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Prince Rupert Journal Jul 29, 1910

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Array New Wdlinjt.D
Coal
Is the best
ROGERS & BUCK
Sole Agents
Print* Bitpirt fomwd
High-Class
Job Printing
In all Lines
VOLUME  1
Published Twice a Week
PRINCE RUPERT, B. C, FRIDAY, JULY 29, 1910.
Price, Five Cents
NO.   13.
MOUNTAIN HOTELS
Choice of Site for First Two for G.T.P.
Will be Hide This
Slimmer.
One Will Be in Full View of Mount
Robson    in    British
Columbia
Additional information is now
available In connection with the plans
of the G. T. F. In the matter of its
hotel system along the line n railway and on the Pacific coast. The
company Is losing no time In connection with this important feature of
the work which will fall to Its officials and by the time the line is
constructed there will be an adequate
system of hotels along the route to
looks after the pressing needs of the
company in that respect.
This summer a choice will be made
In answer to the demand of Charles
M. Hays, the president of the company, of the first two summer hotels
between Edmonton and this coast.
One of these will be on the Alberta
side of the mountains where there
are hot springs to add to the attractions of the route. The other will
be in British Columbia and will be
selected with the object in view of
commanding the best view of Mount
Robson, the highest peak in Canada,
and which is situated so as to allow
of an excellent view being obtained
from the line of the railway.
These, It is acknowledged, will be
but the beginning of the company's
work in this particular line in the
matter of scenic resorts. Later there
■will be others built in the province
for the G. T, P. follows a route
through British Columbia that affoids
some of the most delightful scenery
to be found on the continent.
The hotel system as now planned
includes the Laurier Hotel at Ottawa,
that is to be second to nothing on the
continent; another grand hostelry at
Winnipeg; Victoria and Vancouver
are to be looked after in the same
way; and at Prince Rupert there will
be built a model structure for handling the trade. This joined with the
mountain resorts will give the company unexcelled oportunlties to handle the travelling public.
In connection with the plans here,
while no official announcement Is yet
made, it Is said that the plans will
call for the laying off of the land
within the reserve surrounding the
wharf In a most up-to-date manner.
After provision Is made for the station and the other necessary buildings, a charming park will be laid
out In which the hotel will be situated. In 'his way the first introduction
to the city will be made a most attractive one.
The climate of Prince Rupert, according to all the indications this
season, will leave little to be desired.
It is quite as good as is possessed
by many of the cities in the south
that boast of being summer resorts.
SIGNS OF RISING
Exiles From Spain Await on Frontier
Signal to Join Forces
(Special to The Journal)
Cerbera, Spanish-French Frontier,
July 29.—Several thousand armed
exiles await the signal for a general
strike in Spain to cross the border
and march upon Barcelona and join
forces with the strikers there.
TO PREVENT FIRES
Two Sub-Stations Will be  Put on In
Congested Part of
City.
Hose Will Be So Installed That Firemen Can Hun It Out Very
Quickly
At a recent meeting of the city
council a system of sub-stations In
section one to afford better facilities
for putting out fires was adopted.
The report was made by the fire
and water committee recommending
that 500 feet of 2 M> Inch hose be purchased to be used In these substations which were proposed to be
erected in the congested district in
section one.
Aid. Mobley said that the cost of
these substations would not be great.
All that would be required would be
something to keep the tools, etc., dry.
The cost would me nominal.
Aid. Barrow recommended the purchase of ithe hose as suggested.
His Worship wanted to see reels
added as the hose would not be of as
much advantage as it would with
reels.
In order to inform the council on
the subject, Aid. Mobley said that
there was 1,500 feet of hose on hand
while 500 feet more had' been ordered.
WANTS   ARBITRATION
(Special to The Journal)
Stratford, Ont., July 29.—The
mayor issues an appeal to
Chas. M. Hays, asking him to
agree to arbitration for the
purpose of ending the strike.
Decisive Action
Montreal, July 29.—Vice-
President Murdock of the
trainmen now on strike, says
decisive action will be taken
in the Grand Trunk strike
within forty-eight hours.
MUST  STAND  TRIAL
G. T. Williams is Committed by Stipendiary Magistrate
Today.
His Defence   is   Reserved   For   the
Present—Evidence as to Admission of Guilt
G. T. Williams, accused of setting
fire to his building known as the Talbot House was this morning given
his preliminary hearing before Mr.
J. H. McMullin, S.M. The evidence
of the crown was put in, but no defence was offered, it being reserved.
Tbe magistrate committed the accused for trial at the next assizes.
The crown's case was in the hands
of W. E. Williams, who acted under
instructions from Chief of Police McCarvell. The prisoner was represented by L. W. Patmore.
Fireman Porter told of finding
paper and coal oil tins In the attic
at the time of the fire.
J. Lindsay testified to having received baggage from the accused .en
the Saturday before the fire for storage purposes. The baggage was for
people who had left the house.
J. W. Davis gave evidence that he
had sold gasoline to the accused two
or three weeks before the fire. He
sold him one case. The accused told
him to deliver it in the basement of
the place in the evening. After the
fire the accused had come to witness
and told him of his trouble and requested the witness to cover up the
sale of the gasoline.
Witness said he had suggested that
it might be put down as launch hire
but nothing was done about it.
Under cross examination, witness
said he wanted the gasoline to sell
out in small quantities as people
were wanting it. He wished It delivered in the evening because he did
not want the housekeepers to know
anything about it, not being allowed
to store gasoline around the premises.
Mrs. Humber, who had been housekeeper at the Talbot House, testified
to wall paper being in the place.
J. H. Hoffa had seen the paper in
the  attic.
II. Hansberg gave unimportant evidence.
Mrs. Snell, who lived at the Talbot House, said the accused always
warned her to be careful about fire,
lie spoke to her about taking a rope
to her room the evening before so
that she could get out if necessary.
Accused had warned her to get out
of the house in case of fire quicker
than she had done at the previous
fire. Mr. Williams had told her he
was tired of the place and spoke of
paying heavy insurance,
She told of hearing a noise like the
accused lighting a fire shortly before
the fire broke out. She heard a peculiar noise like the opening of the
trap door. After the fire, accused
had said that the noise she heard of
moving about was made by himself.
Under cross examination she said
accused did not say he opened the
trap door.
Evidence was given by H. Letear-
ner, a tinsmith, with respect to accused getting shears for cutting tin
from him, and E. Chyber, the gun-
(Contlnued on Page Eight)
CONTRACT SYSTEM
ADOPTED BY COUNCIL
First Work of Bringing Section One to Grade Will be Commenced Just as Soon as Possible—Aid. Hilditch Alone
Makes Move in Favor of Day Labor—Full Discussion of
Question by Members of Aldermanic Board.
The first part of the work of local
Improvement in section one will be
carried out under the contract system. This has been decided upon
by the city council. A motion of Aid.
Hilditch that it be done by day labor
found no seconder. It is proposed
to try to have the contracts split up
so as to allow small contractors to
take stations if possible and rush the
work to completion as soon as possible.
The question of which system to
adopt that of day labor or the contract system was very fully discussed at the council board for two evenings this week before a settled
policy was agreed upon. Aid. Lynch
expressed the view that the day labor
system would lend itself to abuses
in th way of graft. Aid. Hilditch
on the other hand contended that
the contract system was full of opportunities for introducing graft.
The discussion arose in connection
with the engineer's report upon the
question. He put the cost at about
$400,000 for reducing the whole of
the streets in section one to the
proper grade and bringing it to a
sub-grade. He was ready to submit
plans and specifications at once for
the work on Second avenue which required attention and suggested that
he could get the specifications ready
for the contractors to bid upon. This
last phrase introduced the subject
of the method of doing the work
which caused all the discussion on
the part of the aldermen.
Preliminary Debate
When the report of the engineer
first came before the council on Tuesday evening it provoked a very full
discussion as to the merits of labor
employed on the work on the streets.
This discussion was introduced by
Aid. Hilditch, who took a strong
stand for the employment of English
speaking workmen.
Aid. Hildltch said he agreed with
the engineer as far as the working
part went. He ceased to agree with
him when the working part was past.
Mr. Davis did not understand the
west as the members of the council
did. There was a class of men in the
city that sent all their money out of
the city. What the city wanted to
remain was not Montenegrins, but
the men who would make homes here
and spend their money here. In the
present undertaking on the sewer
he had no complaint to offer concerning the contractor as a man. He
was, however, employing ninety-
five per cent of Montenegrins.
He would favor the work done by day
labor. The money should go to those
who would make their homes here
and not have it go back to southern
Italy and other countries.
Aid. Mobley said he heard nothing
in the report dealing with the question of employing labor to carry out
this work. He was concerned only
with the carrying out of the enterprise.
Eight  Hour Day
Aid. Pattullo referred to a clause
that Introduced this question of day
labor. If the work was done by contract he favored having a clause inserted in the contract specifying that
the work should be done on an eight
hour day and that the minimum wage
should be $3 a day.
Aid. Hilditch said it was hard to
get men to work in the ditch with
the Montenegrins.
Aid. Mobley advocated the best
class of labor. There was not enough
men of the laboring class belonging
to the Anglo-Saxon race on the Pacific coast to do all the work required. He preferred the Anglo-Saxon,
but if he could not be got, he did
not believe in tying up the work.
There were some Montenegrins and
those other races mentioned, who
were good citizens.
Aid.  Barrow believed   in    paying
NEW YORK RIOTS
Serious   Results   From   Attempt   to
Break a Strike
(Special to The Journal)
New York, July 29.—one man waB
killed, four wounded, and several
beaten In a riot at the Brooklyn Dock
of the American Sugar Refinery company yesterday. The trouble aroBe
over an attempt to break a strike In
he works.
—i o	
READY FOR  CRIPPEN
Alleged Murderer is  Being Watched
to   Prevent   Suicide
(Special to The Journal)
.Montreal,    July    29.—A    wireless
message  received  here  reports  that
Dr. Crippen is on the liner Montrose.
The police have instructed the captain  to  take  precautions  to  prevent
the  committing of suicide   by    Dr.
Crippen.    They specify that he Is to
be kept under watch until arrested.
Ready to Arrest
Father Point, Quebec, July 29.—
Two  provincial   officers  are  here  to
assist in the arrest of Dr. Crippen on
the arrival of the steamer.
 o———
MUST  GIVE  NOTICE
CAPITALISTS CALL
Guggenheim Party  Make  Tour  About
City and Express Satisfaction.
Jacob  Schin* And Other  Financiers
Spend Short Time in Prince
Rupert Today
City Proposes Nay Blast Out Rock Adjacent to New Building Being
Erected.
Aid. Pattullo Demands That Specified
Procedure Shall be Followed
In This Connection
(Continued on Page Eight)
STUDYING   MASSET
G.T.P. Official Seeks Exact Information
About That Much Talked
of District.
W.  P. Hinton   Paid   Visit   to   Rich
Dairy District on the Queen
Charlottes
W. P. Hinton, general passengel
agent of the G. T. P., left this morning by the Prince Rupert for the
south after a rather prolonged stay
in the city. He paid a visit to Mas-
set on the last trip of the Prince Albert for the purpose of looking into
that district as a place of settlement.
The G. T. P. offices, Mr. Hinton
says, are asked for facts concerning
that district and he desired to have
exact information to give them. He
was quite impressed with the area
as a grazing district and for the raising of vegetables and fruits. He will
however get more exact information
on the subject, as the G. T. P. aims
not to deceive In their advertising of
the land contiguous to the line of
railway.
The company has no land to sell
i,tself, but Is carrying on an educational campaign for the purpose of
settling up the land along the route.
Special attention was given to the
prairies and with marked success,
says .Mr. Hinton.
The company, however, intend now
to direct attention to other parts,
particularly in British Columbia. The
officials aim at having exact information to give all seekers after it.
Mrs. Hinton accompanied her husband on the trip.
 o	
Aid. Pattullo Introduced the temporary loan bylaw at- the council
meeting on Tuesday night. He explained that inasmuch as the rate
had not been fixed when the original
bylaw was Introduced there had been
a question as to its validity. In order
to make sure of it he had introduced
this bylaw.
NEAR BY PLACERS
Properties on Gold Creek Near Kitselas
Will be Developed at
Once.
Local  Men  Are  Interested  in What
Promises   to   be   Valuable
Proposition
It Is evident that all the rich
mineral finds are not going to be
made at a distance from this city.
Every week there are discoveries
made in the interior of the province
in the country tributary to ti.e line of
the G. T. P. that indicates that the
mineral wealth of the district Is to
be of most diversified character.
Within easy reach of this city there
Is being opened up what gives promise of being a very rich placer
proposition. It is within about five
miles of Kitselas on Gold Creek. The
I ground has been tested and those Interested are well satisfied with re-
j suits. The gold is found In a black
sand that elsewhere In the province
lias usually turned out well.
Samples of the sand are now In
tlie city, having been placed In the
office of H. F. McRae, who Is Interested In the proposition. There Is
quite a large percentage of coarse
gold in the samples and a good
showing of the fine. Those Interested are incorporating and intend
to put a limited amount of (lie stock
on the market for the purpose of doing the necessary work on the claims.
The location is easily reached and Is
not an expensive proposition to
work.
 o	
On and after September 1 we sell
for CASH ONLY.    Watch our ad. for
specials.    J.  E.  Merryfield.
*     *     *
The telephone system In the city
will, It Is expected, be on working
order probably next week. The city
council are asking Mr. Law to continue to take charge until the bylaw
lias passed.
At last night's meeting of the city
council the question of blasting out
a piece of rock adjoining the new
hotel being built at Seventh street,
came up. Aid. Lynch said he and
other members of the committee had
visited the place and found that the
work could be done very much cheaper if accomplished now before the
plate glass windows were put in. He
proposed that the city do it.
Aid. Mobley supported this and
pointend out that the rock was within a few feet of the building. It
would have to be removed by the
city later and would possibly have
to be taken out with a hammer as
it would be impossible to blast it out
with the windows so near.
Aid. Pattullo wanted to know how
it was to be paid for, whether out of
current revenue.
This introduced some discussion as
to how it could be done, some proposing that it be charged against the
local improvement scheme.
Aid. Pattullo pointed out that with
no bylaw carried yet for that this
was impossible. He was not opposed
to the proposition, but it would have
to be done in order. There was no
machinery for doing it. The case
was exactly the Bame as the application refused by the council relative
to the corner of Third and Centra
street. All should be treated the
same.
He finally appealed to the mayor
for a ruling as to whether a notice
of motion would not have to be given.
His worship ruled that it would,
and accordingly the necessary notice
was given by Aid. Lynch and the matter was then set over until Saturday
night.
 o	
ISLANDS ATTRACT
The steamer Ramona, flying tbe
flag of the Pacific Coast Steamship
company, arrived in port this morning with a distinguished company on
board, representing the Morgan-Guggenheim interests in New York. The
party is on its way from a tour of
Alaska and the Yukon, the vessel being under charter to the party of ten
that composed the company.
At the head of them, acting as the
general guide was Capt. D. H. Jarvis,.
who represents the Morgan interests
in the Guggenheim Investments in
Alaska. Capt. Jarvis is no stranger
to the west. He was formerly at
the head of the United States revenue
cutter service and saw considerable
service in Bebring sea at the time
of the sealing troubles. Later lie
took charge of the Alaska customs
before assuming his present position.
Among the others were Jacob
Schiff, of the house of Pierpont Morgan, Prof. Loeb and his son, and Col.
Wilson, who is likewise no stranger
to the coast.
Col. Wilson Is a financier of New
York who is known in British Columbia from the fact that he represents
some large Investments that have
been made here before. About five
years ago he visited the province in
company with a distinguished party
of capitalists.
The original Intention of the party
was to leave the Ramona at Skagway
proceed to Dawson and then down the
Yukon to Nome, where the Ramona
would meet them again and they
would visit the railing work at Cordova. The plans were changed, however and tbey came back to Skagway
from Dawson and took the steamer
direct to Cordova. They are now on
their way back to Seattle.
Calling here for mail und telegrams, they were taken in charge of
by J. H. Rogers, the shipping agent,
and although they had had no Intention of touring the city they were
persuaded by him to take advantage
of the opportunity of seeing the
place.
They were taken to the high
ground overlooking the harbor and
upon their return expressed the
pleasure they had had and were highly satisfied with the promise which
the city had. They were pleased
that they had not returned without
seeing the city.
 o	
Aid. Pattullo moved last evening
at the council meeting that the city
purchasing agent be Instructed to
purchase a fire-proof safe at an ap-
roxlmate cost of $350. This was
agreed   to.
. o	
D. D. MANN LEAVES
Investors   Pass   Through    Uer<
Way to Queen Charlottes
Among the arrivals on the G, T. P.
Bteamer Prince Ruperl were a number bound for the Queen Charlottes,
Included among these were VV, (1.
McMorrls, of Vancouver. He is deeply Interested in timber, land and coal
on the islands and is making a business trip lo Inspect some of the Interests he possesses there. Formerly
Mr. McMorrls was manager of the
Nelson News. The coast proved too
great an attraction for him, however,
and a few months ago he decided to
take up his residence in Vancouver.
He Is finding this northern country
a rich one from the standpoint of investment. He will spend several
dnys on the Islands.
Mr. Welch who Is interested In
this part of the province from the
standpoint of farm lands, went over
on the Bruno also. Ho comes from
Portland, Ore, and will examine Into
the prospects of following farming
there.
Well Known Financier Returned From
Stewart by Prince
Rupert.
lie   is   Well   Pleased   With   North,
But  Hoc-.  Not   Reveal
Mis Plans
Subscribe  for
Journal now.
The   Prince   Rupert
li li. .Mann on his way south from
Stewart, was a passenger cm the
Prince  Rupert,  which   reached   porl
early this morning, sailing a few
hours later. Mr, Mann was well
pleased with Stewart, bul bis plans
with respeel to thai district have nol
yel been made public, He covered a
considerable pari of the district in
the few days he was there and gathered all the information he could.
lie will Ikely consult with his associates and upon the reports obtained
by Mr. Mann will depend future action.
At Stewart a banquet was tendered
the railway man before he left by the
citizens of the camp. The banquet
was held at the Empress Hotel, J.
Lins, the proprietor, putting up a
splendid spread for which he is so
famed, having made a reputation In
the Empress Hotel, Victoria, along
that line.
Mr. Mann expressed his surprise
at what he had found at Stewart! it
lining even better than be had expected.
' THE   PRINCE   RUPERT   JOURNAL
Friday, July  29, 1910.
NEWS OF THE PROVINCE
| Items vj General Interest From Centres In British Columbia.
Large  .Mill
Victoria.—A   lumber   mill   with   a
:  laily outpul capacity ul' 250,000
.  is io  lie const ruci ■ ''■  al   Esqui-
nciili   by  an   Eastern   i  inadlan   syndicate of capitalists who have absorbed the i'..  F. Graham  Lumber Co.
Earth Tilting
Nanaimo.—Two of the pendulums
which Mr. Napier Denison of the Vlc-
toii.i Meteorological Office employs
lor obtaining records of earth tilting
have been Installed at Nanaimo. One
has been established on the surface
and the other at a depth of 1,100 feet
below sea level, in one of the Western Fuel Company's mines. Tests
will be made which may have an important bearing on the possibility of
forecasting cave-ins in connection
with mines. It is believed that these
accidents which are often responsible for a heavy loss of human life,
are brought about by the tilting of
the earth which has been demonstrated as a scientific fact of periodical occurence. Experiments with
pendulums which record the earth
tilting are now being carried on In
France with a view to the records
obtained being used as a means for
safeguarding life, by warning the
miners of the possibility of a cave-in
following an earth movement. The
same course will be followed at Nanaimo, the foreman of the mine taking daily readings of the instrument
which will be furnished to Mr. Napier
Denison, and collated by him.
Crow's Nest Payroll
Fernie.—The amount paid out in
wages to the employees of the Crow's
Nest Pass Coal company on Saturday
was $203,400, the largest amount
that has been distributed for some
time. The tonnage from the mines
at Coal Creek and Michel has been
steadily increasing, and in the month
of June these two collieries produced
116,447 tons, which is the record in
the history of the company. When
the money paid out by the three
lumber companies in Fernie is taken
into consideration as well as the
amount distributed through the activity in building operations and the
payrolls of the other industries, it
will readily be seen that the city Is
enjoying a full share of the general
prosperity of the province.
Notch Hill ranch, near Nanoose Bay,
B.C.     The  plant   is   in  cost   in   the
neighborhood  nl'  sin, I,  and   is  io
have a capacity of 25,000 bricks per
day.      Mr.   Wallis   does   not   sell   the
perty.   Inn   gets  a   percentage  on
the materials used.
This plant is lo lie Installed and
worked within six months, and will
work on an immense deposit of clay,
covering more than sixty acres that
lias been prospected to a depth of
thirty lent and found still good.
A granite ledge on the ranch will
be opened up, and a lime plant will
also be established, and being the
same company holding the Cowan
Sravel lagoon will furnish all builders' materials to contractors at Van
couver and at other coast cities. The
Vancouver syndicate will have their
own scows and tugs and will enter
Into the work of furnishing builders
with material on a very extensive
scale. The head office of the company will be at Vancouver,
 o	
Henderson's directory climates
that there are at present In British
Columbia 5,000 Hindus, 16,000 Japanese, 17,000 Chinese, 29,000 Indians, and 280,000 whites.
 o	
KITCHENER IS IDLE
Demand Made in England That He Shall
Be Given Work by War
Office.
Mediterranean   Command   Comes  Up
For Criticism in the House
of Commons
Wants Good Grades
Vancouver.—Chairman J. J. Hill,
of the Great Northern Railway, has
sent word from St. Paul that grades
on the V., V. & E. must be still
further reduced before construction
contracts will be awarded. An engineering party in charge of J. E.
Floyd Is now at work in the Hope
mountains revising the survey.
Grading of the 18-mlle section between Princeton and the Tulameen
river, representing the approach to
the Hope mountains, will be completed in October. There will be a
1,063-foot tunnel west of Princeton,
which will he completed in a, few
months.
Construction work is now In progress on the 13-mile Abbotsford section southeast of Vancouver. There
are six camps, with a force of 350
men, and three steam shovels. Tha
located lines of the V. V. & E. and
the Canadian Northern from Sumaa
to Hope, 36 miles, are on the same
right of way. In some instances, for
miles at a stretch, they are only
about IB feet apart.
Iliick Plant
Nanaimo.—A deal has just been
consummated whereby a Vancouver
syndicate will erect a brick making
plant on some 80 acres of clay lands,
the    property   of  R.   P,  Wallis, of
The position which Lord Kitchener occupies, that of being without an
appointment under the war office,
is the subject of considerable speculation in tbe empire. The London
Express takes up the question and
demands that a post be found for the
distinguished soldier. It says editorially:—
"Once more the question.of Lord
Kitchener's position has been raised
in parliament, and this is the only
way in which the government can be
brought to book. But it is not words
which the nation expects in this matter; it is deeds. The time for talk
has indeed gone by. Words and excuses and apologies and hints cannot make or mar a discreditable situation. Lord Kitchener is the first
and chief of our younger soldiers.
He is more than a successful leader
in the field. He is the man who has
shown a genius for organization and
control, the man whose fame is
world-wide. The great , services
which he has already rendered to the
Empire in war and peace, at home
and abroad, need no recapitulation.
Yet he is unemployed, and has had
no work entrusted to him since he
surrendered the chief command in
India. He was persuaded, with reluctance on his part, to accept the
notorious Mediterranean command.
Strange Office
This was the strange and unfeasible
job Invented by the War Office to
which the Duke of Connaught was
first appointed. But the Duke of
Connaught, a devoted and brilliant
soldier, found that the post was a
sinecure, a position of influence without responsibility, an ornate sham.
He refused to continue to serve In
that capacity, and he signed his position. Then Lord Kitchener was induced to step into the place thus vacated. He never filled It, however;
he never took up the command. Lord
Kitchener also found  that this posi
tion was a sha'ii, and that he could
noi iiii ii with credit to himself and
usefulness to the country. So much
for the Mediterranean command,
which was thus shorn of the sonorous pretences with which Mr. ilal-
dane had surrounded It. Lord Kitchener, however, remains—unemployed. Vet h is beyond any sort o
dispute thai the country has more
need than ever of such services as he
best can render. The Govern men t
has shrunk from appointing Lord
Kitchener as Viceroy in India and
from sending l.im to re-establish
order in Egypt. In doing so the
government has sacrificed to the exigencies o. party politics great opportunities of serving the state. Bill
neither the prime minister nor Mr.
Haldane can doubt that employment
must be found for the great soldier,
and that It must be work worthy of
his genius and of the country's
needs. This is not a matter which
admits of longer delay. The scandal of the government's failure has
already gone too far. The country
is tired of subterfuge and evasion. It
demands employment for Loru Kitchener, and that employment must be
found Immediately."
Mediterranean Command
In the House of Commons this subject came up for discussion. Mr
Haldane plunged at once Into the subject of the Mediterranean command
and the appointment to it of Sir Ian
Hamilton, with the'added dignity of
the title of "Inspector-General of the
Oversea Forces."
"The inspector-general of the
forces of the oversea dominions,"
said Mr. Haldane, "will have to deal
with questions of strategy, training,
and tactics which arise on that great
highway, the Mediterranean.
"The post requires a man of great
distinction in the field, and furthermore a man known to have commanded Canadians, New Zealanders, and
Australians, as well as his own countrymen in the field of battle. This
latter qualification will be an encouragement to those with whom Sir Ian
Hamilton will'liave to come in contact. His duties will occupy a great
deal of his time, and he will have
to deal with questions of strategy,
defence, training and tactics which
arise on the great highway of the
.Mediterranean.
Purely Military Post
"A unified mind will be brought
to work in the matter in a way not
possible in the past.
"At first it was thought that the
post of commander-in-chief in the
Mediterranean might well be combined with that of High Commissioner. But when I spoke with Sir Ian
Hamilton he was the first to suggest
that the opportunity had come for
making this a purely military position. Therefore it. was decided to
abolish the position of high commissioner in the Mediterranean.
"The work he will have to do will
bring Sir Ian Hamilton to London for
a considerable period of the year. He
will sit on the defence committee,
and be in close consultation with the
general staff. For two or three
months of the year he will be in
contact with the troops at Malta,
which will be the point from which
he will discharge those duties. He
will have a great deal of travelling."
EXTENDING   CHURCH
Vast Scheme for Carrying on Work on
Pacific Coast is
Evolved.
Appeal is Being .Made to Friends in
the old Laud to Lend Their
Assistance
HAYNOR BROS.
I House Furnishers.
Located temporarily, since the lire,  g
in  Diineilin  Block, corner of Second   8
H  r-
Avenue   and   Eighth   Street.
■   Some snaps in slightly damaged   goods   which   we  want   to   clear  ■
H   out   before  moving  into  new  quarters in Manson lllk., Third Ave.   jj|-
FUNERAL  FURNISHERS
A French scientist who recently estimated the light and heat of the
sun and stars by a new method, has
presented to the Paris Academy of
Science some Interesting figures concerning the intrinsic luminosity of
those bodies. He shows that the light
of the sun is equal, for each square
centimetre of its surface (there are
about six and a half square centimetres in a square inch), to the combined light of 319,000 standard
candles. But there are other suns
intrinsically much brighter than ours.
Vega and Slrius possess, for each
square centimetre of their surface,
the luminosity of no less than 6,000,-
000  candles.
The Anglican church is showing it-
sell' alive lo ihe needs of Western
Canada and the toresight now being
displayed in a business way by the
leaders in that church should pave
the way lor a wide extension of the
church's work.
The London Chronicle thus describes the latest move by the
church: —
Signed by the Duke of Argyll, the
Bishop of London, the Marquis of
Ncrniauby, Sir Gilbert. Parker, Mr.
W. Burdett-Coutts antl others, an appeal is issued from the Church
House, Westminster, on behalf of the
British Columbia Church Aid Society:—
The Dominion of Canada (runs the
appeal) looms big before men's eyes
today, especially the Prairie provinces of Manitoba, Saskatchewan, and
Alberta, usually called Western Canada. Strenuous efforts are now being made to equip the church In
those parts, that is to say, in the
Dioceses of Rupertsland, Saskatchewan, Qu' Appelle, Calgary, and Athabasca, with the men and money so
Imperatively n«edeu.
"That is all for 'he good," it continues, "but the last word has not
yet been spoken":—
Beyond Western Canada proper,
separated off by the ice-bound wall
of the Rocky Mountains, lies the
great Pacific coast, consisting of the
beautiful province of British Columbia, 375,000 square miles, in extent,
together with the vast Yukon Territory, including Klondike, of 200,000
square miles away to the north. It
is high time that public attention
was called to its urgent needs.
"The strong claims of British Columbia will soon be upon us," writes
Bishop Montgomery, "as the new
railways pierce the Rocky Mountains."
The boom has already commenced,
and many who have set forth ostensibly for the prairie provinces of
Western Canada end in finding their
way to the yet more attractive regions of the Pacific Coast beyond.
The Canadian Pacific railway has
already effected a veritable revolution. The Grand Trunk Pacific and
the Canadian Northern will accomplish no less. ±" » immense fruit
farming, timbe u.u mining districts,
to mention three industries only of
British Columbia, are capable of supporting a far thicker population than
Western Canada proper.
On the prairie the majority of settlers find their way to grain-producing farms, not less than 160 acres in
extent. In British Columbia fruit
farms of ten and even five acres are
often found ample. Climate, scenery, fertility alike point to an overwhelming population in a not distant
future.
The dioceses comprised In this Pacific Coast area are those of Columbia, Caledonia, New Westminster,
Kootenay and Yukon, and the financial needs of the church are great.
We therefore ask for the sum of
£300,000, lo he spread over a period
of fifteen years, or an annual income
of £20,000  during that  time.    Considering the greatness of  the Issues
at  stake,  there ought  to  be  no  difficulty  in   accomplishing  our  object.
Six   Urgent   Needs
With this sum it will be possible;
1.   To enable  the  church   to hold
the fort for the Immediate moment,
wlille the new population is pouring
I
x
■
Blf
Grand Trunk Pr°ific  Steamships
For VANCOUVER, VICTORIA, SEATTLE.
Connecting   with   Kastbound   Trains
"Prince Rupert" sails every Thursday, 8.30 p.m., and after July 25
"Prince  George"   sails  every Monday 8.3d p.m.
FOR STEWART:
"Prince Rupert" sails Wednesd ys 8 p.m., and commencing July 2-4
"Prince George"  sails  Sundays at :i p.m.
Steamer for Port Simpson, Kincolith, and Masset, Sundays, 3 p.m.
For Skldegate,  Queen Charlotte City,   and   other   Moresby Island
points, Wednesday at 3 p.m.
Tickets, reservations and information   from
A. E. McMASTER
Freight and  Passenger Agent, G. T. P. Wharf.
in along the lines of the great rail
ways.
2. To buy sites for church buildings while land is still comparatively
cheap.
3. To establish upon a secure
foundation a college attached to the
Provincial University of British Columbia, now on the eve of being
started, where young men born and
bred on the Pacific coast itself may
be trained for the ministry.
4. To endow all the bishoprics
likely to be needed in our time.
5. To carry on vigorous work
among the Indian population, numbering today upwards of 40,000, and
also among the Chinese and Japanese immigrants, who are very numerous.
6. Ultimately to render these five
dioceses of Columbia, Caledonia New
Westminster, Kootenay, and Yukon
self-supporting, and Independent of
outside help.
Contributions should be forwarded to the treasurers at the society's
office, Church House, Westminster,
S.W., or to the society's bankers,
Messrs. Coutts & Co., 440 Strand,
W. C.
 o	
THE  SINGLE  TAX
Vernon  is  Quite Agitated  Over  the
Question—Arguments Used
The city of Vernon has become
quite stirred up over the question of
the single tax method of raising
revenue. This, as announced In The
Journal a short time ago, was introduced by Mayor Husband as the
method to be employed in the city.
A public meeting was held recently
when the subject was fully discussed.
As the question Is a live one here In
Prince Rupert, the arguments used
in Vernon are interesting.
His Worship made a strong plea
for the adoption of the single tax
plan in connection with municipal
taxation. He said that the council
had power, If they so desired, to
adopt this system at once, but they
realized that it was a matter u< j»r-
reaching importance, and had decided to consult the ratepayers, and
take their advice on the matter. He
admitted that the single tax plan was
not perfect, and objection might be
taken to it on the ground that Improvements should poy for tbe fire
and police protection they received
D'om the city; but no scheme of taxation could be devised that was absolutely faultless, and something
might be said even against this objection. An unimproved lot was only
valuable Mr building purposes. Its
value, apart from what It was worth
for agricultural purposes, was entirely dependent upon Its position, and
the  social  advantages,  schools, civil
conveniences, etc., lent it its value.
It could therefore be claimed that it
even derived part of its value from
fire and police protection. He held
it as an axiom that taxation should
be in proportion to benefits conferred; and be was firmly convinced
that a tax on Improvements could
only be regarded as a direct discouragement to enterprise, investment and home building. The single
tax system had been successfully
tried in many cities, and he believed
would be In general vogue within a
few years. He hoped that Vernon
would also adopt it, and not lag
behind in the march of progress.
His remarks were received with
much applause.
Alderman Glover regretted that he
could not agree with the mayor on
this question. While he.betlevvc »v,
the single tax, hu did not think that
the city was ready for it yet. The
people, he thought, who should pay
most towards fire and police protection were those who go most ben ;fit
therefrom, and whose L.ildlngs were
thus protected. He thought that the
man with a $20,000 building should,
in a i justice, pay more towards
keeping up this irotection than the
man with a vacant lot. The assessment had ot en made undt. the old
condi ions, aid he did not th. ik It
would be fair to now levy a rate of
37 in.lis i the amount calculated as
necessary by 'Mayor Husband) on
land all ie. Such a rate would, he
felt, give the city a "black-eye." He
was in favor, however, of letting oft
improvements as far as possible.
 o	
PURE  WHITE   DIAMOND
Rich Find Reported From Johannesburg in South Africa
A repo.-t has retched Maiden Lane
from Johannesburg, South Africa, of
the finding of another large diamond
In the Premier mine. The gem is
said to w»igh more than 191 ca lis,
and is described as a pure white
stone, absolutely flawless, and measuring two inches long by about
thre -four'hs of an inch thick. »t
tapers in breadth from one and one-
fourth of an inch to three-fourths of
an inch it the smallest end, and Is
valued at ,150,000 uncut. The Premier mine became world-famous in
January, if 05, when the Cullinan
diamond was discovered.
When the Cullinan diamond was
discovered, the gem, the largest ever
found, weighed 3,0 32 carats In the
rough. It was cut into smaller
stones and presented to King Edward by the Transvaal government.
The latesr large diamond to be taken
from the Premier mine probably will
rank also unoiig the world's famous
gems.
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦*♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ ***:'***************^^^ $,
Corner 2nd Avenue and 6th Street Corner 2nd Avenue and 6th Street Corner 2nd Avenue and 6th Street Corner 2nd Avenue and 6th Street     1
•:•
We Are Busy Arranging Our 5c and 10c Tables i
We have sold the bulk of some patterns of Dinner Sets, and we are almost giving the rest away.      Just selling an article for 5c or 10c that may be worth as much as 40c or 50c. %
 IF YOU ARE SHORT OF ANYTHING IN THIS LINE IT WILL PAY YOU TO STOCK UP- $
*
Brica-Brac
This is where we shine. There arc Figures of many kinds, Vases,
in variety, If cdlscent Glass Trays, Cups Mugs, all of which we are
marking down.
REMEMBER
WE   Aliu.
•»£       COMPLETE   HOUSE    FURNISHERS
m
Glassware
We me cutting these on some lines  we  don't  intend  to  carry  and
sonic broken sets.
There are WATER SETS and GOBLETS, andabout 26 lands of TUMBLERS.      We carry so many and sell them so cheap that you can't help but buy when you see them.
WE ARE CUTTING THE CUT GLASS DEPARTMENT.  WE OFFER CUT GLASS AT CUT PRICES
Opposite the Theatre    THE BIG FURNITURE STORE    Opposite the Theatre
f»;. ,*,.;. * ,j, $ $ ►;♦ *;« ♦> $.;«*£* »** .>.;. $ .> * »> * *;■ »> * ♦> $ »> *> $ $ *> ■$• $ # »> •> $ ■ > $ $ •;
• ►*.»;«♦>.;. $ .♦. »•« »♦« .j, ,j« »*„ »j, i|i ,$„ ,$, „♦« »♦, ,g, Friday, July 29, 1910.
PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
NON-MAGNETIC CRAFT
Seafaring men the world over, and
scholars and scientists in the great
educational institutions in this country and abroad are watching with
great interest the preparations for
departure that are being made by
the crew of a curious little vessel now
lying at anchor in the broad harbor
of New York City.
The trim little craft that waves
from passing ferryboats toss lightly
about while muscular stevedores and
brown-skinned sailors carry abroad
cases of supplies, is the sea-going
yacht, the Carnegie. She is known
better to the shipping world and
among marine men as the "non-magnetic" yacht, the only ship of her
kind in existence.
The voyage on which the Carnegie
will embark within the next few
weeks will not be finished for ten
years. Her mission is to enhance the
value of the ship's compass to the
navigator by accomplishing a systematic magnetic survey of the globe.
Marine records show that more
shipwrecks .have been caused by compass erors than by any other cause,
and the fatalities incident to vessels
gaing into waters where the attraction from shore is powerful enough
to influence a ship's compass more
than a mile away, are appalling in
number.
An example of this fearful marine
danger may be found in the waters
surrounding the Madeiras and the
Bermuda Islands. Because of their
volcanic origin, these islands are covered with great deposits of magnetic
iron ore. As a vessel approaches thei.e
shores the compass needle shifts its
position In answer to the attraction
of the mineral deposits, and before
seamen learned to allow for this attraction in shaping their course, hundreds of lives were lost by ships being steered on the rock reefs by their
captains.
It is the conlention of the department of terrestrial magnetism of the
Carnegie Institute that a ship, in the
construction of which iron has been
used, exerts* just as much influence
over the compass aboard her as do
shore attractions. To prove this
theory, and tc gather data concerning it, iht yacl.  Carnegie was built.
The Carnegie is a wooden sailing
vessel, brigantine ilgged, carrying
12,900 square feet of sail. Her dimensions are: Length over all, 155
feet 6 Inches; length on water line,
128 feet 4 Inches; beam, 33 feet;
depth of hold, 12 feet 7 Inches; displacement with stores and equipment
aboard, 568 tons, and tonnage, 246.
The materials used throughout her
construction are white oak, yellow
pine, Oregon pine and teak, and the
fastenings are locust tree nails, copper and Tobin bronze bolts and composition  spikes.
The four anchor chains aie of manganese bronze, their total weight being 5,500 pounds. Instead of anchor
chains, there are three 11-inch hemp
cables, each 120 fathoms in length.
While the Carnegie was designed
as a sailing vessel, a new magnetic
auxiliary propulsion plant of about
150 horse-power has been Installed,
which is the first producer-gas engine of the size ever employed on a
sea-going craft.
With twenty-five tons of coal, representing a cost of about $100, the
Carnegie has a cruising radius under
her auxiliary power alone of 2,000
nautical miles, at a speed of six knots
or seven statute miles, making the
average cost for coal per day about
$7, and the run in calm weather 144
knots, as 165 statute miles.
In every particular the idea of
making the Carnegie non-magnetic
has been carried out. The auxiliary
engine is built of non-magnetic
metals, the gallery cooking ranges
are of special design, and constructed of bronze and copper. The cutlery, knives, forks and spoons are of
Mexican silver and the sailors
sheath knives are of non-magnetic
manganese steel. Everything that
was used in the construction of the
boat was subjected to a rigid test
before it was allowed to be used.
Not an ounce of material aboard has
any effect oil  the compass needle.
The Carnegie made its first trip
August 21, 1909, and after a trip of
8,000 miles returned to New York
within six mouths. Within that time
errors of importance in the best
charts now available were disclosed
and the the Carnegie's results are
accepted as correct by the leading
hydrographlc offcers of the world.
For the past ten years the existence of these errors has been more
or less suspected, but in spite of
thousands of observations on vessels
of Iron construction they could not
be verified. Between Madeira and
Bermuda it was found that American charts showed errors of several
degrees.
The Carnegie's next mission is In
ternational. Dr. L. A. Bauer, director of the department of research In
terrestrial magnetism at the Carnegie
Institute has been placed in charge
of the curious vessel and will direct
the voyage.
William J. Peters, who represented the National Geographical Society
on the second Ziegler polar expedition, will command the boat. Mr.
Bauer purposes mapping out the
magnetic forces as they now prevail
over the ocean for the good of all
countries.
On her magnetic survey the Carnegie will find the areas of magnetic
attraction and make known their effects for the guidance of mariners.
It will take ten years to complete the
journey around the earth that Is contemplated and the leading hydro-
graphic officers here and abroad are
eager for the result of the cruise.
The earth, by its magnetic power,
will direct Mr. Bauer's course unfailingly, and he will be able to navigate his craft with confidence, knowing that not a scrap of anything
aboard can alter the direction of the
needle of the compass that guides
him.
The crew of the Carnegie is a
picked body of men, every one an
able seaman. They are alive to the
importance scientifically of the trip
they are about to set forth on, and
have helped in insuring the vessel
freedom from magnetic influence by
casting aside their pocket knives,
razors, etc.
No definite date has been set for
the embarking of the Carnegie, but
it Is expected she will set sail some
time during July.
. o	
LOCATION OP THE
FIRE   ALARM BOXES
Skeena Land District—District ot
TAKE NOTICE that Brenton
Brown, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation insurance agent, intends to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands In the vi-
vlnity of the Kitwancool or Chean
Wein Valley:—Commencing at a
post planted at the north-east corner and about ten miles distant in
a north-westerly direction from the
north end of Kltwancool Lake,
thence south 80 chains, thence east
80 chains, thence north 80 chains,
thence west 80 chains to point of
commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
BRENTON BROWN.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 1, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Jessie Stead-
man, of Victoria, B. C, occupation
married woman, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following described lands, in the vicinity of
Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-east corner and about 6 Vi
miles distant in a north-westerly direction from the north end of Kitwancool Lake, thence south 80
chains; thence west 80 chains, thence
north 80 chains, thence east 80
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 640 acres, more or
less. JESSIE STEADMAN.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated  May 31,  1910. Jy8
No. 1.—Fifth street and Third avenue.
No. 2.—Sixth street and Third avenue.
No. 3.—Seventh street and Third
avenue.
No.   4.—Eighth     street   and    Third
avenue.
No. 5.—Junction of First and Second avenues.
No.  6.—Dominion  Hotel.
No. 7.—Eighth street and Second
avenue.
No. 8.—Seventh street and Second
avenue.
No. 9.—Sixth street and Second
avenue.
No. 10.—Centre street and First
avenue.
No. 11.—G. T. P. dock.
No. 12.—Front of the Government
building.
No. 13.—Second street and Second
avenue.
No. 14.—First    avenue   and    Mr.
Bride street.
No. 15.—Third avenue and McBride street.
No. 16—Fulton Hotel.
The Wesieyan Methodist body has
decided to admit women to participate in the annual conference. The
principle was adopted at the conference of 1909 and the matter was subsequently submitted to the district
synods, 24 of which aproved and 10
disapproved. The conference now in
session at Bradford, discussed yesterday and after prolonged debate,
confirmed the proposal on I vots of
179 to 153.
LAND PURCHASE NOTICES
LAND PURCHASE NOTICE
Skeena Land District—District of
PftRfiiiir
TAKE NOTICE that John Cherry,
of Victoria, B. C, occupation mattress maker, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands In the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Weln Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-east corner and about 14 miles
distant In a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence west 80 chains, thence
south 80 chains, thence east 80
chains, thence north 80 chains to
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
JOHN CHERRY.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 3, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassia
TAKE NOTICE that Bruce Older-
shaw, of Victoria, B. C, occupation
jeweller, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of the
Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at
he north-west corner and about 7%
miles distant in a north-westerly direction from the north end of Kitwancool Lake; thence south 80
chains, thence east 40 chains, thence
north 80 chains, thence west 40
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 320 acres, more or
less. BRUCE OLDERSHAW.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated  May 31,  1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Echo Dudgeon, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
assistant dentist, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of the
Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley.:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-east corner and about 7 %
miles distant in a north-westerly direction from the north end of Kitwancool Lake, thence south 80
chains, thence north 80 chains,
thence east 80 chains to point of
commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
ECHO DUDGEON,
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated May 31, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE    NOTICE       that    William
Hume Grant, of Stewart, B.C., occupation engineer, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described  lands:—Commencing at  a
post marked W.H.G.'s S.W. Cor., and
planted   adjoining    Alfred   .Malison's
corner post, thence 80 chains north, j
along  VV.  N,   Harrison's   west    line, i
tliense east  80  chains,  thence south
80 chains, thence west 80 chains, fol-'
lowing Alfred Malison's north line to j
point of commencement,   and    containing 640 acres, more or less.
WILLIAM   HUME GRANT.
Frank  R.  Strolm, Agent.
Dated July 2, 1910. Jy22
Skeena Land District—District of
PiiR^iRr
TAKE NOTICE that William
Simpson, of Lindsay, Ont., occupation hotel-keeper, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of the Kitwancool or Chean Wein
Valley:—Commencing at a post
planted at the south-east corner and
about 7% miles distant in a north
westerly direction from the north
end of Kitwancool Lake, thence
north 80 chains, thence west 80
chains, thence south 80 chains,
thence east 80 chains to point of
commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
WILLIAM SIMPSON.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated  May  31,  1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that The Canadian
Fish and Cold Storage Company, of
Vancouver, B. C, occupation mercantile and manufacturing, intends
to apply for permission to purchase
the following described lands: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-east corner of lot 34, Range 5,
Coast District, thence south 20
chains, thence east 40 chains, thence
north 25 chains more or less to the
shore line, thence following along
the shore line to the point of commencement and containing 90 acres,
more or less.
The Canadian   Fish  &  Cold
Storage Company Limited.
J. H. Plllsbury, Agent.
.    Dated July 14, 1910. Jyl9
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that George Tutt,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation den-
ist, intends to apply for permission
o purchase the following described
unds in tlie vicinity of the Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—Commencing at a post planted al the
north-oast corner and about 8 %
miles distant in a north-westerly decoction from the north end of Kilwancool Lake, thence south 40
chains, thence west 40 chains, thence
north 4 0 chains, thence east 4 0
chains to point of commencement,
and containing Gil) acre's, more or
less. GEORGE TUTT.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 1, 1910. JyS
Skeena Land  District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Lome Thompson, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
dentist, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands ip the vicinity of the
Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:
Commencing at a post planted at the
south-west corner and about 8 %
miles distant in a north-westerly direction from the north end of Kitwancool Lake, thence north SO
chains, thence east 4 0 chains, thence
south 80 chains, thence west 40
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 320 acres, more or
less. I.OItNE THOMPSON.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 1,  1910. JyS
LAND PURCHASE NOTICES
Skeena Land District—District of
(' 'i ssi iir
TAKE NOTICE that Sarah Ward,
of Victoria, B. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. E. corner and about 22 milec distant In a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kltwancool
Lake, thence north 80 chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence south 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or ;ess.
SARAH WARD.
James W. Smith, Agenl.
Dated June 6th, 1910 JyS
Skeena Land District—District of
Ojissiiir
TAKE NOTICE that George Mc-
Bain, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
merchant, intends to apply for per-
m'sslon to purchase the following described lands In the vicinity of Kltwancool or Chean Weln Valley: —
Commencing at a poBt planted at the
S. W. corner and about 26 % miles
distant In a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north 80 chains, thence
east 80 chains, thence south 80
chains, thence west 80 chains to
point of commencement, and containing C40 acres, more or less.
GEORGE  McBAIN.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 8th, 1910. ,Ty8
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Catherine
Welsh, of Vancouve,, li. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands in the vi-
vinity of Kitwancool or Chean Weln
Valley:—Commencing at a post
planted at the S. E. corner and about
17% miles distant in a north-westerly direction from the north end of
Kitwancool Lake, thence north 80
chains, thence west 80 chains, thence
south 80 chains, thence east 80
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 640 acres, more or
less. CATHERINE  WELSH.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 4, 1910. Jy8
LAND PURCHASE NOTICES
LAM) PURCHASE NOTICES
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Frederick
Tutt, of Selkirk, Manitoba, occupation merchant, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley :•—
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. W. corner about 14% miles distant In a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kltwancool
Lake, thence north 40 chains, thence
east 40 chains, thence south 40
chalnB, thence west 40 chains to
point of commencement, and containing 160 acres, more or less.
FREDERICK   TUTT.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 3, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
(*3RRlnT
TAKE NOTICE that Henry Van
Wyck, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation hotel keeper, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described landB in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Weln
Valley:-—Commencing at a post
planted at the north-east corner and
about 20 miles distant in a northwesterly direction from the north end
of Kitwancool Lake, thence south 80
chains, thence west 80 chains, thence
north 80 chains, thence east 80
chains to point of commencement,
and containing G40 acres, more or
less. HENRY VAN WYCK.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated  June  6th,   1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
|*0 t;cj j -i I*
TAKE NOTICE that Minnie Clarke
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. W. corner and about 28% miles
distant and in a north-westerly direction from the north end of Kitwancool Lake, thence south 40 chains
thence east 80 chains, thence north
40 chains, thence west 80 chains to
point of commencement and containing  320  acres,  more or less.
MINNIE  CLARKE.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated  June  8th,   1910. Jy8
m
JOB PRINTING
LETTER HEADS ENVELOPES
BUSINESS CARDS
VISITING CARDS      STATEMENTS
m
Prince Rupert Journal
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Edward CaB-
pell, of Cayley, Alberta, occupation
merchant, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of the
Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. W. corner and distant about 15%
miles in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence south 80 chains, thence
east 80 chains, thence north 80
chains, thence west 80 chains to
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
EDWARD CASPELL.
James W.  Smith, Agent.
■   Dated June 3, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Charles Gei-
ger, of Victoria, b. C, occupation
clerk, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Comemncing at a post planted at the
S. E. corner and about 19 miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the'north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north 80 chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence south 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
CHARLES GIEGER.
James W.  Smith, Agent.
Dated June 4th, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Samuel John
McDiarmid, of Monarch, Alberta, occupation farmer, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following described lands in the Kitwan
cool or Chean Wein Valley:—Commencing at a post planted at the N.
E. corner and about 4 % miles in a
north-westerly direction from the
north end of Kitwancool Lake
thence south 80 chains, thence west
SO chains, thence north SO chains,
thence east 80 chains to point of
commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
SAMUEL JOHN McDIARMID.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated May 31st, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that John Grieve,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
agent, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands In the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wien Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. E. corner and about 20 nji'es distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north 80 chains, thence
west SO chains, thence south 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to
point of comemncement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
JOHN GRIEVE.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 6th, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
C&ssl<ir
TAKE NOTICE that Lelhi Cherry,
of Victoria, B. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands In the vicinity of Kltwancool or Chean Weln Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at tne
S. E. corner and about 21 miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north SO chains, thence
west SO chains, thence south 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 040 acres, more or less.
LEII1I   CHERRY.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 6th, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE mat Alfred E.
Partington, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation broker, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of
Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—•
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. E. corner and about 15% miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north 80 chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence south 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
ALFRED E.  PARKINGTON.
James W. Smith, Agent
Dated June 3, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that George Williams, of Winnipeg, man., occupation
clerk, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands in the vicinity of Kltwancool
or Chean Wein Valley:—Commencing at a post planted at the S. W.
corner and about 16% miles distant
in a north-westerly direction from
the north end of Kitwancool Lake,
thence north 40 chains, thence
east 40 chains, thence south 40
chains, thence west 40 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 160 acres, more or less.
GEORGE WILLIAMS.
James  W.  Smith, Agent.
Dated June 4, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Sarah Cox,
of Monarch, Alberta, occupation married woman, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands In the Kilwancool or
Chean Wien Valley:—Commencing at
a post planted at the N. W. corner
and about 4 % miles distant In a
north-westerly direction from the
north end of Kltwancool Lake, thence
south 80 chains, thence east 80
chains, thence north 80 chains,
thence west SO chains lo point of
lommencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
SARAH COX.
James W. Smith, Agent
Dated May 31st, 1910.
Coast Land  District—District of
Skeena.
TAKE NOTICE that I, George A.
Poole, of Prince Rupert, occupation
printer, intend to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted on the north-east shore
line of Smith Island, distant about
one mile south-east from Lot 3S, and
marked "G. A. P.'s North-west Corner Post," thence 20 chains south,
thence 80 chains east, thence north
to shore line, thence following shore
line to point of commencement, containing 160 acres, more or less.
GEORGE  ARTHUR  POOLE.
Dated Saturday, July 2, 1910.
(First insertion July  !>.)
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that John Reid,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
broker, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. W. corner and about 15% miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north 40 chains, thence
east 40 chains, thence south 40
chains, thence west 4 0 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing  160  acres,  more or  less.
JOHN  REID.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated  June  3,   1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiki.
TAKE NOTICE that Thomas Sills,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation machinist, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands.in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. W. corner and about 26% miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence south SO chains, thence
east 80 chains, thence north 80
chains, thence west 80 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 64 0 acres, more or less.
THOMAS SILLS.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 8th, 1910. Jy8
" Skeena  Land   District     District  of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that William Wallace,   of  Toronto,   Ont.,     occupation
insurance agent, Intends to apply for j
[permission to purchase tin  following
dlBcrlbed lands In the vI.V tit/ of Kitwancool   or   Chean   Wein   Valh \
Comencing al a post  planted al  the
N.   E.  corner  ami  aliciui   26%   miles
distant In a north-westerly dlroc: on
I from   the   north   end   nf   Kitwancool
1 Lake, thence south 80 chains, thence
west    so chains,    thence    north  80
chains, thence easl su chains to the
[point  of commencement, containing
640  acres,   more  or  less.
WILLIAM   WALLACE.
James W. Smith, Agent, j
Hale,I   .Tune   Mil,    1910. ,IyS
Skeena   Land   District     District  of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Annie Cowan,]
of Victoria, B, C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of Kltwancool or Chean Weln Vnlley: —
Commencng at a post pjanted at the
X. W. corner and about 23 miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kltwancool
Lake; thence soulli SO chains, thence
east SO chains, thence north 80
chains, thence west SO chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 040 acres, more or less.
ANNIE GOWAN,
.lames  W. Smith, Agent,
Dated June 7th, 1010. Jy8
Skeena Land  District--District of
TAKE NOTICE that Grace Cess-
ford, of Victoria, B. C, occupation
married woman, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of
Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—•
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. E. corner and about 23 miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kltwancool
Lake, thence south 80 chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence north 80
chains, thence east RO chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 040 acres,  more or less.
GRACE CESSFORD.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 6th, 1910. JyS
Skeena  Land   District-    District  of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE thai Henry Hemming, of Victoria, 11. ('., occupation
hotel keeper, Intends 'n snnly for
permission lo purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of Kltwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing al b posl planted at the
N. I-;, corner and al t -1  miles dls-
tant, in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kltwancool
Lake, thence south mi chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence north so
chains, thence east 80 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less,
HENRY   HEMMING.
James  W.  Smith, Agent.
Dated June 6th,  1910, Jy8
Skeena Land Dlstriel    District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Nelson
tlciwen. of Victoria, B. C, occupa-
tion mining engineer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands In the vicinity of Kilwancool or Chean Weln
Valley:- -Commencing at a post
plained at the N. E. corner and about
19 miles distant in the north-westerly direction from the north end of
Kltwancool Lake then"c south 80
chains, thence west 4 0 chalnB, thence
north 4n chains, thence west 40
chains, thence north 40 chains,
thence east SO chains to point of
commencement, and containing 480
acres, more or less.
NELSON   GOWEN.
.lames  W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 4th,   1910. Jy8 PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Friday, July 29, 1910.
prince isupcrt journal
PIGHTIXC WHITE  PLAGUE
Published twice a week on Tuesdays
and Fridays from the office oi publication. Third Avenue near McBride Si.
Situation   is
. list ressiiifi
Serious  in
Condition
Old  Land—
Met  With
Subscription rate to any point in
Canada, $2.0(1 a year; to points outside
of c !anada. 83.00 u year.
Advertising rate furnished on appli-
cat ion.
0, II. NELaON,
•*SE»»- Editor,
Friday, July  29,  1910.
PROMISING FOR CITY
Ml pver the United Kingdom the
campaign against consumption is be-
I Ing carried out with as much vigor as
circumstances and funds will permit,
lout every now and again pitiful
stories of the results of the dire
scourge arc brought  to light in the
i courts.    One most pathetic case was
I told at Erith the other day.   .
A little girl had  been  fcund with
her throat cut, and her father con-
 , fessed that he bad been laid up with
A despatch dated from Vancouver consumption, and, in sheer terror
recently contains information that!that he might die and leave his
assures residents of this city of rich j daughter    a    victim    to    the   white
returns wlien this becomes the fishing centre of the Pacific coast. The
despatch says:—
"Owing to a shortage of ice, cars,
and boxes, matters at the New England Fish Company's dock are congested, and one result has been the
despatch of the steamer New England lo Tacoma to discharge her 200,-
000 pounds of halibut which she
brought in. Since Sunday the steamers Flamingo, Celestial Empire and
.Manhattan have discharged I big
catches, and when the New England
arrived .t was considered advisable
to send the fish to Tacoma."
The halibut referred to which
supplied the warehouses of the New
England Fish Company and also
formed the shipments sent on to Tacoma, were all caught within the
radius that will be tributary to Prince
Rupert.
Immense works and many of them
will be required here to handle the
fishing trade which awaits development within a few miles radius of
the city. Seattle, Tacoma and Vancouver are today in so far as the
fishing industry is concerned supplied from the banks that will be
handled here.
THE TELEPHONE CHARGE
Aid.
Pattullo Again  Takes Occasion
to Deny Insinuations
At Tuesday evening's meeting of
the city council, Aid. Pattullo, speaking on a matter of privilege, took
occasion to refer to an editorial in
the Empire in which the awarding
of the contract for municipal advertising to the Journal was dealt with.
Aid. Pattullo said he did not concern himself with the arguments used
in it except with respect to the assertion that the Empire's position
on the telephone question had deprived It of the advertising. Aid.
Pattullo said he believed in the fullest freedom being accorded the press.
He did protest however against anyone taking refuge behind that liberty
that was given the press to make
charges that were utterly untrue.
He would not mince matters, but
would say that the man who wrote
that is a liar. The alderman said
he had taken occasion before to contradict this baseless charge levelled
at the heads of aldermen that they
were interested in not seeing the
telephone bylaw passed. The editor
of the Empire, without any proof,
kept reiterating this with the object
in view of creating a wrong impression with the public.
He did not believe in men hiding
behind the liberty of the press to
vent their personal spleen and spite.
Aid. Lynch said that insofar as
the stock of the telephone company
was held in the council there were
no more zealous workers for the
passage of that bylaw than those
members. There had never been a
thought on the part of any of those
members of the council to form a
company and take this over. There
could he no connection between the
calling of tenders for the printing
and  this question.
Aid. Mobley said that when he
gave his voice to the advertising it
was purely as a business matter. He
did not feel hurt personally with
what was said. When he voted for
the printing as he did, he had no
thought of retaliation towar's the
Empire.
Aid. Naden said he was glad this
matter runic up now. If a newspaper
made a charge against a man that
was true It was best not to deal with
It. If the charge were untrue it was
not worth while to touch It.
Aid. Pattullo said that while he did
not care anything about the charge
made, yet It was calculated to poison
the minds of the public and he did
not propose to allow charges like this
to go unchallenged.
The subject was then dropped.
 o	
According to the Lisbon papers a
group of British capitalists has obtained an important concession in
Mosnamcdes, Portuguese Africa, rich
in minerals, rubber, Ivory and agricultural produce. Four hundred
free Boer families who abandoned the
Transvaal at the time of the war, still
remain In this territory.
scourge behind hi n lie made himself
a murderer.
"She appeared to be going the
same way, so I thoi ght I would put
her out. of her misery.'.'
The most pathetic part of the
story wal told when the body of the
child was examined; the doctor found
her to be absolutely healthy and free
from any trace of tuberculosis. The
unhappy father is now in the prison
hospital dying, more from a broken
heart than from consumption.
While in its campaign against consumption the National Association
for the Prevention of Consumption
is doing notable work, it has been,
owing to the lack of funds, somewhat hampered in its beneficent activities. A special appeal committee, of which Lord Derby is chairman,
has just issued an appeal to the public lor support to the national association in order that a comprehensive
educational crusade may be carried
on.
In the course of this appeal it is
pointed out that "in the United
Kingdom there are at present from
350,000 to 400,000 persons suffering
from tuberculosis, 60,000 die annually from consumption and 30,000 from
other forms of tuberculosis. One person out of every ten dies of consumption.
"Poor law institutions are spending annually $7,500,000 on the relief of consumption. Friendly societies spend yearly $6,750,000, and
charitable institutions $2,500,000 on
the same object. The working classes of the United Kingdom are losing
$15,000,000 a year in wages in consequences of illness due to consumption. The direct loss to the country
cannot be less than $15,000,000,
while the total direct and indirect
loss cannot be less than $40,000,000
a year. It would be cheaper to the
individual, as well as to the state, to
prevent the spread and continuance
of this disease, which Is not hereditary but Is Infectious. It is necessary to educate the public to make it
realize the extent and nature of this
disease and also that It can be prevented. At least $25,000 annually is
required to do this efficiently.
"There is no public demand for action, because the public does not
know what the disease means, it is
not conscious of the terrible losses in
life and money and has not grasped
the fact that consumption and other
forms of tuberculosis can-be stamped out."
Published Twice  a  Week
Third Avenue and McBride St.
In the development of a- city or a district the newspaper plays a most important part. The Journal is prepared to take its full share in building up Prince Rupert
and giving pub'icity to the resources and riches of the country which is being opened
up by the G. T. P., and of which the city must be the great distributing centre. As a
means tc th's end a special offer is made:
Prince Rupert
.. Journal..
Advertisers
will find the Journal
the best publicity medium in the new B. C.
All eyes are at present
turned towards this
part of the Province.
Keep your business before the public by advertising in the Journal. It will bring you
quick returns
$1.50
Per     Year
Yon Can Aid
Do you wish to keep
some friends informed
as to the development
of Prince Rupert?
Place their names on
the mailing list of the
Journal at the low subscription rate and keep
them interested i n
Canada's greatest port
on the Pacific.
During July a special rate of $1.50 for the year will be charged for the Journal.
Subscriptions must be received at the office of publication before July 30, in order that
advantage may be taken of this offer. This rate is applicable to subscribers outside
of Prince Rupert as well as residents of the city.    Remember this is only for July.
Subscribe early and take advantage of the low rate.
•;•:-.•;,;■
London schools have 583,255
school sittings, New York 689,959;
not all occupied In either case. London has 5.038 men teachers and 12,-
431 women, to 2,740 men and 15,651
women in New York. As these latter
figures apparently include some duplication in evening schools, London's
teaching force is proportionately
much stronger, especially in men.
The smaller number of pupils in London means*partly that more of the
children of the moderately well-to-do
attend private schools, partly that
the children of the London poor
leave school for work at an earlier
average age. Though the New York
system is bigger, It is behind London
in some respects. That city has four
open air schools for mentally defective children, who are apparently already well looked after, as they
should be in every city.
 o	
•j. .*f .j. .j. .j..;. .j.,;. »j« *j. »j»»;, ,j. <j. *;. .*. .j* .j* ,j. .j.... ,j.... .*.......
* *
|        What Europe Pays        %
Not long ago Wllbelm II of Germany objected to the Anglican "civil
list" as descriptive of his allowance
from the nation. Sardonic Germans
sneered. "Zivilllste," they said, taking the German form, "It sounds too
much like Zu vlel Hate" which means
"too much list." Thereby the sardonic Germans rightly laughed at
one of the weakest sides of monarch-
ism. For everywhere, from Lisbon
to St. Petersburg, Europe's hard-up
four hundred millions must pay
through the nose for the glitter and
glory of kingship. Altogether the
sovereigns of Europe get about $33,
000,000 a year, not counting their
private property. Most of them say
they are hard-up; and the great majority of their subjects say the same
The civil list system rightly limits
a monarch's gold-hunger and in that
respect is an improvement upon what
went before. Formerly kings took
from the treasury what they wanted.
"Look at this mighty kingdom;
everything in it is yours," said the
Duke of Villeroy to Louis XV of
France. When the idealist Emperor
Joseph II of Austria first declared
that "a king's duty Ib to accept moderate pay for immoderate work"," his
brother sovereigns looked upon him
as revolutionary. Until two years
ago the Sultan Abdul Hamid .practised the Villeroy theory; and it was
only lately that his successor, Mohammed V, was cut down to a miserable $100,OuO, thereby nearly returning to the state of his mighty ancestor Othman, of whom, a historian
said "he had only seven shirts.
Today the monarch who gets the
most and does the least to earn it, is
Nicholas II. A close copyist of Abdul
Hamid in his methods of rule, the
czar takes almost exactly the sum
which Abdul Hamid took. The Russian budget puts it as 16,359,595
roubles, or $U,179,797. It is typical
of Russia that this $8,179,797 stands
first of all items In the expenditure
side of the budget, as if to imply
that the cznr must get his money,
whoever else goes short. In addition
to this civil list, Nicholas II has various lands, foiests, mines and factories, managed by the imperial cabinet, which bring him In about
$3,000,000 yearly, and If honestly
and wisely managed would bring in
at least $10,000,000.
Out of his total official and private
income of about $11,000,000, Nicholas is supposed to support seventeen
of his grand ducal relatives, but
most of these have large estates and
get little from the czar. The czar also
supports tthe St. Petersburg Academy
of Art and makes good the deficit on
the working of the imperial theatres.
On the St. Petersburg ballet there ts
a loss of $100,000 a year. But these
expenses are trifles. What the czar
does with the rest of bis enormous
wealth is now known.
The Winter palace at St. Peters
burg, the great Alexander palace at
Tsarskoe Selo, and the big rococo
Peterhof palace are all uninhabited,
and in the hands of a few dozen caretakers. All of these palaces lie on
the public road exposed to bomb-
throwing, so the hermit czar spends
winter and summer in small, uncomfortable chalets hidden away In
private parks, where he keeps up less
state than the poorest of the grand
dukes. The admiralty must pay for
his yacht, the ministry of communications for his rarely-used train, and
the ministry of the interior for the
horde of policemen, spies and agents
provocateur who surround him.   As
contributor to charities and Patron of
art the czar pays no role; the so-
called "imperial charities" are financed with'practically.-farced subscriptions from richijnerehapts.
The czar spends some money on
the supoprt of the notorious' Union
of. Russian Men, whose function is
to'flgh't'the reform movement, to put
inconvenient politicians out of the
way, and tojptrry out periodical massacres of Jews. His thrift goes to
the'length,!pi; unconscious humor.
L"atefy!'' th$, St, Petersburg official
newspa'per ,?.Ross(y,a printed the following paragraph in all seriousness:
"The czar.has been pleased to give
$12 to Policeman Skvortseff, who
lost his arm in a fight with terrorists. His imajesty ordered the $12
to be paid oui,,.of.state,funds. '
It is a flies nne.in Europe that
the poorer the people the more they
must pay their ruler. That is why
Russia stands first and why Austria-
Hungary comes second, and pays its
sovereign more than rich Germany
pays hers. The Emperor Franz
Josef receives $4,833,300 yearly.
Half is paid to him by Hungary as
king and half by Austria as emperor.
Out of this he supports thirty archdukes, archduchesses and other relations, and he supports them liberally.
He is a hard-up monarch and spends
a third of his wealth In charity, mostly in rigidly Roman Catholic charity.
On himself he spends hardly anything. He lives plainly and occupies
only one side of an ill-paved courtyard In the colossal Hofburg at Vienna; and any morning he may he seen
driving down the Ringstrasse in a
victoria, drawn by an indifferent
horse. He lives thus because he is
a tired and wise old man, thoroughly sick of the pomps and vanities of
existence.
Kaiser WUhelm II is another hard-
up monarch. Like most of his ancestors and nearly all the German
princes of history, he Is a spendthrift. As German emperor he gets
no salry^ but he Is allowed $750,000
a year for "representation." As
king of Prussia, Wllbelm II, he gets
$3,923,824 a year. Of this sum he
gets $1,923,824 under the law *>f
17th of January, 1820, which gave
his then predecessor a civil list In
exchange for large estates which he
handed over to the nation. In 1859
the Prussian sovereign demanded and
got a rise of $375,000 a year; in
1868, he got a further rise of $750,-
000 a year; and, finally, when the
present kaiser came to the throne
he got a list rise of $875,000—in all
rises amounting to $2,000,000 a year.
These rises, and the original $1,923,-
824, make up his present official income.
That is only part of the "Too Much
List." The kaiser and his relatives
also receive large incomes from estate and family trusts. Some trusts
date to the seventeenth century.
These were founded by the great
elector. The income is received today.
In 1733 Friedrich Wilhelm I founded a home trust. The skinflint Freid-
rich Wilhelm II left behind him a
crown treasure of $3,150,000 which
is still in existence. Half is called
the "Notpfenning" or "Emergency
Penny," and must not be touched except under extreme circumstances.
This thrifty king also left a large
sum in trust for younger sons of
HoheRzollern blood. So that the total
incomes of Wilhelm II and his relations from all sources is not far short
or $6,000,000.
Fingering this pretty sum, Wilhelm II must feel like Warren Hastings when he was asked to help himself to the treasures of India. He
must be "surprised at his own moderation," for his ancestors required
twice as much. Friedrich Wilhelm
II, the Fat of Prussia, would not
spend a penny of his own fortune, but
in fifteen years took $140,000,000
from the public for his court,
mistresses and favorites. Friedrich
vVilhelm IV was at the same game
when his antics were checked by the
1848 revolution. The petty German
monarchs of the past were even
greedier, and did not shrink at hiring their soldiers to foreign rulers
and pocketing the proceeds. In comparison with these men Wilhelm II
may feel a virtuous, moderate man,
and con honestly complain that he is
underpaid.
Even today the other German sovereigns get much larger salaries in
proportion to the population which
pay them. The mad king of Bavaria
draws $1,350,770. .The king of
Saxony, who lately boasted, "I am
a soldier and eat black bread and
onions," gets $880,000; the king or
Wurtemberg is allowed $504,700 and
has separate subsidies for his poor
relations. There are twenty-two
other sovereign states in the German
empire, and the rulers of all, except
three free cities, have palaces, poor
relations, over-masters-of-ceremony,
bodyguards, court painters and poets
and French cooks. The Prince of
Reuss has no civil list. Another distinguished exception is Prince Adolph
of Schaumburg-Lippe, who reigns
over a state about the size of Greater
New York. In theory he Is the
kaiser's equal and ally. Prince
Adolph not only has no civil list, but
pays $62,500 a year out of his own
private pocket to help pay the state
finances.
Altogether Germany's sovereigns
draw $9,250,000 a year in salaries
The big states pay relatively least.
Prussia pays its king only twenty-
five cents a head, whereas Schwarz-
bourg-Sonderhausen pays its prince
$1.75 a head.
The king of Italy comes behind the
kaiser. His civil list is $3,200,000.
Next comes the late King Edward
VII. He was the hardest up of all
the monarchs, and the worst paid,
considering his subjects' wealth. He
got $2,300,000 for himself and $590,-
000 allowance for his relations. His
civil list, like the kaiser's, represented the value of properties surrendered to the state. King George's civil,
list is yet to be fixed by parliament,
but It probably will be about the
same as his father's. The king of
Spain is still worse off. His Income
is $1,850,000. The rest of Europe's
sovereigns fall into the pauper class:
King of Belgians $875,000
King of Portugal      600,000
King   of  Holland    525,000
King of Sweden     367,000
King  of  Denmark   345,000
King of Norway      163,500
Norway Is the most democratic
state In Europe, and being a new
state, it did away with the principle
if highly paid kingship. Even the
French republic has to allow its
president $240,000 a year, but half
of this Is for travelling expenses and
for entertainments. That the Norwegians and French have a right to
be thrifty Is shown by the history
of civil lists. The original meaning
of civil list was a budget out of
which the sovereign in addition to
supporting himself had to pay large
numbers of civil officials. When the
number of officials grew too great
the kings got rid of the responsibility
of paying them, but kept the money
for themselves. Hence the present
civil lists of Europe have no historical justification, and urgently need
a drastic cutting down.
The cutting down is difficult. Every
state has its own way of fixing the
sovereign's allowance. In Norway it
must be voted from year to year by
parliament. In Austria it Is fixed for
successive terms of ten years. In
Holland, Spain, Saxony and Wurt-
temberg, the sovereign's income Is
fixed on his acecsslon to the throne
and remains unaltered until his
death. In Prussia it Is determined
by a special law, which remains In
force for an Indefinite term, unless
legislatively amended. Of all the
monarchs, the czar, who has the largest civil list, has it best defended
against thrifty democrats. When he
issued his constitution in the shape
of fundamental laws, he laid It down
that the duma could not question his
$8,179,797, and that any change In
the amount could only be accomplished on his own initiative.
nHMMMMMMnMBHMMMMBHIl     ■ .. A
Friday, July 29,  1910.
PRINCE  RUPERT JOURNAL
—THE-
Oliver
Typewriter
—FOR—
Seventeen Cents a Day
Please read the headline over
again. Then its tremendous significance will dawn upon you.
An Oliver Typewriter—the standard visible writer—the most highly
perfected typewriter on the market
—yours for 17 cents a day!
The typewriter whose conquest of
the commercial world is a matter of
business, history—yours for 17 cents
a day!
The typewriter that is equipped
with scores of such conveniences as
"The Balance Shift"—"The Ruling
Device"—"The Double Release"—
"The Locomotive Base"—"The Automatic Spacer"—"The Automatic Tabulator"-—"The Disappearing Indicator"—"The Adjustable Paper Fingers"—"The Scientific Condensed
Keyboard"—all
Yours For 17 Cents a Day
We announced this new sales plan
recently, just to feel the pulse of the
people^. Simply a small cash payment—then 17 cents a day. That
is the plan in a nutshell.
The result has been such a deluge of applications for machines
that we are simply astounded.
The demand comes from people of
all classes, all ages, all occupations.
The majority of Inquiries has
come from "people of known financial
standing who were attracted by the
novelty of the proposition. An impressive demonstration of the immense popularity of the Oliver Typewriter.
A startling confirmation of our belief that the Era of Universal Typewriting is at hand.
A Quarter of a Million People are
Making Money With
Tlje.
SPORTS
NEW CANADIAN RECORD
The trotting horse Bland S. put up
a new Canadian record at Winnipeg
Industrial exhibition races for three
one mile heats on a half mile track.
Bland S. won three straight heats, the
fastest being 2 minutes, 7% seconds.
GOTCH IS CHALLENGED
If Frank Gotch, world's champion
wrestler, really is sincere in his desire to fight somebody, here is his
chance.
Charley Cutler, fellow wrestler and
former fighter, is anxious to enter
into a series of elimination contests,
the best man in the bunch to battle
Jack Johnson for the title.
But first of all Cutler desires to
light Gotch, and whether the wrestling champion is really there or not,
Cutler has mapped out a comprehensive programme and wants the public
to know all about It. Cutler knows
all about Jack Johnson. He was his
sparring partner once, and while he
frankly admits that the colored man
has it on him in skill-, cleverness and
speed, he believes his own strength
and gameness might carry the day.
According to Cutler's story, he
fought Johnson once In Reading, Pa.,
when Sam Fitzpatrick was manager
of the colored man. The posts of the
ring protruded into the fighting
space, and in the very first round
Johnson drove the back of Cutler's
head into one of them, opening up a
deep gash.
Cutler says he was not hurt in the
least, but he bled so freely that the
referee stopped the contest. "Never
mind, Charley," said Sam Fitzpatrick
"the papers won't get hold of It and
it won't affect your record." Yet the
next day the New York papers had
stories by Fitzpatrick to the effect
that Johnson was developing a terrific punch, having knocked Cutler out
in one round.
The fact that Alfred Holt & Co., of
Liverpool, are so deeply con'cerned
in this port as to despatch a special
representative in the person of Capt.
Bartlett, of the steamer Bellerophon,
to report upon this place from the
standpoint of, its shipping possibilities is enough to indicate that soon
the biggest freighters of the world
will be making regular calls here.
The Blue Funnel line is one of the
great shipping firms and it is safe to
prophesy that the advent of that company here would he followed closely
by the other large corporations that
do trade on the Pacific.
The   Holt   company   Is   at   present
GEART TENNIS RECORD
OLIVER
Typewriter
The Standard Visible Writer
The Oliver Typewriter is a moneymaker, right from the word "go!" So
easy to run that beginners soon get
in the "expert" class. Earn as you
learn. Let the machine pay the 17
cents a day—and all above that is
yours.
Wherever you are, there's work to
be done and money to be made by
using the Oliver. The business world
is calling for Oliver operators. There
are not enough to supply the demand.
Their salaries are considerably above
those of many classes of workers.
"An Oliver Typewriter in
Every  Home!"
That is our battle cry today. We
have made the Oliver supreme in
usefulness and absolutely Indispensable in business. Now comes the
conquest of the home.
The simplicity and strength of the
Oliver fit It for family use. It is becoming an important factor in the
home training of young people. An
educator as well as a money maker.
Our new selling plan puts the
Oliver on the threshold of every
home in America. Will you close
the door of your home or office on
this remarkable Oliver opportunity?
Write for further details of our
easy offer and a free copy ot the new
Oliver catalogue.    Address:
R. C. BEAN
Prince Rupert Agent
General   Offices:   Oliver   Typewriter
Building, Chicago, 111.
CANCELLATION  OP  RESERVE
NOTICE Is hereby given that the
reserve existing on Crown lands In
the vicinity of Babine Lake, and
situate in Cassiar District, notice of
which bearing date June 30th, 1909,
was published in the British Columbia Gazette, dated July 2nd, 1908, is
cancelled.
ROBERT A. RENWICK,
Deputy Commissioner of Lands.
Lands Department,
Victoria, B. C, June 16th, 1910.
(First Insertion July 5.)
Because he will be one of America's most dangerous opponents in
the next Davis cup matches In December, Anthony Frederick Wilding,
who has won the all-English singles,
is one of the most important personages in the tennis world of today. His
defeat of A. W. Gore, holder of the
title in the challenge round, and his
win over Beals C. Wright in the
final, means that Wilding has improved his game of late. In 1908
when the American team went to
Melbourne after the Davis cup
Wright beat Wilding by three sets to
one, the score then being 3-6, 7-5,
6-3, 6-1.
It is only natural that Wilding
should beat Gore, for the New Zea-
lander is only 27 years of age, while
the Englishman is 42. With Wilding
it is a case of the game being In the
blood, for his father, Frederick
Wilding, seven times made one of
the doubles which won the New Zealand championships. In his early
days Anthony was coached by his
father, and when 16 won a handicap
singles at the New Zealand championship tourney. The following year he
won the championship of Canterbury.
Then he went to Cambridge university and played against Oxford In
1904.
In 1903 /he won many prizes in
open tournaments. He won the Scot-
llsh championships in 1904, and the
same year he captured the singles at
Reading, Sheffield, Epsom, Shrewsbury, Eastbourne and Queen's autumn meeting, at Cannes, Barcelona,
Paris, Wiesbaden, Hamburg, Baden-
Baden and Prague. In 1906 he won
the South of France championship
arid all three-cornered courts championships at the Queen's club. With
Norman E. Brooks he won the doubles championship at Wimbledon  in
1907, and with Major J. C. Ritchie
the doubles in 1U.)S at Wimbledon
and the same year he covered courts
doubles, mixed doubles, South of
France championship singles, the
Cannes cup, singles at Wiesbaden
Baden, Dieppe and numerous other
pries. Wilding made one of the
doubles champions of Europe at
Hamburg in 1908, and with Norman
E. Brooks represented Australia
against America in the Davis cup
matches, when he won In the fifth
and deciding match - from Frederick
B. Alexander.
Wilding also represented Australia
in the Davis Cup matches of 1905
and last year. He won the cham
pionship of New Zealand in 1906 and
1908, and the championship of Victoria last year, defeating Norman E
Brooks. Wilding won the International singles at Brussels this year.
He was formerly a lieutenant In the
King's Colonials, and along with be
ing a good cricketer is a keen motor
cyclist.
TRAMS-PACIFIC SHIPPII
^   ™.3A0£
iii.
building a number of new steamers
and will, it expc ited, Increase thi
number  on  the  service     to    North
-American waters. With its arrangements with culler 'lines and  the  facl
i that the Hold company itself has a
; fleet  of  nearly sixty  large  steamers
ihe Importance of such a move is not
to be underestimated.
The Holt company   now    operates
[fifty-nine large steamers, forty-one|
vessels being included in the fleet of
the Ocean Steamship Company and
nineteen in ihe China Mutual line,
the combined fleet having a tonnage
of 346,966 tons. Steamers of the
company  leave  Liverpool  every  f»w
days for the Far EasJ. Home go to
Hongkong, Sbangbai and North
China and Korean ports, some to
Penang, Singapore and Borneo, some
to all the ports of note between Fort
Said and Yokohama, and every
month one of the line continues
across the Pacific to Victoria and
Puget Sound.
The development of the fishing in-
dutry here with the shipments to
the Orient of the cheaper grades, will
create a local shipping trade which
will in conjunction with the through
trade to be developed here, give
abundance of inducement for all the
large companies to come here.
_ ...„, , -,-,y.w.;^y .■■WyyB mini, |, imp^l^u |J
i :   '•-: .:■■   ' '.•ci.V.fe'"' i „   ■   --•- •>...'
■■ s   tV.ii i -:
'v^rrlfcMftMJHS
ir*«MM>li-r'''i-«ilicii«»
The Steamer Kellerophon of the Holt Line — The type of vessel it is pro posed to have call here regularly.
COAL DEVELOPMENT
Expert Has Gone to Examine tbe Queen
Charlotte Measures for
Capitalists.
Alexander   Faulds   is   Satisfied  That
Vast Quantities of Fuel Will
Be Available
The arrival in the city on Wednesday evening of Alexander FatildS, the
coal expert from Vancouver at once
aroused a suspicion that there was
something on in connection with the
fuel problem as it affects Prince Ru
pert. Mr. Faulds is a sure harbinger'
that there is to be some move in the
direction of coal development. •' An
Interview with him at once satisfied
the,, Journal representative that as
usual the well known mining engineer was on the outcroping, but, as
usual, he was not prepared to give
away any secrets as to the exact objects in view.
He left the same evening for the
Queen Charlotte Islands where he has
coal properties to examine for interests that plan a very extensive development of the measures there.
Mr. Faulds is a Scotch expert who
some years ago came to British Columbia and assumed the management
of the Alexandra mines for James
Dunsmuir. Ever since those mines
closed he has followed the consulting end of his profession and at present has more than half a dozen mines
and prospects being operated under
his guiding eye in British Columbia
and Washington State.
He has great faith in the Queen
Charlotte coal properties, and one of
the syndicates that has recently been
taking up claims in the Islands has
sent Mr. faulds to more fully investigate the situation. Boring Is In
progress near Naden Harbor, and the
indications are said to be all that
could be desired. Mr. Faulds is
satisfied that Prince Rupert will not
need to Import Its fuel from Vancouver Island for any great length of
time. Excellent coal will be produced near at hand on the Queen Charlottes that will meet all the requirements here.
No less than three corporations are
at present at work developing the
fields that exist there, all of which
indicates that a plentiful supply of
coal will soon be available here.
Miles of the coal lands have been
acquired and the indications are very
gratifying.
MIXING EXPERT
It. It. Hcclley Has Gone Into Hazelton
District to Examine Properties
_ R. R. Hedley, well known to all
mining men in the province, reached
Prince Rupert Wednesday evening on
the Prince Rupert. He is on his way
to Hazelton to examine some properties for a mining development company with which he Is Identified.
The Inlander having left before
tb!e G.' T. P. steamer reached here,
Mr.( Hedley found It necessary to
take a launch for Port Essington to
catch the Inlander there.
Unfortunately the fog became so
dense that the^'launch had to put
back and Mr. Hedley Is now awaiting the, next river steamer.
Mr. Hedley Is the mining expert
who prepared the data upon the
industry in British Columbia and the
north-western provinces for the comprehensive report covering the whole
of Canada that was prepared soon
after Hon. Mr. Templeman assumed
office as minister of mines.
TERRITORIALS FUR HERE
A small lump of camphor dropped
In the oil receptacle of a lamp will
improve the light and make the
flame clearer and brighter. A few
drops of vinegar will have a similar
effect.
It is Proposed to tiring Them  From
Old Land to Western Camilla
The new scheme for the emigration
ol Territorials was explained In detail to the Godalming detachment of
the Queen's (Royal West Surreys)
recently by its originator, Major the
Hon. Arthur Brodrlck, who, as
brother of Lord Middleton, has long
had a wide interest in military affairs. Admiral Sir G. Atkinson-
Willes, Lieut.-General Sir Hi. St,
Elles, the Headmaster of Charterhouse, the High Sheriff of Surrey,
and the Mayor of Godalming, were
present, and they heard first a lecture
on Canada's resources.
"it Is proposed," said Major Brodrlck, in explaining the scheme, "to
transfer those of the company who
wish to go to Western Canada from
the Territorial Force here to a similar force there.
"1 shall proceed to Canada immediately after this year's camp, and
with the permission of the commanding officer and the Territorial Force
Association, I am prepared to take
those who wish to go with me to
Western Canada.
'Fares will be guaranteed on condition that the money Is repaid in a
certain time."
A number of men have intimated
their desire to emigrate en the terms
mentioned.
Aid. Naden last evening introduced
the health bylaw of the city.
* * *
Owneis of buildings that are on
the street on Second avenue will be
notified that they must be removed
within two months. This was agreed
to on the recommendation of the engineer, who proposed grading that
street  at an  early  date.
* *     *
It Is probable that the members of
the city council and the city engineer
will pay a visit to the Georgetown
sawmill's water power tomorrow. It
is to be examined from the standpoint of its suitability to supply the
city with power.
* *     *
The city solicitor gave as his
opinion last evening at the council
meeting that the city had not the
right to assess for taxes government
prope: ty In the city and pay the taxes
out of city revenues. This opinion
was given In reply to a question re
i'erred to him.
* *     *
A large and pleased audience attended Prof. Macdonald's lecture on
phrenology last night at the Meth
odist church. This evening he gives
another free lecture upon human
'nature. Tomorrow afternoon he will
lecture to ladles only upon health,
beauty and happiness, impaiting
knowledge more valuable than gold.
The lecture is pure and refined. No
woman can afford to miss It. Begins
at 2.30.    Admission free.
 o	
SUNDAY EXCURSION
.Miss Sloan lefl on the Prince Rupert for Vancouver.
* *     •
Mrs. M. II. Craig entertained at
bridge yesterday afternoon.
*
.Mrs.. L. W. Patmore and children
cleft on the Prince Rupert for Van-
I couver.
. '!. *
.M. D. Simon returned to the city
Wednesday evening by the Prince
| Rupert.
* *     *
J. Fred Ritchie returned from
Stewart this morning by the Prince
Rupert.
* *     *
I. J. Brin, of the Brin Furniture
company, left Wednesday on the Inlander lor Hazelton to take charge
of the Hazelton branch.
Mrs, Geo. Arnold returned to the
city on the Prince Rupert. She was
accompanied by her mother-in-law,
of MUwankee, who will spend a few
months in this city.
J. L. Parker, the well known mining man, has returned from Goose
Hay. He reports that the mining
outlook there continues to be most
inviting.
* *     #
Duncan Ross, after a few weeks
spent in the south in Victoria and
Vancouver, has returned to the north.
He will leave shortly for Hazelton to
inspect the work that is being done
on his section of the G. T. P. line.
* *    *
Dr. T. H. Jones, of Victoria, accompanied by Mrs. Jones, made the round
trip by the Prince Rupert this week.
Dr. Jones took time here to make a
tour about the city and take in a
general view of the townsite.
* *    *
C. W. Peck and a party of guests
have returned from a delightful
outing up Graham Inlet. Included
among the party were V. W. Smith
and Mrs. Smith and their son, Mrs.
Angus Stewart, George Sharpe, Mrs.
A. J. Morris, Miss McLaughlin, Mr.
and Mrs. Dawes Gilmour.
The   excursion    on    the     steamer
Hazelton  last Sunday proved  to be
so popular that another one will be
given     this    coming    Sunday     The
steamer will leave the dock at 2 p.m.
and    will  make  for    Port   Essington,
I stopping at all "the canneries on the
j way as well as the new Grand Trunk
bridge at  Ziinardi  Rapids.    The trip
Is a magnificent  one, and   will    be
: taken great advantage of by all lovers
Of the line sea-breezes and  beautiful
scenery.
_n	
The Trail smslter last week shipped a car of lead to Kobo, Japan.
Further shipments to Japan will
shortly be made from the Consolidated Company's works.
 o	
Miss McDonald, daughter of the
co'lector of customs, who has been
visiting in the city for some time
past, left last evening on the Prince
Rupert for her home in Vancouver.
Her many friends gave her a farewell dance on Tuesday evening in
Mclntyre's Hall, a very pleasant evening was spent by all who attended.
*    *    *
Thomas Deasy, Indian agent on the
Queen Charlotte Islands, spent a day
or two in Prince Rupert this week.
He makes his headquarters at Masset
where a home Is being built. He
left on Wednesday by the Bruno to
the points at the southern end of the
Islands, where he will inspect the different Indian settlements that are under his care. Mr. Deasy is charmed
with the Queen Charlottes.
»    *    ♦
E. P. Davis, K.C., of Vancouver,
was a traveller on the Prince Rupert
on Wednesday. He is taking a holiday and selected the most picturesque
route for it. He went on to Stewart
returning by the steamer. Mr. Davis
was deeply interested in Prince Rupert on this, his first visit to it. The
harbor attracted him and the general
characteristics of the place were all
of interest.
PROMPT PAYMENT
Property-owner in Prince Rupert Remits Taxes Before Due
She—"Charlie, why are you so
very much opposed to piano
duets?"
He—"From principle. I think It's
cowardly for two persons to attack
one piece of music."
According to the quarterly report
of the Miners" Association, strikes
caused In Northumberland by the
Dear Coal Act have cost the association £58,000  in strike pay.
Fifteen million gallons of water a
day are pumped from the mines of
I.eadville, Colo., and it is estimated
that 28.6 tons of water are raised
for every ton of ore mined.
It is not usual to have men
clamoring to pay taxes. In the ordinary course of events this Is one claim
that the average citizen puis olT as
long as it is possible to postpone it.
Prince Rupert, however, is a city of
contraries and of surprises. The
latest is with respect to the men
that have invested here.
One. of these cannot wall until
the city Is ready to take the money
before remitting the amount due. He
Is a client of David II. Hays, and today Mr. Hays received a reminder
that the civic taxes were coming due
when he got a cheque for $127, the
amount due fot taxes from one of his
clients.
No notice has yet been sent out
from the city hall notifying the property owners that the taxes were due.
This is probably the first remittance
for the purpose received in the city
and testifies to the fact that Prince
Rupert property is regarded as being so valuable on the outside that
not the least chance is to be taken
by the investors on losing their lots.
In common with other prompt payers this man will, according to the
rules to lie followed, be entitled to a
refund   of  one-sixth.
TilWWIWIII'JWHI—IIPWPNI"'""1'"" cc PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Friday, July 29, 1910.
Canada's Destiny
Speaking before the Canadian Club
In Vancouver, Col. George Denison of
Toronto, an ardent imperialist, said:
"It is a pleasure to speak before
the Canadian Club, and particularly
to hear the remark—which has Just
fallen from your president—that 1
will find a population just as enthusiastically loyal to Canada and to our
Empire as can posBlbly be found in
any portion of our great Dominion.
(Applause.) But I must tell you how
extremely delighted I have been as
I came stage by stage across this vast
country to find everywhere that fine
spirit of loyalty to our sovereign and
of loyalty to Canada, which after all
is the true secret of the greatness of
any country. I hope you will excuse
me for going back a little, and for
making some reference to the past
history of our country, in order that
we may be better able to judge as
to what is the best course to follow in
developing Canada's future. When 1
was a young man, which was just
at the time of Confederation, happened that most important period in
our domestic history, the gathering
together of the old provinces, four
or five In number, into the fabric of
Confederation. It is a tremendous
fact which throws light upon the
characteristics of the Canadian people
at that epoch, that is, that before this
Confederation there were not any
Canadians, strictly speaking, and in
the sense in which this work is now
employed. The people who then
lived in our four or five scattered
provinces called themselves English,
Irish or Scotch, grouping themselves
according to the nationality of their
parents, while the French Canadians
alone called themselves Canadians.
Even after Confederation for two or
three years the feeling in the province of Nova Sco.tia was so strong
against the union that had so recently been accomplished that the very
name of Canadian was not looked
upon with favor or commonly used
there. All this is now most happily
changed, and we are all one people
today. I most sincerely believe that
in no part of the whole Dominion of
Canada are any people to be found
who are not genuinely proud of being
called Canadians.   (Cheers.)
"As I was on the point of saying,
when Confederation came the younger men then perceived and said that
'now we are a nation, now we have
a country and something that we are
able to speak of with pride and to
develop'; and then it was that the
idea of a Canadian country as a national entity, and as a national question came into vogue. Then it was
that a few of us, we were only five
when we started our work, organized
the Canada First Party, the object
of that party being to devote our
whole lives to doing all we possibly
could to make Canada and Canadian
national questions cofne first in all
our considerations. Canada first
meant that we were strongly in favor
of making Canada and Canadian issues come absolutely before everything else, all personal, all pecuniary
or any other kind of consideration,
taking second place.
"One of the very first things that
the Canada First Party did about
forty years ago was to labor for the
acquisition of the Hudson Bay Territories and of British Columbia. For
we all felt that If we could extend our
dominion as far to the west as we
possibly could then we could make of
It an one really great country.
tle.v..Subw Vdir?XDw( , SH SH
"We spoke for it and held meetings
on behalf of a greater Conferedation.
Among other things we advocated
the building of a railroad to Hudson
Bay, for at that time we had many
big Ideas—because we were young
and had confidence In the future of
our country. The people of the Eastern provinces wen- quite indifferent
to the project, while the people of
Quebec were practically nnd covertly
hostile, although a great many among
the people ot Ontario were in favor
ince of Ontario, was the shooting of
Thomas Scott.
"After the lapse of forty years, I
had had the satisfaction of going
through these great and immensely
valuable territories, and I have come
to the conclusion that they are worth
a great deal more than one and one-
half millions of dollars. (Laughter
and cheers.) The reason why I tell
you these things Is this, the younger
men amongst you can hardly Imagine
that there ever could have been such
a state of affairs as actually existed
in the Eastern Provinces only forty
years ago, but was so. Now that we
are able to form something like a
proper conception of the wonderful
resources of Canada, we perceive that
It Is one of the very greatest countries in all the world. When you
come to think of It you find that It
es between the latitude of Rome
and the North Pole, and If you take
a map of Europe and draw a line
which will include the latitude of
Rome and the whole of Europe to the
north of it you will see that this only
represents about the same territory
as is to be found in this part of the
Dominion of Canada, which means
that in Canada we have the same
latitudes and conditions similar to
those which exist in that other part
viding a great navy, this revolution
In her character and in her policy
will have a tremendous meaning for
the whole world.
"While these great changes In the
world's policy have taken, and art
taking place, what are we doing?
We have but a small population, and
if every man In our whole count.-y
were armed and willing to fight, still
there are not, after all, very many of
us. But how is it that we are today
in possession of this immensely valuable patrimony, able to carry on our
business and make money, as we are
now doing? I will tell you why. During last year I was on a visit to my
brother In England. I went down
to see the review of the fleet at Spit-
head, in the harbor of Portsmouth,
and when I saw this magnificent fleet
extended for three or four miles In
one direction and for three or four
miles in the other, I said to my
brother, 'Just think of it! right here,
within the compass of our eyes, rests
floating upon these waters, the whole
power and strength and security of
the entire British Empire. Here is
to be found the reason why our Canadian vessels can sail and are sailing between Vancouver and Hongkong and Yokohama and Australia,
and all over the Pacific Oceon, in absolute safety, security and freedom.
"With all our enormous increase
in wealth, gained under the powerful
protection of that splendid navy, we
do not contribute a single dollar
towards its maintenance! While that
LAND PURCHASE NOTICES
Skeena Land District—District of
(f^fl not q t*
TAKE NOTICE that Phillip Williams, of Sydney, Nova Scotia, occupation accountant, Intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands In the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein
ley:—Commencing at a post planted
at the S. E. corner and about 16%
miles distant in a north-weBterly direction from the north end of Kitwancool Lake, thence north 80
chains, thence west 80 chains, thence
south 80 chains, thence east 80
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 640 acres, more or
less. PHILLIP WILLIAMS.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 4, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
flftflfliAr
TAKE NOTICE thai Annie Grieve,
of Victoria, B. C, occupation married woman, intends to-apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kltwancool or Chean Weln Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. W. corner, and adiout 17% miles
distant In a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence south 40 chains, thence
east 4 0 chains, thence south 40
chains, thence east 40 chains, thence
north 80 chains, thence west 80
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 480 acres, more or
less. ANNIE  GRIEVE.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 4,  1910. Jy8
of the world, and a country quite as|was the condition of affairs a year
large as those regions where all the
great powers of Europe developed
pretty well the whole history of the
past. You can hardly imagine what
an immense heritage we have got.
That is the first point that I wish to
make, what an empire, what a wonderful national asset!
of it. .When it was understood that
they would have lo pay one and one-
hull' millions ot dollars for this immense and magnificent country nearly ciiii'-half of the people in tiie
older provinces, as well as the newspapers and politicians, siiid at that
time thai the sum of one and one-
half millions was altogether too much
to pay for a territory which, although extensive, was, after all, really of no use except for the purpose
of raising fur-bearing animals. For
the Hudson's Bay Company had deceived the public in regard to the
vain of these lands. Among the Canadians at Fort Garry who were put
in prison were the members of the
Canada First Party, John Schultze
and Charles Marr, the author of
'Tecumseh.1 What really roused the
feelings of the people in Eastern
Canada and particularly in the prov-
"The next point to be considered is
what is our duty to our country to
preserve for ourselves and for our
posterity these immense possessions,
this tremendously valuable inheritance? This is a most serious question which I am asking you today to
consider, and we will have not only
to consider it carefully but also be
prepared to make any sacrifice, no
matter how great, and to use every
exertion, no matter how arduous, to
preserve this Immense heritage for
ourselves. The one thing that struck
me most in coming out here was that
everybody can readily understand our
marvellous resources In the way of
agriculture, minerals, fisheries and
lumber, but the thing that impressed
me most in my trip was the very
great scarcity of population. In
coming from Toronto, by way of the
north shore, it is true that we have
two or three very fine cities. Here,
I may say that I am amazed in contemplating .this city, for I had no
idea -that it was so powerful, so
populous, so well built. It has changed very much since I looked up its
population in the public school books.
What I chiefly desire to impress upon you is that we must do everything we can to look to our future,
and to lay down our lines In such
a wise manner that they will be in
the best interests of Canada as a
whole.
"I see that you in Vancouver are
a most enterprising and energetic
people, busily engaged in the making
of money,,and I take much pleasure
in your success. Money is not everything. Look around the world and
take note of the extraordinary change
that has taken place during the last
forty or fifty years! Great Britain
forty or fifty years ago, was unquestionably what I think she still is, the
absolute mistress of the seas. She
had colonies and everything necessary to make her powerful and invincibly supreme! But what has happened in the last thirty or forty
years? Take Germany. Forty years
ago Germany consisted of a number of scattered, disunited provinces,
while today she is strong and united,
a consolidated and a great power,
with a splendid army and navy, and
ambitious of making herself the
strongest nation in the world. Crossing the ocean, we find that Japan,
which was practically not worth talking about forty years ago, has developed a strong national spirit, a
g'real army, and one of the finest
navies In the whole world; a nation,
moreover, that must be reckoned
with In attempting to settle any question that concerns the East. The
serious point for us Is we are here,
with only about seven millions of
people, in possession of half a continent, controlling a country abounding In such a superabundance of
wealth and of resources, while we
are at this very time passing through
such a carnival of prosperity that I
am quite certain is exciting the envy
and the cupidity of every nation on
earth.
'Then comes another factor into
our calculations, China. If China,
with her 400 millions, becomes seized
with the ambitions of Japan, nailing a vast army of soldiers and pro-
ago, I am glad to say that since then
the people have waked up a bit, and
something is at last being done, although we are not doing as must as
we should. I am very much pleased
to find that Sir Wilfrid Laurier has
gone as far as he has, and although
I do not altogether approve of his
plan, nor do I wholly approve of Mr.
Borden's, I would be inclined to approve of both more heartily if they
were doubled. When I was interviewed in Toronto on this subject I
said we should hazard all we have
to preserve the mastery of the sea In
the hands of the British Empire!
(Cheers.)
In conclusion, Colonel Denison
cited several instances of gallantry
on the part of the Canadians in
South Africa and with a triumphant
ring in his voice declared that not
an unwounded Canadian surrendered
nor was a Canadian gun captured.
 o	
A lady, who lost two false teeth
and part of the plate in a cycling accident at Potters Bar In December,
1908, has just died from blood-
poisoning. During a post-mortem
examination the missing teeth and
piece of the plate were found burled
in the tissue of her throat.
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that John Cox, of
Monarch, Alberta, occupation farmer, intends to apply for permission to
purchase the , following described
lands, situated in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Comencing at a post planted at the
north-west corner and about five and
one-quarter miles distant in a northwesterly direction from the north end
of Kitwancool Lake, thence 80
chains south, (.hence 80 chains east,
thence 80 chains north, thence 80
chains west to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres,
more or less.
JOHN COX.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated May  30,  1910. Jy5
LAND PURCHASE NOTICES
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Pearl Caspell
of Cayley, Alberta, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Weln Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. E. corner and about 15% miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kltwancool
Lake, thence south 80 chains, thence
west 40 chains, thence north 40
chains, thence west 40 chains, thence
north 40 chains, thence east 80
chains to point of commencement,
and containing 480 acres, more or
less. PEARL CASPELL.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 3, 1910. jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
('ussi *ir
TAKE, NOTICE that Mary Brown,
of Vancouver, B.C., occupation married woman, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following described lands In the vicinity ol
the Kltwancool or Chean Weln Valley:—Commencing at a post planted
at the North-east corner and about
ten miles distant in a north-westerly
direction from the north end- of the
Kltwancool lake, thence south 80
chains, thence west 40 chains, thence
north 40 chains, thence west 40
chains, thence north 40 chains
thence east 80 chains to point ol
commencement, and containing 480
acres, more or less.
MARY  BROWN.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 1,  1910. Jy8
LAND PURCHASE NOTICES
Skeena Land District—District of
Cussi Jir
TAKE NOTICE that Ethel Welsh,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for per-
mission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—•
Commencing at a post planted at the
south-east corner and about 10 miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north 80 chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence south 80,
chains, thence east 80 chains to
point of commencement and containing 640 acres, more or less.
ETHEL WELSH.
James W. Smith, Agent
Dated June 1st, 1910. Jy8
LAND   LEASE   NOTICE
Skeena Land District—District of
Coast.
TAKE NOTICE that The Canadian
Fish & Cold Storage Company Ltd.,
of Vancouver, occupation Mercantile
and Manufacturing, Intends to apply
for permission to lease the following described land:-—Commencing at
a post planted at high water mark
on the westerly side of Prince Rupert Harbor and distant about 110
chains from the north-east corner of
Lot 443, thence west 20 chains,
thence south 20 chains, thence east
5 chains, more or less to high water
mark, thence following along the
high water mark to the point of commencement and containing 20 acres
more or less.
The Canadian Fish and Cold
Storage Company, Limited,
J. H. Plllsbury, Agent.
Dated June 20th, 1910. Jyl2
LAND PURCHASE NOTICES
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Reginald
Davey, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation machinist, Intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands, in the vicinity of
Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-west corner and about 6 %
miles distant in a north-westerly direction from the north end of Kitwancool Lake, thence south 80
chains, thence east 80 chains, thenco
nrrtli 40 chains, thence west 40
etiains, thence north 40 chains,
chains, thence west 40 chains to a
point of commencement, and containing 4S0 acres  (more or less).
REGINALD   DAVEY.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated  May  30,  1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that James Alexander McDonald, of Monarch, Alberta, occupation farmer, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands, situated in
the Kitwancool or Chein<Wein Valley:-—Commencing at a post planted
at the N. E. corner about five and
one quarter miles distant In a northwesterly direction from the north
end of Kitwancool Lake, thence south
80 chains, thence west 80 chains,
thence north 80 chains, thence east
80 chains to point of commencement,
and  containing 640  acres,  more or
JAMES ALEXANDER McDONALD
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated May 30, 1910. JyS
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that John Henderson, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
agent, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. .W corner and about 25 miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence north 80 chains, thence
east 40 chains, thence south 80
chains, thence west 80 chains to
point of commencement and containing 320 acres, more or less.
JOHN   HENDERSON.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 7th, 1910. Jy8
Coast Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that I, Ernestine
A. Roney, of Prince Rupert, occupation married woman, intend to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a post planted on the north
bank of the Skeena River about half
a mile south of Geo. T. Church's preemption, thence west 10 chains,
thence north 40 chains, thence east
to the Skeena River; thence southwest following the bank of the
Skeena River to the place of beginning, and containing about 80
acres.
ERNESTINE A. RONEY, Locator.
W. A. Roney, Agent.
Dale* July 7th, 1910. Jy22
Coast hand District—District of
Skeena.
TAKE NOTICE that Elijah
Rounds, of Victoria, B.C., occupation
Stewart, intends to apply for permission to purchaeij the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted one-half mile north,
and one-half mile east, of Nettle A.
Lairds N. E. corner of application to
purchase, and 300 feet east of Ana-
ham Lake trail, marked E. R.'s
south-west corner, thence 40 chains
east, thence 40 chains north, thence
40 chains west, thence 40 chains
south to point of commencement,
and containing 160 acres, more or
less. ELIJAH  ROUNDS.
Vincent  M.   Schibner,  Agent.
Dated May 25, 1910. jn2i
Coast Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that I, J. Adolpr
Perry, of Vancouver, B.C., occupation
book-keeper, intend to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted on the north bank of the
Skeena River, about a mile west of
Lot 31, thence north 40 chains,
thence east 80 chains to lot 31,
thence south 40 chains to bank of
Skeena River, thence west about 80
chains following north bank of
Skeena River to point of commencement, and containing about 320
acres.
J. ADOLPH PERRY, Locator.
Wm. A. Roney, Agent.
Dated July 16th, 1910. Jy22
Skeena Land District—District of
(1<itisi 'i r
TAKE NOTICE that Laura Gordon
of Victoria, B. C., occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. E. corner and about 18 miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kltwancool
Lake, thence south 40 chains, thence
west 40 chalna, thence north 40
chains, thence east 40 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 160 acres, more or less.
LAURA GORDON.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June  4,  1910. jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Henry Welsh,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
printer, intends to apply foi permission to purchase the following described lands In the vicinity of Kltwancool or Chean Weln Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. E. corner and 11 miles distant
in a north-westerly direction from
the north end of Kitwancool Lake,
thence north 80 chains, thence west
80 chains, thence south 80 chains,
thence east 80 chains to point of
commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
HENRY WELSH.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 2, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Frederick
Welsh, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation clerk, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-east corner about 11 miles distant In a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence south 80 chains, thence
west 40 chains, thence north 80
chains, thence east 40 chains to
point of commencement, and containing 320 acres, more or less.
FREDERICK WELSH.
James W. Smith, Agent
Dated June 2, 1910. Jy8
Skeena "Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that Walter Marke
of Toronto, Ont., occupation traveller, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands in the vicinity of. Kitwancool
or Chean Wein Valley:—Commencing at a post planted at the N. E.
corner and about 27% miles distant In a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kitwancool
Lake, thence south 80 chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence north 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to the
point of commencement and containing 640 acres, more or less.
WALTER MARKE.
James VV. Smith, Agent
Dated June 8th, 1910. Jy8
Coast Land District—District of
Skeena.
TAKE NOTICE that I, Mary M.
Roney, of sJtillwater, Minnesota, U.
S.A., occupation married woman, Intend to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands.
Commencing at a post planted on the
north bank of the Skeena River at
the south-east corner of Geo. T.
Church's pre-emption, thence north
40 chains, thence east 40 chains,
thence south to the bank of the
Skeena River, thence south-west following the Skeena River lo the place
of beginning and containing about
120 acres.
MARY M. ROENY, Locator.
W.   A.   Roney,  Agent.
Dated July 8th, 1910. Jy22
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Violet Geiger,
of Victoria, B. C, occupation married woman, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands In the vicinity of Kltwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. W. corner and about 23% miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kltwancool
Lake, thence south 80 chains, thence
east 40 chains, thence north 40
chains, thence east 40 chains, thence
north 40 chains, thence west 80
cjiains to point of commencement,
and containing 480 acres, more or
less. VIOLET GEIGER.
James W. S'nith, Agent.
Dated  June  7th,   19".0. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Ofl RRiifl 1*
TAKE NOTICE that Richard
Howie, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation dentist, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands In the vicinity of
Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—•
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. E. corner and about 24% miles
distant In a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kltwancool
Lake, thence south 80 chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence north 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing 640 acres, more or less.
RICHARD HOWIE.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated  June  7th,  1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
TAKE NOTICE that James Welsh,
of Vancouver, B. C, occupation machinist, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. W. corner and about 12 miles distant In a north-westerly direction
from the nortlt end of Kltwancool
Lake, thence south 80 chains, thence
east 20 chains, thence north SO
chains, thence west 20 chains to the
point of commencement and containing 160 acres, more or less.
JAMES WELSH.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 2,  1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
0*1 RR$ fl T*
TAKE NOTICE that Sandford
Burton, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation mining engineer, Intends to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein
Valley:—Commencing at a post
planted at the N. E. corner and
about 23% miles distant In a northwesterly direction from the north
end of Kltwancool Lake, thence south
80 chains, thence west 80 chains,
thence north 80 chains, thence eaBt
8 0 chains to point of commencement
ind containing 640 acres, more or
less. SANDFORD BURTON.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 7th, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that Norman Cle-
land, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation printer, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands In the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Weln Valley:—
Comencing at a post planted at the
S. E. corner and about 26% miles
distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kltwancool
Lake, thence north 80 chains, thence
west 80 chains, thence south 80
chains, thence east 80 chains to the
point of commencement, and containing  640  acres,  more  or  less.
NORMAN   CLELAND.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 8th, 1910.
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassli.
TAKE NOTICE that Marguerette
Burns, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation married woman, intends to apply for permission ,u purchase the
following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein
Valley:—Commencing at a post
planted at the N. E. corner and distant about 12 miles in a northwesterly direction from the north
end of Kltwancool Lake; thence
south 80 chains, thence west 20
chains, thence north 80 chains,'
thence east 20 chains to point of
commencement, and containing 160
acres, more or less.
MARGUERETTE  BURNS.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 2, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Oftssiflr
TAKE NOTICE that Charles F.
Burns, of Moncton, New Brunswick,
occupation auditor, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands in the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Wein
Valley:—Commencing at a post
planted at the south-west corner and
about 12 miles distant in a northwesterly direction from the north
end of Kitwancool Lake; thence
north 80 chain's, thence east 80
chains, thence south 80 chains,
thence west 80 chains to point of
commencement, and containing 640
acres, more or less.
CHARLES F.  BURNS.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated   June   2,   1910 Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that James Jar-
dine, of Vancouver, B. C, occupation
merchant, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following
described lands In the vicinity of Kitwancool or Chean Weln Valley: —
Commencing at a post planted at the
N. W. corner and about 13 miles distant In a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kltwancool
Lake, thence south SO chains, thence
east 80 chains thence north SO
chains, thence west 80 chains to
point of commencement, nnd containing 040 acres, more or less.
JAMES JARDI'ME.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 2, 1910. Jy8
Skeena Land District—District of
Cassiar.
TAKE NOTICE that John McDIar-
mld, of Lucknow, Ont., occupation
farmer, Intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands In the vicinity of the
Kitwancool or Chean Wein Valley:—
Commencing at a post planted at the
S. W. corner and about 13 miles distant in a north-westerly direction
from the north end of Kltwancool
Lake; thence north 80 chains, thence
east 40 chains, thence south 80
chains; thence west 40 chains to
point of commencement, and containing 320 acres.
JOHN   McDIARMID.
James W. Smith, Agent.
Dated June 2, 1910. JyS Friday, July 29, 1910.
THE   PRINCE   RUPERT   JOURNAL
NEW LIQUOR ACT
Sime Features of the Law That Will
Come Into Effect Next
Week.
Stringent Rules Will  Be JSnforced—
Attorney General  Will Strictly Interpret Laws
The new act governing Hie sale of
and traffic in intoxicating liquors in
this province, passed at the last session' of the legislature, and declared
by legal experts to be the most string-
cut, drastic and at the same time
practical piece of liquor legislation
on any statute book of a British Dominion, comes into force and effect
throughout British Columbia on the
first of August, and will be strictly
and impartially enforced from that
■late. It passed the local parliament
(which must be recogniezd as representing undeniably the will of the
people of the province which had
Just elected its members) by unanimous vote, and therefore, crystallizes th'e well-considered views of
British Columbia today on the subject of liquor law.
Not only are the fees for almost
every form pf license increased under the new act, but the penalties
prescribed for infringements are
made much more severe than of
yore; and the number of licenses
which may be held in any one district is limited in a way not even
hinted at in past legislation. The
first part of the act applies to the
granting of the various licenses, and
holds good only In the unorganized
districts, cities and other municipalities, being, of course, governed in
this respect by the provisions of the
Municipal Clauses Act, or, as In the
case of Vancouver, private charter.
The remainder of the "act applies to
the whole of the province.
The first new provision of the act
I is one empowering the government
!' to appoint an inspector of licenses
for British Columbia. His Jurisdiction will extend alike over organiezd
and unorganized districts and chartered cities, and his deputies, ex-
officio, will be the chiefs of police fri
the various police districts. It will
be his duty to Inspect all licensed
premises, to report upon all applications for licenses, and generally to
see that the law is honestly and
strictly enforced throughout the entire province.
In cities and organized districts
the fixing of the license fees is to A
1 certain extent necessarily at the discretion of the local authorities, but
in the unorganized districts, which
come under direct control of the province, license fees are raised in every
case. Wholesalers' and brewers'
licenses are advanced from $200 to
$3fl0 per annum. The number of
hotel licenses for the retail sale of
liquor in each district is limited, and
the stanaard of accommodation demanded of all such licensed premises
is very materially raised, the license
fee being at the same time increased.
Under the old act the hotel license
fee in a district of upwards of 200
inhabitants was set at $200; in a
district of 100 inhabitants at $125;
and in a district of less than 100 inhabitants at $75. According to the
new act the fee in districts of upwards of 1,000 inhabitants is set at
$300; in districts of from 500 to
1,000 population at $200; and in
districts of less than 500 population
at $125. The securing of a hotel
license under the new act is at the
same time a much harder matter than
under the old regulations. In the
first place, before any license can Be
granted, a petition must he presented
to the licensing authorities in favor
of the granting of such license, which
petition must be signed by two-thirds
of tiie householders living wit bin
three miles of the spol where It Is
proposed   to   establish   the   licensed
hotel, no foreigners being permitted
to appear as petitioners, and wives
and children being counted in the
totnl of population from which a
two-thirds majority petition Is required. It is further, enacted that
until a locality has an adult white
population of more than I,fJ00, not
more than three hotel licenses may
in any event be granted. Once the
locality has attained a population of
1,000, a fourth license may be added; and after that, an additional
license for every new thousand of
population, always upon two-thirds
petition of the interested residents.
Part III of the new Act, which
deals with the tailing of orders "for
liquor by commercial travellers and
witli the licensing of steamships and
' railway cars for the sale of liquor,
is little changed from the old Act,
the principal exception being that the
fee for license on steamships is Increased from $100 to $15n. It is
further enacted that special licenses
which  might  uiitlev  file old  Act  oc
casionally be granted to steamships
for excursions or similar special occasions, shall hereafter under no circumstances be issued.
.Part IV of the Act, which deals
with Sunday closing and prohibited
hours, enacts only that all bars and
places for the sale ot liquor must be
securely locked from 11 o'clock each
Saturday night until T> o'clock Monday morning, this regulation applying alike to cities, municipalities,
organized and unorganized districts,
and preemptorily placing a stoppage
upon the trade heretofore constituting the most important factor of the
roadhouses. No mention is made of
week day hours of opening and closing, the understanding being that
regulations in this respect are to be
made by the^local authorities or to
conform therewith. Under the old
Act it was possible for thirsty souls
to secure drinks during prohibited
hours by merely registering at a
hotel and thereby posing as a bona-
flde gueBt. Under the new Act this
is impossible. It Is stipulated that
bona-flde travellers may have liquor
with their meals, such liquor to be
consumed only in the dining room.
Just what constitutes a bona-flde
traveller Is speclflcially defined so
as to exclude the toper who registers
merely for the sake of getting a
drink; and it is speclflcially enacted
that excursionists shall not be considered as travellers. The list of
those to whom hotel keepers are forbidden to sell liquor is infinitely more
comprehensive under the new Act
than under the old. Not only are
bartenders forbidden to supply liquor
to recognized dipsomaniacs, but it is
also made an offence to provide with
liquor, either by sale, gift or barter
"persons notoriously of drunken
habits, "persons addicted to drunken debauches or sprees," and "persons who openly and notoriously
waste their money in liquor and in
riotous living to the detriment of
their families or those dependent upon them." It is further forbidden to
sell liquor to minors, vagrants or
tramps, prostitutes, Indians and
"chauffeurs operating any vehicles
plying for public hire."
The facilities for blacklisting any
person to whom it may appear desirable that liquor should not be sold,
are infinitely extended; hereafter It
is to be within the power of the superintendent of provincial police, the
license inspector, or any chief of
police, upon confidential communication In such premises made to
him, to Interdict the sale of liquor
to "any person resident or sojourning
within the province of British Columbia who by excessive drinking of
liquor, misspends, wastes or lessens
his estate, or injures his health, or
endangers or Interrupts the peace or
happiness of his family." The penalty
for Infringement of the act Is a fine
of not less than $100 and not more
than $300, or in default Imprisonment for not more than nine months.
Under the old act the penalty for Infringement of the regulations was
cumulative, running for the first offense from $50 to $250; for the
second offense from $200 to $500;
and for the third, from $500 to
$1,000; it was found that under the
old regulations the cumulative nature of the fines seldom came into
play beyond the second offence, the
licensing authorities usually refusing
to renew the license of holders who
had been twice convicted of infringements of the regulation. For this
reason the equally heavy penalty for
all offenses whether first, second or
subsequent,  has  now  been  adopted.
There are also included in the new
license law the following essential
new features:—
The superintendent of police has
the right at any time to cancel or
suspend any license in the province.
Every hotel must have a bar-room
entirely separate and apart from any
other room, also a separate sitting
room, nnd separate dining room.
Every hotel must have at least
seven guest rooms, with minimum
door space of 700 square feet, and
comfortably furnished,
Ventilation and facilities for
egress In the event of fire must be
provided to tiie satisfaction of the
inspector; also accommodation for
the licensee's family, i'.ltchen, and
stabling for at least six horses.
No one may hold a license who has
lost that privilege within three previous years, or who has been convicted of a 'criminal offense.
All barrooms in the province
(either In cities, towns or unorganized districts) must close at 11 p.m.
Saturdays and remain closed, and so
as to afford an open view to the public, until 5 a.m. Monday.
No liquors may be adulterated, re-
bottled, or refilled, and officers may
at any time take samples for analysis.
No sale of liquors niuy at any lime
be made to "joy riders," that is,
pleasure-riders, motoring or driving,
and not bona fide travellers. ■
No woman may be served with
liquor  In   any   public   barroom.     No
hotel may have more than one barroom.
No gaming may be permitted on
any licensed premises, nor any
nickel-in-tlie-slot   divice.
No officer or member of the crew
of any steamship may be served witli
drink at the bar of such steamships.
Such in abstract is the new license
law of British Columbia, coming into
force and operation with the month
of August.
"This law is made for enforcement," says the Attorney General,
"and it will be enforced impartially
and thoroughly."
 o	
One of the longest wharves In the
world, almost a mile in length, or,
to be exact, 4,700 feet, Is at Port
Los Angeles, Cal. It extends Into
the Pacific In a long serpentine curve.
The reason for this construction is
that it offers better resistance to the
strong currents and the buffetings
of the waves than if it were perfectly
straight. Until the nearny harbor of
San Pedro was developed by the federal government the big wharf at
Port Los AngeleB waB a very busy
place, but of late it is comparatively
seldom used except by the Japanese
fishermen, who have formed a colony
along the adjacent beach.
 o	
"I. look forward to the time when
every street which does not contain
flowers will have a black mark in
the parish map, and be recorded as
an object of ugliness in the neighborhood," said the Hon. Harry Law-
son, M.P., at the festival of the Gardeners' Benevolent Institution in
England.
Municipal Notice
TAKE NOTICE that the Municipal
Council of the City of Prince Rupert
has fixed Monday, the 8th day of
August, 1910, at the City Hall, Prince
Rupert, as the time and place for
taking the vote of the electors on a
by-law of the City of Prince Rupert
to create a debt of $40,000 by the issue of debentures for the purpose of
providing money to take over and
carry on the plant, pole lines, equipment, and entire assets of the Prince
Rupert Telephone Company, Limited.
AND FURTHER TAKE NOTICE
that the poll shall be taken by ballot, and that the poll booths shall be
kept open on the 8th days of
August, 1910, from the hour of 9
o'clock a.m. to the hour of 7 o'clock
p.m.
AND FURTHER TAKE NOTICE
that Ernest A. Woods has been appointed Returning Officer to take
charge of said poll
Dated at Prince Rupert, this 21st
day of July, 1910.
ERNEST A. WOODS,
City Clerk.
BY-LAW  NO.  11.
A By-law of the City of Prince Rupert to create a debt of $40,000
by the issue of Debentures for the
purpose of providing money to
take over and carry on the plant,
pole lines, equipment and entire
assets of the Prince Rupert Telephone Company, Limited.
WHEREAS, by Section 27 of the
City of Prince Rupert Incorporation
Act, 1910 , the City of Prince Rupert Is empowered to construct, erect,
operate and maintain a telephone system, and to pass by-laws dealing with
the same;
AND WHEREAS, it is deemed expedient and advisable to take over
from the Prince Rupert Telephone
Company, Limited, all their plant,
pole lines, equipment, fixtures, and
other assets;
AND WHEREAS, the said Prince
Rupert Telephone Company, Limited,
is willing to convey and transfer all
its said assets to the said city;
AND WHEREAS, a petition has
been duly signed by the property
owners of the said city, requesting
them to introduce a by-law to take
over the said assets of the said Telephone Company;
AND WHEREAS, to complete the
purchase of the said assets of the said
Telephone Company, and to carry on
the same, it is necessary that the sum
of Forty Thousand Dollars ($40,000)
should he borrowed upon the credit
of the city by the Issue and sale of
debentures therefor, and thnt the proceeds of such debentures should be
applied  for   the   purposes  aforesaid.
AND WHEREAS, It Is Intended to
issue debentures by the sale of which
to realize the moneys necessary for
said purposes, making the said debentures extend over a period of
twenty years from the Issue of the
same;
AND WHEREAS, It will be necessary to raise by special rate In each
year, for the period of twenty years,
beginning with the year 1910, and
ending with the year 1930, the sum
of Eighteen Hundred Dollars
l $1,800.00) for the purpose of paying interest upon the said debt at
the rate of four and a half {i%)
per centum per annum;
AND WHEREAS, it will be necessary to raise annually by special rate
for fiaying the new debt, namely, the
said sum of Forty Thousand Dollars
($40,000), during such period of
twenty years, beginning with the
year 1910, and ending with Ihe year
1030, the sum of Fourteen Hundred
and Fourteen Dollars and Forty-five
Cents ($1,414.45), the computation
for the reinvestment of the said sum
by way of sinking fund, being based
Upon an interest percentage of three
and a half (3 V-.) per centum per
annum;
AND WHEREAS, the said two
minis so required to he raised annually by special rate for paying the
new debt and interest make a total
of Thirty-two Hundred and Fourteen
Dollars and Forty-five Cents
( $3,214.45);
AND WHEREAS, the amount of
the whole ratable land and improvements of the .Municipality, according
to the last revised assessment roll
thereof, being that of the year 1910,
[is Twelve Million Seven hundred and
Twenty-one Thousand a:id Six Dollars   ($12,721,'I'M'.);
AND WHEREAS, the amount of
i the existing debenture debt of the
City of Prince Rupert, inclusive of
local*improvement debts, and school
debts, is nil, unci- does not exceed
twenty per cent of the assessed value
of the land ami Improvements of the
Municipality oi the City of Prince
Rupert, accord'iig to the last revised
assessment  roll;
NOW THERKFORE, THE COUNCIL OF THE MUNICIPALITY OF
THE CITY OF PRINCE RUPERT
ENACTS AS FOLLOWS: —
1. This by-law shall take effect
on the 12th day of August, 1910.
2. The debt hereby created and intended to be created, namely, the
sum of Forty Tho'usand Dollars
($40,000) shall be payable in twenty years from the 12th day of August,
1910, namely, on the 12th day of
August, 1930.
3. There shall be Issued any number of debentures to be made for
such sums of money as may be required for the purposes aforesaid,
either in currency or sterling money,
payable in gold coin for not less than
$100 currency or £20 sterling each,
and not exceeding in the whole the
said sum of Forty Thousand Dollars
($40,000), and the said debentures
shall be duly prepared, executed
and sold for the purposes aforesaid.
4. The said debentures stall be
deemed to have been properly executed by being signed by the Mayor,
and Treasurer of the said city, and
shall be sealed with its corporate
seal.
5. The said deoentures shall bear
date the 12th day of August, 1910,
being the date on which this bylaw
takes effect, and shall contain a
promise to pay the principal of said
debentures and also the interest
thereon at the said rate of four and
a half (4%) per centum per annum,
and shall have attached to them coupons for the payment of said interest,
and the said coupons shall be for an
amount equivalent to one-half year's
interest at the said rate of
four and a half (4V6) per
centum per annum upon the amount
of the debentures to which they shall
be respectively attached, one coupon
being made payable each six months
from and after the date of the said
debentures.
6. The said coupons shall be
deemed to have been properly executed by each one having written,
stamped, printed or lithographed
thereon, the names of the Majc,
and Treasurer of the city. Each coupon shall be numbered with the
number of the debenture to which it
is attached.
7. The said debentures shall be
made payable at the chief offices of
the Canadian Bank of Commerce in
the City of Prince Rupert, or the
City of Montreal, Canada, or the City
of London, England, or the City of
New York, U. S. A.
8. The amount of the said coupons,
namely, the Interest, shall be payable
at any of the chief agencies of the
said Canadian Bank of Commerce in
the following cities, namely. Prince
Rupert, B.C.; London, England;
New York; Montreal; Toronto; Winnipeg, and Vancouver, B.C.
9. There shall be raised in each
year during the said period of twenty
years, beginning with the year 1910,
ahd ending with the year 1930, by
special rate sufficient therefor, on
all.the ratable land of the City of
Prince Rupert, the following sums
respectively, namely: the sum of
Eighteen Hundred Dollars ($1,800)
to pay the Interest of the said debt
at the rate of four and a half (4%)
per centum per annum during the
currency of the said debentures, and
the sum of Fourteen Hundred
and Fourteen Dollars and Forty-
five Cents ($1,414.45) for the
forming of a sinking fund for the
payment of the said debt, the computation for the reinvestment of the
said sum by "way of sinking fund being based upon an intere. percentage of three and a half (3>/2) per
centum per annum during the currency of the said debentures as aforesaid, the said two sums making in
all the total of Thirty-two Hundred
and Fourteen Dollars and Forty-five
Cents ($3,214.45) to be raised annually as aforesaid.
10. The total of the said two sums
for the payment nf interest and debt
as aforesaid shall be raised and
levied in each year during the said
period of twenty years and currency
of said debentures as aforesaid by
special rate sufficient therefor, on
all the ratable land In the City of
Prince Rupert, as provided for in the
next preceding section.
11. The said debentures when sol
Issued unci sold, and the suid coupons
attached   thereto   when   the   debentures aforesaid have been Issued nnd
sold,  shall   he  deemed  a  valid   nnd
binding   charge  upon   the   City  of j
Prince Rupert.
12. The amount of the debt au-
thoriezd by this by-law Is subject to
consolidation with the amount of any
other debt to be authorized by any
other by-law or by-laws of the said
city passed for the issue and sale of I
debentures, and notwithstanding any-1
thing herein contained authorizing
and directing the issue and sale of
debentures for the payment of the
debt thereby created, the City of
Prince Rupert consolidated stock
may lip issued in the place and stead
of debentures to the amount of such
debt. This section shall apply only
Insofar as the city may be empowered
by law so to do.
TAKE NOTICE thai the above Is'
a true copy of the proposed by-law
;cm which tbe vote of the Municlpalltj
will be taken at the City Hall, al
Prince Rupert, on Monday, the 8th
day of August, loin, from the hours
of 9 o'clock a.m. until 7 o'clock p.m.
ERNEST A. WOODS,
City  Clerk.
Fred Stork
General Hardware
...i 'omplete Line of...
VALVES
Pipe and Pipe Fittings
The
Washington Cafe
A PLACE TO EAT
Seats For Ladles
Everything Clean and Tasty
Prices Reasonable
W. P. CARPENTER, PROPRIETOR
Second Avenue, near Seventh Street
Some Rock
Bottom
Prices
Sm Us For Inveatment
Rupert City Realty & Information Bureau, Ltd.
PRINCE RUPERT,
B.C.
CANCELLATION  OF  RESERVE
NOTICE is hereby given that the
reserve existing on Crown lands in
the vicinity of Babine Lake, situate
in Range 5, Coast District, notice of
which was published in the British
Columbia Gazette, dated December
17, 1908, is cancelled in so far as
said reserve relates to lots numbered 1519, 1518, 1517, 1516, 1515,
1510, 1507, 1506, 1506A, 1503 1501,
1502, 1512, 1511, 1505, 1504, 1513,
151-4, 1509, 1508, 1530, 1527, 1528,
1529, 1531, 1532, 1533, 1534, 1535,
1537, 1539, 1536, 1538, 1540, 1541,
1544, 1543, 1545, 1546, 1542, 1547,
1548, 1549, 1550, 1520, 1-521, 1522,
1523, 1524, 1525, 1526, and 1551.
ROBERT A. RENWICK,
Deputy Commissioner of Lands.
Lands Department,
Victoria, B. C, June 16th, 1910.
(First insertion July 5.)
Atlantic Steamship
 Agency	
Through  tickets and  excursion
rates to
England, France, Germanv,
and all
Scandinavian Ports.
Call or write for rates to any
part of the world. 1 am also
agent for all American steamers
to and from Prince Rupert;
Northern Pacific Railway; Alaska Pacific Express.
J. H. ROGERS
General Steamship and Railway
Agent, Prince Rupert, B.C.
Canadian Pacific R'y
Steamer, leave Prince Rupert for Vancouver,
Victoria, Seattle
Princess Beatrice, every Monday at 1 p.m.
Princess May or Princess Royal
every Saturday morning.
Steamer, leave Vancouver
Princess Beatrice every Thursday night.
Princess May or Princess Royal
every Saturday night at 11
o'clock.
Union Steamship Co'y
of B.C. Ltd.
DISSOLUTION   OF   PARTNERSHIP
TAKE NOTICE that the verbal
partnership heretofore subsisting between the undersigned, Arthur F.
Rowe who was to furnish the
Planer, and F. E. Cowell who was to
furnish the Power, at the site of the
B. C. Tie & Timber Company's sawmill at Seal Cove, in the town of
Prince Rupert, B.C., has this day
been mutually dissolved, A. F. Rowe
collecting all accounts and paying
only expense of labor since Installation   of  plant.
Dated this ninth day of July, 1910.
ARTHUR F. ROWE
FRED E.  COWELL.
For Diamonds,
Wedding Rings, Wedding
Presents, High-Class
Jewelry, and all makes
of High Grade Watches, go to
C. B. WARK
The Reliable Jeweler.
Watch Repairing a Specialty
The new Steel Passenger Steamer
"Camosun"
PRINCE RUPERT every Sunday at 9 a.m. for Vancouver,
arriving Monday afternoon.
For Stewart City on arrival from
Vancouver Friday night.
Northbound, leaves Vancouver
Wednesdays at 9 p.m.
Steerage Fare $5.00
The "Camosun" is the only steamer
on the run having- water-tight bulkheads and double bottom, thus ensuring safety of passengers in case of
collission or wreck.
J. H. ROGERS,   Ticket Agent
HAYNOR   BROS.
FUNERAL  DIRECTORS
and
PROFESSIONAL   EMBALMERS
DR.  \V.  B.  CLAYTON'
DENTIST
—o—
Office   in    the    Westenhaver   Block,
Over  Orme's  Drug   Store.
Prince Rupert
WM. S. HAi-L, L. D. S. D. D. S.
:-:    DENTIST   :-:
Crown and Bridge Work a specialty.
All dental operations skillfully
treated. Gas and local anaesthetics
administered for the painless extraction of teeth. Consultation free.
Offices: Rooms 19 and 20, Alder
Block, Prince Rupert.
.1. H. IMLLSBI ItY
CIVIL     ENGINEER
Surveying,   Designs,   Estimates,   etc.
Room   7,   Exchange   Block.
Corner  Third  Ave  and   Sixth   Street
Prince Rupert
G. \v, xi<'Ki:itso\ & CO.
■—o—
CUSTOMS AMI MERCHANDISE
—o—
Brokers, Forwarding Agents,
Storage, etc,
Clarmont Rooms
Sixth Avenue near Fulton street
Comfortable, Homelike Rooms; Newly Furnished Throughout;  Bath
Rooms  with   Hot  and
Cold Water
Rates, 8:1.00 a Week   nnd   Upwards
Mrs.   Annie   McGrath,   Proprietoress
The Roland Rooms
Splendid  Accommodations
Newly Furnished
Hot   baths;   right   down  town;   good
table  board  all  round
l; VIES, FIFTY CENTS AND IT
J. VV. POTTER
ARCHITECT AND STRUCTURAL
ENGINEER
Re-inforced Concrete a Specialty
,aw-Butler Building - Prince Rupert
GRAHAM ISLAM) — 'The surest
sign of tiie progress of a town or
district Is Its newspaper—live, active, hustling." "Tho Masset Review,"  Masset,  Q.C.I.
LADYSNITH
COAL
H. B. ROCHESTER,   -   Centre Street
■»♦■»♦♦♦♦■»♦♦♦ ♦•-»-
The Thompson
Hardware Co.
Second Avenue—
|    Paints  General Hardware,
t     Oils, Stoves and Ranges. THE   PRINCE  RUPERT  JOURNAL
Friday, July 29, 1910.
I Marine News of the Coast I
******* * ♦♦♦♦♦+♦♦*#+*♦♦ ♦♦•M"*-************* •****<• ***<.<. *.;..>
VISITING ISLANDS
Capt. Nicholson, the superintendent of the coast service of the G. T.
P., is giving attention at present to
the local service out of Prince Rupert. He is visiting the different
ports on the Queen Charlottes with
the object in view of studying the
exact needs of these parts.
One change he has introduced is
that the steamer Prince Albert will
leave here on Sunday direct for Mas-
Bet, call at Port Simpson and other
ports on the way back. There will
probably be other changes introduced into the service from time to
time to meet new demands.
 o	
SEATTLE CALLED
the first week in August. The admiralty has agreed to lend skilled
ratings and instructional staff officers
for the safe conduct of the ship.
Rear Admiral Kingsmill states
that inquiries are now being made
among firms on the admiralty list
for tenders for the construction of
four vessels of the Bristol type and
six destroyers.
SHIPPING GLIDE
The City of Seattle on her way
north, reached port last evening with
quite a large number of passengers
on board.
 o	
WILL LOAD LIMBER
After discharging her cargo of
steel rails for the Grand Trunk Pacific and D. D. Mann's Stewart Short
line railroad here, the steamer Belle
of Scotland will proceed south. She
Mias been chartered to load lumber
on the Sound for the Orient.
DEFECTIVE   ARMOR
Defects have been discovered in tbe
armor plate of the new battleships
North Dakota and Utah. Spalls, a
flaking condition that impaired the
armament resistance efficiency, were
found on the plates and new plates
have been substituted. It was s-ild
that, possibly the annealing work In
affixing the plates may have caused
some of the defects. About fifty .ons
of armor, valued at approximately
120,000 were affected. The North
Dakota Is In New England waters
and in commission, the new plates
being already placer, while the Utah
is In course of construction at Cain-
den, N.J. The government is now
suing the Midvale Steel Co., of Philadelphia, for the cost of replacing
the armor.
CANADA'S NAVY
Rear Admiral Chas. E. Kingsmill
returns to Canada shortly. The admiralty has agreed to alterations in
the Niobe as suggested by Canada.
The Niobe will not sail for Canada
until September.    The Rainbow sails
Must Stand Trial
(Continued from Page One)
To Arrive
Friday, July 29—Prince Albert from
Skldegate, Jedway, etc.
Camosun  from  Vancouver.
Saturdeay, July 30.—Princess Royal
from Skagway.
Princess Beatrice from Vancouver.
Amur   from   Vancouver   and   way
ports.
Sunday,   July   31.—Prince     George
from   Seattle,  Victoria   and   Vancouver.
Camosun from Stewart.
Monday,   August   1.—Prince   George
from Stewart.
Prince Albert from Port Simpson,
Naas, Masset, etc.
Princess Beatrice from  Stewart.
Princess May from Vancouver.
Saturday,   July   30—Hazelton   from
Hazelton and Skeena river points.
Monday, August 1—Humboldt from
Seattle.
Wednesday, Aug.  3—Prince Rupert
from   Seattle,  Victoria   and  Vancouver.
Cottage City from Seattle.
City of Seattle from Skagway.
To Depart
Friday, July 29—Camosun for Stewart.
Saturday,  July  30—Princess  Royal
for Vancouver and Victoria.
Princess Beatrice for Stewart.
Sunday, July 31—Prince George for
Stewart.
Prince  Albert  for  Port   Simpson,
Naas and Masset.
Camosun for Vancouver.
Amur for Vancouver and Victoria
by way of Queen Charlotte Islands.
Monday,   August   1—Prince   George
for  Vancouver,  Victoria   and   Seattle.
Princess Beatrice for Vancouver.
Princess  May for Ketchikan, Juneau and Skagway.
Monday,   August   1.—Hazelton   for
Hazelton.
Humboldt for Skagway.
Wednesday,   August   3—Prince Ru-
per for Stewart.
Prince Albert for Skidegate, etc.
Cottage City for Skagway.
City of Seattle for Seattle.
CONTRACT SYSTEM ADOPTED
BY CITY COUNCIL
(Continued on  Page One)
smith, to the effect that he had fixed
shears. The shears were identified
as having been found in the attic at
the  time  of  fhe fire.
John Currey had been asked by
accused what he would take for his
place.
Evidence was given by laundry
drivers to having received laundry
at the Talbot House, but there was
nothing unusual about it.
G. R. Naden testified to his company having $8,000 insurance on the
House. It was in the name of accused.
The chief of police in his evidence
told of finding paper scattered about
in the attic. There were gasoline tins
also. The accused had said that he
did not know how these got there.
He then traced the history up to
the time of the arrest, the facts of
which have already been made public.
He had warned accused on arrest
in the usual way against saying anything that might be used against
him.
The chief told of accused on the
morning after his arrest, after a second warning, saying "McCarvell, I'm
sorry this thing happened. I realize
my mistake now."
Later in reply to a question he
said he placed the gasoline in fhe
attic- that morning, lie added "I
don1! know why I did It; I must be
out of my head."
No evidence was called for tiie defence, and Mr. Patmore, speaking for
Ihe accused, said he had nothing to
say at this time.
The accused was committed for
trial at the next assizes.
 o	
In the year 1219 King Waldemar
of Denmark, when leading his troops
to battle against the Llvonlans, saw,
or thought he saw, a bright light in
the form of a cross In the sky. He
held this appearance to be a promise
of victory. From this time he had
the cross placed on the flag of his
country and called It the Dannebrog,
that is, the strength of Denmark.
Aside from legend, there is no doubt
that this flag with cross was adopted
by Denmark in the thirteenth century
and that at about the same date an
order, known as the order of Denne-
brog, was Instituted, to which only
soldiers and sailors who were distinguished for courage, were allowed
to belong. The flag of Denmark, a
plain red banner bearing on It a
white cross, is the oldest flag now
In existence. For three hundred
years both Norway and Sweden were
united with Denmark under this flag.
Hear
the
Truth
There's nothing about a set of
harness that requires such careful
attention, in both leather and workmanship, as traces and collars, there's
where the strain lies, there's where
we excel, though we are just as
watchful as to every other detail of
a complete set of harness, be It for
heavy or light work.
B. C. Saddlery Company
Limited
MANUFACTURERS OF SADDLERY
Jobbers of heather, Harness, Saddles, Whips, Trunks and Valises,
Pads, Blankets, Rugs; Harness Soaps
and Dressings.
500 FATES STREET
VICTORIA, B.C.
good wages as the best means of getting good workers. He believed that
they might insist upon the men being British subjects. He thought
they might insist that those employed
in using explosives were able to
speak the English language.
His Worship asked Aid. Hilditch
how many English speaking men
would apply for work If the city ad-
veritsed for the workers.
Aid. Hilditch said he did not believe there would be 26 of them.
They would have to be brought In.
Aid. Naden pointed out that in the
upper country complaint was made
against even Nova Scotians coming
in to the mines on the ground that
they sent their money back to Nova
Scotia. In time these same men became attached to the west. If the
Montenegrins were treated fairly they
might also become citizens of the
country.
Would  Attract; Anglo-Saxons
Aid. Lynch believed that with $3
a day set as the wage, there would
be a good number of Anglo-Saxon
attracted in. This would especially
apply to the fall and winter. The
foreigners when they first came to
this country had to meet strong prejudice. He referred to the fact that
signs were posted "No Irish may apply" in many centres not very long
ago. Now some of these same cities
were ruled by the Irish, (haughter.)
It came down to a question of getting this work done and if they could
not get Anglo-Saxons to do it, others
must be got. He objected to the day
labor propositon because it lent It-,
self to creating a great political machine. This was far reaching. The
employing of men under day labor
laid itself open to members of the
council perpetuating themselves in
power without giving adequate value
to the city. He was opposed to day
labor being employed in the city from
the fact that it lent itself to graft.
His Worship said he was bound by
his pre-election promises in favor of
an eight-hour day at a fair wage. He
was as strongly In favor of that now
as before election. In the carrying
out of this work he felt like- leaving
it to the city engineer who was acornl
petent man. •   rp<    - Rponjq
Aid. Naden did not believe in fuming over the conduct of the city business to the engineer. -If tjhe council
agreed with his advice they should
accept it. The council was elected
to take the responsibility. 'If'it die!-
agreed with the advice of the ehc-
gineer it should take its stand. The
Imperial parliament employed experts, but the final decision of the
policy rested with parliament. It
should In the same way be open to
the council to criticize the work of
any official.
Aid. Mobley agreed that the council should not relinquish the right to
control the work. He would do the
work by contract labor in a general
way because he felt that it would be
the better system to work on.
His Worship said he did not advocate turning over the control of affairs to any official.   The council had
a right to agree or disagree with it.
Voices View of Citizens
Aid. Hildltch announced that he
was there not to please the city engineer. He was there to voice the
views of the citizens who elected him.
It was for the council to say how the
work should be done. The engineer
would then carry it out. He believed that they had a good engineer.
Aid. Barrow thought the executive
work should be done by the engineer.
Without getting in on the technical
side of the work, the council could
very well retain the degree of control required.
Aid. hynch suggested that there
was considerable in the report that
would require attention at once. The
part dealing with sewers and water
pipes should be taken up. He
thought that the work connected with
the sewers and water distribution
system during the life of the present
council should be paid out of the
general fund. He suggested that
this should be referred to the. engineer to outline a proposition i for
this work.
This was agreed to.
Aid. Mobley wanted the city solicitor to express an opinion on the question as to whether government lots
were  exempt  from  taxation.
His Worship thought that in view
of the increased value that would
follow on the work being done the
government might agree to pay the
taxes.
Aid. Naden thereupon referred to
a conversation he had with Premier
McBride on this very subject. The
Premier had said that he did not believe that the government could pay
taxes on Its own land out of consolidated revenue. The.only way it
could ho done would beJijUifefllxJUd
way of a grant for some specific undertaking.
■ The report was referred   to    the
streets and property committee.
Committee Disagreed
hast evening when the report of
the streets committee was presented
it endorsed the engineer's report in
large measure, but specified that on
the point of deciding between contract and day labor it could not agree.
Aid. Hildltch said the committee
could not agree as to how the work
should be done. He favored adopting the report of the engineer and
that the city engineer be instructed
to have the work carried on by day
labor with an eight hour day at a
minimum wage of $3 a day. It was
felt that the work should be done
by men who would make their homes
here. Prince Rupert required men
who were prepared to make a great
city of this. The system of day labor
was far freer from graft than by contract labor. Cities in the United
States and Canada were for the most
part doing the work by day labor.
Under the contract system the contractor would get the cheapest labor
possible. He would have these men
naturalized and would control their
votes. The Anglo-Saxon race was
the best adapted to ca'rry out self-
g vernment. This was the better
class to introduce into Prince Rupert.
Contract   System
No seconder appearing for Aid.
Hildltch's motion, Aid. Pattullo
moved the adoption of the streets
committee report. That' did not specify what system of labor should be
employed. This question could be
settled later.
Aid. Naden seconded the motion.
Aid. hynch said he favored contract labor here. He moved that contracts be prepared and tenders called
for the work.
Aid. Naden stated that he would support this if it was included that there
should be an eight hour day with a
minimum wage of $3 and that no
Asiatics' be employed.    .
This was agreed to.
Aid.-Pattullo believed at the present tfriie the work could be done niore
economically by contract than by day
labor. He did not wish to bind himself that he would not at a later
time find that day labor would be the
better system.
I 'The question was raised by Aid.
Smith as to whether the city was to
be bound to accept these tenders.
; Aid. Naden suggested that the tenders should be called for, but the city
should not bind itself to accept any
ill them. If the engineer could do
tile work cheaper by day labor then
he should be allowed to proceed with
it' ttfat way.
1 Aid.'Lynch suggested that the engineer might tender as was done in
some cities. -.,,-,
Ald'J'Mobley thought this was a
safe way to do it.
Ald^ Lynch agreed to this being included in the motion.
Against Sub-contracts
Asking leave to address the council, It was suggested by one In attendance at the meeting that no subcontracts be let. If sub-contracts
were allowed the eight hour day system would be killed.
Aid. Mobley opposed the suggestion. He believed that there would
be an advantage in carrying out the
work by station work in some cases.
Aid. Hilditch feared that the members of the council were going to get
away from their pre-election pledges
and the eight hour day would become
a farce.
Aid. Pattullo said this was a case
of getting the work done In the best
way possible. Aid. Hilditch was too
ready to introduce the reference to
pre-election promises.
Aid. Mobley said that he was getting tired of this continued inference
that the members of the council were
a band of crooks. He wished to
believe the members honest men until he found out differently. Aid.
Hildltch was too ready to throw out
this Inference. He did not believe
th'at any man should be forbidden
(o work longer than eight hours if
he wanted to. He himself worked
10 hours a day. He asked no other
man to do that.
Pre-election Promises
- Aid. Naden Intimated that as well
as Ile'remembered, Aid. Hildltch had
favored station work at the time of
the election.
Aid. Lynch also had the same recollection. For himself he believed
that there were many men who preferred to work :o'n a station rather
than hare a' contractor1 standing over
them'.'"' ":" I
Aid. Hildltch said that he believed
he was elected on the labor ticket
which favored station work if It was
confined to eight hour a day work.
Aid. Smith said that It had been
round that work could be carried
out by station work for about sixty
per cent of the cost of day labor.
The proposed contract being read,
Aid. Lynch suggested that the work
jmight-lte...divided -up.    There were
bElH   wmsuvr
"WHERE QUALITY IS KING."
GEO. D. TITE
Furniture Dealer
■
3rd. Avenue
Prince Rupert
An inspection of our stock
of House Furnishings will
convince you. For quality and
economy you will leave us a
satisfied customer.
Dlnlnj Rotm Fmiltwt, SMeharia,
ButftU, Dlninj Tablu, 6ft.
■  and 8ft. Eitcnalu
Dlilai Itoom Chain, Qurtmd Oik with
Lather Sail, Gold™ er Early Epjllak
flnlah. Prion rtnflaf from
I
Just Received a
Handsome Line of
Iron Beds, Springs and
Mattresses, all sizes
WINDOW BLINDS
Manufactured here to fit any
window up to 10 feet wide.
Tapestry and Lace Curtains,
Poles and Trimmings
Special orders for Upholstering
of any kind.
$22.50 to $50
Wicker Chairs and Rockers
GEO. D. TITE,    -    3rd Ave.
SHERWIN & WILLIAMS
-PAINTS-
mnmmnnBHMBMHHMBWHMBBMnMSBB
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in
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COVER THE EARTH.
WE   ARE   SOLE   AGENTS
CARLOAD JUST ARRIVED
Ready Nixed Paints,
Paints Ground in Oil,
Paints Ground in Japan,
Varnishes, Shellac, etc.
Water Stains
and
Decotint
IN ALL COLORS
Prince Rupert Hardware & Supply
Company, Ltd. ™os. smsHt "*■
&\n®mm®mmnm®mmmmmmmmnmmm®®\®
The Westholme
Lumber Company, Ld.
We carry the largest stock of
Building Supplies in the North.
Quotations given on short notice in all lines.
Rough and Dressed Lumber
Shingles and Lath
Mouldings and Cases
Doors and Windows
We handle Plaster and Lime at reasonable prices
Get our quotations for alljclasses of buildings.
office and FIRST   AVFNTTF
h WAREHOUSES TIlVJl    AVLHUti
three heavy cuts on the avenue and
this might be cut up into at least
three contracts.
Ald._Mobley called attention to the
requirement that $2,000 should be
put up by the contractor who tendered. This would shut out the
smaller contractor. This might be
better considered so as to overcome
the objection.
The report was finally referred to
the streets committee to consider the
proposals with'the city solicitor.
MINUS  TO SHIP
Properties About White Horse Have
Secured a Better Railway Rate
Capt. E. H. Fletcher, inspector of
post offices,  with    headquarters    in
Victoria, has spent several days here
this week. He Is now continuing his
ditties on the Queen. Charlotte
Islands, going over by the Bruno on
Wednesday night.
Mr. Fletcher arrived from the
north by the Humboldt after paying
a visit to White Horse arid other post
offices in that district, where all was
found in good order.
White Horse, according to Capt.
Fletcher, is very optimistic at present. The mines are producing good
ore and a favorable rate has been
obtained so that shipments will be
made to Skagway and from there to
the coast smelters.
 o	
F. Dundas Todd, the government's
apiary expert, estimates that British
Columbia bees produce $100,000
worth of honey annually.

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