BC Historical Newspapers

BC Historical Newspapers Logo

BC Historical Newspapers

Prince Rupert Journal Aug 24, 1910

Item Metadata

Download

Media
prj-1.0311785.pdf
Metadata
JSON: prj-1.0311785.json
JSON-LD: prj-1.0311785-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): prj-1.0311785-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: prj-1.0311785-rdf.json
Turtle: prj-1.0311785-turtle.txt
N-Triples: prj-1.0311785-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: prj-1.0311785-source.json
Full Text
prj-1.0311785-fulltext.txt
Citation
prj-1.0311785.ris

Full Text

Array ■"*^™^m
Hew WelUniton
Coal
is the best
ROGERS ft BUCK
Sole Agents
Ptinu Uttjietrt
-ii—
A
High-Class
, Job Printing
In all Lines
VOLUME  1
Published Twice a Week
PRINCE  RUPERT, B.  C,   FRIDAY, AUGUST 26, 1910.
Price, Five Cents
NO. 21.
G.T.P. PARTY ARE ON
AN INSPECTION TOUR
President of the Company and Large Party of Guests
and Officials of Enterprise are Spending
Several Days in the City.
The city of Prince Rupert has this
week as its guests officials of the
G. T. P. and capitalists representing
Old Country Industrial concerns who
are travelling In the party. Arriving by the Prince Rupert on Wednesday evening the party proceeded
to Stewart and on their return spent
last night here, leaving this morning for a trip up the line of the
railway.
The party is a more than usually
interesting and important one. At
the bead of it is Charles M. Hays
president of the G.T.P., and E. J.
Chamberlin, the vice-president and
general manager, who are making
one of their regular inspection tours.
Accompanying them are Mrs. E. J.
Chamberlin, A. W. Smithers of London, chairman of the board of directors, Miss Eva Smithers, Herbert
Smithers, Sir George Doughty, Lady
Doughty and daughter, G. B. Hunter,
of Wallsend on Tyne, James Carruth-
ers, of Montreal, H. Deer of London,
John \V. Loud, freight traffic manager, W. E. Davis passenger traffic
manager, Dr. J. Alex Hutchison, chief
medical officer, D. E. Galloway, secretary to Mr. Hays, N. Klnsella, secretary to Mr. Chamberlin, A. S,
Loucks, V. A. Payne, Mr. and Mrs.
Thornton Davidson, and A. D. Ten-
nant of Vancouver.
Mr. Hays says his trip is one of
inspection and the occasion has been
embraced to have friends, in the persons of several Old Country men,
make the tour and look Into the opportunities presenting themselves
here.
Mr. Hunter Is of the firm ot
Swan, Hunter & Co., the great shipbuilders who constructed the' Prince
Rupert and the Prince George for
the G. T. P. He is deeply interested
in the harbor and was surprised to
find such an advanced development
on the coast.
Mr. Smithers, as chairman of the
board in London, is deeply interested
in the work of the G. T. P., and
expressed himself as well satisfied
with the way the work was being
done as far as he had so far been
able to inspect it.
Sir George Doughty comes from
Grimsby, Eng., and is deeply Interested in the fishing industry. The
great prospects here has aroused his
deepest attention and he is making
It a point to gain all the information on the subject that is available.
He admits that his interest may become more than that of merely a
casual one. He has in view eventually investing possibly In the enterprise on this coast, believing that a
good investment Is likely to open up
and in addition there may be a fine
field for Immigration from the fishing centres of the Old Land to Prince
Rupert for the purpose of developing the trade. He has no plans yet
matured along this line, but will
make the most careful Investigations
Into the whole subject.
In James Carruthers, the well
known grain broker of Montreal, Is
one that Is no stranger to Prince Rupert. He has had Investments In the
city ever since il wnB first put on the
map. He is one of those Interested
In the Canadian Fish & Cold Storage
Company, and is a director of that
concern that is planning so much to
make this the greatest fishing centre
In the world.
A. D. Tennant, who now makes
Vancouver his headquarters, represents Old Country capital, and Is tha
controlling interest In the Red Clift
mine at Stewart.
After paying a hurried visit to
Stewart in order to give the visitors
the fullest opportunity of becoming
acquainted with the coast, the party
left this morning in' company with
Superintendent W. C. C. Mehan and
G. A. McNicholl for a trip to the end
of the track, about sixty miles up the
river. There they will take a river
steamer and go as far as the Canyon
at least, returning either Saturday
night or Sunday.
If there Ib time some of the party
at least will go over to the Queen
Charlotte Islands and Inspect the development in that part of the northern  country which  comes naturally
within the "sphere of influence" of
the G. T. P.
There are some matters of local
concern which the officials will have
to take up before leaving the city.
Mr. Hays expresses himself as well
satisfied with the way the city Is
progressing and the vistiors are astonished at the development. The
one great concern of .Mr. Hays and
his officials is to have ihe work rushed forward faster if possible—the
lack of sufficient lab-., jeing kee-i..y
felt.
ATTENDED   SMOKER
G.T.P. Officials Gather With Citizens at
Empress Theatre Last
Evening.
Charles M. Hays and Others nf Distinguished   Visitors   in   an
Optimistic .Mood
For about two hours last night a
most enjoyable time was spent at
the Empress theatre the occasion being the smoker tendered by the Publicity Club to Charles M. Hays ana
party. The visitors entered heartily
into the spirit of the gathering which
was one of good will and the reception accorded Mr. Hays showed that
the G. T. P. is near to the hearts of
the people of Prince Rupert.
The Prince Rupert did not arrive
from Stewart until shortly after the
time  set   for   the   smoker   to   begin
OPENINC UP LAND|DELAYED DECISION
Government is Making Survey of
maat Valley at Present
Time.
Kiti-
Presumed That Agricultural Sections
Will Ite Put On the
Market
The government of the province is
giving considerable attention at the
present to the development of this
northern part of British Columbia.
The agricultural resources are being
well investigated and steps taken to
open up for settlement portions of
the country adapted to that industry.
The interest awakened in the district
is due in no small measure to the insistent manner in which W. Manson,
the representative of the constituency  is ever pressing  upon  the an-
IN LIGHTING SYSTEM
City Council Will Carefully Consider the Propositions to
be Presented by Private Companies Before
Deciding Upon What is to be Done.
The city council last evening, after
giving two evenings' consideration to
the question of a lighting system to
serve the immediate needs of the
city, decided to postpone action until
two private corporations had had an
opportunity to present their propositions. . This was done in the face
of the announcement by the Sash and
Door Factory that if tee offer was
not accepted last night the proposition it made was to be considered off.
Several members of the council were
**" *J* *»« *!« »Jc *I* »!• »!♦
i
*      B, .1. Clinniberjln, Vice-President nnd   General Manager, G. T. P.
* Charles M. Hoys, President of the (
P.
ANOTHER CONTRACT
Eighth Avenue to be Put in Shape Under
Local improvement
Phn.
City   Council   Decide   From   Among
Many Who Offer to do
the Work
The grading and planking of
Eighth avenue, which is to be done
under the local improvement plan,
will be proceeded with Just as soon
as an answer as to the financial
arrangements being all in order has
been  received.
On Wednesday night the tenders
were opened.    They were as follows:
E. Rosand & Co., $20,824 for grading and close cutting on tha basis of
$2 for rock work, $2 for earth, and
$100 per acre for close culling.
Mcliinis & Kelly, $8,874.87 Cor
planking, on the basis of •!'■;.• cents
for the roadway,'and 2V6 cents for
railing; for grading and close cutting, $18,583.60, at $350 for close
cutting, $1.80 for rock, nnd 65c for
earth.
S. VV. Watson & Co., $5,048.60 for j
planking  at   6e   for   plank,   and   4c j
for  railing;   for  grading  and  close
cutting, $111,703.SO, at $100 for close
cutting, $1.90 for rock, and 90c for
earth.
E. C. Le Trench, $2,943.(10 for
plank road at 3i/2 cents for planking
and 2 cents for railing; for grading
and close cutting, $18,543.60, at
$300 for close cutting, $1.80 for rock
and 70c for earth.
Slebold & O'Brien', $3,572 for
planking at 4% cents for plank and
2 cents for rail.
Reilly & Robarts, $2,526 for
planking at 3 cents for plank and
2 %  cents for rail.
Campbell, Mitchell Construction
Company, $22,031.80 for grading
and   close  cutting  at   80   cents   for
(Continued on Page Five)
9.43. Mr. Hays and his party, however with scarcely an absentee, proceeded at once to the theatre and
were there in time to take part.
A programme was put on during
the evening which tended to keep up
the good fellowhsip during the time
that cigars and drinks were being
passed round. Cy Peck presided and
in his short introductory remarks
made some very happy allusions.
Included in the programme was
Scottish (lancing by little Miss Gray,
which was exceedingly wel received,
and deserved all the praise bestowed
upon the little dancer. Dr. Slocum
and Mr. Shaw put on a picture series.
Mr. Frond sang a solo with local allusions. Mr. Harrison, as the lightning artist, provided an entertainment
turn. Mr. Weston appeared In imitations. Ryan and Acland put on a
boxing bout that was exceedingly interesting, the former by clever work
putting bis opponent out. There was
an abundance of cigars and liquid
refreshments.
Mr, Hays nnd the other speakers
in his party were most happy in
tlielr remarks nnd seemed to enjoy
Hie evening as well as the local residents.
Mayor Stork was called upon as
the first speaker In the hour devoted
to that part of the programme. He
confined himself to a very few words.
He said that Prince Rupert had Its
welcoming air at the present. The
city extended to Mr. Hays and his
party a very hearty welcome.
A Warm Welcome
Charles M. Hays was greeted with
loud and renewed cheers. He was
glad to be present and to see the
same bright smiles on the citizens as
on the occasion of his last visit. He
felt they were still with the company. Referring to those who had
come with him for the first visit
to Prince Rupert, he said they were
all surprised at the progress. He
himself felt that he almost needed
a guide to get around. He had seen
In the windows displays equal to
that of any place In the south.    He
(Continued on Page Eight)
thoritles  the claims  of  this  part  of
the country.
At the present time there is a survey party under Mr. Hirst, at work
at the head of the Kitimaat Arm on
the government reserve that is located there, making a survey with the
object in view of ascertaining just
what the character of the land Is. It
is understood that what is timber
areas will be reserved as at present
until the policy of the government in
the matter is decided. The other
lands fit for farming will be pul on
the market in such sized blocks as
are felt to be best suited tot he conditions.
When this is done there will be developed a very rich farming area, it
is felt, and a large addition to the
agricultural portion of the district
will be available for settlement. C.
W. 1). Clifford, wlio was in tho city
this week nnd who has always hail
very strong faith in the Kitininnt district, Is of opinion that the opening
up of this area to settlement and the
results that will follow will Induce
the construction al a comparatively
early date of the P. N. & O. Railway,
now eohirolled by the <i. T. P., to
afford   an   outlet   for   the  valley.
The Kitimaat valley is but a continuation of a long series of agricultural areas that extpnd from Kitimaat to the Lakelse across the
Skeena and up the Kitsumkalum and
on to the Naas. Those who have
looked into the conditions prevailing
are convinced that there is no whe'-e
on the Pacific coast areas that will
give richer returns for the money invested than will the lands of this district. In Prince Rupert there will
be a market of the very best character to be found anywhere. The
establishment of experimental fruit
growing stations in this area which
has been decided upon, should be followed by the best of results and set
tlement should follow closely.
MINISTER IS COMING
Hon. Thos.  Taylor Will Arrive in the
City on Sunday
Next.
In Company With to. Manson, M.I'.P.
And  Komi  Superintendent Jennings Will Vi-it  Islands
C. H. Orme, after a short visit to
his former home in London, Ont., returned to the city by the Prince Rupert.
In his efforts to get in touch with
all the scattered parts of the province
so that the affairs .of his department
may be better administered, Hon.
Thomas Taylor, minister of works in
the provincial governmenl will pay
n visit shortly to the northern part
of the province, it is not long since
Mr. Taylor wns here Inspecting the
needs ui Stewarl and In the districts
dicing the Skeena, making the trip
In company with the local representative, VV, Manson. The Hun nl the
disposal nf the minister on that occasion wns nol Bufflclenl to allow him
in vii.it the Queen Charlotte Islands,
On Sunday he will reach the city
for tiie express purpose of Inspecting
the Islands.    He will he  t  by Mr,
Manson, who In company with the
road superintendent of the district,
it. (i. Jennings, will accompany the
minister to the Queen Charlottes nnd
there look Into the work thai is being done and make Investigations nt
lirsi hand Into the needs as far as,
his departmenl is concerned,
There are some matters in the city
having   to   do   with   the   works-de-i
partment that  Mr. Taylor will  have
called  lo his attention  by  Mr.  Man-
son  on   the  coming  visit.
 o	
Mrs. Donald McLeod, Third avenue, held a mUBlcale on Wednesday
afternoon from 4 to 6. Her many
lady friends in the city took advantage of the occasion to be present.
A most enjoyable afternoon was
spent.
W.   Burns  of  Hazelton   Is  In   the
city for a few days.
not dismayed by this declaring that
they believed the city would be better to put in the whole of Its plant
instead of using one boiler of the
sash and door factory and putting in
one new one.
It was only after the most careful
consideration by the council that the
decision was arrived at to postpone
matters for a few days.
The original proposition, as readers of The Journal  will  remember,
was for the city to put an additional
boiler in  the sash and door factory
to supplement the plant already there
and by the city providing the means
for   distributing  the   electric   power
and   tiie   factory  looking   after   the
steaming a steady supply   would be
• | maintained as a temporary supply for
! i this winter at least. 'The report on
|   the cost of that was made by the city
' J engineer's department a few days ago
>   and   published   In   The   Journal   at
I | that time.
' Favored Local  System
- i      On   Wednesday  evening  when  the
', ! subject of lighting was introduced a
1 full discussion followed.    Aid. Smith
was not present at the meeting.
Aid. Lynch felt satisfied to make
arrangements for tbe providing of
power from the Sash & Door Factory.
He would recommend that. These
power companies, according to what
he understood, would not ensure a
supply of power unlil four months
had passed, His experience had
been that these four months' contracts ran inio six months.
He did nol feel iike making u em-
tract that would extend over any
number of years. My ordering the
machinery now the power could be
got quite quickly. Aid. Mobley was
south now and would make a good
purchasing agant. Unless something
were done at once there would be
no light this winter. He wanted the
report of the city engineer on the
water power read to the city.
Aid. Mclntyre agreed with Aid.
Lynch. The people wanted the light
and should have it. There should be
no longer delay. He referred to the
remarks of Sir Wilfrid Laurier that
they were not concerned about the
cost. It was the results. The city
needed the light and'should get this
temporary plant.
< loyiih   Record
The city clerk read  tiie report  of
the assistant engineer to the city engineer on Cloyah River power proposition as requested by Aid. Lynch.
It described the river which emptied into Cloyah Bay from a series
of lakes. The record taken showed
that 42 cubic feet a second was passing. There was a reservoir site of
about six square miles with twenty
square miles of watershed. The report of the city solicitor on the application having been made for 150
cubic feet a second was rend. The
application would be heard on Sep-
tember i". before the water commissioner   here.
Aid. Lynch said thai ni the time
the engineer examined this place the
wnler wns very low.     He was struck
with the ease with which the dam
could be construct! d. for a lighting
i.lnni it would last quite a while. It
wi uId be no good fm- this year, but
it might be gone Into and power
cheaper than any private company
could provide it might bo obtainable
there,
Me moved that the mayor, the city
engineer nnd the eitj solicitor take
up the question of providing for a
plan! to BUpply the city with temporary lighting by using the sash
and door factory. Another boiler
would be necessary.
Aid. Harrow said that as he understood that the style of boiler proposed was readily saleable, It might
be better to get two boilers so as to
ensure having one In use always.
Mayor Explains
His Worship said Cloyah River
was at most only seven or eight miles
from the city. He had been asked
by Aid. Lynch to go and see it. It
looked like a good proposition and
they had at once made application
for It. It was necessary to act
quickly, because there was a reserve
J
(Continued on Page Eight) THE   PRINCE   RUPERT   JOURNAL
Friday, August 26, 1910.
SEEKING INVESTMENT
British Capitalists are in the Northern
Part of the Province.
Tour of Districts Should Have Marked Effect  Upon the Future
Development
The northern part of the province
is at present being visited by an
important company of British capitalists who are seeking investments
In Western Canada. They will probably come north with Premier McBride and after paying a visit to
Prince Rupert will go up the Skeena
and look into conditions in the Interior of the province.
Millions of dollars are likely to be
Invested In Western Canada, including British Columbia as a result of
the tour now being made by the Earl
of Dunmore, Mr. Norton Griffiths,
M.P., and Mr. Harry Brlttain. They
are ardent imperialists, and do not
neglect an opportunity to advocate
the cause they are so prominently
identified with. Mr. Brlttain Is the
father of last year's Imperial Press
conference.
The visitors, accompanied by Mrs.
Griffiths on arrival in Vancouver
were welcomed by Mr. A. D. McRae, the western representative and
business associate of Messrs. Mackenzie and D. D. Mann of the Canadian
Northern Railway. Before coming
west, Mr. and Mrs. Griffiths were the
guests of Mr. and Mrs. Mackenzie at
their home in Northern Ontario. Mr.
Griffiths is .manging director of
Messrs. Griffiths & Co., general contractors of world-wide reputation,
the chairman being Lord Hardwell,
the second richest individual in England.
The visitors devoted an afternoon
in Vancouver to an inspection of the
plant of the Canadian Western Lumber Company at Mlllside. In company with Lord Clinton and Hon. M.
Elphinstone, they will hold a conference with Premier McBride and
take a motor trip along the east coast
of Vancouver Island as far as Comox.
Various matters In connection with
their British Columbian land and
colonization projects will be dlscuBS-
ed with Premier McBride. It Is expected that they will accompany his
party on his forthcoming trip
through the northern Interior
The Earl of Dunmore, who owns
shout 80,000 acres In England and
Scotland is in his fortieth year. He
has already made a great reputation
in the House of Lords for his advocacy of the cause of Imperial unity.
He is extremely affable and courteous. He has a very distinguished
military career. He saw service in
India, Egypt and South Africa. In
1897 he won the coveted Victoria
Cross in the Afghanistan frontier
war for personal valor in saving the
life of a brother officer when surrounded by several hundred tribesmen. As Lord Fincastle he commanded Fincastle'S'horse in the Soutii
African war, and was mentioned in
dispatches. He was also at various
periods an officer of the Sixteenth
Lancers and the Sixth Dragoons. He
Is the eighth earl, Alexander Edward
Murray. The title was created In
1686. He was formerly A.D.C. to the
Viceroy of India. He wears nine
medals for military services.
Messrs. Griffiths and Brittain are
equally well known as the champions
of closer relations between the
motherland and the overseas dominions. .Mr. Griffith is still in his early
forties, a type of the progressive
Englishman who has travelled much,
and acquired a foundation for his
strong Imperial sentiment. Only recently he returned from Chill where
tils firm is carrying out railway contracts Involving the expenditure of
thirty-live million dolnrs. Mr. Griffiths, like his friend, the Ear) of
Dunmore, is n man of very distinguished appearance, lie Is a man of
large physique and every movement
reflects his almost boundless energy.
"Our mission to the Dominion has
a direct bearing on our Imperialistic
principles. We are looking around
for investments. The members of
our party have considerable means
and intend to carefully study the situation. If we see anything that appeals to us we will Invest our own
money and can also secure capital
from our associates in England," said
Mr. Griffiths when interviewed In
Vancouver.
Incidentally it developed in the
course of the conversation that Mr.
Griffiths has already purchased about
140,000 acres In the prairie provinces
The matter was referred to as though
it were the most commonplace incident. Ten or twelve thousand acres
of fruit lands In the Okanagan Valley have also been acquired by mem
bers of the party, including Mr. Brit-
tain, who is ii stockholder in various
London illustrated periodicals.
"This is only a beginning," resumed Mr. Griffiths, very modestly. "We
intend to have a look through various districts of this province. Our
original plan of going west through
ihe Yellowhead Pass was abandoned.
It is now quite probable that we will
ascend the Skeena River and go
through to Fort George and thenee
south to the main line of the Canadian Pacific railway.
"Quite separate from any investments which I may make with my
fellow-travellers I have at heart a
personal project for bringing out at
least 1,200 families from my own
constituency of Wednesbury. A
start has already been made. Seventy
families have already been sent out.
Three of them are in Victoria where
I shall look them up. For
various reasons I prefer British Co-
\ liiinbla to the prairie regions as a
Held for the activities of the people I
shall send out. Here I purpose locating three centers of colonization to
be named Wednesbury, Tipton and
Darlaston, after places in my constituency. There will he a resident
secretary at each point. This is the
first definite non-charitable project
working on systematic lines. The
press of England is watching the experiment with interest. My ultimate
object is to produce results which
will stimulate members of parliament and mayors of cities to start
similar movements. In that way I
think I can do the empire a greater
service than by simply talking. Of
course, I shall expect the co-operation of your government. This is
a matter I hope to discuss with Premier McBride.
"In every instance the families
sent out will be selected very carefully. No undesirables will figure in
the list. They will largely belong to
the type of farm laborers, but arti-
zans and coal miners will be Included. The local secretaries in each
community out here will keep In
touch with conditions and as occasion warrants will cable home for
additional immigrants.
"Let Great Britain have her own
parliament, and the overseas dominions their own parliaments, but let
them join in the establishment of an
Imperial Senate in which all parts of
the empire will be represented," he
continued In championing the cause
he has so deeply at heart.
"I would not have It sitting In
London all the time. Rather would
I prefer to see the senators assemble
this year in Ottawa and in another
year in Cape Town or Sydney.
"The Canadian navy Is a step In
the right direction, but the colonial
units must be a portion of the Imperial navy working under an imperial admiralty in time of war. I
can claim credit for being the first
candidate to conduct an election campaign on purely Liberal Imperial
lines. I formed my opinions as a result of observation In various parts
of the world. On the platform with
my twenty-two foot map I was able
to demolish the argument of every
Little Englander. The idea of an Imperial senate will be realized some
day. This sentiment is now a leaven
working down among the masses.
"In private I have also advocated
the same thing to Hon. Arthur Balfour and other leading members of
the party. We will create the greatest united empire and the greatest
race the world has even seen. There
will be one Imperial army, one Imperial navy controlled by an Imperial
senate. Liberal preference will come
automatically as a natural sequel. If
a plebiscite were taken today seventy-five per cent of the people of the
empire would vote for prferentlal
trade. Let us keep trade In our own
channels as much as possible. An
em|iire united on closer lines will be
able to dictate the peace of the
world. Any tendency to delay the
renllaztion of Imperial unity would,
of course, he to the interest of other
big nations not. Included In it."
— o	
POSTPONES SALE
Mann Interests Will Nol Sell Land lit
Stewart This Fall
During a recent trip to Stewart
where the Portland Canal Short Line
railway, a project Initiated by Mr.
Donald D. Mann, vice-president of
the Canadian Northern, Mr. Darling
Inspected the company's townslte
adjacent to the present, town of
Stewart. Mr. Darling decided that
owing to the lateness of the season
It would be Inadvisable to place the
townslte on the market until next
spring. He, however, disposed of a
number of lots on tho future main
business thoroughfare, stipulating
that buyers must erect suitable
places of business.
 o	
Subscribe for The Prince Kupert
lournal now.
HAYNOR BROS.
1 House Furni ihis
Located temporarily, since the Are,
in  Diiiieiliu Block, corner of Second
Avenue  and  Eighth  Street.
■   Some snaps in slightly damaged   goods   which   we  want  to  clear
m  out before  moving into new quarters in Manson Blk., Third Ave.
1 FUNERAL  FURNISHERS
■ iw»
NEWS OF THE PROVINCE
Items of General Interest From Centres in British Columbia.
New Westminster.—According to
prasent prospects a nail manufactory
will be established on Lulu Island
and In operation by the end of the
present year. G. W. Laldlaw, formerly of Hamilton, Ont., but now a
resident of this citj is behind the
project and is now making the necessary arrangements for beginning of
construction work.
A site for this factory has been secured on Lulu Island about one-half
mile below the Lulu Island bridge.
Mr. Laldlaw now owns two acre)
there with frontage on the North
Arm of the Fraser and extending all
the way back to the Lulu Island
main road. He will probably add to
this site as the exingencies of the occasion demand. He has already a
gang of men at work clearing he
site and has placed an order for the
necessary lumber. The building will
be erected at once and it is expected
that the plant will be In operation
by January, 1911.
The company will manufacture
nails and wire fencing at this plant
and in time will also probably instal
a galvanizing plant. The iron used
will probably be shipped in by sailing vessels from Belgium or other
European countries. There is believed to be a good market for the
product of a factory of this kind.
There is a nail factory in Vancouver, but the demand for nails in British Columbia is large and the plant
Is taxed to capacity to keep pace
with the orders. Mr. Laidlaw's son
is at present in Hamilton superintending the establishment of a similar factory there and will doubtless
come out to the coast this autumn.
Officers of Coal Company
Princeton.—The following are the
officials and directors of the Columbia Coal & Coke Company, recently
In attendance at a meeting held at
Granite Creek for the purpose of
transacting important business:
President, J. W. Bettes, Winnipeg;
vice-president, J. T. Johnson, Vancouver; secretary-treasurer, W. L.
Parrlsh, Winnipeg; J. E. Grey, Winnipeg; attorney-general of Manitoba,
Colin C. Campbell; J. Brown, Winnipeg; important work will be immediately started in the development
of this property.
Vancouver.—The plant of tho
Powell River Paper Company at
Powell River on the mainland, opposite Texada Island, will be completed and In operation about May 1
or by July 1 next at the latest. It
will represent an investment of $2,-
000,000, will have acaapcity of one
hundred tons of paper daily, and will
give British Columbia a new payroll
equivalent to $500,000 a year. The
well known sawmill firm of Brooks-
Seanlon Company, owning scores of
sawmills in Minnesota, Wisconsin
and the Southern States as well as
extensive timber limits in Canada
and the United States is behind the
Mg enterprise.
There are 1.000 men at work just
now. Every class of skilled nnd unskilled labor is represented, flood
progress is being made on the construction of the buildings, a dozen In
round figures, located on the beach
at the mouth of the river. They are
being made of reinforced concrete,
equipped with  automatic sprinklers.
The plant will manufacture newspaper and wraplng paper at the outset, but later will also turn out the
finest grades for commercial use.
Buying Its Own Debentures
Victoria.—As the price offered for
City of Victoria debentures is not
considered by Mayor Morley high
enough to warrant the city disposing of them at the figures tendered,
97, the mayor will recommend to the
city council that the $200,232.28 debentures Issued for local improvement works be purchased out of the
general sinking funds now lying at
the credit of the city having been annually set aside to meet debentures
Issued on other works.
The city recently .called for bids
on the debentures, nnd the best price
obtained was 97.    As the city has a
large sum of mbney lying at the
credit of the general sinking fund account which cannot be used for the
purpose of paying off the debentures
during the lifetime of the local Improvement debentures the mayor suggests that himself and the treasurer
be authorized to purchase out of
this general sinking fund the $200,-
232.28 debentures for the above local
improvement works at the rate of
$97 10 for each $100 of debentures.
Water Supply
Nanalmp.—Rather than pay increased water rates demanded by the
city, the Western Fuel company,
owners and operators of the local
mines, will Install a system of their
own, work on which has already
commenced. From this system the
company Intends drawing the entire
supply of water needed in the operation of Its local mines, including
boilers, washers, stables, etc., and
also as an auxiliary fire fighting system for the protection of its valuable
top works at. No. 1 shaft.
The supply of water is to be obtained from Chase river, a force of
men already being -engaged on the
construction of a dam at a point
known as the "canyon," about a mile
below the city dams, and distant
about two and a half miles from No.
1 shaft. Work on the system, which
it is estimated, will cost in the neighborhood of $25,000, will be rushed
to an early completion, and it is expected by the end of the year to have
it installed and the company's works
supplied with water from the new
source.
A New Dredge
New Westminster.—The contract
has been let to the Westminster
Marine Railway Company for the
construction of a new dipper dredge
to be used In this district by Huff
Bros. The timbers and lumber for
the dredge are now being gotten out
by the Small & Bucklln Lumber Co.,
and the building of the dredge will
be started at the ways in a day or
so. Mr. Beatty & Sons, of Welland,
Ont., have the contract for the supply
of the necessary  machinery.
The new dredge will be 60 feet
long and 20 feet wide and about 5
feet deep and will be capable of doing almost any kind of work. It
will be able to dredge streams of
30 foot depth or of digging out
ditches in the land and building a
dyke. Probably one of the first
works to be undertaken will be the
dredging of the North Arm of the
Fraser by the Westminster Marine
Railway Ways. At the present time
vessels for repair or overhauling can
only be brought on to the ways at
high tide, which sometimes occurs
in the middle of the night. The new
dredge may also be used to do some
dredging at the Lulu Island bridge
for the city's water main to Lulu
Island in the event of the King Edward dredge being unable to do this
work.
Acquire Pulp Mills
Victoria.—A syndicate consisting
of Joseph Martin, K.C.,.). S. Harvey,
T. S. Paterson and W. limes Paterson has purchased all the assets of
the British Canadian Wood Pulp &
Paper company, The price is not
mentioned, but the statement Is furnished that it Is at a price which will
allow the shareholders a large percentage of the money put Into the
company with the privilege of taking
stock at par in the new corporation.
The syndicate proposes to go on
with the operation of the mills at
Port Mellon and have already commenced negotiations for the complete
financing of the proposition.
Included In the assets acquired by
the new syndicate are the pulp concessions of the Quatslno Power &
Pulp Company. The history of these
Is a somewhat involved one. The
holdings of the original grantee of
the timber was taken over by the
Western Canada Wood Pulp & Paper
Company, which undertook to erect
a mill to comply with the conditions
of the grant, but did not succeed in
carrying out Its undertaking.
In  the  meantime  the  British  Ca
nadian Pulp & Paper Company had
erected a mill at Howe Sound to go
into the business and by arrangement
took over the concessions of the
Western Canada Company on Vancouver Island. The Provincial Government allowed the company's mill
at Port Mellon to apply on the lease
of the Quatslno properties, and they
passed an order-in-council whereby
the company had to expend an additional $120,000 before November,
1911.
The British aCnadian Wood Pulp
& Paper Co. had at Port Mellon a
mill capable of turning out seven
tons of finished paper a day, together
with fifteen tons of chemical pulp.
The mill eos.t approximately $375,-
000, but owing to the great demand
for money locally, the mill had to
be closed down for want of capital
to make minor additions., which
would enable them to turrr out a
greater variety of grades of paper.
The directors had realized for some
time that as things are in the money
market it was useless to attempt to
raise locally capital by stock sub-
soriplons, and have-been endeavoring
to float bonds or to dispose of the
property on the best possible terms.
Many deals have from time to time
been pending, but the fact that always there was more or less uncertainty as the the. tenure of the
Quatslno concessions militated
against the consummation of the
sale. This was effected on Monday
last.
The
Washington Cafe
A PLACE TO EAT
Seats For Ladies
Everything Clean and Tasty
Prices Reasonable
to. F. CARPENTER, PROPRIETOR
Second Avenue, near Seventh Street
—TIIE—
Oliver
Typewriter
—FOR—
Seventeen Cents a Day
Please read the headline over
again. Then Its tremendous significance will dawn upon you.
An Oliver Typewriter—the standard visible writer—the most highly
perfected typewriter on the market
—yours for 17 cents a day!
The typewriter whose conquest of
the commercial world is a matter of
business history—yours for 17 cents
a day!
1 The typewriter that Is equipped
with scores of such conveniences as
"The Balance Shift"—"The Ruling
Device"—"The Double Release"—
"The Locomotive Base"—"The Automatic Spacer"—"The Automatic Tabulator"—"The Disappearing Indicator"—"The Adjustable Paper Fingers"—"The Scientific Condensed
Keyboard"—all
Yours For 17 Cents a Day
Hear
the
Truth
There's nothing about a set of
harness that requires such careful
attention, In both leather and workmanship, as traces and collars, there's
where the strain lies, there's where
we excel, though we are just as
watchful as to every other detail of
a complete set of harness, be it for
heavy or light work.
B. C. Saddlery Company
Limited
MANUFACTURERS OF  SADDLERY
Jobbers of Leather, Harness, Saddles, Whips, Trunks and Valises,
Pads, Blankets, Rugs; Harness Soaps
and Dressings.
560 YATES STREET
VICTORIA, B.C.
Clarmont Rooms
Sixth Avenue near Fulton Street
Comfortable, Homelike Rooms; Newly Furnished Throughout;  Bath
Rooms   with   Hot   and
Cold Water
Rates, $3.00 a Week   mid   Upwards
Mrs.   Annie   McGrath,   Proprletoress
LAND 1 URCHASE NOTICE
Coast Land District—District of
Skeena.
TAKE NOTICE that we, George
Hie and Robert Corlett, of Little Canyon, B.C., occupation farmer and
farmer, Intend to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted at the south-east portion of an Island situated and lying
about two miles below Little Canyon,
near the south bank of the Skeena
river, Range V, Skeena Land Dlst.'lct,
District of Coast, thence northerly,
thence easterly, thence southerly
around the shores of the island back
to the point of beginning and Inclosing 30 acres, more or less
GEORGE HIE,
ROBERT. CORLETT.
Dated August 1, 1910. A19
We announced this new sales plan
recently, just to feel the pulse of the
people. Simply a small cash payment—then 17 cents a day. That
is the plan in a nutshell.
The result has been such a deluge of applications for machines
that we are simply astounded.
The demand comes from people of
all classes, all ages, all occupations.
The majority of Inquiries has
come from people of known financial
standing who were attracted by the
novelty of the proposition. An impressive demonstration of the Immense popularity of the Oliver Typewriter.
A startling confirmation of our belief that the Era of Universal Typewriting Is at hand.
A Quarter of a Million People are
Making Money With
Ttje.
OLIVET*
TypeWrifer
The Standard Visible Writer
The Oliver Typewriter is a moneymaker, right from the word "go!" So
easy to run that beginners soon get
in the "expert" class. Earn as you
learn. Let the machine pay the 17
cents a day—and all above that Is
yours.
Wherever you are, there's work to
be done and money to be made by
using the Oliver. The business world
is calling for Oliver operators. There
are notenough to supply the demand.
Their salaries are considerably above
those of many classes of workers.
"An Oliver Typewriter in
Every Home!"
That Is our battle cry today. We
have made the Oliver supreme In
usefulness and absolutely indispensable in business. Now comeB the
conquest of the home.
The simplicity and strength of the
Oliver fit It for family use. It is becoming an important factor in the
home training of young people. An
educator as well as a money maker.
Our new selling plan puts the
Oliver on the threshold of every
home In America. Will you close
tbe door of your home or office on
this remarkable Oliver opportunity?
Write for further details of our
easy offer and a free copy of the new
Oliver catalogue.    Address:
R. C. BEAN
Prince Rupert Agent
General   Offices:   Oliver   Typewriter
Building, Chicago, 111.
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE
NOTICE Is hereby given that the
reserve existing on Crown lands In
the vicinity of Babine Lake, and
situate in Cassiar District, notice of
which bearing date June 30th, 1909,
was published in the British Columbia Gazette, dated July 2nd, 1908, lg
cancelled.
ROBERT A. RUNWICK,
Deputy Commissioner of Lands.
Lands Department,
Victoria, B. O, June 16th, 1910
(First insertion July 6.) Friday, August 26, 1910.
PRINC3 RUPERT JOURNAL
INSURANCE CONTROL
Conclusion Reached by the Commission
Appointed by the Provincial
Government.
It is Recommended  That There Be
a Department Created  at
Victoria
The report of the insurance commission appointed by the Provincial
Government has been laid before the
executive. The commission consisted
of R. S. Lennie, of Nelson; D. H.
McDowell, Victoria, and A. B.
Erskine, of Vancouver. Sittings were
held In different parts of the province and all Interests heard.
The rapid growth of commerce
with the tremendous development in
the different sections of the province
leading to the springing up of many
towns with their constantly increasing population, render it necessary,
says the report, that this special
branch of business affecting the
whole of the people should be to
some extent under government supervision and control, In the interests of
those engaged in the business and
those providing it.
The many instances cited of bogus
companies or underwriters doing
business show it is necessary from
the standpoint of the people as a
whole, as numerous instances of un-
accounable losses indicate the necessity of investigation and the insufficiency of the existing laws; and the
lack of uniformity and the absence
of necessary provisions indicate the
necessity for the revision of such
laws.
It is to be expected that an efficient officer of the government with
such assistance as it may be necessary for him to have will protect the
public and assist the underwriters,
and reduce the fire waste and eventually lower the insurance rates.
The commission reached the following conclusions: —
"That the government should
create an insurance department.
"That no unlicensed companies or
associations of underwriters or their
representatives should be permitted
to solicit fire insurance in the province.
"That all insurers should be permitted to place their insurance freely
with such unlicensed companies or
associations of underwriters, including Mutuals and Lloyds, and should
have the right to obtain inspection
of iheir risks and adjustment of
their losses upon obtaining a licence
for that purpose only, from the department, naming the Inspector or
adjuster, and that the lieutenant-
governor-ln-councll should have the
right from time to time to make and
enforce regulations to prevent the
solicitation of business by such Inspectors  or adjusters.
"That any company or association
of underwriters should be required
to obtain a licence from such department entitling it to do business
throughout the province without
further licence from municipalities,
and as a condition of obtaining such
licence it should satisfy such department as to its financial standing and
make a deposit in cash or securities
or a satisfactory bond of a guarantee
company in lieu thereof, for the re-
Insurance of Its risks to be administered by the department; the
amount of such cash bond to be determined by the inspector considering the evidence submitted, but to
be less than $20,000, with the right
to require a further deposit after its
annual statement  is issued.
"That such department, should
have full power to investigate all fire
losses, and give out the Information
so obtained upon request.
'That the department should have
power lo cancel licences subject to nn
appeal to the lleutetiant-governor-
In-rouncll.
"That for the purpose of maintaining such a department a tax should
be imposed upon the premiums paid
by all insurers doing business with
licensed or unlicensed companies,
and that there should bo no discrimination In the amount of the tax.
"That ther should be no provision
for licensed brokers.
"That in consideration of the benefits to be derived from such department and for the purpose of creating
uniformity In the licence fees the
present municipal licence fees should
be abolished.
"That the proposed bill with these
modifications, substitutions and additions should be approved and the
existing laws repealed."
 o	
FRENCH CAPITAL FOR CANADA
capitalists who are at the present
time showing unexampled, interest in
Canadian lands and industries, Is the
statement of A. O. P. Francis, consul
for France at Victoria.
Mr. Francis was instrumental In
the organization of a strong syndicate of French capitalists which has,
to the present time, invested $1,500,-
000 in Alberta, Saskatchewan and
British Columbia. He states that
their investments are turning out
exceedingly well, and that If the returns for the present year are as
great as In the past—and there is
every Indication that they will be—
there will be practically unlimited
French capital for Investment in Canada next year.
Mr. Francis was at the Royal Alexandra Hotel, Winnipeg, last week,
while a number of noted English capitalists were also there and stated
In no uncertain way that they are
but the forerunners of dozens of European money lords who are looking
to Canada as the best field for investment offered in the world today.
He predicts that the flow of capital
from the money centres of the Old
World will be greater in the next
few years than ever in the past.
Mr. Francis is in close touch with
the realty movement from Winnipeg
to the coast and believes that the outlook at the present time is better
than at any time since he first became interested several years ago.
LAND PURCHASE NOTICES
Skeena Land District—District of'
Queen Charlotte.
TAKE NOTICE that the Queen
Charlotte Whaling Company Limited,
of Victoria, British Columbia, occupation manufacturers, intend to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:-—Commencing at >a post planted about fifteen
chains south of a small creek on the
west side of Rose Harbour, Moresby
Island, thence west forty chains,
thence north forty chains, 'thence
east forty chains, thence southerly
following the sinuosities of the foreshore line forty chains, to the point
of commencement.
Queen Charlotte Whaling
Company Limited,
Per Sydnev Charles Ruck, Agent
Dated July 14th,  1910.
Rose Harbour,  Q.C.I.       . A5
Skeena Land District—District of
pn jacl fl V
TAKE NOTICE that Reginald
Davey, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation machinist, in ten dB to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands, In the vicinity of
Citwancool or Chean Weln Valley:
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-west corner and about 6 %
miles distant in a north-westerly direction from the north end of Kitwancool Lake, thence south 80
chains, thence east 80 chains, thence
north 40 chains, thence west 40
chains, thence north 40 chains
chains, thence west 40 chains to a
point of commencement, and containing 480 acres (more or less).
REGINALD   DAVEY.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated May  30,  1910. Jy8
Coast Land District—District of
Skeena.
TAKE NOTICE that Elijah
Rounds, of Victoria, B.C., occupation
Stewart, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted one-half mile north,
and one-half mile east, of Nettle A.
Lairds N. E. corner of application to
purchase, and 300 feet east of Ana-
ham Lake trail, marked E. R.'s
south-west corner, thence 40 chains
east, thence 40 chains north, thence
40 chains west, thence 40 chains
south to point of commencement,
and containing 160 acres, more or
less. ELIJAH  ROUNDS.
Vincent  M.  Schibner, Agent.
Dated May 25, 1910. jn21
LAND PURCHASE .NOTICES
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that William
Hume Grant, of Stewart, B.C., occupation engineer, Intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—Commencing at a
post marked W.ll.G.'s S.W. Cor., and
planted adjoining Alfred Malison's
corner post, thence 80 chains north,
along W. N, Harrison's west line,
thense east 80 chains, thenco soutii
80 chains, thence west SO chains, following Alfred .Malison's north line to
point of commencement, and containing 840 acres, more or less.
WILLIAM  HUME GRANT.
Frank  R.  Strolm, Agent.
Dated July 2, 1910. Jy22
LAND PURCHASE NOTICE
LAND PURCHASE NOTICES
Skeena Land District—District of
O ARSIS.!*
TAKE NOTICE that John Cherry,
of Victoria, B. C, occupation mattress maker, intends to apply for permission to purchase ihe following described lands In the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted.at the
north-east corner and about 14 miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence west 80 chains, thence
south 80 chains, thence east 80
chains, thence north 80 chains to
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
JOHN CHERRY.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 3, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
O'l SSI ill'
TAKE NOTICE that Brenton
Brown, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation Insurance agent, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands in the vl-
inity of the Kltwancool or Chean
Weln Valley:—Commencing at a
post planted at the north-east corner and about ten miles distant in
a north-westerly direction from the
north end of Kitwancool Lake,
thence south 80 chains, thence east
80 chains, thence north 80 chains,
thence west 80 chains to point of
commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
BRENTON BROWN.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 1, 1910. JyS
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Jessie Stead-
man, of Victoria, B. C, occupation
married woman, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the follow-
ng described lands, in the vicinity of
Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-east   corner    and    about   6 %
iles distant in a north-westerly direction from the north end of Kitwancool Lake, thence south 80
chains; thence west SO chains, thence
north 80 chains, thence east 80
bains to point of commencement,
and containing 640 acres, more or
less. JESSIE STEADMAN.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated May 31r 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Bruce Older-
shaw, of Victoria, B.. C, occupation
jeweller, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described  lands  in  the  vicinity of  the
Citwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing   at   a   post   planted   at
he north-west corner and about 7 %
miles distant in a north-westerly direction from the north end of Kitwancool Lake; thence south SO
chains, thence east 40 chains, thence
north 80 chains, thence west 40
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 320 acres, more or
less. BRUCE OLDERSHAW.   -
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated May 31,  1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Ot Sfiifl i*
TAKE NOTICE that Sarah Ward,
of Victoria, B. C., occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Weln Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. E. corner and about 22 mllec distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north 80 chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence south 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or .ess.
SARAH WARD.
James to. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 6th, 1910 Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Oflflflifli*
TAKE NOTICE that George Mc-
Bain, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
merchant, intends to apply for permission to purchase ihe following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. W. corner and about 26% miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north 80 chains, thence
east 80 chains, thence south 80
chains, thence west 80 chains to
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
GEORGE  McBAIN.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 8th, 1910. JyS
Skeena Land District—District of
O fi ^ s 11\ v
TAKE NOTICE that Catherine
Welsh, of Vancouver, U. O, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands in the vi-
vinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein
Valley:—Commencing at a post
planted at the S. E. corner and about
17% miles distant in a north-westerly direction from the north end of
Kitwancool Lake, thence north 80
chains, thence west 80 chains, thence
soutii 80 chains, thence east 80
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 640 acres, more or
less. CATHERINE   WELSH.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 4,  1910. JyS
LAND PURCHASE NOTICES
LAND PURCHASE NOTICES
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Frederick
Tutt, of Selkirk, Manitoba, occupation merchant, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. W. corner about 14% miles distant in a north-westeriy direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north 40 chains, thence
east 40 chains, thenee south 40
chains, thence west 4 0 chains to
point of commencement, and containing 160 acres, more or leBS.
FREDERICK   TUTT.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 3, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
OflfiRf il Y
TAKE NOTICE that Henry Van
Wyck, of Vancouver, B. O, occupation hotel keeper, Intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein
Valley:—Commencing at a post
planted at the north-east corner and
about 20 miles distant in a northwesterly direction from the north end
of Kitwancool Lake, thence soutii 80
chains, thence west 80 chains, thence
north 80 chains, thence east 80
chains to^point of commencement,
and containing 040 acres, more or
less, HENRY VAN  WYCK.
James' W. Smith, Agent.
Dated  June  6th,   191U. JyS
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Minnie Clarke
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the' following
described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chenn Wein Valley:-—
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. W. corner and about 28% miles
distant and in a north-westerly direction from the north end of Kitwancool Lake, thence south 40 chains
thence east 80 chains, thence north
40 chains, thence west SO chains to
point of commencement and containing 320  acres,  more  or less.
MINNIE   CLARKE.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated  June  8th,   1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Leihi Cherry,
of Victoria, B. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of Kltwancool or Chean Weln Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at tne
S. E. corner and about 21 miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the nortb end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north 80 chains, thence
west SO chains, thence south 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
LEIHI   CHERRY.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 6th, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land  District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that John Grieve,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
agent, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wien Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. E. corner and about 20 miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kltwancool
Lake, thence north SO chains, thence
west SU chains, thence south 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to
point of comemncement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
JOHN GRIEVE.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 6th, 1310. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE unit Alfred E.
Parkinglon, of Vancouver, 11. C, occupation broker, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of
Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. E. corner and about 15% miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence nortb 80 chains, thence
west SO chains, thence south SO
chains, thence east 80 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 040 acres, more or less.
ALFRED E.  PARKINGTON.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 3, 1910. Jy8
m
PHONE 138
FOR
LETTER HEADS ENVELOPES
BUSINESS CARDS
VISITING CARDS      STATEMENTS
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Echo Dudgeon, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
assistant dentist, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of the
Kitwancool or Chean Weln Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-east corner and about 7 %
miles distant in a north-westerly direction from the north end of Kitwancool Lake, thence south 80
chains, thence north 80 chains,
thence east 80 chains to point of
commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
ECHO DUDGEON,
James to. Smith, Agent.
Dated May 31, 1910. Jy8
m
Prince Rupert Journal
*■
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that George Williams, of Winnipeg, .\lan., occupation
clerk, intends to apply for permission
to- purchase the following described
lands In the vicinity of Kitwancool
or Chean Wein Valley:—Commencing at a post planted at the S. W.
corner and about 16i/2 miles distant
In a north-westerly direction from
tiie north end of Kitwancool Lake,
thence north 4 0 chains, thence
east 40 chains, thence south 40
chains, thence west 40 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 100 acres, more or less.
GEORGE WILLIAMS.
James W.  Smith, Agent.
Dated June 4,  1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that William
Simpson, of' Lindsay, Ont., occupation hotel-keeper, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of the Kitwancool or Chean Wein
Valley:—Commencing at a post
planted at the south-east corner and
about 7% miles distant In a north
westerly direction from the north
end of Kitwancool Lake, thence
north 80 chains, thence west 80
chains, thence south 80 chains,
thence east SO chains to point of
commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
WILLIAM SIMPSON.
James to. Smith, Agent.
Dated May  31,  1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Edward Cas-
pell, of Cayley, Alberta, occupation
merchant, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands In the vicinity of the
Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. W. corner and distant about 15%
miles in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kltwancool
Lake, thence south 80 chains, thence
east 80 chains, thence north 80
chains, thence west 80 chains to
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
EDWARD CASPELL.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 3, 1910. Jy8
That French money Is Just as
ready for investment in Western
Canada as the millions of the English
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that The Canadian
Fish and Cold Storage Company, of
Vancouver, B. C, occupation mercantile and manufacturing, Intends
to apply for permission to purchase
the following described lands: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-east corner of lot 34, Range 5,
Coast District, thence south 20
chains, thence east 40 chains, thence
north 25 chains more or less to the
shore line, thence following along
the shore line to the point of commencement and containing 90 acres,
more or less.
The  Canadian  Fish  &  Cold
Storage Company Limited.
J. H. Pillsbury, Agent.
Mated July 14, 1910. Jyl9
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that George Tutt,
I of Vancouver, B. C, occupation den-
| ist, intends to apply for permission
| 0 purchase the following described
ands In tho vicinity of the Kitwancool or Chean Weln Valley:—Commencing at a post planted at the
north-east corner and about 8%
j miles distant in a north-westerly df-
jrection from the north end of Kitwancool l.nke, thence soutii 40
chains, thence west 4d chains, thence
north 40 chains, tnence east 40
[chains to point of commencement,
and containing 640 acres, more or
less. GEORGE TUTT.
James to. Smith, Agent.
Dated June  1,  1910. ,Iy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Lome Thompson, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
dentist, intends to apply for permission to purchase, the following described lands In the vicinity of the
Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:
Commencing at a post planted at the
south-west corner and about 8%
miles distant In a north-westerly direction from the north end of Kitwancool Lake, thence north 80
chains, thence east 40 chains, thence
soutii SO chains, thence west 40
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 320 acres, more or
less. LORNE THOMPSON.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June  1,  1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles Gei-
ger, of Victoria, b. C, occupation
clerk, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands In the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Comemncing at a post planted at the
S. E. corner and about 19 miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kltwancool
Lake, thence north 80 chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence soutii 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
CHARLES GIEGER.
James W.  Smith,  Agent.
Dated June 4th, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Sarah Cox,
of Monarch, Alberta, occupation marled woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands In the Kitwancool or
Chean Wien Valley:—Commencing at
a post planted at the N. to. corner
and about 4'i miles distant in a
north-westerly direction from the
north end of Kitwancool Lake, thence
soutii SO chains, thence east 80
chains, thence north, SO chains,
thence west 80 chains to point of
commencement, and containing 610
acres, more or less.
SARAH COX.
James W. smith, Agent
Dated May 31st, 1910.
Coast Land District—District of
Skeena.
TAKE NOTICE that I, George A.
Poole, of Prince Rupert, occupation
printer, Intend lo apply for permission to purchase ,the following described lands: — Commencing, at a
post planted on the north-east shore
line of Smith Island, distant about
one mile south-east from Lot 38, and
marked "G. A. P.'s North-west Corner Post," thence 20 chains soutii,
thence 80 chains east, thence north
to shore line, thence following shore
line to point of commencement, containing 160 acres, more or less,
GEORGE ARTHUR POOLE.
Dated Satirday, July 2, 1910.
(First Insertion July 5.)
Skeena Land District—District of
■ Ofmsiij.
TAKE NOTICE tnat Thomas Sills,
of Vancouver, B. .C, occupation machinist, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands In the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. to. corner and about 26% miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence south 80 chains, thence
east 80 chains, thence north 80
chains, thence west 80 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
THOMAS  SILLS.
James to. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 8th, 1910. ,Iy8
-District of
Skeena Land District
(IfLRfllf) V
TAKE NOTICE that William Wallace, of Toronto, Ont., occupation
insurance agent, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
discribed lands in the vlni lit
wancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Comencing at a post planted at the
N. E. corner and about 26% miles
distant in a north-westerly dirocr on
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence south SO chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence north 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to the
point of commencement, containing
040 acres, more or less.
WILLIAM  WALLACE.
James to. Smith, Agent.
Dated  June  8th,   1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that John Reid,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
broker, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kltwancool or Chean Weln Valley:—.
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. to. corner and about 15% miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north 40 chains, thence
east 40 chains, thence south 40
chains, thence west 40 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing  160  acres,  more or  less.
JOHN REID.
James to. Smith, Agent.
Dated  June  3,  1910. Jy8
District of
Skeena Land  Dlstrlct-
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Grace Cess-
ford, of Victoria, B. C, occupation
married woman, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands In the vicinity of
Kitwancool or Chean Weln Valley:—
.if |,,. Commencing at a post planted at the
y " N. E. corner and about 23 miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence soutii SO chains, thence
west SO chains, thence north 80
chains, thence east SO chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres,  more or less.
GRACE CESSEORD.
James to. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 6th, 1910. JyS
Skeena I.and  District—District of
Cnssbir.
TAKE NOTICE that Samuel John
McDIartnld, of Monarch, Alberta, occupation farmer, Intends to apply for
permission to purchase tbe following described lands In the Kltwancool  or Chean  Weln  Valley:—Com-
 in ing ai n posl planted at the N.
B. corner nnd about I % miles in a
north-westerly direction from the
north end of Kltwancool Lake,
thence south 80 chains, thence west
SO chains, thence north SO chains,
thence east. 80 chains to point, of
commencement, and containing 040
acres,  more or less.
SAMUEL JOHN McDIARMID.
James to. Smith, Agent.
Dated May 31st, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Lund District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Henry Hemming, of Victoria, II. C, occupation
hotel keeper, Intends to snnly for
permission to purchase the following
described lands In ihe vicinity of Klt-
wancooi or Chean Weln Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
w E. corner and about 21 miles distant, In a north-westerly direction
from the nortb end of Kltwancool
Lake, thence south SO chains, thence
wesl So chains, thence north 80
chains, thence east so chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or lesB.
HENRY   HEMMING.
James to. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 6th, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land  District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE      NOTICE      that      Nelson
Gowen,  of  Victoria,  B.  C,  occupation mining engineer, intends to apply   for  permission   to  purchase  the
Skeena Lund District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Annie Cowan,
of Victoria, B. C, occupation married woman, Intends to apply for per-1 following described lands In the vl-
mlssion to purchase the following clnlty of Kitwancool or Chean Weln
described landB in the vicinity of Kit- Valley:—Commencing at a post
wancool or Chean Wein Valley:—j planted at the N. E. corner and about
Coiiimencng at a post planted at the 119 miles distant In the north-west-
X. W. corner and about 23 miles dls-|erly direction from the north end of
tant   In   a   north-westerly     direction
from   the  north   end   of   Kltwancool
Lake; thence south so chains, thence
east    SO     chains,    thence  north   80
chains, thence west SO chains to the
point  of commencement,   and    containing 640 acres, more or less.
ANNIE GO WAN.
.lames W.  Smith, Agent.
Dated June 7th, 1910. Jy8
Kltwancool Lake thence south 80
chains, thence west 40 chains, thence
north 40 chains, thence west 40
chalnB, thence north 40 chains
licence east 80 chains to point of
commencement, and containing 480
acres, more or less.
NELSON   GOWEN.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 4th, 1910. jyg
/
1
% PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Friday, August 26, 1010.
prince Rupert journal IINVERKIP ARRIVES I ?"'w.******t******T******l
Telephone 188 •-.; %    Nicknames of Regiments   %
'
%
'../
Published twice a week on Tuesdays
and Fridays from the office of publication, Third Avenue near McBride St.
Subscription rate to any point in
Canada. 92.00 a year: to points outside
of Canada, 33.00 a year.
Advertising rate furnished on application.
O. H. NELaON,
Editor.
Friday, August 26, 1910.
Freight   Steamer   Reaches
With Cargo  of
Cement.
Port
Consignment Will Be Used on G.T.P.
Ami at Cold Storage Plunt
in the City
PREMIER'S MEETING
Referring to the reception accorded Sir Wilfrid Laurier by Premier
McBride, the Victoria Daily Times,
the chief organ of the Liberal party
in  British  Columbia, says:—
"As the representative of the people of British Columbia, Premier McBride has done something no other
provincial premier, Liberal or Conservative, has thought of doing, or
possibly did not consider his position
would justify him in doing. Mr. McBride has not only, by duputy, formally and courteously extended a cordial welcome to Sir Wilfrid Laurier
on crossing the boundary line between Alberta and British Columbia
—his government has made arrangements on a somewhat elaborate scale
to receive the Prime Minister and
his party on their arrival at the
capital of the province and to give
all residents and visitors here an
opportunity of paying their respects
to the First Citizen of the Dominion
tomorrow evening. The courtesy and
tact displayed by Mr. McBride will,
we are sure, be fully appreciated by
the people of British Columbia, and
will demonstrate to all the country
outside of the province that on an
occasion of deep significance and importance we of the West are capable
of rising above all political or party
considerations."
 o	
THE   LIGHT   QUESTION
On Wednesday evening the big
steam freighter Inverklp, Capt.
Hand, reached port with her heavy
cargo of cement. The vessel left
Hongkong on July 29 and had an uneventful trip across the Pacific to
this port, the captain bringing the
largest vessel that ever entered the
harbor in without any difficulty and
with no one on board who knew anything of the local waters.
The cargo of 25,000 barrels of
cement Is consigned for the most part
to Foley, Welch & Stewart, although
about 7,000 will go to the Canadian
Fish & Cold Storage Company works
to be used In constructing the buildings there.
The Inverklp is of nearly 4,500
tons burden. The work of discharging Is advancing. The steamer is
the first one to come direct from the
Orient here.
INTERESTED IN COAL
Treasures on Queen Charlotte Islands
May Soon be Developed
The city council Is now confronted
with one of the most serious questions it will have to consider — that
of whether the city shall own its own
light and power plant or will allow
private enterprise to provide it by
agreement with the city. This is not
the first city that has had to wrestle
with the question and there are precedents to guide the aldermen.
Under present day methods of restricting companies granted rights
on the streets the objections that are
so often urged against private companies have been overcome. In old
cBBtablished cities where the growth
was slow it was often found necessary to give what in the present day
is looked upon as most obnoxious
privileges. The day for that has passed now, however, and companies getting rights from the cities are restricted in the public interest so that
the city derives revenues of no Inconsiderable value for the use which
fe made of the streets.
Prince Rupert Is a city that Is sure
to have a very rapid development and
private corporations will look with
favor upon the securing of franchises
here. The council if we mistake not,
will be in a position to make excellent terms with those seeking rights
here.
On the other hand the city is to be
put to a lot of expense to put the
streets in proper condition to meet
the demands of the trade that is to
centre here shortly. An instance of
this Is afforded in the cost of rough
grading which is only the beginning
With pavements and permanent sidewalks added to this, with provision
for parks and recreation grounds,
with a costly water system to metal,
nth sewers to provide and public
buildings to erect, all within a very
limited time, the council will, we are
inclined to think, find Its hands full,
cioth from a financial standpoint and
in a business way, without assuming
any more utilities as municipal works
than can be avoided. If proper terms
tan be made with private companies
to supply light and power and tram-
*ny facilities, the Interests of the
tlty would be probably better served
lhan If the city itself attempted to
operate them.
C. Ross McAdam, who Is deeply
interested in coal properties and
other interests on the Queen Charlotte Islands is in the city for a few
days. He had intended going over
to the Islands before going south,
but a sudden illness contracted just
before his arrival here has interfered
with his plans.
Mr. McAdam has the greatest faith
in his properties there. Experts who
have examined the ground are agreed
that there is a vast area of coal of
the very best quality. Situated conveniently to Prince Rupert, he expects to have capital interested very
shortly that will push development
and soon begin shipping to this city.
NEW JAPANESE SHIP
After completing arrangements
whereby the Toyo Kisen Kalsha will
sever its connection with the Pacific
Mall and other Harrlman steamship
companies and become affiliated with
the Western Pacific, W. H. Avery, assistant general manager of the Oriental company, returned from the east
to San Francisco. Accompanying him
were M. Shlalshl, managing director,
and K. Okawa, vice-president of the
company.
The new traffic agreement between
the Western Pacific and the Toyo
Klsen Kalsha will become effective
January 26, 1911, according to the
assitsant general manager. He announced that his company would
operate five steamers between San
Francisco and the Orient instead of
three, the present arrangement.
The two new ships will be the
American Maru, which Is being repaired for the new arrangements,
and a turbine steamer that is now
under construction in the yards at
Nagasaki. The new turbine will be
a sister ship to the Chiyo Maru and
the Tenyo Maru.
Charles .Moore, of Porclier Island,
convtoed of assault on Frank Lundy,
also of Porcber Island, was sentenced
to six months in jail with hard labor.
Moore struck Mr. Lundy with a hammer as the latter was about to leave
the boat house on Tuesday for home.
 o	
A piano manufactory is to be located in the city of Vancouver and will
be unique in the west, being the
only one in operation west of Toronto. A company was organized for this
purpose recently known as the Brit-
feh Columbia Piano Company,
Limited. The officers are Jas. Auld,
president; A. to. Seaholm, vice-
president; A. F. Gwln, treasurer;
*nd F. H. Lewis, secretary.
On the recommendation of the
streets committee last night it was
decided to allow Mr. Moore to plank
the alley In rear of block 30, section
one, under the supervision of the
city engineer.
* +    #
It has been decided to put the proposed hydrants at the corner ot
Fraser street and Fifth avenue and
on Comox avenue near the Comox
club. Fraser street is to be widened
also.
* *     *
The question of disposing of city
garbage is being considered by the
council. The matter will require
some careful thought and accordingly has been laid over for that pur
pose.
Nearly every regiment in the
British army has a nickname. Some
of these nicknames are distinctly opprobrious, and, eveu if you know
them, it is as well to keep the knowledge to yourself when any of the men,
of that particular regiment are about.
As Kipling remarks in one of his
"Plain Tales from the Hills," If you
go into the stables of a certain
cavalry regiment and whisper a cer-
the men will come at you
with mops and brooms; but breath
In the ears of another regiment just
two little words, and the men will
come at you with belts." I may say
that a heavy buckled belt In the
hands of an angry "Tommy" is a very
terrible weapon.
Anyway, some years ago he would
have been a very bold or very foolish
man who would have talked about
"Peacemakers" to the men of the
Bedfordshire regiment. The "Bed-
fords" can now afford to laugh at
their nickname of "Tbe Peacemak-'
ers, but when It was bestowed upon
them they had no battles on their
colors, and they did not like to be
reminded of the fact.
Some regiments, however, have
nicknames of which, uncomplimentary though they be, they are distinctly proud.
The flrBt battalion of the Duke of
Wellington's (old 33rd Foot) rejoice
in the extraordinary sobriquet of
"The Havercake Lads." This arose
out of the fact that about the time
of Waterloo (a battle, by the way,
borne on the colors), the recruiting
sergeants went about the west Riding of Yorkshire with oatcakes stuck
on the point of their swords so as to
induce hungry lads to enlist.
It would be difficult to imagine
anyone more unlike a coalheaver
than a smart Grenadier Guardsman,
yet "The Coalheavers" is one of the
nicknames of the Grenadier Guards.
It originated in the privileges (long
since abolished) that they once enjoyed of working In plain clothes for
hire In the coal trade. The Grenadiers are also known as the "Sandbags," a nickname given them for
the excellence they showed at trench-
work when in Flanders with that
army which as tradition tells up
"swore horribly."
The Life Guards, as every street
Arab knows are the "Tin Bellies"
from their steel cuirasses; but it Is
not easy to see why the 1st (King's)
Dragoon Guards should be known as
"The Trades Union." They came by
this extraordinary appellation
through having been largely employed some sixty years ago In suppressing trade riots in Lancashire, At
least, that Is one explanation; another is that at one time many of
the 'officers of the regiment we're
sons of successful tradesmen!
Many nicknames simply refer to
the color of the regiment's uniform
or facings, as for example, "The
Canaries" (3rd Dragoon Guards).
"The Blue Horse" (4th Dragoon
Guards), and the "Pompadours"
(2nd Batt. Essex Regiment) so called because when first raised the regimental facings were of a crimson or
puce color then called "Pompadours"
after the notorious Madame de Pompadour. Some regimental nicknames
have a distinctly gory sound. The
1st Batt. the Worcestershire Regiment, for example, rejoice in the
gruesome title of "The Vain Inhabitants of Boston, American," because
as the 29th Foot they were the first
to draw blood at the outbreak of
the American war.
The Devonshire Regiment (11th
Foot) are known as "The Bloody
Eleventh," and the story goes that
they got this nickname because centuries ago the men, being dissntirtled
with the meat supplies, took the butcher and hanged him to one of the
meat hooks in his own shop.
"Pontius Pilate's Bodyguard" Is
the truly extraordinary nickname of
the Royal Scots (Lothian Regiment).
The 1st Foot are the oldest regiment
In the service, and It was over a
question of its antiquity that it got
its amazing nickname.
When in the French service a dispute arose between the Royal Scots,
then   known   as   the  "Regiment  de
Grand Trunk Pacific  Steamships
For VANCOUVER, VICTORIA, SEATTLE.
Connecting  with   Eastbound   Trains
"Prince Rupert" sails every Thursday, 8.30 p.m.
"Prince  George"   sails  every Monday 8.30 p.m.
FOR STEWART:
"Prince Rupert" sails Wednesdays 8 p.m.
"Prince George"  sails  Sunday  at 8 p.m.
Steamer for Masset, Klncollth.Naas  Bay and  Port Simpson,  Sundays, I p.m. i,
For Skldegate,  Queen  Charlotte City,   and   other   Moresby Island
points, Wednesday, 1 p.m., returning via Queen Charlotte City.
Tickets, reservations and Information    from
A. E. McMASTER
Freight and  Passenger Agent, G. T. P. Wharf.
Douglas," and the Picardy Regiment
as to their respective ages. The Picardy men claimed to have been on
duty the night after the Crucifixion,
to which the Scots replied "Had we
been on duty we should not have
slept ai our post."
The East Yorkshire Regiment are
known as "The Snappers," because in
a bygone battle their ammunition
having given out, they continued to
snap their firelocks, and the enemy
retired, misled by their bold front.
The Royal Welsh Fusiliers are the
"Nanny Goats," also the "Royal
Goats," from their custom of having
a goat led at the head of the band.
He who has ever dined with the
"Nanny Goats" on March 1, St.
David's day, is not likely to forget
the occasion, for custom ordains that
the guest who has never before eaten
a leek must now do so.
The 1st Batt. the Northamptonshire Regiment are the "Steelbacks,"
from the unflinching manner In
Which they took their floggings in
the bad o|d days of the triangle and
the ca,t-o^-nine-talls. The 1st Batt.
the Middlesex Regiment were also
known as the 'tsteelbacks," and for
tbe same reason; but later they gained the most honorable nickname of
"The Die Hards.''
The 1st Batt, Royal West Kent
Regiment are known as the "Blind
Half Hundred," because at one time
the men suffered much from eye
trouble, and also as the "Dirty Half-
Hundred," because In a battle on a
hot 'day the men wiped their sweating faces with their black cuffs—
"half-hundred" In each case because
they were the 50th Foot.
If attended by an army doctor,
don't call him a "Linseed Lancer" or
a "Poultice Wolloper." These are the
historic nicknames of the Royal
Army Medical Corps but your medico
mightn't like it, and give you an extra nasty potion by way of revenge.
Also don't ask men of the 1st Batt.
the Gordon Highlanders "what is the
difference between the 92nd and tbe
75th?" The answe.- 's 'Th.; on..- are
real Highlanders, t.'e other Reale
Highlanders," because when the
75th Foot were made Highlanders
they were stationed at Malta, the
Strada Reale being the principal
street there. But the "Gay Gordons"
of the 1st Battalion would be more
likely to answer the riddle with their
skeindhus.
SKEENA DISTRICT
Ferry, Kitselas, Skeena River.
IN ACCORDANCE with chapter
78, R. S. B. C, 1897, "Ferries Act,"
the Government of Bf-Itish Columbia
Invite applications for a charter for
a ferry to ply across the Skeena
River ai, Kitselas.,.    ...,--
Applications will be received by
the Honourable the Minister of Public Work* frp to and including the
15th of September next.
' The limits of the ferry shall extend for a distance of one mile above
and one mite below said point.
The charter will cover a period expiring on the 31st, March, 1912.
The ferry shall be operated whenever  required  between   7  a.m.  and
7 p.m., very day excepting Sundays.
Applications shall give a description of the scow or boat ft ts proposed to use, and method of operation.
Applications shall state the tolls it
Is proposed to ask for—
Each adult passenger.
Each child (not in arms) under 13
years.
Each head of cattle, horse, mule or
donkey.
Each calf, sheep, goat or swine.
Each vehicle with one horse and
driver.
Each cart or wagon with one horse
and  driver, loaded.
Each vehicle with two horses and
driver.
Each vehicle with two horses and
driver, loaded.
Each parcel of twenty-five pounds
and under.
Freight     parcel     of    twenty-five
pounds and under.
Freight, per one hundred pounds
and under, non-perishable goods
Freight, per one hundred pounds
and under, perishable goods.
The Government of British Columbia is not necessarily bound to accept any application submitted.
F. C. GAMBLE,
Public Works Engineer.
Department of Public  Works.
Victoria, B.C., 15th August, 1910.
WATER NOTICE
NOTICE Is hereby given that an
application will be made under Part
V. of the "Water Act, 1909," to obtain a licence In the Skeena Division
of Coast District.
(a) The name, address and occupation of the applicant Is The Municipal Corporation of the City of
Prince Rupert, County of Atlin, B.C.
(If for mining purposes) Free
Miners  Certificate  No.
(b) The name of the lake, stream
or source (if unnamed, the description is), Cloyah Lakes.
(c) The point of diversion, at the
foot of the Lower Lake.
(d) The quantity of water applied
for (in cubic feet per second), 150.
(e) The character of the proposed
works, dam, pipe-line and power
plant.
(f) The premises on which the
water is to be used (describe same),
The Power site at mouth of Cloyah
River.
(g) The purposes for which the
water is to be used,  Power.
(h)   If for irrigation describe the
land intended to be irrigated, giving
acreage.
(i) If the water is to be used for
power or mining purposes describe
the place where the water is to be returned to some natural channel, and
the difference in altitude between
point of diversion and point of return: Water will be returned at
mouth of Cloyah River, 55 feet.
(j) Area of Crown land Intended
to be occupied by the proposed
works.
(k) This notice was posted on the
thirteenth day of August, 1910, and
application will be made to the Commissioner on the fifteenth day of
September, 1910.
(1) Give the names and addresses
pf any riparian proprietors or licensees who or whose lands are like'y
to be affected by the proposed works,
either above or below the outlet:
Owners of lots 130, 131, 632, and
972.
(m) The boundaries and area of
the Municipality are as follows:—
4. The said City of Prince Rupert
shall be bounded as follows:—
Commencing at a post on the shore
of Shawatlan Passage, In Range 5,
Coast District of British Columbia,
and being the southeasterly post of
Section 9, Prince Rupert Townslte;
thence along the boundary of Section 9 as follows: South forty-three
degrees forty-seven minutes (43deg.
47mln.) west astronomical, a distance of four hundred and flfty-ona
and seventy-seven hundredths (461.-
77) feet; thence north eighty-three
degreed thirty-seven minutes (83deg.
37mln.) west astronomical, a distance of one thousand five .hundred
and seventy-two hundredths (1,500.-
72) feet; thence south twenty-seven
degrees twenty-three minutes fifteen
seconds (27deg. 23min. 15sec.) west
astronomical, a distance of three
thousand four hundred and seventy-
three and seventy-five hundredths
(3,473.75) feet; thence south thirty-
five degrees fifty-eight minutes
thirty-four seconds (35deg. 58min.
34sec.) west astronomica1, a distance
of two thousand and fifty-one and
twenty-five hundredths (2,051.25)
feet; thence north sixty-two degrees
sixteen minutes twenty seconds (62
deg. 16min. 20sec) west astronomical, a distance of one thousand one
hundred and twenty-four and eight
hundredths (1,124.08) feet; thence
south forty-seven degrees twelve
minutes ten seconds (47deg. 12min.
lOsec.) west astronomical, a distance
of four thousand eight hundred
(4,800) feet, more or less, to a post
being the north-easterly corner of
Lot 1,194, Range 5, Coast District;
thence along the southerly boundary of Lot 1,994 south fifty-nine degrees forty-two minutes thirty-eight
seconds (59deg. 42min. 38sec) west
astronomical, a distance of three
thousand eight hundred and six and
sixty-eight hundredths (3,806.68)
feet; thence south forty-seven degrees seven minutes five seconds
(47deg. 07min. 05sec.) west astronomical, a distance of two thousand
six hundred and three and seven-
tenths (2,603.7) feet; thence south
seventy-nine degrees forty-one min-
uates forty-three seconds (79deg. .41,
mln. 43sec.) west astronomical, a
distance of one thousand three hundred and, forty-one and twelve hundredths (1,341.12) feet; thence
south flfty-two degrees forty-six minutes twenty-four seconds (52deg.
46min. 24sec.) west astronomical, a
distance of two thousand two hundred and forty-seven and ninety-six
hundredths (2,247.96) feet; thence
south sixteen degrees one minute
nineteen seconds (16deg. Olmin. 19
sec.) west astronomical, a distance
of three thousand one hundred and
sixty-nine and ninety-eight hundredths (3,169.98) feet; thence
north seventy-nine degrees twenty-
two minutes (79deg. 22min) west
astronomical, a distance of five hundred and thirty and sixty-four hundredths (530.64) feet, more or less,
to a post on the shore of Prince R'u-
per Harbour; thence west astronomical one thousand three hundred and
twenty (1,320) feet; thence north
astronomical a distance of twelve
thousand nine hundred and thirty-
six (12,936) feet; thence north
sixty-one degrees and thirty minutes
(61deg. 30min) east, a distance of
twenty-three thousand seven hundred
(23,700) feet to a point opposite the
centre point of Shawatlan Passage;
thence along the centre line of Shawatlan Passage to a point due west
of the point of commencement;
thence due west to the point of commencement; the land area contained
within said boundaries consisting of
about two thousand (2,000) acres
and being shown on the registered
plans of Prince Rupert Townsite,
registered at Prince Rupert Town-
site, registered at Prince Rupert.
(n) Approximately the number of
inhabitants: Five thousand.
(0) The place of the proposed
reservoir for storing: The Cloyah
Lakes.
(p) The means by which It is proposed to store the water: By a dam.
(q) The area or the reservoir site
or sites at each foot In depth above
the outlet: Six square miles.
(r) How It Is proposed to acquire
the land necessary for the purpose:
By  purchase or otherwise.
(s) Approximately the number of
acre feet intended to be impounded,
38,400.
(t) Whether it is proposed to
lower the water in any natural lake
or standing body of water, and If so
then:—
(1) The anticipated extent of the
lowering.
(2) The means proposed to be
adopted to lower and refill.
(3) The nature and character in
detail, of the works proposed to be
constructed to provide for the discharge and penning back of the
water. Dam pipe-line and power
plant.
THE MUNICIPAL CORPORATION
OF THE CITY OF PRINCE
RUPERT.
By Its Agent, F. S. Clements.
A16.
Atlantic Steamship
 Agency	
Through tickets and excursion
rates to
England, France, Germanv,
and all
Scandinavian Ports.
Call or write for rates to any
part of the world. I am also
agent for all American steamers
to and from Prince Rupert;
Northern Pacific Railway; Alaska Pacific Express.
J. H. ROGERS
General Steamship and Railway
Agent, Prince Rupert, B.C.
Canadian Pacific R'y
Steamers have Prince Rupert for Vancouver,
Victoria, Seattle
Princess Beatrice, every Mon-.
day at 1 p.m.
Princess May or Princess Royal
every Saturday morning.
Steamers have Vancouver
Princess Beatrice every Thursday night.
Princess Royal every   Saturday
night at 11 o'clock.
Union Steamship Co'y
of B.C. Ltd.
The new Steel Passenger Steamer
"Camosun"
PRINCE RUPERT every Sunday at 9 a.m. for Vancouver,
arriving Monday afternoon.
For Stewart City on arrival from
Vancouver Friday night.
Northbound, leaves Vancouver
Wednesdays at 9 p.m.
Steerage Fare $5.00
The "Camosun" is the only steamer
on the run having' water-tight bulkheads and double Dottom, thus ensuring safety of passengers in case of
oollissionor,wreck. •"
J. H. ROGERS,   Ticket Agent
HAYNOR BROS.
FUNERAL  DIRECTORS
and
PROFESSIONAL  EMBALMERS
DR. W. B. CLAYTON
DENTIST
Office  in   the   Westenhaver  Block,
Over Orme's Drug   Store.
Prince Rupert
WM. S. HAivL, L. D. S. D. D. S.
:-:   DENTIST   :-:
Crown and Bridge Work a specialty.
All dental operations skillfully
treated. Gas and local anaesthetics
administered for the painless extraction of teeth. Consultation free.
Offices, Helgerson Bk., Prince Rupert
J. H. PILLSBURY
CIVIL     ENGINEER
Surveying,   Designs,   Estimates,   etc.
Room  7,  Exchange  Block,
Corner Third Ave and  Sixth  Street
Prince Rupert
G. to. NICKERSON & CO.
—o—
CUSTOMS AND MERCHANDISE
—o—
Brokers, Forwarding Agents,
Storage, etc.
J.  W.  POTTER
ARCHITECT    AND     STRUCTURAL
ENGINEER
Re-inforced Concrete a Specialty
—o—
Law-Butler Building - Prince Rupert
GRAHAM ISLAND —"The surest
sign of the progress of a town or
district is its newspaper—live, active, hustling." "The Masset Review," Masset, Q.C.I.
The Thompson
Hardware Co.
—Second Avenue—
Paints. General Hardware,
Oils, Stoves and Ranges. Friday, August 26, 1910.
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
I
LINDSAY'S CARTAGE & STORAGE
G. T. P. CARTAGE AGENTS
Office at H. B. Rochester, Centre St.
LADYSMITH COAL
Is handled by us.   All orders receive
prompt attention.  Phone No. 68.
Some Rock
Bottom
Prices
Sec Di F«r lamtnat
Rupert City Realty & Information Bureau, Ltd.
PIIHCE KOPEJtT,
B.C.
The Roland Rooms
Splendid Accommodations
Newly Furnished
Hot baths;  right down town;  good
table board all round
RATES, FIFTY CENTS AND UP
Fred Stork
General Hardware
...Complete Line of...
VALVES
Pipe and Pipe Fittings
AN ISLAND KINGDOM
Strange Conditions  Prevail  in  Cocus
Island in Southern
Ocean.
Death of George Clunies Ross Recalls
Interesting History of Family
That Rules
CANCELLATION  OF RESERVE
NOTICE is hereby given that the
reserve existing on Crown lands In
the vicinity of Babine Lake, situate
in Range 5, Coast District, notice of
which was published In the British
Columbia Gazette, dated December
17, 1908, is cancelled in so far as
said reserve relates to lots numbered 1519, 1618, 1517, 1516, 1516,
1510, 1607, 1506, 1506A, 1503 1601,
1502, 1512, 1511, 1505, 1504, 1613,
1514, 1509, 1508, 1530, 1527, 1628,
1529, 1531, 1532, 1533, 1534, 1535,
1537, 1639, 1536, 1538, 1540, 1641,
1544, 1543, 1545, 1546, 1642, 1547,
1548, 1549, 1550, 1520, 1521, 1622,
1523, 1524, 1525, 1526, and 1551.
ROBERT A. RENWICK.
Deputy Commissioner of Lands.
Lands Department,
Victoria, B. C, June 16th, 1910.
(First Insertion July 5.)
Municipal Notice
TENDERS FOR STREET GRADING
SEALED TENDERS will be received by the City Clerk until SATURDAY noon, AUGUST 27th, 1910,
for the grading of Second avenue,
between McBride street and Eleventh
street.
Plans and specifications may be
seen and forms of tender obtained at
the office of the City Engineer.
The lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted.
ERNEST A.  WOODS,
Wm. Mahlon Davis,
City Engineer.
City Clerk.
A5-23
C. D. NEWTON
Real Estate
Money to Loan
Notary Public
Exchange Block
Corner 3rd Avenue and 6th Street
P.O. Box 226   Tel. 226
> »•« »** «j« $ »> *> »> ♦;< ►> *> ■>:« ♦;« »> ►;« ►:« •> ►> *> *> •> ♦:* •♦« *> •£♦
Don't
Forget |
T
We have the stock and when  *
V
you want to select a Diamond »>
Ring, a Wedding Present, It Is X
no trouble for you to find some- *
thing that will suit you.   Our *
stock is composed of the best &
goods  that the  factories pro- £
duce and we guarantee every- *
thing sold here. *
Bring us your   Watch    and %
Jewelry repairing if you want *
it properly done. *
C. B. WARK |
*
:«.> *> $ $ -j. -j, -> .j. i*.;. ♦;..;. <t> »> $ »> <$• ♦>»;«*!> »> »> # •>
nons and daughters were at his bed-
side when he died. His eldest son,
who is at present at Ventnor, succeeds his father as chief of the
Islands. The body of Mr. Clunies
Ross is to be taken for burial to the
Cocos Islands. It will there rest
with those of his father and his
grandfather. Mr. Ross' grandmother
was an Englishwoman, and his mother was a Malay. He himself married a Eurasian. There are no
white women in the Islands.
 ,—o	
Far away from his Utopian kingdom, the king of the Cocos Islands,
In tbe South Indian ocean, Mr.
George Clunies Ross, died recently
at Ventnor, Eng., whither he had
gone for the benefit of his health.
The connection of the Ross family
with Cocos Keeling, these remote
coral islands, which are under British
protection and are situated about
700 miles from Java, Is strangly romantic. It was in the Cocos Islands
that Darwin studies the formation of
coral reefs, and at the time of the
great naturalist's visit in 1827 the
first of the Ross dynasty—June
Clunies Ross, a Scotsman and a British naval officer—had made bis home
there. Captain Ross happened on.
them when he was sailing in a merchantman in these lone waters in
1825. He found he liked them better than Scotland, went home to
fetch bis family, and returned—to
discover one Hare, son of a London
watchmaker, in possession. Hare
was a diusolute person, proud of his
harem. He held one of the Islets until
his 200 followers followed him no
more. Then he went to Singapore
and died, and Ross was left supreme.
The second of the house, his son,
took up the rule in 1854, and was
succeeded by George Clunies Ross
(who has Just died), at the age of 30,
In 1871. Nominally the late Mr.
George Clunies Ross was a "governor." Actually he was monarch of
the Isles. His word was undisputed
law. The empire authorities left him
alone on his remote domain. He went
eighteen years without seeing a fellow countryman. Mr. George Clunies
Ross was a man of great courage,
capacity and tenderness, and his
island home is an enchanted land.
It is described as a ring-shaped reef
of dazzling coral, over which the
ocean breakers continally lash themselves into a mist of creamy foam, is
Burrounded by islets covered thick
with the abundant vegetation of the
eocoanut palm and other tropical
trees; the clear waters of the lagoon
painted a vivid green in the full glare
of the eastern sun, deliciously contrast with the soft white sand of
the shore.
Coined money is unknown there,
for the parchment notes ot George
Ross are the sole medium of exchange, Clunies Ross having regarded coins as an aid to gambling, which
is not to be found in this ocean Ar-
cady. Mr. Ross was the most benevolent of despots, with tbe power of
life and death over six hundred or
seven hundred subjects. Poverty is
unknown in the realm. The head of
every family has a house, a boat, a
garden, a poultry run. No young
man, indeed, can marry until he has
built himself a dwelling. There are
no rates and taxes; neither are there
any police. Yet order Is preserved.
The inhabitants in turn keep regular
watch at night against fire and over
the safety of the boats. Clunies Ross
put down wife-beating—with the result that the Mohammedan women
Included among the subjects of the
Cocos Island "king" have privileges
which no Mohammedan woman elsewhere has ever dreamed of.
One of the most interesting facts
about the Cocos Islands is that at
their highest point they are only
eight feet above sea level. The principal island, taking its name from
the proprietors, is known as Ross
island, and contains Malay villages.
The waters surrounding the islands
abound in sharks six feet to twelve
feet in length. There is no game on
Cocos; but it has rats and cats in
plenty. The cats were Imported to
get rid of the rats; Instead they preferred to live a comfortable life on
landrail blacktern, and the other
ground birds which had previously
been introduced to keep down the
eocoanut beetle. One set of exterminators thus set about to exterminate another set. Meanwhile the rats
have flourished exceedingly. Now
they live in the tree tops; the natives
have to climb up and shake them
down to the expectant terriers.
The principal export of the islands
is copra, the dried kernel of the
eocoanut, and it Is from this product that the Ross family have
amassed their great wealth. As a
young man Mr. George Clunies Rbss
studied engineering at Glasgow, returning to the islands In 1864. He
had a large family, of whom several
Personals
Mr. and Mrs. Atwater of Detroit,
Mich:, after spending a few days
here have left for the south.
J, A. Mara, of Victoria, formerly
speaker of the Legislature, spent a
few hours In the city on Wednesday
eevnlng. He was on his way to
Stewart where as a director of the
Portland Canal Mining Company, he
will examine into conditions there.
He will spend a few days there before
returning south. Mr. Mara expects
the concentrator which his company
is installing' will be ready to begin
work very soon and then shipping
will commence from the mine. In
company with his old friend, C. W. D.
Clifford, of Kitselas, Mr. Mara made
a tour around the city while here.
 O———— ,.    !.'•'
MUST BREAK RULE
City Council Finds it Difficult to Meet
Only Three Times a
Week.
Routine    Matters    Disposed    of    at
Meeting Held on Tuesday
Night
While the city council has decided
to hold only three meetings a week
for the future, there are special matters coming up constantly that requires more frequent sittings. In
order to deal with these the meetings
are being called practically every
night. The regular meeting nights in
future will be Mondays, Wednesdays
and Thursdays. ,  .
Tuesday evening was a short meeting devoted to routine: matters-only:
The Canadian Rubber company of
Montreal, Wrote: informing the. council that the fire hose would be forwarded as soon as possible.   ■■-■■■"
Moore Bros, asked permission to
construct a plank walk at the rear
of block 30, section one.
This was referred to the streets
committee.
The city engineer reported upon
the apparatus necessary for the installing of the electric apparatus In
connection with the sash and door
factory.
He also reported upon what was
being done In order to increase the
supply of water In the city during the
dry weather.
The engineer also made a report
upon the question of garbage collection, giving the different systems
that might be pursued. In the matter of dry garbage, he suggested that
it might be loaded on a scow and
then towed out to sea at regular intervals. Ashes could be used to
fill up low spots or be towed out. He
suggested enforcing a rule for covered tins for holding garbage which
could be collected in the day time.
This was referred to the health
committee.
Aid. Barrow called attention to
the fact that the sower on Second
avenue put In by private enterprise,
was leaking badly. He wanted to
know what was to be done. He
thought the city might take over the
sewer until It was superseded by a
permanent sewer.
His Worship said this had been
repaired.
In the matter of the permanent
sewer this was being parallelled. The
old one would be out of use then.
His Worship also explained that
the sewer on Second avenue had
been put in at a cost of about $6 by
each individual who contributel.
Those interested intended to take
this up and sell it. The tile would be
practically as good as new.
Some accounts in connection with
the incorporation of the city were
presented from the committee in
charge at that time.
These were referred to the finance
committee for report.
 o	
The temporary way for carrying
off water under the theatre has be-
c o m e deranged and offensive
smells are given off. Aid. Smith
called attention to the fact last night
and it was decided to have the civic
officials attend to It at once.
STAGE HAS EFFECT
Result of Play in Connection With Reforms in Dealing With
Prisoners.
John   Galsworthy's   "Justice"    Will
Alleviate Those  Sentenced
By Courts
The extraordinary influence which
tue stage and the writer of plays can
exert has just been shown In a remarkable fashion, says Public Opinion. John Galsworthy's dramatic and
Intense play, "Justice," In which he
pilloried the sentence to solitary confinement and other horrors of the
prison system, Is to be followed by
action equally dramatic on the part
of Winston Churchill, who, as home
secretary, Is responsible for our
prison system. This will revolutionize
that system. Cause and effect In
this'cake are freely admitted by Mr.
Churchill.
Whait Mr. Churchill proposes to do
Is thus summarized by the Nation:—
"He proposes to check imprisonment for the non-payment ot fine—
this punishment fell on 90,000 persons last year—by giving time for
payment.
"To abolish mere Imprisonment
for youths between 16 and 21 and
substitute a curative and reforming
element, and to introduce a system
of defaulters' drill outside the prison; to cut down separate confinement
for all but recidivists from three
months to one month.
"To supply some educational food
to prisoners in the way of quarterly
lectures; to. relieve political offenders
of degrading conditions.
"To do away with the ticket-of-
leave system; and to place convicts
on license under the supervision of
a central agency, drawn from officials and representatives of Prisoners' Aid Societies.
"Incidentally, Mr. Churchill made
some grave admissions as to the effects of the Preventive Detention
Act, and the necessity for 'scrutinizing' its work. Finally, In an eloquent passage, he exhorted his hearers to a tireless effort towards the
discovery of some regenerating prb-
cess, and an unfaltering faith that
tbere Is a treasure, tfiyoui*4>old .only,
find it, in the heart of every man."
ic-r'Mr. Churchill's statement was
made at the close of a debate on the
report of the home office vote," says
the Morning Post. "Some of the
■ changes' It proposed In the treatment
of prisoners are to come Into force
at once, others are to be the subject
of future legislation..
' "The suggested changes to be submitted for parliamentary sanction include:
"The granting of time to every
person of fixed abode In which to pay
any fine inflicted.
"The substitution for prison in the
case of young men between the ages
of 16 and 21, whose offences are not
serious and who are not incorrigible,
of a system of 'defaulters' drill.'
"The reduction of the maximum
period of imprisonment in such cases
to three years except in very serious
offences."
All these things Mr. Galsworthy
characterizes as "the soundest effort
at reform made In our time."
"The whole scheme of reform constitutes," he writes in the London
Times, "an attempt, such as we have
not seen In our time, to diminish
criminality, and the waste and suffer-
nig entailed by criminality. It stamps
the administrators responsible for it
with the hall-mark of foresight. In
connection with the Borstal system,
and probation, it is the beginning of
a new state of things.
"These changes are one and all inspired by imagination, without which
reform is deadly, and by common
sense.
" i ni'se reforms are not humanitarian and over-lenient, they are merely
sensible, and ten years lienre will be
regarded as part of the A B. C. of our
system.
"The home secretary is now laying
down the principle that the young
shall not be punished except for their
good; and It will be the most astonishing thing in the world if that
principle is not generally accepted
with acclamation. The proposition
that no youth shall be sent to prison
for irss than a month, moreovjr
deals a wholly admirable blow H
the grave evil of the happy-go-luck
three-day, six-day, ten-day term of
imprisonment, that perfect Incubato
of the criminal germ. When these
proposals for dealing with y-uith-
ful offenders come to be developed
in the form of an act of par.'anient
It is to be hoped that the authorities
will extend them so as to embody
the general principle that no first offender of any sort or ag« shall be
committed to  prison,  except   under
some form of the Borstal treatment.
"The reform of separate confinement does not in my belief," continues Mr. Galsworthy, "go far
enough, but it goes, no doubt, as far
as can be expected at the moment,
in face of the uncanny faith and attachment with which this species of
punishment has so long been regarded."
"No more Important statement affecting the administration of the
criminal law has been made for many
years than that by the home secretary," says the Times.
"Every one who speaks from experience is convinced that the old
methods of dealing with offenders
are wrong. It is not certain that
the prison ihs not brought about as
many offences as It has prevented.
It has been to many a finishing
school In crime. To how few has it
brought remorse or repentance?
• "We have relied too much upon
punishment which is barren, too little on the fruitful, Indirect and gradually operating humanizing Influences which are much more potent over conduct than fines or Imprisonment. To all these thoughts
and convictions Mr. Churchill gives
apt expression. He does more; not
regarding" the situation in the fatalistic spirit of some of his predecessors, he throws out novel and Ingenious suggestions which may prove
to be of value."
 o	
ENFORCING THE ACT
General Compliance With New Liquor
Regulations in the
Province.
SKEENA PACK LEADS
Local Salmon Fisheries Make Best Showing in the Province.
Fraser   River   And   Oilier   Districts
Fall   Fur  Below   Thin  One
For 1010
Several    Have    Been    Fined—Chief
Licence Inspector is to be
Named
Reports of general compliance
throughout the province with tbe
stringent provisions of the new
liquor act are already beginning to
reach the attorney-general's department together with Isolated examples of the enforcement of penalties
as prescribed against those who have
•peen rash enough to contravene the
regulations, -becoming operative on
the first of -the month.
The first case of this kind was that
of the blind pig proprietor at Sheep
Creek who upon being convicted before Magistrate Bullock-Webster at
Nelson, paid his fine of $300 without
protest. In this case the liquor had
been served out of a "pop" bottle and
the set-up defence was that the in
vigorating beverage was not an intoxicant as understood by the law,
but merely aerated water capable of
producing no stimulation even if im
bibed by tbe most orthodox member
of any W.C.T.U. As the burden of
proof as to the exact character of
liquor supplied under the new legislation rests upon the purveyor, the
defendant was unable to substantiate
his plea with necessary evidence.
Another case is reported from
Kamloops, where a fine of $100 was
imposed upon a licensed hotel proprietor upon his conviction for having sold liquor to an intoxicated person. This, it is believed, Is the first
conviction that has been secured in
British Columbia under thai particular charge, at least outside of the two
principal cities of the province.
In the Sheep Creek case, the offender was an hotel proprietor with a
pending application for license before the provincial authorities,-Needless to say this application will pro-
reed no further.
A point has arisen with regard to
the strict enforcement of the law
against Sunday sales In cities, which
of oonrse administer with their local
machinery the general law. Sevens]
cases of violation of the Sunday Belling regulation arc stated i» have occurred In Victoria on tbe 7th Inst.,
notably In an establishment on Jdhn-
son street. The provincial authority
will not, of course, be exercised In
the cities unless laxity In enfdrcement becomes patent, in which event
the Attorney-General's department
may be counted upon to Intervene for
the prevention of any Inadequate en-
forement of the law of the land.
It is understood that tho appointment of a chief license Inspector for
the province will be made within the
ensuing fortnight. The .appointment
report has it, was offered to Sergeant
Murray, of the provincial police, as
senior in the service, hut has been
declined by him for private or personal reasons.
The total pack of sockeye salmon
in British Columbia waters this season Is estimated at between 520,000
and 530,000 cases. As yet packing
has not ceased on the Skeena, Naas
and Fraser Rivers, but the best of
the run at all three points is over,
and canners declare that when the
final count is made the total will not
vary a great deal from the figures
given.
The sockeye pack this season In
British Columbia is accounted a good
one. In 1906, the year which corresponds to 1910 In the four-cycle
period governing the runs of fish, the
total pack of all kinds of salmon In
the province amounted to 629,460
cases.
The Skeena this season comes Into
■her own and takes the lead In the
number of cases put up.
On the Fraser River this season
the estimated sockeye pack to date
is 140,000 cases. It is declared that
when the season ends on tbat stream
next Thursday the total sockeye pack
of this rived will not be greatly In
excess of the figure named. As usual
American canners on Puget Sound
have reaped the greatest benefit from
the Fraser River run, their sockeye
pack up to last Monday totalling In
the neighborhood of 220,000 full 48-
pound cases.
Canners estimate the sockeye salmon pack of British Columbia as follows: Fraser River, 140,000 cases;
Rivers Inlet, 123,000 cases; Skeena
River, 150,000 cases; Naas River,
28,000 cases; and outside rivers, 75,-
000 cases.
In the northern part of Southeastern Alaska the run of salmon appears
to be at an end, according to advices just received from Icy Straits.
The canners there declare they will
be unable to secure their expected
pack owing to the failure of the
humpback run. In he southern part
of Southeastern Ainska a fairly large
run of pinks recently occurred, and
the canners there are reported to
have done well.
 o	
CONCLUSIVE EVIDENCE
Medical   Health   Officer   and   Police
Magistrate Differ as to Case
The medical health officer reported
that he had laid an information
against the keeper of a restaurant for
violation of the health bylaw. Although the evidence was conclusive
against the accused the case was dismissed In the police court.
This communication caused some
little surprise owing to the blunt
way In which the latter statement
was made.
Aid. Hildltch said that both the
health officer and the police magistrate were city officials and It was
apparent one was wrong.
Aid. Naden pointed out that the
police magistrate was not an official
of the city. He was appointed by the
provincial  government.
Aid. Hilditch still maintained that
lie was an official of the city inasmuch as the city paid his salary.
Aid. Pattullo said It would make
no difference as to his appointment.
He presumed the police magistrate
gave his Judgment according to his
understanding of the evidence in the
ANOTHER CONTRACT
(Continued from Pago One)
C.    McKenzte,   of   Rossland,   well
known on this coast, arrived  by the
Prince Rupert and went on to Stewart.    .T. Fred   Ritchie    accompanied
I him from here to the mining town.
close cutting,  $L'.I."  for   rock,    and
92 H  cents tor earth,
S.  P,  McMordle & Co.,  $4,21.1.75
for blanking al 5c for both plank and
rail;  for grading and close cutting,
1 $20,548.90, nt $200 for close cutting,
1 $1,915 for rock nnd $1.00 for earth..
to, II. Ferguson fi Co., $18,867.69
forg radian and close cutting, at
$100 fore lose cutting, $1.80 for rock
and   $1.0u  for earth.
The tenders were referred to the
streets committee for report.
Contracts Awarded
Last evening the report of the
committee was received in which It
was recommended that the tender of
Mclnnefl R- Kelly for grading and
close cutting lie accepted, and that
of Rellly & Robarts for planking be
the accepted one.
The report was adopted.
__ o	
O. N'els'in, of Vancouver, representing a safe company, Is In the
city.
Mi PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Friday, August 26, 1910.
ORIENTAL QUESTION
51
Sir Wilfrid Laurier   Gives   His Views
on This Important
Question.
Prime Minister Outlines the Policy
Which He Has Pursued  in
the Matter
On his recent tour of the Pacific
Coast, Sir Wilfrid Laurier presented
his views on the Oriental question In
Vancouver. As that Is a burning one
In British Columbia, it is interesting
to study the stand he takes on the
subject. At the Vancouver meeting
he said:—
"1 have realized that the question
of all questions in Britisli Columbia
is that of Oriental labor. As my purpose in this tour is to meet and reason with the people for the common
welfare of our common country, I
propose to confer with you for some
little time on the question of Asiatic
immigration, to discuss'frankly with
you the policy of my government and
the views I hold ou this subject. It
had been said that tbe east did not
appreciate the situation. The question concerns not British Columbia
alone," said the prime minister, "it
concerns the whole of Canada; nay,
it affects England and the whole of
the British Empire. So let us discuss and shape our policy as Canadians for he common good of Canada,
0]d  England and our Empire.
"My first ideal and conception is
that of Empire. Looking to the fact
that the interest of England is worth
while, it should be our paramount
consideration as Canadians and Britisli subjects to preserve friendly relations between Great Britain and
Asiatics.
"My second thought is of economic
conditions. If we admit indescrim-
inate, unchecked immigration from
the Orient, the good relations which
ought to exist cannot be maintained.
Therefore immigration must be controlled, checked and kept within
reasonable bounds.
"Our conclusions are the same, our
ends Identical. But we differ In
methods. You have looked at the
question from the viewpoint of a
labor man. I have looked at the
question from the viewpoint of the
whole British Empire. While you
have sought to obtain restrictive and
hostile legislation by harsh act of
parliament, I have sought to obtain
the same result by diplomatic and
friendly negotiations and mutual
agreement. Before you denounce me,
may I ask you frankly and fairly
which is the more conducive to the
peace and dignity of the empire?
Canada has rights to affirm and
duties to assume. It is my ambition
that Canada, while securing her
rights, shall prove a worthy daughter of the Mother Land."
Having defined the two ideals that
governed the consideration of the
problem, Sir Wilfrid expressed concurrence in the view that Immigration from the Orient must be controlled. For countless generations the
nations of Asia had been ground
down under despotism in a condition
of penury and subjection as to food,
garments and lodging. Frugality had
become sordidness, and the Oriental
was able to work for a fraction of
the wage necessary to maintain a
white man in respectability. To admit
the Asiatic indiscriminately under
such circumstances would be to
create an economic disturbance,
fraught with evil consequences.
The Premier reviewed the history
of the problem. Under the government of Sir John Macdonald a head
tax of $100 was put on the Chinese.
The present government was asked
to increase the tax to $500 and put
the same amount on the Japanese,
With the first proposition he had
agreed. There were no Canadian or
Imperial relations, diplomatic, commercial or oiborwi.se, to be affected.
With Japan it was different. Close
friendly relations existed with the
government of Queen Victoria.
"I have compunction In Inflicting
Indignity on a friendly power," was
the Premier's observation. He accordingly held a conference with the
Japanese consul, explaining that his
nation was a friendly power, but he
must recognize the different status of
civilization prevailing in the two
countries. The Premier appealed to
the consul not to force Canada to repel his people, and suggested that
the Japan government control the
matter iiself. The result was an engagement to limit Japanese immigration to Canada to 400 per year,
which operated from lfioi to 1907.
Thou the government of Japan turned n new leaf, adopting many rBitish
Institutions.   Canada became a party
to the British commercial treaty with
Japan. In 1907 there was a sudden
influx of apanese immigration. It
was charged that the treaty had overridden the agreement. Hon. R. Lem-
ieux was dispatched to Tokio and was
able to secure the re-enactment of
immigration restrictions. This undertaking has been scrupulously observed to the present time. "I say on my
reputation as a public man, that this
understanding has been fully and
honorably maintained by Japan."
"But another problem was presented in new Asiatic immigration,
this time from the British country
of India. The Hindus are subjects
of the King, yet the same economic
reasons militated against them.
"These men," said Sir Wilfrid,
"could not be turned back ignomlni-
ously by a man who prides himself
on being a British subject. True,
the color of the skin was not the
same, but they were British subjects
many of them wearing British uniforms and fighting Britain's battles.
I sent my colleague, Mr. King, to Calcutta. His mission was confidential,
but since that time not another man
has come from India. Now, frankly,
which is the better method? Was
not my vision as good as the vision
of those who attacked me?"
Britain had great interests on the
Pacific. The Premier had noted with
profound pleasure that the sentiment
of Vancouver was intensely in favor
of Canadian citizenship and British
connection. Sir Wilfrid related the
history of century after century w
Oriental inclusiveness. Fifty years
ago Japan emerged from the
lethargy in many of the arts of peace,
and certainly in the art of war. Old
.Mother England was the first to
realize the new condition. The Anglo-
Japanese alliance, to the glory of
Lord Lansdowne, secured the frontier of India against Russion aggression. The masses of the people in
the Orient were awakened to the
dignit yof man. California attempted
to humble the Chinese and Chinese
residents and the president of the
United States had to go down on his
knees to beg local authorities to
change their tactics. Britain adopted
a different method. The policy of
Home in the old world was the
policy of Britain in the new. Under
Morley and Minto Britain coped
with the new conditions in India in
the Britisli way. They were severe
with the demagogue and agimtor,
but recognized the new spirit by calling upon the natives to take part In
the government.
"This is the glory of England," declared Sir Wilfrid, "and worthy of
emulation by her daughters in all
their dealings.
"The days are past," concluded
the Premier, "when it is politic to
treat other races with contempt and
harshness. Let us follow Britain's
example and treat all men with fairness and equity. If for economic
reasons distinction must be drawn,
let it not be done by harsh mandates,
but by mutual agreement."
Sir Wilfrid referred to the awakening of the white world to the desirability of Oriental trade. England
and Germany and the United States
were vieing in their efforts to capture
it. Canada was behind England and
had the advantage of being the nearer  neighbor.
"Men are men," said Sir Wilfrid,
"and the Orient will prefer to deal
with those who treat her with respect rather than with those who
treat, her with contempt." He saw
no reason why Canada should not
cultivate an exchange of bread fo:
tea.
"When I come again to Vancouve
soon, for it must be soon or not a
all, I hope, nay, I am sure, I sjiail
find the harbor second to none on
the continent, with fleets of steamers plying between China, Japan, India and this great port. To attain the
best ends, material as well as moral,
lei us act as true Canadians, true
British subjects, and so behave that
the flag of Old England shall mean
io the Orient wliiit II means to us—
Freemon, Justice and Emancipation."
 o	
NORTHERN TERMINAL
AUSTRALIAN TRADE
Proposition is Being Pressed to Aid
Line of Vessels to Other Countries
Although the application by the
promoters of the proposed new line
of Australian-owned cargo steamers
to United States, Canada and Europe
has been rejected by the Victorian'
government, the matter is still under
considertalon by the federal government.
It now appears that what the promoters have asked the Commonwealth authorities to do Is to aid the
venture in one of three ways. It is
suggested that the government
should either invest money in shares
in the company, provide an annua]
subsidy until the company could become firmly established, or lend
money to the company at a low rate
of Interest.
The promoters have submitted a
statement to the Commonwealth government setting out the scheme, and
giving a number of reasons why it
should receive state aid. It is contended that Australian shippers are
at great disadvantage on account of
the competition in trade, in which
they are handicapped by high rates.
It is urged that by bringing the
cost of shipment down, added lo the
opening of the Panama canal in the
near future, the disability they labor
under at present in competition with
the Argentine—which lias only a
short distance to cover to reach
Europe—would be reduced to such
an extent as to turn the balance of
trade.
i The promoters put forward the
contention that although English and
foreign companies have been able to
make enormous profits, and have
been able to make enormous profits,
and have been able to put increasingly large steamers on the seas, the
freights have gone up, notwithstanding that the larger vessels have reduced the cost of sea carriage tc
their owners.
The Argentine government, is is
pointed out, subsidizes steamers, and
the exporters there have only one-
half the freight to pay on their goods
that the Australian shippers have;
and as the Argentine is a growing
competitor the need for similar assistance is claimed. As a precedent
the action of the Britisli government
in advancing a large sum to the Cunard company is quoted.
For Job Printing of all kinds see
the Journal man.
COAL CLAIMS
Skeena  District—Queen   Charlotte
Islands.
To all to whom it may concern:—
NOTICE is hereby given that I, the
undersigned, Intend to apply for a
license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum upon the following lands
situate on Graham Island, one of the
Queen Charlotte Group, in the Prov
ince of British Columbia, and more
particularly described as follows, viz
Commencing at a stake planted one
and a quarter miles west of the
north-east corner of Louis Inlet, and
marked "P. C. Coates' S. E. Corner
Claim No. 1," thence west 80 chains,
thence north 80 chains, thence east
80 chains, thence south 80 chains to
the place of commencement.
Staked June 14th, 1910.
Dated this 2Sth day of July, 1910
P. C. COATES,
By his Agent, Wm. Edward Laird
A9
COAL CLAIMS
LAND PURCHASE NOTICES
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Phillip Williams, of Sydney, Nova Scotia, occupation accountant, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Weln
ley:—Commencing at a post planted
at the S. E. corner and about 16%
miles distant in a north-westerly direction from the north end of Kitwancool Lake, thence north 80
chains, thence west 80 chains, thence
south 80 chains, thence east 80
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 640 acreB, more or
less. PHILLIP WILLIAMS.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 4, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
r*RflRifl.r
TAKE NOTICE that Annie Grieve,
of Victoria, B. C, occupation married woman, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. W. corner, and about 17% miles
distant In a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence south 40 chains, thence
east 40 chains, thence south 40
chains, thence east 40 chains, thence
north 80 chains, thence west 80
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 480 acres, more or
less. ANNIE GRIEVE.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 4,  1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that John Cox, of
Monarch, Alberta, occupation farmer, intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described
lands, situated in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Comencing at a post planted at the
north-west cornel' and about five and
one-quarter miles distant in a northwesterly direction from the north end
of Kltwancool Lake, thence 80
chains south, thence 80 chains east,
thence 80 chains north, thence 80
chains west to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres,
more or less.
JOHN COX.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated  May  30,  1910". Jy5
Skeena Land District—District' of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that James Alexander McDonald, of Monarch, Alberta, occupation farmer, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands, situated in
the Kitwancool or Chein Wein Valley:—Commencing at a post planted
at the N. E. corner about five and
one quarter miles distant in a northwesterly direction from the north
end of Kitwancool Lake, thence south
SO chains, thence west 80 chains,
thence north 80 chains, thence east
80 chains to point of commencement,
and containing 640 acres, more or
less.
JAMES ALEXANDER MCDONALD
James to. Smith, Agent.
Dated May 30, 1910. Jy5
Coast Land District—District of
QLrppTi q
TAKE NOTICE that I, Ernestine
A. Roney, of Prince Rupert, occupation married woman, Intend to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted on the north
bank of the Skeena River about half
a mile south of Geo. T. Church's preemption, thence west 10 chains,
thence north 40 chains, thence east
to the Skeena River; thence southwest following the bank of the
Skeena River to the place of beginning, and containing about 80
acres.
ERNESTINE A. RONEY, Locator.
W. A. Roney, Agent.
Dated July 7th, 1910. Jy22
Skeena  District—Queen   Charlotte
Islands.
To all to whom It may concern: —
NOTICE Is hereby given that I, the
undersigned intend to apply for a
lcense to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum upon the following lands
situated on Graham Island, one of
the Queen Charlotte group, In the
Province of Britisli Columbia, and
more particularly described as follows, viz:—Comomnclng at a stake
planked at the S. E. corner of P. C.
Coates' Claim No. 1, and marked
"Wm. Penman's S. to. Corner, Claim
No. 1," thence east 80 chains, thence
north 80 chains, thence west 80
chains, thence south, 80 chains to the
place of commencement.
Staked, June 14th, 1910.
Hated this 28th days of July, 1910.
WM.  PENMAN.
By  his  Agent,  Wm.  Edward   Laird.
A9
Coast Land District—District of
Skeena.
TAKE NOTICE that I, J. Adolph
Perry, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation
book-keeper, intend to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted on the north bank of the
Skeena River, about a mile west of
Lot 31, thence north 40 chains,
thence east 80 chains to lot 31,
thence south 40 chains to bank of
Skeena River, thence west about 80
chains following north bank of
Skeena River to point of commencement, and containing about 320
acres.
J. ADOLPH PERRY, Locator.
Wm. A. Roney, Agent.
Dated July 16th, 1910. Jy22
LAND PURCHASE NOTICES
Skeena Land District—District Of
(-<i ssi ii r
TAKE NOTICE that Pearl Caspell
of Cayley, Alberta, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands In the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. E. corner and about 15% miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence south 80 chains, thence
west -40 chains, thence north 40
chains, thence west 40 chains, thence
north 40 chains, thence east 80
chains to point of commencement,
and  containing 480  acres,  more  or
is. PEARL CASfELL.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 3, 1910. jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Mary Brown,
of Vancouver, B.C., occupation married woman, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following described lands In the vicinity ol
the Kltwancool or Chean Weln Valley:—Commencing at a post planted
at the North-east corner and about
ten miles distant in a north-westerly
direction from the north end of the
Kitwancool lake, thence south 80
chains, thence west 40 chains, thence
north 40 chains, thence west 4f>
chains, thence north 40 chains
thence east 80 chains to point ol
commencement, and containing 480
acres, more or less.
MARY BROWN.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 1,  1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that John Henderson, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
agent, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—■
Commei."ing at a post planted at the
S. ,W corner and about 25 miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north SO chains, thence
east 40 chains, thence south 80
chains, thence west 80 chains to
point of commencement and containing 320 acres, more or less.
JOHN   HENDERSON.
James to. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 7th, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Laura Gordon
of Victoria, B. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—■
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. E. corner and about 18 miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence soutii 40 chains, thence
west 40 chains, thence north 40
chains, thence east 40 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 160 acres, more or less.
LAURA GORDON.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated   June  4,   1910. jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
fp  qcj *\_T*
TAKE NOTICE that Walter Marke
of Toronto, Ont., occupation traveller, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands in the vicinity of Kltwancool
or Chean Wein Valley:—Commencing at a post planted at the N. E.
corner and about 27% miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kltwancool
Lake, thence soutii 80 chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence north 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to the
point of commencement and contain
ing 640 acres, more or less.
WALTER MARKE.
James W. Smith, Agent
Dated June 8th, 1910. Jy8
LAND PURCHASE NOTICES
Skeena Land District—District of
PftRRifl.!1
TAKE NOTICE that Ethel Welsh,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
south-east corner and about 10 miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north 80 chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence south 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to
point of commencement and containing 640 acres, more or less.
ETHEL WELSH.
James W. Smith, Agent
Dated June 1st, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cs ssi ii r
TAKE NOTICE that Henry Welsh,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
printer, Intends to apply foi permission to purchase* the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. E. corner and 11 miles distant
in a north-westerly direction from
the north end of Kitwancool Lake,
thence north 80 chains, thence west
80 chains, thence south 80 chains,
thence east 80 chains to point of
commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
HENRY WELSH.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 2, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Frederick
Welsh, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation cierk, intends,to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kit-
wanobol or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-east corner about 11 miles distant In a north-westerly direction
from tiie north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence soutii 80 chains, thence
west 40 chains, thence north 80
chains, thence east 4 0 chains to
point of commencement, and containing 320 acres, more or less.
FREDERICK  WELSH.
James to. Smith, Agent
Dated June 2, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiai.
TAKE NOTICE that James Welsh,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation machinist, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. to. corner and about 12 miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kltwancool
Lake, thence south 80 chains, thence
east 20 chains, thence north 80
chains, thence west 20 chains to the
point of commencement and containing 160 acres, more or less.
JAMES WELSH.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated  June  2,  1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassh
TAKE NOTICE that Marguerette
Burns, of Vancouver, B. C„ occupation married woman, Intends to apply for permission .o purchase the
following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Weln
Valley:—Commencing at a post
planted at the N. E. corner and distant about 12 miles In a northwesterly direction from tho north
end of Kltwancool Lake; thence
south 80 chains, thence west 20
chains, thence north 80 chains,
thence east 20 chains to point of
commencement, and containing 160
acres, more or less.
MARGUERETTE   BURNS.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 2,  1910. Jy8
[•jiiginecrs Inspecting  Most  Feasible
One for Hudson  Hay  liiiilrond
L.VXD   LEASE   NOTICE
Having landed a parly of engineers
and surveyors at Port Churchill in
Hudson Straits, where they are making a survey for the Hudson Bay
Railroad, the Canadian government
steamer Stanley has returned from
her trip to Northern waters, says a
Halifax despatch. She sailed on
July  2  from Halifax.
From the reports of those on board
the Stanley, unless the surveying
party can find a channel through the
I shoal water at Port Nelson which
j was said to be the likely terminal
of the railroad, Churchill will be selected as the shipping port.
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that The Canadian
Fish & Cold Storage Company Ltd.,
of Vancouver, occupation Mercantile
nnd Manufacturing, intends to apply
for permission to lease the following described land:-—Commencing at
a post planted at high water mark
on the westerly side of Prince Rupert Harbor and distant about 110
chains from the north-east corner of
Lot 443, thence west 20 chains,
thence soutii 20 chains, thence east
r, chains, more or less to high water
mark, thence following along the
high water mark to the point of commencement and containing 20 acres
more or less.
The Canadian  Fish  and  Cold
Storage Company,  Limited,
J. H. Plllsbury, Agent.
Dated June 20th, 1910. Jyl2
Coast Land District—District of
Skeena.
TAKE NOTICE that I, Mary M.
Roney, of Stillwater, Minnesota, U.
S.A., occupation married woman, intend to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands.
Commencing at a post planted on the
north bank of the Skeena River at
the south-east corner of Geo. T.
Church's pre-emption, thence north
■10 chains, thence east 40 chains,
thence soutii to the bank of the
Skeena River, thence south-west following the Skeena River to the place
of beginning and containing about
120 acres.
MARY M.  ROENY, Locator.
to. A.  Roney, Agent.
Dated July 8th, 1910. Jy22
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Richard
Howie, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation dentist, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of
Kltwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—■
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. E. corner and about 24% miles
distant In a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kltwancool
Lake, thence south 80 chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence north 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
RICHARD HOWIE.
James to. Smith, Agent.
Dated June  7th, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Violet Gelger,
of Victoria, B. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands In the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Weln Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. W. corner and about 23 % miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kltwancool
Lake, thence south 80 chains, thence
east 40 chains, thence north 40
chains, thence east 40 chains, thence
north 40 chains, thence west 80
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 480 acres, more or
less. VIOLET GEIGER.
James to. S-nlth, Agent.
Dated June 7th,  19'0. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
flficfifllfLt1
TAKE NOTICE that Sandford
Burton, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation mining engineer, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands In the vicinity of Kltwancool or Chean Wein
Valley:—Commencing at a post
planted at the N. E. corner and
about 23% miles distant In a northwesterly direction from the north
end of Kltwancool Lake, thence south
80 chains, thence west 80 chains,
thence north SO chains, thence east
SO chains to point of commencement
and containing 640 acres, more or
less. SANDFORD BURTON.
James to. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 7th, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles F.
Burns, of Moncton, New Brunswick,
occupation auditor, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Weln
Valley:—Commencing at a post
planted at the south-west corner and
about 12 miles distant in a northwesterly direction from the north
end of Kitwancool Lake; thence
north 80 chains, thence east 80
chains, thence south 80 chains,
thence west SO chains to point of
commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
CHARLES F.   BURNS.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated   June   2,   1910 Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that James Jar-
dine, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
merchant, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of Kltwancool or Chean Weln Valley: —
Commencing at. a post planted at the
N. W. corner and about 13 miles distant In a north-westerly direction
| from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence soutii SO chains, thence
east 80 chains thence nortb 80
chains, thence west SO chains to
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
JAMES JARDINE.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 2, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Norman Cle-
land, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation printer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of Kltwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Comencing at a post planted at the
S. E. corner and about 26% miles
distant In a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kltwancool
Lake, thence north 80 chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence south 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
NORMAN  CLELAND.
James to. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 8th, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that John McDlar-
mid, of Lucknow, Ont., occupation
farmer, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of the
Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. W. corner and about 13 miles distant In a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kltwancool
Lake; thence north 80 chains, thence
east 40 chains, thence south 80
chains; thence west 40 chains to
point of commencement, and containing  320 acres.
JOHN McDIARMID.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 2, 1910. JyS ■ I
Friday, August 26, 1910.
THE   PRINCE   RUPERT   JOURNAL
ARMY IS IN  SHAPE
Review of Situation in Imperial Forces
Explained by Correspondent.
Mr. Haldane's Policy Relative to the
Wiir Office is Strongly
Defended
Despite much that has been said
and written regarding the British
army of today, the fact Is that it has
never in its history been better, more
efficient, or more effective, says T.
W. Grey, a London Daily Mail correspondent, stated by that paper to
be well informed as to the alms and
views of British military authorities.
These be brave words, he continues,
but they can be fully justified. That
there should be any doubts on the
subject is due to ignorance of the
conditions which now exist under Mr.
Haldane's regime at the war office.
The army council, with Mr Haldane as president, have re-created a
real general staff and at the same
time have taken adequate measures
to keep it In touch with the administrative staff.
The changes brought about since
1906 have met with bitter oposi-
tion from some sections of the service Itself. This was particularly so
strongly in favor of the old con-
with the militia. Sentiment was
stitutional force, which had done
much for the country. But a national policy was settled, and the
Interests of the army as a whole
had to be considered, with the result
that the special reserve, which is a
real reserve for the regular army,
has replaced  the militia.
Till Mr. Haldane entered the war
office both the militia and the volunteers were mobs of armed men, the
former, especially in Ireland, showing an overwhelming mass of garrison artillery of no possible use.
Neither force had any war organiza-
ion. They had no supply train, no
field artillery. The Territorial
Force with its organization perfect
In every detail forms a striking contrast to the state of affairs prior to
1906.
The chief questions with which the
military administration, or rather the
statesmen of the Empire generally
are confronted have been concisely
summarized as follows:—
1. To provide adequate forces for
the defence of the various self-governing portions of the Empire.
2. To furnish in peace sufficient
garrisons for India, for Egypt, for
coaling stations abroad, and for certain Crown  Colonies.
3. To place in the field Immediately on the outbreak of war In the
highest state of efflcency as large an
expeditionary force as is possible
compatible with the peace military
expenditure.
4. To maintain both that force and
existing garrisons abroad, throughout the continuance of hostilities, undiminished in numbers and efficiency.
5. To provide powers of expansion
for service over-seas outside the
limits of the expeditionaiy force.
Since then the best brains in the
army have worked upon the task and
with admirable results. First, the
general staff had to reach the stage
essential to its existence of "thinking alike on all maters of principle."
It was the general staff which devised the divisional organization in
place of our former army corps
which proved so unsuitable a formation in Soutii Africa and gave way
there to a divisional sytem. India
has adopted the same formation as
the basis of her military reconstruction. The general staff after mature
deliberation recommended the division of three infantry brigades with
a due proportion of other arms and
services as the most suitable pattern
towards which the military administration of the Empire should be asked to work in future.
Now we have six infantry divisions
with the cavalry division—a more
perfect body of cavalry than we have
ever had before—certain army troops
and troops and services for the lines
of communication, all forming an
expenditionary force of some 160,-
000 to 170,000 officers and men. But
it is pointed out by a member of the
general staff:
"The size of this expeditionary
force is not decided by nor Is it pretended that itl s at all commensurate
wih the strategical needs of the Empire. Look where one will, contingencies exist which may in the
near or distant future necessitate
employment at short notice for the
defence of Imperial interests of a
much larger force, and the hope
may not be vain that other states of
the Empire besides the Mother Coun
try will some day hold a portion of
their military forces, as bodies organized for this special purpose, in
constant readiness for operations
oversea." To bring that about is
part of the work of the Imperial general staff.
Meanwhile we have that splendidly
trained expeditionary force ready.
For it 158,577 wararnt officers, non-
commissioner officers and men are
required on mobilization, and the
estimated number wanted to replace
wastage during the first six months
of a war is 41,427. The normal
number available after the usual deductions have been made Is: Serving, 92,534; regular reserves, 116,-
006; special reserves, 56,545; a total
of 265,085. There Is, besides, the
terirtorial army for home defence.
Further, it Is noted that under the
new arrangement seventy-four reserve battalions whose main function
It would be to train drafts for battalions in the field would automatically come Into being on mobilization.
In addition twenty-seven extra reserve battalions are called upon for
home defence or to reinforce overseas garrisons or the army In the
field. The number available for service oversea has Increased by some
110,000 officers and men. In fine,
say the army council In a brief explanation presented in parliament
last year, their measures have been
directed to the organization "of the
stiongest expeditionary force that
can be maintained In the field with
our existing resources In man and
money, consistently with the obligation to maintain the over-sea garrison." They also aim at maintaining that force throughout the continuance of hostilities undiminished
in numbers and effilcency. They believe they can do this, but that does
not end the tale of their achievemnts.
TRAINING FOR NAVY
SINGLE TAX ADVOCATED
Prominent Australian Journal Makes
Strong  Plea
Examinations  for  Naval  Cadets  Will
Be Held Some Time iii
October.
Condition  Under Which Those Who
Enter Service Will Be
Accepted
Progress, a journal published in
Melbourne, Australia, is devoted to
single tax, with a devotion which is
by no means half-hearted, as the following quotation indicates: "The
democrats of Australia and all lands
demand real Free Trade and wouid
rejoice to see the customs houses
swept away altogether. They demand
that all revenue shall be raised by
the all-round taxation of land values,
a flat rate and no exemptions. They
aim to elevate labor above the condition of the slave cringing for protection. They repudiate the ignominious creed that labor Is naturally a
dependent class, needing legislation
to uphold its wages and to shield It
against oppression, and req airing the
guardianship of government Inspectors. They maintain that labor Is
the chief pillar of civilization—tho
greatest factor In our social life. And
under the term labor they Include all
who devote their skill and energy to
the production of wealth, whatever
their relative positions In the field ot
industry.' They would gradually re
place wagedom with the voluntary
co-operation of free men. They hold
to hte old Saxon proverb, "A land
less man Is an unfree man," and will
rest only in the total abolition of
land monopoly by the gradual, but
eventaully complete restoration to
the people of the land values they
create. They would thus ensure an
economic and social freedom which
would laugh at such crude schemes
as old, and new protection. They
hold that to further extend and entrench prlcilege is sheer folly and a
suicidal waste of time as the solution of the labor problem. That
every step taken in the destruction
of privilege is worth a hundred devices to circumvent the ills it causes.
They stand, not for a class, not for
somi men, but for the rights of all
who by their activities contribute to
the well being of society."
Details for examination of candidates for naval cadets have been officially given out. Examinations will
be held by the civil service commission In October at tbe same time and
place as other examinations for vacancies in the civil service. The
first thirty candidates as to merit,
will be admitted to the Royal Canadian Naval college at Halifax.
Hereafter fifteen cadets will be admitted each year after competitive
examinations, to be held every six
months. The age limit is from 14 to
16. The examination will be that of
the lower grade of the civil service
with additional questions In mathematics and an insistence upon a very
high grade of physical fitness. Thus
It may happen that a lad may pass
the examination with high rank, and
yet be rejected for physical causes.
An essential qualification Is that
the fathers of all the candidates
must be British subjects. Another
stipulation is that the candidates
hemselves must be British subjects.
Candidates must have lived In Canada for two years before the date set
for their examination.
The course in the naval college
will last two years. It wll involve
payments by the parent of $700,
$200 for tuition and $500 for expenses.
After passing at the naval college,
the cadets will be qualified to act as
midshipmen and draw the pay of
that rank. After three and a half
years 'service as midshipmen, they
will be eligible for promotion as sub-
lieutenants.
The chief condition is that any boy
who takes a naval college course
must bind himself to service in the
Canadian navy. There will be no
drifting oq to other professions as
is the case in the Royal Military college at Kingston. A boy entering as
a naval cadet must remain in the
navy unless physically disqualified.
Three positions as surgeons in the
naval service of Canada are to be
filled shortly, and applications from
qualified candidates will be received
by the naval department up to September 15. Candidates must be under 35 years of age, qualified medical
practitioners of at least one year's
practice, graduates of a Canadian
medical college, and Canadians by
birth.
Appointments will be made after
competitive examination. The pay
of the surgeons will be $4 a day, and
after three years $5 a day with $150
allowance for uniform on joining.
Surgeons discharged at the end of
three years will be paid a gratunlty
of $1000, after five years $1500, conditional upon joining the reserve of
medical officers.
 o	
IXTERFSTING FIGURE
MOW RECORD
Another world's record was broken
at the Grand Circuit races at North
Randall part, near Cleveland. The
Harvester, driven by Ed. Geers, won
the two heats of the 2:06 trot in
2.04 and 203% respectively, making
the two fastest heats ever trotted In
a race by a stallion. Incidentally, the
Harvester clipped one second off his
own record, equalled the stal-
trotting record made by Cresceus at
the Brighton Beach track in 1902,
and set a new mark for five-year-old
trotting stallions, in a race, In the
second heat.
The stallion had such a big lead
over Sonoma Girl, Wilkes Heart, and
Oro that Geers did not extend him In
the stretch Had he done so, the Harvester would have eclipsed Cresceus'
record of 2.02%, made against time
at Columbus, 1902, which still stands
as the stallion trotting record.
of Canada. In Mr. Gibson's later
years he met with business reverses,
and the immense property went into
the hands of a company in which
he had a large interest. Recently
he retired, and the property of the
company, which became involved in
legal difficulties, will be sold,to satisfy the claims of creditors in Canada
and England. The cotton mill has
already been purchased by the Canadian Colored Cotton company. oBth
sawmills and cotton mills continue
to be operated, and Marysvllle Is still
a thriving town, a monument to the
foresight and energy of a man who
was compelled to earn his own living from his boyhood days, and who
produced a property that is today
worth some millions of dollars.
SCHOLARS' TEETH
British Expert Reports Upon Importance of Dental Clinics
Alexander Gibson of New Brunswick
Lives in Town Which He Built
The most Interesting figure In the
industrial life of New Brunswick is
Mr. Alexander Gibson, who, on August 1, attained his ninetieth birthday, and is still able to walk about
the streets of Marysvllle, of which
he was the founder. Many years
ago Mr. Gibson, after having risen
from the position of a day laborer in
a sawmill to that of the owner of
the mill, disposed of the later property and removed to the site of the
present town of Marysvllle, on the
Naskwaak river. The Naskwaak is a
tributary of the St. John, which it
enters near Fredericton. There was
an abandoned mill on the property
when Mr. Gibson began operations.
He bought a large area of timber
land, cleared the stream and constructed driving dams, built a new
mill and began to manufacture lumber. As time passed he leased more
timber land, built more mills, opened a brickyard, erected a cotton mill
and brick tenement houses for workmen, built a large church and presented it to the Methodist denomination, and, In short, established a
tion, and, in short, established a
thriving town on the site of the old
abandoned sawmill. He also operated at Blackville, on the Miramlchi,
assisted In building a line of railway
to Woodstock in one direction, and
to Chatham in another, and became
a railway magnate as well as "the
lumber" king of New Brunswick. Mr.
Gibson himself took no part In public life, but one of his sons wns for
a term a member of the parliament
In a report to the London County
Council, on school dentistry In Germany, prepared by R. Blair, who
visited the school of dental clinics at
Cologne, Strassburg and Berlin, it is
stated that on the whole the children
who have good teeth, and are, therefore better nourished, have better
reports on their work than other
children, although In some cases the
former have not so much capability
as the latter. As regards the necessity of erecting school clinics, there
is no difference of opinion; the only
question everywhere is that of cost.
In Germany, Mr. Blair found some
institutions which give free treatment to all elementary school children. These clinics are regarded as
the ideal, for German experience has
shrwn that it is very difficult to discriminate between those able and
those unable to pay. Some clinics
have given up free treatment, and
only do extractions and give advice
free, charging a small sum for fillings, whilst only in very poor cases
is free treatment given. It has already been shown that paren's of
small means pay up money for treatment very grudgingly. Instead of
paying a lump sum, it was p-.-oposc d
iliat instalments should be paid. £..■■
instance, one mark (a shilling) a
year, which would grant free treatment. This system is equiva ent to
insuiance, and preferable to P'lying
i lump sum, and through it the insurance associations, especially the
existing family insurance association,
can have the children permanently
treated.
Hamburg, which   already   has  a
dental   clinic,   is   contemplating   a
working arrangement between the in-;
surance association and the schools.'
Some school clinics established by
voluntary societies are granted by |
the town free rooms and sometimes
a sum of money in aid, the rest of
the cost being defrayed by voluntary
subscriptions. This is regarded only
as a temporary arrangement, and it
is held that the care of the teeth can
best be done by the organization of
town clinics. Apart from the fact
the town has certain duties in connection with the health of the people, the town dental clinic offers the
best solution of this question.
At Cologne the special consent of
the parent is required for all operations, and as a rule the mother is
required to be present.
"The hygiene movement," Mr.
Blair concludes, "seems to me the
most powerful Infulela at worw at a
most powerful influence at work at
the present moment In German elementary schools. The children of the
elementary school class are regarded as a necessary part of the national
organization. It is clearly seen that
the permanence of Germany as a
great and powerful state depends on
what is done in the schools. Tbe
public mind Is governed by a conscious policy of producing a virile
and intelligent race, and to this
policy the unrivalled capacity for
state organization is devoted, with
such funds as the state or municipality or voluntary effort can command."
 o	
SCOTTISH IMMIGRATION
It Is stated on good authority that
the Duke of Sutherland, the largest
land owner In Great Britain, will
visit his estates in Western Canada
next year.
The statement was made by W. B.
Yeats, who is agent for the present
Duke. He is in Canada on his way
to Alberta and British Columbia to
arrange for the settlement of the
first 1 00 families of Scottish farmers
who are leaving Sutherlandshire estates in Scotland to take up farming
in the extensive properties acquired
by the  Duke  in Western  Canada.
The Duke has purchased 250,000
acres in the two provinces, about half
being fruit-growing and the other
half splendid wheat-raising soil. All
the land is admirably adapted for
mixed farming and stock raising, and
situated within easy reach of the
Grand Trunk Pacific Railway.
The Duke means to devote himself
to transplanting his people to a country which will give them great opportunities.
NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that application will be made to the Legislative Assembly of the Province of
Britisli Columbia at its next Session
for an Act to incorporate a company
with power to construct, equip,
maintain and operate a line or lines
of railway of standard gnage with
any kind of motive power for the
conveyance of passengers and freight,
and with all the powers contained
in the "Model Railway Bill": Commencing from a point at or near
Port Simpson, or Work Channel. In
the Coast District, British Columbia,
by the most feasible, desirable and
practicable route to a point on the
Eastern boundary of the Province of
British Columbia, via the South-west
side of Work Channel to the Skeena
River; thence up the North side of
the Skeena River to a point near
Hazelton; thence to the junction of
the Bulkley River; thence up the
right bank of this River eight (8)
miles to the Suskewa River; thence
up this River by a low divide to the
head of Babine Lake; thence to the
north end of Stuart Lake; thence
north of McLeod Lake to the Mls-
nlchinca River; thenee up the Mis-
nichinca River by Summet Lake to
Pine River Pass; theuce north-westerly to head of Pine River, and down
ihis River to Moberley Lake; and
thence by tbe Peace River to the
Eastern boundary of the said Province of British Columbia; and with
power to construct, operate and
maintain all necessary bridges, roads,
ways and ferries; and to build, acquire, own and maintain wharves and
docks in connection therewith; and
to build, acquire, own, equip and
maintain steam and other vessels and
boats, and to operate the same on
any navigable waters; and with
power to build, equip, operate and
maintain telegraph and telephone
lines in connection with the said
Railway and branches, and to transmit messages for commercial purposes, and to charge tolls therefor;
and to generate and to sell electricity
for the supply of light, heat and
power; and with power to expropriate lands for the purposes of the
Company; and to acquire lands,
money bonuses, privileges or other
aids from any Government, municipal corporation or other persons or
bodies; and to levy and collect tolls
from all persons using, and on all
freight passing over any of such
roads, railways, ferries, wharves and
vessels built by the Company; and
with power to connect with and make
traffic or other arrangements with
railway, steamboat, or other companies:
Dated at Victoria, B.C., this 11th
day of August, 1910.
BARNARD & ROBERTSON,
A19.       Solicitors for the Applicants.
Mr. Jones—"Remember, my boy,
a lie is a terrible thing. You should
regard truth as the guiding star—
the—"
Voice (from below)—"The landlord has called for the rent, Mr.
Jones,"
Mr. Jones—"Oh, tell him I'm out."
^■^ kAikAi kAd hAd kAd kAd kAai kAJ kAJ kAJ kAai kAd kAd kAd kAi kAatl kA 4 kAd k A
. * *
* *
i !   THE JOURNAL   !
Is the Official Advertising
Medium for the City
of Prince Rupert
* *i* *** *i* *** *** •j* *t* "J* "i* *t* •** *!■
;..;«.;. »*. #.;. $.-. »;*.;. $.;..;..;..;..;. »>.;
FOLLOW THE TREND OF THE CITY'S
PROGRESS BY SUBSCRIBING
FOR THE PAPER
The Journal aims at keeping Prince Rupert
and new B.C. ever before the public eye. Send
it to your friends and any whom you wish to
interest in the coming Metropolis of the North.
V*
1
*% *>»;. ♦*♦ .j. •;•*;« »> .> .*4 »>.;. «.♦* »> .;4.;.*j. ■>
^WWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWW-^ THE   SRINCE   RUPERT  JOURNAL
Friday, August 26, 1910.
Delayed Decision In
Lighting System
%J
(Continued from Page One)
on the water of the peninsula and
they feared the reserv might be lifted. He did not believe much in
dealing with outside companies, he
felt that this would be an expensive
proposition to instal the plant from
the sash and door factory, yet it
should be done at once.
Aid. Hilditch believed that if they
acted quickly the light could be In
stalled in six weeks. He believed
In the city operating its own light.
Aid. Barrow said he did not be
lieve himself that the Cloyah Lakes
could be economically operated, yet
he thought it should be looked into
A Id. Naden on Private Ownership
Aid. Naden believed in municipal
ownership. At the same time he be
lieved that the city had its hands
full in providing the telephone, the
waterworks and other necessary propositions. New Westminster, with a
great blare of trumpets, put in a
municipal system of electric lighting.
It had been found necessary to get
the lighting elsewhere and the city
had to pay a high price.
He was surprised to hear Aid. Mclntyre say that they should have the
plant regardless of cost. He, for one,
would not use the light if the price
charged was exorbitant. He would
not favor the motion until the private company offering a supply should
be heard from. This would mean a
delay of only about twenty-four
hours.
Aid. Pattullo wanted to know it
there was any assurance from the
sasli and door factory as to a continuance of the power and the cost
next year. He would like to hear as
to the cost.
Aid. Mclntyre said that it was not
urgent that they should do it inside
of wenty-four hours, but they had
been dilly dallying for a long time
with this.
Favors Municipal System
Aid. Hilditch said that there had
been data by the wheel-barrow load
brought down. He was surprised thai
Aid. Naden wanted more data. He
argued that by the city putting In the
plant they got it five cents a light
cheaper than was offered and in the
end had a good boiler. He would always be In favor of municipal ownership. The city could do the work
as cheaply as any one else.
Aid. Naden said that Aid. Hil-
ditch's first report brought in was
such that a fifteen-year-old school
boy would not accept. Aid. Hilditch
did not know what it was going to
cost. If the city could rent a boiler
for $15 a day it could afford to buy
a $1,300 boiler. What bothered
him was that with a plant located on
the waterfront, where a large saving
would be effected it had been estimated that it would cost $1.50 for
a 16 candle power light. How could
It be done cheaper under the proposed proposition?
Aid. Hildltch said his report had
been misrepresented.
Aid. Pattullo Wanted Figures
Aid. Pattullo wanted to have a
definite report as to what was proposed to be done. When that was
done he could vote intelligently. He
would not relegate his duty to others.
He wanted to know exactly what it
was to cost.
Aid. Lynch said that the putting
off for consideration of a little matter like this temporary lighting
scheme would result In nothing being done. If it were something looking to a supply for some years It
would be different.
His Worship said that he had been
spoken to by the representatives of
private companies, but they had not
presented  their  propositions  yet.
Aid. Pattullo said he knew nothing
about the schemes offered by the
private corporations. What be wanted was a report on the temporary
proposition showing approximately
the cost. He could then vote Intelligently  upon  the question.
Mayor Wanted Action
His Worship said that he felt this
would be an expensive proposition,
but he was prepared to get it. If
It were found ruinously high it could
be stopped.
Aid. Pattullo said be was not In
favor or putting tbe city to $15,000
expense because some one cried
"light."
Aid. Mclntyre thought they could
depend upon the city engineer's
figures, and they should go ahead. He
wns agreeable to lay this over another evening In order that the council might be unanimous In the matter.
Aid. Lynch quoted from the engineer's report that at a cost of
$26,nnn for equipment and operation the cost was definitely figured
WANTED—Good   sales    girl;     easy
work; short hours.   Apply Simon's
Fair, Third avenue.
at a rate cheaper than was offered
by one of the private companies.
Aid. Pattullo wanted the committee to report on the material necessary and the cost with the agreement
which the sash and door factory
would charge. Then he would have
something to go on.
His Worship said he felt that Aid.
Pattullo was right In asking for a
definite recommendation as to what
was to be done.
The matter was laid over until the
next night.
.Second Night's Discussion
When the council met last night
there were quite a lar^a number
present to hear the discussion, Including the representatives of the
sash and door factory and the two
private companies offering to provide
light.
A report was read from the city
engineer's department as to the cost
of installing a 75 k.w. plant instead
of 60 k.w. one as was reported upon
at first, the council having decided
to get figures for the larger system.
Increased Plant
The report was as follows:—
As requested, I beg to submit the
following report as to the cost of
installing and operating a plant at
the sash and door factory of 75 k.w.
capacity in place of the 60 k.w.
plant of which an estimate is already given in the city engineer's report of August 13.
I have estimated the cost as follows:—
Electrical Apparatus
75 k.w. generator with excitor
£.nd switch board $2,300
50 h.p. boiler and accessories   1,300
Pole line     5,566
Consumers' service lines, including transformers        COO
Repairing line from power
plaut to Sixth street, including 16 new poles        417
Engineering and erection  . . .    1,200
Total cost of installation. :$11,883
The above cost is an   increase    of
$2,400  over and above the estimate
for a 60 k.w. plant given in the engineer's report of August 13.
Cost of Operating
Rental of boiler and engine at
Sash   &   Door  Factory,  per
year $3,650
Coal consumption per year assuming 7 lbs. per hour per
h.p, In 50 h.p. and 80 h.p.
boilers, 8 nours per day,
365 days per year, and adding 25 per cent to cost for
banking fires, etc     1,45s
Water, waste, oil, etc        300
Engineer's   wages,   $225   per
month        2,700
Fireman, at $100 per month.    1,200
Laborer     1,000
Superintending     1,800
Depreciation ,    3,000
Total cost of operation . . .$28,23,0
Income
The  operating cost  of  the  plant
per year being $28,230 the consumption in  k.w.  hours per year would
work out as follows:—
Street Lamps Consumption Per Year
480 k.w. hours X 182.5 (winter)   . I 87,600
240 k.w. hours X 182.5 (summer)    43,800
Total k.w. hours per year. .131,400
Private Consumers
630 k.w. hours X 182.5 (winter)    114,975
270 k.w. hours X 182.5 (summer     49,275
Total k.w. hours per year.. 164,250
It will thus be seen the the total
k.w. hours for street lighting and
private consumers would amount to
295,650.
Still Opposed to it
Aid. Naden thought the former report would have to be considered in
collection with this. The cost seemed to be Increasing steadily.
The former report having been
produced, Aid. Lynch said that the
new report was on the proposition
to increase the boiler capacity and
thus provide for greater power. This
last report was for a larger plant
with necessarily increased cost for
maintenance. The depreciation was
figured  very  much lighted.
Aid. Pattullo wanted to know
what the revenue from the consumers would be, estimating at 15 cents
per kilowatt hour.
It was ascertained that this would
come to about $24,000, estimating
using seven hours in winter and
three hours in summer each day at
15 cents per k.w. hour.
Aid. Naden said this might be
got if meters were used, but if they
were not there would not be nearly that income on the amount consumed.
Aid. Lynch thought it would be
advisable to instal meters.
Aid. Hildltch moved that the report  of  the  committee  be  received
and the engineer instructed to purchase the necessary plant.
Wanted to Hear Others
Aid. Barrow said he understood
that they were to hear of two other
propositions.
Aid, Smith said Mr. Durant had
informed him that his representative
was coming on Sunday. He thought
it would be wise to look into these
other propositions. It was a serious
matter. He realized the need of getting light as soon as possible. The
fullest investigations Into the Tsimp-
sean and Mr. Durant's propositions
should be gone Into. He favored
postponing decision until next week.
Aid. Pattullo wished to hear from
Mr. Palmer of the sash and door
factory as to what the arrangements
would be for a renewal.
Must  Act  at  Once
Mr. Palmer said that he was not
prepared to offer a renewal at the
present time. He would enter into
a two year contract or agree to a
renewal for the next year at 25 per
cent advance. He was instructed to
withdraw negotiations. If this were
put off until next week the council
could consider his plant as not available.
Aid. Pattullo thought that if this
contract was to be entered into it
should be for two years.
Aid. Lynch said that if a temporary arrangement were made for a
year surely the private propositions
could be decided upon before two
years. The principals in the matter
were agreeable to endeavor to get a
plant in inside of a few weeks and
a year would give ample time. He
was informed that in the south
where water power was available
rates of from 1% to 2 cents a kilowatt hour were given.
He seconded Aid. Hilditch's motion.
Alt?. Mclntyre said that the light
was needed. Had these propositions
been put up before there might have
been a delay allowed. Now the council could do nothing but proceed with
the temporary light.
Aid. Pattullo was agreeable to this
provided the option for the renewal
was looked after.
No Need of Haste
Aid. Naden agreed with Aid.
Smith. He failed to see the need of
this haste. The city could get along
a- few months. If in the next few
months they could arrive at a reasonable proposition the council could
well afford to postpone action.
Aid. Smith did not see the necessity for so much haste. If the council was going to ask for propositions
like this and these were not even
considered it would be found that
few propositions would be put up.
With one proposition before them
tonight and another coming early
next week, he did not think that the
council was acting right to refuse to
consider them.
Aid. Hilditch called attention to
the fact that if Mr. Palmer was not
informed tonight that the temporary
light was off. He did not believe
that the proposers of the other
schemes could get the plant running
before four months. If the plant was
not satisfactory they could shut
down next April and make arrangements with one of the other companies. If Mr. Palmer would extend
his time he would be agreeable to
postpone this consideration for seven
days.
Aid. Pattullo wanted to know what
it would cost to Instal a plant such
as Mr. Palmer had.
A rough estimate was given by Mr.
Burns, the electrician, at about
$4,000, which did not include installation.
Cancel Arrangement
Aid. Smith said he felt that it
might be as well to cancel the agreement with Mr. Palmer. If the city
was to pay $3,600 for what would
cost only about $5,000 to the city to
purchase and Instal he felt It was
better to drop It. It was, he believed,
only a bluff anyway.
Aid. Barrow advised postponement
to go Into the whole matter.
His Worship said that the situation
was peculiar. The city was lighted
by gasoline which was liable to cause
a fire at any time which would entail a loss upon a few men that
would far more than pay for the
whole cost of Installing a plant.
Aid. Harrow did not think that it
was up to the city to provide a substitute for gasoline lighting if the
city considered it dangerous and ordered a discontinuance of it.
Aid. Lynch thought coal oil was
even more dangerous than gasoline.
Aid. Naden did not favor being
Mr. Palmer would not extend the
time beyond tonight. If a temporary
light plant was to be installed, he
felt more like putting In the whole
thing by the city. It would not cost
more than $20,000, and then the city
could decide when it would choose
to instal a permanent one.
The Fire Risk
Aid.  Pattullo considered that the
fire risk was the great argument for
the installing of the temporary plant.
He wanted to know if the proposed
plant would ensure lighting all of
section one by electric lights. If this
was not done the danger from fire
was only partially eliminated. He
wanted to know how many lights
comparatively could be expected to
be supplied.
Mr. Burns of the engineer's department, said ■ that it would take
about 5,000 lights to light section
one. The proposed works would supply about 1,500 lights there.
Aid. Pattullo did not feel like entering Into a proposition at considerable expense and in the end find that
the danger was not eliminated.
Aid. Smith said he had no axe to
grind with any of the companies. He
thought, perhaps, It would be better
for the city to let some company install a plant that would give a plentiful supply rather than have the city
do it.
The motion of Aid. Hilditch to proceed with the purchase of the plant
was lost on the following division:
Ayes, Aid. Hilditch, Aid. Mclntyre
and Aid. Lynch; nays, Aid. Pattullo,
Aid. Naden, Aid. Barrow and Aid.
Smith.
ATTENDED SMOKER
(Continued from Page One)
was going to give place to one who
was here for the first time and who
might be able to give them valuable
information, Sir George Doughty.
Sir George Doughty
Hon. Sir George Doughty, as introduced by. Mr. Hays, was greeted
with ringing cheers. Sir George said
he had had the surprise of his life as
he had no chance to prepare. He had
heard a great deal about the G. T. P.
before he came here. He had been
told by one lady that it was the paradise of the American continent. He
found it was a dry town but that
wou'd not last long as September 1
would soon be here. (Laughter ) He
bad found Hint the sun shone in
great delight here and this would
be the home of thousands. Coming
from the Old Country where they
look about a century to build a city
it was a surprise to see one spring
up as Prince Rupert had done. He
never saw such optimistic people.
In Mr. Hays they had an empire
builder. As chairman of the G. T. P.
they had one of the best men that
could be produced in England who
was present with them tonight. He
believed that Prince Rupert would
not only be a great trade centre but
a very beautiful city from its situation. As he entered by night he pictured one of the prettiest cities In the
world.
It was enterprise and British pluck
that would make Canada great. He
sometimes felt that as the people
multiplied on this coast there would
have to be some portion of the rP.it-
ish nav yhere on the Pacific. If they
were to be peaceful with all other
nations they must De prepared to defend themselves.
He believed that with British men
with British ideals, they might build
up a great fishing industry here that
would form the nucleus from which
to man the battleships. (Applause.)
Mr. Smithers
In reply to repeated calls for Mr.
Smithers the chairman of the company epoke. He said he had the
honor of being at the head of the
old G. T. P. road. He often felt
when he was at this side how little
they did compared with Mr. Hays,
and he assured Mr. Hays they appreciated what he was doing. The Board
in London was heart and soul with
Mr. Hays and were ready to support him In his Ideas.
He hoped all the enterprises that
anadlan skill sent to London would
prosper so that London might continue to send Its money here. The
Increase in property during the past
three years here had been marvellous. He felt with Sir George that
the city was to prosper in a commercial, as It was the terminus of the
best transcontinental road on the
continent. The grades were to be
the best of any road. The city had
natural beauty as well as the promise
of commercial importance. He would
take home a great account of the
possibilities of the great west, the
beauties of Prince Rupert, and he
wished them all kinds of success.
Ships Needed
Mr. Hunter was forced to speak,
also. He was blad to have been able
to visit Canada and have the opportunities to see the beautiful scenery
in this country. He was glad to see
the prosperity that the Canadians
were making for themselves. The
progress of British Columbia was
marvellous. One city had increased
its population eight fold In five years.
With the opportunities which
Prince Rupert would have, this city
•WHERE  QUALITY IS KING."
GEO. D. TITE
Furniture Dealer
3rd. Avenue
Prince Rupert
An inspection of our stock
of House Furnishings will
convince you. For quality and
economy you will leave us a
satisfied customer.
Dinlnf Room Furniture, Sideboards,
Buffets, DlnlDt Tibia, 8ft.
■nd 8ft. Extension
Dlnlnj Room Chairs, Quartered Oik witli
leather Seats, Golden or Early English
finish. Prices tinging from
Just Received a
Handsome Line of
Iron Beds, Springs and
Mattresses, all sizes
WINDOW BLINDS
Manufactured here to fit any
window  ii)i  to 10  feet wide.
Tapestry and Lace Curtains,
Poles and Trimmings
Special orders for Upholstering
of any kind.
$22.50 to $50
Wicker Chairs and Rockers
GEO. D. TITE,
■■■■■i
3rd Ave.
immmmmmmmtM
SHERWIN & WILLIAMS
-PAINTS=
COVER THE EARTH.
WE   ARE   SOLE   AGENTS
CARLOAD JUST ARRIVED
Ready Nixed Paints,
Paints Ground in Oil,
Paints Ground in Japan,
Varnishes, Shellac, etc.
Water Stains
and
Decotint
IN ALL COLONS
Prince Rupert Hardware & Supply
Company, Ltd.  thos. dunn. m*.
mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmB
The Westholme
Lumber Company, Ld.
We carry the largest stock of
Building Supplies in the North.
Quotations given on short notice in all lines.
Rough and Dressed Lumber
Shingles and Lath
Mouldings and Cases
Doors and Windows
We handle Plaster and Lime at reasonable prices
Get our quotations for all classes of buildings.
FIRST AVENUE
OFFICE AND
WAREHOUSES
should be second to none. The city
had a magnificent harbor and a
great country back of it. He wanted to impress upon Mr. Hays the
need of large steamships to cross the
Pacific. In the first instalment the
two steamers which the G. T. P. had
furnished they had a good assurance
In that line. He wished the utmost
prosperity for the city.
LADYSMITH
COAL
H. B. ROCHESTER, -  Centre Street
The gathering broke up shortly
before midnight with thanks to Mr.
Hays and his party for attending.
 o	
NO   GKOG   TUB
Admiral Kingsmill inspected the
anadlan cruiser Rainbow before she
sailed from Portsmouth a few days
ago on her long journey to Esquimau. She is the first British warship in many years that has left port
without a "Grog Tub." Practically
all the crew are teetotallers, but
liberal messing arrangements have
been made for them. Lord Strathcona has presented plate to the officers.

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.prj.1-0311785/manifest

Comment

Related Items