie'
world's furriers would have to balk.
NICKERSON-ROERIG COMPANY
CUSTOMS AND MERCHANDISE
Brokers, Forwarding Agents,
Storage, etc.
J.  W. POTTER
ARCHITECT     AND     STRUCTURAL
ENGINEER
Re-inforced Concrete a Specialty
Law-Butler Building - Prince Rupert
HAYNOR   BROS.
FUNERAL   DIRECTORS
and
PROFESSIONAL   EMBALMERS
DR.  W.  B.  eOLAYTON
DENTIST
—o—
Office  in    the    Westenhaver   Block,
Over Orme's  Drug   Store.
Prince Rupert
LINDSAY'S CARTAGE ft STORAGE
G. T. P. CARTAGE AGENTS
Office at H. B. Rochester, Centre St.
LADYSMITH COAL
is handled by us.  All orders receive
prompt attention.  Phone No  68.
 LADYSMITH	
COAL
ROCHESTER & MONROE, Phone US
Corner Eighth and Fraser Streets
Clinton Rooms
Newly remodelled and furnished.
Board and lodging. Home cooking
a specialty. Mrs. Anderson, Prop.
Rooms, $3 Per Week
New Knox Hotel
ARTAUD & BESNER
Proprietors
The New Knox Hotel Is run on the
European plan. Flrst-clas service.
All the latest modern Improvements
THE BAR keeps only the best
brands of liquors and cigars.
THE CAFE is open from 6.30 a.m.
to 8 p.m. Excellent cuisine; first-
class service.
Board, $1 a Day — Beds, 50c and up
First Aventt"   Prince Rupert
Hamblin's Bakery
Just Re-opened
Sale    counter    In    MERRYFIELD'S
STORE, Third Ave. nnd Fifth St.
Family trade catered to.  Will supply restaurants and steamers.
Cakes and  Confectionery of all
kinds
IHE WESTHOLME LUMBER GO.
LIMITED
We handle all kinds of
Building Supplies
First Avenue Telephone 189
Lady (engaging assistant gardner)
And if l engage you, besides youi
ther duties you will have to attend
GRAND HOTEL
WORKINGMAN'S HOME
25c
Rooms 50 Cents
Spring Beds, Clean
White Sheets
Best in Town for the Money
FIRST AVE. AND SEVENTH ST.
J. Goodman, Proprietor
to tlie three elogs and clean out their
kennels, also clean out the parrot's
cage, clean my sens' workshop and
clean both their bicycles, and also
clean the car except when the weath-
er's dirty.
Applicant   (overwhelmed) — And
shall i have to clean that? PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Tuesday, August 1, 1911.
SBSaSSBSBSSSSBBBBSSSSSBBsasaiSBBSSSsaBa
REVIEW OF FLEET
How the British Fighting Force Looked
at the Coronation
Ceremonies.
The  Navy Showed  Its Terrific Powers and  Readiness for
Action
In view of the "war scare" that
has prevailed for a week past the
question of the readiness of tlie British naval force has been the subject
of a good deal of speculation. The
following, taken from the Daily
Mail, dealing with the review held at
the time of the king's coronation
will  be interesting reading:
The day of the Naval Review came
dark with clouds and gloom, with
falling rain; it seemed as if onet
day at least of the great coronation
cycle of days the weather was about
to misbehave. A naval review to an
accompaniment of splashing rain!
There arose to the alarmed imagination the vison of grey ships seen
athwart slanting showers, on a grey
sea and under grey skies—a very
slate-colored symphony. But the
gracious loyalty of nature did not
fail. There was rain elsewhere over
nearly all England, but as the train
ran southwards in the early morning
the ekies cleared, the winds grew
soft, the sun broke out on green
fields and tangled Hedgerows. And
when the Soudan, carrying the press
representatives, moved along the
pleasant Hampshire coast towards
the scene of the coming review a
sapphire sky bent over the Solent,
weather."
Presently the sea before us is
pricked with a tangle of sail-less
masts and dark funnels that stretch
in a ^dwindling perspective to the
horizon. It Is the fleet, of Ryde.
Within an area of six miles by two
are packed 167 ships of war, ranging from Dreadnoughts to torpedo
boats, to say nothing of eighteen
warships under foreign flags. The
tangle of masts and funnels grows
clearer as we approach; it begins to
take structure. There is a plan be-
neat the tangle. The sea giants are
distributed in parallel lines forming
great streets of slate-colored warships. This is the greatest aggregate of fighting ships—and of ships
the most terrific in fighting strength
-—which has ever in recorded history
been concentrated on one little patch
of the sea.
As the fleet is reached the eye is
first caught and held by the lines
of torpedo boats and destroyers to
port. Some touch of sea mist, or
perhaps the tint of the sea on which
they lay, makes them look, not grey,
but blasck; and, with their dwarfed
funnels, low freeboard, and length
all out of proportion to their width,
they give a curious sense of speed.
And it Is speed of a menacing quality, as of a trusting spear. They
are sea-gnats, but what a stinging
power they have! The smallest of
them could disable a Dreadnought
at a stroke. The suggest the lance
de fer of Eastern forests. Among
those long, lean, black silhouettes
are the two fastest ships in the
world, the Swift, whicb hides within her slender flanks 30,000-horse
power of driving force, and the microscopic Tartar, which, with not quite
half the horse power of the Swift,
can yet beat her in speed, and has
traveled nearly thirty-six knots In
an hour. And she has a displacement of only 8"rt tons.
The   New   Warships
Rut now the eye Is caught by the
lung streets of grey ships to star-
hoard, nritlsh warships have Improved beyond all Imagination In
fighting power since Trafalgar, but
Ihey have lost mournfully in artistic
appearance. The Victory—Nelson's
flagship—as she lies in Portsmouth
harbor Is still nothing less than majestic in look, with her high and
noble stem, her flowing lines, her
vast freeboard. When at sea, leaning to the gale, with her tall masts,
her triple pyramids of white sails,
her triple tiers of threatening guns,
she must have been a sight to set a
poet singing. A line of the three-
dei'kers In 1805 in a fresh breeze
was certainly a gallant sight. But
these streets of Ironclads off Spit
head would, as far as outer aspect
Is concerned, never inspire an artist
or a poet. As symbols of power they
are terrific, but as works of art they
are distressing. They are grey, squat,
ugly.
But our ship Is running on, and
the great anchored hulls are slipping
least. On their funnels are tiny
patches and lines of white, the syllables or marine cypher, Intelligible
to the instructed eye. The first are
protected cruisers such as the La-
toiia, the Thetis; then a pair of
scouts, the Pathfinder and the Skirm
isher,   with   hulls   plainly   built   for
speed. Now come heavier ships, the
Victorious, the Caesar,, the Mars, battleships of 14,000 tons. There are
sea-giants now on both sides; the
Irresistible of 15,000 tons, the Bulwark, the Albemarle. A procession
of great names—names in whose syllables are the eaches of famous sea
battles—runs on either hand: the
Venerable, the Implacable, the Agea
m-innon, the Bellerophon, the Vanguard. As name after name is read
on each ship, each brings up from
the cells of memory stories of great
perils dared and of great feats
achieved. And here are the Dreadnoughts—ships of a. new type in
war. Any one of them, as far as
fighting power is concerned, could
have "taken on" both the fleets that
contended at Trafalgar, have sailed
through them without suffering
harm, and overtaken and sunk every
ship in the two fleets at pleasure.
At 2 o'clock a faint pulse of sound
is heard fro mthe northeast. , Is It
"Nelson's gun" of the Victory signalling the departure of the king? If
so, was it one of the actual guns
of Trafalgar that fired that shot, to
be answered later by the thunders of
Spithead? It would surely be fitting
that when the chief of the greatest
naval power in the world, fresh from
his coronation, comes to review the
mightiest assemblage of warships history has ever seen, he should be welcomed by a gun from the most famous ship that ever floated — the
Victory, in which Nelson led down
to the attack on the Franco-Spanish
feet at Trafalgar. And on Saturday
let us hope it was one of the Trafalgar guns that fired that one signalling shot. There would be something better than an artistic continuity betwixt the flash of Nelson s gun
in the Victory on Saturday and the
deep-voiced thunder of the long grey
streets of Ironclads which answered it.
Dressing the Ships      "*
Presently a shot Is fired from the
flagship—a signal for the fleet to
dress. In a moment, and on every
side—east, west, north, and south—
long lines of flags are rising in the
air. Above each grey hull is a sort
of flattened triangle of flags—a triangle with its apex truncated. The
very sky seems full of lags, and the
slate-colored, not to say sad-colored
fleet grows suddenly gay. Then, too,
triple bars of red are suddenly
drawn across each grey hull. They
are the mines on the bridges and the
shelter decks "at attention." A line
of seamen becomes visible, a sort of
human frieze defining the contour of
each ship. In every direction every
ship upan which the eye falls offers
that same spectacle—red lines on the
bridges and a living palisade of seamen outlining the long decks. The
fleet Is tsanding "at attention" for
the coming of its king.
There is a Ion gpause, but at last
the royal yacht is in sight. Her tall
masts and gilt-decorated hull, her
bright, stone-colored funnels show
with startling effect across the landscape of grey ships. Four torpedo
boats—long, and lean, and dark, In
a single line ahead—come first; the
Trinity House yacht follows, then
comes the Victoria and Albert. On
her foremast flies an admiral's flag,
on her nilzzen the ensign, and high
aloft on her mainmast floats the
Royal Standard. The Alexandra follows the royal yacht, the Fire Queen
conies next. The signal Is given, and
te guns begin to speak. From each
grey hull there comes a jet of white
smoke with a spear-point of bright
flame in it; a moment later is a blast
of sound. Pulse of smoke, sudden
gleam of white fire, roll of thunder
—the fleet is welcoming the king";
and the roar of guns on every side
deepens til] the sound Is that of some
great battle. And above the smoke
still move the tall masts of the stately yacht, the Royal Slandnrd floating
from tbe mainmast.
Presently the roar of the guns
cease, hut still the cluster of yachts
move on. King George himself stood
on the bridge. He was a somewhat
solitary figure In an admiral's uniform, with le blue ribbon of the
Garter ncrss the breast. A few steps
In the rear was a little cluster of
figures. From te excursion boats
and men-of-war again and again the
cheers rolled up, and the king answered with lifted hand In courteous
salute. At times the ensign of the
royal  yacht  was  dipped.
Now the inspection Is completed,
and the Victoria and Albert drops
anchor betwixt the French ship Dan-
ton and the ship carrying the Chilian flag. The marines and seamen
throughout the fleet were "dismissed," and a long pause followed. A
tiny squadron of boats gathered
round the royal yacht; the flag officers of the fleet were being received
by his masjesty. The picket boats of
tlie men-of-war were meanwhile keeping the lines clear of intruders, and
It was amusing to watch swift men-
of-war boats "shepherd" and turn
back, like so many sheep dogs, the
yachts, or motor boats,, or excursion
steamers that tried to cross the lines.
At a little before 6 o'clock the
fleet was again standing at attention.
The bars of red color, the living
frieze along the dacks again made
their appearance. The royal yachts
are maving again; the ships break
Into salute; and, with the pursuing
thunder of the guns, the Victoria
and Albert, with the Royal Standard
still flying from her mainmast, disappears. Tne great review of 1911
is over.
The Ships lleyond the Hoi-izon
Great, majestic, and even overpowering in the scale of Its fighting
strength seemed the ieet at Spithead on Saturday. Yet It does not,
of course, represent the true sea
strength of the Empire. There are
546 pennants In her fleet, and only
167 ships in Southampton waters.
While the royal yacht was steaming
through the great streets of Dreadnoughts there were British ships policing ah the seas of the planet elsewhere, keeping guard in the Mediterranean, of the Cape, through the vast
spaces of the Pacific, and In cyclone
whipped Chinese waters.
Let us only imagine another Nelson—a twentieth-century Nelson—
with his genius for battle, his fierceness in pursuit, his swiftness and
terror in attack, and his magic to
inspire the men under his flag, put
in command of the 167 ships, from
Dreadnoughts to submarines, at
Southampton. There Is nothing
afloat or likely to be afloat that
could resist such a force, under such
a leadership. And the British race
has not seen its last Nelson yet. It
will find a fit leader always for a
great emergency.
 o	
DOOMED TO FAIL
Japanese Antartic Expedition Was Not
Properly Equipped for the
Arduous Task,
Only Meagre Details of the Trip Are
Available but They Indicate
Failure
Count Okuma is jubilant, without
apparently very substantial cause,
over the achievement of Lieutenant
Shirase in his Antarctic expedition.
He indulges in comparisons between
Lieutenant Shirase and Lieutenant
Shackleton and characterizes as a
notable fjat the attainment of 74 de
grees soutli in the short space of
100 days. In the count's opinion,
when after a rest at Sydney, Lieutenant Shirase starts out afresh In
September he will give the German
and American expeditions a run for
Ltheir money.
Sydney is regarded a better place
to sojourn than Wellington, inasmuch as it is the seat of a Japanese
consulate and of many important
shipping firms, including the Nippon
Yusen Kaisha, that can extend help
to the party.
The auxiliary society which is backing up the expedition here has already borrowed 17,000 yen ($8,500)
and forwarded the same to Shirase,
and asks for an additional 50,000
yen ($25,000). Count Okuma is confident that if the government still
declines to assist he will have no
difficulty in raising the balance required.
Later reports concerning the Kain-
an's movements state that she reached Coulman Island 73 south latitude,
170 east longitude, on March 14, but
was compelled to return as she was
in danger of being frozen In, Coulman Island lies to the eaBt of South
Victoria Land and Is well within the
confines of the Ross Sea. The telegram states Hint after spending a few
days amid the pack ice the vessel
had to return.
Lieutenant Shirase "greatly regrets" that on account of the late
start lie could not land, but he holds
the "firm conviction" that his vessel
Is fitted for navigation in the Antarctic regions when the sea Is Ice
free.
Failure Was Certain
Not all the Japanese newspapers
join in Count Okuma's enthusiasm.
While at the outset there was a general determination to make Lieutenant Shirase a popular hero, It is now
pointed out by leading journals that
from the inception of this much heralded expedition it was doomed to
failure because of the paucity of
equipment and the equal paucity of
experience of those concerned.
It is now admitted by some of
those who have contributed to the
support of the enuterprise that not
only Is the Kalnan Maru unfitted for
the Arctic seas but those forming
the expedition had practically no
equipment for the undertaking save
enthusiasm.
In one of his telegrams Lieutenant
Shirase speaks of the death of most
of his dogs "from lack of exercise."
"Lack of exercise does not kill
dogs. What has killed them has
evidently been terrible suffering and
the absence of that care and attention which they might have received
from more experienced men In a
similar situation. And from the
same causes the fate that has overtaken these dogs may easily overtake the men when once they land
on  the  Antarctic  continent."
The woeful lack of proper equipment was at the time of the organization of the expedition pointed out
by foreigners having knowledge of
conditions, but these words of warn-
ng were regarded as only unfriendly
and were In consequence unheeded
by those who insisted upon contributing their mites to the support of
what seems to be a folorn hope.
."Meagre Details of Cruise
.Meagre details of the cruise of the
Kainan Maru are telegraphed to
Japanese papers by Hielr Sydney correspondents and are singularly deficient in features of human interest.
The Kainan Maru left New Zealand on February 11, heading for
latitude 78 degrees south, where It
was proposed to effect a landing.
When she reached Ross Sea she encountered unusually stormy weather;
mountainous billows described as
forty feet in height breaking over
her decks continuously. Happily she
proved herself seaworthy. At the
end of February Icebergs were sighted for the first time and the spectacle seems to have greatly Impressed
the Japanese, although their admiration was appreciably tempered by the
constant danger of collision with
these floating masses.
A close watch was kept day and
night, but the cold was so intense
that the men on duty had to be relieved every hour. On March 1 the
sea again became rough, and thus
the danger of contact with the ice
was intensified. Both sails and tne
schooner's auxiliary engines were
called into requisition, and, thanks to
a combination of luck and good management, no untoward accident
occurred.
On March 6, when the schooner
was in east longitude 168 degrees
40 minutes and south latitude 70
degrees, 41 minutes, the mountain
range of South Victoria Land were
detected in the distance for the first
time and were hailed with joy by
the entire crew, loud cheers resounding throughout the vessel. At this
junction the compass got out of order
and failed to show the direction, so
that Captain Nomura had to rely
upon the heavenly bodies' for guidance. ,
The cold grew more and more Intense, fine powdered snow covering
the schooner's decks and riggings.
In the circumstances It was realized
that It would be impossible to reach
the proposed objective of 78 degrees
south, and it was decided instead to
steer for latitude 75. On March 9
the crew had another anxious time
fighting with icebergs, which fairly
laid siege to the vessel and checked
her progrss.
•J* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
FOR RENT
Store     building     on     Second
Avenue    at    Seventh     Street.
Low   Rent.
JEREMIAH H. KUGLER, LTD.
■^-•><••><« ♦>■>>.;..;«•.;♦ ■><•<•»><»-j-o* •:«*»>•>•'><• ►>•:•>•:
^♦H-J«C»><"><«>*»JK,',5^,>,>,!,,>*5,,:,,W
75 x 100 Feet %
ASK
UNCLE
JERRY
For Lease on Third
Avenue at Ninth
Street     .
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
**************************
* JEREMIAH H. KUGLER, LTD.
1836 1911
The Bank of
British North America
75 Yean in Imlnesi.
Capital and Reserve Over $7,300,000
Business Men's Banking
Money advanced to finance your
business.
Local and foreign Drafts bought
and sold.
Notes discounted. Collections
promptly made.
Letters of Credit, Money Orders
and Telegraph Transfers issued,
payable in all the leading Cities
of the world.
Prince Rupert Braack—
F. S. LONG. Manager.
To the Ladies of Prince Rupert
Did you ever stop to think how much easier it would be for you,
if at the end of each month, you could pay all household bills
by check? We solicit your account and have special facilities
for handling it. Private writing rooms are provided for the use
of customers and individual attention is given each depositor.
We allow 4%  on Deposits and the use of checks.
The Continental Trust Company, Limited
 SECOND AVENUE	
HOTEL
ENAMELWARE
HAVE JUST RECEIVED A SMALL SHIPMENT OF HOTEL
ENAMELWARE ESPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR USE IN
HOTELS, RESTAURANTS AND CAMPS. WE GUARANTEE
THEM TO LAST TWICE AS LONG AS ORDINARY ENAMEL
WARE.
A CALL IS SOLICITED
Prince Rupert Hardware & Supply
Company, Ltd.
THIRD AVENUE
PHONE 120
SlHlHlHlHlHlHlSlHiBlHiHimlHiHimialHIHIBIHIHIBiatHiS
We Require Listings of Inside Business Property
Also Residence Property at Right Prices
MM. Stephens & Co. Ld.
Real Estate, Insurance and Investments,
Notaries, Mines, Timber
Box 275
PHONE 222
PRINCE RUPERT, B.C.
OFFICE THIRD AVE.
llet*SUy Satisfactory Raees.
Good, Sound Reasons for
MONARCH Economy
Monarch Ranges are built so that they can
never have "air.leaks"—
For around every opening into the body there
is a   Malleable   Iron frame to which the
steel is riveted.
No putty is needed In such joints.    They are
air tight when new and stay air tight.
If these other ranges were built in this way
they might be economical too.
Investigate this matter of rivet construction
versus stove bolts and  stove putty.    It's
important to every  one  using  or  buying
a range.
SOLD AND GUARANTEED BY THE
Kaien Hardware Co.
Telephone 3
Third Avenue
TIDES AT PRINCE RUPERT, AUGUST, 1911
HIGH  WATER
LOW   WATER
DATE AND DAY
Time|  Ht TlmefHt :| Tlme|  Ht | TlmerTTT
1 {Tuesday
2 {Wednesday
8   Thursday   .
4   j	
6 Saturday
6 Sunday   .    .
7 |Monday    .
8 {Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday .
Friday . .
Saturday .
13 |Sunday   .   .
14 .ei on day   .    .
Tuesday  .   .
Wednesday
Thursday   .
Friday   .   .
19 i&aturday   .
20 Sunday
21
22
23
24  (Thursday
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
Monday . .
Tuesday . .
Wednesday .
Friday
Saturday .
Sunday . .
Monday . .
Tuesday .
Wednesday
Thursday   .
6:13 1G.
.1 7:
:2fi
. 8:44
. 10:04
. 11:12
.112:00
0:01
0:39
16
.re2
29
07
4 5
27
5:13
6:14
7:45
9:18
10:36
11:40
0:16
1:06
1:54
2:39
3:22
4:05
4:49
5:37
6:35
5 18:
2 19:
5|20:
6 21:
0 22:
0,23:
.112:
118:
88118,
IIS 17.
30 17.
33 17,
32 17.
21 18.
39,16.
.7jl6
2|16
6(17
.2118
0:11
1:04
2:27
3:40
4:44
5:34
6:12
6:46
e:18
7:49
8:19
8:49
9:20
9:55
10:34
11:17
0:14
1:28
*:52
4:06
5:08
6:02
6:50
7:33
8:14
8:52
9:28
10:03
10:40
11:20
0:24
6.8112;
7.3|13:
7.4J14:
|7.0|15:
6.3{16
5.4|17
4.6118
3.8|18
131 7.5
03 9.1
06|l0.3
20|10.7
3.8
2.9
2.8
2.9{21
3.3
4.1
5.1
6.4
5.8
5.9
5.4
4.2
2.9
1.7
0.9
0.7
1.1
2.0
3.3
4.9
6.6
8.4
6.9
12:06|  9.9
10.6
10.1
9.3
8.r.
7.6
6.8
6.1
5.6
5.3
5.2
5.5
7.7
8.9
9.3
8.8
7.6
6.3
5.1
4.2
3.7
3.7
4.1
4.9
5.9
The Time used Is Pacific Standard, for the 120th Meridian west. It Is
counted 0 to 24 hours, from midnight to midnight.     '
The Height is In feet and tenths of a foot, above the Low Water datum
adopted for the Char. The Larbor Datum, as established by the G. T. P.
Railway, is one foot lower.

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