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Prince Rupert Journal Sep 8, 1911

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Array The Journal
$2.00
a year
ptinu ftapiirt jontnai
High Class
Job Printing
in all Lines
VOLUME  II.
Published   Twice  a  Week.
PRINCE   RUPERT,   B.   C.     FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 1911.
PHce, Five Cents.
NO. 24.
FINE RECEPTION
H. S. Clements Was Well Received at
Public Meeting in Empress
Theatre
Conservative  Candidate  Deals  With
Reciprocity  (Question   in  a
Masterly Way
e*************
..............
CHANGE   IN   OFFICE *
On Wednesday evening the popular Conservative candidate for this
riding, H.  S. Clements, addressed a
(Special to The Journal) *
Victoria, Sept. 8.—Among the *
provincial  government  appoint- *
ments Is that if  Wm.  E.  Bur- •
rltt, registrar of titles of Prince *
Rupert, as district  registrar of *
the  county  court,   registrar  of *
the supreme court and clerk of *
the peace for Prince Rupert. *
»
**************
ELECTION  HASTE
public meeting in the Empress The- j
atre. He was given a splendid re- j
ception, and his address was, as
usual, of an argumentative kind,
making many friends for him. Mr.
Clements is never abusive. He deals
with the questions of the day on
their merits, having the subjects well
in hand.
The evening before, Mr. Clements
spoke at Port Simpson and was given
a most gratifying reception, practically everyone in the place turning
out to hear him. He was assured of
a splendid support in that voting
place.
At the Wednesday evening meeting here the chair was taken by Dr.
Clayton, who spoke briefly. William
Manson and D. R. Y'oung of Queen
Charlotte city also delivered short
addresses, the most of the time being given over to the candidate.
Dr. Clayton in his introductory remarks referred to the far reaching
effects of the reciprocity question.
Anything that would revolutionize
commerce was something that had
very far-reaching effects.
He extended an invitation to Duncan Ross, Mr. Cowper, or any one
who wished to represent the Liberal
party to come on the platform, and
they would be given a place on the
programme.
The invitation was not accepted.
William Manson
William Manson, M.P.P., the first
speaker, said that he was satisfied
that Mr. Clements would be the next
member for Comox-Atlin. In support of this view he head from a
private letter received from the
soutli, Mr. Clements, it was stated,
had created a great impression and
would win a majority which it was
hoped would be duplicated In the
north.
Mr. Manson referred to the fact
that the Liberal party had by the
attitude since attaining power paid
a compliment to the National Policy
of the Conservative party under Sir
John A. Macdonald by continuing
that policy. The history of the present reciprocity pact was traced. Canada had prospects and affairs were
moving along well. As Britishers we
had a desire not to make trouble
with other nations, but we desired to
maintain the closest relations among
the different parts of the Empire.
Canadians wished to be friendly with
the people of the United States. There
was no quarrel with the Americans.
They wanted the Americans to come
in and help to settle up the country.
He had married an American girl
and other Canadians could well do
the same. Canadians as a nation
did not want to marry the whole
American family, however.
Wanted Raw Materials
The United States was bound to
have the natural products of Canada. The United States was going
to lower Its tariff walls even in order
to get them. The government of
Canada had acted too quickly. The
Conservative party had Insisted upon
an appeal to the people on this question before entering Into the pact.
Mr. Borden had offered to aid in
passing a redistribution bill before
taking an appeal to the country but
the government refused to do this,
leaving the west unrepresented in
large part.
He admonished all to vote for Mr.
Clements and avoid buildim; ejp any
other than a strong Canadian sentiment favorable to Britis'i connections.
Mr. Clements
Mr. Clements was pleased to see so
many ladies present, for their Judgment was usually good. He had no
ill-will towards the United States.
The people of that country were
astute and had made remarkable
progress. He was pleased to describe
this reciprocity pact rather as a reciprocity steal.
The Liberal government had
feared to meet the electorate upon
the issues of the day, knowing that
it would go down to defeat. As far
as reciprocity was concerned he be-
(Continued on Page Eight)
Lighthouse   on   Queen   Charlottes   to
Re Started at Once With Force
of Men  From  Here
Among the arrivals hy the Prince
Rupert on Wednesday was Mr. Killeen, who has charge of the lights
and fog stations on this coast under
the department of marine. He has
come, he explained, for the purpose
of securing men and starting work
at once upon the new lighthouse that
it has been decided to place at the
northernmost point on Graham Island
as a guide to the ocean shipping that
will come to this port from seaward.
The station, he explained, would
be a first class one, equipped with a
lighthouse and foghorn and quarters
for the staff.
Mr. Killeen was in a great hjirry to
get started, which is always the case
with the department work at election
time.
PAST DANGER STAGE
Wheat of the Prairie Provinces is Not
Liable to be Affected
Now.
Cold   Snap  Found   Crop  Nearly  AH
Cut and Harvested Ready
for   Threshing
(Special to The Journal)
Winnipeg, Sept. 8.—Cold weather
Is general throughout the west. On
\\ > . edtry night frosts were record,
ed from a dozen places In Saskatchewan and Alberta while Manitoba also
suffered from a cold snap.
The question of damage now is
largely a matter of what stage the
standing grains are in. Represents
the districts scout the idea of any
serious damage heing done at this
date.
A large percentage of the wheat is
either in stook or threshed, while
the standing grains are only waiting
the binder to reach them. Harvesting is in full swing, with cutting
completed and threshing w*ell under
v>iay  in  most districts.
 o	
H. S. Clements, Conservative candidate, addressed a large meeting at
Stewart last night.
TEMPORARY HALL
City Has Commenced Work on Excavations for What Will be Civic
Headquarters.
PREPARING FOR
ACTIVE WORK
G. T. P. Has Given Notice That Buildings on the Reserve
Nay be Required to be Removed Any Time on
a Month's Notice—Plans for  Large
Undertakings Well in Hand
The settlement of the G. T. P. taxation question in this city is to be
followed, It is now evident, by a
policy of development by the company. Officials of the G. T. P. are
a little reticent about their plans,
preferring apparently to avoid all
danger of building up a too optimistic spirit. At the same time active
steps are being taken to carry out
on rather a large scale the work in
view.
Notice has been given all those on
the company's reserve that they will
be expected to vacate at any time at
a month's notice, which Is a precautionary step towards being in a position to clear the company's property when works are to be carried
out for terminal and hotel purposes.
In a few days a start will be made
on the clearing away of the yard
for the passenger station and the sidings necessary there. There is a
large amount to move. This work
will involve the site of the Inn,
which, it is expected, riiay be converted Into temporary offices for the
company when the scheme is carried out, the present offices having
to be removed.
The work on the hotel site with
the levelling off and filling in near
McBride will take considerable time
and many months will be taken up
in the preparation of the foundations.
On the site of the dry dock, and
the yards between Cameron Bay and
Hays Creek, there will be a tremendous amount of material to remove,
which with other works will call for
the employment of a large army of
men.
". !*e»l work of the G. T. P: In
Prince   Rupert   Is   only   beginning.
These works made necessary in connection with the terminal facilities
are such that it wjll mean the expenditure of millions within the next
few years.
From now on every year will see
increased expenditures until the
place has been prepared for the
opening of the great transcontinental
and  trans-Pacific  trade.
The unfolding of the company's
policy here as time advances will
make real estate in Prince Rupert
the best investment on the coast.
There are going to be immense opportunities for investment and with
the formation of definite plans for
all their work here the lines of buslines of business are to be established
with consequent rapid advances in
values in different parts of the town-
site.
The investing public has up to a
few weeks ago shown a tendency to
postpone putting money in here, preferring to take chances on some of
the older cities. In many instances
these investors are going to find out
to their sorrow that they have put
off too long to get the richest advantages. Tho wise investor will no^
put off longer in turning in the direction of Prince Rupert. Today the
city Is in its formative period. With
the enunciation of its policy from
time to time by the G> T. P. now
will depend the chances for investment.
Never in the history of the place
has there been a better feeling than
prevails now. Residents of the city
feel that with large expenditures
about to be made by the G. T. P
and by the city there is an assur
ance of settlu'd conditions here.
! SHARP WORDS USED
A   RECORD   YEAR
(Special to The Journal)
Winnipeg, Sept. 8.—Statistics
show that 1911 has been productive of more railway development than any previous year
in the history of Canada. This
year alone the contracts have
been let for upwards of 3,000
miles of road.
SKIDEGATE   WEDDING
Mr. Richard Husband and Miss Lena
Leary United in
Marriage
(Special Correspondence)
Sdidegate, Sept. 5.—On August 28,
at the home of W. J. Leary, Mr.
Richard Husband and Miss Lena
Leary were united in wedlock. Mr.
George Leary supported the bridegroom while Miss Ada Leary supported the bride. Rev. Dr. Spencer
performed the ceremony, after which
the following guests sat down to a
sumpuous repast: Mrs. A. J. Gordon, Captain Davey, Mr. and Mrs.
Howard of the wireless station;' Mr.
Darlington, Mr. and Miss Sommes.
The bride and groom are very
popular In the community and were
the recipients of sincere congratulations by their many friends. They
have taken up their residence in their
own house, near that of Mr. Leary.
crisis hTchina
Alderman Hilditch and Alderman Newton
Exchange Compliments.
Mayor Made  .No Slighting  Remarks
With   Regard   to   Alele'i iiinii
Hilditch
ORDER AMBULANCE
Hospital Board Made Final Decision Yesterday as to Colo- and
Lettering.
Institution   Is    Handling   Many   Patients and Is  Running
Satisfactorily
It  Will   He on  Pulton Street Immediately Adjoining Work on
Third Avenue
The city council having decided
decided upon a temporary city hall
on Fulton Street on property owned
by the city work has already been
started on It. The present quarters
are too small for the staff and with
the G. T. P. plans for terminal works
being aljout to start the present quarters might have to be vacated any
day.
The new block will cost not more
than $15,000 and will be built to
serve for several years. There will
be accommodation for all the city
offices in it. The final details for
the upper stories have yet to be
worked out.
************
INTERIOR FOR CLEMENTS
* (Special to The Journal) *
* Hazelton, Sept. 8.—The anti- •
* reciprocity forces here continue *
* to gain strength.    The Conserv- *
* atives claim  that Duncan  Ross *
* will be beaten In the Interior by •
* a substantial majority. *
The final order in connection with
the new embulance for the hospital
was made yesterday. This had to
do with* the color which the vehicle
would be painted. On the suggestion of the builders the board of
directors at a meeting yesterday decided to have the ambulance painted
bottle green, while in gold lettering,
"Ambulance—Prince Rupert General
Hospital," will^ adorn the sides.
The managing secretary at the
meeting reported that the hospital
staff was kept very busy, there being many cases In. Tbe financial
side of the institution was satisfactory.
A donation of SiiO from C. D. Rand
was received and the thanks of the
board was ordered to be tendered
him.
The water tank was reported to be
In place but It was decided to postpone painting it until next spring.
The fire escapes were also reported
to be ready to be installed.
Accounts for the month were
ordered  paid.
Conservative
Rally!
For the Purposes
of  Organization
All workers in the Conservative cause are invited to be
present in the committee rooms
this evening at 8 o'clock.
A short programme will be
given.
INCREASING SERVICE
G.T.P. Will on Saturday Begin a Service
to End of Track Three
Times a Week.
Line  Is  Growing  iu  Popularity—To
.Meet Demands Company Puts
on Extra Trains
The G. T. P. will on Saturday initiate a new train service out of the
city to Vanarsdol, at Mile 100. The
new service will provide for a train
out of Prince Rupert every second
day, Monday, Wednesday and Saturday, with a return train on Tuesday,
Thursday and Sunday.
This move on the part of the general superintendent, Mr. Mehan, is
made necessary in consequence of the
increasing traffic on the road. It is
not the Intention to reduce the time
of the run to any great extent at
present, the train being a mixed one
and requiring to do shunting at the
various sidings along the route.
Connections are made with the
G. T. P. steamers here and with the
river steamers at Vanarsdol.
The work of ballasting is progressing rapidly and eMr. Mehan will soon
have the entire stretch In first class
condition so as to he taken over as
completed. Every one who makes
the trip remarks upon the splendid
character of the road and the obliging way in which all the officials
look after the comfort of the travelling public.
The passenger traffic Is steadily
growing and the wonder now is how-
people got along without the railway in the months previous to the
opening of the service. Every train
both ways carries practically a full
complement of passengers.
 o—■	
Fire Last Night
A fire near Eighth Street last
night caused considerable damage to
two cottages owner by Mrs. Ellis and
Mr. Bradshaw. Mr. Barbeau Sr., who
occupied one of the cottages, lost
considerable through the fire.
 o	
Mrs. J. C. McLennan has returned
to the city after a few weeks visit in
the southern part of the province.
Rising in Syechuan Has Caused Foreign
Nations to Take Steps to Protect Citizens
Chinese Foreign Office Has Assured
Legations That Protection Will
Re Given Foreigners
(Special to The Journal)
Washing, D. C, Sept. 8.—A crisis
has arisen in the turbulent Province
of Szeehuan, China, and the foreign
offices of the United States and other
countries have, taken precautionary
steps for the safety of their citizens
in that region.
American gunboats will be brought
into play to guard the American citizens and a formidable international
naval array is at. hand In Chinese
waters.
The Chinese foreign office has assured the legations that protection
will be given all foreigners and their
property, and has offered an escort
to all who wish to leave the disturbed area. ,
 o	
William T. Burgess succeeded in
swimming the English Channel on
Wednesday.
FIND NATIVE SILVER
Hudson's Bay Mountain Near Hazelton
Gives Rich Ore   Rush to
Camp Follows.
An Assay Shows 5,000 Ounces From
What  Ih Nol  the Richest
of the Kind
(Special to The Journal)
Hazelton, Sept. 8.—A sensational
find of native silver on Hudson's Hay
Mountain, forty miles east of here,
lias just been reported. Considerable
excitement In consequence has been
created, Specimens brought here
show an abundance of Ihe metals,
which  occurs  in   bornile  ore.
One assay, not of the best ore,
returned 5,600 ounces. Fred Allan
Is the discoverer.
There has been a rush of prospectors from nearby camps to the
new field as a result of the rich
assays.
Dl'LY  NOMINATED
Yesterday at noon the nomination proceedings were held
here In the court house by the
returning officer, F. G. Dawson.
The two candidates only were
named, Herbert S. Clements, the
Conservative, and Duncan Ross,
the Liberal  candidate.
The council meeting on Tuesday
evening found Aid. Hilditch with a
grievance against Aid. Newton fof
editorial reference to himself. A hitter exchange of words followed in
which unparliamentary language was
used and the necessity arose for the
mayor to call the aldermen to order
and cease the altercation. Aid. Hilditch referred to an interview published in the Empire in which It
was credited to the mayor that he
had said that the work in connection
with the water bylaw might be expended under the direction of the
water committee, that point having
not yet been decided. The Interview
went on to state that control of the
work would certainly not he transferred, as had been suggested, in
favor of Aid. Hilditch.
Aid. Hilditch said that he would
not care so much as to this item
had it not been for an editorial in
the Empire, which he read, and which
attributed the opposition to the bylaw to the distrust of Aid. Hilditch.
Aid.  Hilditch  asked   tlie mayor  if
the  interview  given   in  the  Empire
was correct.   Proceeding to deal with
the editorial,  he said  he  would   not
|have   wondered   so   much   had   this
come from a section of the press that
did not know the full situation and
how these matters were handled. Aid.
Newton surely knew that there was
no chance for graft.     If there  was
graft, Aid. Newton, as a member of
the  finance   committee,   was   rspon-
sible, for all the accounts had to go
through   the  hands  of  that  committee finally.    It became a question of
Aid. Newton trying to do a scurrilous
thing or of not knowing what he was
writing about.   He was forced to the
conclusion that Aid. Newton had an
object in view and  that  was to attempt to stab him (Aid. Hilditch) in
the back.    It. was chfldls'.i  to v.iake
such a charge as had been made.
Mayor Explains
His Worship said that the first
part of the interview published in the
Empire was a fair report of what he
told an Empire reporter in reply to
an inquiry. He made no slighting
remark with regard to Aid. Hllditch
or any other alderman, however, and
the latter part, of the interview was
not in accordance with anything he
said.
Aid.  Newton
Aid. Newton said he did not feel
very well and he did not expect to
have taken much part in tlie meeting.
He supposed he would have to meet
Aid. Hilditch, although he did not
feel like speaking. As far as tlie
editorial was concerned, he took full
responsibility for it. He was sorry
that there was a member of the
council so weak lhat it became necessary, in order to ensure the passage
of the bylaw, that he should have to
write as he did. Through the stories
connected with Aid. Hilditch's name,
it was necessary to take the stand
he did to allay public opinion In this
matter in order to have the bylaw
pass. That was his sole reason for
taking the stand lie did
Unparliamentary Liiiigiiiigt-
Aid. Hitldltch thought Aid. Newton deliberately lied  when  he said
he did not Intend to slab him. Aid.
Newton had no other motive In view.
Ills Worship called upon Aid. Hllditch  to  withdraw  the  expression.
Aid. Newton suggested: "Oh, let
him go on. Every time be opens his
mouth  the more lie  hangs  himself."
Aid. Hilditch said he would withdraw these words, but he would say
Aid. Newton was not telling the
truth. He would not object so much
were Aid. Newton able to show anything he had done during his term
of office. He was, however, only a
drone. He had attempted to disorganize the engineering department
and had met with no success.. Aid.
Newton had little to show for the
eight months In office except for the
little time that he was acting as head
of the finance committee, and then
he had shown himself up. They had
an example of his placing Insurance
for private purposes. He (Aid. Hllditch) had sat as a member of two
councils. He had never seen an attempt by any member of those councils   to  graft.     Aid,   Smith,   he   felt
(Continued on Page Eight)
■*. .< n
-"^S
PRINCE RUPERT JOIRXAL
Friday, September 8,  1911.
HARDY PIRATES
"The people of Normandy are Just
now celebrating the thousandth year
of their settlement in that country,
tlie period of 1,000 years being counted from the meeting between Charles
the Simple and Rollo, which took
place in 911 at Saint-CIair-sur-Epte,"
says the Morning Post in a highly
interesting article?.
"At thai time the Northmen had
been for many years a tei»'or to the
coasts, and Indeed for many years
masters of the Seine as well as of
the lower waters of the Loire. Contemporary writers usually called
them pirate's, inn they were nol pirates in the modern sense of tho
word. There was little seaboard
trade with wliich they could Interfere.
"Their practice was to harry and
rob on land. One of their boats,
which was dug up in Norway thirty
years ago, is 7(1 feet long and 16
feet wide wliere the breadt'h of beam
is the greatest. It is only about
four feet deep, and had no deck. The
oars are about seventeen feet long,
and the rudder was a large oar held
on the starboard side. The rowers'
benches were short seats at the boat's
sides, interrupted so as to leave
plenty of room for a free passage
from bow to stern. Thirty-two round
shields, about three feet in diameter
and alternately red and black, were
fixed around the boat's sides and
there was also found a chessboard,
of which the pieces were held in
their places by pegs fixed in the
middle of each square. Evidently
the warriors had means of amusement during the leisure of their voyages.
"When they landed for an expedition they seem to have made long
and fast raids, helping themselves
to horses, and ready to fight either
mounted or on foot. Sometime? they
made a fore on the river bank and
there built smaller boats in order
to penetrate far into the interior.
It was their raids which ompelled
the inhabitants of most of the coasts
of Europe to organize themselves for
defense, and to put such chiefs as
could build forts as havens of security. By the end of the ninth
century these raiders from the sea
had established themselves in a large
district on both sides of the Seine
and had made many incursion further
inland.
"The successful defence of Paris
against one of their attacks seems to
have been the beginning of the rise
of those lords of Paris, who eventually became kings of France. In
July, 911, an expedition of Northmen under Rollo was besieging Char-
tres when it was attacked by Robert, Count of Paris; Richard, Duke
of Burgundy, and Ebles, Count of
Poitiers. The townsmen, under their
bishop, made a sortie, and the Northmen were defeated with great loss.
The moment seemed favorable to
make some sort of an agreement with
them, and on the initiative of the
Archibshop of Rouen, King Charles
the Simple was Induced to come to
terms with Rollo, the leader of the
Northmen.
"The Church had already been
busy among the Norman warriors,
of whom a certain number had been
baptized, and at a meeting arranged
where the road from Paris to Rouen
crosses the River Eptee, Rollo
agreed to become the king's man,
and the king to confirm him in the
lands which be had already conquered.
"Nothing is more remarkable Ihnn
Hi" progress of the Normans from
the time when their settlement wns
completed and rec ;nized In 911. The
French language had only just taken
shape. The earliest document known
to its historians, the famous Stras-
bourg oath, miglii have been bud-
Bcrlbed to as a boy by an nhi man
present at the Interview between
Rollo aud Charles. Yet, In a generation or two the Northmen bad forgotten their mother tongue, and were
speaking the best French of their
Time. They were no longer Northmen but Normans, and they were In
the van of civilization. The imported the best soldiers and made much
of learning. They encouraged architecture, sacred and profane, as their
cathedrals and their castles attest.
They were still the best masters in
the art of war.
"M. Albert-Petit, In his scholary
paper In the Revue des Deux Mondes,
sums up their qualities in a word
when he says that they were preeminently men of organization.
Theirs it was in after times to create the wonderful Sicilian kingdom
and theirs, by their remarkable powers of organization, to give new and
long-lasting shape to the monarchy
and the political Instiiitions of England. Their gift of organization was
accompanied by an equal power of
adaptability. A few generations of
life- In  Normandy transformed them
from Frenchmen into Englishmen.
Wherever they went they were leaders, and became identified with the
population which they led.
"Their material traces are spread
far and wide. The Norman castle
may be seen hy the Seine and by
many an English stream. But it may
be seen also on the rocks of the Peloponnesus and it may he seen In
ils supreme grandeur amid the hills
of Syria—a monument of the energy
with which the west has sought to
penetrate the east and the futility
oi' the effort. Yel tlie east is willing
to learn from tlie west the lessons
of force. The castle built by the
Turks to dominate tlie Bosphorus Is
a proof that the house of Othman
learned something from the house
of Rollo.
"Possibly the greatest work of the
Normans lay entirely outside the
scope of their intentions. It was
their presence which shaped the destinies of France. In resistance to
them the lords of Paris were com?
polled to become strong and to lay
the foundations of the French monarchy. Through resistance the monarchy which they founded in England, the French nation came into
being. This is the instinctive if not
the historical justification of what
might seem at first sight the anomalous combination of the celebration
of the thousandth anniversary of the
formation of Normandy with ceremonies performed in memory of the
maid, the now cannonized representative of . I'ench national feeling.
"A totlch of realism was given
to the Norman Fetes hy the arrival
at Rouen of five Norwegian students
In a Norwegian draker," says the
Times. "Wishing to re-enact the exploits of their ancestors a thousand
years ago, five men left Christiania
In the middle of last month and
covered the voyage, partly sailing
and partly rowing. They are said
to have been somewhat fatigued on
their arrival, when they were welcomed by large crowds assembled on
the quays.'
 o	
BIG   LUMBER  DEAL
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
SIR EDMUND WALKER, C.V.O., LL.D., D.C.L., President
ALEXANDER LAIRD, General Manager
CAPITAL - $10,000,000
VANCOUVER — The Vancouver
Timber and Trading Company has
closed a de"al with the Red Cliff Lumber Company of Duluth for the purchase of some 30,000 acres of crown
granted timber lands on Vancouver
Island. The timber on this tract is
estimated at close on two billion feet
of first class merchantable timber.
Mr. Von Alvensleben of the Vancouver Timber and Trading Company refuses to give detailed information
as to this deal, suggesting that this
is information which should be reserved for the copany and its shareholders. When asked, however, if
the purchase price exceeded $2,000,-
000, he would not contradict the
stateent. At any rate, he Indicated
that he was exceedingly satisfied
with the tiber in question which the
copany lias acquired with a view to
cutting as soon as market conditions
warrant it. Mr. Von Alvensleben believed that the tie for doing this
would not come before the Panama
Canal was finished. When asked if
his company contemplated increasing
its holdings still more, Mr. Von Alvensleben said that it was prepared
to buy timber, but the offerings on
the market were scarce. Mr. Von
Alvensleben says he believes that the
owners of timber in the province
should all make efforts to have the
limber surveyed since the present
custom of selling unsurveyed lands,
hi Bald, would lead sooner or later
in a tremendous amount of litigation,
and in many cases he declared result
in undermining the confidence of
'iiit.siilc capital in the stability of
Ilritish Columbia investments.
        REST, - $7,000,000
DRAFTS ON FOREIGN COUNTRIES
Every branch of The Canadian Bank of Commerce is equipped to issue drafts on
the principal cities in the following countries without delay :
Africa Crete
Arabia _   Cuba
Argentine Republic Denmark
Australia
Egypt
Austria-Hungary    Faroe Islands
ticl (pura
Brazil _
H ul c aria
Cevlen
Chili
China
Finland
Formosa
France
New Zealand
Norway
Panama
Persia
Pei
Siberia
eSoudan
South Africa
Spain
Straits Settlements
Greece
Holland
Iceland
India
Ireland
Italy
Japan
Java
Fr'ch Cochin China Malta
Germany                  Manchuria
Great Britain Mexico  ,	
Tfao amount of these drafts is stated in the money of the country where they are payable ; that is they are drawn in sterling, francs, marks, lire, kronen, florins, yen,
tacls, roubles, etc., as the case may be. Thii ensures that the payee abroad will
receive tlie actual amount intended. 233
J. M. CHRISTIE, Moling er, Prince Rupert Branch
Philippine Islands Sweden
Portugal SwitzerUnd
K t>u m a nia Turkey
Russia United States
Servia Uruguay
Siam West Indies, etc.
INTERESTED IN B.C.
Lindley Crease of Victoria Tells of the
Sentiment in Britain Towards
Canada.
in  Eastern  Provinces  He Found
Determined Effort Being Made
to Defeat Reciprocity
1836 1911
The Bank of
Britisii North America
75 Yean In Business.
Capital and Reiervo Over $7,300,000
Business Men's Banking
Money advanced to finance your
business.
Local and foreign Drafts bought
and sold.
Notes discounted. Collections
promptly made.
Letters of Credit, Money Orders
and Telegraph Transfers issued,
payable in all the leading Cities
of the world.
Prince Ruperl Branch—
F. S. LONG, Mauacr.
It was a cheery message to the
Conservatives of Victoria that Mr.
Lindley Crease brought with him
after completing a lengthy vacation
tour which took him as far as England. Mr. Crease says that on his
return trip across Canada lie found
a marked change in the sentiment of
the people towards reciprocity; and
tlie best informed men believe that
so thoroughly are the people becoming aroused that the defeat of the
government of Sir Wilfrid Laurier
is a certainty.
During his visit to England Mr.
Crease was much impressed with the
amount of interest shown In this
province. Everywhere he went he
found men who either had money
invested in flie country or who had
relatives here. This province was in
greater favor than any other portion of the Dominion. He met a
number of financial men who were
preparing to invest heavily in the
country, the feeling being that owing
to the unsettled political conditions
in the Old Country Canada was a
safer field for investment.
Referring to the political situation
In Canada, Mr. Crease  said:
"Mr. Borden's campaign is meeting with wonderful success, and new-
adherents are joining the ranks to
right against reciprocity from all
quarters. It is significant of the
outcome of this conlest that the opponents to the pact are fighting with
the confidence of victory. They are
moved not by party cries or election
tactics but by a deep and intense feeling that the future welfare and prosperity of Canada, as well as the
solidity of the Britisii Empire, Is at
stake. They are moved, too, by resentment against tlie attempts of
some of the American press to bulldoze us into accepting the pact.
"The expression of some individual
Americans daring Canadians to refuse to accept reciprocity now that
the American government has offered
it, rouses the temper of Canadians,
who are jalous of our national Independence.
"They naturally ask: If we are to
be subjected to pressure from Americans at this stage, how much more
shall we be when they want a reduction of the tariff In other Items
besides natural products; and what
may we expect If we should enter
Into ibis proposed agreement, and
find it does not suit us, and want to
withdraw (rom It, when we have become entangled in it?
"People, loo, nre alive to the fact
thai there never has been reciprocity in Canada as the Dominion now
exists. The reciprocity of 1854-1866
was before Confederation. It applied
only to upper and lower Canada.
Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta and
British Columbia were not parties
to it.
"If any deductions can be drawn
from the effects of reciprocity as it
affected Canada In circumstances so
so different to the existing ones we
might also draw our deductions from
the conditions prevailing in British
Columbia before Confederation, and
before the Canadian tariff was in
force, when the financial and commercial conditions were so deplorable
as to cause grave anxiety for the
future development of the country."
'the respective dates being In abstract
as hereinunder; Victoria, October 2;
Clinton, October 4; Vancouver and
Revelstoke, October 9; New Westminster, October 10; Vernon and
Nelson, October 16; Kamloops, October 19; Fernie, October 30. With
the exception of Victoria and Vancouver, wliere the cases will be limited to the criminal docket, both civil
and criminal matters will be adjudicated upon at these places and
dates. Sittings for the trial of civil
cases exclusively will also be held
at Rossland on the 9 th and at Cranbrook on the 23rd proximo.
NOTICE TO  CONTRACTORS
Police Station, Naas River
SEALED TENDERS, superscribed
"Tender for Police Station, Naas
River," will be received by the Hon.
the Minister of Public Works up to
noon of Tuesday, the 12th day of
September, 1911, for the erection and
completion of a timber-framed police
station at Naas River, in the Skeena
Electoral District.
Plans, specifications, contract, and
forms of tender may be seen on and
after the 17th day of August, 1911,
at the offices of the Government
Agent, Prince Rupert; C. P. Hickman, Esq., Provincial Constable,.
Naas Harbour; and the department
of Public Works, Victoria.
Each proposal must be accompanied by an accepted bank cheque
or certificate of deposit on a chartered bank of Canada, made payable
to the Hon. the Minister of Public
Works, for the sum of $150, which
shall be forfeited if the party tendering decline to enter into contract
when called upon to do so, or If he
fall to complete the work contracted
for. The cheques or certificates of
deposit of unsuccessful tenderers
will be returned to them upon the
execution of the contract. •
Tenders will not be considered unless made out on the forms supplied,
signed with the actual signature of
the tenderer, and enclosed In the
envelopes furnished.
The lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted.
J. E. GRIFFITH,
Public Works Engineer.
Department of Public Works, Victoria, B. C, August 15, 1911. a22sl2
PUBLIC HIGHWAYS
Province of British Columbia
NOTICE is hereby given that all
Public Highways in unorganized Districts, and all Main Trunk Roads in
organized Districts are sixty-six feet
wide, and have a width of thirty-
three feet on each side of the mean
straight centre line of the travelled
road. THOMAS TAYLOR,
Minister of Public Works.
Department of Public Works, Victoria. B. C, July 7, 1911.    jyl8-ol8
CANCELLATION OP RESERVE.
NOTICE Is hereby given that the
reserve of a parcel of land situated
on Graham Island, notice of which
appeared In the British Columbia
Gazette on the 25th of February,
1909, being dated 23rd February,
1909, is cancelled to permit of the
lands being acquired by pre-emption
only and for no other purpose
ROBT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Department of Lands,
Victoria, B. C, April 5th, 1911.
4-14—7-5
NOTICE.
In the matter of an application for
the Issue of a duplicate of the Certificate of Title for an undivided
one-half of Lot 883, Group I,
Cassiar District:
Notice is hereby given that it is
my intention to issue at the expiration of one month after the first
publication hereof a duplicate of the
Certificate of Title to the above
mentioned land in the name of William Jordan Larkworthy, which Certificate is dated the 30th day of September, 1910, and numbered 326R.
WILLUM   E.   BURRITT,
Di   rlct Registrar.
Land Registry Office,
Prince Rupert, B. C,
May 26, 1911. J23
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast, Range 5.
TAKE NOTICE that T. H. Hughes,
of Lakelse Valley, occupation farmer,
intends to apply for permission to
purchase the followirg described
lands:—Commencing at a rost planted at the southeast corner of Lot
4128; thence 40 chains north; thence
40 chains east; thenca 40 chains
south; tlience 40 chains west to point
of commencement, and containing
160 acres, more or less.
TOM HUGH HUGHES.
Dated June 5, 1911.
Skeena Land District—District
of Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that Thomas Stewart, of Prince Rupert, occupation
accountant, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted 40 chains north from
the southwest corner of Lot 1733;
thence west. 40 chains; thence south
40 chains; thence east 40 chains;
tlience nortli 40 cliains to point of
commencement.
THOMAS  STEWART.
John Kirkaldy, Agent
Dated July 7, 1911.
WATER NOTICE
WATER NOTICE.
FALL COURT SITTINGS
VICTORIA — Arrangements have
just been completed by the attorney
general's department for the autumnal  sittings of the court  of assize,
NOTICE is hereby given that an
application will be made under Part
V. of the "Water Act, la09," to obtain a licence in the Queen Charlotte Islands Division of Skeena District.
(a) The name, address'and occupation of the applicant—Merton A.
Merrill, Masset, Q. C. I., B. C,
Prospector.
(If for mining purposes) Free
Miner's Certificate No	
(b) The name of the lake,
stream, or source (if unnamed, the
description is)—I-ln-tsua Lake, Tsu-
Skundale Lake and A'in River.
(c) The point of diversion—At <r
near the outlet of Tsu-Skuudale
Lake Into Ain River.
(d) The quantity of water applied for (in cubic feet per second)
—1,000.
(e) The character of the proposed works—Power Plant, Dam,
Flumes, etc.
(f) The premises on which the
water Is to be used (describe same)
—At or near the mouth of the Ain
River.
(g) The purposes for which the
water Is to be used—Generating
power.
(h) If for irrigation, describe
the land Intended to be irrigated,
giving acreage	
(1) If the water is to be used for
power or mining purposes, describe
the place where the water Is to be
returned to some natural channel,
and the difference In altitude between point of diversion and point
of return—At or near the mouth of
the Ain River, about 100 feet below
point of diversion.
(j) Area of Crown land Intended to be occupied by the proposed
works—10 acres more or less.
(k) This notice was posted on
the 28th day of November, 1910,
and application will be made to the
Commissioner on the 1st day of
June,  1911.
(1) Give the names and addresses of any riparian proprietors or
licensees who or whose lands are
likely to be affected by the proposed works, either above or below
the outlet—Don't know of any.
(Signature)
MERTON A.  MERRILL,
(P.  O.  Address)   Masset, B.  C.
NOTE.—One cubic loot p<;r second is equivalent to 35.71 miner's
inches.
NOTICE
In the matter of an application for
the   issue  of  a   duplicate  of  the
Certificate  of  Title  for  Lot  361,
Range 5, Coast District:
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
it  is  my intention  to  Issue at the
expiration  of  one  month  after, the
first publication  hereof a "duplicate
of the Certificate for the above described Iands in the names of Truman S. Baxter and Albert D. Durham,
which  Certificate  of Title  is dated
25th   November,    1909,   and   numbered 4 4 1.
WILLIAM  E.   BURRITT,
District Registrar.
Land  Registry  Office,  Prince  Rupert, B. C, August 14, 1911. al5-slo
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE.
Notice is hereby given the the
reserve existing by reason of the
notice published in the British Columbia Gazette of the 27th December, 1907, over lands on Graham Island, formerly covered by Timber
Licences Nos. Nos. 37055, 37056 and
37057, which expired on the 6th day
of November, 1909, and the lands
embraced within Timber Licence No.
37059, which expired on the 25th
day of January, 1909, Is cancelled,
and that the said lands will be open
for pre-emption only under the provisions of Section 7 of the "Land
Act" after midnight on June 16th,
1911.
ROBERT A.   RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Lands Department,
Victoria, B. C,
9th March, 1911.
WATER   NOTICE
I, Andrew Christian Skjelbred, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, occupation
farmer, give notice that on the 24th
day of September, I Intend to apply
to the Water Commissioner at his
office In Prince Rupert, for a licence
to take nnd use 3 cubic feet of water
per second from hot springs on the
border of Lake Lakelse in tlie Skeeua
Land Division of Coast District. The
water is to be taken directly from
the springs and Is to be used on Lot
8279, for sanitarium purposes.
Dated August 24, 1911
AND.   CHRISTIAN  SKJELBRED.
9-5 Prince Rupert, B. C.
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
oiteena.
TAKE NOTICE that the Canadian
Canning Company, Limited, of 224
Winch Building, Vancouver, B. C,
occupation salmon caners, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted adjoining
a post marked W. N. about 300 feet
South of Wallace's wharf, Naas Harbour, B. C; thence east 20 chains;
thence south 20 chains; thence west
20 chains; thence following the
coast line in a northerly direction
back to the point of commencement
and containing forty acres more or
less.
CANADIAN CANNING CO., LTD.
Per ii. H. Leslie, Agent.
Dated  6th  June,  1911. 6-26
The Journal (twice a week),
$2.00 a year.
NOTICE Is hereby given that an
application will be made under Part
V of the "Water Act, 1909," to obtain a licence in the Queen Charlotte
Islands Division of Skeena District.
(a) The name, address and occupation of the applicant—Orland P.
Merrill; Massett, Graham Island,
B. O.J  prospector.
(If for mining purposes) Free Miner's Certificate No	
(b) The name of the lake,
stream or source (if unnamed, the
description is)—Ain Lake and Ain
River.
(c) The point of diversion—At
or near Ain Lake.
(d) The quantity of water applied for (in cubic feet per second)
—700.
(e) The character of the proposed
works-—Dam, flume, pipe line and
power  plant.
(f) The premises on v-'il li tie
water is to be used id.:-.-ihe s- i
—Near mouth of Ain River.
(g) The purposes for which _■
water is to be used—Cer.c tl* : :*.
power.
(h) If for irrigation, describe :'.•»■
land to be irrigated, giving acreage
(I) If the water is to be used for
power or for mining purposes, describe the place where the water is
to be returned to some natural channel, and the difference In altitude
between point of diversion and point
of return—Near mouth of Ain River
about 150 feet below point of diversion.
(j) Area of Crown land intended
to be occupied by the proposed
works-— About 10 acres.
(k) This notice was posted on
the tenth day of June, 1911, and application will be made to the Commissioner on the fourth day of September, 1911.
(1) Give the names and addresses
of any riparian proprietors or licensees who or whose lands are
likely to be affected by the proposed
works, either above or below the
outlet—None.
(Signature)  ORLAND P. MERRILL,
(P.  O. Address)  Masset, B. C.
George S. Mayer, Agent,
(P.  O.  Address)   Masset,  B.  C.
Note—One cubic foot per second
is equivalent to 35.71 miner's Inches.
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that I, John V.
Rochester, of Prince Rupert, occupation broker, intend to apply fir permission to lease the following described land:— Commencing at a
post planted on the northerly end of
an island in the Skeena River about
Mile 45 on the Grand Trunk Pacific
Railway; thence north 1000 feet
more or less to low water mark;
thence westerly along the low water
mark 1000 feet more or less;'
thence southerly 1000 feet more or
less; thence easterly 1000 feet to
the place of commencement.
J. Y ROCHESTER.
Dated  May 30, 1911. 6-2
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that T. M. Turner,
of Lakelse Valley, occupation farmer, Intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands: — Commencing at a post
planted on the Omineca & Hazelton
right of way aud adjoining the N. E.
corner of Lot 518; thence west 17
chains to corner of Lot 3996; thence
north 20 chains; thence following
right of way to point of commencement.
T. M. TURNER,
John Kirkaldy, Agent.
Dated 14th June, 1911. 7.4
only!
Skeena    Land    Notice—District    of
Coast—Range V
TAKE NOTICE that Daniel W.
Beaton, of Prince Rupert, B. C, occupation carpenter, Intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about five miles
up the Exchumsik River from its
mouth, and on its south bank; thence
east 40 chains; thence north 40
chains; thence west 40 chains;
thence south 40 chains to place of
commencement.
DANIEL  W.   BEATON.
Dated  June  14, 1911. j.n \
Friday, September 8, 1911.
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
^1******************<t*********************************
|    SIR DONALD MANN    \
* *
*****************************************************
The ideal situation of Canada under present conditions, with regard
to its substanntial development on
the best, largest and surest lines,
with the co-operation of the\ money
power of the Mother Country, was
the inspiring theme upon which Sir
Donald Mann, vice president of the
Canadian Northern and its related
Interests, waxed enthusiastically eloquent in chatting with a member of
the Colonist staff in Victoria. Sir
Donald is an Imperialist in a large
way. He believes through and
through that there is no alliance so
Important as a factor In the making
of Canadian greatness as that at
present obtaining, with the people
of this Dominion as the working
partners and their kinsmen of Great
Britain as the capital finders, for the
systematic exploiation of the potentialities of the vast virgin areas of
the northern portion of the American
continent.
.Moans Development
"The situation under existant conditions is ideal," said Sir Donald.
"We have a great new country, a
country in the raw as yet, but Immensely rich in possibilities. It needs
for its comprehensive and adequate
development two things—capital
and population. Great Britain, on
the other hand, has excess population, and it is the money power of
the world. In the development of
our vast virgin areas the people of
the Old Land are the people we want
to augment our working forces here.
Some of them when they come to
us may lack adaptability; they may
find it difficult to fully play their
part as makers of a new nation, but
their children will be all right.   They
Donald incidentally. He said that
under conditions across the line the
handling by rail of wheat, for the
world's traffic was impossible, inasmuch as the traffic would not stand
division of the receipts among three
or four forwarding lines, with unas-
sociated steamship lines also to be
considered. Here in Canada, the
Canadian Pacific, the Grand Trunk
Pacific and the Canadian Northern,
not only have or will have their own
lines, distinct and Individual through
to a sea base, but their associate water lines as well. Either of the three
Canadian lines could thus handle the
wheat with no division of traffic
earnings. And its cars carrying the
wheat to the Atlantic would be returned to the west with a backhaul
of Eastern Canadian products required by the west—never having left
the metals of the owning company,
and earning revenue for that company both going and coming. In the
United States, if the wheat crop were
to be shipped by rail from theh collection centres, the railroad companies would necessarily scatter their
cars over an infinity of lines, and be
unable to locate or get them back
again perhaps for years. This situation gave and would preserve the advantage in the marketing of the
wheat of Canada to the Canadian
railroads.
FINDS A NEW RACE
Explorer Steffanson Tells of Finding
Strange Tribe Which Had Never
Before Seen a White Man
A  race of people  who had  never
before   beheld   a   white  man   or  an
will be of the country and  capable
of doing their share in its upbuild-1 Indian has been  discovered   in   the
ing.     And   they   are   people   of   the I Arctic regions of British North Amer-
blood and stamina we want as clti- iiea °y Vilhjmar Stefansson, leader of
zens—men of the fighting strain.  As jthe American Museum's scientific ex-
to the money,  Great Britain has it Peditlon, wliich left in April,  1908,
ready for us.    Tlie people at Home according to a letter recently recelv-
look with especial friendliness upon efi from him-
Canada as a field for unlimited in-      In a letter which Is dated, "Mouth
vestment.    They have confidence in of Dease River, October 18,  1910,"
our resources and in our methods of
government and of business. They
are .ready to co-operate with us to
the limit in the making of our country's future, their hearty co-operation
being based on the strongest and
truest sentiment.
"And what is the result? Canada
is more prosperous and in better
shape for expansion today than ever
before. It Is on the eve of the greatest era of development that it has
ever known. Britisii money is available for Canadian industrial enterprises in unlimited volume. The British people are ready and anxious to
to join With us as family partners
in the development of our land; in
the first place because they have confidence in our methods of government, in our institutions, in our stability and bona fides; and in the
second because of sentiment—they
feel in becoming our partners in the
making of a great Canada they are
strengthening the Empire of which
Canada is a part. The capitalists of
Britain trust us now. They have
lost confidence in the United States
and in United States methods, and,
besides, the republic to the south
is out of the family and sentiment
plays no part with the Britisii capitalist to its advantage.
Cause  of  Good  Times
"We see the result In the good
times Canada now enjoys—largely
through the readiness of Britisii capital to come in with us. Why, we
had $200,000,000 of British money
Invested with us in a single year.
We see the result in the United States
In falling slocks, in general depression and hard times, in the Inability,
for the first time, of theh United
States investments to obtain capital
in the world's great market, while
It. is placed al Canada's disposal In
unlimited volume. We see It in the
fact that thousands of workers are
being discharged by the American
railroads, while on this side we are
taking on more and more men every
day. Look at. it from every standpoint, the situation under present
conditions is ideal in the live, practical and best possible partnership
existing between Canada, with a
great virgin country to be developed
and peopled, and the Home Land,
with the money necessary for the
work and surplus population for us
to recruit from,—a partnership with
Canadians as the working and Britishers as the moneyed partners—a
partnership based upon a sterling
sentiment of kinship with and confidence in Canadians, from which partnership we stand to gain more, and
are gaining more, than could be obtained under any other possible association."
Handling of Wheat Crop
The peculiar advantage of the Canadian railroads in marketing the
wheat crop was touched upon by Sir
and is the first intelligence received
from the party within a year, Stefansson  said:
"We have discovered a people in
a region supposed to be uninhabited
and have lived a few months among
people who had never seen a white
man or an Indian. They had heard
of both, but did not even know they
were not Eskimos, so little were they
informed of what white men are like.
"We discovered Eskimos in speech
and habit who are Scandinavians in
appearance.
"This find is the solution of one
of two problems:
"What became of Franklin's men?
"What became of the 3,000 Scandinavians who disappeared from
Greenland in the fifteenth century?
"Or, if neither of these questions
is to be answered, then we have introduced a new problem of scientific
interest: Why do some of the people
of Victoria Land differ markedly
from the rest of their race? Why
are they so European in type? We
have discovered the non-existence of
a stream which the maps make the
size of the Hudson River. When the
River La Bonciere disappears from
the map, I shall feel I have done
some house cleaning.
"We have found a certain cape to
be an island, and a certain island to
be a cape; we know the source of
the Rae River; of which the mouth
and the lowest ten miles were seen
by Dr. Rae; and a few other odd
things we have done that are in the
nature of discoveries. But, of course,
If we deserve any credit it will be
for our online work more than for
any discoveries properly so-called."
Stefansson left New York on the
present expedition in April, 1908.
Ills principal purpose was lo study
the' different tribes of Eskimos in
the northwest and more especially
an unknown tribe living In Victoria
Land. The explorer Is about 33
years old and is a graduate of Harvard University. He is more than six
feet tall, of a ro'bust physique, and
lias devoted many years to anthropological research, particularly among
the Eskimos of the northwest.
H. Gordon Munro   W. Nicholson Lailey
NUNRO & LAILEY
ARCHITECTS
PRINCE RUPERT, B. C.
P. O. BOX 14        PRINCE RUPERT
NOTICE.
A book is kept in the City Clerk's
Office in which to enter the naniee
and addresses, etc. of citizens of
Prince Rupert desiring employment
on City work. All desiring employment should register at once.
ERNEST A. WOODS,
City Clerk.
Skeena La.nd District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKjU NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, .intend to apply w the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:-—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the southeast corner of C.L. 4472; thence west 80
chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence east SO chains; thence south
SO chains to place of commencement.
AUSTIN M.  BROWN.
Dated July 17, 1911.       	
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the southeast corner of C.L. 4472; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south
80 chains to place of commencement.
AUSTIN M.  BROWN.
Dated July 17,  1911.	
Skeena Land  District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the northeast corner
of C.L. 4471; thence west 80 chains;
thence south SO chains; thence east
SO chains; thence north SO chains to
t lace of commencement.
AUSTIN M. BROWN.
Dated July 17, 1911.
Skeena Land  District—District of
Queen Charlotte
"ARE NOTICE that l.h'rty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince tvupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the northeast corner
of C.L. 4471; thence east 80 chains;
tlience south 80 chains; thence west
80 clu.ins; thence north 80 chains,
to place of commencement.
AUSTIN M.  BROWN.
Dated July  17, 1911.
Skeena Land District—District  of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
ore mile east of the south corner of
C.L. 44 tO; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south
80 chains; thence east 80 chains, to
place of commencement.
AUSTIN M.  BROWN.
Dated July 17, 1911.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the southeast corner of C.L. 4470; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80- chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south
80 chains, to place of commencement.
AUSTIN M.  BROWN.
Dated July 17, 1911.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, b. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the northeast corner
of C.L. 4469; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east
chains; thence north 80 chains,
to  place of commencement.
AUSTIN M.   BROWN.
Dated July  17,  1911.
Skeena  Land  District- -District  of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, Intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows;.—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the northeast corner
of C.L. 4469; thence east SO chain.:;
thence south 80 chains; thence west
80 chains; tlience north 80 chains to
place of commencement.
AUSTIN M.  BROWN.
Dated July 17,  1911.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen. Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, Intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the southeast corner
of C.L. 447;e; thence west 80 chains;
thence north 80 chains; thence east
'80 cnains; thence south 80 chrins,
to place of commencement.
AUSTIN  M.  BROWN.
Dated July 17, 1911.
Skeena  Land   District—District  of   I
Queen Charlotte
TAKE   NOTICE   that  thirty   days]
from  date,  I,  Austin  M.  Brown,  of'
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under (iiei acres of land on
Graham    Island    described    as    follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the south corner ofi
C.L.4475;   thence   north   80   chains; j
thence east 80  chains;  thence south
SO chains; thence west SO chains to'
place of commencement.
AUSTIN M.  BRO ., N.
Dated July 17. 1*911.
Skeena Land  District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, ley occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 610 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile north of the northeast corner of C.L. 4477; tlience west 80
chains; thence south SO cliains;
thence east 80 chains; tlience north
80 chains, to sjai'e of commencement.
AUSTIN M.  BROWN.
Hated July 17,  1911,
Skeena  Land  District—District  of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE   NOTICE   that   thirty  days
from   date,   I,   Henry   Edenshaw,   of
Masset, B. C, occupation storekeep-!
er, intend to apply to the Chief Com-!
missioner of Lands  for  a license to
prospect for coal and  petroleum on'
and under 040 acres of land on Graham  Island  described  as follows: —
Commencing at a post planted on the
west shore of West River, one mile
easterly from the mouth of said river;   thence  south  80   chains;   thence
east    SO    chains;    tlience   north   80 J
chains;  thence west 80 chains to the!
place of commencement.
HENRY EDENSHAW.
Hated July  17,  1911.
Skeena Land  District—District  of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to til Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as foi-!
lows:—Commencing at post planted
one mile east of the northeast corner!
of C.L. 4474; thence east 80 chains;]
thence south 80 chains; thence west
80 chains; thence north 80 chains, to
place of commencement.
AUSTIN M.  BROWN.
Dated July  17, 1911. 	
Skeena  Land  District—District of   I
Queen Charlotte
TAKE   NOTICE   that   thirty   days
from   date,   I,   Henry   Edenshaw,   of
Mnsset,  B.  C, by occupation  storekeeper, Intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license'
to  prospect  for coal  and  petroleum,
on  and  under  640  acres  of land on,
Giuliani Island described as follows: i
—Commencing at a post planted on
the west shore  of the  West River,'
about   one   mile   easterly    from    the j
mouth of said river;  thence east 80 I
chains;    thence    north    80    chains;
thence west 80 cliains; tlience south
80   chains,   to  place  of  commencement.
HENRY EDENSHAW.
Dated July 17, 1911.
Skeena Land Distinct—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as foi-,
lows-—Commencing at post planted
at the southeast corner of C.L. 4477;
thence east 80 chains; thence nortli
SO chains; thence west SO chains;
thence south 80 chains, to place of
commencement.
AUSTIN M. BROWN.
Dated July  17,  1911.	
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that Edward H.
Port, of Prince Rupert, B. C, occupation farmer, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following described lands:— Commencing
at a post planted in the Soutli West
Corner, on the shore line of Lake
Lakelse; thence 20 chains East, to
South West Corner of Lot 684;
thence 30 chains North, following
along the West line of Lot 684 to
post; thence South, following along
the shore line of said Lake to point
of commencement, containing about
40 acres.
EDWARD H.  PORT,
By C. N.  Pring, Agent.
Dated June 26,  1911. 6-26
0-26
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, By occupation
sadler, Intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
at the southeast corner ofC.L.4478;
thence north 80 chains; tnence east
80 chains; e.eence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains, to place of
commencement.
AUSTIN M. BROWN.
Dated July 17,  1911.	
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE NOTICE that thirty days
from date, I, Austin M. Brown, of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license
to prospect for coal and petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham Island described as follows:—Commencing at post planted
at the southeast corner of C.L. 4467;
thence north 80 chains; thence east
80 chains; thence south 80 cliains;
thence west SO chains, to place of
commencement.
AUSTIN M.  BROWN.
Dated July 17, 1911.	
Queen Charlotte Land District—District of Skeena
TAKE NOTICE that S. Barclay
Martin, Jr., of New Westminster,
occupation engineer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Com
mencing at a post planted at the
northeast corner of ungazetted lot
1428, said lot being T.L. 39979;
thence north and following the
westerly shore of Massett Inlet 80
chains; thence west 20 chains;
thence south 80 chains; thence east
40 chains, more or less, to the point
of commencement, and containing
240 acres, more or less.
S.  BARCLAY MARTIN, Jr.
Dated  July 21,  1911. 8-8
Skeena    Land    District—District    of
Queen  Charlotte  Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Charles Lamb
nf Blair, Nebraska, IJ. S. a., occupation farmer, intends to apply for
permission to purchase tin.- following
described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 4 .miles west and
4 1-2 miles north from the southwest corner of Lot 99j.; thence south
SO cliains; tlience west SO chains;
thence north SO chains; i.,ence east
so chains to point of commencement;
containing 640 acres.
CHARLES LAMB.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Daled  July  16    I'tll. A-16
Skeena    Land    District-  District   of
Queen  Charlotte  Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Hattie Sttth-
I'lland of Blair, Nebraska, tl, S. A.,
occupation housewife Intends to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about 5
miles west and 2 1-3 miles north
from the southwest corner of Lot
991; tlience west 60 e-hains; thence
north SO chains; theme east 60
cliains; thence south SO chains, to
point of commencement; containing
about 480 acres.
HATTIE SUTHERLAND.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated July  16    1911. A-15
Skeena    Land    District—District    of
Queen  Charlotte  Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Abram Sutherland  of Blair, Nebraska, U. S. A.,
occupation   insurance  agent,   intends
to apply for permission  to purchase
the    following    described    lands: —
Commencing at a post planted about
miles west and  2   1-2  miles north
from   the  southwest   corner   of   Lot
"91;   thence east  SO  chains;   thence
north  .80   cnains;    tlience   west   SO
cliains;   thence  south   80   chains,   to
oint of commencement;   containing
640 acres.
ABRAM SUTHERLAND.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated July  16,  1911. A-15
Skeena   Land   district—District   of
Queen  Charlotte  Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Miriam Hal-
ler of Blair, Nebraska, U. S. A., occupation housewife, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post piante'd aboi" 5 miles
west and 1 1-2 miles north from
the southwest corner of Lot 991;
tlience east 80 chains; theuce north
SO cnains; thence west 80 chains;
thence south 80 chains, to point of
commencement; containing 640
acres.
MIRIAM  HALLER.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated July  16.  1911. A-15
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte
TAKE   NOTICE   that   thirty   days
from date,  I, Austin  M.  Brown,  of
Prince Rupert, B. C, by occupation!
sadler, intend to apply to the Chief!
Commissioner of Lands for a license!
to prospect for coal and  petroleum
on and under 640 acres of land on
Graham    Island    described    as    follows:—Commencing nt post  planted
at the southeast corner of C.L. 4465;
thence nortli so chains;  thence east
SO chains;   thence south SO cliains;
thence west so  chains,  to  place of
commencement,
AUSTIN  M,   BROWN.
Dated July 16., 1911.
Skeena   Land   District — District   of
Queen   Charlotte  Islands
TAKE NOTICE that W. G. McMorris of the City of Vancouver in
the Province of Britisii Columbia,
occupation, broker, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted on an island
in Skidegate Inlet about 500 yards
east from the mouth of Slate Chuck
Creek, separated from the mainland
of Graham Island at high tide;
thence south three chains; thence
east ten chains; tlience north three
chains; thence west ten chains to
point of commencement, containing
two acres, more or less.
W. G. McMORRIS,
Dated   July  29,   1911.       Locator.
Skeena    Land    District—District   of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that James Mullin
of Murdo, South Dakota, occupation
farmer, intends fo apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 4 1-2 miles west
and 1 1-2 miles north from the southwest corner of Lot 991; tnence east
40 chains; thence soutli SO chains;
thence west 40 chains; tlience north
80 chains, to point of commencement;  containing 320 acres.
JAMES   MULLIN.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated July  16.   1911. A-15
Skeena    Land    District—Dislrict    of
Queen   Charlotte  Islands
TAKE NuTICE that Belle Lamb
of Blair, Nebraska, occupation housewife, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described Iands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 4 miles west and
4 1-2 miles north from the southwest corner of" Lot 991; thence north
•SO chains; thence west SO chains;
thence south So chains; thence east
SO chains, to point of commencement;   containing 640 acres
BELLE   LAMB.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated  July  16,  1911. A-15
Skeena  Land   District District  of
Queen  Charlotte
TAKE   NOTICE   that   thirty   days
from   date,  1,   Henry   Edenshaw,   of,
Masset,  B.  C,  by  occupation   store-1
keeper, intend to apply to the Chief,
Commissioner of Lands for a license,
to  prospect  for  coal  and   petroleum
on  and  under  u*0  acres of land  on j
Graham Island described us follows:
Commencing at a post planted on the
bank of west River, about one mile
isterly from the month of said river;   thence  west  80  chains;   thence
south    80   chains;    tlience   east    SO
chains;   thence nn-th   SO  chains,  to|
place of commencement.
HENRY EDENSHAW.
Dated July 1.7,  1911.
Skeena Land  District—District  of   j
Queen Charlotte
TAKE   NOTICE   that   thirty   daysi
from   date,   I,   Henry   Edenshaw,   of;
Masset, B.  C,  by occupation  storekeeper, intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands for a license |
to prospect for coal and petroleum on :
and under 64 0 acres of land on Gra-,
nam  Island  described as follows: —!
Commencing at a post planted on the
west shore of West River, about one
mile easterly from the mouth of said
river; thence north 80 chains; thence
west 80 chains;   thence    south    SO
chains;    thence   east   SO  chains,   to
place of commencement.
HENRY EDENSHAW.
Dated July 17,  1911.
Skeena Land District—District of
of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that James G.
Crombie, of Prince Rupert, occupation auditor, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:— Commencing at a
post planted nt the northwest corner, 55 chains east and 20 chains
south from northeast corner of Lot
1116 (Horry Survey), Coast Disk,
range 5; Ihence 20 chains east;
thence 25 chains, more or less,
south to Angus McLeod Pre-emption; thence 20 chains west; thence]
L'.'e ehains, more or less, north, to!
post of commencement, containing!
50 acres, more or less.
JAMES G,  CROMBIE.
Fred  Bolllen, Agent.
Dated June 14, it'll. 6-23
, |
Skeena    Land    Uistrict     District    of'
Coast    Range  V.
TAKE  NOTICE  thai     I,    Joseph
Pastl,  of   Watson,  Sask.,   occupation,
farmer,  intend  to apply  for permission to purchase the    following do-]
scribed lands:      Commencing    at  a
post  planted  about    30  c. ains in al
northerly direction from the    N. E.
corner of Lot No. 2662 or T. L. No.,
32598 at Lakelse Luke; tlience north I
20 chains;  tlience east    40    chains; !
thence south   20  chains along shore!
of  Lakelse  Lake;   thence  west    40
chains  to point of    qnm men cement, ]
containing  120  acres,  more  or  less.'
JOSEPH PASTL.
George Hlr, Agent.
Dated   May  5,  1911. 6-2
Prince  Rupert   Private   Detective
  Agency
N. McDonald, Manager
All kinds of legitimate detective work
handled  for companies  and  Individuals.     Business strictly confidential.
P. O. Box 80:i — Phone 210
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that I, Charles
Percy Hickman, of Naas Harbour,
occupation constable, intend to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:— Commencing at a post planted on the
east shore of Naas Bay, about two
miles in an easterly direction from
Lot 3, marked C. P, IL, s. W. corner; thence east 20 chains; thence
north 40 chains to the shore; thence
along the shore line to the place of
commencement, containing 40 acres,
more or li'ss.
CHARLES  i'RECY   HICKMAN.
Dated  Juno  7,  1911. 6-30
Skeena   Land   District-
of Coast.
District
TAKE NOTICE that Victor II
Reynolds, of Hull, Massachusetts, oc-
e'lipation chauffeur, iiit<-nfls to apply
for permission to purchase the following described land: Commencing at a post planted at high water
mark on the northerly side of the
entrance to a small unnamed cove on
the west coast of Pitt Island, about
one-quarter mile south of the entrance to Kitkatla slimmer village;
thence east forty chains: thence
south twenty chains; thence west
forty chains; thence north ten
chains more or less to high water
mark; thence following along high
water mark around the head of the
cove back to the commencement, and
containing sixty (60) acres more or
less.
VICTOR H.  REYNOLDS.
J. H. Pillsbury, Agent.
'Dated Feb. 18th, 1911.
LINDSAY'S CARTAGE a STORAGE
G. T. P. CARTAGE AGENTS
Office at H. II. Rochester, Centre St.
LADYSMITH  COAL
is handled by us.   All orders recelvej
prompt attention.   Phone No  68.
1 I PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Friday, September 8, 1911.
prince -Kupert journal
Telephone  138
Published twice a week on Tuesdays and Fridays from the office of
publication, Third Avenue, near
McBride Street.
Subscription rate to any point in
Canada, $2.00 a year; to points outside of Canada, $3.00 a year.
Advertising rates furnished on
application.
0. H. NELSON,
Editor.
Friday, September 8, 1911.
A   TEMPEST   IN  A  TEAPOT
The time taken by the city council a few evenings ago in discussing
the question of whether or not there
mlghl wiih advantage be an executive committee of tlie council appointed by that body in connection
with the water works and hydro-electric scheme, might have been better
taken up with some other business.
To follow the arguments of some
members of the council on the sub-
jee-t one is forced to the conclusion
that they consider that while the
members of the council sitting as a
body are sure to be honest that there
is a possibility that when they sit
in smaller bodies as in committee
there is danger of dishonest actions.
If it were to be decided that the
work was to be done under the supervision of the whole council rather
than under a committee we believe
that the question of an executive
committee being possible should not
have been discussed for a minute.
To appoint such a body is the most
natural thing and is an assurance of
better service than under the plan
of doing the work only through a
more or less cumbersome body such
as a council constitutes. In every
line of operations it has become the
practice to relegate to committees
a considerable share of the executive
work in whatever line of enterprise
one looks. This is done in the interests of efficiency and to avoid unnecessary loss of time which ensues
when a large body must be called
together to take up every little detail. All the acts of these committees have to be passed upon by the
central body, which is a sufficient
guarantee of the work being in accord with the general policy of the
council.
There is nothing more mischievous
in a community than the creation of
a spirit of suspicion with respect to
the conduct of public affairs. Since
the city became incorporated less
than sixteen months ago there has
been an attempt made by a section
of this community to create distrust
with respect to the conduct of mu-
nieipal government. Councils are not
infallible any more than the people
who elect them and whom these
councils represent. Prince Rupert
has been blessed in its history so far
with fairly good councils. The members of the two bodies thai have been
so far elected in the city have worked
bard in tlie interests of the place and
have given really more of their time
to the work than most of them could
well spare from their own business.
If suspicions are to be cast upon
all the acts of the members Prince
Ruperl is going to find itself saddled with a council probably that will
not be composed of the best elements
in the community but by self seekers and those with axes to grind.
policy because I believe it will prevent entangling alliances with the
American Republic Our experience
so far with the Americans has not,
been very satisfactory. Since Mr.
Chamberlain has declared himself in
favor of a preference to the colonies
the Americans have begun to show
considerable anxiety for renewing reciprocal trade relations with us. I ]
have not quite forgotten the reasons :
why the reciprocity treaty negotiated
by Lord Elgin in 1S56 was so sum
niarily repealed in 1866. Neither is j
my judgment closed to the hostile
character of the Dingley Bill, by
which the American market was prac-
tically closed against the Canadian
manufacturers and farmers. In my
judgment the commerce of Canada
should never be placed at the mercy
of the United States Congress or of
any other nation."
IAN   RATE
The city council has struck Its
rate of taxation for the year and It
is gratifying to all that it is as low
as it is. A rate of 12 mills, which,
under the rebate system for prompt
payment, brings it down to a little
over 10 mills, is indeed a low rate
as compared with most of places. It
is true that there are local improvements rates to be added to this but
every other city has these so that
Prince Rupert's taxes will compare
very favorably with those of sister
cities, where it is quite usual to have
from 20 mills to 25 mills as the rate
for general taxation.
There has been a creditable economy shown by the council which will
be appreciated by all citizens at this
stage of the city's growth.
WATERWORKS PLANS
Construction of the Undertaking  Will
be Under the Direct Control of
the Whole Council.
If   Defined   Advisable  an   Executive
Committee May Be Named
to   Act
RESERVES,   HIS   DECISION
Sir Qeorge VV. Ross, former premier of Ontario, and still a great
authority in that province, has not
made a public deliverance on reciprocity during this campaign. Perhaps he wishes to save his political
friends from embarrassment, and
like Mr, Blake in 1891 Is hold is
holding back his manifesto until after
the votes are counted, lint Ihe people' know where he stands. Before
the treaty was made he strongly con-
demned reciprocity <• n Beveral occasions. Fur example, sir George used
the following words In an address to
the Canadian Club al Toronto:
"I   also   favor  Mr,  Chamberlain's
The city council will sit as a com
mittee of the whole In the handling
of the waterworks and hydro-electric
scheme for the city. This was decided upon at the council meeting on
Tuesday evening on the report of
the water and light committee, of
which Aid. Smith and Aid. Clayton
were the members present in the city,
Aid. Kerr being absent.
There has been some question
whether the carrying out of that
work would be put In the hands of
the public works department or in
the hands of the water and light com-
mitee, there being reasons for either
course. The water and light committee, however, propose a solution
which has met with favor and which
puts the work in the hands of the
whole council, it being suggested that
weekly sittings of the committee
shall be held.
The question came up on a request
made by tbe city engineer for various articles of equipment in order to
begin preparations for the installation of the new system. He set forth
that two additional engineers would
be required In order lo do the necessary work of survey at the lake. He
suggested thai orders should be
placed for the material that would
be required in the way of pipe, etc.,
and made the suggestion also that
work should start on the Acropolis
Hill reservoir. As to the pipe line,
he made' the suggestion that there
mlghl be a start made on the island
in Shawatlans Passage in bringing
the line Into the city. In this connection lie' reported Hint even before
the' last part of the pipe at Luke
Woodworth was In for conveying the
water to the point of separation tor
the two systems lie could, 111 case1 of
em emergency, put water Into the
lily ley utilizing the pump to be
pul   in   .Morse  Creek  at  Lake  Shaw
atlans and force water through the
mains laid to the city. ,
The Whole Council
The report of the water and light
committee based on this information
conveyed by the engineer recommends that the work should be under
the charge of a committee consisting
of the whole council, wliich might sit
weekly as the work progressed and
so conduct the affairs. If deemed advisable, the report further stated, an
executive committee could be appointed to deal with matters coming
up that required prompt attention.
During the discussion which followed Aid. Smith made it perfectly
clear that the water and light committee had made the report-It did in
view of the fact that it was felt that
there would be too great a demand
upon the time of the committee itself
to handle this work and that the
whole council might better have it
in charge.
Some objection was raised to the
idea of an executive committee
when the report was read. Aid. Douglas and Aid. Newton both favored the
whole council doing the work without an executive committee.
Executive' Committee
It was ljointed out by Aid. Smith
that the appointment of an executive
committee would allow quicker action in case of emergency than if
they waited for the whole council to
meet.
Aid. Douglas looked at it in a
different way. Aid. Smith no doubt
proposed to do it in a business way;
but he (Aid. Douglas) looked at
it from another way. He wanted
everything above board. He wanted
to have everything done in the open
council.
Aid. Smith took the last speaker
to task, stating that there was never
any intention of doing anything other
than above board.
Aid. Douglas said he nieajit to cast
no aspersions upon any one. As to
Aid. Simth, he was above suspicion.
Aid. Newton was opposed to the
proposal for an executive committee so as to avoid criticism. He believed this should be started out in
any open way. If lat* an executive
were necessary it could be added.
Paternal Capacity
Aid. Clayton made reference to the
paternal capacity in which. Aid. Douglas posed. Aid. Newton and Aid.
Douglas both admitted that this proposal of an executive committee was
a business proposition. This surely
should be a recommendation for the
public. He felt that the executive
committee could effect a saving of
time. Everything that the executive
did would have to be passed upon
later by the council as a whole.
His Worship pointed out that the
executive was not, according to the
report, a necessity. It was to be
appointed if foun d necessary and
would only be appointed when the
necessity arose.
Aid. Smith said that was his idea
in   connection  with   the  matter.
Aid.   Hilditch's   Views
Aid. Hilditch said that if he was
outside the council he would have
little respect for an alderman who
was afraid of what the public would
think. He believed in doing the work
in a businesslike way. He thought
the water committee could well handle this. Half of this $550,000 would
be for supplies. The works department had during the year the expenditure of about $600,000, of which
little was for supplies. This was not
such a large undertaking that the
committee could not attend to it. He
was not afraid of the criticism on
the outside.
Aid. Kirkpatrick felt very much of
the same mind. He ridiculed the
idea of having the work done by
the whole council in order that one
might watch the other. If such were
the purpose It was a foolish course
in lake. The council must bnve con-
ttdence in one another.
I'li'i- Talker
I luring i he further discussion Aid.
Douglas Intimated Hiat he was not
telling all he knew, to wliich Aid.
Hllditch replied, "I never knew Aid.
Douglas to have anything to tell that
he did not tell."
Aid.  Smith said he did not want
**************************
* *
* i
* *
^m t
*	
I _	
*
Remember
That we
Import
Our Wines
t direct from Europe;  and that
? no house in Prince Rupert can
* equal   them   for   quality.     No
* better can be bought anywhere
*
* in the Province.    We make a
.-. specialty  of
Family Trade
and guarantee satisfaction
We  also   carry  a  complete
stock of other
Liquors
Try a glass of
Cascade
Beer
X   market
The best local  beer on  the f
*
CLARKE BROS.!
* Christiansen & Brandt Bid.      *
X t
f ':
* Telephone 39       Third Avenue *
* *
* *
**************************
to shirk any work. If the council
did not want the work relegated to
the whole body his committee would
take it. He was actuated In moving
as he did because he felt he had not
the time personally to give to the
work the attention that it would
require provided the water committee had it in charge.
Aid. Clayton stood by the report
of his committee. The public by the
vote on Saturday had shown confidence in the bylaw and would, he
felt, surely approve of the whole
council handling the work.
Aid. Hilditch said the only way
to accomplish this was by going
about it in a businesslike way. He
did not care for the criticism of the
opponents of the council. It was
proved by the vote that the council
has the confidence of the people and
it was expected this would be carried out in a businesslike way.
The report finally passed as introduce, although Aid. Newton and Aid.
Douglas persisted in striking out the
reference to an executive committee.
 o —■
No  Insurance
Tlie city council, or the advice of
the city solicitor, has decided not to
Insure the new team of horses purchased recently anil now in use on
the streets. The policy proposed to
be Issued was not satisfactory Inasmuch as 11 specified Hint Ihe animals
were nol  to be exposed to danger,
which tlie solicitor Interpreted as an
Impossible tiling In a city like Prince
Rupert at the present time.
The British Columbia Company
LIMITED.
AUTHORIZED CAPITAL $100,000.::  PAID UP CAPITAL $41,800
DIRECTORS:—Reginald C. Brown, President; J. C. Maclure, Vice-
President; H. E. Marks, Managing Director; Capt. E. Naan, William
McNalr, R. A. Bevan, and P. C.   Williams, Secretary.      :-:      :-:
INTEREST 4 PER CENT. DEPOSITS
This Company acts as Executors, Administrators, Transferees and
Secretaries to Public Companies.   Commercial, Industrial and other
business propositions underwritten.    Issues  made  on  the
London and New York Stock Exchanges.
TIMBER, COAL, LANDS, and
COMPANY ORGANIZATION
Head Office for Canada, 208, 208, 210, 215 Carter-Cotton Building,
VANCOUVER, B.C.
The Staneland Co. Ltd
•IS THE-
Paint Supply House
of British Columbia
ALL GOODS ARE GUARANTEED
WRITE FOR PRICES AND SAMPLES
The Staneland Co. Ltd
836-840 Fort Street, VICTORIA, B.C.
W
The Graham Island Oil Fields, Limited.
CAPITAL   STOCK,   $1,000,000.00
We are offering for sale a very limited amount of shares of stock
25 CENTS PER SHARE;  PAR VALUE, $1.00
These shares are going quickly, and will soon be off the market
The Mack Realty & Insurance Co.
SELLING AGENTS
Replenish
the
Pantry
L.......
««.j
High-Class....
Grocery
Stock
to choose from
EVERYTHING CLEAN AND FRESH
Goods lor the Table to Suit the Most
Fastidious  Housewife
\ MERRYFIELD'S [
CASH GROCERY      \
——M........J
2nd Avenue
Prince Rupert,
B.C.
Real
Estate
INVESTMENTS
Real
Estate
List Your
Properties
with
Uncle Jerry
JEREMIAH H. KUGLER
He Sells Buildings He Sells Contracts
He has Houses to Rent
He Buys Lots He Builds Homes
He Buys Leases He Loans Money
He Has Farms for Sale
He Sells Houses He Rents Stores
JEREMIAH H. KUGLER
Special Bargains in
KITSELAS LANDS
FRANCOIS LAKE LANDS
LAKELSE LANDS
HAZELTON  DISTRICT "LANDS
SAND,   GRAVEL  AND  MARBLE   DEPOSITS
BULKLEY VALLEY. LANDS
KISPIOX VALLEY LANDS
PORCHER ISLAND LANDS
KITSUMKALUM   LANDS Friday, September 8, 1911.
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
TAX RATE IS FIXED
Low Taxation Has Been Struck By The
Council For the Year
1911
Estimated Expenditure  Under Various Departments With Recepts
Expected
The city council at a meeting held
on Wednesday afternoon passed the
estimate for the year, representing
an expenditure of $197,406.45, which
Includes the grant to the school
board and the hospital board. With
the assessment roll showing a total
value of real estate of $8,254,470 exclusive of all exemptions, the council
Struck a rate of 12 mills, which is
subject in part to a rebate of one-
sixth if paid within a specified time.
The rate was fixed at 9 mills for
general expenses, 2 mills for school
purposes and one mill for hospital
and board of health. With the discount on all except the school rate,
the taxes, if paid promtply ou the
date fixed, will be one 10 1-3 mills
on the dollars.
The estimates of receipts and expenditures for the year upon which
the rate was fixed ate as follows:
EXPENDITURE
CITY    CLERK    AND ' ASSESSOR'S
OFFICE
City elk., 12 in. at $150. .   $1,800.00
Accntnt., 12 m at $125. . .     1,500.00,
Stenog., 5 m at $90         450.00
Stenog.,   7   in  at  $75....        525.00
Auditor, 12 m at $40   ...        480.00
Auditor, 1910         500.00
Assessor and collector, 12
in  at  $150         1,800.00
Clerk, 12 m at $100     1,200.00
Clerk, 5 m at $90           450.00
Rent,  hall,  12  m at  $100     1,200.00
Fuel             250.00
Light             100.00
Water     25.00
Telephone         150.00
Advertising    printing   and
stationery        1,000.00
Postage and P.O. box rent       300.00
Telegrams         350.00
Bond premimums  80.00
Repairs  and  additions  to
building            300.00
Legal   expenses      2,500.00
Legal ex., arrears 1910. . .     1,000,00
Mayor and aldermen  ....     5,200.00
Interest          3,000.00
Incidentals         1,500.00
1 lineman, 7 m  770.00
Cleaning of boilers, etc . . 300.00
Coal, 1,050 tons at $8   . . 8,400.00
Maintenance of pole line. . 1,650.00
Maintenance   of  plant   . . 350.00
Interest    1,000.00
Contingencies  800.00
Extension    to    plant    and
pole line, including arc
lamp system, in addition
to   $66,000   authorized
by   bylaw     15,000.00
Total    $25,660.00
BOARD     OF     HEALTH     DEPARTMENT
Medical health officer . . .      $600.00
Sanitary inspector        1,140.00
Garbage scow  and  wharf    1,600.00
Contingencies, towing
scow,  etc         1,000.00
Hospital grant        5,000.00
Total   $34,390.00
FIRE   DEPARTMENT
Salaries-
Chief    1,800.00
Asst. chief, 6 m at $125 750.00
2 firemen at $90 each. . 2,160.00
Callmen      1,000.00
Chauffeur for fire aiito 870.00
Coal  125.00
Tools and sundry supplies 400.00
Fire auto and chemicals. . 7,850.00
Contingencies    500.00
Fire   hall   and   equipment 5,000.00
SHIPPING REPORT
Sept. 8—8 a. in.
Triangle—Fog; wind southeast, 8
miles; barometer, 29.23; temperature, 46;  dense fog.
Skidegate—Cloudy; light east
wind;  sea smooth.
Ikeda—Cloudy; wind east; barometer, 29.64; temperature, 56; sea
moderate.
Point Grey—Overcast; wind southeast; barometer, 29.87; temperature,
58.
Cape Lazo—Raining! wind southeast; barometer, 29.88; temperaure,
54;  sea smooth.
Invites Teeumsehs
President Con Jones of the Vancouver Lacrosse Club has wired Man-
lager Charlie Querrie of the Teeumsehs of Toronto, leaders in the Na
tional Lacrosse Union, an offer of
$4,000 for two games in Vancouver
on September 16 and 23. An eastern despatch asserts that the Teeumsehs were offered that amount for
one game, but President Jones declared that this was not correct. The
offer was contingent on Vancouver
winning from New Westminster on
Monday. Querrie, however, has announced that if the Teeumsehs win
the N. L. U. championship they will
come after the cup, so the chances
are bright for the Indians appearing on the Coast this fall.
—o-
Total    $20,455.00
ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT
Salaries— ,
Chief engineer      $5,000.00
Assistant engineer  ....     2,400.00
Second engineer      1,375.00
Chief draughtsman, 5 m
at  $150 and 7 m at
$108.33  .     1,508.33
Construction engineer, 5
m at $125 and 7m at
$150         1,675.00
Transltnian, 5m at $125
and 7 m at $100 ....     1,375.00
Transltnian, 5ni at $100
and 7 m at $108.33. .     1,258.33
2 draughtsmen, 5 m at
$90            9000.00
Asst. water works engineer. 5 m at $200  . .     1,000.00
Temporary  assistance. .     7,000.00
Total    $23,491.66
Less    proportion    chargeable   to   local   improvements,     water    works,    .
etc $19,991.66
Bal.,    gen.    revenue
Cost  completing  G.  T.  P.
plans    	
Accountant   	
Draughtsman,   gen.   work
Supplies   	
Total       $6,300.00
Sewerage
Repairs and inspection  . .     2,500.00
$3,500.00
200.00
1,000.00
1,000.00
600.00
Total     $2,500.00
Streets
Supt. of public works sal. $1,800.00
Maintenance of streets, labor and material    5,000.00
Rock crushes     3,250.00
Road  roller     3,100.00
Weigh  scales     500.00
Total        $9,340.00
SCHOOLS
Salaries     $10,500.00
Insurance   	
Light, water and fuel. . .
School  supplies   	
High school	
Scavenging  	
Gym., playground, etc.  .
Seats and furniture for
new rooms  	
Plank road  	
Contingencies 	
900.00
1,200.00
500.00
150.00
150.00
1,500.00
500.00
500.00
1,000.00
Total   $16,900.00
POLICE DEPARTMENT
Chief of police  $1,800.00
Police magistrate  1,200.00
Salaries, 3  constables   . . . 3,600.00
Salary,    1    constables    to
March 31    300.00
Jailor,  12  m  at $85     1,020.00
Speeial constables    2,500.00
Transportation   of   prisoners     1,000.0(1
Police equipment     100.00
Uniforms     250.011
Keep of prisoners  500.00
Light and fuel     275.01)
Incidentals     250.00
«e	
Total    $12,795.00
TELEPHONE  DEPARTMENT
Maintenance of pole line, in-   ,
struments,     exchanges,
ete	
Operation—
Salary,  manager   2   m  at
$160   	
Salary, manager, 10 m at
$100         1,000.00
Salary, wire chief         1,200.00
Salary troubleman      1,560.00
Salaries, 5 operators .... 3,550.00
Power, light, fuel, etc ... 450.00
Interest and sinking fund 3,814.45
Extensions to pole line . .
Contingencies,    collecting,
etc	
Total   $13,650.00
Water   Department   Pumping  Plants
Gasoline  for  engine   ....     1,800.00
Fuel      72.00
Oil, waste, etc    50.00
Engineer's salary         600.00
Asst.   engineer—nightman       420.00
Miscellaneous — labor    re
lower dam  pipeline etc.        240.00
Engineering    superintendence             235.00
Royals Win From Quill Drivers
In one of the best games of the
league series of indoor baseball last
evening at the rink the Royals won
from the Quill Drivers by the score
of  17-15.
THE CONTINENTAL TRUST COMPANY, LIMITED
Authorized Capital    $500,000
Officers:
WILLIAM T. KERGIN, M. D., Pres. DAVID   H.   HAYS,  First Vlcc-Pree.
M. J. HOBIN, 2nd Vice-Pres. & Mgr. JAY   KUGLER,   Secretary-Treasurer
C.  B. PETERSON, Ass't Manager
Executor and Administrator Receiver or Assignee
Fiscal Agents Trustees
Real Estate and Insurance
„    . . , „,        ,      .       . Farm  Lands and Mines
Registrar and Transfer Agent
Agent for Care of Real Estate Escrow Agents
Trustee Under Mortgages  and  Deeds of Trust Collection*
SAVINGS DEPARTMENT
4 per cent on Deposits        SAFE DEPOSIT VAULT AND BOXES
We will be pleased to answer any inquiries regarding investments In
Prince Rupert ami  Northern British Columbia,
THE CONTINENTAL TRUST COMPANY, LIMITED
SECOND AVENUE
PRINCE   RUPERT,  B.  C.
YOU ARE SURE OF
Engine  Reliability
IF  YOU  RUN A
Fairbanks - Morse Marine Engine
OVER 125,000 IN USE THROUGHOUT THE WORLD
TWO
CYCLE
FOUR
CYCLE
HEAVY
DUTY
MEDIUM
DUTY
Runabout
Type
MOST  COMPLETE  LINE OF GASOLINE ENGINES IN
THE WORLD
Write for Catalog P10
The Canadian Fairbanks Co., Ltd.
101-107 WATER STREET     •
Local Agent—F. M. DAVIS
VANCOUVER, B. C.
- PRINCE RUPERT
Total       $3,417.00
Hays  Creek  Water Works
Salaries—
Foreman       $1,440.00
Assistant             600.00
Services,    repairs,    extensions, hydrants, etc....     5,000.00
Dam—Supervision,   maintenance           500.00
Engineering    superintendence             525.00
Total    $11,482.00
Morse Creek  Water Works
Morse Creek water works.   $5,000.00
City Hall
City hall    $15,000.00
Surveying Cemetery site mnl  Building Roadway lo Cemetery
Brectlng   wharf  nnd  constructing    roadway    to
same       $7,000.00
400.00
320.00
3,740.00
900.00
Total   $16,934.45
LIGHT AND POWER DEPARTMENT
Salaries—
Supt., 11 m at $100 . ..   $1,100.00
Chief engineer        1,375.00
Second  engineer         1,265.00
2 firemen        2,200.00
Total   expenditures   $197,406.45
RECEIPTS
Cash on hand, January 1,
1911    . .  $1S,292.20
General taxes, current . . 100,130.70
General taxes, arrears . . 21,000.00
Police court fines    2,500.00
Liquor licences  9,233.55
Bar tenders' licences . . . 250.00
Trade licences    5,000.00
Dox taxes    200.00
Road taxes    1,500.00
Building permits     250.00
Sewer connections  150.00
Sewer rentals   750.00
Govt, grant to schools. . 3,000.00
Telephone rentals    17,000.00
Water rates    , 10,000.00
Water connections  150.00
Light and Power receipts 8,000.00
Total receipts $197,406.45
 0	
Mr. Wade returned to the city today by the Princess Beatrice. He
was accompanied by his father and
his sister.
IN THE COUNTY COURT OF ATLIN
HOLDEN AT PRINCE RUPERT
In the matter of "Official Administrators  Act"
And
In the matter of the estate of Patrick
Kennedy deceased intestate.
TAKE NOTICE that by order of
His Honor Judge Young, made the
17th day of June 1911, I was appointed administrator of the estate
of the said Patrick Kennedy, deceased, and all parties having claims
against the said estate are hereby
required to forward same properly
verified to me on or before the 4th
day of September, 1911; and all
parties indebted to the said estate
are required to pay the amount of'
their indebtedness to me forthwith.
Dated August 18, 19.11.
J. A. FRASER,
Official Administrator.
Atlin, B.  C.
IX THE COUNTY COURT OF ATLIN
HOLDEN AT PRINCE RUPERT
111  the  matter of the "Official  Administrator's Act"
And
In the matter of the estate of George
McLeod deceased Intestate.
TAKE NOTICE that by order of
His Honor Judge Young, made the
28th day of July, 1911, I was appointed administrator of the estate
of the said George McLeod deceased,
and all parties having claims against
tlie said estate are hereby required
to forward same properly verified to
me on or before the 4th day of September, 1911; and all parties indebted to the said estate are required to
pay the amount of their indebtedness
to me  forthwith.
Dated August IS, 1911.
JOHN II. McMULLIN,
official Administrator.
Prince Rupert, B. 0.
IX THK COUNT!' COURT OF ATLIN
HOLDEN AT PRINCE RUPERT
In  the matter of the "Official Administrator's Act"
And
In the matter of the estate of John
Bowman deceased intestate.
TAKE  NOTICE  that  by  order  of
His  Honor  Judge  Young,  made  the
16th day of June, 1911, I was appointed  administrator of  the estate
of the said John Bowman deceased,
and all parties having claims against
the said estate are hereby required
to forward same properly verified to
me on or before the 4th day of September, 1911; and all parties Indebted to the said estate are required to
pay  the  amount  of their  Indebtedness to me forthwith.
Dated August 18, 1011,
JOHN  H.   McMULLIN,
Official Administrator.
Prince Rupert, B. C.
IN    THE    SUPREME    COURT    OF
BRITISH  COLUMBIA
In the matter of the "Official Ad-'
minlstrator's Act"
And
In   the   matter   of   the   estate   of
Thomas Smith deceased Intestate.
TAKE NOTICE that by order of
His Honor Judge Lampman, made
the 16th day of August, 1911, I was
appointed administrator of the estate
of the said Thomas Smith deceased,
and all parties having claims against
the said estate are hereby required
to forward same properly verified to
me on or before the 4 th day of September, 1911; and ah parties indebted to the said estate are required to
pay the amount of their indebtedness
to me forthwith.
Dated August 18,  1911.
JOHN H. McMULLIN,
Official Administrator.
Prince Rupert, B. C.
Double Weekly Service
S.S. PRINCE RUPERT & S.S. PRINCE CE0RGE
Sail for Vancouver, Victoria and Seattle
Mondays and Fridays at 8 a.m.
For STEWART Thursdays 8 a.m.
S.S.
Naas  River,  Masset and
and for Queen Charlotte
PRINCE   JOHN   for   Port   Simpson
Naden  Harbor,   Wednesdays, 1P.M
Island  points,   Saturdays, 1  P.M.
RAILWAY SERVICE TO COPPER    RIVER,    mixed     trains from
Prince   Rupert   Wednesdays and  Saturdays,  1   P.M.;   returning  Thursdays   and   Sundays,  5:20 P.M.
THE GRAND TRUNK RAILWAY SYSTEM, connecting with
trains from the Pacific Coast, operates a frequent and convenient
service of luxurious trains over its DOUBLE TRACK route between
Chicago, Toronto, Montreal, Quebec, Halifax, Portland, Boston.
New York and Philadelphia.
Atlantic Steamship bookings arranged via all lines
Full information and tickets obtained from the office of
A. E. McMASTER
Freight and Pasenger Agent, G. T.  P. Wharf.
ft
^-^
Low Rates! Finest Equipment!
Eastern Excursions
Only a few dates left.   Final return limit Oct. 31, 1911
For full particulars apply to J. G. McNAB, Gen. Agent, 6th St.
*St *•* "I* *5* •*•* *$- *2* *!• *** *£* *\* *»* *•* "S* •J* "J1 *»* •8t •J* •S* *S* *!* •5* •*♦■* *■** *■*
STORAGE
*
Household Goods and Baggage *
given careful attention. *
Forwarding,   Distributing   and *
Shipping Agents T
TRANSFERERS t
Rupert     Warehousing *:•
*
st'I
DOUGLAS SUTHERLAND,      I j
Manager.
O. Box 007 Phone 202
Prince
and   Forwarding   Co.
First  Ave.,   near   McBride
TO  WATER  TAKERS
On account of scarcity of water
the supply will be cut off between
the hours of 9 p. m. and 5 a. m.
during the dry weather.
WM.   MAHLON   DAVIS,
tf Supt. of Water Works.
The Thompson
Hardware Co.
* »j* »j* *j« >j« »*» »j* * j »j« »
i* *j« »jt »*« a *ji •** tj« *j» »j« •** »*« »j«
TENDERS WANTED
-Second Avenue
Paints General Hardware,
Oils, Stoves and Ranges.
Sealed tenders will be received by
the Building Committee of me Methodist Church of Prince Rupert, B. C,
until 12 o'clock noon, August 22nd,
1911, for the erection and completion of a Church building, to be
erected on Sixth Avenue, in the City
of Prince Rupert, B. C, according
to plans and specifications prepared
by G. L. Proctor, architect, Prince
Rupert. A certified check, equal to
ten (10) per centum of the amount
of the tender drawn in favor of the i
Treasurer or Trustee Board, which I
will be forfeited If the party tendering dei'llnes lo niter into a contract
when called upon to do so; or if he
or his heirs or executors fail to complete the contract. The lowest or
any other tender not necessarily
accepted.
Plans and specifications may be
seen at the office of P, McLaughlin,
Third Avenue, after noon, Tuesday,
Augusl  16th, 1911,
Excursions!
Let us tell you all about the cheap
ROUND TRIP EXCURSIONS
to all Towns and  Cities in Eastern
Canada and  United  States
Via
The Great Northern
Choice of Return  Route
Tickets to the Old Country by all
Lines. Take any Steamer from
Prince Rupert.
ROGERS STEAMSHIP AGENCY
Phone 110 Second Ave
Prince Rupert, B.C.
GRAND HOTEL
WORKWOMAN'S HOME
Spring Beds, Clean ORr
White Sheets    -    •    &OK
Rooms 50 Cents
Best In Town for the Money
FIRST AVE. AND SEVENTH ST.
J. Goodman, Proprietor
Free Employment
Office
Job   Printing  of  all   kinds   neatly
executed at the Journal Office.
.;..;..;..;. * * * * * * * *.;
**********
*
GROUND
Floor Space For Rent
IN THE
HART BUILDING
Corner of Second Avenue and Sixth Street
The Best Business Corner in
Prince Rupert
For all kinds of help. Cooks, waiters, dishwashers, hotel porters, all
kimls of laborers or mechanics, call
up 178 or call nt  the
FREE EMPLOYMENT OFFICE
GRAND HOTEL
Readquarters for Cooks and Walters
ROGERS & BLACK
Wholesale Dealers in
BUILDING  MATERIAL.     CEMENT,
LIME,  HAIR-FIBRE PLASTER
COKE,  BLACKSMITH  COAL,
COMMON BRICK, PRESSED BRICK
SHINGLES AND LATH
NEW   WELLINGTON   COAL
All   orders   promptly   filled—see   us
for prices.
PHONE 110 PHONE lie
Jermiah H. Kugler, Ltd.
*+**+*+*+++********♦<• {•*****++++*-s-** ********** ********
r
For Neat Job Printing
nee the Journal Man
Tel. 138
J
H PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Friday, September 8, 1911.
*-*$• ■*> <« •> •*> •> <* <• *> *> -fr *> ♦ ■*> »> •> •> * -> ♦ v *> *> ♦;• -> *
<$• •>
I Moroccan Trouble f
* *
* *• * * * * ** * * * * * * * * *' * * * * * * * * * *
Again, after four centuries, tbe
affairs of Spain are centring in the
lands of the Moors, across the Strait
of Gibraltar. Morocco is most intimately a Spanish problem, although
it probably is more importantly a
pan-European problem.
Spain holds several small coastal
cities in the territory of Morocco,
chief among them being Ceuta, in
plain view of Gibraltar across the
narrowest part of the Strait, and
Melilla, farther to the east. Ceuta
is simply a Spanish port, but at
Melila the Spanish claim a "sphere
of influence" in the hinterland which
amounts io an assertion of suzer-
alnty over the Riff tribes lhat inhabit the region. Spanish capitalists
operate mines in the Melilla country.
The Riff tribesmen objected to the
operations, and two years ago a Spanish army invaded Morocco and subdued the natives. The war was so
unpopular at home that it led to
the riots in Barcelona and to the
overthrow of the Conservative government. Tlie present Madrid government recognizes clearly that
Spanish national intersts demand the
participation of Spain in every diplomatic movement concerning Morocco and that at the same time every
act on the part of the ministry will
involve the danger of a domestic
revolution, perhaps merely political,
possibly  one of blood.
Unique Among Nations of West
.Morocco is unique among the nations of the West. Its sovereign is
a sultan, who rules over the Shereef-
ian Empire with the absolute authority of civil and religious supremacy.
Unlike all other Moslem monarchs of
the present day, who must recognize
the religious authority of the Sheik-
ul-Islam, the sultan of Morocco is
the head of the faith as well as of
the state. The present sultan, Mulai
Hafid, is the lineal descendant in
the thirty-sixth generation of AH,
uncle and son-in-law of the Prophet
.Mohammed. He came to the throne
by virtue of leading a successful revolt against his brother, Mulai Abel-
el-Aziz, having had himself proclaimed suhtan of the City of Morocco,
the southern capital of the empire,
in August, 1907. Six months 'ater
he was acknowledged in Fez, the
northern capital, and a year later
in Tangiers, the diplomatic capital.
In January, 1&09, he was formerly
recognized by the Powers upon his
obligating himself to respect the engagements entered into by his predecessors and the provisions of the Act
of Algeclras.
.Morocco occupies the northwestern corner of tne continent of Africa,
and is known to its people as Magh-
rlb-el-Aska, or "The Extreme West."
It is nearly as large as the State of
Texas, and although a great part of
its area is desert, it supports a population of about 5,000,000 people, a
great, many of whom are nomads
without fixed habitation. The people are Berbers, Bedouins and Arabs
by racial descent, and there are also
a great many Jews and negroes. Pez-
the principal capital of the sultan,
has a population of 140,000; Tangiers, the principal seaport, has
about 35,000. The country annually
exports about $13,000,000 of products, chiefly barley, cattle, wool,
Hides, Morocco leather and poultry.
It sends more than $1,000,000 worth
of eggs each year to the European
markets. And all this in spite of a
total lack of government or modern
transportation   facilities.
The Act of Algeclras was the outcome of a conference of the Powers
called to consider the problems of
Morocco, internal as well as external.
Early in 1904 a series of conventions
entered into by the British and
French government ended several issue's In ellspiilc and established the
niuili-dlsi'iissed Franco-British entente cordials, chief among the considerations of this practical alliance
were the abandonment of all French
pretensions to predominant Influence
In Egypl and the Upper Nile country,
and a reciprocal acknowledgement
■ em the part of Greal Britain of the
supremacy of French Influence In
Northwestern Africa, Including the
Moorish coasts and hinterland. Nobody raised any objections at tlie
time.
Eleven months later, the military
power of France's ally, Russia, in the
meantime having been destroyed by
Japan, the German emporer, on a
yachting cruise in tlie Mediterranean,
landed in Tangiers and made a spectacular speech, recognizing the complete and absolute independence of
his Shereefian majesty Abel-el-Aziz.
Powers Sinn Act of Algeclras
The kaiser's speech was followed
by such aggressive activity ou the
pari of the German government lhat
the French minister of foreign affairs was forced to resign under most
humiliating circufstances. The Germans called for an international conference to decide the status of Mo-
THE
PRINCE RUPERT
JOURNAL
Office  is equipped   for all  kinds of
Job Work*.     Prompt attention given
to all orders,   and  work handled by
the most competent printers.
rocco, and the ultan supplemented
the call with an invitation for the
delegates to assemble in Tangiers.
But the Moorish hotels are not very
good, and therefore the conference
assembled on January 15, 1906, at
Algeclras, in Spain, a port on the
coast of the Strait of Gibraltar at
which three different Moorish armies
had landed to effect the conquest of
Spain in the days when the crescent
was bright. After several weeks of
discussion the Act of Algeclras was
drawn up and signed by the Powers.
This act provided for the reform of
tne internal affairs of Morocco and
for the uniform treatment of European  investors.
The overthrow of the then reigning sultan . his brother was not
recognized until the new monarch
obligated himself to respect the Act
of Algeciras. But in fact the act
has not been worth the parchment
on which it is written. Mulai Hafid
has flouted it by giving a German
firm, the Mannesbann Brothers, a
blanket mining concession that laps
over and invalidates all other mining concessions. Germany has flouted it by seizing the port of Agadir,
on the western coast, near enough to
Gibraltar to be a menace to the Englishmen. France has flouted it persistently and quietly, pusing westward the line of its Algerian settlements. Spain has flouted it by extending its sphere of influence hack
to .Melilla and by seizing Alcazar.
As a matter of fact, every one of the
European nations want a slice of Morocco, with its rich mineral deposits
its productive herds and flocks and
the  possibilities  of  its  grain  fields.
 o— •
CAR OVER GROWS NEST
Remarkable   Run   From   Calgary  lo
Cranbrook, II. <".. of
Motor Car
The tremendous progress being
made le.v the manufacturers of automobiles In perfecting the construction of their machines to meet the
roughest and most difficult road conditions has again been forcibly illustrated uy the trip from Calgary, Alta.,
to Cranbrook, B. C, made July 10-
11, 1911, in an Everitt touring car,
the property of R. H. Bohart of Wardner, B. C, and driven by W. II.
Einert.
The route traversed lends through
.MacLeod, Pincher . Creek, Crow's
Nest, Fernie, Elko, Wardner and
Cranbrook, and comprises 323 miles
of assorted road, Including mud, rock
and corduroy. The consumption of
gasoline was 25 gallons, or one gallon to every 18 miles; of oil, 3 1-2
gallons, while the total running time
of 19 hours for the entire distance
completes the record of a most remarkable run.
The car in this case was an all-
Canadian   Everitt,   made   in   Orlllin,
Ont., by the Tudhope Motor Co., and
rated at 30-horse power. The fact
that no tire troubles were experienced shows the excellence of the Canadian product, with which all Tudhope cars are supplied. In speaking of this tour, Mr. S. H. Roe, manager of the Calgary agency of the
Everitt, says:
"This is the first car that even
went over the pass on its own power.
Two others got across, but had to
be towed over the summit with
teams. With due consideration of
the fact that these cars are rated as
of much greater horse-power, the
showing made on this occasion is sufficient to convince any fair minded
person that in the Everitt we have a
car that is thoroughly reliable, with
plenty of power for work in a mountainous district, one that is simple
and economical of operation, both
as to tire wear and consumption of
gasoline and oil, and, when price is
considered, the superior of any car
on the market."
SCRIBNER'S   MAGAZINE*
In Scribner's Magazine for September General Funston continues his
narrative of fighting and adventure
with the most thrilling incident of
his Philippine experiences. He describes the battle of Calumplt and
the famous swimming of the Rio
Grande River, which secured for him
and two of his regiment the Congressional Medal of Honor. ■
James Ford Rhodes reviews in historical perspective and with clear
judgment the Republican National
Conventions of 1SS0 and 1884 which
nominated respectively Garfield and
Blaine.
Ralph U. Paine contributes a description of the picturesque and
amusing features of "The Waterside, of Antwerp." lie wiM in later
numbers describe Hamburg and the
Port of Loudon.
Frederick McCormick, who has
been a newspaper representative in
Pekln for a number of years, writes
an Illuminating review of "America
and the China Loan."
Kenyon Cox, the eminent artist
and critic, contributes another analysis of modern art, with special reference to its weakness in "Design."
Mrs. Wharton's vivid serial of New
England life reaches in this number
a tragic situation told with dlrect-
noss  and  simplicity.
F. Hopkinson Smith's serial, "Kennedy Square," which has been one
of the successes of the year, is con-
luded  in  this number.
The short stories; "The Trick-
Doctor," by Thomas Nelson Page.
"The Rubber Stamp," by Georgia
Wood Pangborn.
"Under the 'Penobscot's' Bow," by
•lolin II. Walsh—a story of the
workers in the navy yard on  Puget
J. L. PARKER
MINING ENGINErR
Prince Rupert, B. C.
Open for Consultation and Mine
Examination
Temporary Address:—
Prince Rupert Inn
FREDERICK PETERS, K. C.
Barrister, Solicitor and Notary Public
Office in
EXCHANGE BLOCK
WM. S. HAuL, L. D. S. O. D. S.
:■:   DENTIST   :-:
Crown and Bridge Work a specialty
All dental operations skillfully
treated. Gas and local anaesthetlce
administered for the painless extraction of teeth. Consultation free.
Offices, Helgerson Bk., Prince Rupen
NICKERSON-ROER1G COMPANV
CUSTOMS AND MERCHANDISE
—o—-
Brokers, Forwarding Agents,
Storage, etc.
J. W. POTTER
ARCHITECT    AND     STRUCTURAL
ENGINEER
Re-inforced Concrete a Specialty
—o—
Law-Butler Building - Prince Rupert
HAYNOR  BROS.
FUNERAL  DIRECTORS
and
PROFESSIONAL   EMBALMERS
DR.  W.  B.  CLAYTON
DENTIST
Office  in    the   Westenhaver   Block
Over  Orme's  Drug   Store.
Prince Rupert
 LADYSMITH	
COAL
ROCHESTER & MONROE, Phone 116
THE WESTHOLME LUMBER GO.
LIMITED
We handle all kinds of
Building Supplies
First Avenue Telephone 180
Corner Eighth and Fraser Streets
Clinton Rooms
Newly   remodelled   and    furnished
Board   and   lodging.   Home cooking
a specialty.    Mrs.  Anderson, Prop.
Rooms, $3 Per Week
New Knox Hotel
ARTAUD & BESNER
Proprietors
The New Knox Hotel is run on the
European plan. FIrst-clas service.
All the latest modern Improvements
THE BAR keeps only the best
brands of liquors and cigars.
THE CAFE Is open from 6.30 a.m.
to 8 p.m. Excellent cuisine; first-
class service.
Board, $1 a Day — Beds, 50c and dp
First Avenu"   Prince Rupert
Skeena   Land   District — District   of
Queen  Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Harry Martin, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
artist, Intends to npply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted two and one-half miles
norlh of the northeast corner of Lot
993; tlience east 80 chains; thence
norlh 80 chains; thence west SO
chains; thence south 80 chains, to
the point of commencement; containing 040 acres, more or less.
HARRY MARTIN.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated July 31, 1911.
Skeeua   Land   uistrict — District  of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Allan Orr, of
Masset, B. C, occupation carpenter,
Intends to apply for permission to
purchase . the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted three and one-half miles north
and one mile wect from the northwest corner of Lot 992; thence west
80 chains; tlience north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence south
80 chains, to point of commencement;  containing 640 acres.
ALLAN ORR.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated July 31, 1911.
Sound,
Montgomery Schuyler discusses in
the field of art "Stray Statues" which
are wrongly placed, that that their
full meaning and association are forgotten.
Skeena   Land   uistrict — District   of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Burton Vivian
Brewer, of Vancouver, occupation
clerk, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about two miles north
from the nortv.east corner of Lot
993; thence west 80 chaiis; 'thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains, to
point of commencement; containing
640   acres.
BURTON VIVIAN BREWER.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated July 31,  1911.
Skeena   Land   District — District   of
Queen     ..arlbtte Islapds
TAKE NOTICE that Edgar J.
Young, of Vancouver B. C, occupation painter, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing nt a
post planted two and one-half miles
north of the northeast corner of Lot
993; thence west 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence south 80 chains; containing 640  acres.
EDGAR J. YOUNG.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated July 31, 1911,
Skeena   Land   District — District   of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Margaret
Merrill, of Chicago, Illinois, U.S.A.,
occupation housewife, intends to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about three
miles west, and one-half mile north
from the southwest corner of Lot
991; tbence west 40 chains; thence
south 60 chains; thence east 40
chains; thence nortli 60 chains, to
point of commencement; containing
240 acres, more or less.
MARGARET MERRILL.
George S. Maver, Agent.
Dated August 7, 1911.
Skeena   Land   District — District   of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Arthur W.
Nelson, of Chicago, Illinois, U.S.A.,
occupation clerk, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 3 miles west and
one-half mile north from the southwest corner of Lot 991; thence east
SO chains; thence south 60 chains;
thence west SO chains; thence north
60 chains, to point of commencement; containing 480 acres, more or
less. ARTHUR W. NELSON.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated August  I, 1911.
Skeena   Land   District — District   of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Frank Gray,
of Blair, Nebrasaka, U.S.A., occupation farmer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 2 miles west and
Vm mile north from the southwest
corner of Lot 991; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south
80 chains, to point of commencement;  containing 640 acres.
FRANK  GRAY.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated July 29,  1911.
Skeena   Land   District — District   of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Wirt A.
Stevens, of Chicago, Illinois, U.S.A.,
occupation civil engineer, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about two
miles west and one and one-half
miles north from the southwest corner of Lot 991; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south
80 chains, to point of commencement;   containing 640 acres.
WIRT A.  STEVENS.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated July 29, 1911.
Skeena   Land   District — District   of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Christina Orr,
of Masset, B. C, occupation housewife, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted about four miles west and tliree
and one-half' miles north from the
northwest corner of Lot 992; thence
west 80 chains; thence north 80
chains; thence east SO chains; thence
south 80 chains, to point of commencement; containing 640 acres.
CHRISTINA ORR.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated August 7,  1911.
Skeena   Land   Uistrict — District   of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Ellen Ives, of
.Massel, B, C, occupation housewife,
Intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted about four miles west and tliree
nnd one-half miles north from the
northwest corner of Lot 992; thence
east SO chains; thence north SO
chains; thence west 80 cliains; tlience
south 80 chains, to point of commencement; containing 640 acres.
ELLEN IVES.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated August 7, 1911.
Skeena   Land   District — District   of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Joseph C.
Merrill, of Chicago, Illinois, U.S.A.,
occupation retired, Intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about four and
one-half miles west and one-half mile
north from the southwest corner of
Lot 991; thence north 20 chains;
thence west 60 chains, more or less,
to the Ain River; thence following
shore of river In a southerly and
easterly direction to point of commencement; containing 120 acres,
more or less.
JOSEPH   C.   MERRILL.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated August 2.  1911.
Skeena   Land   District — District   of
Coast, Range v.
TAKE NOTICE that Alice Munro,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted on the west shore of
Lakelse Lake and about one and one-
half miles distant in a southwesterly direction from the southwest
corner of Lot 39S2, Skeena Land
District, District of Coast, Range 5;
tlience west 40 chains; thence north
40 chains; thence east 60 chains,
more or less to the shore of Lakelse
Lake; thence following the shore of
said lake to point of commencement;
containing 200 acres, more or less.
ALICE MUNRO.
Dated  August   12,  1911.
Skeena   Land   District — District   of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Norman
Hurst, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation clerk, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about three and one-
half miles north and one mile west
from the northwest corner of Lot
992; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains thence south 80 chains, to
point of eomniencement; containing
640 acres. NORMAfJ HURST.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated July 31, 1911.
Skeena   Land   District — District   of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that C. Verne
Brewer, of Vancouver, occupation
clerk, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described Iands:—Commencing at a
post planted three and one-half miles
nortjf and one mile west from the
northwest corner of Lot 992; thence
east SO chains; thence south 8*
chains; thence west SO chains; thence
north 80 chains, to point of commencement; containing 640 acres.
C. VERNE BREWER.
George S. Mayer, Ag«nt.
Datedo July 31, 1911.
Skeena   Land   District — District   of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that John Henry,
of Vancouver, occupation contractor,
intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described
lands:—Commencing at a post planted two and one-half miles north of
the northwest corner of Lot 992;
thence west SO chains; thence south
40 chains; thence east 80 chains;
thence north 40 chains, to point of
commencement; containing 320 acres.
JOHN HENRY.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated July 31,  1911.
Skeena   Land   District — District   of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that William Robert Little, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation mason, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about two and one-half
miles north from the northwest corner of Lot 992; tlience east 80
chains; thence south 40 chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence north
40 chains, to point of commencement;   containing  320  acres.
WILLIAM ROBERT LITTLE.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated July 31,  1911.
Skeena  Land   District — District  of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Fred Jackson,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation painter, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
Iands:—Commencing at a post planted about two miles north from the
northeast corner of Lot 993; thence
west 80 chains thence north 40
chains; thence.east 80 chains; tlience
south 40 chains, to point of commencement; containing 320 acres.
FRED JACKSON.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated July 31, 1911.
Skeena  Land   District — District   of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Stanley Hol-
brook, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation clerk, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about two miles north
from the northeast corner of Lot
993; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 40 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south 40 chains, to
point of commencement; containing
320 acres.
STANLEY HOLBROOK.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated July 31, 1911.
Skeena   Land   District — District   of
Queen Charlotte Islands
TAKE NOTICE that Patrick O'Connor, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
foreman, intends lo apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about two miles north
from tlie northeast comer of Lot
993; thence cast SO chains; thence
south SO chains; thence west 80
chains; thence north 80 chains, to
point of commencement; containing
640    acres.
PATRICK O'CONNOR.
George S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated July 31, 1911.
Skeena   Land   District — District  of
Coast, Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that William H.
Hargrave, of Vancouver, B. C., occupation banker, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted on tbe west shore of
Lakelse Lake, and about one and one-
half miles distant In a southerly
direction from the southwest corner
of Lot 3982, Skeena Land District,
District of Coast, Range 5; thence
40 chains west; thence 8u chains
south, more or less, to the shore of
Lakelse Loke; thence following the
shore of said lake to point of commencement; containing 160 acres,
more or less.
WILLIAM H. HARGRAVE.
Dated  August  12,  1911. Friday, September 8, 1911.
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
TRIBUTARY COUNTRY
Hon. Thomas Taylor Expresses His Views
With Respect to the Great
Interior.
G. T. P. Will Open  l*p a Rich Area
According to the Minister of
Public Works
THEOLOGICAL  COLLEGE
Anglican Church  Decides Upon Line
of Action With Regard to
Education in Theology
"It wl'l not be so many years before there will be hundreds of thousands of acres under cultivation in
Northern British Columbia if natural
development, now well inaugurated,
is permitted to continue," says Hon.
Thomas Taylor, provincial minister
of public works and railways, who
has just returned to Victoria from an
extended tour through Yale and Carl-
boo. "There are vast areas well
adapted for agricultural utlization in
the vicinity of Fort George, as well
as farther to the west around Stuart
and the Fraser Lakes and In the
Bulkley Valley, and settlers of the
right sort are giving them their attention and coming in prepared to
make their permanent homes on the
land and aid in the upbuilding of
Britisii Columbia."
Hon. Mr. Taylor speaks from recent personal observation, not from
hearsay or report. He has but just
been on the ground, inspecting the
progress of improvements now being
carried out by his department in the
Nicola and Cariboo sections. The
appropriations this year for roads
and bridges in Cariboo exceed $150,-
000, while the Yale district, in which
is included the Nicola Valley, the
amount totals approximately $85,000.
/'Good Roads Taylor" since entering the government of Premier McBride has conscientiously made it a
point to visit the various sections of
the province once or more in each
year, to see for himself how the public money is being expended and
wherein further expenditures may
promote more rapid and satisfactory
industrial growth. Leaving this city
on the tour just completed on the
9th instant the minister first proceeded to the Nicola Valley, where
many important Improvements are
being carried forward. He found
conditions in the valley exceptionally'
good. There has been quite an influx of settlers this year, and much
quiet development Is going on. He
found the coal mines of Merritt
working to capacity, and the town
exceedingly prosperous. His trip extended as far soutli as Aspen Grove,
where he visited a well stocked ranch
in company with one of its owners,
George A. Fraser of Victoria. Mr.
Taylor greatly admired many of Mr.
Fraser's thoroughbred horses.
On reaching Quesnel he was
joined by John A. Fraser, M.L.A., for
that riding. They then took steamer up the Fraser to Fort George, visiting many intermediate points to inspect Improvements. The numerous
roads aud trails under construction
will greatly increase the existing
transportation facilities and aid settlers In bringing in stock and supplies.
"I was much impressed with the
improved look of Quesnel, as well
as other places along the road and
steamboat route since my last visit
two years ago," said Mr. Taylor.
"The country around Fort George
as far as the eye can reach is open
and well adapted for raising hay and
grain and for ranching.
Future  of   Nechaco
".Settlement thus far has been limited, owing to lack of transportation
facilities, but all this will soonn be
changed. 1 look to see that region,
as well as the Nechaco Valley, peopled by thousands of farmers. The
soil is rich, and the elevation not too
high, ensuring freedom from summer frosts. This is indicated by the
good crops secured by pioneer settlers. I was pleased to observe that
quite a number of fruit trees are
thriving and promise to yield good
crops when they reach a further
stage of growth. The fertility of
the soil was evidenced by the remarkable growth of wild berries all along
the route.
"I visited Fort George and South
Fort George, midway between which
on the Hudson Bay reserve my department recently completed a temporary government office. The final
location of the office will depend on
future development. The opening of
the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway will
' greatly stimulate the establishment
of an important business ce'ntre In
that   vicinity."
_ o	
"The clinging type of girls is disappearing."
"Yes; modern woman, with her
numerous hatpins, is more like a cactus than a vine."
 o— ■
"There goes Spriggins. They say
that man has been given up by half
3. dozen doctors."
"What's the trouble with him?"
"He won't pay his bills."
At the call of the Bishop of Columbia, as senior bishop, the bishops of the province and the representatives of the several dioceses appointed to deal with the question of
the Anglican Theological College met
in St. Paul s schoolroom in the city
of Vancouver on Thursday, August 24. On motion of the Bishop
of New Westminster, seconded by the
Bishop of Caledonia, the chair was
taken by the Bishop of Columbia.
The Rev. C. R. Littler was elected
secretary.
The bishops of the several dioceses
and the following clerical and lay
representatives were present:
Diocese of Columbia—Ven. Archdeacon Scriven, Rev. H. A. Collison,
Messrs. Crotty, Wollaston and Beaumont Boggs.
Diocese of New Westminster—Ven.
Archdeacon Pentreath, Rev. C. C.
Owen, Rev. H. F. G. Clinton, Chancellor Dunbar Taylor and Messrs. A.
McCreery and J. R. Seymour.
Diocese of Caledonia—Ven. Archdeacon Col'ison, Revs. Canon Keen
and W. H. Vance, Messrs. Cambie,
Clark and Cowan.
Diocese of Kootenay—Revs. T.
Greene, C. A. Procunler and C. R.
Littler, Chancellor Crease and Geo.
Johnstone.
After full consideration and discussion of various amendments the
plan of the three bishops as presented to the various synods was
amended and adopted as follows:
There shall be an Anglican Theological College of Britisii Columbia,
with a board of governors, consisting of Ihe bishops of the several
dioceses of the province, and If tt
prove absolutely necessary to establish separate halls, the heads of such
halls ex-officio, and also three clerical and tliree lay members representing each diocese of the province,
elected in such manner as the several dioceses may determine. The
board of governors shall at its annual meeting elect a chairman, who
shall also be president of the Anglican Theological College. Vacancies
among the elected member of this
board of governors shall be filled by
the respective bishops till the next
meeting of the synod of the diocese.
SCHOOL INSPECTORS
Changes in the Department of Education Relative to the
Coast District
****** ** * ******************
%     FASHIONS HEAD GEAR      I
* *
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Bamboo hats have lately masqueraded as the real Panama article
and have been found to surpass these
both In utility and beauty. The fact
is that the much lauded Panama
product exists more in faction than
in reality; that is, the extremely fine
grade is scarcely to be had at all.
The bamboo sails under the name of
Panama since some time past and
not one in a hundred knows the difference. .
It is expected and probable that
the United States agricultural bureau will do everything to pneourage
the new industry of manufacturing a
superior grade of bamboo hats in the
Philippine Islands. A Frenchman,
the first to give the matter serious
attention, has established himself
near Batavia, in Java, and is doing
a flourishing business. He already
has a demand for the goods for the
export trade which far exceeds his
manufacturing capacity.
The raw material, the bamboo, receives considerable care. It is cut
at the time it has almost reached its
maturity, but still is green. It must
be handled with extreme care, for
the slightest blow bruises the sap,
and produces an ineffaceable blotch
of spot. On this account the bamboo is never hauled by rail or wagon,
but cut and carried by the natives
directly from the field to the factory.
Here the rather hard surface is
peeled off with specially shaped
knives. The bamboo is then exposed
for two days to the heat of the sun
and for twenty-four hours to the
heavy night dews. This seasons the
material sufficiently to permit its being sliced or pulled in "thongs" of
exact length and wonderful firmness.
After the seasoning process the
desired lengths are cut, then the
"trunk" split into pieces ahout two
inches wide. Only a lustrous close-
grained portion, less than 1-16 of
an inch, is kept and from this are
pulled five or six ribbons of gossamer texture, light as air and yet as
strong, glossy and plant as the best
quality of silk.
The hats are braided by native women, who are killed in giving the
shape desired without any mechanical aid. The hats are always double
and the finishing process of the
"bell"—lining—and the brim is entrusted to little Javanese children,
the girls especially having obtained
such a proficiency that working by
the piece they often earn more than
their elders.
The opening of the school term
is marked by the coming into effect
of new arrangements with respect to
to the various inspectorates necessitated by the country's growth. In
this readjustment of education department affairs, Inspector George
H. Dean will hereafter have control
in Victoria City, the Saanich Peninsula, and the rural schools of southern Vancouver Island as far as Otter
Point.
Inspector D. L. MacLaurin, formerly stationed at Nelson, has been
transferred to Victoria also, and will
have particular jurisdiction over the
public schools of the remained of
Vancouver Island and the contiguous
islands of the Gulf of Georgia.
Inspector Thomas Leith is given
charge of the schools of Vancouver
City and will be assigned an additional inspector as his assistant during the ensuing few months.
Inspector J. C. Pollock, previously
in charge of Kamloops, will now
make his headquarters at Vancouver,
and will have jurisdiction throughout all the country nortli of the Fraser River, and as far as Prince Rupert.
Other inspectorates are virtually
unchanged, Inspector J. D. Glllis, as
before, having charge of the schools
of South Vancouver and Point Grey,
Burnably, Richmond and Delta districts, as well as North Vancouver
City. Inspector A. E. Miller retains
his district and headquarters at Revelstoke, and Inspector Albert Sullivan remains at New Westminster. An
additional inspector in the person of
W. H. M. May, previously engaged as
principal of the public schools at Nelson, succeeds Inspector MacLaurin
in charge of the South Kootenay district, with headquarters at Nelson
City. J. S. Gordon, inspector of high
schools, remains with headquarters
in this city, his duties being unchanged.
 o	
"What's the difference," broke out
the exchange editor, all at once, "between a crack in a musical instrument "
"And a senator from New York
going up in an elevator?" interrupted the literary editor. "One Is a rift
in a lute and the other Is a Root
in a lift. You oughtn't to try as
easy a one as that on me."
Nothing more w*as said, hut they
continued to glare at each other.
Form of Notice   (Section  34)
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that Edward Chesley, of the City of Prince Rupert,
B. C, occupation trainman, intends
to apply for permission to purchase
the following described land:—Commencing at a post planted about half
way between Mile Post 77 and Mile
Post 78 on the Main Line of the
Grand Trunk Pacific Railway from
Prince Rupert and about fifty (50)
feet west of the right-of-way of the
said Railway; tlience north eighty
(80) chains; thence west forty (40)
chains; thence south eighty (80)
chains; thence east forty (40) chains,
to the point of commencement; and
containing tliree hundred and twenty
(320) acres more or less and which
land was located by me on the 26th
day of August, A. D. 1911.
EDWARD CHESLEY.
Dated August 28, 1911. s5
Form of Notice (Section 47)
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that George W.
Kerr, of the City of Prince Rupert,
occupation butcher, intends to apply
for permission to lease the following described land:—Commencing at
a, post planted about three hundred
(300) yards west of Mile Post 79
on the line of the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway track from Prince Rupert; thence south eighty (80)
chains; thence west forty (40)
chains; thence north eighty (80)
chains; thence east forty (40) chains
to the place of commencement, and
containing three hundred and twenty (320) acres more or less, and
which land was located by me on
the 26th day of August inst. A. D.
1911.
GEO.   W.   KERR.
Dated August 28, 1911. s5
Form of Notice (Section 47)
Skeena    Land    District—District    of
Coast, Range 5 <
TAKE NOTICE that George A. Mc-
Nlcholl, of the City of Prince Rupert, railway superintendent by occupation, intends to apply for permission to lease the following described
land:—Commencing at a post planted about tliree hundred (300) yards
west of .Mile Post 80, on the line of
the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway
track from Prince Rupert; thence
north eighty (SO) chains; thence
west forty (40) chains; thence south
eighty (80) chains; thence east forty
(40) cnains to place of commencement and containing tliree hundred
and twenty (320) acres, and which
land was located by me on the 26 th
day of August, A. D. 1911.
GEORGE A. McNICHOLL.
Philip T. Chesley, Agent.
Dated August 29, 1911. s5
Hazelton   Land   District—District  of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that John Gabriel,
of Aldermere, B. C, Prospector, intends to apply for a licence to prospect for coal and petroleum over the
following described l.*nds:—Commencing at a post planted five miles
east and one mile south from the
moutli of Kitnayakwa River; thence
south 80 chains; thence east 80
chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains, to point of
commencement.
JOHN GABRIEL   Locator.
Dated July  10,  1911.
Hazelton   Land   District—District   of
Coast. Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that John Gabriel,
of Aldermere, B. C, Prospector, intends to apply for a licence to prospect for coal and petroleum over the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted 4 miles
east and 2 miles north from the
mouth of Kitnayakwa River; thence
south SO cliains; thence west 80
ehains; thence north 80 chains;
theuce east 80 chains, to point of
commencement.
JOHN GABRIEL, Locator.
Dated  July  9,  1911. sl
Hazelton   Land  District—District  of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that Vivian
O'Brien of Copper City B.C., prospector,
intends to apply for a licence to
prospect for coal and petroleum over
the following described lands: —
Commencing at a post planted four
miles east and four miles north from
the mouth of Kitnayakwa River;
thence south 80 chains; thence east
SO chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains, to point of
commencement.
VIVIAN O'BRIEN, Locator.
Dated July  10,  1911. sl
Hazelton   Land   District—District  of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that John Gabriel,
of Aldermere, B. C, Prospector, intends to apply for a licence to prospect for coal and petroleum over the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted four miles
east and four miles north from the
mouth of Kitnayakwa River; thence
west 80 chains; tlience south 80
chains; thence east 80 chains; thence
nortli 80 chains, to point of commencement.
JOHN GABRIEL, Locator.
Dated July  10,  1911.
Hazelton  Land  District—District of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that. Vivian
O'Brien of Copper City B.C., prospector,
intends to apply for a licence to
prospect for coal and petroleum over
(he following described lands: —
Commencing at a post planted three
miles east and three miles north
from Ihe mouth of Kitnayakwa River; thence south 80 chains; thence
west 80 cliains; thence north 80
chains; thence east 80 chains, to
point of commencement.
VIVIAN O'BRIEN, Locator.
Dated July 9, 1911. sl
Hazelton   Land   District—District  of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that John Gabriel,
of Aldermere, B, C, Prospector, intends to apply for a licence to prospect for coal and petroleum over the
following described lands:—Com-
iiiencing at a post planted 4 miles
east and 2 miles north from the
mouth of Kitnayakwa River, thence
south SO chains; thence east 80
cliains; thence north 80 chains;
Hience west 80 cliains, to point of
commencement.
JOHN GABRIEL, Locator.
Daled  July  9,  1911 sl
Hazelton   Land   District—District  of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that Vivian
O'Brien of Copper City B.C., prospector,
intends to apply for a licence to
prospect for coal and petroleum over
the following described lands: —
Commencing at a post planted 4
miles east and 2 miles north from
the mouth of Kitnayawka River;
thence north 80 chains; thence west
SO chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains, to point of
commencement.
VIVIAN O'BRIEN, Locator.
Dated  July  9,  1911. sl
Hazelton   Land   District—District  of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that Vivian
O'Brien of Copper City B.C., prospector,
intends to apply for a licence to
| prospect for coal and petroleum over
the following described lands:—•
Commencing at a post planted 4
miles east and 2 miles nortli from
the mouth of Kitnayakwa River;
thence north 80 chains; Hience east
SO chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 80 chains, to point oj!
commencement.
VIVIAN O'BRIEN, Locator.
Dated   July   9,   1911. sl
Skeena  Land  District—District  of
Cassiar
TAKE NOTICE that Marion Mc-
Diarmid, of London, Ontario, occupation nurse, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described land:—Situated on the
Kitwancool River; commencing at a
post planted at the northwest corner and about 5 1-4 miles distant in
a northwesterly direction from the
north end of Kitwancool Lake;
thence south SO chains; thence east
SO chains; thence north SO chains;
theuce west 80 chains to point of
commencement, and adjoining Lot
1S7S to the north; and containing
640 acres, more or less.
MARION  McDIARMID.
Daniel McDonald, Agent.
Dated July 24   1911. A-15
Form of Notice I Section 47)
Skeena    Land   District—District   of
Coast, Range a
TAKE NOTICE that Philip T.
Chesley of tlie City of Prince Rupert,
occupation prospector, intends to apply for permission to lease tlie following described land, bounded as
follows:—Commencing at a post
planted on the south hank of the
Shamos River I sometimes called the
Shames River) about three-quarters
of a mi'e west from the Grand Trunk
Pacific Railway and on the soutn
bank of the said river; Ihence north
eighty (SO) chains; thence west
forty (40) chains; thence south
eight; (80) chains; thence earl forty
(40) chains to point of commencement, and containing three hundred
and twenty (320) acres more or less,
and which land was located by me
on the 25th August, A. D. 1911.
PHILIP T.  CHESLEY.
Dated August 28, 1911.
Form of Notice   (Section  34)
Skeena    Land    District—District    of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that Philip T.
Chesley, of the City of Prince Rupert, B. C., occupation prospector,
intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described
land:—Commencing at a post planted
about half-way between Mile Post
77 and Mile Post 78 on the main line
of the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway
from Prince Rupert, and about fifty
(50) feet west off the said right-of-
way of the said railway; thence
soutli eighty (80) chains; thence
west forty (40) chains; thence north
eighty (80) chains; thence east forty
i4ni chains to point of commencement) and containing th-ee hundred
and twenty (320 1 acres more or less
and which land was located by me on
tne 26th day of August, A. I). 1911.
PHILIP   T.   CHESLEY.
Dated   August  28,   1911,
Form of Notice (Section 47)
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that John A. Kirkpatrick, of the City of Prince Rupert, dry goods merchant by occupation, intends to apply for permission
to lease the following described land,
bounded as follows:—Commencing
at a post planted about three hundred (300) yards west of Mile Post
79 on the line of the Grand Trunk
Pacific Railway track from Prince
Rupert; thence north eighty (80
chains; thence west forty (40)
chains; thence south eighty (80
chains; thence east forty (40)
chains to place of commencement,
and containing three hundred and
twenty (320) acres more or less, and
which land was located by me on the
26th day of August A.D. 1911.
JOHN A. KIRKPATRICK.
Philip T. Chesley   Agent.
Dated August 29, 1911. s5
Form of Notice (Section 47)
Skeena    Land    District—District    of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that Alexander
Faulds, of the City of Vancouver,
B. C, occupation mining engineer,
intends to apply for permission to
lease the following land, bounded as
lease the following described
land, bounded as follows: —
Commencing at a post planted
on the south bank of the
Shamos River (sometimes called
Shames River) about three-quarters
of a mile west from the Grand Trunk
Pacific Railroad and on the south
bank of said river; tlience south
eighty (SO) chains; tlience west forty
(40) chains; thence north eighty-
ISO) chains; thence east forty i4n)
chains to the point of commencement,
and containing three hundred and
twenty (320) acres more or less, and
Which land was located by me on the
25th day of August, A.D. 1911,
ALEXANDER FAULDS.
Philip T. Chesley, Agent.
Dated August  25, 1911,
Hazelton   Land   District—District  of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that John Gabriel,
of Aldermere, B, C, Prospector, intends to apply for a licence to prospect for coal and petroleum over the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted three miles
east and three miles north from the
mouth of Kitnayakwa River; thence
north 80 cliains; thence west 80
chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains, to point of
commencement.
JOHN GABRIEL, Locator
Dated  July  9,  1911. sl
Hazelton  Land  District—District of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that John Gabriel,
of Aldermere, B. C, Prospector, in
tends to apply for a licence to pros
pect for coai and petroleum over the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted 3 miles
east and one mile north from the
mouth of Kitnayakwa River; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; thence south SO chains;
thence east SO chains, to point of
commencement.
JOHN GABRIEL, Locator.
Dated July II, 1911. sl
Hazelton Land District—District of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that Vivian
O'Brien of Copper City B.C., prospector,
intends to apply for a licence to
prospect for coal and petroleum over
the following described lands: —
Commencing at a post planted three
miles east from the mouth of Kitnayakwa River; tlience north 80
cliains; thence west SO chains;
thence south SO chains; thence east
80 chains, to point of commencement.
VIVIAN O'BRIEN,  Locator.
Dated July 9, 1911. sl
Hazelton Land District—District of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that John Gabriel,
of Aldermere, B. C, Prospector, in-
I tends to apply for a licence to pros-
j pect for coal and petroleum over the
"ollowing    described    lands:—Com-
Hazelton   Land  District—District  of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that John Gabriel,
of Aldermere, B. C, Prospector, intends to apply for a licence to prospect for coal and petroleum over the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted 4 miles
east and one mile north from the
mouth of Kitnayakwa River, thence
south 80 chains; tlience west 80
chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence east 80 chains, to point of
commencement.
JOHN GABRIEL, Locator.
Dated July  10,  1911. sl
Hazelton   Land   District—District  of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that Vivian
O'Brien of Copper City B.C., prospector,
intends to apply for a licence to
prospect for coal and petroleum over
the following described lands: —
Commencing at a post planted 4
miles east and one mile north from
the mouth of Kitnayakwa River!
thence soutli 80 chains; thence east
80 chains; thence nortli 80 chains;
thence west 80 cliains, to point of
commencement.
VIVIAN O'BRIEN, Locator.
Dated  July  10,  1911. sl
Hazelton   Land   District—District  of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that John Gabriel,
of Aldermere, B. C, Prospector, intends to apply for a licence to pros-
ect for coal anJ petroleum over the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted 4 miles
east from the mouth "of Kitnayawka
River; thence soulh So chains;
Ihence east 80 chains; thence north
80 cliains; tbence west 80 cliains, to
the point of commencement.
JOHN GABRIEL, Locator.
Dated   July   10,   1911. sl.
Hazelton   Land  District—District  of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE thai Vivian
O'Brien of Copper City B.C., prospector,
mends   to  apply   for  a   licence   to
mencing at a post planted three miles Prospect for coal and petroleum over
east from the mouth of Kitnayakwa the Pillowing described lands: —
River;    thence    south    so    chains;  Commencing at a post planted four
thence west 80 chains; thence north miles easl from the i th of kitna-
80 chains; thence east so chains, to yakwa River; thence south 80 chains;
point of commencement, thence west 80 chains; thence north
JOHN GABRIEL. Locator. !Ml chains;  theuce easl 80 cliains, to
Daled July 9,  1911.
Hazelton   Land   District—District  of
Const, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that Vivian
O'Brien of Copper City B.C.. prospector,
intends to apply for a licence to
prospect for coal and petroleum over
the following described lands: —
Commencing at a post planted five
miles east and two miles north from
the mouth of Kitnayakwa River;
thence south 80 chains; thence east
80 chains; thence north 80 cliains;
tlience west 80 chains, to point of
commencement.
VIVIAN O'BRIEN, Locator.
Dated July 9, 1911.' sl
Hazelton   Land   District—District  of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE      NOTICE      that      Vivian
O'Brien of Copper City B.C., prospector,
intends   to   apply   for   a   licence   to
point of commencement,
VIVIAN O'BRIEN,  Locator.
Dated July 10, 1911
Hazelton   Land   District—District   of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that John Gabriel,
of Aldermere, B.  C,  Prospector,  intends to apply for a licence to prospect for coal and petroleum over the
following    described    lands:—Com-
i mencing at a post planted five miles
least and  two miles north  from  the
I mouth of Kitnayakwa River;  ihence
north   80   chains;    thence   east   80
chains;    thence    soutli    Su    chains;
thence  west  80  chnlirs,  to  point   of
i commencement.
JOHN GABRIEL, Locator.
1     Dated July 9, 1911. sl
Hazelton   Land   Districl     District  of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE tha! Vivian
prospect for coal and petroleum over O'Brien of Copper City B.C., prospector,
the following dese-ribed lands:— (intends to apply for a licence te>
Commencing at a post planted four I prospect for coal and petroleum over
miles east and one mile south from|t|le following described lands: —
the mouth of Kitnayakwa River; , commencing at a post planted five
tlience south SO chains; thence west miles east from the mouth of Kltua-
80 chains; theme north SO chains; |vakwa River; tlience east So chains;
thence east 80 chains, to point of thence south 80 chains; tlience west
commencement. so chains;  thence north  SO  chains,
VIVIAN O'BRIEN, Locator.   t0 ])0int of commencement.
Dated  July
1911.
sl
Hazelton Land District—District of
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that John Gabriel,
of Aldermere, B. C, Prospector, intends to apply for a licence to pros-
pect for coal and petroleum over the
VIVIAN O'BRIEN, Locator.
Dated July 10, 1911. sl
Hazelton   Land   District—District  ot
Coast, Range 5
TAKE NOTICE that John Gabriel,
of Aldermere,  B.  C, Prospector, Intends to apply for a licence to pros
it
mencing at u post planted four miles e following described lands:—Corneas I and one mile south from the mencing at a post planted 6 miles
mouth of Kitnayakwa River;  thence I east from  Hie mouth of Kitnayakwa
east   80   cliains;    tlience   south    SO
chains;    thence    west    sn    chains;
'thence  north  SO  chains, to  point  of
commencement.
JOHN GABRIEL, Locator.
1     Da'.ed July 9,  1911. sl
River; thence north so cliains;
thence east so chains; thence south
80 ehains; thence west su chains, to
point of commencement.
JOHN GABRIEL, Locator.
Dated July 10, 1911. sl PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Friday, September 8,  1911.
FINE RECEPTION
(Continued From Page One)
lieved in reciprocity within the British nation.
Touching upon some of the other
issues, Mr. Clements attacked the
policy of the Dominion government.
An immense sum was to be spent
upon the navy without much to show
for it. The Dominion had the protection fully of the British navy. He
felt that Canada might well assist,
especially in an hour of danger to
the -Mother Country, and contribute
a Dreadnought to the Imperial navy,
which might be added to from time
to time.
Repudiated Their Policies
Taking up the arguments of the
Liberal party when attacking the National Policy, thai of free trade,
commercial union, etc., none of these
had been brought into effect upon
the Liberals coming into power. He
thanked God that the party did not.
Sir Wilfrid Laurier had time and
again s-tated that the United States
• was not the natural market if the
United States. He argued it was not.
In this pact the United States was
getting the thick end of the wedge
while Canada was getting the thin
edge. The United States had built
up their nation by a system of protection but he believed the United
States had carried that to greater
lengths than it should be carried.
The National Policy aimed at protecting industries while in a developing stage until they reached an adult
stage, when they should be left to
fol'ow their course.
i National Policy
The United States had refused reciprocity to Sir John A. Macdonald.
The National Policy was Introduced
and a tariff wall between the two
countries was established. The United States then went to the extreme
measure of raising the tariff wall
still higher by the McKinley Bill.
The Ottawa government should, in
the interests of Canada, have met
this with increased tariffs on this
side. The United States now sought
to secure the raw materials of Canada, the natural resources that were
left in the United States being largely in the hands of monoplies.
Under the circumstances, he felt
that Canadians should do to the United States what the latter said to
Canada twenty years ago, which was,
"If you want to do business here
come over to this country." Canada
could tell the United States that if
it wanted to do business in our natural resources it must send Its people
and its capital into Canada and help
it to build up this country. That was
what was wanted in this country. It
would build up industries in the
cities, giving mechanics work .
If Canadians let any foreign country get the raw material this country
got only the product of the toil of
the miner or of the lumberman, while
the larger profits went to the cities
of that foreign country. In the interests of Canada, they should force
the United States to bring capital In
here, and give Canadians the benefits from the manufacture of its raw
material. ,
Referring to the development of
the democratic sentiment in the United States, he showed that the government of the United States must,
in answer to the demands of the people there, give cheaper food products
and where it was deemed necessary
take off the duty on Canadian products, like fish. It would be taken
off without Canada goving any advantage.
Wheat Question
With respect to the wheat question he showed that the United
Slates mills had to have the superior
wheat grown in the Canadian Northwest if a barrel of flour could be
produced that could compete with the
Canadian flour. If he had his way
he would levy an export duty upon
Canadian wheat going into the United
States. He would by this say to the
people of the United States, "If you
want to grind Canadian wheat you
must come over Into Canada with
your millions and build up your
mills here."
What Canada wanted was the
building of mills and elevators on
this side of the line to use the natural products of the prairies. There
was no reason why Prince Rupert
should not have these as well as
other seaports. But if this policy of
the government was carried Into effect there was little chance for anything of the kind.
Fish for Export
Taking up the question of fish,
Mr. Clements said that it was a disgrace that the Dbmlnion government
had not given the proper protection
to the fisheries of this country. He
then devoted his attention to the
argument that the removal of the
duty of one cent a pound on fish
going into theh United States would
work great benefit to Prince Rupert.
As to  the  salmon   market,  he  said
any canneryman would tell one that
the British market was the best one
for that commodity.
With respect to halibut, he said
that he had discussed the question
with practical men. They had told
him that to take halibut in ice from,
say Ketchikan to Seattle or Vancouver, would cost about $7 a Ion. There
would be a double ieing also in order
to ship it east. To bring it to Prince
Rupert would not cost more than
$2 a (on and one Icing would probably be saved. This left ii margin
that made it absolutely sure (hat the
trade would come lo Prince Rupert,
a saving being effected even If the
one cent a pound duly were paid.
But the United States, he felt, would
remove the duly themselves if the
fish was needed. Besides, the home
market of Canada was developing
quickly, amounting last year to $16,-
000,000.
Abuses of Government
The United Slates was not a very
large market, taking all into account.
Tlie New England Fish Company had
rights in this country from the Do.
minion government that it should
not have. In the matter of licences,
also, there were abuses that should
not exist. Japanese were granted
licences that should never be given.
Tlie industry should be preserved for
the people of this country.
With respect to the cold storage
plants being erected on the coast,
he said that these were all started
before reciprocity was thought of.
Under the present regulations
there was a charge of $1.50 a ton
on American bottoms doing business
in fish in Canadian ports. This gave
the Canadian bottom an advantage
of about $125 a vessel. Under the
new pact this was annulled and an
American ship paid only $1 for entering. Then a United States ship
could leave a Canadian port for the
fishing grounds on paying a $1 fee.
A Canadian ship would have to go
from an American port to a Canadian port before clearing for the fishing grounds.
Ottawa Not Informed
He contrasted the course taken by
the Canadian government and that
taken by the United States government in preparing for the treaty.
The United States government had
experts gathering, information on the
subject in Canada and the United
States. The Canadian government
had done nothing of the kind, and
were not prepared to meet the experts of the United States.
Taking up the government's policy
with respect to appointments to the
judiciary he said that this was something that should be very carefully
guarded. That had been the pride
of the government of Sir John A.
Macdonald, but there had been appointments made by the present government that were not calculated to
reflect credit upon the country.
On the labor question he did not
believe that Asiatics should be
brought into the country. In this
connection he referred to the treaty
making propensities of the present
government and the way it worked
out. The government had signally
failed in this. He told of the explanation given by Sir Wilfrid in the
House as to the working of the Japanese treaty when it was entered
into. Sir Wilfrid said It would mean
that only 120 Japanese would come
into the country a year after it came
into effect. Yet in the first nine
months after it came into effect over
8,000 Japanese were landed at Victoria and Vancouver.
Labor Questions
The provincial government in British Columbia had looked well to the
interests of the mechanics and labor
men in all contracts, Insisting upon
an eight-hour day. The Dominion
government, however, allowed an
hour and an hour and a half to be
added to this. They had the example
of the alien labor la-vs of *'ep country being overridden and labo, Introduced that should not. have been.
In the Crows Nest Pass coal fields
the miners had put up a fight for
what they considered their rights.
The Dominion government had not
shown any disposition to help, but
had blocked off a square of country
and said coal should be allowed to
come in there free of duty from the
United States in order to bring the
miners to terms.
During his travels through the district of Comox-Atlin he had been led
to the conclusion that the Ottawa
government acted in a disgraceful
way In the matter of mail service.
He had found on Denman Island that
settlers did not get their mall for
as long as six weeks at a time. This
should not be. The pioneers of the
country were entitled to fair consideration if any one was. The ogv-
ernment should take steps to make
the lot of the pioneer as good as possible by giving adequate mall service,
so that the outlying parts could get
the news and keep In touch with
the world.
This government was a government, not for the people of this coun
try, but for the grafter. He referred
to the Dominion government telegraph service, which ought to be for
the benefit of the public. That service, however, was not run like the
private companies did their business.
The private companies gave a letter
rate at night which served the pubic well. The government, however,
did nothing of the sort. It might
well be done, he thought, even if It
were done at a loss.
If elected, he would be the servant
of the people and would do his best
for the whole district. He would
look carefully after the interests of
Prince Rupert and would be a frequent visitor here in order to keep
In touch with the needs of the residents. He had no doubt as to his
success.
Mr. Clements resumed his seat
amidst loud applause.
P.  It. Young
D. R. tfoung of Queen Charlotte
City followed. He referred to the
fact that he bad been born in the
United tSates. When, fourteen years
ago, he took the oath of allegiance
to the sovereign of Great Britain and
unfurled the British flag over his
office in Siocan it was the proudest
moment of his life. The United States
wanted the raw material from here,
lie believed that Canada should live
on the most friendly terms with the
United States. There was a market
for the products of Canada in Great
Britain.
The meeting closed with cheers for
Mr. Clements and the singing of
"God Save the King."
 o	
BLACK COD IN USE
D. R. Young of Queen Charlotte City
Has Succeeded in Curing
Fish for Use.
He Is Now  Putting the Product on
the Market and Will Be Prepared to Meet Demand
D. R. Young of Queen Charlotte
City has been a visitor in the city
for several days this week. He left
this morning for Vancouver with a
shipment of several tons of black
cod put up in/different styles for use.
The visit of Mr. Young at this
time has to do with the marketing
of the first of the black cod put up
by the plant in which Mr. Young is
so deeply interested. The promoter
of this enterprise is nothing If not
original and bo when he had had
the curing of the fish brought to a
stage where he w*as satisfied to put
it on the market he put a shipment
on the way and subjected it to the
most trying conditions under which
it could ever be expected to have to
pass. He had the barrels and cases
delayed here in the G. T. P. warehouses in order to see how the product would come through such a test.
He then opened part of it and his
friends and the guests at the Prince
Rupert Inn have been enjoying the
black cod put up by his company.
The tests have been entirely satisfactory and Mr. Young has undoubtedly provided for the consuming public a most delightful fish product and
one that will continue to grow in
favor.
He has taken the shipment on to
Vancouver, where it will be put In
the hands of P. Burns & Co., who
will look after the marketing of It
in the Coast cities. It is Mr. Young's
intention to keep a plentiful supply
in the hands of P. Burns & Co. all
the time.
The black cod is a new fish to
commerce. It is taken in the deep
water off the coast of the Queen
Charlottes and will he made a special
feature of the cold storage and curing plant at Queen Charlotte City.
The fish are taken In the open sen
at a depth of about 1,000 of 1,800
feet.
Under the processes which Mr.
Young's company has perfected it
will be put on the market smoked or
salted and forms a delicious food.
FORCE AT GOOSE BAY
Nearly  1100  Men  Are At Work  At
Granby Mines—Sawmill Nearly
Completed
W. Yolen Williams of the Granby
Company nnd Mr. McDonald, the
manager at Goose Bay, are In the
city. Mr. McDonald reports that they
have two hundred and sixty men at
work and within ten days the sawmill will be running. When that 1b
operating the buildings for the men
and other works will he carried out.
Mr. Williams is still investigating
the ore showings in the different
camps in the north. While there are
good showings in many places, yet,
he says, there has not been enough
done in many instances to prove the
real value of the deposits.
NOTICE
The Prince Rupert Sash and Door
Company will temporarily close its
factory on September 16 for repairs
and additions. Patrons are hereby
thanked for their patronage, and the
company hopes upon reopening to be
able by additions to the plant to be
in a position to meet the local demand even better than in the past.
The company has on hand a large
stock of manufactured goods of all
classes to meet requirements during
the time the factory is closed.
LOCAL IMPROVEMENT NOTICE
TAKE NOTICE that the Municipal Corporation of the City of Prince
Rupert intends to make the following
local improvements:—
The rough grading of and construction of the necessary retaining
walls of lane between Second and
Third Avenues from Fourth to Ninth
Street, and to assess the final cost
thereof upon the property fronting
or abutting thereon, or to be benefitted thereby, and that a statement
and diagram showing the lots to be
so especially assessed for the said improvement or work is now filed in
the office of the City Clerk, and is
open for inspection during office
hours.
The estimated cost of the work is
$17,500.
Dated at Prince Rupert this Sth
day of September, 1911.
ERNEST A. WOODS,
City Clerk.
WM. MALHON DAVIS,
City Engineer.      sS-12
POLES WANTED
TENDERS will be received by the
undersigned up to o p. ni., September 18, for the supply and delivery
in Cow Bay of: —
200 Cedar Poles.
Specifications may be seen at Telephone Office, Third Avenue.
Tender must, be accompanied by a
certified cheque, or cash for 2 per
cent of the total amount of the tender, and must be on form to be obtained from the City Clerk.
The lowest or any tender ndt necessarily accepted.
ERNEST A.  WOODS,
S8-12 City Clerk.
••..j.***.;..:. ******* **** ********
!   FOR RENT   l
* *
* Store    building    on    Second *
* Avenue    at    Seventh    Street.  *
J Low  Rent. *
$ JEREMIAH H. KUGLER, LTD. |
* *
**************************
**************************
! 75 x 100 Feet I
*    ASK    For Lease on Third *
Avenue at Ninth     *
Street J
f JEREMIAH H. KUGLER, LTD. *
v v
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦-^♦♦♦■i'*^<>4Mi'<t*^*<t*^4>4
* UNCLE
* JERRY
NOTICE is hereby given that on
the eleventh (11th) day of October
next application will be made to the
Superintendent of Provincial Police
for the grant of a licence fer the sale
of liquor by retail in and upon the
premises known as The Copper City
Hotel, situated at Copper River,
Skeena District, upon the land described as Lot A, Block 312, Copper
City, Skeena District, B. C.
Dated September 11, 19il.        s-5
HARVEY CREECH,
Applicant.
SHARP WORDS
(Continued From Page One)
sure, could bear him out In this. Yet
this drone cnnie in with charges of
Ihis kind.
After some further exchange of
compliments by Ihe aldermen concerned His Worship suggested thnt
they should drop this and proceed to
business, which suggestion was acted upon, although Aid. Hilditch expressed a readiness on little more
provocation to hit Mb colleague.
 o	
Harry Spaw of Vancouver, representing Ihe B. C. Life Assurance
Company, Is In the city for a few
weeks. He is selling stock locally
In this first British Columbia Institution of the kind and, as In other
cities of the province, Is meeting with
success. The stock for sale promises soon to be entirely taken up.
The local rcpresententlve of the company Is M. M. Stephens & Co.
; o	
Army   Visitors
Adjutant Smith of Wrangel, who
is in charge of the work of the Salvation Army in Southeastern Alaska,
Is In the city. He is here to meet
Major Morris, who Is expected In the
city tomorrow. Major Morris, after
conferring with officers here, will
proceed to Hazelton, Inspecting the
different corps In the Interior.    On
To the Ladies of Prince Rupert
Did you ever stop to think how much easier it would be for you,
If at the end of each month, you could pay all household bills
by check? We solicit your account and have special facilities
for handling It. Private writing rooms are provided for the use
of customers and Individual attention is given each depositor.
We allow 4%  on Deposits and the use of checks.
The Continental Trust Company, Limited
 SECOND AVENUE	
lli*Suy SMlsfaaory RMeJt
Good, Sound Reasons for
MONARCH Economy
Monarch  Ranges are built so that they can
never have "air leaks"—
For around every opening Into the body there
is a   Malleable   Iron frame to which the
steel is riveted.
No putty is needed in such joints.   They are
air tight when new and stay air tight.
If these other ranges were built In this way
they might be economical too.
Investigate this matter of rivet construction
versus stove bolts and  stove putty.    It'»
important to every one  using  or buying
a range.
SOLD AND GUARANTEED BY THE
Kaien Hardware Co.
Telephone 3 Third Avenue
FOR SALE
Lot 56, Blk. 34, Sec. 1, $5,000; 1-3 cash, bal. 6 and 12 months.
Lots 33 an* 34, Blk 5, Sec. 1,    ?4,000; half cash.
FOR RENT
STORES, OFFICES AND DWELLINGS
FIRE INSURANCE in  old   English,   Canadian   and   American
■ companies, at tariff rates.   Policies good as collateral at All Banks,
and all written in our own office.     PLATE   GLASS,   ACCIDENT
and MARINE INSURANCE
M.M. Stephens & Co. Ld.
REAL ESTATE
Phone 222
LOANS   INSURANCE  INVESTMENTS
Office: Third Avenue
P. O. Box 275
You Can Avoid This
by sending your Clothes to the
PIONEER  STEAM  LAUNDRY
There are Many
Reasons Why
IT  IS  TO   YOUR   INTEREST
We do first-class work and
are careful with your Garments. We can do your work
and return it within 48 hours
if necessary. We call for your
i.eaundry and return it to you.
Should anything be lost or misplaced we will make it satisfactory.
When your Laundry goes to the Chinks there are many drawbacks. When you send It to us your money helps pay WHITE
LABOR.
PIONEER STEAM LAUNDRY
HBBEiBBiBBEBBBBBBBBBEBBBEBHH
©
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I*******
m
[51
HOTEL
ENAMELWARE
HAVE JUST RECEIVED A SMALL SHIPMENT OF HOTEL
ENAMELWARE ESPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR USE IN
HOTELS, RESTAURANTS AND CAMPS. WE GUARANTEE
THEM TO LAST TWICE AS LONG AS ORDINARY ENAMEL
WARE.
A CALL IS SOLICITED
Prince Rupert Hardware & Supply
Company, Ltd.
THIRD AVENUE
PHONE 120
H EBlBiB ElEiE E:E|EB;BE,E E E S EBB E 0 E E E
his return south he will leave for
Toronto to attend the congress that
Is to be held there at which Mrs.
Bramwell Booth will be present. Adjutant Smith is astonished at the
progress that Is being made in Prince
Rupert and is loud In his praise of
the enterprise of the citizens.
"Well, farmer, you told us your
place was a good one for hunting;
now we've tramped It for three hours
and found no game."
"Just so. Well, I calculate as a
general thing, that the yess game
there Is, the more hunting you have."

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