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Port Moody Gazette Jan 19, 1884

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 -^■THE-e-
rtrSLASMSD
EVERY 8ATURDAY.
SVBACBirTIOK BT >«•*,
TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM
»VAaiABLT IK  AllTAaOa.
AS ooamssnlcstions addressed to
r. f. HAMILTON, I<r!*r.
Port Moody.
Or to th* GuAJWMX Office, New Westmin
sUr, will reeai.* prompt attention.
J. A. CLARKE,
PORT   MOODY.
mi
OiUco:—Telephone Building,
CLARKE STREET.	
P. 9. HAMILTON,
Ba»AISTIB AT-LaW,   Notabt   Pdblic,
•aiserraa ajiu Arrest***, ResJ. EsTATS
Aunt     ASO      L'ONVSYANCSR,
.   .   Port  XX'X&.y.
BUILDING LOTS FOR 8ALE IN
• «.rv section *f Port Moody. Also,
Suburban Lets, by th* acre, immediately
adjacent to th* Port Moody surveyed Toa u-
•it*.
Lend* (or *al* oa th* North side of, and
hs.ing water frontage on. Port Mondy
Harbor, finely situated and exceedingly
valesbl*.
Also, Fsrm Lands of superior quality and
on fsrorsble terms, iu New Westminster
District.
Csrefully prepared Maps and Plans exhibited, snd the fullest information furnished, st Mr. Hamilton's oifine
hit:
Jk..   NOON,
Carpenter & Builder.
Yuma tip of Stohks axd Oppicis a
Bfwjiai.ty. Ai.l K ishh or Johbinu
Pbomptlt Attkndkii to.
ssT PLANS AND SPECIFICATIONS. "»
PORT   MOODY,   U.   O.
Port
Moody Seminary,
MURRAY STREET.
TERMS can lie bed on application to
_	
MRS. HESLOP.
Hong Sing,
BAKERY UAUNDRY
QuaiK Str.kt, Port Moony.
SHOE    STORE.
Qckkm Stbkbt, PokT Moody.
"1 IRISHES TO INFORM THE PUBLIC
» f that h. is now thoroughly established in business at the Terminus of the C.
P. U., ami is prepared to make ami repair
Boots and Shoes at exceedingly low rates.
Real Estate for Sale
PORT MOODY!
   ,
The Thompson Property!
Haw Westmisstku District.
LOT   369,   CROUP    I.
rpHE SUBSCItlBER OFFERS FOR SALE
•» on most favorable terms, Fifty Acres
of th* North-East corner of tho above Lot,
the whole Fifty Acres, or one half of tho
saeie, at the purchaser's option.   ALSO,
SIXTY-EIGHT
Port Moody Town Lots!
VOL. 1.
PORT MOODY, B. C, JANUARY  19, 1884.
NO. 6.
'
Adjoining anil iturned.att,ly to the North of
the above, comprising a part of District Lot
375, (*roup I., only twafity-nine chaina from
tike shore of the harbor. No building lots
more eligible than these are purchasoable at
Port Moody.
Apply personally to the subscriber, at his
•See on tlie premise*.
' QEOROE THOMPSON,
d!5 l'KorniKToa.
PIONEER STORE
Queih Street, Port Moody,
D-B. GRANT  •  -  -  Proprietor.
TTaspa ccnotantly em. Kind.
DRT   GOODS, CLOTHING,
BOOTS k SHOES, HATS k CAPS,
BLANKETS!
HARDWARE, GLASSWARE,
GROCERIES, Ac.
Having imported a large stock ot
Ready-made Clothing
Direct from the East, I am now prepared to
supply customers at prices that will
DEFY COMPETITION!
••"Orders will be promptly attended to
and satisfaction guaranteed.
Port Moody
SHINGLE MILL
0ONT FORGET TO GO TO THE PORT
Moody Shingle Mill, where the best
of Shingles can be had at the lowest prices,
wholesale or retail.
A supply kept constantly on hand.
JOHN B. TIFFIN.
The Double (ilioxt we uw in Siliria.
"Ho lies in that room," ettid a man
near urn to bis neighbour, adding,
"Would to heaven tbey could find a
doctor! the* say he ii not dead."
1 poshed my way to tbe threshold of
the nun,; it was already full of people.
At that moment the doctor arrived, the
crowd separated to let linn pass, and 1
followed closr, getting llicri'by within
the riug formed round the tick man.
Tho prostrate figure waa in shadow,
and at thu Gist glance I did not ruake
out alio it was, till a bystander, reaching a lamp from a biackct on the wall,
held it close down for the aid of the
doctor, wbo was kneeling on tbe floor
Wd« tlie extend**! form. Th* Iwht
at once revealed to me tbe features of
Count Kubir.aky: it was he »bo lay
there, dead or dying; hia white shirt *»-
red from blood pouring from a wound
in the left breast As I gated, hotror-
stricken, the grey hue* of death crept
over the upturned face, and then 1
knew that I had seen it nil before!
My liist impulse was to rush away
from the gha.tly M*n*j a feeling of intolerable distress oveipowmed me. and
I longed for a breath of fresh air—the
room waa stifling. While struggling
through the crowd, I beard many comments on tbe event, whispered from one
to another, I had beard tinn. tell tbe
doctor that tbe wound was self-iuflicted.
"Tbe Count shot himself, I bear, in
consequence of something that louk
place at the card-table," aaid one.
"My belief is, he did it from jealously of his wife," added a second
speaker in a low voice.
"I doubt that," said the other. "His
affnirH were known to be in a desperate
condition, and I suspect he could not
face the ruin tbat threatened him. He
was said to be mortgaged up to the hilt
and I fancy the Jews wore about to be
down upon him."
"Those cursed Jews again; they will
soon absorb nil the land in the country,"
rejoined the friend. "1 wish we were
back in the days before '48: tbe laws
were all for the nobles then; whereas
now,'bii> pestilent race fatten on our ruin
Nearly three years after my visit to
Ualicia, I went to Ostend for my health.
During the Russo-Turkisb war, I had
been knocking about in the East; and
in the end I suffered so severely from
I>anubian fever, that I was obliged to
give up all woik for a time. My last
doctor in his wisdom had sent me to
O.tcnd, where 1 wsa ineffably bored
by everything and everybody—myself
included. Tbo monotonous stare of die
ocean from that wearisome Digue—the
vaunt and glory of Ostend—was becoming every duy inure and more intolerable to me. Knforced idleness is crucifixion of the spirit; and what with
having nothing to <lo, and knowing nobody in the place, 1 began to think 1
wo Id prefer all lisks elsewhere, to the
slow process of getting  well at (Mend.
Unable to walk much, I was Rilling
one afternoon in a seat on the Digue,
looking seaward. I don't know why,
but all at once I began thinking of my
friend WalterB, and wondering how he
was getting on with his petroleum refinery in ti.licia. 1 had not heard from
him for a long time—indeed I had not
written, owing to my own unsettled life;
but 1 made a resolution that 1 would
write to him that very evening.
The events of that strange visit to
Galrcia came so vividly and persistently
into my mind, that some how I could
think of nothing else. I closed tbo yellow-
backed novel, aud allowed my thoughts
to wander over-all the circumstauces of
that mysterious night at the Kubinskya'
castle, when Walters and I had seen
the double ghost, the portent as it
proved, of tbe Count's suicide,—for
such, indeed, it seemed I
While speculating on the singular
coincidence of our impressions on tbat
particular Jiiglu, and the subsequent
fulfillment of the mental illusion, I had
in a half-conscious sort of way remarked the face of a lady who waa being
drawn backwards and forwards in a
wheel-chair. I had a sensation tbat the
face wan known to me. Sbe waa still
young, and there were traces of great
beauty, somewhat, though not altogether
marred, by an appearance of much suffering.
She appealed to be waiting for some
one, for Bhe never went far from the
spot; and at length the chair came to a
standstill a few yards from where I was
seated.
1 was moodily lest in thought, with
my hand over my brow, when the slight
grating of the chair-wheels on the
gravel made me look up. A gentleman
wai now walking by the lady's side; our
eye* wot, il Was Walters—my friend
Walters I
"My dear old fellow I" he exclaimed,
"bow giad 1 am to see you, though you
do look seedy, byJovel I found out
just an hour ago, through the visitors'
book, that yon were here, and ever since
I have been running about to the different hotels trying to find you. It
seems you left the one where you first
put up."
"By the strangest coincidence, Walter, I waa thinking of you at the very
time you were looking for me."
"My wife ia no stranger to you," said
Walt»rs, leading me up to th* invalid's
chair.
Now I knew the face, pale and wort*
though it was; it was the face of the
lovely Countess Kubinsky of former
days.—From Blackwood Magazine.
A  WITLESS   THING.'
"A document in rnsdneas; thoughts and
ruiieuibrauce* fitted. "—Hamlet, act iv. sc. 5.
'Now remember, Lord Cray ton."
said the doctor solemnly, "all 1 told you.
You are very aelcome to our ball,
though, at a rule we only ask a certain
set if wise men aud maidens who know
our ways and their asys. hSuli, you are
(jood looking, humor jus, snd cheery,
and if you are sensible you can enjoy
yourself, and maybe, do them a world of
good. Ibelieveiu eleciricityas acurative
■.gent—not the quack nonsense of
belt and chains and musical boxes, that
only shako the nerve centres, but tbe
real electricity of animal spirits, tbe
tonic ol food health,"
•'I shall do eaactly as I am bid,"
said Lord Uraytnn, a handsome, florid,
muscuUr, young man, sireng as a bo.se
buoyant aa a balloon, just hack after a
self imposed exile of five years in India
with th.- big game; "but tell me of all
those confounded caut.ons again. 1 did
a lot of dancing of various kinds years
.go, before 1 uent after the tigeis' —
■.no be laughed as mingled memorios
of Mayfiir and tin; Lotos Club swam
back to him—"and I've tried both the
Vorroboree and the Salonika; but 'poo
honor, I never danced with a lunatic
girl yet'"       ' . .     v    r.      -J
"Are you quite   aure or   that]   said
the Doctor, grimly; "they are to be met
with out>ide Copswood, I can tell you.
However, listen: the rule is simple. Be
civil and don't coalradic If old Crack-
ton aaka yoa lo play cbets, play. He's
a good player, and will ateat yoa fairly if
he can; if he can't he'll make a false
move and call "checkmate," and you
must resign. If poor Snobley thinks
you aie tbe Prince, and 'hits' you all
over the place, a»d throws out hint;
about being asked to bandringhani; if
you aie asked lo listen to the chiming
clock in Baker's interiors, or to avoid
some one else, because he's glass and
might break, you must do your best to
be courteous to them ail, and on no account laugh at their fancies."
"Sounds rather jumpy. And the
ladiesl"
"I'll see to that, and introduce you to
the nicest, and tell yoo what to avoid
speaking about; the men will make the
talking for themselves, tho women don't
talk much."
"Sign ot insanity, I aupp-'Se. And
what am I to talk abooll"
'Everything save one thing—tbe
Empress of Austria, the stage, oi white
roses, or Mr. Mallock, or blacksiock-
ings. I'll give you the cue—never fear
only it may happen that one of thei
will ask you to dance, and then you
must steer as beat yoo can—talk
society or art on chance. My own girls
and their friends get on famously with
the male patients, and you most do your
best. Come, you are going to be our
best tonic to night, and you must be otf
and dress: nine sharp, mind, as they all
go to bed at midnight."
"Queer thing this," soliloquited
Grayton as he completed an elaborate
dressing, "beginning my first season
after five years by dancing with a lot of
lunatics. 11 ope they won't wear Btrsw
in their hair: if they do, I shall boll to
tho Congleton's dance."
Ho had many strange adventures th*l
evening as he strolled about the pretty
ball-room at the Copswood private, asylum. He was duly defeated at chess by
the venerable Crackton, whodelibeiately
slid back a captured queen on the
board, and performed prodigies of valor
with her. He sympathized with the
man who had swallowed a crocodile, and
he noticed the pale cadaverous man who
amused himself by counting (lie lights
on each side of the room and singing
softly to himself, "Sorry I can't adroit
it." He bad been an Acrostic Editor
once upon a time. He noticed the fussy
little mau, with a pale blue shaven face,
who wanted to stage manage the sixteen Lancers, and who piteously en
treated the dancers to "go back over al
that again, please, and try and get it
crispei;" and the erratic journalist who
wrote paragiaphs on his shirt cuffs, and
many strange folks that passed by in
the motley pageant of unsettled reasona.
"There's King Lear," whispered the
Doctor, as a very foolish, fond old man,
fourscore and upwards, passed the muttering of 'Brighton's A's;' "you know
who he was?" and he whispered a name
in Grayton'sear that made thst nobleman whistle softly.
"And are there any Ophelias, 'whose
young maid's wits should be as motta
as an old man's life?' " asked Grayton,
showing lhat he knew his Shakspeare as
well aa the Doctor.
"Yes, but we keep their secrets. Now
go and dance;" and the Doctor took
King Lear off fof a cup of coffee.
It wa. a sad, weird sight altogether,
and as Grayton watched it, it reminded
him of Kaulbuch's "Danco of Death,''
and he felt oddly morbid as he thought
of his own lonely life, lie hanVonce
loved and given his heart to a woman
whom he had bo'h idralized and iJol-
ileil; he bad youlh, brains and position
and with her he felt he could conquer
the world. It was an old story; she was
said to he as loveless as she waa lovely
and so he took to the tigers. He had got
over it All now, but he shuddered as he
remembered the fret of it all, »nd
thought how near madness he had been
driven when he heard of her ultimate
fate, and where her life had drifted to.
So there were Ophelias herel More
like Andieys, bethought, as he watched
Some lather   uncouth  gamboling  ia B
corner.    His eye* wandered round the
room, and rested at last on afac*.
It was nn iniuitite oval face, soini--
what aad and wistful in expression, of
that ran- iblii.aU- olive color one Re,-s
in tha South, with the skin of so fine
a texture that the red flush springs up
through the viintracry at a nomenta
excitement; the large brown eyes were
soft and drear*, the'diiwliVd mouth was
hulf parted, and the dark brown hair,
looking black at night, was worn Ores k
fashion close to the head, sweeping in
undulating lines past tho tiny rose
tipped "are. Sbe was seated on alow
sofa, carelessly clasping one knee with
both bunds. She wore a simple white
frock, just mysteriously frilled round
the little white column of a throat, and
»^reatiblaok-riad rose nestled *n her
breast. One little high-arch foot, in
peach colored netted silk, kept swinging to the music No one seemed to
talk to her except the Doctor, who
smiled pleasantly as he passed and said
something to which sh« answered with
a nod.
"Ophelia at last," said Grayton to
himself; and in melancholy vein he
wished he Weft Hamlet and could lie
at her feet and watch the play.
" 'Pour Ophelia! divided from herself and her fair judgment!" ' (the quo
tation was irresistible). "I wonder
wlint sent her here—some brute of a
man, or a soldier-lover killed at
Kassassin. Gracious! I hope this
terrible Meg Merriliea is not going to
ask me to dance!" and he moved away
as he saw a wild eyed woman bearing
down upon him, to a seat somewhat
nearer tbo palo girl with tbo black-red
rose.
For a time hn watched her; then he
tried to magnetize her. At last their
eyes met; he stared her full in the face.
Sho never shrank from his look, only a
sort of pitying light seemed to glow in
the sorrowful eyes. A moment passed
and then she rose quietly and with perfect self-possessed grace walked over to
him—to his intense astonishment sat
down quietly by bis side, and said in a
soft musical voice:
"You seem sad, to-night. I am
sorry."
For a moment ho was tongue-tied;
then he recollected his instructions and
pulled himself together.
"Well, I think I was sad because
you were looking sad."
"Was II I supposo I ahvavsdo, then.
Of coarse, being here naturally makes
one feel sad. Lut we won't talk of
that," she added quickly. "Do you
care for dancing) I'll dance with you
if you like."
"Dance! with youl"
"0 yes, if you like; many of the
others dance, you know."
"How ealinnly she seems to recognize her sad state!" thought Grayton,
as he stood up and passed his arm
round poor Ophelia's slender waist,
wondering how she would "jig and
amble.' They wero playing the
"Dream-Faces," and as they swung in
undulating rhythm to the pretty song
felt that few slips of sane seventeen
could come up to her.
"That's right," said the Doctor encouragingly; "set a good example."
"Means 1'in to be a tonic, I suppose,"
thought Grayton; so he carried oil'
Ophelia fur an tee,
"You dance beautifully," she said.
"No, you sit down and I'll get you the
ice; there now, there's a spoon and a
water; now you feel comfortable, don't
youl    Isn't that a lovely valse'f'
'Yes, I'm fond of "Dream-Faces;"
tho people ono meets in dreams a>'e
generally vastly nicer than the real
folk.    1 have many dream friends."
"Havo you?" ihe said, looking amused
"tell me of them."
'•We'.l, you know, I think I'm married to a dream-wifi—just like Gilbert's
Princess Toto, you know, with her
dream-husband. And she comes to me
sometimes and scolds me if I've dane
anything wrong in the day; and sometimes she's very loving, and sometimes
she's cross and doesn't como near me
for weeks."
He felt as if ho was telling a fairy
tale to a child,
"How charming! Do tell me more
of her. Is sho beautiful? Wrhat is sbe
like?"
The fanciful conceit seemed to amuse
her, so he went on drawing pretty
pictures of an ideal woman; then grovr-
ing unconsciously eloquent, he burst
out: " Ah, if one could only meet ner
alive, what a wife she would make! A
very second self, aiding, sympathizing
helping, loving—at once the cbceriets
of chums and tho most idolized of
idols."
She had flushed a little aa he spoke,
bat she went on, "What a pretty
picture! Where did you get your
beautiful thoughts about marriage?"
'I suppose my dream-girl taught
me."
"Is she pretty?"
Grayton wondered if deliberate barefaced compliment would be n good
tonic for a lunaiic. "Yes, beautiful.
She lias large brown eyes, wonderful
hair, a low voice, an olive oval face, she
dances superbly, and she wears a black-
red rose in her white dress."
Ophelia looked a little frightened.
"Forgive me, I didn't mean to be
rude, but she is—really, you an- not
angr.y with me?" and he laid his hand
gently on hers.
"O  no," then there   was a   pause.
Come,   and  let  me  show  you  some
pictures; 1'ut something of  an  artist
myself," and she led him into a long
gallery, and talked art so sensibly and
sympathetically that here,at all e,a*jta)
be felt there was a very pleasant method
in her modi-eaa.
"Talking art" is a recognized method
of interchanging sympathies.
He was no bad judge of a picture;
but he preferred to affect ignorance, and
asked the stupidest questions simply
for the pleasure of hearing baf talk.
There was a kind of innocent dig*iry
about her tbat fascinated him. She
was more like a Vestal virgin than a
Hnr.hnnte. Ho the evening passed all
too quickly, till he suddenly In-thought
himself .hat there waa an important
division in the Lords that night, and
that he waa bound to be a "not content" before tbe clock struck eleven,
and after that he was due at Lady
Gongleton'a dance.
"Must you go awayf ahe ttud;
"why?"
"Well, yon see, I'm one of the moch-
abused people that the Kadicais call'
Hereditary Legislators, and I am no*
abolished yet; I must be in our House
at eleven."
Of course she could not have under
stood a word he said, for she murmured to herself, "Poor fellow! so young
too!"
He rose and held his hand out.
"Good-night: thank you for a very
charming evening."
"Good night," said Ophelia, tenderly.
"I should like* little memory of this
meeting; will yon give me that rosel
I've been longing for it all the evening.
"Of course I will; why didn't yon
ask for it before!" and she took it from
her dress and fastened it in hia coat.
"I shall see you again, there will bean-
other dance here soon. How is it that
I never saw you before at one?"
"This is my first dance here," he said
gravely.
Why it was that Ophelia's eyes suddenly tilled with tears he couldn't understand, but she left him with a quiet
bow and went back to the dancing
room."
"You've been enjoying yourself, I
see," said the doctor, as Grayton came
to say good-by, "though I must say it
was rather selfish of both of yoa."
"Selfish why, I did all 1 could for
her, poor dear girl!"
"Poor! why, my dear Lord Grayton,
sho has six thousand a year of her
own!"
"Dear me! and what la done with
it?"
"Sho does what she likes with It;
she helps all the. big charities, and she
helps me end Copswood in particular
and she generally does a lot of good to
our poor people—picks up bohio one
she takes a fancy to, ant, cheers him
up a bit. She's one of my best tonics,
and this is tin- first time that I have
noticed that she never danced once
wiih a patient; that was your fault you
know."
"Good gracious! then she —isn't—a
—a patient herself?"
The Doctor laughed till tears rolled
down his jolly face. "Bless my heart,
no! That's l^ady Mary Pettigrew,
daughter of old Lord Polonius, nnd
she's one of the cleverest and sweetest
girls in the world. I thought you kn-w
her."
"Not I! She came over and spoke
to me and—"
"1 see it all—took you for a patient!
0, this is too lovely!" and the Doctor
was positively boisterous in Iris merriment.
Grayton bolted to the House, and
having duly recorded his vote against
the Bill, sent up from tho Commons,
for chloroforming grouse instead of
shooting .theui, betook himself in a
strange siate of bewilderment to Lady
Oongleton'a, His hostess welcomed him
warmly, like, the returned prodigal that
he was, and insisted upon introducing
him to some one in whom she seemed
to have a special interest.
"Keally a delightful girl, Lord Grayton, quite after your own heart—devoted to Art and Philanthropy, yoa
know."
Grayton was too full of thought to
protest, bo submitted meekly. What
were girls to him juBt then? He was
thinking over Copswood as his hostess
took his arm and set out on a pilgrimage,
"Ah, here she is! Lady Mary Pettigrew, Lord Grayton. I'm 6ure you
two will get along capitally;" and her
ladyship was off, leaving Grayton Btar-
ing vaguely at his   fascinating lunatic.
Lady Mary could hardly suppress a
scream aa she turned her head and
blushed as deep aa the rose heatill ware
in his buttonhole.
"How—how did yen get eutt" ahe
asked awkwardly.
"I never was in, Lady Mary, the
fact is I'm afraid there has been a little
mistake on both Bides. I only found
out from the doctor aa I left that you
weren't a—"
She put her feathery fan up with a
warning "Hush!" then said. "What
brought you there?"
"Curiosity; and you?"
"I often go there and try to do some
good. I cheer them sometimes; but
tonight! O, how wrong and stupid
of me!"
There was a little pause as he looked at her with his frank, kindly eyes.
"Let us forget and forgive, Lady
Mary; after all, you were very good
to poor Hamlet."
"Aad yoa were very nice and kino?
to foolish Ophelia. listen! there's the*
'Dream-Faces,' again; let na see if wer
can dance it in onr right minds.' she
aaid, as ahe rose with a nervous .muler
quivering in Use const-re other lips.
And so it happened that in a month
they both came to th-ir right minds,
and the Doctor waa at the wedding.—"
I/>ndon   World.
I»lorLe*3ir
DRUG STORE,
lic&aAT t*raa», I'nar Mooi.y.
M. HESLOP, - - Proprietor
A rotnplete stock trf
Drugs and Patent Medicines
A*Prescriptions carefully dispensed.
MEEK BROS.,
Real Estate Brokers*
Oitt a*d Farm PaoriirrT tun Sals
AT   THE TBRKIKCI   0>   THB   OaKADlAjf
Paoirio Railway1.
Bast of reference.    Information willingly
given.
POUT MOODT, t. C
roar Ainmm. eirf,
PORT MOODY FERRY I
Patrick Mcdonald
RUN" A FERRY, DAILY. BKTrYKEl*'
th. end of the Korth ko.il and Cal.--
donia Hotel pier, on arrival of the *sai»
coach from hew Westminster, RETURNS
in the afternoon, i»nnctually, In time fer the*
.tage coach to New Westminster.
aarCh.rges moderate.     Freight cer«fnlly
attended to.
D. a. CUIITIB.
t. CLARK*, H. D.
D. S. CURTIS & CO.,
Direct Importer, md Dealers In
DRUGS AND
MEDICINES,
F1NCY GOODS, TOILET ARTICLES,
Lamps and Lamp Goods, &c,
COLUMKIA   STREET,
NEW WESTMINSTER,   -   •   B. C,
(Neit Door to the Colonlsl Until]
Special facilitiea for the Jobbing Trade
DOMINION
COMPANY.
(LIMITED)
Richard St„ New Westminster
Manufacturers and Dealers in
all kinds of
Rough # Dressed
LUMBEE!
Shingles,
Laths,
Pickets,
Doors,
Windows,
Mouldings,
Orders from the Country
Promptly Filled,
of quantity and C06t  of  material  fof
building   carefully   prepared
free of charge.
FIRST-CLASS
Brain-Edged Flooring
A SPECIALTY.
A. MENNJE Agent
PORT MOODY.
LUMBER YARD
DeBiSd BROS. & CO.,
KEEP A FULL ASSORTMENT OF
Rough and!Dressed
J. A. CALSECK, Agent.
i£
..
a*.
te£. ■
■
|trt )(o«.* |ettl
Head of north Rmd, Port lootty
JOHN 8. WATKIS
fUkr) W INFORM HIS NUMEROUS
M9 frteii'1" thst He Mi recently taken the
shore house, where h* is prepsred to do
everything possible fur the acoouimodatiuii
Ot in art*.
THE TABLE 1. always rare to be sap-
jilted with all the dalicscle. vf the season ;
th* BEDS are of the most eoaifortable, and
there i» ample raid comfortable STABLING
an tbn premise*.
Vf BOA i S always obtainable on the harbor iu front of the premises, by applying At
the sou**.
CITY
DRUG STORE!
NEW WESTMINSTER, B. C.
^0
A. M. Herring,
WllOLBSAL    A HlTAII.
The Largest Stock in the Cltj
—AT TliK—
LOWEST   PRICE8
	
***NEXT DOOR TO BONBON'S.
Toys Toys
! OF EVERT DESCRIPTION.
SELECTED FOR THIS MARKET BY A
SPECIAL AUKNT, AT
W.H. REAM'S
opi
PIONEER BOOKSELLER AND STATIONER,
LUMBIA ST., NEW WESTMINSTER.
THE POUT MOODT AND NEW
WESTMINSTER
LIST OK CHARGES.
Rent of Telephone per month, including erection of wire. 15.00
For every roessapc for every person not
betas; a monthly tenant, snd not exceeding tweuty-live words 26
Every additional ten words 06
All deliveries within a half.mils radius
...   of office 15
Beyond the above distance, per mils..     .25
The N. TV. * P. M. Telephone Co. sr.
prepared to erect private lines iu New Westminster and Port Moody, or between these
places, nod to connect the same with the
Ceutral Telephone Office, if desired.
Parties wishing Telephones |hou!d apply
' to the undersigned.
CHARLES FOSTER,
Dec. 7, 1883. See'y-Treas.
BOOTS & SHOES
IN EVERY VARIETY
t ^ FBOM
&   HEATHORN'S
BOOT & SHOE
MANUFACTORY.
VICTORIA.
AT   VICTORIA  PRiCES
THOMAS,
Hall,
Under  th*  new Oddfellows'
COLUMBIA STREET.
(ESTABLISHED 1862.)
PRED/K "EICKHOFP
OSNKHALDIALED  IU
an*)
GROCERIES
Provisions,
DOry   G-oocls
CLOTHING
BOOTS & SHOES,
&C.i &c.
J
Of First-Cte Quality,
AND    AT
THE BOY BMPKKOH OF CHINA.
The ruler of the two hundred and fifty
miltioat of which the (JhiueM nation probably consist* U now within five yean of hia
majority, and ia aa Occupant, while yvt
minor, of the aame apartinenta in whieh li
ud the Emperor who preceded him urn the
Ifn-gon Throne. There he eata with tfoid-
tippr-1 cbopaticks of .very. There he sleep*
on a largo Ningpo .«ed*tead, richly carved
and ornamented with Kory aimI gold, tl
tamo on whirl, the nulriu-minded Kuiprrors
Kang Hsi and Chieu Lung listed to recline
after the day's fatigue, List century and the
century ttefure. Like one of those living
Itiiddhas who may be seen ou a lanmaery on
tho Mongolian pUteau, he is knelt to tv all
bis attendants and huuored as a god. There
is this difference, that tho respect felt for
him ia more profounii than for them. The
seclusion In which he is kept ia also far
more complete.
Tho bunding iu which the Kmperor re-
ides ia called Yan^ Hsin Tioii, ami is i
little to tbe west of the I'lutn C'h'iug Meu
iu the middle uf the palace. At the back of
the central gate, on tbe south side, ia the
great reception hall. When Ministers of
State and others enter for an audience at 4,
5, or 6 in the morning, according to custom,
tbey have to go on foot to the center of tbe
palace, over half a mile, tf they enter by the
east or went gate; and when they gut on
years they can appreciate the r'inperurs
favor, which then, uy a decree, allows them
to be borne in a chair instead of walking,
The rooms of the Kmperor comprise seven
compartments. They are provided with thn
divan, or Vang, the peculiar institution of
North China. The k'angs are covered with
red felt of native manufacture, and thu floor
with Kui'opi'au carpets. Tlie cushions
have embroidered on them tho dragon and
the phd'iiix. Pretty things scattered through
the rooms are endless in variety, and sre
changed in accordance with any wish expressed by the Emperor.
The rooms aro all thirty yards long by
from eight to nine yards deep, and are divided into three separate apartment*, the
throne room being the middle one. Folding
doors ten feet iu height open into each of
these apartments to the north and aottth in
the center of each. The upper part of these
doors is in open work, in whieh various
auspicious characters and flowers are carved.
At the back paper is pasted to admit light to
the rooms. The front is ornamented with
gilding, sculpture, and vnrnish of various
colon. These doors remsin open even in
winter, because during that season a thick
embroidered curtain of damask is hung in
the doorway, which, by its weight, keeps its
place close to the door posts mid prevents
culd air from entering. Iu summer this is
replaced by a curtain admittiug tho breeze,
on account of its being mode of very thin
strips of bamboo. The silk threads used in
sewing the strips of bamboo together are of
various colors, and, passing through the
whole texture of the curtain from tho top to
the bottom, are very agreeable to the eye.
These summer and winter curtains are rolled
up to give uir to the rooms when required.
Exit and entrance are effected on each side
of these curtains by side doors. Along the
whole front of thirty yards then* is a covered
flight of steps, fifteen feet wide. The roof
over this rests en two rows of pillars. The
pillar* shine with fresh vermilion, both in
the rooms and on the steps outside, and arc
decorated with sculptured work, partly gilt
and partly varnished. The Uoppo who
lately returned from Canton gave the Emperor a present valued ut $8,000. It con-
sistcd of chandelien holding ."00 wax caudles each. , His Majesty has also electrical
machines, and numberless foreign curiosities.
The Emperor woe vaccinated when an infant before his high debtiny waa thought of;
otherwise it would have been difficult to
vaccinate him, for, his person being sacred
when Kmperor, no lance can touch him.
His mother, the Princess of Ch'un, who is a
sister of tbe Empress of the West, will be
raised to the rank of Empress Dowager
when he is 16, and his father will also he
made T'al 8hang Huang. At least this is to
be expected by precedent, so that after three
years we shall again have two Empresses
Dowager, but in this case thsy will be sis-
The Princess, his mother, gues in to
sec him once a month, and kneels when sli
tint speaks to him, hut rises afterward. His
father does so too. The Emperor studies
Chinese daily for an hour and a half, and
Manchn also for an hour and a half. He
spends two hours in archery and riding, and
in winter amuses himself with sledging. He
has a little brother of 5, whom it may he
hoped the mother takes with her when she
goes to the palace. Tno teachers who instruct him kneel to him on entering, but
afterward sit. The Emperor has eight eunuchs who constantly attend him, besides an
indefinite number for special occasions. He
has his meals alone, and tho eight eunuchs
wait round him, restraining him if he takes
too much of any one thing. His school
room is at the back of the Yan Tsin Tien
already described, and the hall for conference with Ministers is a little to tho east.—
North China Beruld,
Moderate  Rates*
Corner of From   and Begbie Streets,
•flj »EW   WESTMINSTER.
80  TO  THE
Uttr San  Francisco
8TOBE!
AND GET YOUR MONEY'S WORTH!
Boots & Shoes
(From aa Infant'* Shoe up to a Man's Boot
MADE   TO   ORDER.
Repairing Neatly Executed-
Highest Market price paid Tor
HIDES.
m 	
JAMES ROU8SEAU,
COLUMBIA  STREET. 0PP. BANK OF I. C.
The CalcuUta Englishman, referring to the
Exibition building in that city, says: "At
the West end of the restaurant is a refrigo-
rating room. It is not intended fur mast or
auy Mich corpus rilo; it is intended for vi-
sitors, who, when they become heated and
tired frt'm sight-seeing, can rest and recruit
themselves bodily and physically in a temperature )f CS degrees. The walls are being
hung with appropriate subjects, such ss the
'Snowy .Sange,' Spitsbergen in the Winter,
and the 'Home of the Laplander.' The ser.
vice of the tabic will be in frosted glass,
and visitors will greet each other in the
glacial tones of conventional politeness."
How to divide live eggs between three
people ia a problem which might fairly pus
zle a philosopliei, but the practical genius of
Prince Bisniark has solved that, as it has
many other difficulties which have proved
too much for profound thinkers. The only
wonder is that, as he made the great discovery aa many as thirteen years ago, it should
only now have boen given to the world in
the pages of the Deutche Revue. It appears
that it was on the evenijg of Gravefotte,
after a day when the Prince, like everybody
cite, had had nothing to eat and was hungry
—hungrier, we may presume, than anybody.
He had, however, the good fortune to secure
five eggs for twenty francs, and the generosity to share them with two of his companions.
But, foreseeing the mathematical difficulty
which would arise if he were to attempt an
equal division, he took the precaution to eat
two of the five himself first, and than dashed
off to Iris comrades, and with great show of
magnanimity made a fair distribution of the
remaining three, keeping to himself all
knowledge of the two that he had so conveniently got nd of.
A working mason died a few days ago at
Chantenay, near Paris, who contributed almost as much, though in an indirect way, to
tho making of modern European history as
Prince Bismark himself. Jean Michel Bs-
dingtiet, tho individual in question, was employed on some repairs at the fort of Ham
when Prince Louis Napoleon was a prisoner
there. He facilitated the Prince's escape by
lending him his can, blonse, canvas panta-
lon, and his short black pipe. Thus disguis-
ed, and carrying a board on his shoulders,
the future Emperor made his way outof Ham,
unchallenged by a single one of the warders
or sentries whom he had to pass. Badin-
guet was not so fortunate. He was arrested
and kept for some time in prison. After the
coup d etat he came to Pans, and the Empe
ror allowed him an annuity of 1,200 francs
out of his privy parse. Napoleon TJL, ss is
well known, received the sobriquet of Badin-
guet, and the e ri. inal bearer of the name
I"r •,1.v ; ;>l i it, as it was anything but
| ■ | -I.-..' w.u I,, class with which he ssso-
c .. ' l.o asr.i.-ned the surname of Rudot,
by which alone he was subsequently known;
and it was only at his death that his identity
*m discovered.
'ihe Northern Pacific Railroad Company's
iron and steel bridge over the Missouri at
Bismark is of four .pans, each 400 feet long.
It coat s fortune, largely because it was
necessary to change the course of tbe river
to make it mor* manageable. This was done
by a dyke, which the accumulations of tha
muddy stream are converting into an Impassable barrier against iUelf. The Missouri at
thi. point rises thirty or forty feet at carina season., snd i. >ubj*ct every spring to
tremendous ice gorges, so thst a bridge
which is to stand lias to be very stroug.
foundation, for pier, were therefor* carried
to uuu.ual depths, snd • quarry waa opened
by the company 'a Its search for heavy
stone.
According to the Ooa. Med. Hal Tenete,
Prof. Silvotrini has made a series of experiment, to ascertain if the uiiseiu of malaria
really exists, as is generally supposed, in th*
the dew and the soil. He collected soil snd
dew from notoriously unwholesome place,
injected infusion, of them under hi. .kin, having first ascertained thst they held various
forms uf sporiferous and other baccilli. No
evil result* wore experienced. He tried si-
milar experiments on his wife, snd he snd
In. fiieiid. msde lifty-two experiment, with
dew iufusiojis of soil collected from many
places. All of them proved innocuous. The
Professor denies,there(ore, that a primitive
infection is the cause of malaria fevers.
Victor Hugo has been visited by a del.,
gation uf Mormons, wbo urged him to join
their body and endeavored by appeals to Li*
poetic sense to make a convert of him. Such,
at least, ia the story that is going the rounds
of the German newspapers, which assert
further tbat the aged poet's visitors introduced two Mormons girls to him and give him
to understand that he might have them both
as wives if he should conclude to become s
follower of Krifham Young. The French
journals pronounce tin latter part of thi.
report a sheer invention, prompted by Teutonic malice; but they sdmit that Hugo gave
audience to a Mormon deputation, and that
lie had an extended conversation wiih
them.
Prof. Ho.mer of the Washington University of St. Louis ask*. "Shall America look
forward to a reunion with Kngland?" This
was his theme in a lecture an Monday ever,
ing last. Noting the prophecy of the Rev
F, Hainan Jincke, chaplain to Queen Via-
r ia, that a century hence there will be on
earth 1,000,0( I.IXKJ English-speaking people,
.•nd that of these 800,000,000 will liave their
nuiie in tbe United States, whieh will be the
dominant power among the nations of English doacent, the Professor asked whethe ■
It may not be well tj go into a confederation
with England and what are now her pro-
ncea, and become a part of an international
Congress. In this compact, be said, the
United States a< a whole would be tbe Empire Slate of the larger United Stales,
Wilberforce, Bishop of Winchester, speak.,
apropos of the Irish Church, of the great
ability of Dr. Fitzgerald, the Bishop of Kil-
luloe, just deceased, and who was for a long
time secretary to Wheteley. Archbishop ol
Dublin, wbo used to say jestingly, "1 am
subject toFitz." Tho Archbishop was first
nttrncte.l toward Fitzgerrld, when an outside
curate, by a witty reply of hia WhaUley
had a pet crotchet lhat a raw vegetable was
hygieoioally of great value at breakfast,
which his clergy usually played up to,
Sceiug on this particular morning Fitzgerald
wiling bacon and eggs without the erase.
reived. "How comes it. Mr Fitzgerald,"
ho ssked, "that you do not oare for tne ciesses of which all your brethren are so fond?"
You forget," was the reply, "that I am not
yet of you.'G.-ac.'s diocese."
Irrigation woks in India, which r.re generally acknowledged to be the only pa,.
nrvnent protection sgninst tbe terrible a.ul
co.i.ta.itly recurring famines, appear f om
tiie official table-. ..ubUslied in the Gove n-
men. Ga.rH* .o bo oivpable of returning n
considerable profit. Tiro only exception .
Bengal, where the irrigation of 372,ti(J(i acre.
at a cost of 12,230,000 uipeos has yieV d
during the four years under review s -olii i
only a trifle over 1-10 par cent. The Punjr.li
heads the list, the ir.-igalina of 1,42",O0.)
pcres in that province yielding a rctu ,i o-i
t.ie capital sunk of a Taction over 7 per
cant. In Madras tin return js over 6 ,rcr
cent., snd in Bombay over !!.$. These fi0u < s
show that irrigation judiciously carried out
is profitable.
Germany seems to be well supplied with
poets thirsting for fame and anxious for compensation, however small. A newspaper of
Dresden, Dan Deutsche Diehterhrlm, recently
published an offer of (55 (100 marks) for the
best ballad that should be sent to its office
by anonymous contributors, $12,50 for the
best lyrio, and $12,50 for the best narrative
poem. This offer has already been sufficient
to bring 632 competitors into the field, who
have submitted over 1,000 poems. The
number of these sffusions, in fact, has grown
to be so large that the editorial staff of the
Dichlerhelm ar. in dismay, and have selected
three individuals of hardy coni'titutions to
act as judges. They have also announced
thst no decision Is to be expected until some
time next vear
Writing to t.ie Baltimore Sun from Sydney, N. S. W., a traveller saysi "I havo
never seen anything in America that compared with Wentworth Folia in the combination of both beauty snd grandeur. At
first the water leaps a distance of 700 feet,
as though falling over the back of the seat of
a great armchair cut out of tho face of the
mountain by some giant of nature. Falling
in spray, it gathers itself for another run
and leap, th* second time falling over 800
feet into the great gorge below. The fall is
so far and the foliage so dense at the foot
that the eye fails to see tho second gathering
place of the clouds of spray glittering in the
sunlight 1,600 feet below. The valley below
the falls spreads out into a great amphitheatre fifty miles across, and hemmed in on
every side but one with the perpendicular
walls of the mountains. No human foot has
ever been known to tread this valley, as it
cannot be reached from below, by reason of
a second precipice over which the same
stream falls, and to go down from above
would be a perilous undertaking."
According to the London correspondent of
the Manchester Guardian, the little State of
San Marino, just thirty miles in circumference, the oldest Government in Europe and
the oldest republic in the world, proposes to
enter into diplomatic relations with England.
San Marino, situated in the midst of the
Papal States, has been entirely independent
since, in the fourteenth century, it refused
to pay certain taxes to the Pope. It was
already a self-governing community, the
sovereignty being exercised by the whole population. But in the fourteenth century
this absolute form of democracy was replaced
by a sort of oligarchy, power being vested in
a conncil of sixty life members elected from
all classes of the population. Five centuries
later, in 1847, it was decided that the council of sixty should appoint annually a com-
New Fall G-oods
 JUST RECEIVED AT	
JAS. ELLAED & CO.'S
.Specially Selected by Mr. Baney stile is tl'ROPK,
 CONSISTING OF	
DRESS   GOODS!
ALL WOOL PLAIDR, BEIGES, FRENCH SERGES, OTTOMAN MERVEL-
LEUX, FANCY PLAID CASHMEUES, VELVET k VELVETEKSS,
IN ALL COLORS AND STYLES.
HOW UonV TaTOQTI COLLARS AND CUFFS, RUTFUNG8 AND RUCHES IN
HOW UdOU WBdili, ALL SHADES, SILK AND CHENILLE SCARFS AND
SQUARES.     APRONS, A GREAT VARIETY.
HOW CTVI W TABLE COVERS, ANT1MACCA8SARS AND lTni[
l\l>W   OlILEnl    TOILETS, LACK AND NET CURTAINS,    ilBW   IHlLljl)
QU1L8, TOWELS, ETC.
Lsd'ei land children's Brocaded 811k, uitoman Cloth and Herman
Curl Dolmans, Ulsters and Jackets, the Latest Fashions
(Or this Fall and Winter.
ALL STYLES IN LADIES' AND CHILDREN 8 FUR. FELT, FEATHER-EDOB
AND STRAW
HATS AND BONNETS
A SPLENDID ASSORTMENT OF INFANTS' WOOLLEN JACKETS, PELISSE
HATS, BONNETS, M1TT8, GAITERS, ETC.
A Full Stock of Flowers, Feathers, Hat Ornaments Beads,
nvtiiinxory Trt
r inm MALTESE, SPANISH, HONITON, AND IBRETONNE r a rH?C3
IjALJib LACES, IN ALL COLORS. ljALJio
A Full Line or Men's and Boy'* Clothing, Shirts, Collars, Neckties, HOsle y, Etc.
VERY LARGE STOCK OF HEMP, KIDDERMINSTER, TAPESTRY k BRUSSELS
C*arpets and rtxx«s!
FLOOR CLOTHS AT VERY LOW PRICES.
CALL AND EXAMINE OUR 8TOCK.
JAMES ELLARD & CO.,
Corner Mary and Columbia Streets, New Westminster.
HOLLOWAYS PUIS
This Great Household Medicine ranks among tha lead
Ing necessaries of Life.
These famous Pills purify the BLOOD
and act most powerfully, r«i soothin§Vr,
on th*
LIVER   STOMACH.   KIONIVt
and BOWELS, giving lone, ««*rtT, ski
vijoi to the** grest MalN HPBIrttWVF
LIFE. The. sr* coonantlv receaimendea a.
. u.ver failing RDMaT in ail mm* user. Ike
ooa.iituiioii, mm «Lsl*v.r caaar, bas he-
come lorpsired or weakened. The* ar* *•»-
d.rfullv eflcsclons in all sllmtnt. iseldentsl
to Females of alt .(,<••; snd •■ » GUI CAVIL
FAMILY MEDICINE, an aasarMawtl.
Caledonia Hotel
HEAD OF PORT MOODY.
R. B. KELLY,      -     -     -
-    .Proprietor,
THE PROPRIETOH OF THE ABOVE HOTEL takes pleasure in
announcing that the House is now completed with every convenience for the traveling public THE TABLES are well supplied with
every article in season, and THE BAR is provided with a well-selected
Stock of
LIQUORS AND CIGARS-
THE BEDS are well aired, and THE STABLING is extensive
and tho best of Feed always ready for Horses.
It may be well to remind visitors that this Hotel is within a few
minutes walk of tho Hallway Whoii <w,a ouiuod, and Just us u>t>
Terminus of the New Road, now iu course of construction.
GUESTS may depend on receiving every attention and a hearty
welcome from the undersigned, whose long experience is • guarantee
of everything being comfortable and satisfactory.
J. T. SCOTT, Manager.
Its searching and Healing
Properties are known
throughout the World-
For the cure of BAD LEGS, Bad Breasu
Old Wounds, Sores and Ulcers,
It Is aa Infallible remedy. If .fTeetnallr r*h-
be* on th* Deck snd cl est, ss all iota ss.at,
It Cires SOhETBliOAT, Bronchil'S, ('•Ids,
Coughs, aad even Ahl IIS A. F*r Olssdalar
Swellings, Abscesses, riles, Fistnlss,
GOUT   RHEUMATISM.
And ever; kind ef SKIN DISEASE, It ha*
ue.er been known to fail.
The Pills .ud Ointment ar* Msaofaetsred
only it
638 OXFORD 8TKKET   I.OKD0S
And sre seld b* all vendor* of Mrdhls.a
throughout ihe civilize) world,with dlreetfras
for n. t* in nlmost every language.
The Trade Marin uf these Medicinrs are
registries in Ottawa. Dense, say ...
throughout tbe BritishPosMs.ion, wo taut.
keep the Amerioaa Counterfeits f«r .*:., wis,
he prosecuted.
t^PurebsMrs should look la th. (aa.
on ihe Puis snd Boxes. If tbe address is soi
633, Osford Street, London, tbey ar* apart-
Office or the rontraetors
CANADIAN
PACIFIC   RAILWAY.
Y AXE. Mareh J-*. »««»
Sew Schedule of Wages
-FOE—
WHITE LABOR,
—ON TIIE-
CANADIAN PAW RAILWAY
LONDON MAEEET.
W. BfTOWNSEND
HAVING, BY A LONG PERIOD IN THIS CITY, acquired
reputation for supplying the choicest quality of
BEEF, MUTTON, LAMB, PORE and SAUSAGES
A&mireB his customers and the publio that he is always true to 'the
position he has obtained, and supplies FAMILIES, HOTELS and
STEAMBOATS promptly, at the lowest market rates.
«zrVEGETABLE8 FRB8H EVERY r;DAY-«l
mittee of twelve, who still form the Supreme
Judicial Court. Recvctaries of Home and
Foreign Affairs and a Ueceiver-Oenernl of
Finance were also appointed. San Marino
c.".n scarcely possess a large army, but its
Government has often given proof of cor.ra.
B"; and on one occasion, when Garibaldi had
sought refuge within the lioiindaries of the
brave little republic, it refused to give him up
and persisted in its refusal, notwithstanding
Austrian threats of invasion. It may be
further mentioned in honor of San Marino
that, unlike another notorious little Italian
State, it does not tolerate public gambling.
II kalth is impossible when the blood is
impure, thick and sluggish, or when it is
thin and impoverished. Cnder such conditions, boils, pimples, headaches, neuralgia,
rheumatism, and ono disease after another
Is developed. Take Ayer's 8*r»aparilla,
and it will make the blood rich, warm, snd
vitalizing.
Direct Importation
-:o:-
E. BROWN,
BEGS to inform the residents of New Westminster and
vicinity, that he is  constantly receiving from Europe
shipments of choice
WINES,
SPIRITS,
LIQUEURS,
ENGLISH ALES,
LONDON & DUBLIN STOUT,
Which he will supply
&&.IN BOND  or  DUTY PAID-^®
In quantities to suit purchasers.
In British Columbia.
Overseers $125 »» month
Rook Foremen *3 to 84 V day
Esrth Foremen *260to$3
Bridge Foremen S3 60 to M       "
Bridge Carpenters (l.t class) ft SO
do do       (Zd   class)....18   '  "
Masons 82 60 to S3 60       "
Stonecutters $3 to S3 60
Blacksmiths (let class) $3 SO       "
do (2delsss) 13      "
Drillers WtotSM      "
Lshorer* fl 67 to »2       "
Hewer. 1360
Choppers S2toS2 20      |"
All outside labor io hours per day.
All carpenters to furnish their own
chest tooU.
AU employes to find themselves bed,
boarrl and lodging.
Boarding Houses will be convenient
along the line.
Board $4 per week.
It will not be compulsory for employes
to board in the Company's houses.
Wages will be paid  monthly on tbo
10th of each month.
A. ONDERDONK,
mb. 14 General Manager
NEW TIME TABLlf
General  Merchandise
Ohas. McDonougrh
GROCERIES,
CROCKERY,
HAS AN EXTENSIVE STOCK OF
DRY GOODS.        BOOTS & 8HOES,
GLASSWARE, HATS A CAPS
HJLGXX'm dks Boy's  js\xits
And a great variety of articles necessary for a household.   He has also,
GRAIN, SEEDS,  POTATOES, LIME, and GENERAL STORES
N. B.—Farm Produce bought at market rates or sold on commission.
JQCOrders from the interior promptly attended to. al2
(LIMITSTj)
T* Take KffccToet. 90th, 1883.
Leave Victoria for Nsw WBrratrmTia,
TUESDAYS and FRIDAYS, at 1 a. m.
Leave Nr.w Wx»tiiinitiii for Victoria,
WEDNESDAYS at SATURDAYS, 7 a. m.
L-wv* New Wsstshnbtih for Yali on
WEDNESDAYS k SATURDAYS, 7a7s».|
THURSDAYS k SUNDAYS, S a. am.
Leave YAi.it for Nsr»r I WsBTHiwimra. oa
MONDAYS, 10 a. m.; TUESDAYS, 6 a. m.;
KR1DAYB, fi a. m.; SATURDAYS, 5 a. m.
C. P. N. Co. reserve the right to altar this
time table st any time.
T,L. BRIGGS,
o20 Agent.
TH1M0FITN0W!
Although maeh Is said abont the tumor-
sue* of a Mond-purtfrinf saedlsUe, it nay bo
poeslele that the subject has oarer serloasly
claimed your attention.    Tatalre/UlMa..'
Almost every penon ha. some form of sefofa.
Bios. poUon latent to hi. reins. When this
dav.lop. In Scrofnloa. Sores, Dicers, or
Eruptions, or to the form of *thea*a*tt*ra,
or Orsjaata IMMa***, the •ufT.ruMr. that ensue, t. terrible. nei>e*tSM|ratttad*of taok*
vrho daworar. a. thous«.in. rawly do, that
Ayer's Saraaparilla
will thoroughly eradicate this evfl treat th*
System.
As wen expect Iff* wtthoat air as health
without pur* blood.   Oat
ATaB'S BASSATASIIiA.
Br...C.Ayer&Co.,Lowell,rVU»/.
fcWbf.Mi^sjaBHrsi*»,^ho*aa*a«a»
__ *% $ort 3TH.no>q ©nitttt.
BATCRDAT, JANUARY 19, 1984.
H0ME|L0CALS.
NoTjci TO CoaaMFOiiDaXTS.—We must
decline publishing the coinniuulc.tion of
"Csin," .imply bacauan w« cannot waste our
space on what Is, sfter all, "Much ado abort
nothiug,"—h*w»ver tall, or loud, tke men-king
aaay be. We h.ppes to lie thoroughly co>t-
T.raant, aa we believe, with all the facts as
to the mode, th* wherefor, snd th"onB'h
whom, tbs Stipendiary Ma.ir.tmto was appointed ; the manner In which he exhiliite.1
his incapacity during bis brief tenors of office ; the aai'iinod, or reel, reasou of his dismissal; aad e<-eu the secret of the add, as
•rsatfted'tohim, Uv which there was a fsir
•scum fer anybody signing. Those fact* do
not redound particularly to the oredit ol «nv
of th* parties implicated. Still loss docs the
ha*vy l**d«r in the Columbian of the 16th
inst., resound to the credit of th* sound aud
fnfy of that recently very effective journal.
Tb* article in nuestlou travls far out of its
Vsgitimit* way to assail—not wandering *•-
Tsntu.ers, but jjeut'emen of the bl^htnt
•tsnding and of the Ik gest li.t-r-sta, heie in
Port Woody, sod gentlemen wbo had nothing
mors to do with that Stipendiary's airpoint
mart, or dismissal, than bis own as yet unburn child baa to do with it,—and cared as
little s'oout i*, too. If there Is sny more
aljr *Vo.it this not too s.emly msttcr, we
m-y in j itice n*arsuaio f>oiii "Cain," o-'
deai orself with th" matter; s'though it
•etme to he m.Uuptoo ni"ch of an adver
tlseaieut of tlie v hole matter.
lur iiiakt DiscovEiv.—M Dsvi.l NeV
svnandMr. Henry Vli.'ric ba'e been lot
Mm time past experimenting, at the Railway wbarl in thi» l-rwu, aa to the means of
ssvinit sul merged timber from the operations
of sea vioiini. W* believe they hare dis-
. anvsudaaiaterial whhh, by saturating 11 e
l.i.e. with it, will pie.ent the ecti-iu of such
Teiinin. A number of ji!e.have been submerged (or months past, by the Railway
wharf. On recently raising some of them,
ths result of the application waa found to be
highly lsl.sfa.tory. Experiments have been
saad. ou s pile .pecjnen of th* rtooglas fir,
hemlock and .p.ucc. The Douglas fir, no
understand, was s seasoned pile, the othei*
were green ; tbe result happens to be that
th. hemlock snd spruce ar* quite unsfTucted
by ths actios> of tbe teretes, while the Douglas 6r was slightly affected by toem. It may
4m rea.on.bly supposed that tbe Douglas fir,
. if saturated in the sap, would have been as
well | reserved ss the spruce and hemlock.
We arc ant permitted to divulge Messrs.
Melson k Mutrie'a secret, but the reasunnhle
presumption is that they have mado an important discovery.
Mr. T. Pogue, who has a contract for
grubbing and grading the western section of
John street, with others intersecting it, and
the adjtceut town lots,—although his cm-
tract does not terminate until April,—has
Just put on s lsrge gang of Chinamen, In or-
day to hurry up thejobsauaicklyaa possible,
.Fair progress,lias been made, during tbe
- -week, in the emotion of the buildings of Mr.'
Fale* snd Mr. A. Williams, on Clarke street
Dear Douglas street. They are each to bo of
two storeys, one of them 30 feet by 00 on the
ground : the other, 30 by 40. Mr. Fales's
building is to be s furniture warehouse.; that
of Mr. Williams, a dwelling with probably
a shop on the street front. Clarke street is
now opened out from Douglas eastward nearly up to Queen street.
BoaoLAur.—On Friday night or Saturday
morning of last week, the shop of Mr. D. B.
Grant was entered, or, at all events, the
hand and arm of a burglar had entered, and
certain pillage effected. The burglar must
have been an adroit professional. He had
Whittled swsy s portion of the window sash
so as to be enabled to take out on* of the
panes of glass without necessarily making a
crash. He then obviously thrust in his arm
and drew out a quantity of dry goods, which
happened to be within arm's-length of the
window. The value of the goods so taken
Is, ss near ss Mr. Grant csn say, (taut <2B
or $30. The burglar was probably startled
by some disturbance inside, or he would not
bsve gone away with so small an amount of
plunder. This ovent shows how w* are progressing In civilisation.
Th* opening ont of Clarke street, which
wu commenced Isst week, is now cleared
from Albert up to Queen streets, and opens
ap s fine vista through what wu very recently a dense forest. This portion of
' Clarke street, hqwever, has now a number
of the best houses in the town erected upon
It. About the middle of this section of
Clarke street Is the sit* engaged for the
future publication office of this journal, and
abetter one ootid not be found in Fort
Moody.
Tbe tiiubor for the framework of th* pub-
Mo hall about to be built by Mr. Wintemute,
Is now fully prepared f*r the c*rpenters>
hands; whilst tbe other requisite materials
aft ready for the continuation of that edifice.
V Igoroua progress is being made in that vicinity—thst is, in that part of the Murray
quarter between tha railway and th* harbor
—la "sluhing" und clearing oS the timber;
and every day is opening op to view more
' (airly the attraction* of the neighborhood.
Captain Clarke hu a large boom of logs
secured in those intended for piles for his intended Wharf, which ia to be an extension of
Douglu street out to deep water channel.
Two powerfal pile-drivers with all the necessary secompaniments ar* alao close by, and
Captain Clarke only awaits th* formal authority lrom th* C.nsdisn Government, to
commence operations, after which the work
will be poshed forward with all possible
vigor.
Fartbib Improvements on Clarke street.
Mr. Fales, and also Mr. Williams, havo received within the hut few days all the materials tor their newly-projected buildings.
On* of th* buildings is to be 30x60, and the
other, 30x80, both of them two stories in
height. One of these buildings is sxpected
to be a fiftt-otas* furniture stors; the other
a dwelling.
Mr. William Kane I. vigorously engrged
In the clea.ing up and grubbing of his two
tnely situated lots, on Murray street, near
Douglu street, preparatory to building upon
A new sidewalk, on Murray street, to extend slong Murray street and the Esplanads
to the Rocky Point Hotel, is about completed. It will be a gnat accommodation to
people expecting to frequent the upper end
of town, and is a very crediUble result of
tbe enterprise of Mr. John Murray, (nr., the
representative of tbe hotel property in question.
Tho telegraph posts srs n#w up, and the
wi'-e* sre fixed snd th* line opened to
the railway wharf. The extension of
the telegraph line will be proceeded with
immediately, along the railway tine, up to
the front of the works, and afterwards farther on u rspidly as th* railway lino pro-
ceeda.
Me. Oko. Own hu aold his unfinished
building and the ground upon which It
stands—which bui'.diug >H to be an hotel—
w Mr. Cllbirt. We understand that Mr.
Uilbert.wiU complete the unfinished build-
ing, with modified designs, so u to be able
to relet it u offices for professional men.
Mr. Iusley, th« proprietor 'd the Elgin
Hotel, hu had a gang uf painters, upholder-
tn, and othei mechanics busily t.iyi^ed during the cur.tut wtek, i j fitting up snd ' urn-
lading tiis houie. It will be fully furnished
and opened for geesta In s day or two.
The Messrs. Insley, tho present proprietors, havu been making rapid progress
in their very tasteful fitting up of th, Elgin
house, snd the restauiaut department of
that hotel opens to-day.
F. F. Nelson hu, we learn, been appointed agent of the North American Accident
Iruiuiance Company for Fort Moody, upon
which w* congratulate our fellow-townsman.
ESSENCE OF PARLIAMENT.
FaniAV, January 11th.
[Trow th. Unlnl.nrl Quantise.)
Mr. Orr introduced a resolution to provide for the re-registration of voter., but the
Government, feeling that their tenure of
office was very uncertain, took care to .helve
it, for fear it might interfere with their
future political msnouvres. Tho Provincial
Secretary answered Mr. Duck qnito obsequiously, when the hitter asked if tho Government was not going to establish a primary
school in Johnson street Ward, in Victoria.
The Provincial Secretary (Mr. Uobsou) told
Mr, Duck that tho Government had
decided to establish one. Of course, a
dor.cn, if tbe members for Victoria uk for
them, but if a member from tho mainland
aekfl for a school for an entire settlement, he
is told that many applications aro in before
his, and tb* vote for educational purposes did
not admit of placing schools in every part of
tho country. Mr, Smithe told Mr. Orr, it
was the Intention of the Government to Introduce a bill to give equitable representation to New Westminster and probably other
districts. Very like a whale! Wc aro inclined to bet a small sum that no such bill
will ever lie introduced this session, or if it
is, it will be found necessary to defer it from
some cause invented by the Government.
Mr. Raybould introduced an additional
clause fur the Coal Mines Act, 1877. By it,
Chinese would be prohibited from performing certain portions of their work in coal
mining, literally reducing thoir work to such
small proportions that they would in time bo
useless in coal mines. Mr. Dunsmuir took
the alarm at once, and the lawyers supported him, houoet John coining to the rescue u
in duty bound. Amongst them they very
soon bustled Mr. Baybodld* clause out of
existeiico. Whether he expected sny other
fato for his clause, is hard to soy. But honest John could not allow the opportunity to
pass without saying something disagreeable
of a personal nature; and Mr. Boavcn, whom
he attacked, having suggested that ho could
say something very disagreeable about him
(H.J.), the latter got into a great rage and
called Mr. Beoven an Improper name, whieh
was duly taken down by the clerk, The
House then adjourned till Monday.
Monday, Jan. 14th.
Mr. Martin very properly asked for a
return of the contract, if any, for the Eagle
Pass wagon road: we shall see'what we shall
see. Mr. Senilin moved for au address to
the Lieut.-Governor to urge upon the Horn
ion Government the desirability of defining
the limits of the railway lands.. That is a
vsry proper motion, but we doubt its ever
being acted upon: it would place the local
Government, m a very unenviable position.
Mr. Martin moved that the reserves to Indians lying unutilized be thrown open for
settlement, and the Indians be granted reserves in other localities. The question is
ops that should lie scttlod if possible, but we
do not think that thr.t can be don* juat now:
there are too many opposing elements in tka
matter. Some more cobbling is to-be done
on the Notaries bill. M r. Kay hould's u n lor
tunate clause for the Coal Mines Act wa,
dragged in, so that it might receive it. cup ds
grace; this wu administered with hearty
good will which, no doubt, wu very pleaa-
ant to Mr. Dunsmuir. The House ga-ve to
the J. P.'s who seem to be in favor., the
power to adjudicate on small debts up to
|100. This they will find to be impracticable.    The House adjourned till Tuesday.
port Moody telegraph.
On Monday last the telegraph line from
New Westminster to this town was formally
opened. The first message over the line was
ss follows;
Port Moody, Jan, 14. 1SS4.
The Mator-blv.ct, Nsw Westminster.
The citizens of Port Moody send congratulation, to the Royal City of New Westminster and its officers-elect, on this auspicious
occasion, the opening of the first link in the
transcontinental telegraph through British
territory.    Viva Regina.
Juo, T. Scon,
RETtT.
Nsw West., Jan. IB, 1884.
New Westminster thanks Port Moody, and
cordially reciprocates her congratulations.
R. Dickinson, Mayor-Elect.
PRIVATE ROADS.
fPVmi tbe Ms u..n<i Oa.rtl.n.)
To tlit E'litor Mainland Guardian :—
hi the "British Columbian" lur last Sstur
day, appeared an article with the above
heading, beginning thus:—"Some people
pretend to think that it would be very BBsfMf
to build a new road to Granville, via False
Creek trail, unlse* aa equally good road i.
built to Port Moody," Further on the editor
**y*: "A* a matter of fact the present road
to Port Moody i. very llttl. worse, i( worse
.tall, than theGraiiville road," und"between
the Port Moody and Granville road, there
can lie or lair comparison in point of importance." Tbe article i. fall of mia-.tato-
m.nU, and statements calculated to mislead.
Now, u for the .tate ot the two roads,
there cannot be any fiir uomparison. The
stages to Hastings are drawn by two horses
only, snd, though the road I. bad, there hss
b*en no interruption to traffic. It wotbe,
wise with the Port Moody roid. Ou this
road it has, since the rainy Mason set in,
required four horses to do th* work two
eould on tho Hastings road. It hu taken
24 horu. to run two dally stage* to Port
Moody, though the distance is only 6 miles,
until the road finally became utturly imputable and the stages wre withdrawn, to tbe
serious loss of tbs proprietors. Lately the
proprietor* have been able to lay on the
tbe stages again, frosty westher hsving ««-t
in, but interruption to irav.I will certainly
tske place again with the coming of soft
weather.
As for the relstlve Importance of ths two
roads there can b« little less oomparisou.
The two sawmill, at Granville snd Moody-
ville—the only Industrial Interests there, sr*
owned by Victorians, snd supplied from
Victoria by water carriage, and eon tribute
but Uttle to the support ef thi. city. It may
fairly be questioned if the liu.rnes* done at
present between New Westminster and the
[net would warrsnt sso heavy an outlay u it
would tako to buibl an entirely new road
between the two places. Let us now see how
tho case stands with Port Moody.
According to the "ColnmbianV'own show-
ing there was eroetod new buildings st Port
Moody, lut summer, to the vslne of $40,000;
to this the "Culumbisn" might hsvs added
$10,000 more for clearing lots snd streets.
What the railway expenditure "was, I have
no means of knowing, bnt it oonld not have
been less than $100,000. Then there Is the
real estate investments which must have
been very large, for sales have beeu made almost every day, sometimes very large ones.
It may be taken for granted that of the on.
thousand and one real estate transfers In the
province for 1883, amounting to nearly two
million dollars, a very great portion should
be credited to Port Moody. Most of this
money, which went to enrich our own citizens, came from outside the province. It
surely cannot be denied that New Westminster haa derived a great benefit from thia
expenditure, and from all these investors
reaching Port Moody by way of New Westminster, spending their money amongst us,
filling our hotels, and keeping two stage
lines busy between the two points.
But tbe public and private expenditure at
SCR1.KY COUNCIL.
Council met our«uant toad^otaMksit, All
member, present.
Minutes of previous meeting read snd sp-
proved.
O'lunmnicatlen. were received from Geo.
Jay, junr., Maple Ridge Municipal Council,
and J. E. Murne, which were ordered filed.
The Treasurer', and Auditor', reports,
snd balance sheet, was Landed in and read,
and, on tnoti ,n, adopted. The atatement
and balance sheet were ordered to be published in both local papers.
Ou motion the Clerk wu ordered to b*
paid $2.1 for cxjiensc. incurred.
On motion, I). W. Brown ni granted $5
for eervlcea aa Auditor.
Council then adjourned.
IVrom tbe bUidI.iiJ Ourrtl.D.]
Dsatii or Dr. Frickelton.— Thi. gentleman died at the Royal Columbian Il'npital
on Thursday night last; he wu afflicted
with cancer iu the neck, which caused hi.
death. Dr. J. II. Frickelton wu a native of
London, Canada, and 61 year, of age. He
hu been some years In thi, Provinoe, and
made for himself inauy friends. His arduous
efforts to stay the progreu uf .mall.pox at
Yale, were worthy of all praise.
WOODS * TIIMEI,
LAND SURVEYORS
Beal Estate Agents,
Conveyancers & Icconntants.
PORT MOODY LOTS
FOR SALE
MONEY   TO    LOAN.
COLUMBIA ST., NEW WESTMINSTER.
J. H. PLEACE & CO.,
—IKFOBTEB* ANI, IiEAIytlkS IK—
HARDWARE,STOVES, RANGE
rutin, taoa pipes and 7rma«s,
•HUNTS. OltSr &G.
(From ibe Milr.lsn.l Quarnt.D.]
Chilliwuack Election.— D.McGillivray,
Esq., has liet-n elected Reeve. The following
Councillors were elected:—Tho*. Thompson,
A. C. Wells, Win. Brsnchtlower, Mark
Wheeler; the foregoing were elected by acclamation, the only contest being In No. fi
Ward, lKtwccn J. Ryder and K. Greyell.
The ratepayers of Chilliwhack arc well
pleased with tbe re.ult.
[From ibe M.tni.nd fta.rejl.s.]
Tna News.—The threatening appearance
of the people of the Soudan is compelling
England to prepare for eventualities. It is
not the Mahdi, but the slave dealers and adventurers in search of plunder.. .Tlie Chinese
won't brick down, so that France must Und
herself in con.irler.ble of a dilemma... -The
British Parliament meet, on Feb. 6tb J
W. Carey was elected Mayor of Victoria.
cotmrBT ohderh piiojiptlt
BIBCCTKD.
A aw.
Kyle &
Tilton,
HEW WEBTM1N8TEB. 1 0.
IMPORTEFiat,
Port Moody during thu neuon jiut closed, ii
small when comparad with thai we may expect Boon. It it well known that as aoon aa
mil connection ia effected with Yale, a Tery
Urge force will \h withdrawn from that place
to Port Moody and kept there all Bummer;
we may, therefor*-, oount on a railway ei-
penditure at the latter place during the coining season, of fomethiag like a quarter of a
million. Then there is the expenditure of
tho citizens in boilding up the new town.
Anyone walking through Port Moody ^ will
easily perceive that moat of the ex|>oi.diture
is for preparatory work; and judging from
the magnitude of thia work, and from po«i
tivc knowledge, I am moderate in counting
ou I^OO.OOO being expended on buildings
alone, and half as much more on th*t clearing
and building of streets; add to this half a
million for real estate inveitmenU, which
will.be made by the army of speculators
which will come here aext aummur, ami wc
have an expenditure and outlay of more than
a million of dollars—aud this within 6 miles
of New Westmintter. Here in an opportunity for thia city such as it never had before,
I look upon this question of a road to Port
Moody from a New Westminster point of
view. Tho editor of the "Columbian" may
eay that it is a few lot-owncra at Port Moody
only who want this road, but the fact is it
makes no difference to the lot owners of
Port Moody if thoir supplies and the ati-oam
of speculators and investors come to this
place from Victoria direct, or by way of
Slew Westminster. Port Moody can do
without tho road but New Westminster cannot. Yes, there is a New Westminster
point of view to look at. Road or no road—
that is in the two policies in question, and as
each policy has an advocate in a local news
paper, let me apply their names to these
policies.    There is
TUB OUAHDtAR P0U0T
which means a first class road. By all means
let ub have it. The stream of emmigration
come through thiB city, fill our hotels to overflow, and let tbe emmigrants spend their
money amongst us. Let our stage proprietors be busy carrying passengers over a good
road to and from Port Moody. Let freight
wagons be laid on, carrying ths merclu ndise
of our businens men to the Port Moody
market, etc., etc. Then there is
thi '•oolumhun" polioi .
which means no road to Port Moody, for "it
would be very unfair to take a large sum for
such a purpose.'' Yes, leave the mud holes
aa tliey arc, and tha rood impassable. Let
tho people seeking Port Moody find some
other way of reaching the place than by way
of New Westminster. Whv not go from
Victoria direct, and why not take supplies
the name way? Let our hotels stand empty
and our stage horses idle. Let there be ■
general stagnation.
Now that the C. P. N. Company Intend
transferring their forwarding business to
Port Hammond, and thus carry the up country freight past New Westminster, should
we not seek some other trade to coinpeusate
for this loss?
The outlay for a good road to Port Moody
would not bo heavy. The first two miles
from the city may be considered as fairly
good. Other pieces of tbe road, aggregating
one mile more may be considered in the same
condition. There really is not more than
three miles of road toauvake to complete the
connection,
Fur Plat.
Pout Moody Sales.— Negotiations are
proceeding for several Urge purchases at tho
terminus buyers appear tg anticipate a
great Loom in the spring, and are anxious to
secure as much of the property, at going
ratcri, as possible. Building is going on with
uuatvated spirit, only restrained by the
scarcity of material.—Guardian.
Stuck in tub Mut».—A wagon, loaded
ith goods for Port Bloody, started out the
other day to brave all the adventures on the
so-called road to the terminus. The driver
must Imve been a bravo man, but wanting
in that letter part of valor called discretion.
By dint of much labor and a liberal use of
the whip, he accomplished about half the distance between iSapperton and Clarke's road,
when the power of horse-flush was no longer
sufficiently potent to mora the wagon, and
the horses had to be rescued from Butlbcatiou
in the mud. Ths OftTgO was subsequently
carried to its destination piece-meal, the
wagon remaining sunk to the hubs,to be dug
out on some future occasion. Verily wo
have a valuable Government, and one that
takes care not to trouble the mainland with
the outlay of any of its religiously collected
taxes. —Guardian.
COLUMBIA BT., NEW WESTMINSTER.
P06UE * BR0TMER8f
CONTRACTORS
—roB—
(tearing tVaad, (laklaa tsaads at Street*,
aad UENKKAl. VTOHKN ftattea t*
the W..U of a Ploaeer laws
SATISFACTION  GUARANTEED.
jar Hotel, Livery St.l.le, sod Blacksmith
Shop ia progress, snd will soon bo rssdy for
.ccotntoodstion of customers.
POUT   MOOST,   OB. O.
NEW WESTMINSTER
Soda-water Manufactory
ALEX. PHILLIPS & SON
CAN SUPPLY TIIK CITY AND V7
CIMTY with Soda-water (olsia and
sweet). Ginger Beer, Ginger Ala, Sarsapa-
rilla; Lemon, Raspberry, and all other
Syrups; Essence of Ginger; Cocktail Mix
tr.p-s, etc.
CARaruLtT
OllDEBH    FROM
THE   CoUXTKT
ElECl'TEIl,
And Wholesale Deafer* at
Groceries!
8U0AR8, BYEimi,
MOLA8SEH, VINEGAR,
teas and oorrzut,
—SUCH M»—
PLUMS,      PRUHE8,     ATPLE&V
EAI8IN8,     CUBRAKT8.
CRACKERS, 0AKE8,
PILOT BREAD,
YEAST POWDER,
(Cook's Friend and P.AM.J
00RN-8TARCH, HOPS,
EXTRACTS (Assorted,)
CREAM OP TARTAHs)
80DX 8ALERATT7B,
LYE, WASHING POWDER,
BLUINO, STARCH,
WASHING SOAPS,
TOILET SOAPS,
COARSE AND FINE SALT,
PICKLES, OLIVE OIL,
MUSTARD, KETCHUP,
PEPPER SAUCE,
CURRY POWDER,
CELERY SALT,
JAMAICA GINGER,
SUGAR OF LEMOrf
CANDY, AND
ALL KINDS OF NUTS/
LEA&'U     9   UCES.
CANNED
GOLDS f
CONTEMPTIBLE.
I From the MaiiilsUid Onartllan.l
We leave onr readers to  form their own
opinions of the following:—
To tke Editor Mainland Guardian .•—
Dear Sir,—Allow me space in yonr valuable columns, to make known that, by Borne
means, the Guardian ami Port Moody
Gazettt are always removed from the Heading Hoom, and it seems to me that they
nnst be removed for a purpose, evidently,
to keep strangers from seeing them. The
Cohinfoian ia nlwiys visible, but I never see
the above -mention**!: the matter ought to be
looked into. Citizen.
Ifew WeatrmiDrter, Jan. 15, 1884.
Titm Por* Mootjt Wham.—A telegram
has been received by tb*a railway officials at
Port Moody. Informing them that it baa bran
decided to build the wharf od iron piles, ami.
that thia will be proceeded with iimwediately.
—Guardian.-
[Prom the Matalind Onardlin.]
Dkath or Dr. Masters.—We regret to
have to record the death of this unfortunate
gentleman. It la painful to think of what
would have bee* a useful and promising
career being cut short by the great leveller.
Dr. Alfred Masters was a native of the
Island of Jersey, in the British Channel.
He left home at an early age, and, by dint
of steady perseverance, aided by his genius,
he achieved much that would have been un-
possihle to most people Ho graduated in
modicin* in New York, but subsequently improve-, and extended his knowledge in Edinburgh, London, and Part, He went to
Australia with about300 emigrants in charge,
and only lost tine on the way. In thi? Province he has acquired the must favorable estimate of bis abilities as a doctor, and his
oharacter as a gentleman, and by many he is
much regretted^ Hewwinterred yesterday,
under the auspicea of the United Workmen
Secicty, tn the Masonic Cemetery: ho waa
only Ml years of age.
Port Moodt.-The tnuwactionB mithin
the liMt three days comprise lots on the
Mrlnncs and Murray properties, which ap-
p«ir to be attracting attention. The pHcta
Qhtaii*r.il wore- very good.
A well-known clergyman in the north of
England entertained recently a brother cler-
gyina-i from some distance, The evening
being uupropitious, he asked him to remain
for the night At dusk thu clergyman asked
his gtieht to step into tho manse' while he
gave orders to have his conveyance ready
in the morning. As the visitor entered the
manse tbfl clergyman's "ufe mtltook him m
the dusk for her husband, and, seizing the
pulpit ISiblo which wuun the lobby table,
brought the full weight of it across his
shoulders, exclaiming emphatically, "Take
that for asking toe ugly wretch to stay all
night,"
In Bavaria it is illegal to criticise, even In
a friendly Iplrtt, the actions of the King
Soon after the termination ol* the Franco*
Herman war a story was told of a meeting in
the streets of Munich between the King of
Ba\aria and a wounded soldier, during
which the King, Hndin^ that he was not recognized, expressed his surprise. "How
should I know your Majesty?' snid tho soldier in explanation. "Von never go to the
armv, and I never go to the play.' To the
publication of this anecdote may probably
be attributed the determination taken by the
King not to tolerate remarks of any kind on
his private movements.
Fifteen hundred cab proprietors and drivers have petitioned tho Merlin City Council
that no inure wooden or asphalt pavement be
laid down. Some of the petitioners.say that
the accidents are from fifty to a«;vonty-nve
times greahT than on the old stone pavement, and it is further alleged that the ex-
peuse of repair is much greater. The worst
stone pavement is preferable, they declare,
lo wood or asphalt. Yet in France the wood
aud asphalt seem preferred, and only last
summer several streets could be seen in London in which the stone pivement was being
replaced by wood.
Very trivial matters, tho New Bedford
Mrrcury says, sometime* influence a jury,
and nobody understands this better than the
habitues of the court room. An oilieer called
for a young lady, the chief witness in an assault case, recently, and she appeared in a
hat in which bright yellow | predominated.
"If you want to win your case you will
change that hat," said the otGcer. "H will
prejudice the jury against you," The girl
put on a black hat with a red feather and
got a compromise verdict. The officer aaid
that if the hat had been plain black without
the red feather ahe would probably have
convicted the defendant of thu crime alleged.
A great quantity of human hair has been
recently exported to France and Kngland
from Russia, and, the suspicions of the police
authorities of the province of Pskov having
been aroused, a priest named Heraphin was
recently arrested on a charge of fraud. It
was then discovered that this man last year
founded a religious sect, every member of
which, on joining it. had to sacrifice his or
her hair as a symbol of obedience to the superior. Seraphin-has a brother, & fashionable hair dresser in St. Petersburg, and to
this man the priest consigned the locks of
the faithful. Seraphin U now in jail; the
new sect of the Seranhinovski has beeu un
timely extinguished; and the shorn sheep
are consoling themselves as best they may
upon the money obtained from a sale of the
effect* of their too ingenious pastor.
The following letter on the question whether hanging i* painful appears in the Pall
Mall Gazette; The following facts, as related
to me by a late distinguished attest who
died high in rank ltv her Majesty's service,
may Ivo of some public interest Many years
ago when a fag at a public school, he was
ordered by his master to get his eilk stockings rand> for an evening, party, but unfor-
tunately, only one could be found. Vain
were the excuses offered by the poor little
fag. His-master, in a rage, threw the silk
sto^kim* round his neck and held hint suspended in the air a snfficient time to produce unconsciousness, and to make it a
doubtful matter if vitality could again be
restored. He therefore experienced all the
scnHfttrions of being hanged, but he suffered
no pain, .Hid used to say he had no recollection of anything happening to him from ths
moment the stocking was thrown pound his
ncoi-untU ho felt life returning.''
COLUMBIA ST., NEW WESTMINSTER.
DOUGLAS & DEtGHTON,
Saddlers & Harness-malters I
Every Article in their Line
Always in Stock.
THE   TRADE   SUPPLIED.
Front St
YALE' B. C.
Weeks
JAMS, JELLIES,
PIE FRUITS,
TABLE FKUIT8,
PEACHES,
PINE APPLES,
BLUEBERRIES,
TOMATOES, CORN,
ASPARAGUS,
STRING BEANS
GREEN PEAS,
LOBSTERS, OYSTERS,
SARDINES, MACKEREL,
SALMON, CODFISH,
CORNED BEEF, BRAWN,
LUNCH TONGUE,
DEVILLED MEATS,
BAKED BEANS,
PIGS' FEET,
PORK & BEANS,
ASSORTED BOILED aud ROAST"
MEATS, Etc., Etc.
-AND-
Foster,
TATE
-AT-
PORT MOODY.
O.
OFFICE
With the N. W. & P.
M. Telephone Co.
aft'"
Lots offered in every
portion of the town-
site; also a few desirable Estates in
the immediate vicinity of Port Moody.
PROVISIONS 1
FLOUR, FEED, OAT-MEAL CORtf
MEAL, BUCKWHEAT FLOUR,
CRACK'D WHEAT, GRAHAM
FLOUR, PEARL BARLEY,
SPLIT PEAS, MACARONI,
VERMICELLI/TAPIOCA
SAGO, RICE (No. 1 A 2,)
nAM. BACON, LARD,
CHEESE,  BUTTER,
SALMON    BELLIES,
MACKEREL,   SALT
HERRING    IN    HALF
BARRELS   AND    KITS,
SMOKED    HERRING   IN
BOXES,   POTATOES    AND
ONIONS,   ETC.,    ETC,,   ET0.
Wooden anilillow Ware
TUBS, PAILS, BROOMS, WASHBOARDS, BRl'SHES, BASKETS,
ROLLINCi-PINS,    CLOTHES--
PINS, WRINGERS, LEMON
SQUEEZERS,  WOODEN
MEASURES   (latcat,)
*TEP LADDERS,
BROOM   STANDS,
ETC., ETC.,  ETC.
JMORERS'_ ARTICLES. _
TOBACCO, CIGARETTES,
SKiARKtTE VAFK&.
PIPE STEMS,
CIGARETTE HOLDERS,
CIGAR HOLDERS,
CIGAR CUTTERS,
CIGAR LIGHTERS,
MATCH SAFES,
MATCHES,
POUCHES, Et<v
Cigars from $27 to $150 per H.
SimDRlES
Coal Oil, Matches, Shoo Blackings
Stove Polish, Straw Paper, Papor,
Paper Bags, Second-hand Grain Bags,
Cotton Twine, Candle Wick, Can
Openers, Demijohn9.
PLAYING  CAKDS
SPICES—Whole and Ground, in Oh,
Jtt,  IB), 2$tt) and 51b Tins.    Dried
Herbs, ^ft> tins; Citron Peel (Scotch)
in- 7lb tins; SiiltaiiA Raisins.
LIQITORS !
(In bulk) CANADIAN RYE, AMERICAN BOURBON, BRANDY,
SHERRY and PORT WINE.
(In case,) AMERICAN BOURBON,
BRANDY, GIN, CALIFORNIA
RED AND WHITE WINES,
CLARET, CHAMPAGNE, OREGON CIDER, and MILWAUKEE
•*** Cjit $ort Ihooij ©ujtttt.
SATURDAY, JANUARY 19, 188*.
PORT MOODY AS AN ARSENAL
We have pointed out the great future
importance of Tort Moody as the terminus ol ihe greatest railway system on
1 the continent, and its great value as the
eerier of commerce on the Pacific frontiers of the Dominion; we now come lo
another great feature in its future progress, in iu guise as an arsenal, where
ail the munitions of war, naval and
military, will be stored—where the war
ships will be repaired and refitted, and
where troops and supplies will' arrive
Irom England for distribution on the
Pacific. It would be difficult to find a
more tplcndid site for a graving dock,
large enough to receive the greatest ironclad atloat, than ibe small cove in the
North Arm known as Bcdwell Bay.
The whole outline of a graving dock
has been formed by nature, and so far
mJ; ' from excavation being required, the
"bottom of ihe'"dock would become
a receptacle for the debris from
the sides which will be teraoved in
placing the stone, in order to reduce the
depth. An unlimited quantity of the
finest granite is on the spot, so that the
cost of constructing a first-class dock
would be less, probably, than in any
other place in the world. The Arm it
self would contain an entire fleet, so that
* every branch of refitting, victualling and
arming a squadron, could be carried on
at the tame lime. The entrance to the
Arm is open at all seasons of the year,
and at all times of ihe tide; i; is undisturbed by any wind lhat blows, and could
be defended against any possible attack.
Wood and water of the best quality are
plentiful; splendid spars can be obtained when required. As a place for a
naval depot it has no superior, and we
are much mistaken if this fact has no;
been du'y chronicled at the Admiralty?
The site chosen by Colonel Chambers
for fortifications includes the bluff at the
mouth of the North Arm, which dominates the whole of the Inlet, including
Port Moody. Thus, from the ramparts
at the fort, the whole of ihe Inlet and
the North Arm can be overlooked, and
every operation carefully noted. A site
will be selected, no doubt, for the erection of extensive barracks, where troops
arriving from Europe may be lodged before tratisfer to the troop ships or trans-
^ ports; as, a'so, for the reception of troops
on their way home. As a sanatorium
for soldiers lrom the East Indies, nothing
could be betrer; the fine mild climate,
with its pure bracing air, would be an
excellent preparation for the homeward
journey. But in ihe case of precau ion-
ary measures for eventualities, where
troops could be placed on ship-board in
a few hours, it is wiihout equal. The
surroundings of Port Moody would have
many attractions for military men; the
fishing and shooting being both excellent. For yachting or boat racing it is
Ihe very beau ideal, and the level
plateau between the head of Port
Moody and the Coquitlam, offers many
splendid cricket fields or racecourses.
The presence of large numbers of com-
,. mercial, naval and military gentlemen
will, of course, create a gay city; theaters
and opera houses will soon raise their
stately heads as ihe rendevous of beauty
and fashion. The drives in every direction will throw Victoria in.o the shade,
because the level country in the immediate vicinity of ihe mountains, will produce a coup d'cril ot surpassing grandeur.
. Our readers can but dimly imagine the
appearance of Port Moody a few years
hence; its Port ihronged with large
steamers; its wharves covered with merchandise from every clime; its streets
lined with magnificent stores, thronged
with a gay and fashionable crowd; carriages rolling through the streets of the
city, and in the business portion, crowds
of great wagons carrying the merchandise from warehouse to whaif and wharf
to warehouse. Amongst the residences,
the spires and lowers of churches, and
in the center of the city, the great ho els
and public institutions. It will be the
center of commerce, from being the
center of the telegraphic system of the
Dominion, on the Pacific; connection
with every part of the world will be
made from this city, because the Asiatic
system wilt be united lo the Dominion
telegraph now stretching from the Eastern Provinces to tlie Rocky Mountains,
and soon to be joined by ihe wires now
being stretched from this C17.
THE MAINLAND AND THE
ISLAND.
[From the M.lul.nd a.r.rdl.n.]
However we may assail the Islanders
for Belfishneas and greed, we must ad
mit that they have always the power
to do as they like, by securing the services of our own representatives to help
them in taking everything to themselves
And they have either the art or the
good luck to have elected the best men
to serve them. We aro not going at
this moment, to nam" tlir men we nl-
lude to : we shall refer to them by name
at another time :   it  will auawer our |
purpose to give a single bistance, and
that is honest John. The anxiety to
get 1 Iiis man returned at the last election, by the ring in Victoria, was most
intense. Even honest John's eagerness
to get down to Victoria waa not so all
ulisorl'ing as their longing to receive
him. Ill urinwert'd a double pur]>ose.
He repn-si'iited the most important
constituency On the mainland, and they,
with iniK-k gravity, made him a minis
tir. But liis great valuo waa in his
perfect iiuliuVrt-nci- as to whom he served, so long as he served honest John.
It is said that wo cannot servo two
masters, und that is perfectly true; one
may lie served in true eeruestness and
MmiTity, because it ninr.ns self-interest,
hut for the other, nothing remains but
falsehood and hypocrisy. Honest John
haa determined to attempt tins double
service iu respect to the Island and the
Mainland, but he signally fails; his
double face is too apparent: his real
face is turned towards the Island, it is
only a mask that we see this way.
Would any true, maiiilander have urged
and advocated the Kootenay bill!
Would any true luainlander have passed the Settlement bill?—particularly
with the falsehood and misrepresentation adopted by honest John and his
colleagues. The vile falsehood repeat-
id over and over ogain by these preci
ous ministers, that the Province was
paying for the building of the g-aving
dock, in order to smooth the way for
treacherous mainland representatives to
vntnfor the Island railway job, under
tlie pretense tliat tlie Settlement bill
must bo taken iu its entirety so aa to
get rid of the graving dock, was only
possible with honest Joint to give
:t countenance. This subject must
be very sickening to true muin-
landers, who feel outraged by the
base conduct of their representatives ;
but, they should remember that
they are themselves, very muah^to
blame in ,tho matter, owing to their
apathy and want of patriotism, by
which means certaiu men were elected
who sliould never have entered tlie
HouBfi as members. We are inclined
to think that a vast change will be
oliservable at tlie next election, and we
will guarantee that very few of the
present members for tha mainland will
ever be returned. It must have, struck
tho people of the mainland that in
matters of legislation they arc quietly
ignored, except in the matter of taxation and the disposal of their lands
and minerals. They have really no
veice in legislation; their wonts are pooh
poohed; their appeals for roads or any
other necessary improvement, thrust
aside and deferred, with any trumpery
excuse. On the other hand, probably
at the instigation of honest John, thn
taxes are piled on to mainlandirs, as
for instance at Port Moody, although
tho semi-official paper—honest John's
—recently declared that the lands at
that place were worth nothing ar, all if
the terminus was not fixed there, and
tlitt that was very uncertain, iu fact,
unlikely, it is, therefore, evident that
a fraud lias been committed on tho
property holders of Port Moody, if
they pay tho taxes, because honest
John is very familiar with everything
that appears in his own paper, and
must know full well the opinions there
expressed. But thiB is only a singln instance. The refusal of incorporation
to Port Moody; the cancelling uf the
appointment of Stipendiary Magistrate;
the persistent refusal to spend any
money on tho rond from this city to
the torminvs, although it is only six
miles long and is now actually impassable: the g"oss outrage to the owners
of property at Hastings in leaving
them out in tho cold and making a
quite unnecessary road by way of False
Creek, because it, improved tlie way be
honest John's property ; the shameful
deceit practiced on the PWpl* of Mtpls
Ridge in respect to their roads and
their giant; the duplicity in thn cabe
of Sumoss and OiiilliwhacA-, in winch a
snlnnin promise to alter their Charter
was broken without a word oi excuse.
So much for this district. But when
we look at the upper country, wc find
a complete blank in regard to anything but absolute necessities, and even
even these are uncared for, to the great
loss and annoyance of up-country traders and farmers. The Island, on the
contrary, is petted and pampered at the
expense of the mainland. Here tho taxes
rtre collected witli tlie me*t stringent
promptitude, and if they get into
arrear, the lands on which they are
levied are sold. It matters not to
our Island governors that the puor
struggling settler has fodnd it imptni-
ililn to raise the fniuls to pay the taxes,
and that the Bale of his farm will reduce him to' beggary; handsome roods
in the suburbs of Victoria—according
to the Colonist— as good as their principal streots, must I10, made with mainland taxes, that Victorians and their
visitors may have nice drives, tho people of the mainland, meanwhile, being
left to struggle through the mud the
liest way they can. The Islanders are
astute in turning corruption to thrir
own profit, but they forget that a day
of reckoning may come, and that thn
dollars they are making by tricks just
ntiw, maycauso tho loss of millions to
them hereafter.
THE
ROLLING WAVE
DEMOCRACY.
OF
[From tbo Mainland Gaardlan.l
The existence of revolutionary societies
all over the world, is hurrying on events
which Kings, Kaisers and Ministers of
State regard with very natural apprehension. If we instance Nihilism in Russia, Socialism in Germany, Anarchism
in Francs, and Fenianism in England,
it is merely because the terms are famii-
iar to the general reader; but the tidal
wave of democracy is fast submerging
even-portion of the world, and, reallv,
for our own part, wc regard it with anything  bul dissatisfaction,  since it will
culminate the sooner, and by the natural
revulsion bring back society to its proper and natural basis. With the dominion of democracy, the elevation to
high places of commonplace and unrefined intellects, begets irreligion. depravity, and anarchy. C»n anyone be
surprised at the general desire of all
nations to fee friendly with the Roman
Pontiff, since he alone, of all the rulers,
tias any influence with the great masses
of ihe people all over the world ? Take
away the benefits of religion from a
man, and you make of him a savage;
you cast loose all his passions, render
him reckless, and pi one to every vioe.
By some strange infatuation, the tendency all over the world for the last
quarter cf a century, has been towards
tree thinking and scoffing a', religion.
Th'.s, unfortunately, has not originated
with the masses; wc say unfortunately,
because wiih the presence of good examples amongst ihe middle and upper
classes, we should still have the means
of repressing disorder. But the fleau
has had ils origin amongst the great intellects of the day, and has become
fashionabte wi.h ihe great and wealthy,
those looked up to by the peop'e for
guidance and example. Witness, for
instance, the distressing [tale of mind
suffered by the Princess Alice, who had
absolutely reached the point of doubting
the existence of a God. This is really
terrible; when we think that this single
instance, made public, implies the existence of thousands like this really good
woman, brought back to her faith by
her maternal love, we may well tremble
for die future of society. We have often
pointed out that what is really meant by
democracy, is impossible for hamanity
as it is. Even those who, for sheer love
of novelty, preach up the universal
equality of all mankind, would be revolted with the rea Uation of their own
doctrines. Burns is constantly quoted
where he says:
"The rank is bnt the guinea stamp,
Tha man's tho man for a' that."
The idea is very r cetical, and very correct to a certain degree; but it does not
apply to ihe extent to which every dirty,
demoralized, lazy loafer would carry It.
wc preach a universal doctrine of
equality and fraternity, we cannot make
limits und conditions for ourselves, because tha would lie only bringing down
conservatism and aristocracy to a lower
level than where it now exists, with a
consequent deterioration. The fact is,
lhat ad Ihe communistic creations of
men, no doubi < f great imaginative
tower, but of bndly balanced intellects
Let us instance two men now making a
noise in the world—Bradlaugh and
Ingersoll. They are each fluent speakers ami wrircrs, socially very pleasant
companion1;, and we'l calculated to mislead weak minded people. The misfortune for society is, that the abnormal
character of Ibeie men's minds cannot
be distinguished by the uninslructed —
precisely those who are their victims
and proselytes. 11 the masses could
only understand the terrible judgment
they are bringing on themselves, they
would, instead of listening 10 those men,
hang them to the nearest lamp-post.
They forget that in all grent wars or
revolutions—generally the result of dissemination of irreligious doctrine—they,
the masse-, are the real sufferers. People
who can command the means of evading the effects of disorder by flight, can
laugh at the follies ol ihp people who
bring aboul their own destruction in
iractising the evil doctrines of men like
Bradlaugh ami Ingerso'l. They are
said to bo good men; they preach
charity and good will to all men. This
is merely the "guinea-stamp"—a mock
one at that—affixed to their vicious
teachings, which have neither charity
nor goo.l will to anyone connected with
them. Tlkey merely enact the jiart of
earthly devils in making their immor-
ity attractive.
EDITORIAL NOTES.
[From the M.itii'.suid Omrti.m.J
In discussing Mr. Raybould's proposed
clause for virtually excluding Chinese from
coal ruining, honest John became quite enthusiastic iu his opposition ; he possibly de-
Bired to find favor in the eyes of Mr. Dunsmuir. So decided was his opposition to the
clause, that he made a poraonal attack on
Mr. ttcaven, to the effect that he (Mr. B.)
employed Chinamen on his lota at Port
Moody. This Mr. Beaven denied, and
strongly deprecated personal allusion in the
House ; he hiuted that if he chose he could
tell something that would place honest John
iu a humiliating position before the public.
It may bo that hotiesl John felt that Mr.
Beaven was telling the truth with regard to
his power of saying something, for he got in
a towering rage, aud as Mr. Beaven did not
think it convenient to expend his powder
and shot, he told Mr. Beaven he was "a
slandering coward,M Now, in this, honest
John overstepped the bound* of prudence,
because Mr. Beaven did not say anything,
and the mere statement that he could say
something should have given no offense to a
man who has been eighteen years an elder in
the kirk, and who made such an interesting
picture at a revival meeting. But there is
no doubt he was "sensitive." Mr. Beaven
was wrong when he said he could place honest John in a humiliating position before the
puUir, todftfe we don't think that likely.
Hom/st John le well experienced, and is not
easily caught In a "humiliating petition."
The fracas was anything but edifying, and
throws an ugly reflection on the Government
of which honest John is a member. We
told them when they enrolled bi-n, that he
was unlucky, and they will find to their coat
that hu will bo their Jonah.
GENERAL NEWS ITEMS,
The English Primate and his daughter
have just had legacies of $10,000 apiece
from a wealthy relstionless clergyman, aud
two other members of the Archbishop's
family benefit under the name will aa godchildren of the deceased.
Earl Granville, tho British Foreign Secretary', h** no country house exeept Wslir.tr
Caatle. his official anode as Lord Warden of
tho Cinque l'r»rts. He has a largo income
derived from colliery property in Shropshire,
but scarcely any land.
A Melboumo paper says that thirty-five
known lotteries are being carried ou ia Melbourne and suburb** in connection with the
Victoria "Derby," and, according to the
prospectuses, they amount in the aggregate
to no leas a sum tbau £230,000.
At the rooeut dinner of the Scottish Vnr
porationin London, on St. Andrew's \*ny,
over which the Marquis of !x>rnt presi led,
everythingsugcestivc of degenerate Sr.xon-
doin was carefully suppressed, Th"re were
only two pairs of trowsers present.
Sir John Willoughby, a young (AoaY of
the Guards, is the owner of the Adelaide
tHly which is now the first favoHr-' jf the
Derby, and which has apparently u bright
future. As winner of the "July' aud Doer
hurst riate, she has secure! $ir..000 in
stakes.
The cities of Ely aud Wells, both of which
have episcopal palaces and a grand cathe
dral establishment, are so email that the
latter was disfranchised aimply because it
had not, under the provisions of tbo last
Reform bill, the requisite 7,000 people entitling tt to representation.
A young foreign doctor wbo had lost
faavily at the gaming table at Monte Carlo
recently entered tbe Church of St. Barthc-
leray at Nice just before closing time. Having been requested to Uave, ho begged for a
few minutes' grace, declaring that he was
ahout to kill himself. He was taken for a
lunatic, and compelled to leave. He shot
himself just outside, aud fell dead.
The observatory on tlie top of Ben Nevis,
Scotland, is uow in good working order, aud
M. Omand aud staff are domiciled there.
The last ascent was made witli difficulty, as
the suow was fourteen feet deep and a passage had to Ire cut through. The journey
occupied nine hours. The obaervators will
be cut otl fox mouths from the world.
Althorpe, the country seat of Ireland's
Lord Lieutenant, Earl Spencer, where he In
aow staying, is a very plain building, but
holds the .merit private library in England.
There a.*o thirteen rooms filled with books.
The volumes in the smallest of the»c are
valued at $300,000. It is full of pictures by-
Sir Joshua Remolds, including one of him*
self by (himself.
Mr. Bayne, an engineer in the employment
of the East India Railway Company, has
succeeded iri identifying the exact site of the
Historical Black Hole in Calcutta, and has
laid bare a portion of Its walls. They are in
a perfect state of preservation, with the
punter intact on the inner surface. The dimensions of the chamber correspond exactly
with those recorded.
Mr. J. Lowes of Newcastle-on-Tyne, the
doyen of North of England reporters, is about
to issue a work descripture of a system of
stenography of which he is the author, Mr.
Lowes writes: "With an average amount of
intelligence, you can master the rules and
principals in hair au hour, and the details by
the application of an hour.a day for a week.
To apply both principles and details to verbatim reporting must dtqwud upon individual
capacity and application," The system has
been largely iu use in the North of England
for the put thirty years.
Earl FitzhardiDgo, the popular hunting
Earl of Berkeley Castle, wherein King Edward II, is said to have boen killed, chiefly
signalized himiclt by giving $20,000 for a
bull and redeeming much land. The Severn
is very broad near his estates, and he gave
orders that a stone wait should be built in a
line parallel with tho nhoro, but so far swiy
that when the tide came in it washed mud
over the stones, but could not wash it back.
In this way he added many acres to his laud.
The Duke of Leinster has, like his father
before him, always been a steady resideut in
Ireland, and has the advantage of a seat
within ono hour of Dublin and reach of plenty
of good society. The Duke of Abcrcoin,
although in former days much < f an absentee,
is now constantly resident. His hue seat,
Baronscourt, is remote from towns, and
there are no neighbors of his own class, but
he is usually surrounded by a large funnily
circle. Both have very large families, and
are not very wealthy for their position, but
they get their rent punctually.
A reminiscence of Mr, Dilke's, which appears in Mr. Buxton Forman's odithn of
Keat's works, almost proves that tho poet at
one time believed in metempsychosis. After
the death of Thomas Keats a white rabbit
came into the garden of Mr. I hike, who shot
the creature. Keats declared that the poor
thing was his brother Tom's spirit, and so
earnest waa he iu this view, impressing it
upon others in the circle, that when tbe
rabbit was put on tho table no one could
look at it, and it waa taken away untouched.
Tho Empress of Austria's health has failed
very much of late, and she has been differing very severely from rheumatism and sciatica. The court physicians have peremptorily forbidden her to indulge iu any of her
favorite outdoor amusemeuts, for which,
however, she can feel no inclination, as she
has been much pulled down by her illness,
which has caused her excruciating pain.   ,
Miss Vera Manning, a niece of Cardinal
Manning's, has entered the convent at llo-
champton in England. At ths expiration of
three months probation she will return to
the world again for another three months,
and then, should ahe still desire a religious
life, she will take the veil. The young lady
would bo a decided acquisition to the convent, as she comes into £2,000 a year under
her father's will.
A co.respondent of the Pall Mall Gazette
says: "A novel incident occurred at Hawar-
den Castle recently. The Premier Mrs.
Gladstone, and the Misses Gladstone were
going to dine with Mr. and Mrs. Scott Banks
at Sougthon Hall (Mold), where they were
to meet the Duke and Dnchess of Westminster. The Premier's coachman was una*
ble to drive, owing to indisposition, but an
able snbtitute was found in Lord Aberdeen.
His lordship put on coachman's attire, drove
the distinguished party to their destination,
and returned with tha carriage to ths castle,"
M. Henri Roche fort's paper, tha Lantern? t
has shocked and horrified ihe Legitimists by
stating that the expiatory chapel in the Rue
d'Anjou in Paris, which it is proposed to demolish, contains not the hones of Louis XVI,,
but those of Robespierre! The assertirn
however, is not new. In his memoirs, Vie.
Castel states that the autobiography of Bar-
ras had been read by Ransselin de Saint-
Albin, who found there amplo evidence of
the truth of this statement, fiarras wrote
that, after the death of Robuspicrra, he was
present at the opening tf the King's grave.
when a quantity of quicklime was thrown on
the remains of the unfortunate monarch and
Robespierre was buried on tha top of them,
Barras added that proof of the truth of hia
extraordinary assertion could be found In
the grave in the shape of the buckles of Ilo-
hcppb'rre's* shops and rnl^ttra. He wore silver shoe bucKh-8, but had gold buckles on
his cuhUe*.
Rocky Point Hotel,
r>onT  MO*ox>"sr.
pHl8 FINE KEW HOUSE HAS JUST BEEN FITTED UP DI
L Firat-alaas Style, and is now tb* BXsTT HOTEL at th* T*rmlnu*.
THE TABLES WILL AMAH U WELL StPPUEl
With every iHjlicjtcy of the Bei
the    :e a.
Ia supplied with (he BEST WISES, LIQUORS »nd UGABS to U iamU to
the Market.
The  Beds  are  Carefully  Attended  to
And Guests may depend en receiving every Convenieuee »nd Comfort,
Slncerbeau & Lamont,     *     *     -     Proprietors.
A RASCALLY TitlO WANTB OUR
COAL urn
Euii'M Kree l'ntSH:~A we.-k or two eg
one of your correspondents inonirwi, "who
are Crocker, Stanford and Huntington?"
The question was *.up ■ ■ • ntly asked because
Cheap John (Chamelion John ho ia sometimes called' tried to make the country believe the Is1 - d Hallway Co. was not at all
composed of .'oreignersl Of course, John
kuew hetter; but toe .dear people may be
told that anyhow. As with the others who
surround him, he dare not growl otherwise
than aa directed by the political old must iff
who rept'escnts Nanarmn. Well, who are
Crocker, Htanford and Huntington ? Have
your many readers seen tlie "Chronicle" of
the 2V.nd December last? If not, they ou/ht
to obtain It and read it. Meantime permit
me to statu that thu rascally trio referred to
cunti-ol the Central 1'acitic, and Southern
Pacific Railway Company^ that they have
for years aa shown by a series of private
letters of Huntington, whieh are now made
public, l>uen systematically engaged in de-
b-aUching Senators aud Represeutat.ves; buying up newspape.s and agents of the Associated Press; gobling up steamships and railway lines so as to totally monopolize -tbe
railroad business of California, and abut out
all overland competition from that State.
They purchased Congressmen outright, corrupted the National Legislature, aud committed other dcfcds of wickedness too numerous." Now have these—what will you term
them, British Columbians or foreigners—
corruptionists becomo sick of the expense at
Sao Francisco aud transferred their profit-
•kldo thifughdeuioraliziug line of business to
Vicuma, and have an agent, an associate
there "intriguing aud purchasing" at> old account. It would certainly seem so, and in
all pro'.ability a bvauoh house will be, if it is
not already, ooened at Ottawa. Good Senators of Canada—Central, Kast and West,
the gi eedy cormorants and corruption mon-
£ere and their agents have met With gratifying success in British Columbia, how will
they fare at Ottawa? Will you tike in
hand the noble work of preventing Vancouver Island from being spoliate*! and our
national coal stores—the only coal fields on
the Pacific Coast—from being donated to
roKKiONEfts of the most abominable type.
Tbat you will is the hope of every
Loyai. Canadum.
—NanatTKo tfrte Preu,
THE FRKAK OF A BIRMINGHAM
CHIMNEY SWEEP.
A strange scene in one of the principal
Birmingham thoroughfares was ths subject
of magisterial proceedings. A sweep named
Cheshire ran up a ladder on the roof of a
gentleman's house, and, for thu edification
of a large crowd, stood upon his head on the
top of * ehiiuieypot, at the aarpe time performing with his legs a variety pi fantastical
movements. The chimney collapsed and fell
Into the street, doing damage to the extent
of a sovereign, and causing several persons to
have narrow escapes from injury, while the
adventurous performer of the freak rolled
into the waterspout, and had a narrow escape
from what must have lieen Instant death.
Ultimately he was rescued through a sky*
light in thu roof. Tho prisoner said he aup-
(losed he had been playing the fool. The
Clerk—Annt vou w*'» u:'ve *° PttV 'or It.
Cheshire was lined 5s., aud 20s., damages.—
London Telegraph,
A RIVAL TO TICHBORNE.
Fnyreuth is proud of the possession of a
scanoal superior in many raepcets to the
Tichborne affair. When the millionaire Ott
died intestate in Vienna, the Countess Boud-
issen, of Bayreuth, placed herself before the
public as the patroness of a young gentleman
who furnished acceptable proofs that he was
tho proper legal heir of the dead Ciceeui,
The Countess pushed with great vigor and
skill the claims of her protege, and succeeded
in securing for him the advantages of ail but
the final rulings in the case, flne produced
nine witnesses who withstood alb the as*
s&ult's of the estate's lawyers. They appeared to have a weak eftse so far aa testimony went, hut possessed a strong belief
that Ott had other aud mors legitimate heirs,
and In the hope of eventually finding them
confined their efforts to breaking down the
testimony of the Countese' witnesses and to
securing delay. When the patience of ths
zenxrt had about become exhausted, the lawyers for the estate found some poor neasants
living in Baden who possessed indisputable
proof that they wero the real and only heirs
of millionaire Ott. The discovery was made
juat in time to save the estate to them, aud
tho niuc witnesses furnished by the Countess
have just been sent to prison for tonus varying from one to three years upon the charge
of attempting to 'oist a false heir upon the
Ott estate, aud the Countess Boudissen, as
the principal of the conspiracy, has been
sentenced to three years' imprisonment.
A London scientific paper says that a
shoulder of mutton contains more bone than
a leg, and considerably more fat and connective tissue; and that, consequently, a shoulder at 20 cents a pound is dearer than a leg
at 2*5 cents.
•szja
Pacific Boarding House,
Ci.as.it* SxaaiT, Post Moodt.
GK0R6E ANNAS I) • • Proprietor.
PARTIES VISITING PORT MOODY
will find «\ cry couTcnieucu and coiu-
fort at lb. above Hotel. Meals at all hours.
Charges moderate. dl53m
Notloe.
NOTICB IS HEREBY OIVEW, THAT
application will be made at the present Session oi the Legislative Aaaembly ot
the Provinoo of British Colombia, for so Act
giving th* applicants the privilige of taking
water from th* Coquitlam river, situate ia
New Westminster iKstrict, and for l.avo to
supply water for domestic snd other purposes to the town of Port Moody, and all
othsr towns, district*, sad villagss between
the said tows of Port Moody and English
Bar, as shall or may be situate within one
mile of th* water fronton of Port
Moodr, Burrard Inlrt aad English Bay;
sad for ths right fin order to enable
them to carry oat the same) to build such
flumes snd acrjundncts, to acquire such lands
and lay all pipes, and do all other acta sad
things as may be neceMary for the purpas*
of the shove.
Dated 7th. January 1884.
.1. P. WA£LS.
Solicitor and Agent lor the applicants.
lABgley Street, Victoria.
Arlington House
(Better known ss "Campbell's," sad svsry.
body in the Provine* knowsCaoipWU,)
New Westminster,   -   B. C.
The Pint Hotel la New WwtsslpsUr,
On Ihe Highway froa Port-- Moody,
And ths last—and bet—available Jor th* returning passenger to that place, orte all th*
,-r,uutry up the Fraser. ■     ■"m
ROBERT CAMPBELL,
Jan. S, 18B3. Boh Bsoorister.
"NEW~FALL GOODS!
New Fall Goods!!
Wm. ELSOK,
The Cash Tailor!
Lrrron Squa«b,N«w WssT*u.svraB,
Has opened out bis FALL STOCK, aad a
now prepared to usoute order*.
tsTSaTisraenoa Guababtud. .1
William Sincerkau;
PUBLIC WQRJtOOmACTOE
|S PREPARED TO ENTER INTO COS-
Highways,  Constructing VYbarv**, Krec
of buildings, or for sny class of work ce
TRACTS   for   Clearing Land. Opsins.
up Town Streets, or more eitended Runs
'hways,  Constructing Wharves, Erection
nected with tha constructmn at ltailwiji.
I*T Every Reasonable Satisfaction aaaund
to thine with whom h* oootracta.
Address:—" Rocky Point Hotel," Perl
Moody, II. G.
B,\Hll\ k BONUS,
BARBER    SHOP.
TAILORING AND GENERAL CLOTHH
REPAIRING DOME.
Mubbuy Stbikt,   -   •   Cobbbb or Qviss
PORT   MOODY
 '■-.' ■■' a.. ■•*..! i ..
IIBAL
Estate
Broke:
mm public,
1*1X6. j,tt» k |ccii£J
INSURANCE AGT.
t*' ***• -   *   *
NE Vf WI8T*CI*r stsb, a
I.
rarticular Attention g>
to the transaction of Real Es<
Business, In TSfelf WwStmiui
City sod Dintrio*. *nd tke T»
of Port Moody.
MONEY TO LOA
On Good Seofl&ritj.
V —m
■»*
THE
,
ROYAL CITY
Raning
>    Mills Co.
Take this opportunity of thanking thoir
numerous patrons for
past favors, and respectfully ask a continuance of the same
in future. Having on
hand a large stock of
Rough and Dressed
of various kinds and
grades, they are prepared to give
|argaiw iort^i)
for the balance of the
year.
They have also to
announce that they
have opened a branch
of their business at
PORT
MOODY 1
and will keep a full
supply of
-Lumber,
Sawn # Split
Doors,
Windows,
Mouldings
and all the necessary
furnishings for buildings at tho Terminus.
Parties who intend
building there can
count on obtaining
all the requisites for
that purpose on the
ground.
The Nanaimo
SAW
MILL
is now in operation
under   the  superin
tendence of MR. A.
HASLAM, and will
keep a full supply of
DOORS,
WINDOWS, &C,
It has been ssid that because cstt! s**BB>
time, uiefer impure water to pure driukiog
water as Jiaiu. should be taken to suujily
tbern vita pure Hater.     The  ItrUuk Htedieai
Juunuit expuuus to aifricultahsta that lb*
ratsoa- fur this fact ii that cattle when given
tank a utu-are nut kept properly supplied
with ruck salt.    Iu their desire fur saliue
fund   udmal*    will  drink   ths   SSost iuipUl-
fluids, sud will even sat earth. The writer
thruL. it li'th iuisdk-iou* aud cruel to d.-
prh e ■ataV si .alt, aad ths* uoiap-1 thsui to
■M-ek it  in  refuse.
Though tlier. ha. been hut tin* p-a-t SSBaJsV
led iu huglauil, tli<-r* hare U*u uuailwrs uf
IrasVsa psssskt, Julio I oveutiy, from whom
th. pit .ut Earl of CovaBtry is oWendad,
a a. a hick or uf London, ami Lord Mayor in
phen Brown, a grocer, gars Viscount Moutague lo the [leeiage; til* t'apals,
Karl. .( Ba**S, are dtaoaiidtU friiia a draper;
Edward Oaborsw, founder of th* Dukes of
Leeds, ws* a elutii worker; from Willi un
Craven, a Bailor, sprang the Earl of Its.cii.
juat diccaM.il; Lord lJisdl.y slid Ward »
desc.ndsd from William Ward, a jweller.
The vacant Irish Chaocsllorship lias bcreu
filled by appointlaanl uf Sir Edward Sulli-
vsu. Much haa hr.n saiil by the Eugli.h
Brats about the eunraious'salary attach.il to
this office ({lO.WJO, with s p-u.iuu of I'-JU,-
000 ou ratiremeiit, wholly ma.pertive ol
duisii.m of tenure). It is »IO,000 a rear
uioro than that of the Euglihh Chancsllor,
wh-rne duties ss L'liaucclfor sre twic* a*
arduous, aud he ouly nosivafl $30,000 aa
Chancellor, hia other |'20,000 being for his
duties aa Spsaksr of the Uuu.e of Lords.
Besides, living iu Dublin is at least 20 per
sent, cheaper than iu  London.
M. Ciirard, Director o. tho l'arls Municipal
Labonitory, says that the chemical know
ledge applied to the concoction of spurious
foods ami drinks is of s very high order, and
would make the fortunes of the adulterators
a dozen times over, if applied In an honest
capacity. The matter which aeeins to have
aroused him of lata is * peculiarly ingenious
thing in gooselwrry j.'ly. It appe.rs that
tho article i. made entirely of Saajriad, The
coloring matter if fuchsius and the flavor i.
given by s compound of acetic «ther, tartaric acid, aldehyde, and u-nanthie. Inspectors
often recognize It from tho fact that it is "a
Little more elegant thau the genuine article."
A stranger in Denver stopped on the sidewalk, and manifested deep interest in a brok-
cu-ilown, spavined black home that was
doing his liest to draw a load while * cart
driver was vigorously belaboring him. Tbe
poor beast tugged again iu vain. At leugth
the straugor called, in a low tone, "itaven!
Raven!" The'horse looked up with intelligent:*, glanced furtively around, and made
for the etranger, drawing th* cart out of
rut. He whinnied with delight, and then
rubbed hie now agaiust th* stranger's shoulder. The etranger had known him waen he
was king of the turf in Toms, New Meiico,
aud Colorado, making mints of monoy, for
his owner, the notorious and improvident
desperado, Clary Allison. The dscpu-udo
broke the horse down, and thou broke himself down.  The horse wo.sold to a ilraymnn.
The Copland system of asphaltic wood
pavement, iutrudnci'd in Loudou, ia claimed
to meet some of the most important requirements for the purpose which have hitherto
been uululiill.il, and, though inure costly at
fir.t than aomo other methods of roadway
construction, its durability ami satisfactory
wear nroro than meet that point. The advantage of simplicity is at once presented,
namely, a bed of concrete, with a layer of
asphalt over it, upon which arc laid trans-
verse courses of red pine block, with intermediate Bpaces j these spnecs nro filled in
purtly with heated mastic asphalt, anil then
with coarse lini* and gravel grout, Hushed
with hot air, to the surface of the roadway.
Finally, about an inch of rnugh gravel is
spread over the whole, and left to be worked
in and oompaoted by the ordinary etfect of
trafhe.
Hatfield House, the residence of Lord Salisbury, tho Conservative leader, where a
large Christmas party is assembled, is the
finest Elizabethan building in England, and,
though it has suffered from fire and modernisation, is still in a great part externally in
the sumo state as when Elizabeth's Chancellor occupied it. No house in the land is so
full of recollections of tho Virgin Queen.
She is there "a la Diane," a portrait taken
when quite young, rind also in gorgeous
gown, well known through the engraving
From Zricchero. Suits of armor hang like
sentinels around the long gallery, half ball,
half corridor, by which you enter. The
staircase is of oak, with huge carved lions on
the landing, and the drawing moms arc
splendid. Tho dining hall coirtaina portraits of CharlsB I., Kichard HI., Henry
VIII., a curious ono of Mury Stuart, half a
dozen of Queen Bess, aud no end of Vsudyoks
and  Ueynoldses.
King John of Abyssinia has made the following reply to an invitation rent by the
Malnli to unite forces and together tn harry
the fruitful plainn of the Delta: "May the
writing of John, tho chosen of the Lord, the
KingofZion, the King of the Ethiopian
Kings, reaolr the hands of him who is a \ ro-
pbet among the Turks. By the grace of
tho God of Saints and his Intercession of our
Lady or Zion, I and my army are keeping
well. Praised be thu grace of the highest!
How art thou! Thou bast written to mo:
'I am u great prophut. 1 will not seek strife
with thee. Peace be between ub.' 1 do not
know whether it be the will of Cod that
wu should light against uucll other; hut what
does that matter? Are we not enemies in
our hearts? 1 am n Chimtian and thou art a
Turk. Where I am there thou canst not be;
where thou art thcru 1 cannot live in peace.
Written in thu camp of Michail-Devri, the
10th Benigsof the year of grace lo"5 (August
|8M)."
The project of flooding the Sahsra, and
thus opening up Central Africa to commerce
ami civilization, appears to !>u reviving—tho
opinion still being urged by geographers aud
engineers that, if the water of the ocean
con I-1 thus be let into that .Insert, the climate
the soil, ami the (military condition would
all he improved. Though nearly two-thirds
as large as Europe, ami containing some two
hundred million inhabitants, the only means
of communication with the rest of tho world
lies in the caravan tracks. In the Sahara
desert there is a remarkable depression covering an area of about 00,000 miles, this
depressed portion being known as Elijuf,
snd said to extend from within twelve miles
of the seashore to regions in the olose neigh-
borhood of Tiinbuctoo. The theory of both
ancient and modem geographers has been
that Eiijuf was originally filled with water,
which llowed into the ocean, but that, a bar
having gradually formed ut the entrance,
the flow inward was slopped, and the heat
of a vertical sun caused the inside water to
evaporate. The practicability of reopening
thia ancient channel is the great question.
The Florentines hare beeu holding high
festival iu their city. All the boarding
wliioh has covered the west front of the cathedral for years is now down, and strangers
and residents see the fscade as the lost of its
illustrious architects planned it,    This corn-
AN KNOL1SH BACHELOR'S CHARITY,
wiir aim a  svbi-m imi ham a swan
BLISS   WITH JOV TUB KAM* OS  aAl.NK.
Iii the year 1719 Henry Raine, a wealthy
brewer, snd a parishioner of St. Caeorge-iu-
the East, determined to do something sound
.i,l sssksstsal for the pari.h iu which be had
Ih.ii loin, and where he had acquired bis
great wealth and pr.aperity. The simple
words of this tine old gentleman's will ebow
the sssrit* that animated his pious intention:
"Whereas it ha. pleased Almighty Cud from
a small hrgiiiunig to rai»c me to s plentiful
fortuue, aud to enable me to assist my  rels-
ta*B*. ■»»>. b) Cod', blessing oil their eudea
voni, no longer uced my B*>i.tancc. I think
it my duty, in gratitude to God and obedience to the precepts of Christian charity, to
settle part of my substance for charitable
■MS." He proi < eded to do so s* follow.:
First of all he erected a pile of bml lnv»,
which may lie seen to this day in Charles
street, i rl I Grsvel lano, to bo used as a free
school for fifty boys aud fifty grrla uf the
liari.h of St. Ccorgc'»-iii'the-F.a.t. Attached
to the schools were residences for the master
snd mistress. Inserted in the facade were
models of the schoolboy snd schoolgirl of the
period, in their quaint costume, of the last
century, and placed iu a conspicuous place
uu the building was tho founder's precept,
expressed in very simple words. "Come in
and learn your duty to God and Man." He
was sn old bachelor, and he determined to
keep unmarried so that be might do what he
could f. r his relative, aud never hamper the
one idea of his life.
But the great idea of Henry Raine, which
has lieeu perpetuated to this very day, was
the setting apart ol a certain sum for mar
Huge portions, to bu awarded by lot to eer
tain of the girls who had attained the age of
k"2, and had been previously uducnted at the
schools and at the asylum tounded by him.
Having rendered a girl of St. Ceorg*-iu>the-
East a good scholar aud a thrifty young woman, he was determined, if possible, to make
her a valuable wife, under arrangements by
whieh, if fortune fuvored her whuu she dip
ped into the lucky hag, she might on her
wedding day receive the sum of £100; nay,
more, she might oven eujoy, with lur husband anil her friends, a wedding banquet ut
the founder's expense. Henry llaine would
not allow any ot "Rslosa girls" to look further than the parishes of St. Ceorgo-in-the-
East, St. Paul's, Shadwoll. or St. John's,
Wapping, for a hushund. If she selected s
partner elsewhere she was doomed to forfeit
her hundred pounds. The marriage portion
cci-emouy remains to this date what it was
iu old Kalnc's time, 150 years ago. Ou May
I, tlie day appointed for the marriage of
Raiu*'s rosier., the hell, of St. Oeorg*-in-the-
East, ring out a merry peal. Many of the
parishoncrs and all th* trustee* attend the
service, when a ipeclal sermon Is preached by
a selected preacher, snd ths marriage of laat
year's lucky one is duly solemnized. Directly after the marriage service the governors, trustees, und theirs friends repair to
tho old hall iu Kaine's schools, whero the
drawing for tho marriage portion takes place.
It ia conducted exactly according to a programme drawn out by the founder.
The lottery tickets are sealed up strictly
according to piout. ,itjiitictii.ii, they are put
into the very canister that Henry Raine selected himself, and the ceremonial table, a
splendid pitico of furrriture, is Kaine's own
gift. Hymns are sang and voluntaries played
during the drawing of tho lots, speeches are
made both to the successful and unsiiccesful
candidates, and the lucky young woman is
duly congratulated and warned for wedding
the next 1st of May. The drawing over, the
wedding banquet takes place, at which the
marriage portion U handed to the young woman who had been married that very morning. It is significant, in connection with
this wedding banquet, that so long as 150
year, ago the old founder almost anticipated
the historical appetite of thu voracious vestryman," for he decreed that ou the day of the
wedding a dinner should be provided for
the bride and bridegroom anil their friends,
but that the governors aud friends of the
foundation should also dine together, but at
their own expense. The first ode sung annually ut the wedding feast is very quaint
and characterise:. It culls ou tbe "Spirit
of Love, who in Jays of old didst move thy
servant to provide this goodly help to virtue's cause, shed on our hearts thy grace,
and aid us to fulfil the plans of Hnine's munificence!" and further the following quatrain
is chanted:
And wh*n loss yo,. hsvo mine .nil gc-a.,
bill! .ball th. work of kooiI ('■> on:
And many a nyinuh .nd in.uy » .ails,
all.li bl... with Joy th. name ef Udne.
A purso of 100 goldeu sovereigns is then
handed to the briiTe, anil, after more hymns
and odes according to the Raine ritual, "the
in-wry ma: Tied couple and their frieuds retire. *
Unfortunately, the full and best intentions
of old Henry Raine were never carried out.
Living aud dying unmarried, he left all his
property to his two nephews, and in his will
lie strictly enjoined thuin to invest £*,000
in the three pet- cents in order to give a marriage portion and a wedding breakfast to two
gir-Ts instead of one. His dying request to
the two nephews who had iuheritcd his
plrntiful stock und his trade in brewing is
very touching. Ho had no esrtlily doubt
that the .said William Dutuii and William
Wilson would fulfil his dying request, "If,"
said be, "my nephew, had soon, as I have,
six poor innocent maids como trembling to
draw the prise, and the fortunate maid that
got it burst out in tears with excess of joy,
they would readily perform tho aaine," Alasl
for the faith of this excellent unci.. The
nephews undutifully winked at his sentiment, and satisfied their conscience in some
other way. Anyhow, the £4,000 were never
invested, and so St. Gcorge-in-the-East can
only send nut one endowed maiden into the
world every year instead of two.—London
Telegraph.
A PUGILISTIC ENGLISH CLERGYMAN.
ALL  ORDERS WILL RECEIVE
PROMPT ATTENTION.
pletion of the duomo is the return which the
King of Italy
which the Fl(
John Hendry,
Manager.
had promised for grave losses
[eiitii.es bore, and for the ■bitter disappointment which the city patriotically endured. Twenty-three years ago
Victor Emanuel entered Florence as King ot
Italy, and five years afterward the city waa
decreed to bo the capital of the new monarchy. The Florentines plunged into every
kind of expense, so aa to make their old
city worthy of the new court; but the disappointment which Turin had tn endure indue
time fell upon them. In May,\ 1805, the
King aud court had removed to Florence;
in July, 1871) tbat utty ceased to be the
capital of Italy. As some compensation for
this misfortune, the Florentines were promised that the chief building of their city
should no longer remain incomplete and unadorned. Tho inlaid marble was to case the
west front of the brick-built cathedral, and
to make it is beautiful as tho wonders of
f.rvieto and Siena.
At the Kpsom Petty Son-ions, the Rev. Gt*
raid Hay of Ockley, new Dorking, waa summoned for unlawfully beating ana assaulting
Mr. A. It. Jackson, partner in the firm of
Je.ckt.on <V Prince, solicitors, of Cannon street
and Sutton.    The defendant did not appear.
Mr. 11. W. Iannis of Croydon appeared
for the prosecution, and aaid the defendant
was a member of the Established Church,
and not only had he set the bench at defiance
by not putting in appearance, although the
summons was served personally, but had
sent to a relation of the prosecutor's a letter
in which the following extraordinary passage
occurred:
"I camo to Sutton yesterday on purpose
to punish the impertinence of that man. I
knew I should meet him on the way to the
station, I told him I wanted to speak to
him, so his friends went on. I then asked
him whether he intended to apologize. He
■aid 'No.' .Then take that/ said I. as I
struck him in the face. Then we fought.
The only mark I have sustained are the oat-
ting of three knuckles during the process of
pummelling; but look at hia forehead next
thno you see him. I expect the blustering
fop will tak« me before a magistrate, but if I
have to pay £5 it will be a small price for the
satisfaction and equanimity I now express.
I afterward went on to West Croydon, and
heard the Archbishop of Canterbury preach
at the consecration of St. Michael and All
Angels, and thought I might have seen some
of vou  there.
The reading of the letter created loud
laughter in which the bench joined. On the
application of Mr. Dennis the Earl of Eg-
mont granted a warrant for the reverend gentleman's apprehension.
The Marquis of Waterford must feel that
he has exercised a sound discretion in transferring his hunters to Kngland when we
learn that 500 farmers have given notice
prohibiting tho Curragliroora hounds from
going over thoir land.
fort ||ooiy |otel
(LATH BONSOM'8,)
Head or North Koad. Port Mood/.
JOHN 8. WATKIS
BEGS TO INKOUM 1118 NUMEROUS
friend, that b* ha* recently taken ths
shore bouse, wh.r* h* is inspsred to do
ererythinf pouibl* for th* accommodation
ol  eurrt..
THE TAIIl.E U always aar* to b* .up-
plied with all the delicacie. of tb* *ea.on ;
th. BEDS ar* of the mo.t comfortable, and
th.re U ample snd comfortable HT AllLINO
*n th. prenuses.
aw* BOA'IS always obtainable on th. bar
bor iu front of th* premises, by applying st
the sous*.
CITY
DRUG STOREI
MEW WESTMINSTER, D. C.
A. M. Herring,
Whoucsalx & KniiL
The Largest Stock in the City
—AT THI—
LOWEST   PRICES
«rNEXT D00E TO BONSON'S.
Toys Toys
OF EVERY DESCRIPTION.
SELECTED foil THIS MAKKET BY A
SPECIAL AUENT, AT
W.H.KEARY'S
PI0NEEI BOOKSELLER AND tTMIONIS,
COLUMBIA ST., NEW WESTMINSTER.
THE 1'OKT MOOD. AND NEW
WESTMINSTER
LIST OF CHARGES.
Rent of Telephone per month, including erection of wires $5.00
For erery message for every person not
being a monthly tenant, and not ex.
ceeding twenty-five words 25
Every additional ten words 05
All deliveries within a half-mite radius
of office 15
Beyond the above distance, per mile..      .26
The N. W. & P. M. Telephone Co. sr*
prepared to erect private lines iu New Westminster and Port Moody, or between theso
rlaces, and to connect tho same with the
V.ntral Telephone Ottice, if desired.
Parties wishing Telephones should apply
to the undersigned.
CHARLES FOSTER,
Pes. T, 1863. Sec'y-Tress.
BOOTS & SHOES
IN EVERY VARIETY
FROM
HEATllORN'S
BOOT & SHOE
MANUFACTORY.
VICTORIA.
AT   VICTORIA PRICES
H.  THtDMAS,
Under  tha  new Oihlfcllo*.'  Hsll,
COLOMBIA STREET.
New Fall Goods
 JUST RECEIVED AT	
JAS. ELLAED & C0.'S
Specially Metl«l by Hr. llaney ffbilt ia ECEOrt,
 CONSISTING OF-
DRESS   GOODS!
AU. WOOL PLAIDS, BEIOE8, FRENCH 8F.HOE8, OTTOMAN MXKTU>
LEUX, FANCY P1JL1I) CANHMEKEN, VELVET k VELVETEENS,
IN ALL COLORS ANI* bTYLEH.
HoTlT   nTonlr  TffOQTI   COLLAI1S ANI) CUFFS, RUFFLINOS AND RUCHES IN
Hon IIdUaa"WGal, all miakes. kilk. and uiemlle scarfs ami
SgUARES.     APRONS, A WHEAT VARIETY.
VCIIJ  OTVI fit1 TA.I1LB COVERS, ANTIMACCASSARS AND »rni|
IMjW   iMII/lii)    TOILETS, LACE AND NET CURTAINS,    llLsW   alULDa
tJUlLS, TOWELS, ETC.
Lsd'es and chlldrei's Brocaded Silk, Ottoman Cloth and O'erran
Corl Dolmans, listers and Jackets, tbe Latest Fasblooa
fOr Ibis rail and Winter.
ALL 8TYLES IN LADIES' AND CHILDREN 8 FUR, FELT, FEATHER-EDOU
AND STRAW
HATS AND  BONNETS
A SPLENDID ASSORTMENT OF INFANTS' WOOLLEN JACKETS, PELIISM.
HATS, BONNETS, MITTS, WAITERS, ETC.
1 Full Stock of Flowers, Featliers, Hat Ornaiitmta M..,
IBtsHininery "Trij
r An pa Maltese, Spanish, honiton, and ibketonne r *riua
l i A.L/H*5 laces, in all colors. IjR \j IVi
A Fall Line or Men's and lioj's Clothing. Shirts, collars, Neck*
tics, HOsle ), Etc.
VERY LARGE STOCK OF HEMP, KIDDERMINSTER, TAPESTRY A BRUSSELS
0«a.riDot» and. I*.tjlks !
FLOOR CLOTHS AT VERY LOW PRICES.
CALL AND EXAMINE OUR STOCK.
JAMES ELLARD & CO.,
Conor Mary snd Columbia Streets, New We.lndn.faj,
 - I .'■■ msa-SMB
Direct Importation
E. BROWN,
BEGS to Inform the residents of New Westminster and
vicinity, that he ia  constantly receiving from Europe
shipments of choict
WINES,
SPIRITS,
LIQUEURS,
ENGLISH ALES.
LONDON & DUBLIN STOUT,
Which he will supply
IN BOND  or   DUTY PAID-s^a
In quantities to suit purchasers.
General  Merchandise
(ESTABLISHED 1862.)
FRED.'K "EICKHOFF
URHKKAl. UKALKH   IK
GROCERIES
Provisions,
Dry   Groods
CLOTHING
BOOTS & SHOES,
&C.i &c.
Of First-ClasB Quality,
AND    AT
Moderate   Rates-
Corner of Front   and Begbie Streets,
NEW   WESTMINSTER.
GO  TO  THE
San  Francisco
BOOT
SHOE
STORE!
AND GET YOUR MONEY'S WORTH.
Boots & Shoes
(From an Infant's Shoe op to a Man's Boot
MADE   TO   ORDER.
Repairing Neatly Executed-
lushest Market Price paid for
HIDES.
JAMES UOUSSEAtr,
COLUMBIA   STRELT; QPP   BANK OF B. C.
Chas. McDonough
HAS AN EXTENSIVE STOCK OF
GROCERIES, DRY GOODH.       BOOTS & SHOES,
CROCKERY, GLASSWARE, HATS & OAPI
laVEerL'a cto Boy's aStxlts
And a great variety of articles necessary for a household.    He has also,
GRAIN, SEEDS,   POTATOES, LIME, ami GENERAL BTORE3
N. B.—-Farm Produce bought at market rates or Hold on oommisaioB
KjC"Orders from the interim- promptly attended to. ul
Caledonia Hotel
HEAD OF PORT MOODY.
R. B.  KELLY.
•-    .Proprietor,
	
—.—.	
THE PROPRIETOR OF THE ABOYE HOTEL takes pleasure I
announcing that the House is now completed with erery conrat
ence for the traveling public. THE TABLES are well supplied wil
every article in season, and THE BAR Is provided with (swell-select.
Stock of
LIQUORS AND CIGARS.
THE BEDS are well aired, and THE STABLING is extenaii
and the best of Feed always ready for Horaes.
It may be well to remind visitors that this Hotel is within a ft
minutes walk of the Railway Wharf and Station, ana just at tl
Terminus of the New Road, now in coqrso of construction.
GUESTS may depend on receiving every attention. and a hear!
welcome from the undersigned, whose long experience is a guaranti
of everything being comfortable and satisfactory.
 J. T* SCOTT, Manager
LONDON MARKET.
W. B. T0WNSEND
HAVING, BY A LONG PERIOD IN THIS CITY, acquired
reputation for supplying the choicest quality of
Bill, UTTOB, LAMB, FOM and SAUSllil
Assures his customers and the public thai he ia always true to 1
position he has obtained, and supplies FAMILIES, HOTELS *
STEAMBOATS promptly, at the lowest market rate*.
*VVEGETABi£3 F&USU BVK&V . IM.Y1*.
1     il.aj

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