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Prince Rupert Journal Apr 25, 1911

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Array /
f.v       MAY 2   Nil
New Wdliniton
Coal
is the best
ROGERS & BLACK
Sole Agents
flfrina ftnpjert
.^CTORIA, *>'%
omnai
High Class
Job Printing
in all Lines
VOLUME 1
Published Twice a Week.
PRINCE RUPERT, B.  C, TUESDAY, APRIL 25, 1911.
Price,  Five  Cents.
No.   90.
WORK ON STREETS
Contractor Writes That He is Hurrying
Work But Does Not Expect
Penalty.
Council  Replies  That No  Undertaking.Has Been Made—Other
Items Up
At the meeting of the city council
last evening the subject of the time
for the completion of the street contracts again came up.
A communication was read from
S. P. McMordfe in reply to his lettter
of a week ago, stating that he was
making due progress with his work
on the understanding that an extension of time would be granted.
Aid. Morrissey moved to reply to
this to the effect that the council
had not agreed to any understanding that no penalty would be inflicted.
The motion carried.
Rat Catcher
Thos. Reed wrote offering to
make arrangements to deal with the
rats as he was a qualified rat
catcher.
This was referred to the health
committee.
The Salvation Army asked for a
walk to their citadel, which was referred to the finance committee.
On the request of the city engineer, it was decided to advertise for
500 cedar piles to be used in connection with sewer work.
A petition was presented asking
for a roadway from Sixth avenue to
the Britisii Columbia Tie and Lumber Company's property.
This was referred to the streets
committee.
Condemned Oranges
The health committee reported
against entertaining the claim of
G. W. Nickerson for condemned
oranges. The report of the medical
health Inspector was read in connection with it.
The report was adopted.
Aid. Kerr asked when the sewer
on Sixth avenue would be completed.
This was referred to the streets
committee for a reply at the next
meeting.
 o	
INTERESTED IN PLACE
N. J. Hobin Found Eastern People Very
Anxious to Learn of
City.
The  Continental   Trust  Company  Is
Preparing to Open Up
on Large Scale
M. J. Hobin, second vice president
and manager of the Continental
Trust Co., Ltd., of this city, has returned to the city after a trip east
in the interests of his company. Mr.
Hobin while in the east, however,
did not devote all his time to the
Continental Trust Company's business. He has returned to Prince
Rupert accompanied by Mrs. Hobin,
having been wedded during his absence. Mr. and Mrs. Hobin will
take up their residence here.
In the east Mr. Hobin found
every one interested in Prince Rupert. It was the same whether in
Detroit, Chicago, Toronto, Montreal or Winnipeg. All wanted to
know about the  opportunities here.
In connection with the Continen
tal Trust Compay active steps are
being taken to fit up the home of
the company on Second avenue in
the new block which has been built.
In a few days the company will be
able to open up in a general business
way with the most comfortable
quarters.
A. D. Burnett, of the Commercial
Bank, Port Huron, who has become
interested  in  the  organization,  will
visit    Prince    Rupert in a month's
time, when  he  will  look  into  this
city as a field for investments.    He
"'■was the organizer and is prominently identified with    many    financial
and industrial institutions    and his
investing   here   should   he   attended
with splendid results to the city.
 o	
H. L. Johnson, of the engineering
staff of the Grand Trunk Pacific, is
spending a few days In the city.
......
TO BEGIN FARMING
* Mr.  Corbett is  one  of those *
* who will leave tomorrow morn- *
* ing by the river steamer Oper- *
* ator  for  Hazelton  on  his way *
* into the Telkwa.    He has pur- *
* chased   2,400  acres  of  land  on *
* the   railway  line   near  Telkwa *
* and  will  Investigate his    hold- *
* Ings. He intends to begin farm- *
* ing operations on a. large scale *
CHANGE IN OFFICERS
Chief    Constable    Owens    Is    Here,
Taking Over New Office—Chief
Wynn Leaving for Hazelton
Chief Constable W. Owens, of the
provincial police force, has arrived
In the city and is taking over the
duties connected with the office
here. He will be chief constable in
Prince Rupert instead of Chief
Wynn, who is transferred to Hazelton, where he assumes the post vacated by Chief Maitland Dougal,
who goes to Duncan as government
agent.
Chief Owen is accompanied by his
wife and three children. He is an
officer of considerable experience
and stands well in the force. Chief
Wynn will leave as soon as possible
for the new post at Hazelton.
 o	
s      AUTO FIRE  ENGINE
Council Wishes to Have the Original
Specifications Here for
Inspection
The city council last evening had
the new auto fire engine up for further discussion to some extent. The
fire chief reported that in company
with the driver he had gone over
the machine and found it complied
with the copy of the specifications
forwarded.
The question came up whether the
original contract should not be forwarded before final action was
taken  as  to receiving the machine.
On motion of Aid. Smith, it was
decided that the original specifications should be forwarded for comparison.
The suggestion of the chief that a
possible test before the council
should take place was considered.
It was decided to notify the office
of the company asking when an expert could be sent to take part in
the test.
The recommendation that $241
be expended in fitting up a temporary hall for the new engine was
passed. The location will be close
to the bank of British North America, on Fulton street.
 o	
CONDEMNING CABINS
Medical Health Officer Recommends Removal of Those on G.T.P.
Reserve.
Other   Unsanitary   Sections   of   the
City  Receive  Attention  at
Hands of Officials
The medical health officer presented a report last evening to the
city council in which he condemned
the cabins on the Grand Trunk Pacific reserve on First avenue and
Wayne place. He reported that
those indicated in a plan accompanying tlie report were a menace to
health. If typhod or diphtheria
germs once became active there, it
would give endless trouble. There
were accumulations of filth covering
years and he advised the destruction
of the buildings and general cleaning away of the filth.
He also called attention to the
alleys between Second ana Third
avenues and between Third avenue
and Fraser street which he contended were in an unsanitary condition
in parts.
The whole matter was referred to
the health committee, which will
look into the situation and take advice as to the authority which the
council has in these matters.
 o	
J. W. Stewart, head of the Foley,
Welch and Stewart firm, Duncan
Ross, one of the sub-contractors, and
D. A. Rankin, another contractor,
leave for Hazelton tomorrow.
RECIPROCITY WILL BE
ISSUE AT ELECTION
Indications are That General Vote Will Be Taken to
Determine the Feeling of the Country on This
Question—Conflicting Reports Received From the West.
(Special to The Journal)
OTTAWA, April 25.—That it will
take a general vote of the electorate
to determine the feeling of the country on the reciprocity issue is manifest from the conflicting reports
brought by members who recently
visited constituencies in Manitoba,
Alberta and Saskatchewan.
The minister of tbe interior, Hon.
Frank  Oliver  and    Dr.  Clarke are
bringing assurances that the country
is overwhelmingly in favor of the
bill.
On the other hand, Dr. Staples, of
MacDonald, G. H. Bradbury, of Selkirk, and Glen Campbell, of Dauphin, have returned with countenances illuminated with the hope
that the sentiment of the farmers in
Manitoba is by no means unanimous
for the agreement.
WATER SITUATION
Council Considers the Question of Probable Shortages During the
Summer.
Suggested   That   Perhaps   Acropolis
Hill   Reservoir Might Be
Put in Shape to Serve
The water situation in the city
came up for consideration before the
city last evening. It was suggested
that probably there might be a
shortage of water during the summer.
Aid. Newton wanted to know if
the city was obliged to pay for all
the pumping even if the Grand
Trunk Pacific used so mucn water
that the pumping was made necessary.
His Worship  read  the section of
*************
*
*      THE WATER PROPOSALS
* R.  H.  Thomson,  engineer  of
'■'■ the city of Seattle, accompanied
* by    T.   H.  Carver  of  his  staff,
* reached the city last night. To-
* day,  in  company  with   Colonel
,! Davis, a tour about the city was
* made.      This    afternoon    they
•- started   for     Woodworth   Lake
* with Mr. Clements    and    about
* three days will be spent there.
* Following the visit to the lakes
* and the route of the pipe line,
"Mr.  Thomson  will go into  the
* whole scheme and report to the
* council.
*
*******   ******
the city charter under which the
Grand Trunk Pacific was entitled to
forty inches from Hays Creek. He
a'so pointed out that the engines
used in pumping were the property
of the Grand Trunk Pacific and the
city used them on providing for the
operating of theni.
His Worship suggested that if the
new waterworks scheme were adopted, the council might with some advantage proceed to finish the Acropolis Hill reservoir and connect it
with the present supply so as to ensure against a shortage.
Aid. Morrissey did not. think that
steamers outside of the Grand
Trunk Pacific vessels should receive
water at the wharf.
Aid. Kerr said he was in formed
that the Grand Trunk Pacific engineering departnmnt wolud require
200,000 gallons every twenty-four
hours this summer. He also pointed out that steamers made this
place only to receive water on the
way from southern ports to Alaska.
His Worship thought that outside
steamers should pay for water. He
suggested referring this to the water
committee which wan agreed to.
A report of the fire and water
committee recommended that the
rates for cabins should be reduced
to $6 a year wliere only one tap was
used, on condition that all these cabins put in connections. The report
further recommended lhat all stand-
pipes should be cut. out after June
and connections forced throughout
the city except where it was impossible  to take  these  out.
A.d. Morrissey put in u claim for
i.inth avenue residents whom he
said had long wanted for the connection.
It was decided to refer this to the
committee for report.
DISPUTE AT AN END
Industrial Workers Have Formally Called
off Strike Work in
General.
Rapid   Completion   of   Contracts Is
Sought by Citizens in Interests of Business
The industrial dispute which has
been carried on in the city for a
number of weeks is now at an end
and the strike declared by the P. R.
I. W. has been called off by that
body. The move on the part of the
association was taken at a meeting
held in their hall on Sunday night,
when the situation as it now existed was discussed and the resolution passed. The association has
taken the course of duly notifying
the mayor on the subject.
This action on the part of the association Will have a beneficial effect, although previous to this the
contractors on the streets announced
that they were fully manned and
were not in need of any further additions to their staffs.
The various sections of work in
the city are again being operated at
a steady rate and the prospect is
that there will be a very busy summer here. The wish of the council,
according to recent discussions is to
have the contracts now under way
completed just as fast as they can
be finished.
The citizens generally will back
up any such move as there is awish
to have the streets put in the very
best shape for business purposes at
an early date. To do this it may be
necessary to put on double shifts on
most of the places. The citizens
will be pleased to see such a course
taken and have the thoroughfares
put in such shape that permanent
buildings may be put up and the
streets used to the fullest extent.
 o	
INCREASED OFFICE ROOM
City Assessor Has Had to Kind More
Room  for  His  Money
The city assessor and collector
J. C. McLennan, has found it essential to have Increased accommodation, Which is a most prosperous
sign from the city's standpoint.
The old quarters in the city hall
have been found altogether Inadequate for the collector to make a
proper disposition of the taxes and
collections that he is making, so added space had to be found, or else
he would have to forgive some of
the taxes, which he absolutely refused to do.
An addition to tlie assessor's
quarters by erecting a small building adjoining his old office, has
been put up by the building inspector and fills all the needs of the immediate present to perfection. The
quarters are so comfortable that
Mr. McLennan is loath to quit them
at closing time and is found working
far into the night. As a result the
taxpayers will not have to wait long
for their notices this year but will
receive their ever welcome requests
to   'pay up" In good time.
The new quarters were found absolutely essential in view or tho
fact that there has in the redistribution of the duties of the city hall
Staff been added responsibilities put
upon .Mr. McLennan and his staff in
the matter of making practically all
the collections for the city.
THE SKEENA IS OPEN
Foley, Welch & Stewart Steamers Start
Up the River Tomorrow
Morning.
Expect   to   Operate  Out   of   Prince
Rupert for a Few Weeks Until
Track Is in Good Shape
The Skeena River is open to navigation again. Tomorrow morning
the Operator and Conveyor of the
Foley, Welch ad Stewart fleet leave
at 6 o'clock, the former for Hazelton and the latter for Skeena Crossing. Both will carry the full complement of freight and passengers.
The Distributor leaves on Thursday for mile 162 and on Friday the
Omineca starts with explosives only,
for tbe river points.
The water is rising and no trouble
is expected in getting through. For
awhile the service will be continued from here until the railway line
is in position to operate a regular
service.
The Hudson's Bay Company will
have its steamers on the run in -i
few days, it is expected.
SENTENCED  FOR  SHOOTING
John   Mosca,   Convicted  of   Using a
Gun, Is Sent to Jail  for
One Year
NAY  HOLD ASSIZE
Request to Have Special Sitting to Di*
pose of Criminal Cases Here
Under Consideration.
Attorney General Will Decide After
Reference to Evidence Taken
at Preliminary Trial
It is probable that a special assize
may be fixed for here when the
caBes arising out of the fight at
Kelly's cut may be disposed of. The
attention of the attorney general
has been called to the fact that there
are about twelve cases and a request
made to hold the trial here.
In a letter from the deputy attorney general it is stated that after
the depositions have been received a
decision will be reached. Whichever
course will be the least expensive to
the accused will be adopted.
 o	
The tender of the J. H. Thompson Hardware Company for a quantity of small sized water pipes, was
accepted by the council last evening
on the report of the water committee.
— o	
INSPECTING  OFFICER
William   Marrluuit,   of   tile   Customs
Department Is Here on Official Business
John Mosca, convicted of shooting
Gregoria in the thigh during a
drunken bout, was yesterday sentenced by Judge Young to one year
in jail with hard labor.
The evidence was similar to that
taken at the preliminary hearing.
It was evident' that he intended to
shoot Mr. Camozzi and hit Gregoria.
Judge Young, however, pointed
out that he intended to shoot and
in view of the serious consequences
that might follow from using firearms inflicted the sentence as
stated.
W. E. Fisher prosecuted, while
L. W. Patmore appeared for the defence.
POSTAL LETTER BOXES
First Ones Have Been Placed in the City
With Collections Made Twice
a Day.
Additions to the Supply Arc   Promised   at   an    Early    Date   to
Meet Glowing Demands
The first letter boxes for the
streets of Prince Rupert have now
been installed. There are four of
these already supplied by the postal authorities hut others are expected to be authorized, later in
some of the outlying sections.
The boxes now placed are at tho
following corners: Third avenue and
Sixth street; Second avenue anil
Eighth street; Second avenue and
Second.street; and Sixth avenue and
Fulton street.
The collections are lo be madd
twice a day—at !) a. m. and at K
p. m., except, on Sundays, when the
afternoon  collection only is made.
MINERS KILLED
* (Special to The- Journal) *
* ELK GARDEN, W. Va., April •
* 25.—Twenty-three miners have *
* lost their  lives at Ott  Mine, of •
* the Danes Coal and  Coke Coin- *
* pany,  as  a  result  of  an  explo- •
* sion. *
* *
* ****•***•*••*•
The Salvation Army will hold a
social entertainment on Thursday
night in tlie citadel. There will be
a choice programme in which
Gray's orchestra will take part. Other musical selections will be ran-
dred and recitations. In connection
With the entertainment there will bo
n, lemon pie social with e-offee and
cake.
Duncan Ross addressed a,large
audience in tiie Empress theatre Ins!
Friday night In which he advocated
the reciprocity pact between Canada
and tine United States.
Among the arrivals in the city by
the steamer Prince George on Saturday was William Marchant, of
Victoria, inspeector of customs. He
is paying an official visit to this
office.
A change has recently been made
in the districts to he covered by the
inspectors in this province, Mr.
Marchant and Mr. Busby. Formerly
Mr. Marchant covered Vancouver
Island and a large area of the interior of the province while Mr. Busby
covered Vancouver, New Westminster and the northern coast including the Yukon.
Mr.   Marchant,   in   future,   is     to
take as his district    this    northern
Busby takes the interior i>oinfs.
coast    and    the Yukon,  while    Mr.
REORGANIZING STAFF
Fire Chief Will Act as Building Inspector ii Future-Other
Charges.
Work on  Streets Occupies  So Much
of Time of W. McNeill Thai
Alteration  Is l!<<|iiiro<l
The city officials' duties arc being
somewhat altered as a result of tbe
investigation of Ihe council as to
the working of the civic staff. The
new bylaw specifying the duties of
the various officers was considered
last evening in committee of ihe
whole.
In compliance with the new bylaw and to better provide for the
work of the city being carried out
some changes were made, in the distribution of work, by motion last
evening. Under the change, W. McNeill, who has charge of the work
being carried out on tiie streets is
to be relieved of the duties of building  inspector.
Tho fire chief shall perform the
duties of building Inspector in addition to his other duties. Kaiph
Walker, Ihe waterworks foreman,
will be given tlie additional duly of
acting as plumbing Inspector. Tfce
only change of salary will he lhat
Mr. Walker will receive' $100 a
month instead of $00.
Aid. Clayton did nol. know the
quallfI<»tIOM of Mr. Walker. He
did nol know whether he was capable as a plumbing inspector.
Aid. Morrissey asked if the fire
chief was a capable building inspector.
His Worship said tbe engineer
gave the information that Mr. Walker was qualified as a steam filler
and   would  be a  capable  man.
The report of the water commit-
too covering  this  was adopted.
The local lodge 1. O. O. V. will
attend divine service in the Presby-
t erf Ian church in the Empress t.hea-
tre on Sunday forenoon al 11
■i'e lock.    The members of Ihe order
II parudei in a body to the churrk. PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Tuesday, April 25,  1911.
FISHERY POACHING
C H. Barnard in the House of Commons
Brings Up the Subject.
He Advocates the Use of the Kestrel
for Lighthouse Service and
New Fast Protector
In the House of Commons a few
days ago the question of the con-
trac. awarded to the Collingwood
Shipbuilding Com.iany for the construction of the lighthouse tender
Estevan for Britisii Columbia waters
for $200,000 was brought up by
Mr. Barnard, M. P. for Victoria, who
said : 1 would like to ask the minister if lie does not think it would
have been very much more advar
tageous to the service in that province to have used the Kestrel for
this service, and to have built a pro
per fisheries protection cruiser. He
could have built a cruiser, or possibly two small ones, for the same
amount of money, and thus have provided a fishery protection service.
The Kestrel has done this work at
different times and she is just as
good, if not a very much better ship
than the present lighthouse tender
—the Quadra. I would ask if that
would not be a far better disposal
of that amount of money than to
build this new ship?
Mr. Brodeur: I think my hon.
friend (Mr. Barnard) is mistaken
with regard to the Kestrel being
used for this service. The Kestrel
is engaged in the fisheries protection  service.
Does Not Protect
Mr. Barnard: She does not protect anything.
Mr. Brodeur: Well, I think she
is doing fairly good work. I do
not think she would be any use,
however, for tlie lighthouse service.
That requires a different boat entirely and tho Kestrel would not be
suitable. We are doing a great deal
on the Pacific Coast, though little
was done in the pr.st, and in view of
the large amount of shipping which
is being carried on it is necessary
to provide bettor aids to navigation.
We have one boat there which has
been engaged in light' ouse service
—tlie Quadra—but it was found
necessary that a new one should be
placed in this service. So we called
for tenders nad the contract has
been given to the Collingwood Ship
building Company.
Mr. Barnard: What I stated was
that the Kestrel had relieved the
Quadra from time to time, and I
think that is the case if I am not
very much mistaken.
Mr. Brodeur: I never heard of it,
and the commissioner of lights informs me that he does not remember it.
Mr. Barnard: I think he is mistaken.
Mr. Brodeur:     He may be.
Better Protection
Mr. Barnard: However, in connection with this question, I want to
point out once more, as I have already twice done during the present
session, tlie necessity for at once
providing permanency for better
fisheries protection on that coast.
Since the last time I mentioned this
matter in the House I have seen
some reports of fishery poachers
again operating on that coast, and
apparently without very much attempt on the part of this department to stop that poaching. I will
quote from the Colonist newspaper
of March 22, and possibly in quoting that I will show the minister
how much use the Kestrel is for the
purpose of fishery protection. The
article is as follows:
The fish poachers have seemingly
extended their operations from the
west coast of Vancouver Island to
the Queen Charlottes according to
advices brought hy the steamer
Amur. Arrivals hy the Canadian Pacific railway steamer from the islands state lhat two gasoline auxiliary United States fishing schooners were sighted with their dories
out fishing within the three-mile
limit off Rose Harbor close to the
whaling station. The schooners
were well within the three-mile limit, poaching on the British Columbia
fisheries grounds. The Dominion
government's fishery protecton
schooner Kestrel was lying at Queen
Charlotte City when the Amur
called  there.
Is Too Slow
My honorable friend's protection
cruiser, the Kestrel was within hailing distance practically of these
schooners that were poaching, and
yet, through no fault of the men in
charge, but probably because the
Kestrel was too slow to catch them,
they were not interfered with. This
question   has   been   agitated   by   the
people of that province for a number of years. They have been put
off with promise after promise by
the department for the same length
of time. Votes have been put into
the estimates annually and never expended, until today the situation is
a disgrace to this government. To
show you what our friends on the
other side of the line think in regard to this matter, I will read you
another short extract taken from
the Colonist of March 25, just the
other day, which publishes a statement from the Seattle Post Intelligencer. The quotation is as follows:
The halibut, schooner Montana,
which has been building at the shipyards of Markey & Wilson, In the
east waterway, was launched at 7
o'clock yesterday morning, says the
Post Intelligencer. The Montana is
being constructed for W. H. Butt,
of Seattle, and will be used off the
coast of Vancouver Island the coining summer. The vessel is 81 feet
long and IS feet beam. She will be
able to carry 90,000 pounds of halibut under deck. She will be
equipped with an 85-horsepower Imperial engine and her bunkers will
hold fuel enough for a 4,000-mile
voyage. She will be ready to leave
for the north in about three weeks.
Poaching  Promised
Now, I say it is the business of
the minister and of his department
to see that If that vessel does leave
for the north in three weeks, she
does not go to the west coast of
Vancouver Island, and if she does,
it Is further the business of the minister and his department and his officials to see that she does not carry
any 90,000 pounds of halibut. This
grievance has been going on unremedied for so long a time that one
gets almost tired mentioning it. I
understand that the minister has
some votes of the supplementary
estimates this year for the purpose
of chartering some vessels for this
service, and I want to tell him that
is not sufficient. He cannot hope
by chartering vessels to stop this
poaching. He needs a permanent
force there all the time. Now, last
year he chartered a vessel for the
fisheries protection service, which,
as a matter of fact, is a tugboat, and
he paid $21,465 for doing it. That
is an extravagant way of doing the
business, because this will need to
be a permanent matter. Every time
he charters a vessel he uses her for
two or three months, and then she
is laid off. The result is there is an
interregnum, during which the
poachers do just as they please
along the coast. If the honorable
gentleman wants to stop this, the
only way he can do it is by organizing a proper patrol of the whole
coast, and to do that he must have
a proper and regularly organized
force. I submit further, that he
will find it very much less expensive by going to work and ordering
his boats now. In the past he has
promised us cruisers and other
kinds of boats, and given us nothing. This matter is an outrage on
the people of the province of British
Columbia it has gone so far, according to reports that come from there,
that even the islands on the coast,
who see these poachers coming
ashore and breaking the game laws,
want to know why the Dominion
government cannot protect the fisheries which belong to them.
Minister's  Reply
Mr. Brodeur: I think the reports
mentioned by the honorable gentleman are somewhat exaggerated.
That question does_ not come up
under this item, but I may deal with
it. We have been doing our, best
to protect the fisheries. My honorable friend complains, and other complaints have been brought before
the house, that some of those poachers who come ashore, were stealing
game from the province. It is not
our duty to protect the game of
British Columbia, and that is a work
which pertains to the provincial authorities. If there is any lack of
protection or enforcement of the
game laws of the province of British
Columbia, certainly my honorable
friend is not justified in charging
this government with it. We are
looking after the protection of the
fisheries, and we are doing it so well
that I think nobody can seriously
complain. We had some fishery protection vessels there, but they were
not found numerous enough, and at
the request of some members of this
house, I do not know whether my
honorable friend is one of them,
we chartered a vessel to look after
the protection of the fisheries, with
very good results. Immediately after the Rainbow arrived in this country we gave her instructions to look
after the fisheries. The Rainbow'
has done so, and the other day she
seized an American vessel which
was fishing within the three-mile
limit of the north shore of the island
of Vancouver, off Cape Scott. The
matter is now before the courts, and
will soon be adjudicated. I hope
we will succed in proving that this
vessel was within the three-mile limit, and that her seize\-e was valid.
My honorable friend will admit that
there has been a good deal of exaggeration in the reports In regard to
poaching. People think that a vessel iB fishing within the limit, when,
as a matter of fact, she may be outside of it. Three miles is a short
distance from shore, and people Imagine that the fishing is going on
within the three-mile limit when it
is outside.
I'nder-Estlinatcs   Situation
Mr. Barnard: With regard to exaggerated reports, I think the minister has very much under-estimated
the situation in which they are exaggerated. It is a matter of common knowledge all along the Pacific
Coast cities that that goes on practically unchecked, and has gone on
for years; and 1 am much mistaken
if a great many representations
have not been made to the minister
by boards of trade and other official
bodies to that effect. With regard
to his suggestion that I am complaining that the game laws of the
province of British Columbia are
not enforced by the Dominion government, he is either very dense or
is trying to misinterpret what I said.
That is not my complaint at all.
What I am trying to point out is
that the fishermen are actually so
bold that they come into the harbors along the coast, anchor their
vessels and go ashore, and commit
breaches of the game laws. They
leave their vessels and go ashore,
and tnere is no one to check them.
Mr. Brodeur: What can be done
in a case like that?
Mr. Barnard: I am not asking
this government to enforce the game
laws, but to stop these men from
fishing. If you stop them from
fishing, they won't come ashore.
That is the situation. I am not
asking the minister to enforce the
Britisii Columbia game laws; as has
been shown frequently, the provincial government are well able to
take care of their own game laws.
But I say the minister and his department have so far neglected to
stop this poaching, they have
brought the administration in that
particular into contempt, and not
only into contempt of the business
people of the province, but into the
contempt even of the aborigines
who are not supposed ta know
very much about it.
The latest Eldorado is in the
Province of Quebec, some sixty
miles northeast of Haileybury, where
it is said some 60,000 acres have
already been staked as a result of
reports of some good free gold finds.
The district is called Keekeek and
the Quebec Government intends to
boom it.
New Knox Hotel
ARTAUD & BESNER
Proprietors
The New Knox Hotel Is run on the
European plan. First-clas service.
All the latest modern improvements.
THE BAR keeps only the best
brands of liquors and cigars.
THE CAFE is open from 6.30 a.m.
to 8 p.m. Excellent cuisine; first-
class service.
Board, $1 a Day — Beds, 50c and np
First Avenue,  Prince Rupert
GRAND HOTEL
WORKINGMAN'1? HOME
25c
Spring Beds, Clean
White Sheets   -
Rooms 50 Cents
Best in Town for the Money
FIRST AVE. AND SEVENTH ST.
J. Goodman, Proprietor
THE WESTHOLME LUMBER GO.
LIMITED
We handle all kinds of
Building Supplies
First Avenue Telephone 180
Corner Eighth and Fraser Street*
Clinton Rooms
Newly remodelled and furnished.
Board and lodging. Home cooking
a specialty. Mrs. Anderson, Prop.
Rooms, $3 Per Week
Skeena  |Land   District—District   of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that William H.
Hargrave, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation banker, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lanas:—Commencing at a post planted on the west
shore of Lakelse Lake, and about
1 Vi miles distant and in a southwesterly direction from the S. W.
corner of Lot 3982, Skeena Land
District, District of Coast, Range V;
thence west 40 chains; thence south
80 chains, more or less, to the shore
of Lakelse Lake; thence following
the shore of said lake to point of
commencement, containing 160
acres more or less.
WILLIAM H. HARGRAVE.
Mancell Clark, Agent.
Dated 20th March,  1911.
Skeena Land DlBtrlct—District of
Queen Charlote Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that Wirt A. Stevens, of Chicago, 111., U. S. A., occupation civil engineer, Intends to
apply for permission to purchase
the following described lands: —
Commencing at a post planted on
the shore of Masset Inlet about one
mile northeast of the mouth of the
Ain River; thence north 80 chains;
thence west 40 chains more or less
to the eastern boundary of T. L.
35413; thence south along the
boundary of T. L. 35413 and
T. L. 35414, a distance of 80 cliains;
thence east 40 chains, more or less,
to point of commencement, containing 320  acres more or less.
WIRT   A.   STEVENS.
G. S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated Feb.  24th,  1911.
Skeena Land District—District of
Queen Charlotte Islands.
TAKE NOTICE that James Mul-
lin, of Murdo, So. Dakota, U. S. A.,
occupation farmer, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands: — Commencing at a post planted on the
shore of Masset Inlet, about one
mile northeast of the mouth of the
Ain River; thence west 40 chains,
more or less, to the eastern boundary of T. L. 35414; thence south
60 chains, more or less to the shore
of Masset Inlet; thence northeasterly along the shore to point of
commencement, containing 60 acres
more or less.
JAMES   MULLIN.
G. S. Mayer, Agent.
Dated Feb.  24th,  1911.
Skeena Land  District—District
of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that Victor H.
Reynolds, of Hull, Massachusetts, occupation chauffeur, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described land:—Commencing at a post planted at high water
mark on the northerly side of the
entrance to a small unnamed cove on
the west coast of Pitt Island, about
one-quarter mile south of the entrance to Kltkatla summer village;
thence east forty chains; thence
south twenty chains; thence west
forty chains; thence north ten
chains more or lees to high water
mark; thence following along high
water mark around the head of the
cove back to the commencement, and
containing sixty (60) acres more or
VICTOR H. REYNOLDS.
J. H. Plllsbury, Agent.
Dated Feb. 18th, 1911.
Skeena Land District—District
of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that F. C. Pills-
bury, of Boston, MaBS., occupation
civil engineer, intends to ppply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:—beginning at a
post planted at high water mark on
the northerly end of Pitt Island, on
Ogden Channel, and about 2 miles
southwesterly from Swede Pt; thence
east 60 chains thence south 40
chains; thence west 50 chains more
or less to high water mark; thence
following along the high water mark
back to the point of commencement,
and containing 240 acres more or
less.
F. C. PILLSBURY,
J. H. Plllsbury, Agent
Dated Fob. 19, 1911.
Prince Rupert Land District—
District of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that P. McLachlan,
of Prince Rupert, occupation broker,
Intends to apply for permission to
lease the following described land:
—Commencing at a post planted
one-third of a mile northerly from
head of Alice Arm, on Its Easterly
Side; thence 40 chains northerly;
thence 40 chains easterly; thence 40
chains southerly; thence 40 chains
westerly to place of commencement.
PETER  McLACHLAN.
Thos. L. Fay, Agent.
Dated 2nd Feb., 1911.
Skeena   Land  |DIstrict—District   of
Const RflDfTG   V
TAKE NOTICE that Alice Munro,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
married woman, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted on the west
shore of Lakelse Lake, and about
1% miles distant and In a southwesterly direction from the S. W.
corner of Lot 3982, Skeena Land
District, District of Coast, Range V;
thence west 40 chains; thence north
40 chains; thence east 60 chains,
more or less, to the shore of Lakelse
Lake; thence following shore of
said lake to point of commencement,
containing 200 acres, more or less.
ALICE MUNRO.
Mancell Clark, Agent.
Dated  20th March, 1911.
GRAHAM ISLAND — "The surest
sign of the progress of a town or
district is Its newspaper—live, active, bustling." "The Masset Review," Manet, Q.C.I
For Sale
155% Acres good land, on South
Bank of Skeena River, 85 miles East
of Prince Rupert by G. T. P. Ry.,
with buildings erected thereon, containing dwelling, store and post
office.
P. McLACHLAN.
Box 324.
For Sale
160 Acres Alberta land for sale
at $15.00 per acre, or Exchange for
Prince Rupert property; fenced; 40
acres broken; small house; 2 miles
from P. O., being southwest quarter
section 6, township 53, range 9.
P.  McLACHLAN,
P. O. Box 324    Prince Rupert, B. C.
Wanted
A live, active Real Estate Partner,
with some capital, to take half-
interest in company handling Real
Estate, Insurance and Manufacturing Agencies. Party to take full
charge of office in Prince Rupert, as
I am soon to leave for the Interior
for the summer. Apply to
G. W. ARNOTT
Drawer-1539 Prince Rupert
The Thompson
: Hardware Co.
—Second Avenue—
e e   Paints. General Hardware,
Oils, Stoves and Ranges.
Prince Rupert  Private   Detective
  Agency 	
N. McDonald, Manager
All kinds of legitimate detective work
handled for companies and Individuals.    Business strictly confidential.
P. O. Box 803 — Phone 210
WM. S. HALL, L. D. S. D. D. S.
:-:   DENTIST   :-:
Crown and Bridge Work a specialty.
All dental operations skillfully
treated. Gas and local anaesthetics
administered for the painless extraction of teeth. Consultation free.
Offices, Helgerson 3k., Prince Rupert
MCKERSON-HOERIG COMPANY
CUSTOMS AND MERCHANDISE
Brokers, Forwarding Agents,
Storage, etc.
J. W. POTTER
ARCHITECT    AND    STRUCTURAL
ENGINEER
Re-inforced Concrete a Specialty
—o—
Law-Butler Building - Prince Rupert
HAYNOR  BROS.
FUNERAL   DIRECTORS
and
PROFESSIONAL  EMBALMERS
DR.  W.  B.  CLAYTON
DENTIST
—o—
Office  in   the   Westenhaver  Block.
Over  Orme's Drug   Store.
Prince Rupert
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE, that I, Minnie
Meredith, of Victoria, B. C, occupation a married woman, Intend to
apply for permission to purchase the
following desoribed lands:—Commencing at a post planted about 40
chalnB distant and in a South direction from the. Southeast corner of
Lot 1733; thence east 40 chains;
thence south 40 chains; thence west
40 chains; thence north 40 chains
to point of commencement, containing 160 acres more or less.
MINNIE  MEREDITH.
John Kirkaldy,
Agent.
Dated  February  20th,  1911.
Skeena Land District—District
of Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that Joseph Edward Merryfield, of Prince Rupert,
occupation merchant, intends to apply for permission to lease the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about 10 chains
north from the northeast corner of
Lot 33; thence west 1500 feet to
shore of Smith's Island; thence following shore In a southerly direction
1200 feet; thence east to shore of
De Horsey Island; thence following
shore In a northerly direction to
point of commencomont.
JOSEPH EDWARD MERRYFIELD.
E. Spro, Agent.
Dated April 4, 1911. 4-7
NOTICE.
Tenders will be received by the
undersigned up to the 22nd day of
April, 1911, at 5 p. m., for the purchase of Block 27, Subdivision of
Lot No. 541, Group 1, New Westminster District, situated In the City
of Vancouver, and being the site of
the old Provincial Court House.
Each tender must be enclosed in a
registered letter and must be addressed to the under Igned, and
plainlv marked " ''ender for old
Vanno-iver Court House Site," and
must be accomparied by an accepted
cheque for ten per cent of the first
payment of the purchase money.
Payment for the property will be
accepted in instalments of one-
quarter of the purchase money.
The first of such instalments to be
paid within thirty days after the acceptance of the tender, and the other
three annually thereafter, with interest at the rate of 6% per annum.
In the event of the person whose
tender is accepted failing to complete the .first Instalment within
thirty days of the notice of such acceptance the sale to him will be
cancelled and his ten per cent deposit forfeited. The cheques of unsuccessful tenderers will be returned. The highest or any tender
will not necessarily be accepted. No
commissions of any kind will be allowed.
WM. R. ROSS.
Minister of Lands.
Department of LandB,
Victoria,  B.   C.
March 7th,  1911.
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE.
Notice is hereby given the the
reserve existing by reason of the
notice published in the British Columbia. Gazette of the 27th December, 1907, over lands on Graham Island, formerly covered by Timber
Licences Nos. Nos. 37055, 37056 and
37057, which expired on the 6th day
of November, 1909, and the lands
embraced within Timber Licence No.
37059, which expired on the 25th
day of January, 1909, is cancelled,
and that the said lands will be open
for pre-emption only under the provisions of Section 7 of the "Land
Act" after midnight on June 16th,
1911.
ROBERT A.   RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Lands Department,
Victoria, B. C,
9th March, 1911.
NOTICE
TENDERS for the installation at
the Prince Rupert School of twelve
(12) Red Cross Sanitary Closets,
furnished by the Government, will
be received by the undersigned up to
noon on Wednesday, March 22nd,
1911, for transmission to the Public
Works Department. The successful
tenderer will be called upon to furnish a bond in two sureties in a
sum equal to 50 per cent of the contract price. Specifications can be
seen at the Government Agent's Office, Prince Rupert. The lowest or
any tender not necessarily accepted.
J. H. McMULLIN,
Government Agent.
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that F. T. Saunders, of Vancouver, occupation master
mariner, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands:— Commencing at a
post planted about 6 miles northwest of Love Inlet on the north
east shore of Pitt Island; thence
south 20 chains; thence west 40
chains; thence north to shore;
thence following shore in a southeasterly direction to point of commencement , containing 80 acres
more or less.
FRANK TAUNTON SAUNDERS,
Locator.
W. Hamilton, Agent.
Staked 17th, Feb., 1911.
Skeena Land District—District ef
Queen Charlotte Island.
TAKE NOTICE that Robert Fraser Ogllvle, of Vancouver, occupation banker, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the folowlng
described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted about 2 miles west oef
the southwest corner of A. P. 12-
037; thence east 80 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence west 80
chains; tbence south 80 chains to
point of commencement, eoentainlng
640 aori36.
ROBERT FRASER OGILVIE.
Arthur Robertson,  Agent.
Dated Dec. 9, 1910.
NOTICE.
A book is kept in the City Clerk's
Office in which to enter the namee
and addresses, etc. of citizens of
Prince Rupert desiring employment
on City work. All desiring employment should register at once.
ERNEST A. WOODS,
City Clerk.
For Neat Job Printing
see the Journal Man
Tel. 138 Tuesday, April 25,  1911.
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
 ON THE BANKS OF THE SKEENA	
The Only Main Line Townsite in British Columbia in which the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway Company has Announced its Joint Ownership
Look at the Nap
Ellison, you will find, occupies
the strategic commercial point which
seems hound to command all the
trade of the Interior tributary to
Prince Rupert. It is where the steel
Mills of the transcontinental railway from tlie Atlantic touch the salt
waters of tho Pacific on the navigable waters of the Skeena River.. As
a port it will he second only to
Prince Rupert in the northern part
of this province and is also second
to this city as the only other town-
site in which the Grand Trunk
Pacific Railway and the Government
arc jointly interested and in which
lots  arc now offered  for sale.
fy$+****$*****************i*****************************************************i'*****4>
* *
* *
I What are We Here For ?  I
We are all Pioneers. Not here for our health, but to make money. No man ever
saved more than a competence on a salary; few do that. To get a footing on "Easy
Street" you have to invest. DOLLARS don't grow in your pocket, or in a stocking.
They must be put to work. Old Russell Sage said: "Plant a few in a new country
and see how fast they grow." That's what your Uncle is telling you, and here is
the biggest opportunity of this kind that is likely to knock at your door this year.
//  You  Own Ellison Lots List   Them   With   Us.
Read Current History
Prince Itupert lot speculators do
not need to have pointed out to
them what magic lies in the nn-
t>ouncement that the great railway
company and the government are
partners in the Ellison townsite.
That should be enough to bring
them n-running, (tut not everybody has the time to read the newspapers as closely as your uncle. In
the Manitoba Free Press of April
5th, for instance, there was a hiy
headline reading: "Hundred aud
Seventy New Towns to he Horn hi
Western Canada During the Coming
year." Reading the list one finds
many are Grand Trunk Pacific
towns, hut not one in British Columbia. No, Ellison and Prince Itupert
are the townsites in this province in which the railway is directly
interested at  this time.
• A A A A ,-, ,J« A A A A A,
♦ $i£h>$I *Jt*Jt •£«*« t|H$ »*« A A |>|h$ vj
ELLISON—Where Atlantic Locomotives will toot salute to Pacific Steamers on the Skeena River—ELLISON
WHY ELLISON SHOULD GROW
ONE of the most popular of all
the official reports published
hy the British Columbia
Columbia Government is tho one
bearing upon its title page the caption: "New British Columbia,"
which has become generally known
as "Bulletin No. 2 2," that being the
official number of the report. It has
been widely distributed and you
will have little difficulty in finding
one. On one page of this popular
report you will read this official
declaration: "Upper Skeena will
become one of the garden spots of
British  Columbia."
ELLISON, from its advantageous
position, with the Skeena River
navigable for large steamers at its
front and a great transcontinental
railway intersecting it, should naturally become the metropolis of the
wonderful garden spot of Britisii
Columbia referred to in the official
report.
ELLISON lots lire ready sellers.
Why? Just study the map a minute
or two.
ELLISON is a townsite in which
the Government and the Grand
Trunk Pacific are active partners.
There can, therefore, be not even a
shadow of doubt as to its future success. You are invited to share in
this certain success by investing in
a few town lots while they are at
bottom prices. There are only n
few on sale ami unless you are
Johnny-on-the-spot on the day announced as the Opening Day of our
sale you may be disappointed. Better make your deposit as soon as
possible and we will get you in on
It at the prices fixed for our first
offering.
ELLISON should, within a short
time, have a regular train service,
as it is but a little distance from
Mile 104, to which point it is expected that trains from Prince Rupert  will  be  running this  summer.
ELLISON may not be the only
pebble on the Skeena River beach,
but it certainly is the only townsite
on that navigable water in which
the railway company have announced themselves interested. No
doubt next year there may be other
additions and sections put on the
market, but by that time prices will
Ask
Uncle Jerry
For reservation of lots in Ellison or
Rogers' Addition to Ellison, write
or wire
J.    H.   KUGLER
Prince  Rupert,   H.   C.
have  gone  up.    Now  you   have   a
chance to be in on the ground floor.
DOLLARS invested in good
ground, rapidly grow. Did you look
at  that map?
WHERE the Grand Trunk Pacific
and the Government are joint owners in a townsite the lots should be
regarded as a safe invest nent. Your
money invested In ELLISON, or in
Rogers addition or any section that
may be offered later, is safeguarded
by every legal method human foresight can conceive. Wliere one
might and properly should hesitate
before investing in townsites promoted by individuals or town-promoting companies, there can be no
hesitancy or misgiving as to town
lots  In which  the  Government  and
the  Grand   Trunk    Pacific   Railway
are jointly interested.
ELLISON is different.. Do you
catch on? What better guarantee
can you  possibly look for?
ELLISON lots should double and
treble and then go up some. It is
believable that they will soar four
or five times above present prices.
You are a lucky chap today if you
own even one. If you should think
of selling it and want quick action,
list it with us. We feel confident
the demand for these lots will exceed the number we have at present
to offer.
PRINCE RUPERT'S brief history
will be repeated in the sale of
ELLISON  town  lots.
ELLISON should have the most
rapid growth of any new town in
Britisii Columbia or anywhere else.
Lots in the sections we are now
offering for sale, as well as such
additions and sections that may be
offered later, may be calculated to
bring investors similar returns to
those resulting from the first sale
of Prince Rupert town lots.
ELLISON, where the Grand Trunk
Pacific Transcontinental trains from
the Atlantic will first strike that
wonderful Skeena River,
ELLISON is probably tiie greatest
opportunity for investing a few dollars on a reasonably certain chance
of winning big profits you are likely
to see this year. But don't forget
that the number of lots is limited
and you will have to hurry some if
you want, to pick out one of the
choicest locations.
ELLISON needs at present merchants, hotel men, "the baker, the
butcher and the candlestick maker,"
more than lot speculators, but they
will come later all right, as they
did in Prince Rupert, and pay BIG
RENTS.
ELLISON  trades people will  live
TIME TO GET A "HUNCH"
in a town where railway freight
rates will always be regulated by
the competition of water transportation, as Ellison will be the last important landing up tbe Skeena
River. It is where the railway leaves
the Skeena Valley to follow that of
the famous Bulkley Valley.
ELLISON is your opportunity
GRAB IT. "Opportunity knocks nt
every man's door.". Knocks all tlie
time but  some people are sleepy.
ELLISON is on the market NOW.
It is very doubtful if any other
Grand Trunk townsite in British
Columbia will be on the market this
year. Better come in early and gel
a little Ellison in your list of holdings. Start a few dollars to work
there and see what they will earn.
E
L
L
I
S
0
N
E
L
L
I
S
0
N
DO YOU SEE THAT HUMP?    THAT'S ELLISON.
LOTS IN ELLISON TOWNSITE AND ROGERS ADDITION FOR SALE
Sale Begins Wednesday Morning, April 26th, 1911
Prince Rupert
British Columbia
JEREMIAH H. KUGLER
Offces:   2nd Ave.,
Facing Grand
Trunk Terminal
ELLISON is destined to be tlie
principal shipping point not only for
the agricultural belt in the Bulkley
and adjacent valleys—just glance at
the map again and see what a vast
country will depend on Ellison for
its supplies and transportation for
its products. And then, when Grand
Trunk officials announce the fact
that it is THE townsite in the Hazelton district in which their company
is interested, you are reminded of
the great mining activity that district is promised this season, the
machinery to go in and the rich ore
to come out.
ELLISON, tlie metropolis of "The
garden spot of British Columbia."
Remember that railway townsites
cannot be chosen in British Columbia like they are on tlie prairie between Winnipeg and Edmonton—
every eight miles a town, every hundred and thirty miles a divisional
point. In British Columbia there is
great engineering ability required to
lay out a route, many natural obstacles to contend with, and towns
must be located wliere the engineers
can find suitable land for sidings.
Ellison is an ideal spot for a town
outside of its superiority geographically. Like grape nuts, "There's a
reason," why it should be at the
point where the railway leaves tlie
Skeena Valley.    Eook at your map.
ELLISON is the first spring opening of Grand Trunk Pacific offerings
in the way of town lot opportunities.
There may be others later, but
there's no certainty when. Jump in
and take a flyer. .Money will not
grow in your pocket, it should
grow every month this summer If
you plant it in ELLISON, How can
you lose? You don't have to put up
the whole price, you know. Come
early and selct Ellison lots, 20%
cash, balance easy terms, 7% Interest. Select Rogers Addition lots,
10% cash, 10% per month, no Interest. A few lots in Ellison Town-
site for sale—Inside lots $250.00
each; corner lots $350.00 each. A
few lots in Rogers Addition to Ellison Townsite for sale—Inside lots
$150.00 each; corner lots $250.00
each.
Ask
Uncle Jerry
For reservation of lots in Ellison or
Rogers' Addition to Ellison, write
or  wire
J .    H .    K U G L E It
Prince   Rupert,   B.   C. PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Tuesday, April 25, 1911.
prince JSupett journal
Telephone  138
Published twice a week on Tuesdays and Fridays from the office of
publication, Third Avenue, near
McBride Street.
Subscription rate to any point in
Canada, $2.00 a year; to points outside of Canada, $3.00 a year.
Advertising rates furnished on
application.
O. H. NELSON,
Editor.
Tuesday, April 25, 1911.
A   BRIGHT   PROSPECT
Of all the cities on the Pacific
coast, Prince Rupert has reason to
expect the most portentous developments this summer. There are
places with larger populations,
where, of course, there will be much
greater volumes of trade done than
will be the case here. There are
no places, however, that have so
much to expect from the develop
ment work that will be done in the
country tributary to it.
This yaer will see practically the
beginning of development In a commercial way for a very large portion
of the interior of the province along
the route of the Grand Trunk Pacific. That line will be operating
this summer and carrying into tho
Skeena district those who will expend capital in the exploitation of
the resources of that territory.
The result of this portends great
things. This fall is likely to see the
opening up of mines of such richness that here will be built up camps
that will rival the best that the
province lias seen so far in its history. These will have Prince Rupert
as their base and judging from the
results obtained fro mthe properties already opened up there can be
little doubt that the mineral is there
in vast quantity.
UNIVERSITY   PLANS
Hon.   Dr.   Young   Tells   What   the
Government Has in View
with Itespect to It
Hon. Dr. Young, the minister of
education for the province, at the
annual banquet given at Westminster Hall in Vancouver, in tracing
back the initiation of the university
at Point Grey, referred to what they
were proposing to do In the future.
He did not intend this year to
ask for competitive plans. It was a
great mistake to ask for these plans
in a general way. What he intended to do this year was to call for a
ground plan scheme, and when he
had received these he intended
first to select three or four of these
plans. There was no reason, as far
as could now be seen, why Westminster Hall should not be in her
own building on those grounds in
1913 (cheers). If, however, this
could not be, and it was necessary
to arrange otherwise, temporary
buildings would be put up, and
classes would certainly commence in
the mid-summer of 1913. It would
be a great mistake, he pointed out,
to build buildings that Jiight do for
a period of say twenty-five years.
What was wanted was an elasticity
in the buildings that would amply
meet the modern educational requirements.
Instancing the number of British
Columbians at the present time
•tudying in 1110" eastern part of the
Dominion and the high class of
work they were doing, he was satisfied that the students at the new
university would be such as to show
the Dominion a great object lesson.
He assured them of his best efforts
on their behalf, and wished them
godspeed.
 o	
BENEFITS   OF   PUBLICITY
Alberta     Is    Deriving    Advantages
from a Wisely Directed
Campaign
arrivals since Saturday is placed  at
1,200.
The 900 hundred odd settlers
brought out by the publicity department came in four separate excursions. From Montreal came 500
sttlers from Europe, and eastern
Canada who distributed themselves
all along the line from Calgary
northward, every little town getting
in a share of the party. The majority of them, however, went to
Vegreville, and will settle in the St.
Paul de Metis district.
On the excursion from Toronto
came over 200 settlers to Edmonton. From Great Falls, Montana,
Commissioner Clarke brought a
similar number to the south of the
province. From Wisconsin, H. M.
Kenny, of the International Land
Company, brought two carloads of
buyers who wil   purchase land.
That the publicity department
has full expectations of keeping up
the record they have created in
bringing 900 settlers in three days,
was stated by Mr. Hotchkiss this
morning. All of his commissioners
have in sight many similar excursions that they will bring through
the summer. Commissioner Mail-
lette has in sight at least 1,000
more settlers. Commissioner Mc-
Cutcheon, from Toronto, will send
out several more special excursion
out several more special excursions
similar to that he brought through
on the Grand Trunk and Grand
Trunk Pacific last Saturday, Commissioner Morin, in Michigan, expects to bring his first excursion of
Michigan farmers to the province in
May, ad others later.
The Alberta publicity department
was organized with the express purpose of increasing the population of
the province to the 400,000 mark
necessary to secure increased indemnity. The census comes in
June. By that time the department
expects to have more than fulfilled
its objects.
"For the first time," said Commissioner Hotchkiss, "Alberta is
getting its fair and just share of the
immigration into the west. Formerly we got only a handful of the
thousands who came west. Now, we
are getting more than an equal proportion with the other western
provinces.
"The great cause of this has been
that we have realized the importance of securing the settler before
he leaves home, or before he is
booked. We have now commissioners at the ports of entry, and at all
starting points, and the money and
efforts we have spent along this line
are reaping their just rewards. We
cannot change the route of a settler
once he is on his way. We must
have him booked to this province
before he starts."
 o	
FOR  HOSPITAL  AID
Contributions Made to the Funds by
Boxes Placed in Hotels
The Ladies' Auxiliary of the Hospital have made their first collection from the contribution boxes
placed in the hotels, etc. The proceeds were as follows:
Postoffice, $1.15; Premier hotel,
40c; Central hotel 30c; Empress hotel,- 60c; Knox hotel, 45c; G. T. P.
inn, 40c; Queens hotel, 10c; Royal
hotel 60c; Savoy hotel 55c; Empress
theatre, $1.27; Windsor hotel, 71c.
Donation from Robt. Ashland, proprietor of Windsor hotel, $5.
 o	
Local News
Aid. John Hilditch, who has been
confined to the hospital for some
days is now improving.
Mrs. W. H. Morrison is making
satisfactory convalescence at the
hospital.
There will be a meeting of the
hospital board tomorrow afternoon
in the office of P. I. Palmer.
By actual count of railway tickets, the publicity department of the
Alberta government has introduced
to the p.rovince no les than 900 new
bona fide settlers within the past
three or four days, settlers from
the old country, the states and eastern Canada, uiiief Publicity Commissioner Hotchkiss-gave tills information to tlie Capital this morning,
by way of giving some definite idea
of just how many new people have
come in through (lie medium of his
department, in the tremendous rush
since Saturday morning.
This extract is given as an Indication of the advantages reaped by
wise publicity campaigns.
With the addition of 50 Rolland-
rs, 150 French families, and other
add parties brought through other
mediums  the  total   number  of  new
The finance committee has recommended the deferring of the planking on a part of Sixth avenue for
the present, ii proposition of Mr.
Angle and others for sewerage connection was not acted upon owing
to the cost being high. If the owners can make some arrangement
agreeable to the engineer to provide
temporary sewerage, they will be
authorized to do so.
Miss Johnstone, the latest addition to tlie teaching staff in the
public school, has arrived in the city
and on Monday morning entered
upon her duties. Miss Johnstone,
who comes from Vancouver, is a
teacher of experience. For some
time she was on the teaching staff
of the Normal School, which is a
sufficient guarantee that her methods of management are of the highest order.
1836 1911
The Bank of
British North America
75 Tun la loiteetts.
Capital and Reserve Over $7,300,000
Money Earning
Money
Small weekly or monthly deposits in a Savings Account soon
count up—Interest compounded
at highest current rates.
Deposits of )i.oo and upwards
received.
Prince Rapert Branch—
F. S. LONG. Manager.
J. J. Sit an, the popular clothier
of the city, who has just returned
from a business trip south, says that
the inquiries about Prince Rupert in
all the cities could not fail to satisfy anyone of the great future the
place has. He has returned more
convinced than ever that steps
should be taken at once to further
boost the city.
 o	
WORDS USED IN MENUS
pre-
Au gratin—Dishes    baked
pared with cheese.
Bouillon—A clear broth, usually
beef.
Cafe—Coffee.
Cafe an lait—Coffee with hot
milk.
Consomme—Clear soup.
Croutons — Bread toasted in
squares used for soup and in garnishing.
Frappe—Semi or half frozen.
Fricasse—Stew.
Fromage—Cheese.
Glace—Frozen.
Jus—Gravy or juice of meats.
Menu—Bill of fare.
Neufchatel—A  soft  Swiss  cheese.
Parmesan—An Italian cheese.
Timbale—Pie crust baked in a
mold.
Tutti frutti—Various kinds of
fruits chopped  fine.
 o	
Cotton gloves to wear in doing
housework are cooler and better in
every way that old kid gloves. If
bought especially for this purpose
get a size larger than usually worn.
WANTED
WANTED—An assistant in the furniture business. Apply to J. F.
MacDonald, Second avenue.
BOARD WANTED
Gentleman desires board and room
in private family; $10 to $15 per
week. State conveniences. Address
R. A. M., "Journal."
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that I, Roy,
Chrisman, of Port Essington, B. C,
occupation prospector, intend to apply for permission to lease the following described land:—Commencing at a post planted about five
miles distant and in a southwesterly
direction from the point at the entrance to Captain Cove, Petrel
Channel, and on the northeast side
of McCauley Island; thence west 20
chains; thence south 40 chains,
thence east about 20 chains to shore
of Petrel Channel; thence northerly
along shore line of Petrel Channel
to point of commencement and containing eighty acres more or less.
ROY CHRISMAN.
Dated April 11, 1911. 4-25
Skeena   Land    District—District   of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that W. H. Ferguson, of Prince Rupert, B. C, occupation civil engineer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about one
mile southerly, following the sinuosities of the shore line from the
southwest corner of Lot 104, Range
V; thence 20 chains west; thence 20
chains south; thence 20 chains west,
thence 20 chains south; thence 20
chains west; thence about 40 chains
south; thence along shore northerly
to point of commencement.
W. H. FERGUSON.
G. Hansen, Agent.
Dated April 22nd, 1911. 4-25
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast—Range V.
TAKE NOTICE that W. II. Ferguson of Prince Rupert, B. C, occupation civil engineer, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted about onj mile
southerly following the sinuosities
of the shore line from the southwest
corner of Lot 10 4, Range V; thence
in chains west; thence 20 chains
south; thence 20 cliains went; tlience
20 chains soulh; thence 20 chains
west; thence about 40 chains south;
tlience along- shore northerly to
point of commencement.
W. II. FERGUSON.
G. Hansen, Agent.
Dated April 22nd, 1911. 4-25
The British Columbia Company
LIMITED.
AUTHORIZED CAPITAL $100,000.::  PAID UP CAPITAL $41,500
DIRECTORS:—Reginald C. Brown, President; J. C. Maclure, Vice-
President; H. E. Marks, Managin g Director; Capt. E. Nash, William
McNair, R. A. Bevan, and F. C.   Williams, Secretary.      :-:      :-:
INTEREST 4 PER CENT. DEPOSITS
This Company acts as Executors,  Administrators, Transferees and
Secretaries to Public Companies.   Commercial, Industrial and other
business propositions underwritten.    Issues made on  tbe
London and New York Stock Exchanges.
TIMBER, COAL, LANDS, and
COMPANY ORGANIZATION
Head Office for Canada, 203, 208, 210, 215 Carter-Cotton Building,
VANCOUVER, B.C.
DURESCO
The King of Water Paints
FIRST IN THE FIELDEEE30RE1ST EVER SINCE
=SOLE AGENTS IN WESTERN CANADA -
The Staneland Co. Ltd
836-840 Fort Street, VICTORIA, B.C.
New Twin Screw Steamer
Prince George
For Vancouver, Victoria and Seattle
Mondays at S a. m,
S. S. "PRINCE GEORGE" sails for Stewart, Sundays, 8:00 a.  m.
Vancouver,  Victoria,  Seattle, Mondays, 8:00 a. m.
S. S. "PRINCE ALBERT" for Port Simpson,    Naas   Kiver    Points,
Massett, Naden Htrbor, every Wednesday, 1:00 p. m.
and for
Refuge Bay, Skidegate, Queen Charlotte City, Lockepurt, Pa-
cofi, Jedway, Ikeda Bay, Rose Harbor and return    via Queen
Charlotte City, e>'e.-y Saturday, 1:00 p. m.
THE GRAND TRUNK RAl^ VAY SYSTEM, connecting with
trains from the Pacific Coast, operates a frequent and convenient
service of luxurious trains over its DOUBLE TRACK route between
Chicago, Toronto, Montreal, Quebec, Halifax, Portland, Boston,
New York and Philadelphia.
Information and tickets obtainable from the office hereunder
mentioned. Trans-Atlantic steamship bookings by all lines arranged
A. E. McMASTER
Freight and Pasenger Agent, G. T. P. Wharf.
Replenish
the
Pantry
Lnn.n««Hj
I
I
High-Class....
Grocery
Stock
to choose from
EVERYTHING CLEAN AND FRESH
Goods for the Table to Suit tlie Most
Fastidious Housewife
S MERRYFIELD'S !
■
i
L.
CASH GROCERY
I
I
.J
Free Employment
Office
For all kinds of help. Cooks, waiters, dishwashers, hotel porters, all
kinds of laborers or mechanics, call
up 178 or call at the
FREE EMPLOYMENT OFFICE
GRAND HOTEL
Headquarters for Cooks and Waiters
ROGERS & BLACK
Wholesale Dealers in
BUILDING  MATERIAL,     CEMENT,
LIME,  HAIR-FIBRE PLASTER
COKE, BLACKSMITH COAL,
COMMON BRICK, PRESSED BRICK
SHINGLES AND LATH
NEW   WELLINGTON   COAL
All  orders  promptly  filled—see  us
for prices.
PHONE 110 PHONE 110
ROGERS STEAMSHIP AGENCY
Through tickets to all polntB In tha
United States and Canada by
The Northern Pacific Railway
The finest train across the continent.
Connecting at NEW YORK, BOSTON
PORTLAND and HALIFAX with ATLANTIC STEAMERS for all points In
ENGLAND, SCOTLAND, GERMANY.
FRANCE, ITALY, NORWAY and
SWEDEN, by WHITE STAR. RED
STAR, AMERICAN - DOMINION,
WHITE STAR DOMINION, CUNARD
FttENCH LINE, NORTH GERMAN
LLOYD, HAMBURG AMERICAN and
CANADIAN NORTHERN Steamship*.
For all information write me, or
call at office:
3. H. ROGERS
General Railway & Steamship Agent
Prince Rupert, B.C.
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAW CO.
B. C. Coast S. S. Service
#
FAMOUS
Princess Line
^5^
Princess
May
FOR
Vancouver, Victoria,
AND
Seattle
MONDAY, MAY 1.
3. G. McNAB,
General Agenfe
The Roland Rooms
Splendid Accommodations
Newly Furnished
Hot baths;  right down town;  good
table board all round
RATES, FIFTY CENTS AND UP
LINDSAY'S CARTAGE ft STORAGE
G. T. P. CARTAGE AGENTS
Office at H. B. Rochester, Centre St.
LADYSMITH COAL
Is handled by us.  All orders receive
prompt attention. Phone No. 68.
4. *** * *********************
JRemember
*
*
I That we
} Import
I Our Wines
*
*
*
*
*   direct from Europe; and that
§ equal   them   for  quality.     No
J better can be bought anywhere
% in the Province.    We make a
,j, specialty of
*
Family Trade
and guarantee satisfaction
* *
* We also  carry  a  complete *
§   stock of other *
Liquors
Try a glass of
*
j Cascade
I   Beer
J       The best local beer on  the
%   market.
! CLARKE BROS.
Christiansen & Brandt Bid.
*   Telephone 30       Third Avenue  f
f
*
H'************** *********** Tuesday, April 25,  1911.
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
!   Shipping Report   J
* By Dominion Wireless. *
**************************
April 25—8 a. m.
Skidegate—Clear; calm; sea
smooth.
Ikeda—Cloudy; wind west; barometer 29.98; temperature 43; sea
smooth.
Triangle—Cloudy; wind southwest, 8 miles; barometer, 29.40;
temperature 33; sea smooth; spoka
Prince George at 6:30 p. m. at
North Island, southbound.
Estevan—Clear; calm; fresh; barometer 29.67; temperature 42; sea
moderate.
Pachena—Clear; wind northwest;
barometer 29.56; temperature 60;
light swell.
Tatoosh—Clear; wind west, 22
miles; barometer 30.08; temperature 35; in, steamer Watson, 5:50
p. m.; out, Alameda, at 7:10 a. m.
April 25—noon
Skidegate — Clear; light west
wind; sea smooth.
Ikeda—Clear; wind west; barometer 29.97; temperature 43; sea
smooth.
Triangle—Passing showers; wind
southwest, 10 miles; barometer
29.42; temperature 39; light swell;
spoke Quadra at 10:30 in Milbank
Sound, southbound.
Estevan—Clear; fresh west wind;
barometer 29.68; temperature 44;
sea smooth.
SAILING  CANCELED
The Grand Trunk Pacific steamer
Prince Rupert will not make the
trip this week. She has remained
over at Victoria to undergo repairs
in her boiler room before entering
upon the summer schedule. This
course was considered wise, in view
of the fact that the spring rush has
not yet really commenced. It was
decided that it would be wiser therefore, to have the repair work done
permanently now rather than have
to lie off later in the season.
FISHING   VESSEL   SUBSIDIES
An order in council has been
passed at Ottawa rescinding section
6 of the act to encourage the development of sea fisheries and tho
building of fishing vessels, and substituting the following:
"5. Canadian registered vessels,
owned and fitted out in Canada, of
10 tons and upwards (up to 80
tons), by whatever means propelled,
contained within themselves, which
have been exclusively engaged not
less than three months in catching
sea fish, other than shell fish, salmon or shad, or fish taken in rivers,
or mouths of rivers, shall be entitled to a bounty calculated on the
registered tonnage, which shall be
paid to the owner, or owners, provided that vessels known as steam
trawlers, operating beam, otter, or
other such trawls, shall not be eligible for any such bounty."
FOR SKAGWAY RUN
Announcement of the new spring
and summer schedule of the Canadian Pacific Railway coast service
steamers hap been made from Victoria. According to the new arrangement there will be six steamers a
month for Skagway, the Princess
May and Princess Royal running on
the northern route. The first sailing on this new schedule from Victoria will be June 5, and Alert Bay,
Swanson Bay, Prince Rupert, Port
Simpson, Ketchikan and Juneau will
be included in the ports of call.
Skagway boats will leave Victoria
on Mondays and Thursdays of each
week. The steamer Beatrice, now
on the Vancouver run, will be used
this summer on the Queen Charlotte
Island route, and will make two
trips a month from the south. The
new schedule will become effective
May 1, and will continue so un
September 1. Details of the service
to Seattle and Vancouver, on the triangular run, for the sumer months
have not been completed.
TRYING EXPERIENCE
About 35 miles off the west coast
of the Queen Charlotte Islands,
when on her way from Kyuoquot to
Naden Harbor, the little steam
whaler Brown, Captain Christoffer-
sen, of the Canadian Northern Pacific Fisheries Company, had a trying experience some days ago. Disabled, with fifty fathoms of- chain
out, her anchor took hold within i
mile from the rocks of the Islands.
The Brown is undergoing repairs in
Victoria.
The little whaler had left the
Kyuoquot whaling station to proceed to the new station at Naden
Harbor, Virago Sound, on the northern coast of tne Queen Charlottes,
and ran into a heavy storm.    When
daylight came the vessel was laboring in a great sea off the west of
Queen Charlotte Islands in the open
Pacific, big seas breaking over her,
combers sweeping her decks and
drenching all on board.
Through the engine room skylights a big sea broke into the engine room and knocked second engineer Bergen from the ladder. Then
there was an explosion, a sudden
shock when the cylinder head,
blown upward, struck the metal of
the casing above with force, and, as
a cloud of steam arose, the main
cylinder head roled from the top
of the engine and fell beside the engineer on watch, who escaped serious injury by a narrow margin.
The enine room was full of steam in
an instant, and, after winding cloths
about his arms. Chief Engineer Ed-
wardsen rushed forward, and, while
the scalding steam burnt his skin
off, he shut off the steam.
Meanwhile the steamer rolled
heavily, and with the steam shut off,
fell off into the trough of the sea,
listed over to starboard so much
that the waves swept along the
bridge, and Captain Chrlstoffersen
and the helmsman were waist deep
in the swirling sea. The coal on
deck shifted to starboard, and the
vessel listed so much that the crew
feared she wolud capsize, but the
whalers are excellent sea craft. She
righted and rolled over to port, and
the deck crew hurriedly shoveled
the shifted coal back, while the seas
broke over them, drenching them
from head to foot as they worked.
Captain Chrlstoffersen and the
helmsman sa wthe steam clouding
from below and realized that something had happened. The vessel
was swung over with difficulty, and
efforts made to keep the Brown's
head to sea. Below Chief Engineer
Edwardsen, and his second, John
Bergen, and others, worked to make
temporary repairs, and the work,
carried on in face of great difficulties, with the steamer rolling from
beam to beam in the trough of the
heavy sea, with water sweeping the
decks—she rolled so much that tbe
sea broke away the starboard sidelight—was skilfully carried out.
The carpenter made a wooden
cynider head to pig the blown out
cylinder, and the engineer disconnected the high pressure cylinder
and shut off steam, and meanwhile
the steamer drifted. The wind was
blowing on shore, and despite all
that could he done, the little steamer drifted nearer the rocky coast.
Hour after hour she drifted, rolling
from side to side, as the seas struck
her, and meanwhile the chief engineer took a metal door, and, with
this material he cut out a temporary
cylinder head with difficulty, working against time while the vessel
drifted shoreward, with her anchor
and fifty fathoms of line out.
It was 8 a. m. when the cylinder
head blew out, and ten hours later
the makeshift head was clamped
tight in place, and shored down, and
steam was let into the intermediate
and low pressure cylinders with a
head of 80 pounds of steam, instead
of the usual 180 pounds, and the
vessel which had meanwhile brought
up to her anchor within a mile from
shore, was worked into a safe anchorage, whene the engineers went
over their work and effected such
temporary repairs on Saturday and
Sunday last as permitted the vessel
proceeding to Victoria,
It was a most praiseworthy performance, reflecting great credit
upon the seamanship and engineering ability of those on board, and
shows the seaworthiness of the little vessel, one of the five new
steamers recently added to the local
company's fleet. For hours, with
the seas sweeping up over the bridge
often waist deep in the water, the
captain and- steersman navigated the
disabled vessel, and the engineers,
with their arms scalded by the
steam which escaped before tbey
could close the valves, worked arduously and with great difficulty, to
effect temporary repairs. First it
was a wooden cylinder head, the
work of the carpenter, then a crude
cylinder cover cut from a metal
door, but it held in place, and when
the Brown reached Victoria 3he had
the cover cut from the Iron door
still clamped in place.
 o	
REORGANIZED   DEPARTMENT
C, P. It. Has Changed Titles of Officials in the West, But Duties
Remain the Same
The Canadian Pacific Railway
have completely reorganized their
freight department in the west. By
circulars issued last week all the
offii'fals of thte freight department
have their titles altered, although
their duties remain the same. The
expansion of trade is the reason for
the changes which follow:
R.  E.  Larmour    is    the    division
Provincial Elections Act.
Skeena Electoral District.
TAKE NOTICE that I have received objections in writing to the retention of the following names on
the Register of Voters for the Skeena Electoral District on the grounds stated below.
And take notice that at a Court of Revision to be held on the 1st day of May, 1911, at the Court
House, Prince Rupert, at 10 o'clock In the forenoon, I shall hear and determine to said objections, and unless such named persons or some other Provincial Voter on their behalf satisfies me that such, objections
are not well founded, I shall strike such names off said Register:
.1.  H. McMULLIN,
Registrar of Voters.
Dated  this  5th  day of April, 1911.
The following persons are reported absent from the District:
No.
63
274
335
407
421
451
464
530
540
553
724
745
798
882
1097
1098
1207
1260
1263
1627
1917
1928
2047
2067
2102
2481
NAME
BADHAM, FRANK   	
BYRNE, PATSY JENSON	
CATT, JAMES  	
CONNOR, CHARLES F	
COREY, THOMAS	
CRAIG, WM. ALEX	
CROUCHER, ERNEST	
DENOON, GEORGE 	
DICKSON, RYAN 	
DOCKERY, GARLAND D	
FOX, HERBERT S	
FRY, REGINALD G	
GLADMAN, GORDON G	
HAMMOND, FRED. ERNEST .
KEELEY, MARTIN FRED	
KEELEY, NEIL A	
LAYCOCK, EDWARD P	
LOYAL, WALDEMAR   	
LUCAS, FREDK. TRAVERS   . .
McINNES, ANGUS   	
PEPIN, GEORGE   	
PETHICK,  GEO,  HAROLD	
ROSS, ROBT. STEWART	
RYAN, ARTHUR E	
SCRIMGEOUR, JOHN   MURRY
WHITCOMB, JAMES   	
PLACE
Prince Rupert.
Port Essington
Prince Rupert.
Prince Rupert.
Prince Rupert.
Prince Rupert.
Prince Rupert.
Prince Rupert.
Prince Rupert.
Borden, B. C.
Prince Rupert.
Prince Rupert.
Prince Rupert.
Prince Rupert.
Princ Rupert.
Prince Rupert.
Lakelse, B. C.
Prince Rupert.
Prince Rupert.
Prince Rupert.
Prince Rupert.
Prince Rupert.
Prince Rupert.
Prince Rupert.
Prince Rupert.
Prince Rupert.
Oliver
Typewriter
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Seventeen Cents a Day
Please read the headline over
again. Then Its tremendous significance will dawn upon you.
An Oliver Typewriter—the standard visible writer—the most highly-
perfected  typewriter on  the market
■yours for 17 cents a day!
The typewriter whose conquest ot
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business history—yours for 17 cent*
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The typewriter that is equipped
with scores of such conveniences at
The Balance Shift"—"The Ruling
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Keyboard"—all
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The following persons are reported deceased:
No.
795
829
1232
1515
1137
NAME
GILROY, CHAS. HENRY
GRANT, ROY F	
LEWIS, THOMAS   	
MURPHY, FRANK	
KBVITT, OSCAR V	
PLACE
Prince Rupert.
Prince Rupert.
Prince Rupert.
Prince Rupert.
Sloan, B. C.
TIDES AT PRINCE RUPERT, APRIL, 1911
HIGH WATER
LOW WATER
DATE   AND  DAY       ["Time] Ht | Time| Ht|[ Time| Ht | Time| Ht
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
Saturday  .
Sunday .   .
Monday.   .
Tuesday.   .
Wednesday.
Thursday .
Friday.   .
Saturday .
Sunday.   .
Monday   .
Tuesday.   .
Wednesday.
Thursday.
Friday.    .
Saturday.  .
Sunday.   .
Monday .  .
Tuesday.   .
Wednesdav
Thursday .
Friday .   .
Saturday .
Sunday.   .
Monday.   .
Tuesday  .
Wednesday
Thursday .
Friday.   .
Saturday .
Sunday.   .
2:19
2:52
3:29
4:14
5:10
6:19
7:48
9:18
10:29
11:27
0:03
0:3'i
1:08
1:38
2:08
2:39
3:10
3:42
4:18
5:06
6:12
7:46
9:09
10:16
11:06
11:51
0:07
0:41
1:16
1:52
21.8114:
21.8
21.5
20.8
19.7118
18.5
17.9
18.1
18.9
19.7
20.0
20.7
21.1
21.4
21.3
21.0
20.5
19.7
18.7
17.6|18
16.6J20
16.2(21
16.6|22
17.6J22
18.6|23
19.6|. .
20.6(12
21.6jl3
22.3J13
22.7114
20.7
19.8
18.6
17.3
16.2
16.0
16.8
17.9
19.1
20.3
20.5
20.5
20.1
19.5
18.7
18.8
16.8
15.9
15.3
15.4
16.0
17.1
18.3
19.5
20.3
20.7
20.7
44120.3
8:40
9:22
10:11
11:08
0:13
1:40
3:10
4:24
5:19
6:06
6:47
7:23
7:58
8:32
9:06
9:42
10:21
11:09
0:10
1:46
3:12
4:16
5:00
5:42
6:22
7:01
7:40
8:22
2.4
2.5
3.0
4.0
10.0
10.6
9.9
8.3
6.6
5.1
3.9
3.1
2.8
2.9
3.4
4.2
5.2
6.2
11.3
11.3
10.4
8.8
7.0
5.1
3.5
2.2
1.4
1.1
:47
:27
:12
:06
:15
:32
:55
:04
:5S
:45
:24
:59
:31
:02
:33
:04
:36
:12
:67
:0H
:17
;86
:40
:81
:14
:53
:81
:08
:46
:26
4.6
5.7
7.2
8.8
5.1
5.8
5.7
5.1
4.5
4.2
4.1
4.4
4.9
5.6
6.4
7.3
8.5
9.5
10.6
7.0
7.5
7.3
6.8
5.9
5.2
4.7
4.4
4.5
5.0
5.8
The Time used is Pacific Standard, for the 120th Meridian west. It
is counted from 0 to 24 hours, from midnight to midnight.
The Height is in feet and tenths of a foot, above the Low Water datum
adopted for the Chart. The Harbor datum, as established by the Grand
Trunk  Pacific  Railway,  is  one  foot lower.
freight agent at Winnipeg, supervising the main line and branches,
Port Arthur to Swift Current and
Rissyth, inclusive.
Geo. H. Smith is the district
freight agent at Winnipeg, supervising Winnipeg city and terminals,
including St. Boniface.
R. W. Drew is the district freight
agent at Saskatoon, supervising the
main line, Yorkton to Rossyth, and
the branch, Lanigan to Strassburg.
John Halstead is the division
freight agent at Calgary, supervising the main line and branches—
Beverley to Laggan and Burmis,
Hardisty to Wetaskiwln, Calgary to
Edmonton and Lacombe to Castor.
W. R. Haldane Is the division
freight agent at Nelson, B. C, supervising Passbgurk to Kootenay Landing, Proctor to Midway and Rossland, Gerrard to Lardo, Nakusp to
Scandon, Siocan Junction to Siocan
City and the Arrow and Kootenay
Lakes steamers.
W. C. Bowles is the division
freight agent at Vancouver, supervising the main line and branches,
Stephen, B. C, to Vancouver, I!. C,
Esquimau and Nanalmo Railway,
Okanagan Lake service, Britisii Columbia coast service and all Pacific
c*ast freight traffic.
P. II. Clendenning is the district
freight agent at Vancouver, supervising the Britisii Columbia coast
service and transpacific steamers.
W. II. Gardiner    is    the    district
freight agent for the Esquimau
and Nanaimo Railway, Victoria,
B. C, to Cameron Lake, B. C, inclusive.
B. G. Holmes is the chief of tariff bureau, Winnipeg, Man., in
charge of tariff publications and divisions, western lines.
CLAIMS   ESTATES
Carpenter in Australia Lays Claim
to Heritage  in  England.
A claim to an earldom and to
some of the richest estates in Great
Britain has been put forward by an
Australian and is the sensation of
the hour there. The estates involved are none other than those of
the Governor-General, the Earl of
Dudley. William Ward, by occupation a carpenter, a resident e>f
Northcote, has come forward claiming descent from Thomas, the- second Baron Ward, whose offspring
he declares migrated tee Jamaica.
The claimant, who was born In England in 1866, e-anie to Australia 20
years later, and has since followed
the- occupation of a carpenter. lie;
has written to the Governor-General indicating his intention tee form
a syndicate to press forward his
claims to the Earl's estates. I.on!
Dudley has replied to the man referring him to his solicitors.
MUNICIPAL  NOTICE
Tenders will be received by the
undersigned, for the Collection and
Disposal of Garbage and Nightsoil
and for the supply of Garbage and
Nightsoil Cans. Tenders must be
on form to be obtained from the
City Clerk and to close at 5 p. m..
May 1st 1911. Each tender must
be accompanied by a certified cheque
for ?100.
Full particulars at City Clerk's office.
The lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted.
ERNEST A. WOODS,
City Clerk.
4-25-28
NOTICE   OF   DISSOLUTION
TAKE NOTICE that the partnership heretofore existing between
Joseph E. Merryfield, Prince Rupert, B. C, and Joseph E. McEwen,
of Kitselas, B. C, has this day been
dissolved by mutual consent, and
that Joseph E. Merryfield will carry on the grocery business heretofore
carried on by the firm at Prince Rupert, B. C, under the name of "J. E.
.Merryfield," and will collect all
debts due to and pay all debts owing
by the said firm, and that Joseph E.
McEwen will carry on the business
of the partnership heretofore conducted at Kitselas, B. C, under the
firm name of "Merryfield & McEwen," and will collect all debts due to
and pay all debts owing by the said
firm at Kitselas, B. C.
Dated   at   Prince   Rupert,   B.   C,
this 21st day of April, A. D. 1911.
.1.  E.   MERRYFIELD,
J.  E.  McEWBN,
Witness:
M.   M.   STEPHENS. 5-12
If you want tlie honey
That conies  from  the  hive
Take up the phone and
Call one, double five.
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast Range 5.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles
James Gilllngham, of Prince Rupert,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner of Lot 992 and
marked C. .1. Gillingham's N, E.
Corner Application for Purchase; I,
0. .1. Gilllngham, intend to apply
for permission to purchase 320 acres
Of land bounded as follows:—Com-
menclng at this post; thenco 80
chains south: thence 40 ehains west;
thence SO chains north; thence 40
chains easl to place of commencement.
■ .iARLES JAMES Gil.I INOHAX
Rolicri Osborn Jennings, Agent.
Dated January 5, 1911.
Tlie Journal (twice a week), only
?2.00 a year.
—THE—
We announced this new sales plan
recently, just to feel the pulse of the
people. Simply a small cash payment—then 17 cents a day. That
is the plan in a nutshell.
The result has been such a deluge of applications for machines
that we are simply astounded.
The demand comes from people ot
all classes, all ages, all occupations.
The majority of inquiries has
come from people of known financial
standing who were attracted by the
novelty of the proposition. An impressive demonstration of the Immense popularity of the Oliver Typewriter.
A startling confirmation of our belief that the Era of Universal Typewriting is at hand.
A Quarter of a Million People are
Making Money With
Tfie.
OLIVER
The Standard Visible  Writer
The Oliver Typewriter Is a moneymaker, right from the word "go!" So
easy to run that beginners soon get
in the "expert" class. Earn as you
learn. Let the machine pay tbe 17
cents a day—and all above that Is
yours.
Wherever you are, there's work to
be done and money to be made by
using the Oliver. The business world
Is calling for Oliver operators. There
are not enough to supply the demand.
Their salaries are considerably above
those of many classes of workers.
"An Oliver Typewriter in
Every Homo!"
That is our battle cry today. We
have made the Oliver supreme in
usefulness and absolutely Indispensable in business. Now comes tbe
conquest of the home.
The simplicity and strength of the
Oliver fit It for family use. It Is be-
i-oming an important factor In the
home training of young people. An
educator as well as a money maker.
Our new selling plan puts the
Oliver on the threshold of every
home In America. Will you close
the door of your home or office on
this remarkable Oliver opportunity!
Write for further details of our
easy offer and a free copy of the new
Oliver catalogue.     Address:
R. C. BEAN
Prince Itupert Agent
General   Offices:    Oliver   Typewriter
Building,  Chicago, 111.
LADYSMITH
COAL
ROCHESTER 8i MONROE, Phone US PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Tuesday,  April 25,  1911.
THE accompanying views taken along the route of the Grand
Trunk Pacific across British Columbia, are from the collection made by the official photographers and artists,
who made the trip last summer. The,construction of the Grand
Trunk Pacific means tlie opening up of a new scenic route
across the continent, in this age> when tlie travelliing public
are awaiting a change continually, the inauguration eif a new-
route like the one to be offered will mean much. It will resul
In a stream of tourists seeking the newest attraction.
The scenery along the Grand Trunk Pacific is acknowledged
to be second to none on the continent. It will, near the eas
ern edge of tlie prairie, run in full view of Mount Robson, the
highest peak in the Canadian Rockies. As the western terminus is reached, the travellers will be carried along the banks of
the Skeena with a delightful change of scenery from time to
time, with fertile valleys soon to be filled with settlers, and
snow-capped   peaks   with   ever-changing features.
Long before the Grand Trunk Pacific is completed as a transcontinental road, there li to be a great new field for tourists.
it will lie opened this summer, when by means of the palatial steamers plying on this coast, travellers may visit this city
and before many weeks pass have the opportunity of invading
the interior by means of the railway supplemented on the
upper  reaches  of the  Skeena by the river steamer.
Doubtless Prince Rupert will see its.first invasion of tourists this year and will have to prepare to take care, of them
These will come in increasing numbers from now on. It is. In
reality,  the  beginning  of tbe city's growing time.
The city should undoubtedly take steps to give due publicity
to the attractions of this northern country. Exact information
on this subject is required It is gratifying to know that steps
are being taken by some of the citizens in this direction and
before long a definite proposition along this line' may be ready
to be offered to the general public. Communities can no better do without publicity work in these days than can the private business. Judicious advertising always pays and the north
warrant all that can be said in its favor.
Prince Rupert must remain the centre of that vast field of
investment. Tlie awakening of interest in any section of this
country   means   added   wealth to Prince Rupert.
HUNTERS' : PARADISE
The results of the trip through
Jasper Park of R. W. C. Lett, travelling passenger and colonization
agent of the Grand Trunk Pacific
last summer with a couple of authors, an artist and a photographer,
will appear in book form about the
first of May when F. A. Talbot, the
representative of World's Work,
who accompanied Mr. Lett on his
trip, will issue a beasutifully illustrated volume entitled "The Garden
of Canada."
The material for the book was obtained during Inst summer's trip
over the Grand Trunk Pacific grade
and over the survey through Jasper
Park and west of the mountains.
Ever since his return to the east,
articles from Mr. Talbot's pen on
the country  west of    Edmonton  in
Alberta and along the Fraser River
in British Columbia have been appearing in tlie World's Work magazine and these have been very favorably received by engineers and others who know the country thoroughly.
The book will be illustrated by a
number of photographs obtained by
Mr. Lett during the trip. These include pnotographs of the hot springs
in Jasper Park, of the forests in the
park and west of the summit in
British Columbia and r.!so of the
mountain streams nad the lakes of
the district.
In order to secure a photo of the
lake lying at the foot of Mount Rob-
son, Mr. Lett spent two days cutting a six-mile trail through the
dense timber from the right of way
to the lake. This body of water is
known to the old prospectors as Six
Mile Lake. Mr. Lett states that it
rivals in beauty Lake Louise in the
park at Banff.
"For big game hunting, the country bordering on Jasper Park cannot be excelled," said Mr. Lett. "Of
course, shooting in tlie park is not
permitted, but there are large unexplored areas outside the reserve
that abound in big game. There is
no reason why Alberta should not
make as much out of its game preserves as New Brunswick out of its
moose country. There are large
areas in the Brazeau country, where
moose are plentiful and north of
Jasper Park there are mountain
sheep and goats in large number.
Grizzly bears are numerous, both in
the park and beyond the boundaries.
Mr. Lett stated that enquiries are
being received from a large number
of tourists as to whether or not it
would be possible to secure guides
in the park this summer and he believed a large number of tourists
will visit the place, even though the
railway is not completed beyond
Prairie  Creek.
THE ANGLO-INDIANS
An acute division of opinion has
sprung up over the official announcement that the government of
India has decided that members of
the domiciled community are to be
classed as Anglo-Indians, and not as
Eurasians, in the census tables.
The Times of India denounces the
decision: "This must, be the first
time since people were numbered
when any government has deliberately employed a misdescription in
census tables. Presumably there
are dictionaries in the government
offices. A reference to any dictionary shows that Anglo-Indian, as
a substantive, is defined as 'A native
of England, or of the British Isles,
resident in India.' If any lingering
doubts remain, a further reference
will show that the term native
means 'a person born in a particular
place or country.' The term Is consequently, etymologically, as wrong
as can be applied to the domiciled
community.    There are many cases
where etymology and practice have
hut scant connection; but everyone
—at least everyone outside the Imperial Secretariat—it quite aware
that in literature and in common
parlance Anglo-Indian is invariably
used as implying a native of England or of the British Isles resident
in India, never a person of mixed
parentage. It would be interesting
to know what possible excuse can
be offered for this visible and patent inaccuracy except deference to
importunity. And it seems only
natural to conclude that such a palpable attempt to ignore hard facts
can only fail in its purpose. We
should be happy to believe that the
official acceptance of the blessed
word 'Anglo-Indian' would charm
away all the disabilities, social and
economic, under which the .domiciled community labor. But the
way of the world is higher than
that. The domiciled community will
find that the appropriation of a des
ignation is a small thing after all,
and there is genuine spade work to
be done before they can realize
their ambitions."
On the other hand, the Englishman supports the new nomenclature: "The change has been made
at the instance of the Anglo-Indian
Empire League of Bombay. The
Anglo-Indian Association of Calcutta would rather have the word 'domiciled,' but apparently failed to put
his views before the government.
There are, of course, some objections to the application of the term
'Anglo-Indian' to the community because it has another and common
application, but on the whole no
one will regret the dropping of the
word 'Eurasian,' which was often
used in a contemptuous sense."
The Journal (twice a week), only
?2.00 a year.
.
■	 -*—-*..^.= --^.^_;.i    ■
Tuesday, April
1911.
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
IN CAUSE OF PEACE
Thinkers in Germany and Great Britain
on the Ontlook Presented.
Conflicting   Views   Held    by   Those
Who  Have  Studied  the
Subject
The editor of Public Opinion desired to know whether there was any
hope of any very Immediate approach to political rationalism in
the relations between Great Britain
and Germany; and to discover
whether public opinion In Germany
was hostile to such new conceptions
in politics as outlined In "The Great
Illusllon," and whether ethere was
any nucleus of enlightened thought
in Germany which might furnish a
"point de depart" for such reforming as would sensibly affect German
policy.
He therefore put the question to
• considerable number of German
public men—members of the Reichstag, professors in the German universities, German pastors, journalists and men of affairs generally.
Sir Edward Grey's remarkable
and unprecedented speech, in which
he held out friendly hands to both
Germany and the United States, and
In which he feared revolution and
danger to civilization if the burden
of armaments was increased, also
shows that this question is no academic one, but fundamental, urgent
and of supreme importance, and
possible of solution if wise hands
lead.
A Grave Question
The  gravest  question  which  confronts  British   statesmanship  today,
says Public Opinion, is this:
"Can Germany be brought to see
reason in the matter of armaments?
Has she really any motive pushing
her to aggression upon England?"
We know the theory of those who
are most insistent as to the necessity of an absolutely predominant
British navy: Germany is determined to "fulfill her destiny by
challenging Britisii world-supremacy at sea." Mr. Robert Blatchford
in the Weekly Dispatch, returns to
the attack. We are told that Bismarck, the pupil of Clausewltz, laid
down the lines of Germany's advance
half a century ago. First, Austria
had to be put back to a secondary
position. The Prussian army was
therefore made—and used. Then
France had to be reckoned with;
preparations were made—and the
necessary action taken. Then Germany was united and the period of
expansion begun. Her "future lay
on the sea"; but the British navy
stood in the way. An army had been
made to cope with Austria and
Francfe—and had been used. A navy
is necessary to cope with England.
It is being made—for use.
A Duel Between Millions
Such is the theory, and if it is a
true one, how can we hope for any
definite reduction of armament? Indeed, if it is true, we are only at the
beginning of the contest. As the
Daily Mail pointed out on Friday,
Germany is acting not only in alliance, but in close, practical co-operation with Austria, and in formal
alliance at least with Italy. Great
Great Britain's ententes are very
loose, so that we shall have to build
against a combination represented
by 140,000,000 of highly civilized
and highly organized people. If,
therefore, the real conflict is of the
nature which Mr. Blatchford and
those who share his views have Indicated, is it likely that 140,000,000
will withdraw from the contest before 40,000,000 do so? If the orthodox principles of international
rivalry are well founded, the present
estimates are a mere fraction of
what may be expected in the not
very distant future In the effort to
outbuild a resolute combination outnumbering us more than three to
one. i
But is the orthodox view well
founded? We know the modifications In tbe axioms ot European
statecraft, which a notable discussion of the last twelve months has
tended, to introduce. There is a
growing belief that organized society has reached a condition of Interdependence which renders the domination of one nation by another a
social and economic futility. Whatever principles may have guided
politics In Bismarck's time, it is today generally recognized that even
If Germany could by some magic
realize all her dreams in international politics, or what we are given
to suppose are such, could at one
stroke dominate Europe, her people
would not benefit thereby in the
least, and the real problems which
confront them and clamor for treatment remain as far as ever from solution.    If, therefore,    the   German
people can gain nothing by this
Titanic conflict, are they likely to
precipitate it, to take the frightful
risks of aggression, when, even if
successful, their victory will be
without profit?
Where We Stand
The present stage of the discussion among the best minds in Europe is this: The material truth of
the thesis is in large part admitted;
but it is urged that so much out of
keeping with German ideas is it that
it is never likely to be recognized
and influence policy within any period tha need concern us, or as Sir
Edward Grey has laid it down:
"True as the statement in that
book may be, it does not become an
operative motive in the minds and
conduct of nations until they are
convinced of its truth and it has become a commonplace to them."
The practical question then is
this: Is there any hope of it becoming a commonplace? The most notable statement of this newer view
of international relationship, and
the one to which Sir Edward was
specifically referring, is that embodied in Mr. Norman Angell's book,
"The Great Illusion," which has appeared not only in English but in
practically every European tongue.
What Germany Thinks
It appeared to the editor of Pub-
lie Opinion, therefore, that expressions of German opinion on that
book would serve to show as well as
anything, the trend of opinion In
Germany, and whether we could in
the future look for any modification
of political ideas which would lead
to a solution in the direction indicated.
Answers were received from some
two hundred letters of inquiry addressed at random to members of
the Reichstag, university professors,
clergymen and authors. Not one reply categorically hostile to the thesis has been received—unless that
of Captain von Sossberg, can be so
considered.
The fact that all those sufficiently
interested to reply at all are precisely those favorable to the more
modern conception of international
statecraft, would go to show that
there colud easly be found in Germany among those active in thought
and politics—those that is, who
help to mould German opinion—the
nucleus of a propaganda which
would so transform political ideas
as to render a thesis like that embodied in "The Great Illusion" a
commonplace, or,  to adopt Sir Ed
ward Grey's phrase, "an operative
motive in the minds and conduct of
nations," furnishing by that means a
solution which can never be found
in the sheer bulldog rivalry of warship building, especially when forty
millions have to outbuild 140. Such
a contest would only end—if no
other factor is introduced—in one
of two ways: Collision, which is
war; or exhaustion, which is bankruptcy.
Public Opinion then quotes from
a number of the letters showing
that there is throughout Germany,
among the influential classes, a genuine desire for peace, and especially
for the cessation of rivalry in arma-
mens.
 o	
B. 0. DIAMONDS
The report of the Geological Survey of Canada that Simon pure diamonds are to be found in th© Mount
Olive district of this province has
stimulated very active interest in
the district in question and many
prospectors have gone in from
Princeton and are staking claims in
an endeavor to secure precious
stones large enough to be of commercial value, several of these hav
ing lately been discovered in the
conglomerate. In a letter to a
friend at Princeton heading the Ottawa date of ten days ago, Mr.
Charles Camsell, of the Dominion
geological staff of experts, says of
the original discovery, that "the
sample of chromlte from which the
diamonds were obtained also yielded platinum and gold. This is the
first time I have been able to see
the platinum in solid rock. * » *
Practically all the diamonds obtained are clear and white, apparently excellent gem stones, if we can
only find them bl genough and there
is no reason why we should not."
Interest in the diamond discovery
In the Tulameen section continues
Actual prospecting for diamonds in
the "wash" will begin as soon as the
snow leaves that altitude.
COAL MIXES ACT
Hamblin's Bakery
Just Re-opened
Sale    counter    in    MERRYFIELD'S
STORE, Third Ave. and Fifth St.
Family trade catered to. Will sup
ply restaurants and steamers.
Cakes and Confectionery of all
kinds
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Local Agent—F. M. DAVIS
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- PRINCE RUPERT
The Best
Publicity j $2,000
Channel
Subscription
a Year
THE JOURNAL
Is the best Advertising
Medium in the City
of Prince Rupert
*i* ♦ »> «t* 't* ♦ ♦ *■;♦ »i- < ♦ ►j' ♦ ♦ <• •!•• <* *> ♦ ^* <* ♦ ►*> •> *:* *2« »s* <* *i* *i» ♦> *** *;* <* <• << *;* *> *t* ►!■♦ *s» ♦ ♦ •£* <• *> <* ►!• •> *•• ♦> »t* <i
FOLLOW THE TREND OF THE CITY'S
PROGRESS BY SUBSCRIBING
FOR THE PAPER
et"»e»e»e|e.ti»»e|e.|ee>.|H;..|H{^.|,,M'-Kee>»*»**»^^
The Journal aims at keeping Prince Rupert
and new B.C. ever before the public eye. Send
it to your friends and any whom you wish to
interest in the coming Metropolis of the North.
Skeena    Land    District—District    of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, ii.tends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Commencing at post planted 6%
milejs N. E. of the mouth of the
White River and the junction of the
Naas, marked Chas. J. Gillingham's
S. E. Corner; thence 80 chains
North; thence 80 chains West;
thence 80 chains South; thence 80
chains East to point of commencement and containing 040 acres more
or less.
CHARLES J.  GILLINGHAM.
Charles  M.  Huff, Agent.
Dated March 4,  1911. 4-18
thence SO chains North; thence 80
chains West; tlience 80 chains
South; thence SO chains East to
point of commencement and containing 040  acres more or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles M.  Huff,  Agent.
Dated March 4th, 1911. 4-18
Skeena   Land    District—District   of
( 'jLMS J '1 r
TAK.J NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C.,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Comencing at a post planted 7 miles
N. E. of the mouth of the White
River and the junction of the Naas,
marked Chas. J. Gillingliain's S. E.
Corner; thence 80 chains North;
tlience 80 chains West; e thence 80
chains South; thence 80 chains East
to point of commencement and containing 640 acres more or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles M. Huff, Agent.
Dated Marclr5th,  1911. 4-18
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land:—-
Commencing at a post planted 7%
miles N. E. of the mouth of the
White River and the junction of the
Naas and marked Chas. J. Gillingham's S. E. Corner; theuce 80
chains North; thence 80 chains
West; thence 80 chains South;
thence 80 chains East to point of
commencement and containing 640
acres more or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles  M.  Huff, Agent.
Dated March 5th, 1911. 4-18
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Commencing at a post planted 7Vfc
miles N. E. of the mouth of the
White River and tlie junction of the
Naas, marked Chas. J. Gillingham's
S. E. Corner; thence 80 chains
North; thence 80 chains West;
thence 80 chains South; thence 80
chains East to point of commencement and containing 640 acres more
or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles M. Huff, Agent
Dated March 5th,  1911. 4-18
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Commencing at a post planted 6 %
miles N. E. of the mouth of the
White River and the junction of the
Naas, and marked Chas. J. Gillingham's S. E. Corner; thence 80
chains Nortn; thence SO cnains
West; thence 80 chains South;
thence SO chains East to point of
commencement and containing 640
acres more or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles  M.  Huff, Agent.
Dated March 4th, 1911. 4-18
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Commencing at a post planted about
8 miles N. E. of the mouth of White
River and the junction of the Naas
River, marked Charles J. Gillingham's S. E. Corner; thence 80
chains North; tlience 80 chains
West; thence 80 chains South;
thence 80 chains East to point of
commencement and containing 640
acres more or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles  M.  Huff, Agent.
Dated March 5th, 1911. 4-18
Skeena   Land    District—District   of
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Commencing at h post planted about
8 miles N. E. of the mouth of White
River and the junction of the Naas
River, marked Chas. J. Gillingliain's
S. E. Corner; thence 80 chaine
North; theuce 80 chains West;
thence 80 cliains Soutli; thence 80
chains East to point of commencement and containing 640 acres more
or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles  M.   Huff, Agent
Dated March 6th, 1911. 4-18
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gilllngham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Commencing at a post planted about
8 miles N. E. of the mouth of White
River and the junction of the Naas
River, marked Chas. J. Gillingham's
S. E. Corner; thence 80 chains
North; thence 80 chains West;
thence 80 cliains South; thence 80
chains East io point of commencement and containing 640 acres mou
or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles M.  Huff, Agent.
Dated  March  6th,  1911. 4-18
Skeena   Land    District—District   of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for a
license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Commencing at a post planted about
8 miles N. E. of the mouth of the
White River and the junction of the
Naas, marked Chas. J. Gillingham's
S. E. Corner; thence 80 chains
North; thence 80 cliains West;
thence 80 cliains South; thence 80
chains East to point of commencement and containing 640 acres more
or less.
CHARLES  J.   GILLINGHAM.
Charles M. Huff, Agent.
Dated  March 6th, 1911. 4-18
Skeena   Land    District—District   ot
itfLftRl t r
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for a
license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land:—
Commencing at a post planted about
8 miles N. E. of the mouth of the
White River and the junction of the
Naas, marked Chas. J. Gillingham's
S. E. Corner; thence 80 chains
North; thence 80 chains West;
thence 80 chains South; thence 80
cliains East to point of commencement and containing 640 acres more
or less
CHARLES  J.   GILLINGHAM.
Charles M, Huff, Agent.
Dated  March  6th,  1911. 4-18
WATER NOTICE.
Skeena    Land    District — District    of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Charles J.
Gillingham, of Prince itupert, B. C,
occupation contractor, intends to
apply to the Minister of Lands for
a license to prospect for Coal and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land:—
Commencing at a post planted 8 %
miles N. E. of the mouth of White
River and the Junction of the Naas.
marked Chas. J. Gillingham's S. E.
Corner; thence 80 cliains North;
thence 80 chains West; thence 80
chains South; thence 8 0 chains East
to point of commencement and containing 640 acres more or less.
CHARLES J. GILLINGHAM.
Charles M.  Huff, Agent.
Dated  March  ith,  1911. 4-18
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Cassiar.
TAKE     NOTICE  that  Charles  J.
Gillingham, of Prince Rupert, II. 0.,
occupation    contractor,    intends    to
apply to the  Minister  of  Lands  for
a  license  to prospect    for  Coal  and
Petroleum over 640 acres of land: —
Commencing at a post planted    six
miles N.  E.  of the  mouth  of  White
River and tbe junction of the Naas
River  on   Canyon    Creek,    marked
Chas,  J.  Gillingham's  S.  E.  Corner
NOTICE is hereby given that an
application will be made under Part
V. of the "Water Act, I;i09," to obtain a licence in the Queen Charlotte Islands Division of Skeena District.
(a) The name, address and occupation of the applicant—Merton A.
Merrill, Masset, Q. C. I., B. C,
Prospector.
(If for mining purposes) Free
Miner's  Certificate No	
(b) The name of the lake,
stream, or source (if unnamed, the
description is)—1-ln-tsua Lake, Tsu-
Skundale Lake and Ain River.
(c) The point of diversion—At >r
near the outlet of Tsu-Skundale
Lake into Ain River.
(d) The quantity of water applied for (in cubic feet per second)
—1,000.
(e) The character of the proposed works—Power Plant, Dam,
Flumes, etc.
(f) The premises on which the
water is to be used (describe same)
—At or near the mouth of the Ain
River.
(g) Tho purposes for which tho
water is to be used—Generating
power,
(h) If for Irrigation, describe
ihe land intended to be Irrigated,
giving  acreage	
(1) If the water Is to be used for
power or milling purpose's, describe
the place where the water Is to be
returned to some natural channel,
and tlie difference In altitude between point of diversion and point
of return—At or near the mouth of
the Ain River, about 100 feet below
point of diversion.
(j) Area of Crown lnnd Intended to be occupied by the proposed
works—10 acres more or less.
(k) This notice was posted on
the 28th day of November, 1910,
and application will be made to the
Commissioner on the 1st day of
June,  1911.
(1) Give the names and addresses of any riparian proprietors or
licensees who or whose lands are
likely to be affected by the proposed works, either above or below
the outlet—Don't know of any.
(Signature)
MERTON  A.   MERRILL,
(P.  O.  Address)   Massel,  B.  C.
NOTE.—One cubic loot per second Is equivalent to 35.71 miner's
Inches.
The Journal (twice a week), only
$2.00 a year. PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Tuesday, April
1911.
RECIPROCITY BILL
Sir Edmund Walker Breaks With the
Liberal Party on This
issue.
He   Believes   That   It   Would   Be   a
Sacrifice on the Part of Can
ada to Enter Agreement
In a special Canadian number of
the "Iron Age Hardware," Sir Edmund Walker explains the reasons
for his opposition to the reciprocity
pact. He speaks without partisan
bias, as becomes one who has always
been a Liberal, but finds it necessary to break with is party on a
great national principle. Sir Edmund says that there was a time In
our history when reciprocity with
the United States would have been
of some temporary benefit to this
country, but that was before Canada "had a great national establishment of its own for the carrying
on of business with the world at
large." Times have changed in the
last twenty years, and for Canada
to go into the deal today would be
to prove herself "the most foolish
nation under the sun."
A Warning, Not an Inducement
Sir Edmund doubts that the
agreement would temporarily increase the prices of certain of our
raw materials, but even admitting
for the sake of argument that it
would, he denies that this would be
the reason for Canada concurring in
it. The fact that the anxiety of the
Americans to get our raw materials
wolud raise their prices should rather warn us that they were making
Canada the "slash" of North America. He compares the American
manufacturers to the foolish virgins
whose oil has been nearly consumed.
They turn their eyes to Canada and
see our resources almost untouched,
and naturally desire to fill their
lamps from our stores. The strongest argument in favor of reciprocity
on the American side of the line is
the access it promises to Canada's
Taw material. Again and again,
have President Taft, Secretary
Knox, Governor Foss, Senator Beveridge and others pointed out that
the free admission of Canadian raw
materials would relieve the strain
on the remaining reserves in the
United States. Thus Uncle Sam
colud achieve the feat of eating his
cake in Canada, and having his cake
in the United States to stay his industrial stomach later in the day.
Export Duties Recommended
The provinces of Ontario and Quebec have demonstrated how our raw
materials should he handled. They
require that the timber cut on
Crown lands undergo manufacture
before it is removed from the country. The Dominion Government in
1897 passed an act prescribing a
stiff export duty on pulpwood,
whether grown on Crown lands or
on private lands, and imposts of the
same kind on certain ores and
mattes. This act has never been
brought into effect by proclamation,
as was provided, and judging from
the policy of the government in the
reciprocity deal, Is not likely to be.
Nevertheless, the passing of the act
displayed true vision as to Canada's
destiny. It presupposed that this
country was to be great, that the
"Twentieth Century was to.be Canada's century," and that Canada
would have need of all her own raw
materials. "The fact that the
United States has now to look beyond its own bounds for resources
of raw materials ought to admonish
Canadians as to their duty to themselves in respect to this agreement."
Sir Edmund says that "to place the
country's raw material at the disposition of a foreign power would be
like parting with territory."
. ncrifco Demanded of Canada
The need of the United States for
the agreement is plain enough, but
why should Canada be expected to
sacrifice herself on this account? It
was not by sacrificing her interests
to those of her friends that the
United States had become a great
nation. For a good many years now
Canada has been trying to follow the
good example set at Washington;
and as a result of the recent policies
of both the Conservative and Liberal parties, our national industries
are healthfully expanding under the
large Inward movements of population and capital from other countries. "Canada is going forward at
an amazing rate alon ggrooves It
lias made for itself. The agreement
wolud be an influence to deviate the
country from the splendid course on
Which it has set out. It might operate to decompose the commercial
bonds now well established between
eastern and western Canada, and to
bring about commercial union upo
lines  running     north     and     south.
Fancy Groceries
Family Groceries
Fresh Groceries
Green Vegetables
Fresh Fruits
Special Attention Given to Family Trade.
You Will Find Our Prices RIGHT.
STALKER & WELLS
ler
2nd Aur.ie & McBride
^
Commercial mergers that take in
national corporations are generally
followed by political mergers."
There was certainly no popular
demand for a reversal of the National Policy. Never were Canadians
more prosperous and contented.
This is not the time they would have
chosen to make experiments.
 o	
A BUFFALO HUNT
Montana's     Herd     to     Be     Finally
"Rounded Up" for Delivery to
the Canadian Park
Two hundred Montana Indians
have started on the greatest roundup of buffalo ever witnessed in the
west, in order that Michael Pablo,
the Montana Buffalo man, might
carry out his intention of delivering
to Howard Douglas, commissioner
of parks at Edmonton, every hoof
that is yet left wandering on the
Flathead reservation, near Missoula,
Montana.
The round-up will cover 40 miles
of territory, and will be even more
spectacular than the first big roundup which took place three years ago,
when the Canadian government got
its first consignment of the buffalo
from Pablo.
Pablo has given orders to the Indians that every hoof must be
cleared off the reservation, and
those animals that resist capture
are to be shot.
Pablo has made elaborate preparations for the event, and has had his
200 Indians mounted on the best
ponies procurable. The Indians are
of the old stock that were wont to
hunt the monarch of the plains in
the old days, and they are trained
to the job.
As a result of this huge round-up,
Pablo expects to deliver to the government for the park at Wainwrlght
at least 60 more head, and possibly
as many as 80.
Fifteen head of the buffalo from
Pablo's ranch are now on their way
to the buffalo park.
 o	
TO PROTECT LIFE
Recommendations Made by the Coroner's
Jury That Inquired Into
Iroquois Wreck.
More Rigid Inspection Is Urged Better Facilities  for Saving
Passengers
"That Isabelle Fenwick, Mesacli
Phillips, Ernest Hartnell, A. D.
Munro, John Brydson, Andrew 01-
lerson, Ian Bactern, Stanley A.
Clark, Tom Chan Lung, Foong Yet
and Fow Suey His, came to their
deaths at or near the southern entrance to Canoe Pass, near Sidney,
by drowning or exposure, on or from
the wreck of the S. S. Iroquois on
the 10th of April, 1911, and that
Captain Albert A. Sears, the master
of the said S. S. Iroquois on the said
10th day of April, 1911, at or near
Canoe Pass, near Sidney, B. C, did
feloniously and unlawfully kill and
slay the said Isabelle Fenwick, Mesacli Phillips, Ernest Hartnell, A. D.
Munro, John Brydson, A. Ollerson,
Ian Bactern, Stanley A. Clark, Ton
Chan Lung, Foong Yet Sin and Fow
Suey His," was the verdict which
the coroner's jury returned at Sidney after a two days' investigation
into the circumstances surrounding
the deaths of a number of passengers and chew of the Iroquois, of
which Captain Albert A. Sears was
master at the time of the wreck.
The verdict is one of manslaughter.    As the provincial    authorities
Dont you
Believe it!
Many men pretend that
they are not interested in
the good clothes question.
They'll tell you that any
kind of a decent fitting
suit will do. Well, they
are only pretending. Truth
to tell most men are nearly
as much interested in their
clothes nowadays as
women are. Some of them
are just as hard to please
as women nnd just as particular. We know this to
be a fact nnd that's why
we handle
20th Century Brand
Garments
SLOAN & CO.
SIXTH STREET
ALDER BLOCK
had already indicted Captain Sears
of the same offense, there was no
necessity for the coroner, Dr. Hart,
to issue a warrant for his arrest.
Attached to the verdict were the
following recommendations which
will be forwarded to the proper an
tborltles:
"That tbe attention of the Domin
ion government he at once called to
tbe lack of regulations of coastwise
shipping governing cargo on passenger boats;
"That a more rigid and frequent
Inspection be made of all life saving
appliances on any and all passenger
boats;
"That all passenger vessels be
made to carry life rafts and steel,
unslnkable life boats, and that no
boat be rated for more passengers
than its capacity."
CANCELLATION OP RESERVE.
NOTICE is hereby given that the
reserve of a parcel of land situated
on Graham Island, notice of which
appeared in the British Columbia
Gazette on the 25th of February,
1909, being dated 23rd February,
1909, is cancelled to permit of the
lands being acquired by pre-emption
only and for no other purpose
ROBT. A. RENWICK,'
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Department of Lands,
Victoria, B. C, April 5th, 1911.
4-14—7-5
RESERVE
NOTICE is hereby given that all
vacant Crown lands not already under reserve, situated within the
boundaries of the Land Recording
Districts of Cariboo and Lillooet,
and the Kamloops Division of Yale
Land Recording District, are reserved from any alienation under
the "Land Act" except by pre-emption.
ROBT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Department of Lands,
Victoria, B. C, April 3rd, 1911.
4-14—lm
SKEENA DISTRICT.
WHARF, PRINCE RUPERT.
In the Matter of Chapter 115, "Navigable  Waters Protection  Act,"
R. S. C, 190o.
NOTICE is hereby given that
drawings and description of the site
of a proposed wharf at Prince Rupert, B. O, have been deposited
with the Minister of Public Works,
Ottawa, and duplicates thereof with
the Registrar of Deeds at Prince
Rupert, B. C, and that thirty days
after date the Honourable the Minister of Public Works and the Government of British Columbia will
apply to the Governor-General in
Council for approval thereof.
J. E. GRIFFITH,
Public Works Engineer.
Department of Public Works,
Victoria, B. C, 5th April, 1911.
4-14—lm
TRUST   COMPANIES.
EVERY COMPANY receiving deposits of money or carrying on business in the Province of British Columbia as a Trust Company, as defined in the "Trust Companies Regulation Act, 1911," is requested to
furnish particulars as to the corporate name of the company, and the
name and address of its managing
director to the Inspector of Trust
Companies, Victoria, in order to receive a supply of forms to be used
in making the return as provided in
section 4 of said Act.
W. U.  RUNNALS,
Inspector of Trust Companies.
4-18—lm
NOTICE.
PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given
that, under the authority contained
in section 131 of the "Land Act," a
regulation has been approved by the
Lieutenant-Governor in Council fixing the minimum sale prices of first
and second-class lands at $10 and $5
per acre, respectively.
This regulation further provides
that the prices fixed therein shall
apply to all lands with respect to
which the application to' purchase is
given favourable consideration after
this date, notwithstanding the date
of such application or any delay that
may have occurred in the consideration of the same.
Further notice Is hereby given
that all persons who have pending
applications to purchase lands under
the provisions of sections 34 or 36
of the "Land Act" and who are not
willing to complete such purchases
under the prices fixed by the aforesaid regulation shall be at liberty to
withdraw such applications and receive a refund of the moneys deposited on account of such applications.
WILLIAM R. ROSS,
Minister of Lands.
Department of Lands,
Victoria, B. C, April 3rd, 1911.
4-11—6-11.
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS
STEWART SCHOOL.
SEALED TENDERS, superscribed
"Tender for Stewart School," will
be received by the Honourable the
Minister of Public Works up to noon
of Monday, the 1st day of May,
1911, for the erection and completion of a two-room frame school
with basement, etc., at Stewart,
B. C., in the Skeena Electoral" District.
Plans, specifications, contract,
and forms of tender may be seen on
and after the 7th day of April, 1911,
at the offices of J. H. Smith, Esq.,
Secretary to the School Board, Stew-
are, B. C.; the Government Agent,
Prince Rupert; and the Department
of  Public  Works, Victoria.
Each proposal must be accompanied by an accepted bank cheque or
certificate of deposit on a chartered
mmmsiBEmBEEittEtttt&BissieiBim
SHERWIN & WILLIAMS
-PAINTS-
COVER THE EARTH.
WE   ARE   SOLE   AGENTS
CARLOAD JUST ARRIVED
Ready Nixed Paints,
Paints Ground in Oil,
Paints Ground in Japan,
Varnishes, Shellac, etc.
Water Stains
and
Decotint
IN ALL (XDLOKS
Prince Rupert Hardware & Supply
Company, Ltd. thos. dunn. m*.
BBQQQBQBQBQQQQQBBIslBElQBBBQB
M.M. Stephens & Co. Ld.
offer the following bargains in real estate subject to   prior   sale
or change in price:
SECTION 1
Lots 3 and 4, Block 5, Terms $4,500.00
Lots 33 and 34, Block 5, Terms $3,750.00
Lots 18 and 19, Block 7, Each $1,500.00
Lots 33 and 34, Block 29, Terms $4,250.00
SECTION 5
Lots 5 and 6, Block 37, Terms $1,800.00
Lot 7,  Block  32       $700.00
Lots 43 and  44,  Block  27, each    $000.00
SECTION 0
Lots 19 and 20, Block 4, %-cash, each $1,080.00
Lots 10 and 11, Block 21, Terms $3j000.00
Lot 11,  Block  22       $850.00
Lots 8 and 9, Block 26,   %  cash $2,500.00
Lot 20, Block 27, % cash    $000.00
Lots 1 and 2, Block 29,  %  cash $2,025.00
SECTION 7
Lots 27 and  28, Block 5,  %  cash $000.00
Lots 21 and 22, Block 10, Each   $450.00
Lots 11 and 12, Block 21,  Ms cash,   each . . .  ... $450.00
Lot 15, Block 39    $500.00
Lot 16, Block 35,  %  cash   $000.00
Lots 35 and 36, Block 50, each $250.00
SECTION 8
Lots 28 to 31, Block 15, each $225.00
Lots, stores, offices and dwellings for sale and lease in all parts
of the City.     Insurance  of  all kinds.
PHONE 222
P. O. BOX 275
You Can Avoid This
by sending your Clothes to the
PIONEER  STEAM LAUNDRY
There are Many
Reasons Why
IT   IS  TO  YOUR  INTEREST
We do first-class work and
are careful with your Garments. We can do your work
and return It within 48 hours
if necessary. We call for your
Laundry and return it to you.
Should anything be lost or misplaced we will make It satisfactory.
When your Laundry goes to the Chinks there are many drawbacks. When you send It to us your money helps pay WHITE
LABOR.
PIONEER STEAM LAUNDRY
BLOCK
11
11
12
13
18
FOR   SALE
SECTION ONE
LOTS BLOCK
19	
.1-2-3-4-5-6
 9-10
 22
 21-22
 1-2
19
20
34
34
27
27
LOTS
 3-4
...15-16
...19-20
.36-37-38
 42
 9-10
. ..42-43
SECTION FIVE
SECTION SIX
9    22-23 '8 7-8-9-10
18 22-28
XJLT     O       JD fi* ATCtf} AT    The Atlantic Realti) and Improvement
VV.    O.    U1^1\\J\J1M     Company Ltd. P.O. Box 51
bank of Canada, made payable to
the Honourable the Minister of Public Works, for the sum of $250
which shall be forfeited if the party
tendering decline to enter Into contract when called upon to do so, or
if he fail to complete the work contracted for. The cheques or certificates of deposit of unsuccessful tenderers will be returned to them
upon the execution of the contract.
Tenders will not be considered
unless made out on the forms supplied, signed with the actual signa
ture of the tenderer, and    enclosed
in the envelopes furnished.
The lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted.
J. E. GRIFFITH,
Public Works Engineer.
Department of Public Works,
Victoria, B. C, 3rd April, 1911.
4-14—5-2
The Journal (twice a week), only
J2.00 a year.

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