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Prince Rupert Journal Apr 12, 1912

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Array The Journal
$5.00
a year
Prime  fUro^rl
APR 18 W
High Class
Job Printing
in all Lines
VOL. II.
PRINCE   RUPERT,   B.   C. FRIDAY, APRIL 12,  1912.
Price, Five Cents.
NO.  120.
WANT RELAXATION
IN CUSTOM RULES
Board of Trade   Have Questions That They
Want Disposed of By the Inspector while
Here-Express Charges  to Come
Before   Railway
Commission
The Board of Trade last night at
Its regular meeting considered the
question of holding meetings more
frequently in the future. After discussion it was decided to meet once
a month, the first Friday in the
month being named as the date for
this meeting. At last night's gathering the president, Frank Mobley, presided. The attendance was not large,
the scant attendance being the reason for the decision to hold monthly
meetings in the hope that greater
interest will be aroused in future.
Three new members were elected
at tlie meeting, George Leek, A. T.
Broderick and C. H. Orme.
The discussions for the most part
had to do with customs and express
business. Under both heads there
were complaints made and efforts
will be made to right  them.
Under the head of customs complaint was made that the rules of
the local office were more strict
than those enforced at other places,
like Vancouver. G. W. Nlckerson
pointed out that in Vancouver and
other places the rule with respect to
adding 26 per cent to the regular
duty In cases where the second column, showing the price at which the
goods were sold in the country from
which they came, was not filled in
was not enforced as strictly as here.
The enforcement of this rule created
a lot of Inconvenience. To have the
refund made entailed a lot of trouble
and waste or time. In other Canadian  cities  the  officers  used  discre
tionary [lowers in this regard.
Several others referred to difficulties experienced along this line
and   in   other  ways.
It was finally decided to take tlie
matter up with the inspector of customs, W. Marchant, who was in the
city, and see if something could not
be done*to have a little relaxation
with respect to the rule. H. S. Clements, M. P., it was suggested, might
be communicated with in this matter.
A committee consisting of G. W.
Nickerson, J. H. Rogers and H. B.
Rochester was appointed io go Into
the matter.
Another matter raised was that
with respect to express rates, it was
pointed out that express companies
put express matter on board vessels
as freight at Vancouver and charged
quite heavy rates for express to
Prince Rupert in addition to the
rates from the east to Vancouver.
The result was that the receivers of
express here had very exorbitant
rates in many instances, especially in
small parcels.
Mr. Rochester was able to explain
this, which was due to a rule of the
company.
It was decided to refer this to a
committee to go into with the object
of bringing the matter before the
railway commission, which, it was
pointed out, had authority in the
matter. '
INTRODUCES BILL
Premier Asqinth Urges the Home Rule
Measure Upon the House
of Commons
He Declares That Ireland Is in Favor
and He Will Xol Favor Ulster
Vetoing It
London, April 11.—Premier As-
quith brought in the Home Rule Bill
this afternoon. He was greeted by
Liberal and Nationalist cheers when
he rose  to speak.
"The will of Ireland." said the
premier, "is preponderantly in favor
of Home Rule and I would not admit
the right of the Ulster minority to
veto the will of the majority."
> This is the third Home Rule Bill
introduced into the Commons by Liberal governments in order to pacify
Ireland.
 o ■
HOME  RULE  BILL
It Is Now About Complete and Ready
for Introduction
London, April 11.--Leading members of the British cabinet today put
the finishing touches to tlie Home
Rule bill, which Premier Asquitii
will introduce In the I louse of Commons tomorrow.
Members of tlie government and
a few Nationalist members who have
been taken in I heir confidence have
kept secret the details of the measure, but with the exception of clauses
relating to the control of excise and
customs and the number of Irish
representatives to be retained at
Westminster, the general outlines of
the bill are pretty well known. It
Is expected that the bill will follow
closely that which was proposed by
Mr. Gladstone.
I    MEETING!
Prince Rupert Conservative Association
There will be a meeting of  Hie Association  in
McINTYRE HALL,
Tuesday Evening, April 16
AT 8 I". M.
For the purpose of amending the Constitution of the Association
and if necessary electing additional members on the Executive
Committee.
Admission   will   be   by   Card  of Membership.
GEORGE D. TITE, President.
O. H. NELSON, Secretary.
BBS
NAIL  FOR   NAAS
Representative of the Settlers in that
Part of the District Seeks
Facilities
W. A. Myers Has Presented to the
Favorable Consideration of Residents  Claims  of  Valley
KM,I,El) ON  STREET
Vancouver, Feb. 11.—Plee,
a Russian, was killed, and Gio-
vanna Plella, an Italian, was seriously injured today as a result
of a blasting accident on Rob-
son Street sewer excavation
work. The men, who \Jere city
workmen, ignored or misunderstood the warning to keep clear.
LIBERAL REFORMS
H. C. Brewster has Entered  Upon the
Reorganization   With
Party
He Plans a Constructive  Policy  for
That  Party and Is Infusing Vigor
Into Rank and File
"I can trace my descent for .100
rears."
"Sure enough."
"Yes. ow ar can you trace iour
descent?" *
"Not very far. But I never claimed to have descended so far as you.'1
Choice meats at the Royal Cafe.
Vancouver, April 11.—The Provincial Liberal Association will endeavor to infuse some vigor Into
the rank and file of the party in
Ibis province, II. C. Brewster is
here today on au important mission
in commencing the reorganization of
the party. He plans constructive
planks in Ihe platform of the party,
lie is desirous of seeking reform
methods in Handling the voters' list,
W. A. Myers of Gwinoha, on the
Naas, is in the city at present and
while here he is endeavoring to
arouse interest in the providing of
better mail facilities with that part
of the district. There is now' beginning to be somewhat of a settlement there and the need of better
facilities is all the more fell. Last
winter, it will be remembered, that
there was a move made for the getting in of the mail over the snow.
This was accomplished but the way
was heavy and all of the mail did
not get in by way of Kitsumkalum.
The move in this 'direction was the
result of the good offices of the
member for Ihe district. H. S. Cle-
I meats, who took steps as soon as
the matter was brought to his attention to have the mail  carried in.
Mr. Myers is anxious to have a
regular service established for the
Naas in that direction. At present
there is not business enough offering to make it worth while to have
a light draft steamer ply on ilie
steadily but Mr. .Myers thinks that
perhaps something could be done to
accomplish  Ihe ends sought.
He appeared before the board of
trade last evening and put fiTs views
before that body. The board will
take action in making recommendations in the matter. .Mr. -Myers also
took the question up with members
of the Conservative executive In an
informal way and there will be representations made to the member
of the district when he visits the
Skeena in a few weeks' time looking
to having something done in the direction   indicated.
TEHUANTEPEC
FREIGHT
* STELLO   IS   GUILTY *
*                            *
* Vancouver, April 11.—Valen- :;
* tine Stello, accused of wounding *
* a      fellow     countryman,      W. *
* Brandt,   at Prince Rupert, was *
* found    guilty    at    the    assizes *
* here today.    His sentence was *
* deferred until the close of the *
* assizes. *
City Visitor—How much milk
does a cow give?
Farmer—None; you've got to
take it.
In    One    Year    Increase    in    Traffic
Across Isthmus Over Previous
Year Is .->() Per Cent
By agreemenl with the Tehuante-
pec National Railway the Can.adian-
Mexican Steamship Company of Vancouver handles all Teruantepec
freight, The Amerlcan-Hawilan
Company handles all cargo destined
for lii'itIsh Columbia;
Statistics secured by the United
Stales consul at Salina Cruz, Mexico,
of the tonnage carried during the
last fiscal year by I lie Tehuantepec
Railway across the Isthmus of Tie-
huantepec, show an increase of more
than HO per cent in Ihe traffic across
the Isthmus over the previous year,
due almost entirely to Hie increased
trade between New York and European ports and San Francisco and Seattle on the vessels of the American-
Hawaiian Steamship Company. The
Tehuantepec. National Railway
tranships tiie goods carried by these
vessels, transporting the cargoes
across the Isthmus between Salina
Cruz, on the Pacific, and Puerto
Mexico, on the Gulf of Mexico.
The eastbound tonnage in one year
increased from 306,826 tons to 478,-
888 tons, or 46 per cent, while the
I Continued on Page Three)
IRON ORE ON COAST
R. H. Flaherty Tells What He Thinks
of the Deposits Found on
the Coast
Abundance   of   Raw   .Material   and
Cheap Transportation That Will
Work Advantages
R. H. Flaherty, the mining expert
associated with the Mackenzie &
Minn iron mining and smelting enterprises.in tlie easl, has returned to
Vancouver after several weeks spent
in Northern British Columbia looking into several iron deposits. Mr,
Flaherty paid a visit, to Princess Louise Island, off Moresby, in the Queen
Charloote Islands group. While
.Mr. Flaherty declined to say what
his mission in the west was it is
well understood that he has been
employed in making examinations of
different ore fields with a view to
their development by tlie interests
he represents, it having been semiofficially announced that It was the
intention of Mackenzie & Mann to
establish at Port Mann an iron smelting plant and works on a plan similar to that already well under way
at. Port Arthur.
While tiie neglect of development
of British Columbia iron mines has
been ascribed largely to the prevalence ''!' t'omparatively low grade
magnetite deposits with the almost
entire absence of hematite ore, Air.
Flaherty states thai with the modern
processes involving concentrating
systems magnetic Iron ores uavej
been commercially treated with metallic contents as low as .",2 and "■',
per cent and lie says that the magnet i<- ores of the Attikokan range at
the Port Arthur plant of the Mackenzie & Mann will be used exclusively
without the mixture of the hematite
ores which could easily be obtained
from the Minnesota side of Ihe line,
into which territory Hie Mackenzie
& Mann railway, which was purchased from the old Port Arthur. Du-
luth & Western Railway, runs.
The presence of sulphur, which
was another defect in British Columbia ores, and which discouraged the
development of the local m-cs, Mr.
Flaherty declares by tho adoption
of the wedge Bystetn of roasting will
be eradicated with economic success
and will also result in raising the
metallic contents of the ore from ."
to 7 per cenl and In addll Ion to ha!
i he i o .iIng process gives a resultant
thai is practically a bemal Ite one.
While nol giving an Intimation of
the results of his inquiries into the
iron proposition lie had examined,
Mr. Flaherty said: "There is undoubtedly lols of good iron ore along
this British Columbia coast. The
Texada Island mines of course have
proved that, and In other places there
are unlimited quantities of ore and
should be a good future for the iron
business in this country. You have
tlie iron ore and the coking coal Is
here in close junction, and on top
of that, you have cheap transportation  to  all   the  big  markets.
METEOROLOGICAL   REPORT
(April 11—6 p. m.)
Barometer     211.688
Maximum temperature r» 4. o
.Minimum   temperature    41.0
 _ o	
I enl   ut   the  Royal  Cafe.
RICH VALLEY IS
THAT <0F THE NAAS
Resident of the  Northern District Tells of
Conditions in that Section of the
County—Land is Productive and Seasons
Enjoyable
W. A. Myers of the Naas Valley,
now in the city, has a thorough
knowledge of that part of the country and he classifies it as one of
the most desirable parts of the province in which to live. The soil is
rich and productive. The seasons
are not severe in the least, the
weather being very similar to what
it is in Ontario. In the lower levels
of the valleys the land is mostly
the deposit from the streams and
is consequently exceedingly productive. The higher benches consist of
clay subsoil with a black loam top
soil.
The soil is capable of producing
the best of any c'ass of vegetables
or grain. There is also splendid results from the growing of fruit on
thense benches.
The fall of snow is not heavy—
not as great as some other parts of
the province—and spring opens in
excellent style.
Mr. Myers expects to see a great
rush for the Naas in the near future.
The attractions of tlie place will
draw a good class of setllers who
will make their homes there.
The clearing in some instances is
very heavy, but the results will be
well worth the labor involved.
Mr. Myers is a missionary in the
district and combined with his duties in that direction he acts as
teacher and Instructor in an industrial way among the Indians. He
is arranging now to have supplies
provided for the carrying on of ex
perimental   work   in   gardening  and
other lines of agriculture.
WORKING AGAIN
Vancouver, April 11.—Station *
men along the line of the Cana- *
diau Northern Railway construe- *
tion are continuing to work and *
are not being molested  by the *
other   men.      Small    gangs    of *
strikers   still   continue   to   idle *
about the I.  W.  W.  camps,  but •
the majority are flocking to tiie *
cities on the coast.
POKES FIN AT CANADA
i •
London,  April   11.—Truth,  a *
well  known   weekly  paper,  lias *
no use  for Canadian  politicians *
and has many bitter tilings to *
say   about   them.     It   says   Hie •
payment of members of I'arlia- '
ment  will   lone  a   tendency   to *
bring   many   more   of   them   to *
England. *
it pokes fun at  Premier Borden  and  his   Windsor  uniform, *
and  remarks on statesmen  who •
like  to  be   photographed.
KiLLED  CAPTAIN
FATAL  ACCIDENT
i
Vancouver, April 11.—The
C. P. R. passenger train No. 2,
which left this city last evening
was wrecked by a rockslide at
(! o'clock this morning three
miles east of Savonas. Engineer
Walker and Fireman Hoskin-
son were so badly injured Hint
they died within a short time.
POWDER   EXPLOSION
Nanaimo has  Anothfr  Fatal  Accident
at the North Field Works
In City
Superintendent    Wilson    Killed
\\\  Woods Seriously   Injured
in ihe Accident
and
Nanaimo, April 11. Supt. W. A.
Wilson ni' Hie Canadian Explosives
Company was killed and a laborer
named w. Woods waa seriously in
jured in an explosion of the works
at Xorthfield at in o'clock yosterdaj
mornlug Other deaths wen' prob-
ablj averted through tlie explosion
from the tail thai the explosion was
anticipated. Supt. Wilson was 200
feet away ai the time, and was ilis-
embowlled.
OVERSEAS CLUB
GRAND  ANNIVERSARY  CONCERT
AND  DANCE
To  he held   in
McINTYRE   HALL
On
FRIDAY, APRIL 12
At !i P. M.
Full   Orchestra
Admission:     Gents, $1;   Ladies Free.
Japanese Cook  on   American   Schooner
Murdered His Commander
on High Seas
Accused Man Was Put in Irons I mil
llix Reached San Francisco, Where
lie Was Arrested
San Francisco, April 11. Captain
Bersen of tiie American schooner
Americane, which reached porl here
today, 128 days from Australia, was
killed mi January 27 by tlie vessel's
Japanese cook. This Information
was received when the vessel entered
quarantine.
United states marshals have been
sent to the ship to arrest the cook,
who was held in irons- during tlie
completion of tlie voyage.
DAFFODIL  LUNCHEON
Enjoyable Event   Held  in  the Anglican   Hall   Vestetd.iv   at   (lie
Noon  llniir
Tlie ladlei i'I 'in- Angll an iIhurch
have ." i'i \ reason i" feel proud '>f
Hie success thai attended Hie daffodil luncheon that was given yesterday a; noon in ihe hall. For the
period ut two hours the place was
crowded with Visitors Who enjoyed
the home made dishes thai were set
before  them.
Tho Indies had gone to a great
deal of pains to prepare for this
evenl and in consequence everything
passed off in the most acceptable
manner. So great was the rush
upon Hie tallies thai the ladies in
charge were in imminent danger of
falling short  in the supplies.
POPE   REPORTED  l)F,AI>
This morning word was received that the Pope had died.
Tho report had not been confirmed from the Vatican, but is
believed  to be true. PRINCE RUPERT JOURNAL
Friday,   April   12,   1912.
prince iRupevt journal
Telephone   138
led at 87 feet, and at S."> feet duriny
the dry season.    The minimum chau.
nel   depth  in  the canal  is   47   feet,
;    and as 11 feet is all that is required
near McBride Street.   Telephone 138.   for navigation,  there will  be stored
P. O. Lex 8U7 for the dry season, three months, a
(). II. KELSON, Editor. surplus of five feet and over, which
,,  ,,. .DAILY  BDITI01J. .will supply the electrical power nec-
Publlshed   every   morning   except '.' ' „        '
Monday. Delivered by carrier in the essary in the operation of the gates
city at the following rate if paid in and towage of the boats through the
advance:- locks.     This   power  will   be   gener
ated  at the spillway, which  is situated nearly midway of the dam.  The
One Year $5.00
Six  Months $2.50
Three    Months $1.25
I Ine  .Month ?  .50
WEEKLY EDITION.
Published everj Friday for circu-
lati m outsIde the citj of Prince
I;:, ii 11 al .. it) a y ar addressed to
points in Canada or $3.00 a year to
al!   poinl.-  In   the  United   Kingdom,
spillway Is 1,200 feet long by 300
feet wide. This is fitted with gates
and machinery for regulating the water  level of  the lake.
During the rainy season the maximum  runoff from the above  watei
the   United   stales  or  other  foreign   gne(]   of   ]3,,0 re  mj,(,s   W()1|W1
countries,
Advertising Rates Upon Application,
Friday, April  U
1912.
WRONG  PRINCIPLE
In this city we have the spectacle
of the mayor, in season and out of
season, attacking the police magistrate because he does not give judgments in accordance with his idea
of what should be given. That at
least is the reason given for the
animosity shown towards the magistrate, although there are those who
attribute his actions to other motives
entirely.
The mayor takes a most unjustifiable stand in this matter. For generations our ancestors fought for the
principle that men shall be held to
be innocent until they are proven
to be guilty of offences. Under
the modern system of justice every
man is entitled to a fair trial. The
accused is judged by men who in
taking their positions on the bench
bind themselves to be guided purely
by the evidence that is produced in
reaching the decisions that are arrived at. No right minded person
wishes to see any deviation from this
course.
In the decisions that are readied
by the police magistrate of the city
there is an easy method of testing
the corectnes of the judgments
and ihat is in an appeal to the county
court judge in the city. This is not
attempted by the mayor in his capacity of chief of police and chief of
the detective force. The fact that
no appeal is taken, but that on the
contrary the mayor prefers to cast
out slurs upon the way in which the
police court is conducted, goes to
show that there are other motives
behind the criticisms other than
those of a desire to serve the ends
of  justice.
 o	
PANAMA CANAL
What   the  Big  Ditch   Looks   Like  to
tlie Man Who Is Not an
Engineer
fill the lake ane and one-half times,
thus furnishing during the rain season an Immense amount of water,
which can be used In developing an
enormous power.
. o	
UNITED   STATES   STEEL
The canal is forty miles in length
from shore to shore and fifty miles
from deep water to deep water. Entering at Limon Bay on the Atlantic
sale it is sea level for a distance of
seven miles to Gatun, where is the
enormous dam. a mile and a half
long by half a mile wide at the base.
This Impounds the watershed of
the Chagres Rivr and ether stream.-,
i erlng a basin of 1,320 square
miles, making a lake which with the
nearlj nine miles of the Culebra
• ii to Pedro-Miguel would be aboul
thirty-five miles long, containing 10 I
square miles, which would be some
what larger than Lake Oneida the
largest body of water in New York
state.
From   sea   level   up   to   the   lake
above  Is a   lift   of  86  feet,  dli Ided
ei  locks, each  1 ,000
;. I   feet  v. Ide.     For
ter i ach lock  is suh-
ti id   !"■   ■■■ >• s  Into  chambers  of
1      and   feel each.   These lo I
are an exacl  twin of five serti i
thai   traffic   may   be   iccommodated
■  thei direction al the same time.
Ill   be   towed   through   the
i ■■   eh i ; 1Ic   locomotives   iiiti-
pg rails laid "ii the tops of
Ihe lock walls.
Qatun Lake will cover fully
me-thlrd of the canal zone of 448
ii length of the canal proper, while
In the lake vessels may steam at
full .speed for a distance of 24 miles,
Rnd It will require aboul ten hours
an: it from ocean to ocean, and
three of these passing through the
locks.
There   will   bo   six   double   locks,
three  pairs  on   Hie  Atlantic  side  at
II   with   a   r bitted   lift   of   86
feet and three pairs on the Pacific
side, one pair at, Pedro-Miguel with
a lift of 80 1-8 feet and two pairs
at Miral'lores With a combined lilt
of .'. I J-:i feet. The usable dimensions of all the locks are the same,
a length of 1,000 feet and a width
of 11  feet.
The waler surface of tho lake during the wei season will be maintain-
Big   Itonil   Issues  of Great   Corpora
tion Discussed by New
York Brokers
The exchange was full of talk
when it was announced that the
Steel Corporation had sold $30,500,-
000 bonds by way of capitalizing a
little bit of the enormous expenditures the company has made in new
construction and acquisition. The
company needed the money, the men
on the floor said, because last year
it did not appropriate from earnings
as much as in previous years for de
preciation and new construction. If
It had done so, floor traders, said,
it could not have paid a cent in
dividends on the common stock. The
most ironical persons said that to
all intents and purposes the company
had to have the money if it hoped
to continue dividend purposes.
Later they convinced themselves
without too much difficulty that the
financing'was not at all subject.to
honest hostile criticism. All of them
soon had before them figures showing that since the organization of
Hie company $410,000,000 had been
expended in new construction and
acquisitions, $300,000,000 had been
deducted from earnings for depreciation and sinking fund, and $310,-
000,000 had gone into ordinary repairs. There was a total of more
than a billion for these purposes.
By way of capitalizing a small
part of its enormous appropriations
for new construction, the company
last year sold a total of $33,400,000
bonds of subsidiary companies, but
it retired $9,500,000 bonds, so that
the net increase in the bonded in
debtedness was only $23,900,000. A
more inquisitive statistician discov
ered that since the organization of
the Steel Corporation it had redeemed up to the close of last year,
bonds to the amount of $58,908,500.
Up to the end of last year its expenditures had been $7S,2.r>S,508 on
the Gary plant alone. On account
of that plant there had been no
bond issue up to today, and the
amount now authorized for it is only
$15,000,000.
 o	
BROWN   BEARS ONLY
Incise of  U.   S.   Districl   Court   Had
Interesting Suit Before Mini Dealing  With  Species of  Bears
Judge T. R. Lynns of the United
Slates district coufl has held thai
the bears of Southeastern Alaska are
brown bear, and in the case of II.
Moses, vs. Collector of Customs Willis, ruled as such In trial at Juneau.
Mr. Moses, who is a fur buyer with
headquarters at lloonuh, brought
suit to compel Mr. Willis to issue
hippi r's manifest for one pelt,
the former desiring to gel it south
for marketing. Under the laws
brown bears cannot be shipped outside. Mr. Moses contended that the
skin was thai of a grizzly hear. Collector Willis contended the pelt to
be ' al of a brown bear, and ai i ord-
Ini I;   iefused  the manifest.
Tiie plaintiff himself and other
w inn ss.'s in his behalf test Ifled that
in their opinion Hie hide described
':; Ho- con pit In I was the hide of a
grizzly bear, and the plaintiff testified thai Hie hear from which the
hide wits taken was killed on Admiralty Island. Tlie witnesses for
the plaintiff further testified thai in
their opinion there is no other Bpe
eies to which Hie particular bear in
eontroversy belonged.
.Mr. Moses offered as evidence an
article found in the American Natural History, which says Hint In Alaska there exists two or throe species
of huge brown bears, totally differ-
out in character from all the American hears previously known. These
hears range from Sitka around tin
extremity of the Alaskan Peninsula,
Kodlak Island, and Inland for unknown distances.    They are marked
shoulders, massive heads of great
breadth, short, thick claws, and
by their light brown color, high
shaggy pelage. In their high shoulders they resemble the grizzly bear,
but otherwise differ from them in
many ways.
The defendant offend in evidence
an article written by Wilford Osgood, assistant biologist, wherein the
author  says:
'The varieties of brown hears as
at present classified are as follows:
The Kodiak bear, Inhahtlng the
Alaska Peninsula; the Yakutat bear,
of the vicinity of Yakutat Bay and
the coast north and south for undetermined distances; the Sitka bear,
of flaranof Island, and the Kidder
bear, of the Alaska Peninsula. With
tne exception of the last three, which
are smaller than the others and of
uncertain relationship, all Ihe
brown bears are similar in general
characters and external appearance,
the varietal distinctions being based
mainly upon cranial character obvious only to profession mammalo-
gists."
Judge Lyons, In deciding the case,
said:
"All the evidence before the court
is to the effect that there is only
one species of bear on Admiralty
Island and Mr. Osgood, who is an
authority on such matters, says that
a variety of the brown bear species
inhabit that island. The work offered
as evidence by the plaintiff shows
that there is a brown bear in Alaska known as the Sitka brown bear.
The court must conclude that the
hide or pelt described in the complaint is the hide of a variety or
subspecies of the brown bear species which is protected by law and
which may not lawyfully be shipped
from Alaska except in accordance
with the provision of tlie act of congress approved May 11, 100S. It
must be concluded that plaintiff has
neither pleaded nor proved that he
has complied with the provisions of
the act entitling him to ship the
hide of a brown hear from the District of Alaska.
"II follows that plaintiff is not
entitled to the relief sought and,
for the reasons herein assigned, this
proceeding must he dismissed, and
It  is  so  ordered."
TENDERS
TENDERS addressed to the undersigned at Ottawa, and endorsed on
the envelope "Tender for Holland
Island Lighthouse" or "Tender for
Point Atkinson, B. C, Lighthouse"
will be received up to noon of the
TWENTIETH DAY OF APRIL, 1912,
for the construction of a wooden
lighthouse and dwelling combined on
a Concrete Pier and Protection Work
on Holland Island, Chatham Sound,
B. C, and also for the construction
of a reinforced concrete tower, double dwelling and a fog alarm building, at Point Atkinson, in the Province of British Columbia.
Tenderers may quote for one or
both jobs, but in any case a separate
price must be iudicated for each one
of the two jobs. The Department
reserves the right to accept an offer
for one or both station.
Each tender must be accompanied
by an accepted cheque on a chartered
Canadian Bank equal to 5 per cent
of the whole amount of the offer,
which cheque will be forfeited if the
successful tender declines to enter
Into the contract prepared by the
Department or fails to complete the
work in accordance with the plans
and specifications.
Plans and specifications can be
seen and forms of tender procured
at this Department, Ottawa, at the
Agency of the Department, Victoria,
B, C, and at the Post Offices, Vancouver and Prince Rupert, B. C.
The lowest or any tendtr not necessarily accepted.
Newspapers copying this advertisement without authority from the Department will not be paid for same.
A. JOHNSTON,
Deputy Minister of Marine and Fisheries.
Department of Marine and Fisheries,
Ottawa, Canada.
March  1, 1912.
—18979. m20
BRITISH COLUMBIA COAST STEAMSHIP SERVICE
Famous
Princess
Line
.CANADIAN]
^PACIFIC/
N^T
Safety
Speed
Service
S. S. "PRINCESS ROYAL"
TENDERS WANTED
Sealed tenders will be received by
the undersigned up to 5 o'clock p m.,
April 22, for the purchase of debentures to cover the cost of the construction of a 16-foot plank roadway
between McBride and Dunsmuir
Streets on Fifth Avenue.
Full particulars from the city
clerk.
The highest or any tender not necessarily accepted.
ERNEST A.  WOODS,
al2-13 City Clerk.
WANTED
Position by experienced stenographer.    Apply M. J.,  P.  O.  Box 87S.
WANTED
A large quantity of piles. Specifications can be obtained at the cold
storage plant at  Seal Cove 3-7
A Regular Meeting of Tyoe Lodge,
I'. I).. A. F. & A. M„ will take place
in the Masonic Temple on the evening or Tuesday, April 9, at S p. in.
snarp. Visiting and sojourning
brethern  invited.
.IAS.   M.
April S. mi;
CARMICHAEL,
Secretary
LAND  REGISTRY  ACT
TAKE NOTICE that an application has been made to register James
Alfred Roberts as the owner in Fee
Simple, under a Tax Sale Deed from
William tl. Vickers, assessor to
James Alfred Roberts, bearing date
the 9th day of November, A.D., 1910,
of all and singular that certain parcel or tract of land and premises
situate, lying and being in the Province of British Columbia, more particular known and described as: —
Lot 556, Group 1, Cassiar District.
You and those claiming through
or under you and all persons claiming any Interest in the said land
by virtue of any unregistered Instrument, and all persons claiming any
interest in the said land by descent
whose title is not registered under
the provisions of the "Land Registry
Act," are required to contest the
claim of the tax purchaser within
forty-five days from the date of the
service of this notice upon you, and
in default of a caveat or certificate
of lis pendens being filed within
such period, or in default of redemption before registration, you and
each of you, win be forever estopped
and debarred from setting up any
claim to or in respect of the said
land, and I shall register James Alfred Roberts as owner thereof in
fee.
Dated at the Land Registry Office,
Prince Rupert, Province of British
Columbia, this 20th day of May,
A.D.,   1911.
WILLIAM E. BURRITT,
District Registrar.
To J. L. Parker, Esq., 523-24 Pacific
Block, Vancouver,  B.  C.
Block, Vancouver, II. C. m2S
Skeeno    l.and    Districl    District   of
Coasl     Range    five
TAKE NOTICE thai George M
Wilson, of Mountalr, Now .Mexico,
occupation Farmer, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands: —Commencing at a post planted at the northwest corner or Lot OS!); thence south
70 chains, more or less to Hells Gate
Slough; thence westerly along slough
following edge of Island around lo
point of commencement; containing
220  acres  more  or less.
GEORGE M. WILSON.
W.   J.   Goodwin,   Agent.
Daled  March  15,  1912. a5
HAYNER BROS
Pioneer Funeral Directors and
Embaltners.     Open   Day   and
Night.      Lailics'    Assistant    In
Attendance
PHONE 88.    7 I il THIRD AVE.
———■
TO CANADIAN ARCHITECTS
Competition     for     New     University
Buildings  lo  lie Erected at Point
Grey,    Near    Vancouver,    British
Columbia.
The Government or British Columbia invite Competitive Plans for the
general scheme and design for the
proposed new University, together
witli more detailed Plans for the
buildings to be erected first at an
estimated cost of $1,600,000.
Prizes of $10,000 will be given
for the most successful Designs sub-
milled.
Particulars of tlie competition and
plan of site may be obtained on request from Hie undersigned.
Tho designs to be sen'. In by July
31st,  11)12,  addressed  to  the
MINISTER  OF  EDUCATION,
Parliament Buildings,
f27-a9     Victoria,   British   Columbia.
—FOR-
Vancouver, Victoria and Seattle
Every Sunday 6 p. m.
J. G. McNAB General Agent
C. D. NEWTON
REAL    ESTATE
To Rent front offices in Exchange Block, lately occupied by Carss & Bennett.    Also inside offices;
    STEAM  HEATED   	
Exchange Block
''   P. O. BOX 220.
3rd Ave and 6th St
PRINCE RUPERT, B. C.
♦  ♦ ♦
CONTRACTORS, it ml MINING MACHINERY, and SUPPLIES, BUILD-
ING MATERIALS, Gasoline Engines, Marino Engines, CONCRETE
MACHINERY, Rails.  Wheels, Axles, etc. CANADIAN RAND CO.'S
PRODUCTS, Motor Vehicles & Trucks, Wire Hope, Steel, etc. Boilers, Agricultural Implements, Hoists, Teaming & Dump Wagons.
O. H. HANDA8YDE, ,11!. p, in.
Manufacturers   Agent fllOneS  I 6 I
prince rupeut, ii. c. Blue 326
Third Avenue
P.O. Box 436
1      LEVNICK & CO.
SOLE AGENTS FOR
UNION DYE WORKS
A. F. Le,vnlck has bought the business known as the Union Dye
Works, and has the same registered at the City Hall. Take notice
that Mr. C G. Muller has no interest in the business whatever.
UNION : DYE : WORKS I
141 Second Ave. Telephone Green 302.
»*********■*-»•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••»•*»•••£
OW»tWHKttt)MH>lMHKHKHWKtmH>^^
JKHKHStWKHJtKHWimHKHKHK^
EVERY PACKAGE OF
Burr ell's  White Lead and
Linseed Oil
IS MARKED "WARRANTED GENUINE" and is
guaranteed absolutely pure.
Sole Agents in Western Canada
The Staneland Co. Ltd
836-840 Fort Street, VICTORIA, B.C.
0{HKHKH>»WrKHJ{HKHKH3 CK3 CWjfl O-CKW CIKH5 <3 U0CH3 CKXW atKKH5«-r>r>a*0
Subscribe  for  the  Prince  Rupert i
Weekly Journal, $2.00 a year.
PRINCE    RUPERT    ASSESSMENT
DISTRICT
NOTICE is hereby given that a
Court of Revision and Appeal, under
the provisions of the "Assessment
Act, 1003," and the "Public Schools
Act, moo," for the Prince Rupert
Assessment District, will be held at
the Court House, Prince Rupert,
Monday, April 15, 1912, at 10 a. m.
A. CARSS,
.ludge Court of Revision and Appeal.
Prince  Rupert,   March   20,   1!M2.
rr lo-iB
The British Columbia Company
LIMITED.
AUTHORIZED CAPITAL $100,00
DIRECTORS:--Reginald C. Brow
President; H. E. Marks, Mauagln
McNalr,  R.  A.  Revan.  and  P.  C.
0. ::   PAH) DP CAPITAL $41,1500
n, President; .1. c. Maclure, Vlce-
g Director; Capt. E. Wash, William
Williams, Secretary.      :-:       •.•
INTEREST 4 PER CENT. DEPOSITS
Administrators Transferee! and
Commercial, Industrial and other
itten.     IsBues  made  on  the
rk Stock Exchanges.
Thin Company acts ai Executors,
Secretaries to Public Companies,
business propositions underwr
London and New Yo
TIMBER, COAL, LANDS, and
COMPANY ORGANIZATION
Heud Office for Canada, 203, 208, 210, 215 Cnrter-Cotton Building,
VANCOUVER, B.C.
GASOLINE ENGINES
MelNTYRE BLOCK
ASK US ABOUT THEM
PHONE 245
CANADIAN GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY, LTD. Gr8!'Z2rney ■P
Friday,  April   12,   1912.
PRINCE  RUPERT JOURNAL
THE  PRESS  GALLEY
Some   Information   Given  as   to   The
Work at Ottawa During
Parliament
How the "Roys" Keep Young in the
Most Trying of Occupations—
How They Work
A little eyrie over the speaker's
chair, hair way between the floor
of the House and the public gallery
—half way, I hat is to say between
Parliament and the people. In this
eyrie—when the nest is full—twenty-eight youngish looking men taking the notes which are to become
In due time the news and views,
Grit, Tory, or independent, of seven
million Canadians. That is the press
gallery.
A long room, the longest in the
Parliament buildings a double row
of desks each side of a long aisle,
said desks freckled with typewriters,
blue books, writing pads, mucilage
pots, ink bottles and other signs of
activity. Twenty-eight youngish
looking men, talking, laughing,
smoking, dictating, ruffling their
hair, perpending, scribbling and
otherwise licking their gallery notes
into shape. This is No. 8—the press
room, so writes Gadsky, the well
known parliamentary writer.
Parliament does the press well.
The press room, besides being long,
is high, airy and full of sunshine,
which ought to make for sweetness
and light. It commands the finest
view in Ottawa of the river and
the mountains, which ought to make
for breadth of vision. It is across
the hall from No. 89, the Grit lobby,
which should put it in touch with
the pure ideals of a defeated party,
and it is just far enough away from
No. 16 to keep clear of the selfishness of a party in power. In short,
the press room is conveniently situated—just close enough to the practical politics of the green chamber
to Interpret, not near enough to be
swayed. You must know your politicians well enough to illuminate
their actions, but not well enough
to suppress their shortcomings—No.
8 is at the right distance.
Visitors look in on Ihe press room
ever and anon. They speak with
bated breath—bait may be procured
at the restaurant upstairs—also
they take off their hats as people
do in an art gallery. There is considerable art in some of that re
ports that go out from the press
room. Another reason for taking
off their hats is that they are in
the presence of Thought. Applied
Thought—thought as ready on the
rail at 7 o'clock in the morning as
it is at 12 o'clock at night. All
these twenty-eight youngish looking
men belong to the Thought Moulders' Union, and have their union
cards intheir pockets, and draw pay
envelopes every week, some of them
from a dozen newspapers of as many
varying shades of opinion. This is
the shop where thought is for sale, j
You can have as much of it as you
like and what kind you like. You :
get what you pay for. What bus- j
iness can be fairer?
. Besides being reporters or resident
correspondents or special correspondents, or editors escaping from
office routine—they cull it "looking
the Ottawa bunch over"—several of
these twenty-eight youngish looking
men are thwarthed poets who have i
s.onc into it because journalism is.
three meals a day, while literature;
may be famine. Literature may be
a goal, tlie mature dalliance of comfortable age, but meanwhile the
newspaper is a school of human nature anil a ticket for coup, Others
of the twenty-eight are statesmen in
the bull. They get the smell of
politics into their heads, and presently they descend from their high
estate in the gallery to take part in
the .struggle in lite mud. From
looking on at the light they get an
Itch to take a hand in it. Many famous Instances can bo cited of newspaper men who have gone from bad
lo worse just this way, and a thing
Hint litis happened so often is likely
to happen again. Others again arc
newspaper men, and will lie newspaper men to the cud of the chapter,
and they are tlie best of the lot,
because their heart is not divided.
This article has alluded lo them
right along as twenty-eight youngish
looking men. The age scale runs
from fifty-five to twenty-seven. The
average age of the press gallery is
thirty-nine years, but they look
younger. Statesmen in their
speeches and members of Parliament
in their moments of unbending allude to them as "the boys." This
is not only a tribute to the gallery's
ever-blooming youthfulness, bul lo
its blithe spirit. It was only the
other day that Sir Wilfrid Lauricr
greeted a callow sprig of forly-three
with, "Hello, young man." All of
which goes to show that age cannot wither nor custom stale the gallery's infinite variety. In that word
variety ' lies the secret. Heaven
knows the business of Ottawa correspondents is enough to make any
man old with hard work, but it turns
out the other way—it keeps htm
young by keeping him interested in
the multiplicity of human affairs.
And this applies to all newspaper
men Ihe world over. They shave
clean, take tilings as they come,
crowd self and trouble and sorrow-
out by their absorption in others,
live every minute and never have
time to feel old. Forgive one of
them for saying that they are God's
own people. Is it any wonder they
look young.
But what becomes of the press
gallery, not when it grows old, but
when youth's sweet scented manuscript is closed, say at sixty. Dr. Osier's chloroform age? Time solves
its own question. In the press room
are a number of gallery pictures
dating from the early seventies.
Even the latest picture, which Is dated 1908, shows how quickly the
landscape changes. Being a young
man's business, it follows naturally
that quite a few die young. Others
drift into government jobs, or go
into business, or make money and
become lost to the profession. Quite
a few of them stick it out.
What will they do when they reach
sixty? On this point there is a remarkable unanimity of opinion. All
those who are not premiers or newspaper proprietors or successful manufacturers at that age are going to
be farmers, preferably fruit farmers in British Columbia, or some
other sunny spot. The press gallery feels to the full the back-to-
the-laud call. After a long experience of human nature, which has
made of them not upbraiders, but
mellow cynics, they would get close
to Mother Earth, which rests and
does not- deceive. They will not run
their farms to make money. They
will have enough sand to do without
that. Horace Sabine's farm is the
idea—the chief crops will be dreams,
content, quiet happiness, tender
retrospects. Not one of them intends ever to look a pencil in the
face again, unless it be the poet
who will take time from his apples
to write a great play, the great nov
el, and the bundle of short stories
that have been festering in his sys
tem for forty years. He will write
out of a full bosom, so to speak
That is, maybe. He will if he likes
You see, he won't have to, and if
you take the spur of need away you
may end by doing nothing. Oh
well! What's the difference? The
best stories are the ones that are
never written. Who would spoil the
perfect thought by flixing it—imperfectly.
What is tlie mental attitude of the
press gallery toward Parliament?
Don't ask us for a straight answer.
Remember their geographical position in the House. Remember that
they are looking down most of the
time. It takes a very big man indeed to make them look up. Remember that they are in the green
room and see the actors with their
paint off. Remember—oh, well, let
it go at that.
There are ranks and classes even
in the democracy of the press gallery. Some derive importance from
the papers they represent, some from
I lie money they draw down, and all
on their merits. They differ as one
star does from another in glory, but
there are no jealousies, some of the
warmest newspaper enemies sharing
a flat together. They are tlie stuff
of which editors-in-chief and managing editors are made. Indeed, some
of them have been such, bul have
chucked it up because it was too
slow, and are still drawing pay on
that Beale. This fail should give
the dough-head M. 1'. from Dobbs'
Corner pause when he starts pitying tlie incomes of Ihe press. The
chaiices are that, even when it comes
to tho dollar test, that they have
him lashed to the mast. They arc
not making fortunes, but they are
making a good living and bringing
up their families without much
sliming. Tlie happiest thing about
them is that they do not desire to
become rich. This is a frame of
! mind which tariff bogs cannot ttti-
, derstand.
All the big Canadian newspapers,
tlie London, papers, the New York
! papers, the Chicago papers, and tlie
great news agencies of America and
England are represented in the gallery. A very modest young man, by
means of his newspaper connection,
may be making opinion on both
sides of the ocean. If any two-by-
four politician contemplates patronizing the press it may chasten him
to  bear  Ibis  fact in  mind.
CLARKE BROTHERS, LIMITED
IN   LIQUIDATION
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
a meeting of the Creditors of the
above named Company will be held
at the office of Fisher & Warton,
Second Avenue, in the City of Prince
Rupeit. on Saturday, the 20th day
of April, 1912, at the hour of 2
o clock in the afternoon.
All persons, firms or corporations
having claims against the said Clarke
Brothers, Limited, are required to
forward particulars of same, duly
verified to me, the undersigned, at
P. 0. Box 351, Prince Rupert, B. C,
on or before the 25th day of May,
1912, after which date I will proceed to distribute the Assets of the
said Company, having regard only
to the claims for which I will then
have received notice.
Dated April 10, 1912.
GEORGE* STEWART,
lla-lt Liquidator.
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Coast—Range   Five
TAKE NOTICE that John V. Rit-
tenhouse, of New York, occupation
Broker, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:—Commencing at a
post planted at the northwest corner
of Lot 5051; thence south 68.96
chains; thence west 44 chains;
thence north 20 chains; thence
east 20 chains; thence north
48.96 chains; thence east 24 chains,
more or less to point of commencement; containing 205.50 acres, more
or less.
JOHN V.  RITTENHOUSE.
A. P. Chenette, Agent.
Dated March  22,  1912.
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Coast, Range Five
I, George W. Ledingham, Contractor, Vancouver, B. C, intend to apply for permission to lease 640 acres
of land, bounded as follows:—Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner of Lot 3997;
thence south 40 chains; thence west
80 chains; thence north 80 chains;
thence east SO chains; thence south
40 chains to point of commencement; containing 640 acres; staked
by me on the sixth day of April,
1912.
GEORGE W. LEDINGHAM.
Alexander  Faulds,  Agent.
Dated April  6,  1912.  a9
Skeena    Land    District—District    of
Coast, Range Five
I, J. A. M. Faulds, Passenger
Agent, Vancouver, B. C, intend to
apply for permission to lease 320
acres of land, bounded as fol'ows:—
Commencing at a post planted 40
chains south and 80 chains west of
southwest corner post of Lot 3997,
on the northern bank of the Skeena
River; thence west 40 chains; thence
north 80 chains; thence east
40 chains; thence south 80 chains to
point of commencement; containing
320 acres; staked by me on the
sixth   day  of  April,   1912.
J. A.  M.  FAULDS.
Alexander Faulds, Agent.
Dated April 6, 1912. a9
Skeena   Land   District—District   of
Coast, Range Five
I. Jonathan Rogers, Builder, Vancouver, B. C, intend to apply for
permission to lease 320 acres of land
bounded as follows:—Commencing
at-a post planted at the northwest
corner of Lot 3997; thence west 80
chains; thence north 40 chains;
thence east 80 chains; thence south
40 chains to point of commencement; containing 320 acres; staked
by me on the sixth day of April,
1912.
JONATHAN  ROGERS,
Alexander  Faulds,  Agent.
Dated   April   6,   1912. a9
S.  S.   PRINCE  GEORGE
Sails
Friday's
9 a.m.
FOR
Vancouver, Victoria and Seattle
S. S. PRINCE JOHN
Maintains Bimonthly Service to
Stewart and Queen Charlotte Islands
Triweekly Train Service  Prince Rupert to Vanarsdol
For Full Information Apply to
A. E. McMASTER,
General Agent, G. T.   P.  Wharf
Agency   for   all   Atlantic   Steamship
Lines
TO WATER CONSUMERS
For the present tho high water
pressure will be on from 12 o'clock
noon to 1 p. m. dally. Water consumers will therefore take precautions to provide for a supply at other
times. WM. -1AHLON DAVIS,
Superintendent Water Works.
J. L. PARKER
MINING ENGINB"3
Prince Rupert, B. C.
Open for Concul'ation and Mint
Examination
Temporary Address:—
Prince Rupert Inn
FREDERICK PETERS, K. C.
Barrister, Solicitor and Notary Public
Office in
EXCHANGE BLOCK
J. W. SHIRLEY
Locator, Timber Cruiser, Valuator
p. o. Box oo;;
A   few   choice  Farminr;  Locations
left close in.
LAND   CLEARED   BY   CONTRACT.
Choice  Nursery  Stock   for  sale.
Taylor St. Prince Rupert
J. W. POTTER, L.R.I.B.A.
ARCHITECT     AND     STRUCTURAI
ENGINEER
Re-Inforced Concrete a Specialty
—o—
P. O. Box 271
A. FAULDS, M.I. ME.
Consulting  Mining  Engineer
Examinations   and   development  on
Coal, Metal, Oil, etc,
709 Dunsmuir St.     Vancouver, B. C.
RITCHIE & AGNEH
Civil Engineers
Dominion and British Columbia Land
Surveyors. Mine Surveyors. Reports,
Estimates and Surveying
OFFICE:   Rand   Bldg,   Second   Ave
Skeena    Land    District—District   of
Coast, Range Five
I,     George     W.     Kerr.     Butcher,
I Prince Rupert, B. C, intend to apply
for   permission   to   lease   320   acres
of land, bounded as follows:—Commencing at a post  planted at nortli-
Iwest    corner    of  Lot   3997;   thence
i north   SO   chains;   thence     east     40
'chains;    thence    south    SO    chains;
'thence  west   40   chains   lo  point   Of
commencement;      containing      320
'acres.    Staked by me on the seventh
day of April. 1912.
GEORGE   W.   KERR,
Alexander  Faulds,  Agent.
Dated  April  7.  1912. a!)
Skeena    Land    District-   District    of
Coast, Range Five
1, John A. Kirk] atrlck, Drai - .
Prince Rupert, B. ('.. Intend in apply
fur permission to lease '■'■-" acre:- of
land,    bounded    as    follows;     C	
menclng at a posi planted 80 chains
easl ami 40 chains north from posi
p'antotl at northwest corner of Lot
3997; thence south 40 chain's; thence
west 40 chains; thence north 80
chains; thence easl 40 chains; thence
south 40 chains to point of commencement; containing 320 acres.
Staked by me on the seventh day of
April,   1912.
JOHN   A.   KIRKPATRICK,
Alexander  Faulds,  Agent.
Dated   April   7,   1912. n9
WM. S. HAi.L, L. D. S. D. D. S.
;■:    DENTIST   :-:
Crown and Bridge Work a specialty
All dental operations skillfully
treated. Gas and local anaesthetic*
administered for the painloss ex
traction of teeth. Consultation free
Offices, Helgersou "-k., Prince Ituper
II. P irdon Muuro   W. Ntc. olson Lailey
MUNRO & LAILEY
ARCHITECTS
PRINCE RUPERT, B. C.
P. O. BOX 14 PRINCE RUPERT
CHIC
.       DAILY
MEMOR A.NDUM
■ OPEN EVENINGS UNTIL 9 Otl-OOl
LET US LOAN
You the Money at
PER
CENT
TO   BITS
TO  BUILD
PAY OFF MORTGAGES
OF IMPROVE REAL ESTATE
SEE OUR PLAN
WRITE,  PHONE OR CALL
The
Canadian Home
Investment
Co., Ltd.
Branch Office      Phone 365
Mclntyre Block
F. E. IBBOTSON, Supt.
PONY EXPRESS
Systematic Merchants' Delivery Service. Baggage, Storage and Forwarding Agents.   For Rigs or Motor Car
DAY OR NIGHT
7th Ave. and Fulton Thone 301
Northern B. C.
Liquor Co.
The Leading Wholesalers of
Northern British Columbia
Exclusive Agents for
Budweiser  Beer
HOTEL CENTRAL
ALL MODERN CONVENIENCES
The larg.-st, best app inted Hotel
in Prince Rupert. First Class
Cuisine. European and American
plan. Best accommodation in town.
Sunday dinner a specialty. Ask for
"Key  to the Cellar."
PETER BLACK, Prop.
First  Avenue and  Seventh Street.
GRAND HOTEL
WORKINGMAN'S HOME
Free Labor Bureau in Connection
GEO, BRODEUIUS, Prop.
Phone 17S 1st Ave. and 7th St
New Knox Hotel
BESNER & BESNER
Proprietors
THE NEW KNOX HOTEL is run
on the Eu-opean plan. First class
service. All the latest modern Improvements.
THE BAR keeps only the bett
brands of liquors and  cigars.
THE CAFE is open from 6:30 a.m.
to 8 p.m. Excellent cuisine. First
class service.
Rooms 50c and up.
FIRST AVE. PRINCE RUPERT
FOR   SAIiE
High Class Bell Piano Player
(Autonola); practically new; in first
class coruition. Can be seen at 618
Fifth Avenue East.
LINDSAY'S CARTAGE ft STORAGE
G. T. P. CARTAGE AGENTS
Office at H. B. Rochester, Centre St
LADYSMITH  COAL
la handled by us.   All orders receive
prompt attention.   Piione No   68.
L.O.L.
Meets second and fourth Friday in
each month in K. of P. Hall.
Helgersun, Blk., 3rd Ave and 0th St.
Recording Secretary, Box 324.
New Wellington
COAL
FREE FROM DUST
DOES NOT CLINKER
ROGERS & BLACK
SECOND AVENUE
PHONE 110 PHONE 110
J. H. HILDITCH
Contractor and Builder
Estimates given on  a.l c asses of
work* whether sin '1 or large.    Per*
simal attention given to every Item.
PHONE GREEN 321.
Pbom   1.10
IHE INSURANCE PEOPLE
Fire
Life
Marine
Accident
i'late  Glass
Employers'   Liability
Contractors &  Personal  Bonds
Policies    Written    Direct
The Mack Realty & Insurance
COMPANY
P.S.-—Houses and  Rentals
BOWLING, BILLIARDS AND POOL
4 Alleys, 7 Tables. A good exercise.
A clean sport. Ladies every afternoon. Newman Block, between 6th
and 7 th Streets.
TED   MORRISON
Proprietor and  Manager
»J. .j. »j. .j. .j. »J* .j. ,J. »*. .*« »j. »j. *j. »J. »J»«[»»J, .*. >J. ••« »J. »*« »|. •]. .J. 4.
I Customs Broker j
|    STORAGE   |
* t
* Forwarding,   Distributing   and   *
* Shipping   Agent %
* *
* Special attention given to stor- J
■:•   age of  Household   Goods  and  *
| Baggage *
.;. *
•:• DOUGLAS SUTHERLAND *
.;. v
* First Ave. Near McBride St. %
•>    P. O.  Box 1)07 Phone 2(12   *
.!. +
.;. +
.' :• * * ■> * ***•> * * •> * v •'• ►? * •> * •:• i'» * * •:•»j»
Skeena    Land    District—Districl    of
Coast, Range Five
I, George A. Macnlcholl, Railway
Superintendent, Prince Rupert, 11. C .
intend to apply for permission to
lease 320 acres of land, bounded as
follows:—Commencing at a pobI
planted .SO chains east and 40 chains
north from a post planted at the
northwest corner of Lol 3997; thence
north 80 chains; theuce easl 40
chains; thence south 80 chains;
thence west 40 chains to point of
commencement; containing .'12"
acres. Staked by nnj on the seventh
day  of   *     •'    '"12
GEORGE A.  MACNICHOLL.
Alexander Faulds, Agon'.
Ilalcd   A. a'I
The Club
! i   Ail    up-to-date    Barber    Shop
j   which caters lo the fastidious.
j   Tl c  most  modern  shop  north
of   Vancouver
Six Chairs Experienced
Ruths Barbers
|    THE WESTHOLNE BLOCK
Sccind Avenue
"DOC"   DEMURS,  Mkc
E.  L. FISHER
Funeral  Director ,v  Eniluilmer
CHARGES   REASON Wtl.E
.517 THIRD  \\ E.   PIIONE 35(1
OPEN DAY AND MGHT
Pioneer Steam Laundry
WHITE   LABOR   ONLY
SYNOPSIS OF CANADIAN  NORTH-
WEST   LAM)   REGULATIONS.
o ft a 6o att-Cf ci-bo o cHa-cioflociOrsrao-coc
l  THE IDEAL J
*
-v
Men's Furnishing Boot and Shoe 2
House J
*
»
3rd and 7th Streets J
  *
Harry Smith,
f Corliss Coon Collars.    Everything *
for the Working Man
A*************************
DO AWAY   WITH  Till
Prompt  Service      Reasonable  Ratei
Goods Called for and  Delivered
Phone 118
Any person who is the sole head of
a family, or any male over is yean
old, may bomestead a quarter section t 160 acres more or less) of
available Dominion land in Mani-
toba, Satskatchewan or Alberta. The
applicant inusl ai i ear In person at
Mie Dominion Land ' gency or Sub-
\gency   feft  the  dli I rli I      Entry  by
irnxy   may  In de  al   any  agency,
:i    i ertain   t ondll I in ,   by    rather,
ion,    I  ughter,   brother   or
.  i i  ol  Intending homei tender.
DUTIES,    SU   month's   residents*
upon and cultivation of the land In
i   throi    eat       '• homesteader
".   I|vi    ,vll   lit   nine   miles  of   his
homestead on a farm i>r at least 80
. : e   BOlely on tied and occupied by
tlm  or by  his father,  mother, son,
iter, brother or sister,
in certain districts a homesteader
.ii   good   standing   may   pre-empt   a
inarter Bection alongside his liome-
stoad   Price J3.00 per acre. Duties.—
aii.si   reside six  months in  each  of
ix   years   from   date   oi   homestead
ntrj  (Including the time required to
earn   homestead   patent)   and   ruinate fifty acres ex'.ra.
A   bomesteaiioi   who  tias cxhaust-
i   his   homestead   right   and   can-
am   obtain  a   pre-emption   may  take
•;t chased homesti ad in cei tain dis-
tricts.   Price |3 per acre.   Duties.—
reside  ^ix  months  in  each  of
  years, cultivate fifty acres, and
t  it  a house worth $300.
W,   W.  CORY,
Deputy   of   the   Minister   of   the   Interior.
N li. Unauthorized publication
of this advertisement will not be
paid for
■Hi
■■MBMMMMM PRINCE RUPBRT JOURNAL
Friday, April  12,  1912.
SPORTS
BAYLEY-ALLEN MATCH
The announcement that Joe Bay-
ley and Billy Allen, the two foremost Canadian lightweights, have
been matched for a twenty round
bout at Bassano, Alberta, on .lime
'29, has started tlie fight fans talking all over the coast. It was Tommy
Hums who sogned the pair up and
be will promote and referee the
fight. It will be their first meeting,
and as both have strong claims on
the Canadian title the match promises to excite no little Interest
throughout the Dominion. It is altogether likely that Vancouver and
Virtoria boxing enthusiasts will ar
range to charter a special car to
make tlie trip to the Alberta town,
as Bayley has many admirers on
the coast who are anxious to see him
In the approaching title match with
the Ottawa lightweight.
PERMANENT FOREST RESERVE
Rocky Mountains  Reserve Set  Aside
—One of Largest in Existence—
Adequate Appropriation
Two years ago tiie commission of
conservation began agitating for the
establishment of the Rocky Mountains Forest Reserve. This involved
the setting aside in perpetuity of
nearly 18,000 square miles of forest
territory on the east slope of the
Canadian Rockies. During tlie
spring of 1911, this reserve was formally established by Act .of Parliament. It extends from the international boundary northward for 600
miles, and includes all lands on the
eastern slope above an altitude of
4,000 feet. It thus covers the headwaters of the prairie rivers which
rise in the Rocky Mountains. Owing to Ihe great altitude of much of
the reserve, much of the timber is
scrubby and of little commercial
value in preserving a relatively uniform flow for the rivers that flow
across the prairies. If it were not
for this regulating factor, the great
wheat lands of Alberta and Saskatchewan would be subject lo alternate
floods and  drouth.
Further, the Rocky Mountains
Forest Reserve is one of the largest
national parks in the world. It is
annually growing in favor as a resort for tourists and hunters. It
abounds in a great var.ety of game,
■which is being wisely protected.
Thousands of people visit Uie reserve every year to enjoy tlie mountain scenery, the fishing and tlie
hunting. It is not improbable that
In a few years the reserve will he
provided with numerous chalets such
as are found in the Swiss Alps for
the convenience and safety of tourists.
it is obviously of great Importance that the reserve should ve care-
fttli., protected from fire, «nd be
otherwise administered so as to
maintain tlie forest growth. Witli
this end in view the forestry branch
of the department of the interior is
organizing an effective administrative force, and is planning to cut
trails and construct telephone lines
through tlie reserve. Tlie forestry
branch, however, lias been hampered
by lack of funds. R. H. Campbell,
tlie director of forestry, stated recently that wltile he had asked for
an appropriation of $110,000, or
about one cent an acre, to administer the reserve, tlie government had
reduced the amount to about $80,-
000. Commenting on this at the recent annual meeting of the commission "f conservation, lion. Clifford
Slfton   said:
"It is quite possible thai if this
;■,.'• ■ iii' , ; ret ented t" the government a little more Btrongly, ii
might l>e willing in Increase the
an,'..iir'. I do toil know how you
feel iouI ■ i , fo myself, l d"
nol think thai Hi.' govemmenl is
Bpendin oi    any    purpose
lira Important   than   thal;
and it seems Hi mi that this is one
ol tin i ' ii n 'ii it " e can come
in coul h  l "■ government for
the benefit of the public."
A'ling on this suggestion the following resolution was later passed
by the meeting and afterwards pre-
sented t" tlie government: "That in
view of the enormous importance of
this object, the commission of con-
eervation recommenrds thai tin appropriation of not less titan $110,-
000 be provided for forest, protection in tlie Rocky Mountains Forest
Reset ve during the fiscal year 1912-
1913."
—o	
(Ooatiiu«4   Frnm   rt-n  0*6)
TEHUANTEPEC FREIGHT
westbound  tonnage grew  from  265,-
If Call
For all kinds of
g00d Insurance
See
618 Third Ave., Prince Rupert
Phone 203
George Leek
046 tons to 445,202 tons, an increase
of 70 per cent.
This increase in trade between
United States ports on the Pacific
and Atlantic coasts, despite the
handicaps of transshipment by rail
across the Isthmus, indicates the im-
mence commerce that will be built
up when the Panama Canala is
opened. The American-Hawaiian
line, Dwhich now operates a big
fleet between Seattle and Saline
Cruz, half of the sailing being over
the triangular route, including the
Hawaiian Islands, is building new
and larger steamships for the canal
trade, and has already notified the
Tehuantepec National Railway that
it will abandon the Tehuantepec
route when the canal is finished.
The consul predicts that the opening of tlie canal w'ill have a far-
reaching effect on the trade across
the Isthmus of Tehuantepec, but
shipping men on the coast believe
that if high toll rates are charged
through tlie Panama Canal, the Te-
huanutepec route may become a serious competitor to the canal.
 o	
Hawkshaw Holmes—I wish to lie
vaccinated.
Doctor—What's your business.
Hawkshaw Holmes—I am a detective.
Doctor—Stand out of line, please,
and give somebody else a chance.
There is no danger of you ever
catching anything.
Bill—And   you   asked   the   father
for his daughter's hand in marriage?
Jill—Yes; last night.
Bill—What   did   he   say?
Jill—He  was  very  angry.
Bill—And  what did you  do?
Jill—I  treated him as I would a
king.
~ Bill—How so?
Jill—Why,   I   backed   out   o   Iris
presence.
TENDERS   WANTED
Sealed tenders will be received by
tlie undersigned up to 5 o'clock p. m.,
April 22. for the purchase of debentures to cover the cost of the
construction of a 16-foot plank roadway round the north side of ays
Cove Circle, from the junction of
Fourth and Fiftli Avenues to Sixth
Avenue. Full particulars from the
City Clerk.
The highest or any tender not necessarily accepted.
ERNEST A.  WOODS,
a 12-1.'! City  Clerk.
Lots 12 and 13, bloVk 29, section 1;
$8,000;    $500    cash;    balance-  in
5  years;   interest  7  per  cent per
annum.
Lot  13,  Block  14, section   2;   $900;
$4 00  cash;  balance G. T.  P. over
3   years.
Lot 20, block 37, section 5;   $1,050;
$400    cash;    balance   0    and   12
months.
Lot 24, block  7, section  6;   $1,575;
$S00 cash;  balance 1 and 2 years.
Lots   18   and   19,   block   37,   section
7;  $1,500;   v.; cash;  balance 6, 12
and  18 months.
Lots   1   and   2,  block   Hi,  section  8;
$850;   1-3 cash;  balance 6 ami  12
months.
FOR SALE
Rooming house;  best location  in the
city.
Restaurant  on  Second  Avenue,  near
Sixth Street.
FOR   RENT
Store, 2nd Ave., corner of 6th St.
Store, 2nd Ave., corner of 7th St.
JEREMIAH H. KUGLER, Limited
SCHOOL NOTICE
Public School reopens on Tuesday,
April 9.
Parents desiring to enrol their
children in the Primary Division
(Junior Grade) are rehiinded that
such must be enrolled during the
first two weeks. No other class for
beginners will be made during the
last quarter (I. e. April, May and
June). By order,
SCHOOL   BOARD.
Provincial Elections Act
SKEENA ELECTORAL DISTRICT.
TAKE NOTICE that I have received objections in writing to the retention of the following names on the Register of Voters for the Skeena
Electoral District on the grounds stated below.
And take notice that at a Court of Revision to be held on the 6th
day of May, 1912, at the Court House, Prince Rupert, B.C., at 10 o'clock
in the forenoon, I shall hear and determine tlie said objections, and unless such named persons or some other voter on their behalf satisfies
me that such objections are not well founded, I sha'I strike such names
off the  said  Register.
J. H. McMULLIN,
Registrar of Voters.
Dated   this  9th  day of April,  1912.
The following persons are reported absent  from  the District: —
NO. | Name. | Place.
1067|Grant,  Donald j Bella  Coola
1106]Ilaakenson,   Christian j Bella  Coola
2675 Rettle,  Andrew  Bella  Coola
3266JYoung, David | Bella  Coola
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
SIR EDMUND WALKER, C.V.O., LL.D., D.C.L., President
ALEXANDER LAIRD, General Manager
CAPITAL, - $10,000,000
^^^^^^^^^^^^^     REST, -   $8,000,000
DRAFTS ON FOREIGN COUNTRIES
Every branch of The Canadian Bank of Commerce is equipped to issue drafts on
the principal cities in the following countries without delay
Africa Crete ■" *'---  **-
Arabia Cuba
Argentine Republic Denmark
|eypt_
Australia ^^^^^^
Austria-Huacmrr    Faroe M—ai
Belgium
Brazil
Bulgaria
CeylM
Chili
China
Greco
Holland
Iceland
India
IrdaW
Italy
Java
i Malta
New Zealand
Norway
Panama
Persia
Peru
Philippine
Portugal
Roumania
Russia
Servia
Siam
Siberia
Soudan
South Africa
Spain
Straits Settlements
Sweden
Switzerland
Turkey
United State*
Uruguay
West Indies, etc.
Finland
Formosa
France
Fr'ch Cochin China I
Germany Manchuria
_ _ Great Britain Mexico ^^^^^^^^^
The amount of these drafts is stated in the money of the country where they are payable ; that is they are drawn in sterling-, francs, marks, lire, kronen, florins, yen,
tacls, roubles, etc., as the case may be. This ensures that the payee abroad will
receive tlie actual amount intended. A233
J. "M. CHRISTIE, Manager, Prince Rupert Branch
THY   A   WANT  AI)
LIGHT AND POWER
To supply all coming soon. Estimates given for supplying and fitting for
Light, Power, Bells, Phones, water Heaters, Etc. Stock of Lamps
Shades and General Electrical Supp lies carried.
W. R. LOVE,   Electrical Contracting
P. O. Box 957
Fulton St. and Third Ave.
Phone 41
a aa<K>0^><HK*^3^a^KHKHS{HJ#*«r^^
I Among the New Arrivals the Newest Things
in the Larger Cities are:
?
B OHILL-liES BRASS BEDS OSTERMOOR  MATTRESSES
P MORRIS ROCKERS LEGGATT SPRINGS
2 Carpel Square In Wilton, Velvet, Axminstcr and Brussels.
5
\ The Big Furniture Store
it ran re   2nd   Avenue
Corner of 2nd Ave. & Gth St.
EKH>0<KWWW<HKKHKHKHKHW1HHKH»
INSURANCE
Fire Insurance in Board Companies.   We Never Handled Any Other
Norwich Union Fire Ins. Society, Ltd., of Norwich, Eng. (Founded 1797.)
London Assurance Corporation, of London, Eng. (Founded 1720.)
Alliance Assurance Company, Ltd., of London, Eng. (Established 1805.)
Caledonian Insurance Company, of Edinburgh, Scotland. (The oldest Scottish Company. Founded 18 24.
Canadian Fire Insurance Company—as its name implies, purely Canadian.
Ask about our new policies In the British Columbia Life. They are
unequalled.
Our Accident policies pay triple benefits of accidents in travel.
EMPLOYERS  LIABILITIY
M. M. Stephens & Co., Limited
Phone L'L'2 HsBBBBsl Office; G 3 1-2 Third Ave.
M. M. STEPHENS & CO., LTD.
Offer   the   following   subject   to
prior sale without notice:
Section One
Lots   7   and    8,    block    5;   $6,000;
$2,000 cash; 6, 12 and 18 months.
Lots  33  and   34,  block   5;   $6,000;
$3,000 cash; 6, 12 and 18 months.
Lots 3 and 4, block 8;  $10,000; one-
third cash;   9  and  15  months.
Lots 23 and 24, block 23;   $35,000;
$10,000   cash;   balance   arranged,
or 10 per cent less for cash.
Lots   30  and   31,  block   29;$6,260;
third cash;   6,  12 and  IS months.
Lot 46, block 29; $6,250; half cash;
6 and 12 months.
Section Two
Lots   50   and   51,  block   12;   $1,100
each;  $415 cash; balance G. T. P.
Lot 26, block 12; $1,800; $675 cash;
balance G. T. P.
Lot 1, block 15;  $1,650;  $650 cash;
balance G. T. P.
Section  Five
Lots   12   and   13,   block   2;   $4,725;
$2,735 cash; 6, 12 and 18 months.
Lot 27, block 9;  $2,100;  $900 cash;
6, 12 and 18 months.
Lot 39, block 22; $1,600; $800 cash;
6 and 12 months.   Has house rented for $12 per month.
Lots 41 and 44, block 27; $750 each;
half cash;  6 and 12 months.
Lot 8, block  29;   $600;   $350  cash;
6 and 12 months.
Section Six
Lots   6   and   7,   block   21;    $2,000;
cash.
Lot 3t>, block  22;   $950;   half cash;
6 and 12 months.
Lot 27, block 29; $1,000; half cash;
6 and 12 months.
Lot 30, block 29; $1,100; half cash;
6 and  12 months.
Section Seven
Lots   11   and   12,  block   5;   $1,000;
half cash;   6 and  12  months.
Lot  27,  block  5;   $750;   half  cash;
6 and 12 months.
Lots   5   and   6,   block   11;    $1,5 00;
half cash;  6 and 12 mouths.
Lots  3   and   4,   block   19;   $1,700;
half cash; 6 and 12 months.
Lot 11, block 21;  $750;  half cash;
6 and 12 months.
Lot 18,  block  30;   $600;   half cash;
6 and 12 months.
Lot 16,  block 35;   $800;   half cash;
6 and 12 months.
Section Eight
Lot  10,  block  4;   $600;   $200  cash;
6 and 12 months.
Lots 15 and 16, block 4;  $900 pair;
half cash; 6 and 12 months.
Lots 29 and 30, block 15; $650 pair;
Lot 31 and 32, block 15;$600 pair;
half cash;  6 and 12 months.
half cash;  6 and 12 months.
Lot 13, block 27;  $550;  $450 cash;
balance 6 months.
Lots 29 and 30; block 46; $750 pair;
half cash; 6 and 12 months.
FOR SALE
Steam laundry with buildings, machinery and two lots; complete and
In first class edition; $9,000; one-
third cash; balance 1 and 2 years.
A bargain lor the right man.
FOR   RENT
The best steam heated apartments
in the city; 5 rooms, bath, private
hall, and all modern conveniences,
In Campbell Block. Walls are deafened. Excellent marine view. $50
and $55 with range and hot water
equipment.
FOR  LEASE
50 feet, Second Avenue, between
First and Second Street.
50 feet Third Avenue.
50 feet Beach Place.
FOR   RENT
Steam heated offices In the Stephens  Block.
Offices in new Post Office Block,
now under construction.
FOR   SALE
160 acres finest, land in Kitsum-
kalum Valley, $12.50 per acre.
See our lists.
Insurance written in all its
its branches. See our new B. C. Life
policy.
Phone  222
M. M. STEPHENS & CO., LTD.
Office  623%  Third Ave.
P.  O. Box 275
P.O. Box 436 Phone 131
Office  Requisites of Every Descr'ptioih
" UNDERWOOD " TYPE™S for „ire
"MAfFY"   Inter-Inter Filing Systems
11HVL 1 0ffice Furniture
Call or Send for Catalogue
C. H. HANDASYDE, Jr.,   Third Avenue,   Prince Rupert, B.C
0
I Royal Bank of Canada
HEAD OFFICE:   MONTREAL
ESTABLISHED   1869
Surplus         $7,200,000
Capital        $6,800,000
X Total Assets   $100,000,000
§ Savings    Bank    Department—$1 Will Open an Account
2     Branches Throughout Canada and   Banking  Connectisns  With   All
j Parts of the United States
a Agents Throughout the World
S H. I*. WILSON, Manager Prince Rupert Branch
CHWKKHKI<HKBKW-WKHKW{TOWaW
j WESTHOLME LUMBER CO., LTD. *
COMPLETE LINE  OF
BUILDING SUPPLIES
I COAL! Ladysmith COAL!
$8.50 PER TON DELIVERED
*
*
^^^^^^^^^H Telephone 186   *
*•***••••*****•****••*••*******•* it*******************
First Avenue
T
t
PHONE 17 THIRD AVE *  FIFTH    f
WE MAKE A SPECIALTY OF BOTTLED GOODS FOR RETAIL TRADE
When replenishing your larder don't forget
The Family
Wine and Liquor Store
A complete lin-    ol all the best   Wines   and   1 iqtiors   always   in   ^
stock.    Al) orders delivered.
J. A. SMITH,
PROPRIETOR
OUR    BEST   LEADER
Rexall Glycerine Soap
15c the Cake.   You will come back for more
REMEMBER THE GUARANTEE
C.H. ORME, The Pioneer Druggist
Telephone 82     The $&xoJll Store
SMOKE!
Is your House full of it 'i
Call in a Chimney Sweep
Razors Honed, Saws Filed, Grinding   of All  Kinds,  Furniture  Repaired
Job Work.    Prices Reasonable
GET YOUR WORK  DONE BY AN EXPERT
Five Doors to left of Norfolk Hotel
Sixth Ave   and Fulton
H. BADERTSCHER

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