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Port Moody Gazette Jan 12, 1884

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Array —THE—
f oft gootlg $#.rtt*.
Xr
EVERY 8ATUR.DAV.
■.ncsimw srx r-gei.
TWO DOLLAR* PER ANNUM
imaujAr ie ADvaicas.
A« —— nieaHinis sddrsss.a to
P. S. NAI.it.Tea, UMsr,
Pott Moody.
to tsts <Hritma*t Office, !4«w Weetniiu.
Her, will reoeive prompt attention.
J. A. CLARKE,
'?f'
PORT   MOODV.
Office:- Telephone Building,
CLARKE STREET.
P. 8. HAMILTON,
Bahsistih at-Law,  Notakt 1'ublio,
goucrroK ahd Aitobket, Real Ektate
Aacni    and    Conveyancer,
ICvArM-T- SStmsst.   -   -   3*ort Moody
M0ILDINO LOTS POR SALE IN
MM every section of Port Moody, Also,
Mcburbau Lote, by the Acre, immediately
adjacent to tbe Port Moody surveyed Town
site.
Lands for sale on the North side of, and
having water frontage on, Port Moody
Harbor, finely eitaated and exceedingly
valuable.
Also, Farm Lands of superior quality and
cm favorable terms, iu New Westminster
District.
Carefully prepared Maps and Plans ex
United, sad the fullest information furnished, at Mr. Hamilton's office
Jk..   I0IOO1V,
Carpenter & Builder.
Firrma tjp of Storks and Offices a
Specialty. All Kinds of Joubino
Promptly Attkndsd to.
AST PLANS AND SPECIFICATIONS.
PORT  MOODY,   U.   O.
Port Moody Seminary,
MURRAY STREET.
TERMS oaa 1« had on application to
MRS. HESLOP.
Hong Sing,
B Am Y& LAUNDRY
Queen Stbist, Port Moodt.
SHOE    STORE.
Qcxjcx Srstusr, Post Moodt.
VI
7ISHES TO INFORM THE PUBLIC
that he is now thoroughly eetab
lisbed in business at the Terminus of tbe C.
P. R., and is prepared to make and repair
Boots and Shoes at exceedingly low rates.
Real Estate for Sale
-AT-
PORT iMOODY!
Tlie Thompson Property!
New Westminster Dintrjot.
LOT    869,   GROUP    I.
THE SUBSCRIBER OFFERS FOR SALE
on most favorable terms, Fifty Acres
of the North-Eaat corner of the above Lot,
the whole Fifty Acres, or one half of the
same, at the purchaser's option.    ALSO,
8IXTY-EIQHT
Port Moody Town Lots!
Adjoining and immediately to the North of
ihe above, comprising a part of District Lot
378, Group I., only twenty nine chains from
the .bore of the harbor. No building lota
more eligible tbau these are purchaseable at
Port Mooily.
Af ply lierso.ially to the subacriber, at bis
elite oa the premises.
,
dlB
GEORGE THOMPSON,
PrOI'KIETOS.
2ER STORE
Queen Strut, Port Moodt.
D B. GRANT
Proprietor.
iTr*Mj»«icom tern tly oaa. Trnd.
DRY   GOODS, CLOTHING,
BOOTS & SHOES, HATS k CAPS,
BLANKETS!
HARDWARE. GLASSWARE,
GROCERIES, fto.
Having imported a large stock of
Ready-made Clothing
Direct from the But, I am now prepared to
supply customers at prices that will
DEFY COMPETITION!
StTOrden will be promptly attended to
mad satisfnetion guaranteed.
Port Moody
SHINGLE MILL
DONT FORGET TO GO TO THE PORT
Moody Shingle Mill, where the best
of Shingles can be bad at the lowest prices,
wholesale or retail,
A-nupjjlj kept uBSRexsxsay an hand.
seas B. TIFFIN.
__
I
sasssMi
alette.
TOL. 1.
PORT MOODY, B. C, JANUABT 12, 1884.
HO. 4.
The Double Most we saw iu Galieii.
(Continued)
After finally concluding the arrangement of my toilet, I left my room to
Seek tbe rest vt tbe party, thinking tbst
by this time they must be assembling (or
breakfsst.
I looked in at the dining-room; there
was no one there except a servant filling the nova with billets of wood. He
was without shoes of stockings, hut I
knew by bis peculiar featuiea that be
was the same man who wore livery and
wsited st dinner the dsy before. The
absence of foot-gesr is no uncommon
occurrence with domestics in this part
of the world, including Hungary.
I now made my way towards tbe
drawing-room; and pushing open the
door, which was not shut, entered, to
find the Countess and Walters tbe only
occupants of the room. They evidently
did not hear meeome in, for they continued spesking together earnestly. 1
saw the Countess put her handkerchief
to her eyes; she appeared deeply moved
Walters wss standing on the other side
of the table at which she sat, and I
thought I heard him say, "Whatever
may come out, depend on me as your
friend."
"Good morning, Madame Is Con-
tease," said I, in a voice an loud as the
Msjor's, for I was dreadfully embarrassed at my position. Walters, on
seeing me, coloured slightly, snd tlie
lady rose from her chair quickly, but
perceiving me, seemed reassured; she
came forward with infinite grace, but
with the tears still in her eyes, saying,
"Excuse me, monsieur, that I am so
poor a hostess, and give you so sad a
greeting, but I have many troubles."
Tbe ingenuous appeal for sympathy
in the sweet glance she gave me would
have melted the veriest iron-plattd heait
l*<lo not know what folly I might not
have been capable of committing had
she given me her confidence.
Foitunately, an end was put to the
sentimental awkwardness of the bUub
tion by the audible clink of tbe Major's
spurs, snd directly tbat warlike individual entered. He had just had an
"official despatch" fiom headquarters,
and was bristling with self-imports nee.
Breakfast was announced, and we
went to the dining room, to find a substantial repast, something in the style
of an eaily dinner or luncheon. There
was a samarvar On the table for tea-
making: but with the exception of the
Countess and myself, tbe rest drank
light wine. Thri Count did not- make
bis appearance directly. When he
came lie apologised for being late, say
ing that he had been detained by his
chief Jagir, who had come to report a
herd of wild boar in the neighbourhood
they had come down from the higher
Carpathians. It was proposed to organise a hunt, and our host said he
hoped we would all stay and join in this
sport.
The Major's "despatch from bead-
quaiters" ot oourie obliged him to ream instantly to his garrison duties;
and Walters declined on tbe score of
pressing business.
I was half sorry he spoke so decidedly, for the prospect of some good sport
was a sore temptation to me; but breakfast was barely over, when our sledge
was announced to be roadyand waiting.
Our sdieux were soon made, and we
departed under a grey sky and thick
atmosphere, tbat looked like the promise of more snow.
It was not until late in the evening
after the conclusion of dinner, or rather
supper, that my friend and I had time
or opportunity for any confidential
talk.
Directly on his return, Walters had
founds host of matters waiting his attention. His "house-Jew" was thore
already, with a pocketful of papers aud
proposals for the tale and purchase of
divots things.
A "bouso-Jew" is a person of Hebrow
race, who establishes himself, with ur
without your leave, as your agent in the
general business of life. With some
taint perhaps of Judenhass in your
blood, you may at first have looked
askance at your bemitio friend; but in
the end he is too many for you—you
cannot, in short, get on without him.
If you want to bear of a cask of "really
good wine," or you would gladly sell a
pair of excellent horses that "don't quite
suit you," or you would make a contract for building a bouse, or raise a
mortgage oa your land, tbe Jew is
ready to find all you want. You may
desire to throw off the incubus, resolve
on doing your own work first-hand, and
you scout your helper, forbidding him
your presence; but, sure as fate, necessity and the hour bring back your "house-
Jew."
This central region of Europe is par
excellence the country of the Jews.
"O'est le milieu de la toile dont
I'araignee a tendu le fin reseau sur
lout le continent," says M. Rectus. In
many of the towns of Oalicia, the Jews
form a third of tbe population.
The sapper hsd been some time on
the table before Walters' long confabulation with his Jew came to an end
and even after wo were seated at table
he eome in again for his employer's
last instructions. A strange figure he
cut, with his greasy, brown overcoat
down to his heels, and a large flap-hat
covering an abandant growth of
grizzly black hair, hanging in ringlets
on either side of an elderly face of the
most pronounced' Jewish type.
Wkstsv at length wo v-wre left at peace
■nx&Zi^c ■
and when our meal was over, we drew
our chairs close lo the open hesrtb,
where a bright wood-fire was burning,
—a capital addenda to the stove, which
placed between tbe two to ma, warmed
tha sitting-room and my bedroom in a
half-and-half-way. The wind whistled
round the house in dismal gusts; but
Walters had hitched up a thick
Austrian blanket over the entire window and he had stuck a gimlet into the
door leading to the passage to (top the
rattling. Our pipes, and a good supply
of whisky from old Scotland, had been
placed on the table; a kettle, suspended
from a gipsy tripod, hung murmuring
over tbe blazing logs. Our seo.e of
comfort was "utterly consummate,"
as one would say in these days; but we
belonged to the "awfully jolly" period,
and expressed ourselves after the manner of our ignorance of better things.
There it always a crumpled rose-leaf
however; and in my case it waa the
builder's estimate, which Walters would
keep looking st. He is the best fellow
in the world, — generous-hearted a
stanch friend, truo as tried steel; but he
cannot have dene with business when
be has got it on the brain. He would
go over the figures of one estimate,
comparing them with another, halanc
ing the advantages of each, with a
steady persistence that was aggravating,
btcauHo I knew that hii mind was made
up as to which plan be meant to
select.
We had talked petroleum matters for
a good half-hour, when I said, ' By the
way, is Count Kubinsky likely to join
yoa in any of your undertakings! I
suppose he would be glad to mend his
fortunes."
"I should avoid having anything In
do with him in matters of business; the
Count's ideas and mine are east and
wist." replied Walters, drily.
"I thought you hoped to benefit them
in regard to (heir allium."
"I have relinquished that hope,
which I never entertained but for tbe
sake of the Countes«. 1 knnw now
that they are at the brink of ruin. I
piiy that poor woman ftom my heart.
The Count is a selfish brute, not to say
worse things of him. Nothing would
induce me to cross his threshold again."
"What persistently bad luck you and
I had last night at cauls 1" I remarked
in a tone meant to elicit some rejoinder.
' My advice would be not to play
cards again with the Count. He understands his game better than either
you or I."
"You mean "
"Don't ask me what 1 mean," my
friend interrupted, in a decided tone.
"Ah, well I see; the same idea occurred to us both. But, now, Walters,
I have a carious thing to tell you.
When you came to my room last night
asking for some brandy from my flask,
you said you had seen a ghost,'
"Well, I had nightmare, or something of the kind; tho fact is, I folt confoundedly ill. It is a large order to say
one has seen a ghost."
"Now comes the oorious part of tbf
story, I did see a ghost, and it wan
identically the time appearance that
had disturbed you. I had even jutnped
out of bed to help a wounled man whom
I believed was there bodily, lying on
the floor of my mora, when you came
in, and then the apparition utterly
vanished."
"This is really very singular. Were
the features of the wounded man—
or, 1 should say, his spectre—known to
youl"
"Yes; it was Count Kubinsky whom
I sow in extremis."
"Why did yon not tell mo of this
stange coincidence last nighti"
"liecauao— paidou me — yoa were
very much agitated—unnerved, in fact
—to a degree I could not havo suppose!
possible.
'I was ill at the moment," replied
Walters, putting down his pipe; and
with folded arms and compressed lips
he gazed abstractedly into the fire.
"If you come to reflect, tho whole
affair," said I, "curious as it is as a
mental phenomenon, is oapable of explanation ss the coincident reiult of
previous impressi ns on tho brain. Tbe
circumstance of finding the murdered
man iu the petroleum pit, and tbe subsequent death of the conscience-strickeD
innkeeper—these events supplied a
spectral presentment; then (he episode
of the card-playing, and our mutual
suspicions excited against the Count,
transferred his personality, or brought
it bo to speak, within (be focus of tbe
mind's imagery."
"You have said all this before,"
said Walters, looking straight at
me.
"No, I have not."
"Well, then, the same notion had
passed through my mind: that again is
odd. Of course those things arc capable
of explanation. The brain and the
Stomach can concoct a ghost between
theiu—that goes without saying; but the
coucidence is curious that both of us
should have boen stibj-ct to the same
impression, at the self-same time."
We talked on for some while, always
beating about the bush, starting fresh
theories of ghosts generally, and telling
old stories of them long relegated to the
umber-room of memory, till tho witching hour midnight. Then' laughing at
tho fancies we had conjured up, we went
to bed.
During the next few days the weather
proved boisterous in tho extreme.
Soow fell at intervals,.and a keen north
wind  made things generally   Unpleas
ant. Tbe renewed soow fall was a
hindrance to our work, for tbt ground
could not be cleared and measured for
the foundations of the bnildiez that
Wslters proposed to erect. Under these
ciicumstances we utilised tha time by
tioing over to Kreslau for s couple of
days, about some pans of the machinery
required for the reftrery. Bnt 'Mte
was a great wiury over this mat'rr, and
in the end we had to order soin? cf IN
iron work from Germany.
Tho morning afi*r our return, my
friend ji-ceived amongst his other
letters olio vhicli he vossed ov>,t to me.
h proMxi lo be. an invitation to be
prwont t* a concert given at a villnge
a Caw miles ml. when it was expect/i-d
there would Ijo a ^aihering of the local
society.
"They gel up things In this rough-
and-ready so.-t of way," said Walters.
"A gip?y hand and a full moon ar,»
excuse enough for bringing people to
geth'-r in Uieu- wilda. The place
where the concert is to b» held is only
fifteen i.iiles off. If the night is as
line as it promises io be be, shall we
■ol"
"Nothing I sliould like better," I replied. "I am glad it comes o!f this
evening, for nt the end of tlie week I
must lie leaving you,"
"ft has lieen awfully good of you io
stay so long- you have helped ue *«t
menscly; and 1 shall feel it my duly
to send you ..iy finest petroleum, ear
riage paid, Tor the rest of your natural
life."
"Do yon wish me, then, to make
light of your promise!"
"Your advice is liettcr than your
jokes, iny dear lienderson. Now to
business if we are to give up the even
ing to pleasure;" a.id so saying Wol
ters kept mn at work, dinner-time ex
copted, till it was pretty well time for
us to depart for our entertainment.
The weather was perfect—not a
breath of wind stirring, and though
the thermometer was below zero, it did
not seem so very cold. As the gipsies
say, there is no cold, but wind. We
Btaried soon af.er six o'clock. The
moon had not risen yet, but "the mam'
multitudinous" splendor andthe refract
ion of light from the snow were enoug'h
to guide us on our way. After passing
for a couple of miles along the high
road marked out by the "snow-trees,
we turned into the open country. Th
snow was in splendid state for sledging
and our horses, like ourselves, Beemei
to enjoy the run. We were skirting
the confines of an extensive forest,
when nil at once a black object darted
across the road about five yards in
front of us. It was unmistakably It
wolf; and the horses knew it was, for
they shied tremendously, and all but
upset us. They would have turned,
but Walto.rs managed to keep their
heads forward; and, by Jove, they went
oil' like the wind! The wolf-scare gave
us an exhilarating run of three miles;
indeed it was not till we came within
sight of the village that the frightened
horses really slackened speed.
Hero again we are on the highroad,
and soon overtook other sledges, and
tho "tintinnabulation of the bells,
liells, bells," made merry mado. Meanwhile the moon had risen; lighting up
tho whole scene with cold, blue lustre,
and casting most delicate tracery of
shadow from the naked branches of
the sentinel trees.
Houses by the roadside became more
frequent, and at length wo saw a building larger than the rest, from whose
wide-open door a stream of red light
issued. Within this triangle of rays
a crowd of sledges and people were
visible. Every moment, it seemed, a
slodgo drew up, and muffled figures
alighted, passing quickly beneath the
welcome porch. Cheery voices of
friendly greeting, rough words of rival
coachmen, the champing of ho-.es and
tho jingling of their bells, made hub-
bud enough; but the fiddles were
.'.creaming Strauss's waltzes abo>>e the
general din.
"This is a lively beginnings" said J,
follownig Waliers into tho house, "and
promises some fun."
We passed into a lar^c room, at the
end of which were piled a miin'jer of
empty casks and other lumber; but an
attempt had been make to make the
place look a little furnished by setting
up some tables and a few chairs. A
double lamp suspended from cue centre
lit up the place fairly well, showing
that hero the gentlemen vere \o put
off iheir heavy furs and w-aps; already
several men were uncloaking and each
moment fresh people entered.
"Ah, Herr Von Steinberg, is thr.t
you! Let mo introduce my friend;"
and so saying, Walters presented >ne
to the gentleman, who waa, in fact ihe
promoter of the party.
"Our soi-disant concert is ree.'ly a
dance, said the Gerr.ian, "Ocr h lends
liLe the excuse of meeting togotlie«-
and a concert sounds less formal. You
will know many of the people hire, 1
am sure. I believo ws ar-e going to
have a very successful eveiiin;;, en many
of our neighbours have already p..i in
an appearance, and we have a capital
Hungarian band.    I must go, for I see
Count .    It is a great compliment
his coming, poor gentleman,"
I noticed the name directly, and
asked Walters if it was the Polish
nobleman of that name who had taken
part in the, last revolution. He nodded
assent, adding, in a whisper, "A noble
old patriot, worthy of something better
than a lost cause.    You see how ter-
DRUG STORE!,
Mcasus Brum, I'oSrt Moovr.
M. HESLOP, - - P¥ojrletolr
A complete stock of
Drugs and Patent ledleiit*
aWTreecriptioru-oarefnlly dUpSMtti
ribly he   has been cot to piece* in the
tr."
We now followed the stream of pe"
pie who   were snaking   for > fo-nn
the r'-ar of  the house.    The   aoundo
music guided us through a long passagi
dimly lighted; but at the end we foun
I ml l»lm  in a bright spacious   apart
merit, which turned out to be nothing
leas than a gloriiied barn.    The rafters
were hung   with flags;   branches of fir.
trees were nailed up round   the   walls,
forming an effective dado   of greenery;
and numerous lamps,   with   reflectors,
ado   a respectable illumination.    At
the further end of the room  wer.; the
^ipsy band, al-eady pouring forth their
ii resistible music.
The toilet of the ladies was simply
morning dress, viih a tasteful ad^i.ion
of festive garniture: I do not know how
to express the Bobtle difference in
in her words. There were several very
handsome and extremely highbred
looking women amongst the crowd, and
two or th ee of tne younger ladies w':.-«
c.iiarmitig y pretty.
Herr von Stein'x-rg kindly Int.o-
duoed me to some partners, and I was
soon trying vainly to catch the foreign
tep in the waltz. I was so engrossed
with this little ditfice'ty and the lively
conversation of my very pretty iiartner,
that I did not notice the enhance of
any new arma's. but the lady sak',
"Look at Corn.ess Kub'nsl;v; she is
'xiwin;? to yon. How lovely she is to-
night!"
I was quit* surprised at seeing t'e
KubinBkys, for T bed puked Walter if
they were likely to ■*> at the concert,
and he had said, certainly not,   for the
village of I) was so fat' from   their
caslle, lying quite In another direction.
I continued to amuse myself so ex-
iremely weK through the evenin^, that
I did not take much notice of my friend
or Lib proceedings. Once I taw him
valtziiis. with the Coiintesa Kubinskv
but she dancer, several tr.ies with other
men. In the latter part of the e>«.
ni.ig the Count was not present with
(he dancers. I heard that a cbrd-iaMe
had been set up in another room, for I
was asked if I would play but I
declined] the probabilities are he whs
there.
The mutt dance of the eiening w«i
to be the Hungarian Czardas. I was
al'.nost fctirprivd to find that it was
in fash'Oii in Calicia; but it seems it
.r-.i. been very uncli daneed in Vienna
the previous winter, and Ihe provinces
Wowed suit, When the gipsy band
struck vp the fi"st, strains of the
Czardas, fresh animation prevpded the
who'e room. The music and the dance
are alike prculiar, and could only find
favour with the passionate people of
the South; it must also be dancen to the
wild, intoxicating gipsy music—any
tiling else would *je ta.ne p.nd irnpoiai-
be At nrs. the measure ts slow and
di ooroua, not unlike the step of the
minuet. To this fo'lows tho intimacy
o". a waltz. Then comes a niisunder-
stfuirUng betv een the partners: the
lady goes off in anger, and dances
OOquettishly alone; .he gentleman pur
sues her, ana manifests ns despair by
the most characteristic figure of the
whole dance- —he i»ises 'xnh hands to
bis html, which is sv.syed from side to
side; nt ihe same time he stamps his
heel on the ground, striking his spurn
sharply together. After this comes tho
pp.n oi.nne of reconciliation; the   music
aks forth af.'esh iu its w ildect strains
of passionate delight, and the dancers
whirl off in the mad excitement of t'ne
.nojiieut, every pulse beating to the
wild measure of that s.range, almost
demoniac, i.ii'sic!
My partus ■ was the belle of the evening,— one ol the lowhes have girls it
hi r sen; when my arm pusvd round
her slight ^.e.isi for the iinal waltz
I believe I con'd June danced with her
to the water's depths, like the victim of
another Lurlei. Just as the quick
i.n'Piure commenced, we passed my
friend and ihe Countess; they were
partners,— . had noticed thin before,
tor her graceful dancing was remarkable in the minuet figure. As we
approached, they were near the door.
I was hardly conscious of the fact at
the moment, but 1 reniember-d hfter-
wards seeing Herr Von Steinberg enter
the door, and laying his bond on Wal
ters' shoulder, he said, in an audible and
agitated whisper, "Come out with me
directly."
I va> so entirely carred away by
the excitement of the dance,
tha'; the wonts fell unheeded on
r.iy ear. Thn Waltzers sped madly on
—the music was at its loudest—when
ighin I was conscious of Herr Von
Steinberg's presence. He dashed past
me m a state of great excitement. I
then saw him jump up on a table ao tne
side of the i-oom. Timing towards
the orchestra, and raising his hands, he
shou.ed out, "Silence, mutdciaus!—stop
the dance !" and then the hoarse whis-
jx-r vent round, "There is death in the
house 1"
A'l was confusion and dismay. The
shuffling of feet, the cries of mingled
voices, and the faces of tho anxious
crowd who gathered round Von Steinberg, made the strangest impression on
my yet reeling brain. A sudden thought
possessed me that something had gone
wrong with ray friend ; a confused recollection of the mysterious summons
came over rue. I was not long in pushing my way through the door, and ran
along the passage, where many others
were also hurrying.
erobd Comlnuea.)
Pacific Boarding House/
Claim frrnsrr, Poar Mauar.
IOK0E AlfflAND • • rraprlclwT/
ABTIE8 VIMTINO   PORT HOODf*
will find every oonvenienea and com.'
• t the above Hotel.    MeaOaat all hours."
Charges moderate. dl63m
"meek fttos.,
Real Estate Brokers/
Oitt awn Farm Pbopbbtt ro» Bxllr
AT   TBI  TkHMIHCI   Of   TH»   OaJTADIAM1
Pacific Railway.
Beet of reference.    Information wuilnglf/
given.
POST MOODY, I. C. POST AnTIUM, 0*7
PORT MOODY FERRY t
PATRICK McDONAtD
RUNS A FERRY, DAILY, BITvYKErf
the end of the North Road and Oale '
donia Hotel pier, on arrival of the stage?
coach from New Westminster, RETURN!;"
in the afternoon, punctually, hi time far the'
stage coach to New Westminster.
(^Charge, moderate.     Freight •areinll/
attended to.
D. t. CURTIS. t. CLAKU, If. O.
MEDICAL.   HALL,
D. S. CURTIS & CO.,
Direct Importers snri Dealer. In
DRUGS AND
MEDICINE&
F...V1(IOOIIS, TOILET ARTICLES,
Lamps and Lamp Goods, k<
COLUMBIA   STREET,
NEW WESTMINSTER,   -   -   B.C.
(Nest Door to the Colonial Hotel,;
Special facilities for the Jobbing Trade*
DOMINION
COMPANY.
(LIMITED)
tchardSt., New Westminster
Manufacturers and Dealers In
all kinds of
Rough & Dressed
LUMBEEl
Shingles,
Laths,
Pickets,
Doors,
Windows,
Mouldings,-
Orders from the Country
Promptly Filled,
of quantity and cost  of  material  frff"
building   carefully   prepared
free of charge.
FIRST-CLASS
Grain-Edged Flooring
A SPECIALTY.
A. MENNIE   -   -   -   Agenf
PORT MOODY.
LUMBER YARD
DeBEI'K BROS. & CO.,
KEEP A FULL ASSORTMENT 0^
Rough and (Dressed
J. A. CALBECK, Agent* Cjjt^ortBflotojtairttr.
SATURDAT. JANUARY 12. ISM.
1.\
TORT MOODf.
—— i
jVne peoji'c  who have  been most
bitterly o|>(K*ed to this city, and Its prepress as likelv lo detract from the importance of the jrrescnt capital, aie now,
by tbe utiiailing arcrument of facts, compelled to accept the piciuon and Ixfrin
lo argue on the amount of fortihore
the Canadian Pacific railway  company
Hill be en itlcd to, as laid down in  the
Act passed in their behalf.   It is argued
liy some that tbe rigltt to land as  belonging to the railway belt,  ends with
Ihe 'ine,  so that the company tan nr,t
interfere with the land   below the wharf
at this'port.   JOlhers insist   that die
title to land will extsnd twenty ntOe* in
Iront of the terminus,  and   that, consc-
qsstitly, the company will be entitled to
claim all lands unoccupied when the
route   was   declared in   1878,   which
would extend their limit  to the Fraser.
These people go still further and insist
lhat the company will lay claim to the
foreshore,  all   round  our port, upon
which they will build  their railway to
encircle the harbor. This we can hardly
think will be the case,     It is true that
all the foreshore between high and low
water-marks belongs to the Admiralty
and the rights of the latter  have evidently been conveyed to the company
by section (a) of the eighteenth clause
©f the Act,  which reads thus:   'The
"company shall have the right lo take
" use and hold the beach and land below
" high water mark, in any s'ream, lake,
" navigable water, gulf or sea, in so far
"as ihe   same may be vested in ihe
" Crown, to such extent as shall be re-
" quired by the company for its railway
" and other works, and as shall be ex-
" hibited by a map or plan thereof dc-
" posited in the office of the Minister of
" Railways."    We need hardly say that
a very great interes'. was shown by the
surveyors, not only in  the  flats which
were   carefully 'measured  and  staked,
but in the foreshores all the way down
our port. Of course the Crown will take
all ihat may be required for fortifications
and an arsenal if it be decided to place
one in Port Moody;  but  exclusive of
such requirements, the company will
take all that they can in fairness.     The
entire frontages round this port will all
be immensely valuable, and if the company   did    lake   the   foreshore,   the
proprietors of the adjacent lands would
not lose anything;  as,  so Mr from loss
Ihey would really be the gainers by the
increased   value of the land abutting
upon the railway wharves.    We have
previously pointed out that  the great
, majority  of the vessels entering Port
Moody   will   be large steamers,   and
owing to the great value of the time of
such vessels and their heavy expenses,
each company must have a wharf 10
themselves   in order to secure every
facility for discharging and unloading.
It will be seen from this, that every
inch of frontage from  the sea wall on
each side 10 the entrance of the harbor will command enormous prices for
either   the fee simple or long leases.
The company will probably make their
own wharves a'ong the sea wall, by
which they  will reclaim  the flats.     It
was stated some time ago, that they in-
fended to place three lines of steamers
on the routes, probably,  lo Australia,
New Zealand and China, the  moment
the through line is in running order,
and this we think is very probable.   It
must be remembered that our brethren
in the eastern provinces manufacture
many articles that command a ready
sale in the countries above mentioned.
It is well-known  that Americans buy
Canadian goods and  sell them in ihe
above-named markets as their own productions.     It must also be patent to
everyone who takes an interest in our
railway, that we  shall be able to lay
our manufactures down in those pons
cheaper than the Americana, because
ihe rates for railway and ship will be
much less, the handling less, and the
time from the manufacturer to the market less, hence a considcrab'e saving.
It will, therefore, be seen that steamers
owned by the company would not only
be profitable to that corporation, but of
great advantage to the Canadian people,
for whom they will provide and retain
the markets against all competitors.
A GOVERNMENT  OF HUMBUG.
(From the Ilslnlud Guardian.]
Our present local government was
ihe outcome of falsehood and misrepresentation; its actions since it occupied
the government office has been marked
by pure humbug. The stories upon
which its several members secured their
return to the House, were based on the
following fictions: First, that previous
governments had been "fightingCanada"
which had never been the case; previous governments had asked and insisted on justice to British Columbia, and
declined lo bate one jot of what they
knew to be our rights..    No one doubts
tbat had lb* hue government remained
in poire/ sre sliould at least have received a portion of our just does instead
of being fleeced to produce what onr
present government is pleased to cad
uxtcilliatiori. TIicm same humbug,
told their audiences at the hustings and
elsewhere, that the graving dock was
eating the vitals out of the province
and absolutely carried several constitu
encies on the mainland chiefly with >hat
falsehood, when tbey knew tbe dock
was not costing ihe country one cent,
but, on the contrary, the province was
bench ting 10 the extent of the half or
three quarters of a million being spent
by the Imperial and Dominion Govern
ments. They humbugged the people of
this district with the belief that the Federal Government would not throw open
the lands 10 settlement till the Se;tle-
111 cut bill was passed: the lands were
thrown open before the House met.
But what about this throwing open, and
how much are ihe people benefitted
thereby? The lands will be granted as
homesteads if the Commissioner in this
country thinks meet, to persons who
have been in cons-ant occupation from
the date of the application until the
grant is conceded. But it may happen
that tho application will not be granted,
then w hat becomes of the settler's time i
The government or some of the members led us 10 believe that ihe lands
would be at everybody's disposal
when the Settlement bid was passed.
We have some misty recollection that
someb dy said that  the  lands  in this
latere ate satisfied. Of coarse these
liassseiiB must know what tbey are
about, tbey do not require to be told
that tbey are mining the country.
JTorvignore do not come here to invest
their money for an ordinary profit such
as a British Columbian would be satisfied with; tbey require from one linn.
drcd to fifty thousand per cent on their
outlay, so that in the case of agricultural land, they are the safe custodians
for any length of time. They will strip
it of timber or mine en it, but Uiey
will neither cultivate it themselves nor.
let anybody elso cultivate it for anything like a reasonable sum. It can,
therefore, be easily imagined what a
serious position wo aro in, when we
are, by our ministers, giving away all
the agricultural land to foreigners and
Inviting immigrants to come hero and
starve. But it is not alone the agricultural land or the timber, that these
ministers of ours are generously donating to our neighbors of the United
States, they are giving them also, our
richest mines. Great trouble has been
taken by the Government and the lawyers in the House, who are employed
by the intelligent land seekers to convince us, that Kootenay was perfectly
worthless to us, because we could not
got into it. And then they tell you
that it will be of immense value by inducing these foreigners to bring all
their ore to the Canadian Pacific railway, in order to send it abroad from
Port Moody about fire hundred miles I
district at least, were to be given back  How on earth they can  reconcile the
to the province in consideration of the
three and a half million acres ai Peace
river. So far from .his^being ihe case,
the lands arc more liiinly locked up
than evei, because tho conditions under
which they are to be obtained are so
stringent, thai most people will prefer
buying from private hands at a much
higher price, to carrying out ihe terms
ollcred now the lands are thrown open,
wiih ihe accompanying uncertainly.
Honest John, amongst other things,
promised toads in various parts of ihe
district, not one of which has been
commenced yet. Only one lias been
submirtcd 10 tender, and foi that the
lenders have been set aside and new
ones called for. Even lhat, we suspect,
would never have been offered to public
tender, had it nol been a direct road to
his own land, through ihe property of
his friends, and likely to afford a job to
a supporter. But even in this, honest
John is likely to be foi ed, because the
road will cost too much^to be made at
present. He will make enemies on the
roads be would abandon, and enemies,
also, on this road lhat he will be unable
lo carry through. He and liis col'cagucs
have managed, by their reckless promises and slarcuienis, to a ienatc the people of British Columbia, so lhat not one
ol the members of ihe present government, or any "of the representatives
who supported rhem, will ever be returned to Parliament again. The latter,
by-the-way. know that «cry well, hence
ihe tenacity with which they hold together, casting principal, honor snd
truth to the winds in the vain hope of
ho'ding iheir po-ilions till the end of
ihe Parliament. Falsehood and reckless
promises may secure a man's return to
the House, and if he has companions
enough like himself, who have taken
the chance of "making a pile," they
may hold their own for a session or
two, but the people are not to be deceived by frothy speeches from men
like honest John, and these men who
run and vote together may be grevious
ly deceived when they lost expect ii.
Kootenay and Setilement bills can only
be passed once, and although land grabs
are going on al a most extraordinary
rate, some of these jollv fellows may
become dissatisfied wi,h the smallness
of their share of plunder, and may
secede." "Honor among thieves" is
an old adage, but it se'dom exists in
fact. Every man thinks he is emitled
to a larger share than his neighbor, at
least, -that his share should be the best.
We have very Btrong suspicions that
the harmonions band who "run" and
voted together at the early part of this
session, will not cominue to run and
voie together. There are rumors that
one or two of them are likely to find
what they are pleased to call their consciences, and that failing due satisfaction on certain points, they will become
virtuous and join the opposition. The
members of the Government have no
reason to complain of this; like master
like man. Our ministers are humbugging the people, and they will
assuredly find themselves served with
the same sauce. _ One thing is certain,
they have made a reputation that will
stick to them as long as they live.
OLAP-TRAP.
[from th. Msinlmd Uusrdlsn.)
Tlie members of the present ministry, at least since they succeeded in
capturing tho reins of government,
have persistently claimed to be doing a
benefit to the country by inducing foreign capitalists to take possession of
our best lands, pretending that they
would never be developed or explored
if foreigners did not do it. Everyone
knows that this is mere trash ; that our
own people, considering the smallness
of their number, have done wonders,
and are yearly doing still mora for the
development of our resources. But
these valuable ministers know very
well that the success of any or all of
their neighbors does not imply a largo
or signal advantage to themselves, Bo
toey prefer handing our wealth over to
.orcigners who can acknowledge the
favor in a proper manner, and the rriin
two statements, it is very hard to imagine, unless they take the people of
British Columbia for fools, which is
very likely. That We, the people to
whom it belongs, should not be able to
get iato some portion of our own territory, which foreigners can penetrate
with case; not only so, but that thoy
can take therefrom ore, a bulky and
difficult thing to handle, and bring it
ever our rivers and railways five hundred mileB to ship it twelve thousand
miles jUBt to accommodate as! Do
thess ministers expect that the people
are so Tcrdant as to looking for anything ofthe kind! and do they suppose that no ono will over suspect that
if the ore can be so valuable to foreigners, that it ia at least as valuable to usl
The fact is that the land which our
ministers are determined to give away
In Kootenay, from reasons best known
to themselves, is seamed with most
valuable ores, and Hcb just in the centre
of rich alluvial gold diggings. The
Occur d" A lone and Pen d'Oreille mines
are just in the vicinity, and the possession of this land will open iho way to
the Bow river and Kicking Horse
passes, securing to our neighbors the
rade of these extensive mineral ramps.
By giving away the land, the timber,
the minerals and the trade, these ministers may be satisfied; but what about
the people of British Columbia and the
Immigrants these men are inviting
here 1 They are being robbed and
beggared, but the ministers will be
satisfiedl How very gratifying! It is
truly nice to know that although you
are impoverished, some other man is
getting rich at your expensel The
only question is, how long will the
people of British Columbia stand to be
fleeced, while men like honest John
make frothy speeches involving statements that any intelligent man must
know, are puro fiction! With tbe
night jolly fellows that run and vote
together, so prostituting the trnst confided to them by their constituents,
our present mock Government may
last, but corruption creates its own
antidote, for when thieves fall out,
honest people come by their own.
the Jovial eight may be eonsci.nce-atrtcken
and refuse to John la aa* more qoeetlonabU
jobej or It may be that the minister* alt
afraid of being tronblsd with remorse and
don'tUketoberasninded ol their pecadillo.
We observed tbat me of the clergymen
hinted, is asking th. a.ual blessing on their
latx>rs, at uiatWra by wkirh their hand,
have been usach wiled, and the topic being
very disagreeable, they determined to have
nu more ou't. There is another reason a I itli
may also have crested the moving cause,
and that is that honest John and Smiths are
both great at prayers, and they rather find
themselves thrown into the shade by the
talented clergymen who offer up tho petitions
for the whole House. It might be well if
honest John and Smithe woald say prayers
forthcHouso: they could take time about
and sttend before the House opened; the
members would thus be relieved from th.
pain of listening to them, and the time of the
legislature would be aared.
It is a quxstio* for the city of New
Westminster, whether their infatuation will
continue to the extent of cutting off all connection with Port Moody, and so depriving
themselves of the entire trade of that rising
place. The condition of what is called the
North road ha* become so outrageously bad,
that the stage proprietors, after great and
continued efforts to have some rcpaii o effect,
ed, have decided to vitiidraw their stages,
and will also decline to send out buggies or
any other description of conveyance for passengers. The only alternative in the share
of conveyance, particularly fur goods, has'
been taken from us accordiug to rejiort
who has by the Marine Inspector,
prohibited the " Adelaide, " stern
wheel steamer, from plying between this
place and the terminus; so tliut there will he
no means of currying goods from this city to
I'm t Moody. Capt. Clarke of Port Moody,
at his own expense, had a new and excellent
road partially cut out, and duly gazetted by
the loual Government; but, of course, it is
beyond his ] ower to complete it. Will the
people here assist him in keeping up communication, or is the entire trade to be given
to Victoria T If the people of th in city havo
decided on tho latter course, it would bo as
well to say so, and people desiring to go to
the terminus can then avoid this city, and
trailers at Port Moody can obtain their supplies from the capital.
Rocky Point Hotel,
-TH18 FUSE NEW HOUSE HAS JUST BEEN FITTED UP H
1 First-slass ft;Us, and is now tbe BZST HOTAU, ot Iks T*n»in«s».
TBE TABUS Will AMAIS N W8LL oLfPUB
Willi every Delicscy •* tha Htmam,
THE      B ^ H.
Is supplied  with the lifcST WIRE", L1QDOM and UGAfiS U b*
the Market.
The  Beds  are  Carefully  Attended  to
And Guests may depend en receiving every Convanieoc* and Osnfbrt.
Slncerbeau & Lamont,     ■•..«■     Proprietors,
THE
C'ltOWN   PRINCE
VATICAN.
AT   THE
EDITORIAL NOTES.
[From Ihe Mslnlsnd Gusrdl.n.]
Hosist John was a terrible champion of
Representation on the basis of population,
and was pretty liberal with abuse for all
those who differed from him on this subject.
His election address was most elaborate on
the subject, and he promised everybody be
fore he was elected, that it would be the
first question upon which he wonld insist
upon the ministry taking up and legislating
upon. Now, honest John hsa had many
opportunities to bring the question forward.
Nay, last aesaion the ministry were terribly
at a loss to find anything to discuss, and
brought up matters with which there was no
necessity to dsal.ln order to fill up the time.
But honest John has been silent on this representation husinese, carefully avoiding the
subjeot. We need hardly tell onr readers
that this district, tbe one represented by
honest John, Is the one where the grievance
feinting 10 want of due representation is
most ovident, yet honest John says not a
word, notwithstanding his many promises
and blatant deolsration of Its claim*. Of
course this is not the only promise ho ha.
made, only to be broken, but It la tho most
glaring on*.
Wa were surprised by noticing In tho
Victoria Standard, an Item informing
the publlo that prayers In our local legislature were in future to be dispensed with.
This may he aooounted for In a variety of
waya. It may be that th. mon who passed
the Kootenay bill and the Settlement bill do
not look upon the oustmn with a favorable
eye. It may be that tho principals in these
iidehrated mesnnrrs sr. afraid that some of
We are not likely to learn what passed
between Leo XIII. and the heir to the German empire during their long private interview at the Vstlcan, and the Italian Government ic naturally anxious that but little importance should be imputed to the incident,
i'o thoHe, however, who recall the relations
of the Prussian monarchy to the Papacy during the last thirteen years tho fact, that
such a visit should have been paid at all is
fraught with undeniable significance. The
atteuipt, indeed, to represent the tender of
respect and good wilt made by Prince Frederick William as a mere formality will
seem absurd when we consider how easy it
would hive been to arrange a meeting with
King II1:miiki'.t at Florence or Turin instead
of at Home. Either of the first nsmed places would have suited the Duras-ris Cubinct
much better, for there would have been no
occasion to give the world emphatic proof
that the L'ulturkainpf'v.1 over.
Let us recall some of the events which
render tho friendly conference between the
Roman Pontiff and the eon of tbe German
Kaiser in a high degree remarkable. The
galling fact that the successor of Hilokbxano
and Led X. possesses but a shred of temporal
authority, that the States of the Church have
dwindled to the preciucts of a paluce, is, of
• mice, directly chargeable to the victory of
tiic German army at bodan, and to tho Lar*
gain made by Bismarck with the Miuis-
tcrs of Victor Emanuel, by which they
were permitted to seize Rome in return for
thrir pledge of non-intervention in the war
with France. This was only the fust of
many blows which the Prussian champion of
militarism was to level at tho Papacy.
Peace hod scarcely boen made with France
when measures were takon at Berlin to
convert into a veritablo schism the opposition to the dogma of papal infallibity which
had boen proclaimed by the Vatican Council; and the Old Catholic movement, nominally led by Dr. Dollinoxr, but actively
promoted by Bismarck, managed for a time
to gain a firm footing iu Bavaria, Baden,
and all along tho Rhine. In July, 1871, thu
Prussian Government abolished the Catholic
department in the Ministry of Public Worship and Education, and some six months
afterward the Prussian Parliament passed
the school inspection law, framed to debar
Roman ecclesiastics from any share in thu
work of popular instruction. Exasperated
by the., attacks, which wero accompanied
by similar demonstrations in the Reichstag,
Pope Pius IX. refused to receive Cardinal
Hoiienloiix, who had been appointed German Ambassador to the Vatican.
With the formal sundering of diplomatie
Intercourse betwoen the German empire and
the kingdom of Prussia on the one hand, and
the Papacy on the other, the aggressiveness
of Bismarck became still more violent and
bitter. His first retort was tho expulsion of
the Jesuits from Germany by a law which in
1873 the Federal Council construed as applying also to many other Catholic associations. Then came the complete suppression
of the independence previously enjoyed by
the Roman Church In Prussia by the four
Fai.k laws, promulgated in May of the last
mentioned year. This legislation was supplemented in 1874 by three more acts intended to utterly subordinate the Catholio
religion to the Prussian civil power; and a
fatal stroke was thought to have been dealt
in January, 1875 by an imperial statute
making civil marriages, compulsory, enjoining the registration of births, marriages,
and deaths by civil functionaries, and permitting Roman ecclesiastics to marry. Finally, in March of the same year, the Prussian Parliament passed tho Sperrgaetz or
interdict on the payment of salaries to recalcitrant ecolesiastics, the object of which
was to starve Catholicism into submission,
That this war upon the Papacy was no
hasty and transient ebulitioa of resentment,
but the outcome of deliberate and inflexible
resolve, was repeatedly declared by the
self-willed statesman who was, and still is,
intrnsted with the dual functions of Prime
Minister of Prussia ond Chancellor of tho
Gorman empire. "Of this," said Bismarck
in the Reichstag, referring to the rcpuhie
of his ambassador by the Pope, "of this
you may bo sure, that wo will not go to
Canossa, either iu our ecclesiastical or political relations."
it is less thnn six years sineo Cardinal
Pecci sneoeeded to the Pontificate, and although, like his predecessor, he romains the
prisoner of the Vaticon, and has wielded no
weapon but moral influence in his contest
with tho civil power in Germany, he has unquestionably achieved ft substantial victory.
Bismarck has found it impossible to govern
either the empire or the kingdom of Prussia
without the cooperation of the Clerical party,
arid he has purchased their support by the
disnvnwsl of his vaunts and tho meek abandonment of his high-handed Cuilvrkampf.
H-has deserted Dr. Falk, the faithful instrument of his aggressive policy; he has
emasculated the May laws; he hns restored
to their sees the Bishops that he had banished; ho has sued for a renewal of diplomatic intercourse with tho Papacy, anil has
once mom sent an nmbm-ndor to  tf»r> Holy
See. There is, in brief, nothing left of his
proud boast for alike in ecclesiastical and
political matters be has been glad to retreat
from the arrogant positlou taken ten yeurs
ago and to compromise with Rome. And
now, literally as well aa virtually, the jour
ney to Canoes* has been taken, lor although
ia these modern day* there i. no talk ol
holding stirrup, and kneeling in the snow,
not tbe less conclusively and flagrantly haa
tho visit of the Crown Prince to the Vatican
betrayed to the world the moral defeat and
rrajp! iation of th* German Chancellor.—A>v
York t  n	
A COLOboAL   FORGERY.
AN    ABSCONDINO    CLERK      fROM    MVERl'OOI.
STEALS A  HUNDRED TUOUSANO  DOLLARS.
Chicago, Jan. 3.—A forgery to a very
largo amount, followed by Bight and arrest,
was made public this morning by Pinkertdn's
Detective Agency. About Christina* time
the agency received a telegram from 8p«rry
k Barnes, of New York snd New Haven,
American scents for the large Liverpool
commission house of Bamford Bros., tint
their exchango clerk, E H. Kabbe, had absconded, after forging and converting to hi.
ewn use $100,000 in exchange. The agency
at once went to work on the case, snd soon
discovered that Kabbe waa here in the company of a man named John R. Van Arsdale.
and that they were spending money very
freely. While the case waa being worked
up Van Arsdale returned to New York,
where he was arrested. Last Friday Kabbe
was arrested secretly in a house of
ill repute, with one of the inmates of
which he has been enamored. He was on
the point of starting for Mexico. - In money
$100 was found in his possession, and {1,200
worth of furs which he had lavished upon the
woman wero also taken possession of. It
was found that Kabbe had spent $2,500
upon the woman, and Van Arsdale has spent
$2,000. It appears that Kabbe forged the
bills of exchange on Bamford Bros., which
were readily disposed of to Jeasup, Patten k
Co. Being recognised ss the exchange clerk
of the firm, and having checka made pay
able to his own peraonal order instead of
that of the firm, he opened an account with
another bank and collected the amount from
.Tessup, Patten k Co.'s checks. He invested
the monoy in Government bonds and then
alwconded. The PinkertonH Bay he confess,
ed his gains to be fully 3100,000. lie was
taken to Now York on the same day that he
was arrested, and on last Sunday he took a
detective to the upper part of New York,
where they recovered from a dry cistern, encased in a hermetically scaled drain pipe,
and wrapped in oiled silk-, government bonds
to the amount of {20,000. Going thence to
Brooklyn another piece of drain pipe was
wade to y ield $25,000. It is not knows here
whether any more monoy has been recovered. Kabbe is well connected, and once occupied a responsible position with the Ionian
line, of which his brother ia now chief clerk.
LOOKING 00T FOR SQUALLS.
Dr. Stephen, tho Gorman Postmastor-
Gencra), said to lie a great humorist, and
certainly tho following amusing anecdote,
iu which he plays a prominent part, will not
diminish his reputation: It appears that
His Excellency, who is an ardent Nimrod,
had taken the train for Konigsberg to enjoy
a few days's deerstalking. Arrived at Hit
schiiu, s town near his destination, he
stepped into the station telegraph office to
wire his safety to his wife at Berlin. Tbe
efficial recognized his chief st once, and
with all obsequiousness began to write
down his message. Suddenly the Morso
instrument used for service tolcgrams only,
began to work, and very shortly His Ex
collency pricked up his ears, for he distinguished the peculiar clicks that represent his
own name. A glance at the olerk's face,
new deadly psle, induced him to inquire
further into the purport of this State telegram, and when the clicking had ceased
he took up tho paper ribbon snd read as
follows: "Look out for squalls; Stephen is
somewhere on the lino. He will be poking
his nose everywhere." The Postmaster-
Geneisl smiled sardonically; and then went
to the transmitter snd flashed back thia
replay. "Too late I He has already poked
his nose in here. Stephen." —- Tueotna
Ledger.	
Hullowat's OnrnuiTT and Pills.—
Coughs, Influenza.—The soothing properties
of these medicaments render them well
worthy of a trial in all diaeases of the re
spiratory organs. In common colds and influenza the Pills, taken internally, and the
Ointment rubbed over the chest and throat,
are exceedingly efficacious. When influenza
is epidemic, this treatment is the easiest,
safest and surest. HoUWay's Pills purify
the blood, remove all obstacles to its free
circulation through the lungs, relieve the
over-gorged air tubes, and render respiration
free, without reducing the strength, init.it
ing the nerves, or depressing the spirits:
such are the ready meana of escaping from
suffering when afflicted with colds, coughs,
bronchitis and other idlest complaints, by
which the nealth of ao many is seriously snd
permanently injured in most countries.
The assortment of glass snd delf provided
by Chns. McDonough, for Christmas gifts,
are truly beautiful. The decanters to hold
wine or brandy, have stoppers to hold bosquets, or the perfumes of the East. But iu
tlie large and varied collection the greatest
curiosity is tho "Irishman" glass potato-dish.
It represent. > grand ides.
Some say "Consumption can't bo cored."
Ayer's Cherry Pectoral, as proved by forty
years' experience, will oure this disease when
not already advanced beyond the reach of
medical aid. Even then its uBe affords very
great relief, and insures refreshing sleep.
Arlington House
(Better known ss "Csmnbsll's," sad ever;
'    Provinc* knswa Campbell,)
body is th. 1
New WMtminater,
B. C
The First Hotel in M.w Wsstmlnster,
On the Highway fr»n Port Hoed;
And th* last—snd beat—avsDsbl* for th. n
turning psssenger to that place, or to all tl,
country up tha Frsssr.
ROBERT CAMPBELL,
Jsn. 8, 1883. Set* ProorUta
x^ie
Estate
Brokei
NOTAEY PUBLIC,
INSURANCE AGT.
NE W WESTMINSTER, 6 (
Notice.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, THAT
application will be mado nt tho present Session of tho Legislative AssombFy of
tho Province of British Columbia, for an Act
giving tho applicants the privilige of taking
water from the Coquitlam river, situate ia
New Westminster District, and for leavo to
supply water for domestic and other par-
poses to the town of Port Moody, and all
other towns, districts, and villages between
the said town of Port Moody and English
Bay, as shall or may be situate within one
mile of the water frontage of Port
Moodv, Burrard Inlet and English Bay;
and for the right (in order to enable
them to carry out tho some) to build such
flumes and acqueducts, tq acquire such lands
and lay all pipes, and do all other sots and
things as may be necessary for the purpose
of the above.
Dated 7th. January 1884.
J. P. WALLS.
Solicitor and Agent for the applicants.
Langley Street, Victoria.
 >—
tSF Particular Attention gin
to the trauHaction of Seal Ratal
Business,  In   Now Westminsi
■ ■
City and District, and the Tow
of Port Moody,
MONEY TO LOAN
On Good Security.
William Slncerbeau,
PUBLIC WORKOONTBAOTB
IS PREPARED TO ENTER INTO CO
TRACTS for Clearing Laud, Opes
up Town Street*, or more extended B«
Highways, Constructing Wharves, Erect
of Building., or for any class of work e
nocted with the construction of Hai'wn
Bf Every Reasonable Satisfaction ain
to those with whom he contract..
Address:—"Rocky   Point  Hotel,"
Moody, B. C.
BARRY k BOWUfl,
BARBER   SHOl
ALSO,
TAILORING AND GENERAL CLOTSI
REPAIRING DONE.
Murray Street,   -
1'OItt
•   Cobb-ib or Qf*
MOOT>Y
NEW PALL GOODS!
New Fail Goods!
—
Wm. elson,
The Cash Tailoi
LriTos 8qnA«B,NiwW*»r»iii»8TXRP
Haa opened out hie FALL STOCK, an
now prepared to execute order*.
HrSATrrtJirrrrt; OrABAirrinni, I Ck ?<J. Imbij ©fljtitt.
HATURDAT, JANUARY 12. 188*.
•  •'«■
BOMELOCAIii.
/ Thew**ther haa been oontlnsouly wet
(car tha last w«*k, but lu spits of that, much
prugrns ba* bras triad* an the sracaka of
bouse*, and soeie slsshing hss bs**i doss,
j« psopl. bar. sre only wsitiag some dry
Weather to cesnassaoe operations in funs,
and all an looklag forward to that time impatiently, for it is well known that there
will he a vast ludui of people in th* *pring.
Th< trains anj running daily up th* line,
with rail, and other material required for
laying tbe permancal wsy. We learn thst
ooaaeotioB will b* made in ten daya or *
fortnight st most, sod that after that time,
traiaa will ran through to Yale or farther
up the line ss required. The fresheU hsve
csused some aUdea on the track, but they
ar. not likely io cause much delay. The
ssles of lots bsve been, in the aggregate,
ooasidsmhl., sad In susae ess*., fancy price.
were paid. There are now quit* a number
of really good hotel* .nd bosrdiug house, in
full o*«rstiou, but the accommodation is not
yet equal to th. demand.
up the
MEETINO AT PORT MOODY.
A'maeting of the citizen, of Port Moody
ws* held on Wednesday evening last, in the
Caledonia Hotel, for the purpose of presenting Mr. T. 8. McCillivray with a petition
asking him to accept the position of s ,iu>-
"tier; of th* Peace, now offered him by the
Oa I V Oafveroment. Mr. J. T. Scott, with a few
appropriate remarks, mado the presentation,
to which Mr. MoUilliv ray mad* a suitable
reply, expressing his wilUngnew to serve in
... tbat capacity. The following is a copy of
tbe petition:—
Port Mooiit, Jan. let, 1884.
To T. S. McOillivray, Eki.:—
Sir, -Ws, the inhabitants of Port Moody,
with s high appreciation of your aterilog
worth and uprightness ss a man, and your
judicial ability which haa been so well
proven to us by your decisions as Stipendiary
Magistrate, request that you will, for the
good of this important city, accept the position of Justice of the Peace now offered you
by the Government.
Ws regret, exceedingly, that the office of
Stipendiary Magistrate, which was so much
needed in this growing town, ha* been
abolished.
Dead, indeed, would we the people of Port
Moody be to every impulse of the soul, if,
after faithful services done by yon, with
devotion to principle and integrity and purity
of purpose, we did not condemn the dastardly
, . act of the Government that turned you out
of office without a fault snd without a
moment's notice.
Asking you once again to become our
Town Justice, and wishing you the compliments uf the season,
Wo are, yours faithfully,
Albert J. Hill, P. f. Kraaer, J. Davidson, J.
W. McKay, J. T. Scott, R, B. Kelly, J. B.
Tiffin, D. B. Grant, J. B. Butchart, George
Annaud, Wm. lnsley, A. J. Annaud, S. W.
Lehman, J. S. Fraser, T. II. Iitster, Z. R.
Robinette, J. Murray, J.T. Pogue, E.Pogne,
I* Pogue, 0. Martin, A. G. Garrison, Geo.
Stafford, Wm. McLean, N. Fraser, H. H.
Fraser, W. Fraser, H. Mutrie, T. 8. Meek,
A. Mennio, H. S. Stramberg, J. Tomlinson,
H. Cameron, A. A. Cameron, J. Pigott, A.
F. Clark. J. L. Watkjss, F. F. Nelson, Geo.
L*wis, J. Lydon, Jamas Murray, J. Meagle,
S. Carman, W. Kobinson, W. Ovens, John
Davidson, H. Willcinaoa, 0. P. Kelley, P.
Coffee, B. Bowliu, J. W. Barry, T. Paine,
W. C. Whit*. N. Butchart, W. WilliauiB,
E. Cammidge, E. Oallarthcr, M. Richardson,
G. Steinburg, J. D. Campbell, S. D. Bruce,
W, McBride, J. MeDougall, J. Kennedy, S.
H. Haalam, C. Pickard, John Mariurt, A.
McKac, H. McDonald, E. Robsrts, A. Noon,
A. Cameron, J. Wilson, C. D. Willisms, G.
Williams, R. W. Ross, James Orr, A. W.
Gilbert.
, .. '
i..-
■      .
.
_
•
BHOOTINQ AKFRAT.
[Kro« th* H-lnUnA Qaardla*.)
Ahout 5 p.tn.. on Thursday last, ft negr*
■ftm«l Joseph Chamitorlain, who haa been
•poking for » w«ek or two lately, at the
Cleveland Hotel, went into a building next
d"or to obtain aome clothing which he had
left with Sue Lee, the victim in the case, to
be washed. It appears that some difference
arose between them as to the clothes alludod
to, and Chftmberlaiii seized ft package of
shirts and walked off. The Chinaman followed, inalating that his colored friend had
some .other gentleman's package, Cham
btrkin wont up to hi a room, followed by the
Chinaman, and some words ensued, during
which Cbfunberlftin drew a small pistol aud
fired ftt the Celestial, but missed him. The
C'hiftAinftii atftrted down stairs ftt a lively
gait, but the darkey was too quick for bim,
for just as he reached the bottom of the
stairs, Chamberlain fired again, hitting poor
John in the right ear*. The bullet took a
downward course, and lodged somewhere in
the throat. Drr." Mclnnes and McLeod,
who dressed|the wound, looked upon it as a
remarkable piece ot good fortune that tha
bullet had not out one of the numerous
largo blood Teasels intersecting the neck,
whit.* would have , caused instant death.
The Chinaman, however, ties in a very
critical state. Chamberlain, immediately
after the shooting, put on his best clothes,
jumped off the sidewalk, and thereby made
his escape by crawling under the houses.
Several persons who were standing about,
saw the shooting, and related how the Chinaman, on receiving the bullet, screamed and
fell, but nobody interfered. The negro waa
was apprehended by constable Wiggins during the night, and was placed in the dock at
the Police Conrt yesterday morning, before
"VV. D. Ferrij, Esq., J, P., Mr. Lumby, of
Bpellamacheen, also occupying a seat on'the
bench. The proceedings amounted only to
a remand until 10 o'clock this morning,
when a short, punchy'looking .black man
will again be brought forward to explain
why he shoots a man for telling him he has
made a mistake.
[sfnm th* swMtaAn flu»rdisn.l
NWW   WaWTMINffTER   AND    PORT   MoODT
Railway—"We learu that the surveyors havo
reached tho Pitt river road, on the way to
towij, and have found a splendid track for
tho line. The cost of constructing the Una
will be very moderate: tbe surveyor* wait
probably conclude their labon in % ffcnr Agar
If the weather clears up, but tha- tttiiu 'in-
pedes them very much. The-lino wbU net
exceed ten miles in length to the Coquixdani,
where the junction with the main line will
be effected.
rrssSB ttw M*. I.*.. eroardlaD. ]
- Port Usee* FktAt>.—A, meeting of property holders and others interested in Port
Moedy, took place at the Council Chambers
on Tuesday ereuiag last; Dr. L. U. Mclnnes
occupied the chair. After aome diacnseiou,
Msaara. Luodlx>m and iJuBeak wer« appointed a eoenrnfttee for collection, and they will
singly ur together call upon tbe citben* for
further aabscriptiooa towards the Immodiata
completion of tbe road, ia the proaeal emergency. A committee was aUo appoioted to
lay oat the wum*y a#lUeUd, oowipoSe*T of
Measrs. Luvdboni, Ussidry aud lit-Keck,
Mr. Land bom, being appointed rbaiimau uf
the committee, Tlie saeeting then adjourned
subject to the call of the chairman.
GENERAL ISfcWB ITRM8.
Under the sceptre of the Cxar of Russia
live thirty-eight different nutionalitii-a, each
speaking its own language, which is foieigu
to all others.
Berlin tradesmen are so excited by the
proposed opening of cooperative stores that
they have asked the ttmpuror to forbid members of the army aud navy to have anything
to do with them.
Tbe big diamond recently found hi South
Africa, ttiough weighing nearly six ounces,
is not eetimaied as worth mure than 110,000,
the color being bad. However, a bath of
acid has improved  it.
Prince Itietnarck has taken to industry in
a new channel. Mr. Gladstone fell* trees
for exeroiae. The great German folia them
for gain. The industry he has taken to bt
tlie conversion of wood into paper.
A proposal is under consideration for ion
necting Portsmouth, England, with tbe isle
of Wight by means of a tunnel Under tlie
tSolout. ihe cutting would be chietly
through blue clay, and the distance three
mites and a half.
A peculiar case, illustrating hew easily
fevers are spread, is reported, trout Market
Hm borough. A letter from a house iu a
village near Peterborough, in which scarlet
.ever cxiited, was sent to Kibwurth Beau.
Champ, near Leicester, and the envelope,
having been left laying about, letl into tlie
possession of one of the children there, who
waa shortly afterward aeizod with the disease.
At the recent quarterly meeting of the
Manchester Chandler of Commerce the President, (Mr. George Lord) said that sound
commercial men deprecated altogether the
system which had grown up in Liverpool of
lato years of turning the article of cotton
into one of gambling between men who did
not own a bale, and yet sold thousands—he
might say millions—of bales in a year, to
the detriment of all legitimate traders. This
was a system that affected tho Importer and
distributer of cotton, as well as the consumer
of it.
A contributor to a London scientific paper
writes: "The poet has said. 'The toad
wears yet a precious jewel in its head.'
however beautiful, it cannot surpass, in
lustre and beauty of setting, the cyo of the
flea (Pulex iritam). When viewed undor a
power of 200 or 300 diameters by reflected
light, it presents a crystalline lens about
1-500 of an inch in diameter, surrounded by
a dark brown or block rim, and sunk in a
depression of the rich chitinous covering of
the head. If tho light be judiciously applied, this combination of bright light in the
tens With the middle tint of the surrounding
yellow skeleton of the head and the dark supplied by the black rim—these being harmonized and blended by the shade and shallow
of tha depression, and assisted by tho harmonious curve winch bounds its dorsal margin—presents a combination worthy the
study of the trained eye of the artist.' It is
to be feared that even its lovely eye will
reconcile thu Pulex iritant to thosoon whom
it dines.
A most eccentric funeral ceremony took
place recently in Paris. A speculator, M.
Penguilty, died a few days previously. He
was well known in the journalistic world,
having shares iu the most of thu successful
Paris papers. lie left directions that tho
hotirse containing his mortal remains should
be preceded by an Italian playing, or rather
"grinding" on am organ some of tho most
lively and popular cafo concert airs. He
lsoleft a list of sixty woU-knowtt writers,
begging them to partake of a banquet at the
Hotel Continental on tlie day of the funeral,
and to be as merry asthey possibly could. Two
thousand dollars had riecn set (utide by the
testator for tho expenses of the feast, which
duly took place. The organ player, however,
was not allowed to perform while the funo-
rat procession was inside tho fortifications,
but as soon as It entered the suburbs the
music began, and the woman, children, and
gamin* formed a dancing escort.
A commission of Neapolitan engineers and
architects, which has for some time been occupied in considering tlie best mode of providing for tho future of the island of Iscula.
has now closed its deliberations. Thoir investigations were confined to tho causes of
tbe great disaster of Casamiocciala from an
architectural point of view, and to the best
method of reconstructing the houses. During
the investigation they were much struck by
finding in the midst of the .ruins a zone of
about 300 metres square which hail escaped
untouched. There is not tlie slightest trace
of tho severe earthquake in this oasis—no
house was damaged, and the walls of the
gardens are intact. Wood and iron are re-
cornniended as the best materials to be employed, ana two types of this mode of construction were minutely examined, the one
called the "Calabrese," consisting of wood
and mason work on walls, the other, much
used in America, consisting of iron. Preference was, however, given to the Calabrian
type. One thing was decided—thit vaulted
roofs should b» avoided in a country subject
to continual shocks. The sum total of what
haa been collected for the sufferers in Ischia
now amounts to about $550,000.
It appears from some figures given In a
recent speech by M. Bar?derali. the chief
engineer to the Northern of Franco Railway
Company, that, in point of speed at any
rate, the English railways still stand first.
The actual speed attained there sometimes
reaches 65$ miles an hour, while In France,
Germany, and America it never exceeds 62^.
The average "mean speed" (i e., the speed
measured by the time taken between terminal stations) 484 miles an hour with English express trains and 45 with French. M.
Banderali points out that tho English railways have one advantage to start: with; for
it is not obligatory, aa it is in most foreign
countries, to slacken at crossings. In the
matter of fares, England and France enjoy
the distinction of charging third-closs passengers more than any country except Turkey. The average fare in Turkey is S-75
centimes per kilometre (| mile), in France
6,75 and in England 6,74. Norway by far
tho cheapest country for railways travelling
the thiru-elaas fares there averaging 1,4 centimes, and next come Russia and|BeIguim,
where the average fare is 3,75 centimes per
kilometre.
Thi Silk Industry.—The Canadian silk
industry is prosperous. Considering the
short space of time that the Montreal factories have been established, there Is reason
tn congratulate them on the success achieved.
Tfcegreat drawback they have to contend
with ia the low grade of goods desired. In
nothftig Is this more Apparent than in the
cornnanatively email atttinib- nf tawing silk.
THo great demand in (C^innta wocmn to bo for
a cheap- quality, bu^enn .rm^jfrox thst a
cheap thread must iin^p-^iii'lTli^&r*, mid
consequently a weak..one;i—irX'^tir fUointon* i
PISCOVsCKY OM A iiOLDIEE'8
6KKLKTOK.
An Interesting dlacenrery was made recently at An.der.iutt,. in the Canton of Uri by
sotae workman who were eicarating beer tha
old church, well known to tourists.
Whlln digging they suddenly came «pon
sereral skclctooti, and, on disturbing them,
there fell from the lower jaw of one two gc*Jd
oolm<*f tbe reign of Charles VIII, of Prance
at the end of the fifteenth century. Further
search revealed tbe preface m the bony
band of the skeleton of a piece of l.n* n rag
in^excelleot preavrvatiuu, and on unfolding
the ra>g tlie am brought to light ten silrtr
1 <>in- of the sixteenth century, of the time of
Francis I, of Prance.
It ii huppoaed that the skeleton Is that of
a soldier who fough at the battle of Man
guan, and that, having stul«n some money
Ms! put the gold coins in his month for
safety, ha waa immediately after killed on
the held.— London Jjixiiy Acv«.
THK   CONSTITUTION  OF A  NATION
Kl'KNfclJ UP.
^Belgium, the freest and bcst*goveLued
country on the continent of Europe, is fur
the present without a Constitution, the
charter of J b'*0p together with all the paper*
l elating to Belgian independence, having
.**en destroyed in the fire which has uuriied
aO the ground theChamberof Uep.'ese'itativet.
1 .ie case is unprecedented; and it will be
interesting to set* iu what manner the na*ioo
will readopt tlie act. Fortunately, one may
say without undue emphasis that tha rWl-
gian Constitution is written in tbo hearts of
the people; and <.he l>elgian», after all, a.e iu
no wese position than the English, who also
have no Constitution iu documentary fo.-m.
The only/A her count, y which was ever deprived of its Constitution at one blow is
T'olaud. Ihe Polish Constitution of the
year l81o was seized bodily by the
troops of the Emperor Nicholas
after the suppression of the insurrection of 1830, and carried away, rolled
up and enclosed in a japanned tin case, to
be exhibited at Moscow in a museum of
curiosities, where it is still to lie seen.
DEMOLITION   OF A FAMOUS   HOTEL
IN PARIS.
The rebuilding of tho Sorbonno, In Paris,
has necessitated the demolition of tbe famous hotel in the Hue des Cordiere, formerly
known as the Hotel St. Quelitin, but more
recently as the Hotel Jean Jacijnes Rous
i eau. It was here that Leibnitz lodged when
in Paris, and he waa followed by the Pro
feasors of Philosophy at the Surbonnc, Mably
and Condillae.
Attracted by the celebrity which this hos
telry had acquired, Jean Jacques Housseau
went to stay thero, and in the seventh book
of his confusions, he Bpeaks of himself as
going "to lodge iu the Hotel St. Quentiu,
near the Sorbonnc, iu an uninviting street, an
uninviting hotel, aud on uninviting room."
He does not appear, however, to have been
haul/ cired for, as he returned to the Hotel
St. (Juc. tin on several occasions, and wrote
one or tw. of his books there. After his
death the pi.urietor changed the name of
the hotel to "Jean Jacques Rousseau,"
which it has retained ever since. It has of
late years been frequented by students, and
fetched only £1,'J02 when put up for auction,
—London Daily News,
A QUEER OLD ENGLISH CUSTOM.
The Livery Cloth Committee of the Court
of Aldermen met at Guildhall recently to
inapect and select the so-called "livery
cloth," annually sent, in accordance with an
ancient and absurd custom, to the high officers of state andjfothor functionaries.
In the early periods of history tho retainers of great lords wearing their liveries were
so numerous as to be dangerous both to the
King and the laws. The disorders arising
from them required all the vigor of thu Le
gislature to restrain, and many statutes were
passed bctweon 1977 and 1504 for that purpose, an exception being introduced in the
prohibition in favor of guilds and fraternities,
and men of the mysteries of cities and boroughs. That, probably, gavo ri*e to the
"Liverymen" of tho various companies. Ice.,
supposed to be the origin of the gift of livery
cloth.
However that may bo, the practico Is to
send annually 4£ yards of the best black
cloth to each of the following officers: The
Lord Chancellor, the Lord Chief Justice, the
Master of tho Rolls, tho Lord Chamberlain,
the Vice-Chamberlain, the I/ord Steward,
the Treasurer and Comptroller of tho Household, the Home Secretary, tho Foreign Secretary, the Attorney-General, the Solicitor-
General, tlie Recorder, and Common Sergeant, Six yards of black cloth and six
yards of graeu cloth are sent to the Town
Clerk, aud four yards of black and four yards
of green to the principal clerk of tlie Town
Clerk's otnee,—London (Eng.) Standard.
CANADIAN   PACIFIC AFFAIRS.
The Ottawa correspondent of the Mail in
a oopversatlon with Mr. Van Home, General Manager of the Canadian Pacific
Railway, learns that the work of construction around the northern shore *of (Lake Superior is progressing rapidly, that large parties of men are at work, and that tho telegraph linos will bo established by spring
from Sudbury junction to Port Arthur, thus
completing the connection. Mr. Van Home
states that the work around Lake Superior
is not so difficult as R was at one time
thought to bo. A considerable portion of
land, very good in quality, has been found a
few miles back from the shore. The strike
in tho North-west has practically ended and
trains are now running with thoir usual
regularity. Public sympathy has, from the
first, been strongly with the company, He
expresses himself highly pleased with the
way in which the coal of tho North-west is
panning out. The company in all their railway operations consume about half a ton of
coal every minute, and the discovery of good
coal in so many quarters of the North-west is
of great consequence to them sb well as to
the settlement of tho country, On being
asked what he thought about the connecting
link between the Ontario Bystoro. bud the
Canadian Pacifio, he intimated that he
thought the Ontario public would see that
their best interests conld beset ved by having
the connection between GravenhuBt and the
main line of the Canadian Pacific built so as
to tap the latter further west than Callander. At least forty miles could be saved
between Toronto and Port Arthur by having
the line to run from Gravenhurtt in a more
westerly direction than tbat originally proposed. He confirmed the statement made
some time ago about the good quality of the
land in the Nipming region, and considers
that there are, on a low estimate, not less
than 9,000,000 of acres of land there fit for
cultivation.—Hamilton Tribune,
POLICE COURT.
(Before W. D. Fern*, Keq., J* P.)
(.Trass i'-t staiahutd Oaaiclaa.)
Ti'EsoAT. Jan. athr-
Louis Miller waa placed in the dork,
charged with keeping a common gaming
house.
Mr. J. Mclnnbi, the first witneec examined, testified tbat he rented the room te prisoner, from the 10th tilt the 25th December
last. Wit new had no control over tbo
premist* during the time in question, and
no interest in the business earned on during
tbe time.    Prisoner paid $5 rent
Chas. Wilson, who laid the information,
was the next witness. He visited the place
between 11pm. on Christmas Eve, until 3
a. in. Christmas Ifay. Witness described
the games played as poker and stud-hfrrae
poker, and explained to the Court how they
were played. Witness lost $5.50. Another
player lost $30.00. Largest bet witness re
•numbered was 110.00 or $8.00. Witneas
knew of no other business being carried on
npon the premiaes. One of the tables in the
room was of a kind expressly built for play
ing stud-horse poker.
W. Wallin, sworn:—Was m the place several times during tbe 10 days or so it waa
running. Miller was always there, and he
always doalt the cards when witness was
present. A pack of cards being produced,
witneas explained the game to the Court.
The dealer, so it appeared from this witness,
always taking a percentage of the stakes.
The dealer never lost, and if he made a mistake the players took up their money and a
fresh deal would be made. Brennan, Jack,
and others were present.
W. Bronnan, the next witness, on taking
the stand, wished to know how his costs
were to bo paid, but, after some haggling,
gave evidence to the efiect that he had worked as a hand-logger, but was residing in town
at present. Knew thu prisoner. Hail lieen
at the premises known as the Union liar.
The evidence of this witness was given very
unwillingly, most of it being dragged out of
hira by the vigorous cross-examination of
Mr, McColl, who appeared for tho prosecution, but its general character was very
■imilar to that of the two previous witnesses
and corroborated them in all important
points as to the nature of tho business carried
on by the prisoner Miller. (To Mr. Armstrong)—Did not think he was thero on
Christmas day. (To Mr. McColl)—Witness
had seon the dealer, Miller, make a mistake
and settle up, but not on the premises alluded to in the present case.
Mr. McColl, in addressing the Court, Raid
there was no doubt a prinw facto case existed
against the prisoner. He stated that even anin-
nocent game of carda became unlawful if tho
stakes became excessive, but nhon, as in the
case now before the Court, tho chances of
the game wero unequal, the game became a
crime even if played only for five ceuts, and
he did not see what his worship could do but
to send the prisoner up for trial.
His worship appearing to agrco with counsel, Mr. Armstrong, for tho defenso, said he
Would not take up tlie time of the Court at
present, and tho remainder of the proceedings coosisted only Infixing tho amount of
his security, which was finally settled at
$1000 for L. Miller, and two sureties of *fr>00
each.
8. Wllion waa bound over to prosecute,
and Wallin, Brennan and Molnnes to appear
and give evidonce.
(Before W. D. Ferris, Esq.,  J. P., Justice
McCreight occupying a seat at the Bench).
Wedhrrdat, Jan. ftth.
Charley, an Indian, was charged with an
ascsnlt upon another Indian named Jimmy,
maliciously breaking property belonging to
said Jimmy, and likowise selling liquor to
other Indians and cau? ing trouble, Mr. McColl appeared for the j ^secntion. Tho
evidence went to show that in' Saturday,
6th inst., prisoner encountered the complainant while talking to a friend, aud committed the assault. Jimmy went for the
constable, and when he returned found prisoner in the house with a bottle of whisky.
Complainant then went, into an inner room
and locked himself in; prisoner broke down
the door and smashed crockery, Ac, to the
alleged value uf $10. Prisoner practically
pleaded guilty to assault and damage, but
said It was caused by complainant trying to
turn him out in tho cold. In answer to the
Bench, it was admitted that the whisky was
'cultua potlatch" .on the part of prisoner.
Prosecutor said that prisoner was constantly
supplying liquor, and that was the cause of
the whole trouble. The police gave prisoner
a passably good name, and he was sentenced
to pay a fine of $5 and costs for the assault,
$10 for the damage to property, and $50 for
supplying liquor, with the alternative of four
months' imprisonment, if said dncs were not
forthcoming.
DELTA COUNCIL.
[Fr.-iin (ho Mainland 6asrdiaa.].
Dakokbocs AoniDKNT.—A youth—James
Kelly—was running from one portion of Mr.
T. Ovens' blacksmith shop, where he is apprenticed, to another, when he came in contact with a hook suspended from the roof.
The hook caught the iancrpart of the eyelid,
and tho result waa a serious rupture. Fortunately the eye is uninjured, but it was
within a hairs-breadth of bring dostroyed.
Dr. h, R. Mclnnes dressed the wound.
"ViobRot' a*sx> "ProvOst" Whiskey.—
Tlie purest and best Irish and Scotch Whiskeys imported. The tmly whiskeys bottled
uudir the superintendence of Her Majesty's
Customs and guaralMJedd genuine according
to Act of Parhanumt, (38 and 39 Vic. cap.
#V) E. Brows* <v."Co., Importers, New
Wohttiuiiater.'
The Council met at Ladner'a Landing on
Saturday, 5th Jan. Present: tho Reeve,
Councillors Page, Pybus and Kirkland.
The minutes of previous meeting wero
read and adopted.
A communication from tho Provincial Secretary waa read and placed on file,
A communication from Mr. H. V. Edmonds was read, and tho Clerk instructed to
answer it.
A number of accounts were passed and
ordered paid.
The "Eleotion By-law, 1884," was finally
passed.
Council adjourned till Saturday, 12th
inst., at 7 o'clock.
AVer's Cherry Pectoral,
"Orrrllle.OMo, Sept 10,1882.
COLDS. " "arlnir ,H"'n "ot'l^" to a bronchial nffcrtlon, trith frequent
sold., for a number of years, I hereby eor-
tlfy that Ayib'b OhMibt Psctobju. gi»e*
me prompt relief, and Is the moat oflootit*
remedy I haro erer tried.
JAKBS A. HAKTI.TOK,
Editor of The Crueml."
" Vt. Gllead, Ohio, Jniia SH, 188J.
COUGHS. " I hvro n"^ AYKR'9 "tEtitT
Pectosal this spring for a se-
roro oougb. and Inn.; trouble with good
effect, snd I sm pleased to recommend 14
SO Soy OOO similarly affected.
Habvby Baughmak,
Proprietor Globs EeM."
PBErABZD BT
Dr. J.C.Aycr&Co.,Lowell,Mas*.
.«* MtassrtftwiMisasa  .,.,•
WOODS A TURNER,
LAND SURVEYORS
Real Estate Agents,
Conveyancers & Accountants.
PORT MOODY LOTS
FOR  8AL.E
MONEY   TO    LOAN.
COLUMBIA ST., NKIV WESTMINSTER.
J. H. FIEACE * CO.,
—larroBTiss aku uauu ir—
l!.RDW.RB,!;TOVEMkB
PUMPf. ia0N PIPE! AND f ITTINCI,
PAINTS, OILS, &C,
AIJ.   inrilTBf   OHDBRH   PBOBPTLT
BXSCCOTED.
COLUMBIA ST., NEW WESTMINSTER
POBUE & BROTHERS,
CONTRACTORS
—yon—
Clearing I.a art, n.kliii Raad. * StrMts,
sad GENERAL. MuKKs Salted (.
the w..U of a Pioneer Tawn.
SATISFACTION  GUARANTEED.
ttr Hotel, Livery Stable, snd Blacksmith
Shop in progress, and will eooa be ready for
accommodation of customer*.
PORT  M098T,
NEW WESTMINSTlR
Soda-water lanufactory
ALEX. PHILLIPS & 80M
CAN SUPPLY THE CITY AND VI
CINITY with Soda-water (plain and
sweet), Ginger Beer, Ginger Ale, Sarssps-
rilla; Lemon, Raspberry, and all other
Syrups i Essence of Ginger; Cocktail Mix
tures, etc.
Orders   mis  thi Cochtri   Car«ftllt
Executed,
COLUMBIA ST., NEW WESTMINSTER.
DOUGLAS & DEiGHTON,
Saddlers & Harness-iakers!
Every Article in their Line
Always in Stock.
THE   TRADE   SUPPLIED.
Front St    -    YALE' B. C
Weeks
-AND-
Foster,
STATE
-AT-
PORT MOODY.
13.   O.
OFFICE:
With the N. W. & P.
M. Telephone Co.
Lots offered in every
portion of the town-
site; also a few desirable Estates in
the immediate vicinity of Port Moody.
Kyle&
Tilton,
MEW WE8T1UNBTEB. B. C.
- s . ..*...
: IMPORTEF18,  j
And Wholesale Dealer* In
Groceriesf
SUGARS), HYRUPK,
MOLASSES, VINEGAR,
'TEAM AND COFFEES,'
DRIED ZFRTJTTer
—ITCH AS--
PLUMS,       PRUNES,     APPLES^
RAISINS,     OURRAffTS.
CRACKERS, CAKES,
PILOT BREAD,
YEAST POWDER, ,
(Cook's Friend and P.AMJ
CORN-STARCH, HOPS,
EXTRACTS (Assorted,)    ,
CREAM OF TARTAR,'
SODA BALER AT US,
LYE, WASHING POWDER,
BLUING, STARCH,
WASHING SOAPS,
TOILET SOAPS,'
COARSE AND iTKE 8ALT,
PICKLES, OLIVE OIL,
MUSTARD, KETCHUP,
PEPPER SAUCE,
CURRY POWDER,
CELERY SALT,
JAMAICA GINGER, ;
SUGAR OF LEMOX
CANDY, AND
ALL KINDS OF NUTS'
LEA & PERM'S' SAUCES.
GOODSt
JAMS, JELLIES,
PIE FRUITS,
TABLE FRUITS,
PEACHES,
PINE APPLES,
BLUEBERRIES,
TOMATOES, CORN,
ASPARAGUS,        ,
STRING BEANS*
GREEN PEAS/
LOBSTERS, OYSTERS,
SARDINES, MACKEREL,
SALMON,  CODFISH,
CORNED" BEEF, BRAWN,
LUNCH TONGUE,
DEVILLED MEATS,
BAKED BEANS,
PIGS' FEET,
PORK & BEANS,',
ASSORTED  BOILED asd ROAST
MEATS, Etc., Etc.
PROVISIONS^
FLOUR, FEED, OAT-MEAL, CORl/
MEAL, BUCKWHEAT FLOUR,'
CRACK'D WHEAT, GRAHAM
FLOUR, PEARL BARLEY,
SPLIT PEAS, MACARONI,
VERMI0ELLI.TAPI00A
SAGO, RICE (No. 1 & 2,)
HAM, BACON, LARD,
CHEESE,   BUTTER,
SALMON    BELLIES,
MACKEREL,    SALT
HERRING    IN    HALF
BARRELS   AND    KITS,
SMOKED    HERRING   IN
BOXES,    POTATOES    AND
ONIONS,   ETC.,   ETC,,   ETC.
Wooden and Willow Ware^
TUBS, PAILS, BROOMS, WASH-'
BOARDS, BRUSHES, BASKETS,
ROLLING-PINS,    CLOTHESPINS, WRINGERS', LEMON
SQUEEZERS,  WOODEN
MEASURES   (Patent,)
STEP LADDERS,
BROOM    STANDS,
ETC., ETC,  ETC.
SMOKERS' ARTICLES,
TOBACCO, 0IGAR"ETTES,
CIGARETTE PAPER,
PIPE STEMS,
CIGARETTE HOLDERS,'
CIGAR HOLDERS,
CIGAR CUTTERS,     ..
CIGAR LIGHTERS/
MATCH SAFES,
MATCHES,
POUCHES, Etc: '
01 gars from 927 to $150 per M
SUNDRIES
Coal   Oil,   Matches,   Shoe   Blacking,'
Stove Polish,  Straw  Paper, Paper,
Paper Bags, Second-hand Grain Bags,'
Cotton Twine,  Candle Wick,  Can
Openers, Demijrthns.
PLAYING  CARDS
SPICES—Whole and Ground, in Jib, j
Alb,  1ft, 2*Ib and ,51b Tins.    Dried'
HeVbs,-jlb ti*; Oitroh'Peel (Scotch)''
in 7lb tins; Snltana Raiting.
.LlCiTJOE8 I
(In bulk) CANADIAN RYE, AM-'
ERIOAN BOURBON, *BRANDY,'
SHERRY asd PORT WINE.
(In case,) AMERICAN BOURBON,-'
BRANDY, GIN, CALIFORNIA'
RED AND WHITE WINES,'
CLARET; CHAMPAGNE, ORE"
GON CIDER, and MILWAUKEE
BEER *
aasss.
TUB
ROYAL C1TT
Haning
Mills Co.
Take this opportun-
, tty of thanking their
numerous patrons for
past favors, and respectfully ask a continuance of the same
in future. Having on
hand a large stock of
Rough and Dressed
m
!ti
of various kinds and
grades, they are pre
pared to give
Jargain? for {aft!
for the balance of the
year.
They have also to
announce that they
have opened a branch
of their business at
PORT
MOODT!
and will keep a full
supply of
dV.
Sawn Sf Split
Doors,
Windows,
Mouldings
and all the necessary
furnishings for buildings at the Terminus.
Parties who intend
building there can
count on obtaining
all the requisites for
that purpose on the
ground.
The Nanaimo
SAW
MILL
is now in operation
under the superintendence of MR. A.
HASLAM, and will
keep a full supply of
DOORS,
WINDOWS, &C.
ALL ORDERS  WILL RECEIVE
PROMPT ATTENTION.
TEE GATE OF HiDIA.
The city of Herat ha. long been recognised
throsgbout the East ss the gat* of Iudia, it*
geographical position lacing .uch that it I.
btre all tbe route* coining from the nest
mast nscessarily oonvargti. India i. pro
tected on tbe north by the great range of
.tbe Himalaya, which, issuing from the
mountains of Chins, mas westward int.
Afghanistan, and, turning sostliward at tbe
Himloo Koosh, is broken up into the ius*.-
csuible range, of the rVapeaiisas. These
mountains extend southward ■ little beyond
the latitude of Herat, snd are .uccerded b>-
s level belt of fertile country, extending
westward into Persia, and eastward to Can-
dah.r, affording easy mesas of access to the
plain, of India. To th. south sad west of
this usrrow belt, inhospitable deserts extend
all tbe way to tbe Indian Ocean snd Pursisn
Unit; SO thst the fertile valley in wllii'h
llerst lie* constitutes the only feasible
route by which India csn be approached
from Penis, from Asia Minor, or from
Europe, whether for purposes of pesos or
war. Tire invailers of India, Seauirsmia,
N*hucbaduexsar, Alexander the Great,
(ihengis Khan. Nadir Shah, and many
others, entered by this route; and in 1837,
aad sgain in 1855, the acquisition of the city
by Persia, under Russian instigation, was
only prevented by the resolute attitude of
England—resulting in tbe latter osae in war
with Persia, when the city which had been
captured was given up. It has long been
foreseen that a line connecting tbe railways
of the east with those of Europe must one
day be constructed, ami tbat this line must
pass through Herat; while it has been
equally obvious tbat, If bussia had meanwhile gained possession of this natural gate,
ws should find ourselves in tho condition of
tbe man who was anable to enter bis own
house from the hall door being forcibly shut
in bis face. The construction of this great
junction-line—long ago projected by Sir
Macdonald Stephenson, the well-known
pioneer of railways in tho eut—ia now about
to be undertaken by him. The East Indiao
line, which was projeoted and constructed
by him, and which has proved to be a great
success, both in s structural and financial
sense, has a capital of twenty millions,
which is a larger capital than will he required for the new undertaking, though it is
uf greater length. Before fixing the route
Sir Macdonald Stephenson had the merits of
all tbo possible alternative routes carefully
examined, so that the best might be selected. This work has constituted Ihe labor of
many years. But the result haa been to
creote a confidence in the soundness of the
undertaking as a commercial enterprise such
as could not otherwise have been commanded. A revenue approaching that of the East
Indiau line will, it is expected, be got from
the local traffic alone; while the through
traffic, it is believed, will be large when tin
whole of the railways of India and the whole
of tbe railways of Europe are made the re'
ciprocal collectors and distributor, for one
another. Mr. Bourne, the Principal of tho
new Engineering College st Muswell Hill,
who, under Sir Macdonald Stephenson's direction, msde the estimates of cost and
traffic for the East Indian line, has also,
under the same direction, made the corresponding estimates for the junction line; and
just as his anticipations of profit have been
exceeded by the reality in tho one esse, so
may be expected they will be similarly ex
ceeded in tho other.—Land and Water.
John Hendby,
Mai-ages.
Okifohms or Riflk Vomjntxer Corfu
A correspondent writes: "A cslculation has
been made tbat of the 211 Rifle Volunteer
Corps in Croat Britain, 112 wear scarlet
tunics, fifty-nine green uniforms, and forty
gray uniforms, the latter, however, being of
all shades called gray, from dead black to
brilliant silver gray and drab. Scarlet is
suro to become tho universal color, all argu
ments against it or not. 'Invisible' uniforms
are generally not handsome, but the fact re.
mains tbat troops exist, and are trained to
be Been and felt, snd not to bo unseen aud
Invisible except when they run away. Sol
diers who want to be invisible should keep
out of the field. Khaki has failed in India,
and itsadoption by our own troops has not
taken place. Notwithstanding, s good working dress is wanted for soldiers as well as for
our civilian artisans."—Broad Arrow.
Dynamite Pills.—Messrs. Laudousky &
Ballet have published a curious observation
of spasmodic contraction with paralysis of
tlie lower limbs, which had lasted two years
and a half in a hysterical girl of twenty-six
years of age. On October 7 two pills were
given to her, described as fulminating pills,
which she was recommended to take with the
greatest care, dividing each pill in half. On
ths following day the patient announced
that she had tried to poison horself, and that
she had taken all four pills at once, and they
had produced a terrible effect upon her, hut
that nor disease was suddenly and completely cured, Ths pills were composed of oread
orumbs only.—London Medical Record.
Ermine has now descended so low among
far. ss to be regarded ss only fit for mere
cloak lining.
The Duko of Albany has composed a waltz,
which was included in the programmo of tho
recent tenant's ball at Sanaringham.
There is no truth in tho report, according
to the London "Truth," thst the Prince of
Wales hss recently purchased a vast tract of
land near Kansas City.
In 18C5 there were two total abstainers in
tho House of Commons, the lute Sir Edward
Baines, M. P. for Leeds, aud Mr. Whit-
worth, M. P. for Droghuda. At present
there arc 30.
A recent Parliamentary return shows
that since the year 18P0 sixteen baronetcies
and thirty-four knighthoods have boen conferred upon the physicians and surgeons of
Great Britain and Ireland.
The winnings of Hanlan, the oarsman,
during the lost five years amount to $70,-
000. Of this sum he has managed to save
above $10,000, of which $30,000 is invested
in a hotel on Toronto Island. Ho has a wife
and two children.
The Eddystonc Light of the Pacific is to
be erected on Seal Rock, St. George's Reef,
eight miles from the shore, opposite Crescent
City, Cat., and will cost$*00,000. The highest point of Seal Rock is fifty-four feet above
mean tide. The light will be 100 feet higher.
John L. McMillan, who is making a tyre-
sotting machine in Ilion, N. Y., with which
ho expects to Bet 5,000 ems an hour, says
tbat $.500,000 was spent on the Alden typesetting and distributing machine before it
was given up as impracticable, and that
$1,000.000 was wasted on the Page machine,
whose patent right was subsequently sold
for $10,000.
The now German Navy List for 1884 is
just issued. Tho Imperial Navy now com-
priee8ethirteen ironclads, of which seven are
frigates and six corvettes. There are thirty-
one cruisers, of which twenty-one are corvettes and ten gunboats, besides thirteen
ironclad gunboats and fifteen torpedo boats
for coast defence,
Being complimented by one of his Interviewers the other day on his powers of eloquence, the Spanish King said: "I know 1
speak with a bold and easy freedom. This
is a gift I derive from nature. When I came
to Spain as a youth of 17 I had to make a
speech on horseback on the first day of my
arrival at Barcelona, That was my best
speech, and ever since then I hsve always
been able to speak."
There still exists in Germany, on the
banks of the Elbe, a colony of Flemings
which was founded in the year 1300. The
colonists from the very first kept to themselves, and have never intermarried with
the Germans in the midst of whom they
live. All their old customs have been preserved; they still speak tho ancient Flemish;
they wear the Flemish costume of five centuries ago, and primogeniture is still iuioroe
among them.
James Bishop died recently near London,
aged 83, from a fall from hi. caravan, in
which he had lived without Interruption for
the last thirty five years. Daring this time
hi. wife gave birth in the caravan to eixht-
een sons and two daughters, all of whom
ware reared there. Ou* of tbe latter became
the mother of JSihna Young, the female
Htondtn, who crossed tbe Tbsuus on s tight
rope. Ths other married s tboi.-uiau, and
ws* mother to twenty-four children, ail of
whom were born and reared in a caravan.
Bishop brought up his eighteen sons to trades
or the musical profsssioa.
It Is proposed to bold ia London next ysar
an International Health Exibition, alien
shall Also illustrate certain branch** of education. It will occupy th* building erected
for the International Fisheries Exibilion.
Th* object of tlie exiUUoa will be to illustrate, ss vivid'y and in a. practical a manner
aa possible, food, dr.-v. tje dwelling, the
school, aud the worL.hop, a* .fTeciug th*
condition, of health.'ul li e. snd also to biing
into public notice tne most recent .pp'tance.
for eleniente-y school teaching and in.ti uct-
km iu applied i-cicuce. art, aud bs-idicrafts.
Capt. J. Cross Barrel! of the British army
assart, thst the recsut telegram* picturing
Manitoba as dissatisfied with Britain's rule
arc misleading, if not absolutely untrue. To
a Missouri Hepuhlican reporter ho said:
"The mercury has been 50 degrees below
zero at times when 1 have been under canvas. The wiuter in that climate continues
seven months, and tbe summers, though fine,
are not very hot. In the winter our milk is
delivered in blocks of ice, the ssmo as water
iu blocks of ice in tbe summer season. In
November all meats are bought in froxen
joint.. They are throwu into the woodshed
and remain fresh all winter."
A Dr. Granville writes tojthe London
Times: "Many persons who sre not by
habit 'dreamers are dreaming a great deal
just now and wondering why they do so.
The answer is very simple. When cold
weather sets in suddenly sua is much felt
at night, tho head, which is uncovered, has
the blood supplied to it driven from tbe
surface to the deep parts, notably the brain
—the organ of the mind. The results are
light sleep and dreams. Tbe obvious remedy
is to wear a nightcap or wrap the head
warmly, at least while the cold weather
lasts. I believe we of this generation sulfur
more from brain troubles than our predeces
sors because we leave the head exposed at
night and the blood vessels of our cerebral
organs aro seldom unloaded."
About the time Tom Thumb arrived In
Paris a celebrated rival dwarf had just died
tnere. He was a scion of the De Riche-
bourg family, and a trifle over half a yard in
height. He lived at the court of Philip
Egalite aa butler to the Duchess when 15.
Afterward, on the revolution, n< was denounced, but escaped dressed as a baby, his
head wrapped in a bonrrelet, and important
papers wrapped In his swaddling clothes.
For thirty years De Richebourg lived in the
Faubourg St. Germain, And never went beyond the courtyard. He was very shy, and
avoided being seen in public, but with his
friends was animated and witty. He had a
pension of three thousand francs from the
Orleans family, and died at 02,
A robbery under extraordinary circumstances was committed a few nights ago in
the streets of Paris. M. Soriano, a Spanish
Prefect, was being driven in a cab from the
hotel where be had been staying to tho railway station. Among his baggage on the cab
was a trunk containing important papers,
6,000 franca in gold and jewels, and objects
of art to the value of 50,000 franca. About
half way to the station tbe driver was start
led by ono of the trunks falling upon him,
He pulled up, and was replacing it when he
saw that the strap had been cut and tbat a
large trunk was missing. This proved to be
the one in which the treasure was packed
So dexterously had it been abstracted that
neither the driver nor his fsre had remarked
anything until ono of the other trunks had
fallen ss described.
The London City Prets records the death
of Mr. Henry Oxenford at tho age of 100
years. He was the last survivor of the official agents in the Customs Long Room, Custom House. There were about sixty years
ago twelve of theso gentlemen, who were
called the Twelve Apostles. The Treasury,
being desirous of abolishing the ancient
privileges pertaining to tho office of Agent,
mado au arrangement by whiob they were
offered largo pensions, seats in the Long
Koom free of rent and charges, in lieu of
these privileges, to be hold during life.
Most of tbem lived to be over eighty years
of age, and Mr. Oxenford is the hut of them.
When over seventy years of sge, he went to
Germany to learn the language, Aud acquired it so as to speak like a native.
In the early part of the last century the
British Parliament sought to deal with tho
baccarat clubs of that day. The fashionable
games were, at the end of the seventeenth
century, "gleok," "primero," and "iu and
a," To these succeeded the "ace of hearts,"
'faro," "basset," and "hazard. In 1739 an
set was passed making all these games
fraudulent and unlawful, and enacting that
any person who played them in any place
except where the King resided should forfeit, £50. The law waa soaroely mode when
it was eluded by the invention of other
games, thu principal of which was called
"passage." To prevent this, it was enacted
the ensuing year tbat this and every other
Same invented, or to bo invented, with one
io or moro, or any other instrument of the
«smo nature, with numbers thereon, should
be subject to a similar penalty.
The semi-official Pont of Berlin contradicts
the idea that the friendship between the
lato Princess Alios and David Friedrich
Strauss implied on her part any particip
ation in his religious opinions. But we
believe, said the Pali Mali Gazette, that it
is no secret that from a very early time the
traditional religion in which she had been
brought up became intolerable for her; and
because she could no longer believe in A God,
half I ireek. half Jewish, she for some time,
as her biographer writes, doubted the very
existence of a God. After the death of one
of her childen, however, a ohange came over
her, and a correspondent recollects the Princess saying to him: "Tbe whole edifice of
philosophical conclusions which I hsd erected for myself has dwindled down to nothing.
Nothing is left of it, and what would become
of us in this life if we bad not tho belief, the
conviction, that there ia a God who rules the
world, and rules over every one of us? I
weary for prayer; I love to sing hymns with
my children, every one ol whom has his
favorite hymn."
Riddanoe of undesirable fat has been
achieved of late by a number of actresses;
and they are said to have done it by dieting,
and not by the uso of drugs, as many suppose. The direction, are simple enough, and
yot rather hard to follow. They are substantially the same as recommended by Banting,
tho Englishman who reduced his weight
from 201 to 1S7 pound* in six months, snd
then published his experience for the guidance of others afflicted by corpulence. The
system consists in abstinence from food that
contains starch or sugar.'' -This excluded
bread, butter, milk, potatoes, beer, and all
the preparations into which sugar enters.
Unfortunately for this purpose, women almost invariably have s-.veet teeth; but they
cannot part with their excess of flesh without
giving up sugar. They must consent to live
chiefly on most that isn't fat, aud vegetables, excepting potatoes. . To* quantity of
food eaten may be as great ss the appetite
calls for. so long as starchy and saccharine
matter ii eschewed. This docs not leave a
woman so badly off as she might at a glance
imagine, if she can only make up her mind
to live without candy and pastry. She may
drink sour wines, or sherry, but no port,
champagne, or l»er. Distilled liquors are
not objectionable In small qjtantitle..
(LaVXK BONSON'S,)
Head of Hor.li Boatf, Port Moody.
JOHN 8. WATKIB
BEOS TO INFORM HIS NUMEROUS
friend, thst bs ass recently taken th*
*bov* house, wb*r* ta i* prepared to do
•v.rythiaf possibls for ths acsaaauodatioa
of guests.
THE TABLE Isalway. sar* to b* aup-
plied with all th* delicacies of the season ;
th. BEDS are of th* most comfortable, aad
than is ample aud comfortable STABLING
an the premises.
SAT BOATS always obtainable oa th* bar.
bor in front of th* premise*, by applying at
th. Lous..
CITY
DRUGSTORE!
NEW WESTMINSTER, B. C.
A. M. Herring,
Wholdali A Retail
TIib Largest, Stock in the City
—AT THS—
LOWEST   PRICES
AWNEXT DOOR TO BONSON'S.
Toys Toys
OF EVERY DESCRIPTION.
SELECTED FOR THIS MARKET BY A
SPECIAL AGENT, AT
W.H.KEARY'S
PIONEER BOOKSELLER AND STATIONER,
COLUMBIA ST., NEW WESTMINSTER.
THK PORT MOODY AND NEW
WESTMINSTER
f
LIST OF CHARGES.
Rent of Telephone per month, including erection of wires $5.00
For every message for every person not
being s monthly tenant, and not exceeding twenty-five words...., 35
Every additional ten word. 05
AU deliveries within a half-mile radius
of office It
Beyond the above distance, per mil*..     .85
The N. W. k P. M. Telephon. Co. an
prepared to ercot private lines in New Westminster and Port Moody, or between the**
places, snd to connsct the same with th*
Central Telephone Office, if desired.
Parties wishing Telephones should apply
to the undersigned.
CHARLES FOSTER,
Dec. 7, 1883. Sce'y Treaa.
BOOTS & SHOES
IN EVERY VARIETY
FBOM
HEATHORN'S
BOOT & SHOE
MANUFACTORY.
VICT0K1A,
AT   VICTORIA PRICES
R.  THOMAS,
Under th*  new Oddlellews' Hall,
COLUMBIA STREET.
(ESTABLISHED 1862.)
fred:k~eickhoff
OKXIaAL DIALIB DC
GKOCEEIES
Provisions,
Dry    C3rOO<3Lfi»
CLOTHING
BOOTS & SHOES,
&0.1  &Q.
Of First-Glass Quality,
AND   AT
Moderate  Rates-
Corner of Front   and Bcgbie Streets,
NEW   WESTMINSTER.
80  TO  THE
San   Francisco
BOOT
STORE!
AND Gn YOUR MONEY'S WORT
Boots & Shoes
(From an Infant's Shoe up to a Man's Boot
MADE   TO   ORDER.
Repairing Neatly Executed.
IllKhcst Market price paid for
HIDES.
JAMES ROUSSEAU,
COLUMBIA  STREET. OFT. BANK OF B. C.
aMsaaaamsaatatasaa»saaa»sa^Ms^^
New Fall Goods
 JUST RECEIVED AT	
JAS. ELLAED & CCS
Specially Mttiti by Ir. Iirrej vkili ia EDI0H,
 CONSISTING Or	
DRESS   GOODS!
ILL WOOL PLAID8, BXIOES, FRENCH SKBGE8, OTTOMAN MEJtTXL-
UCUX, FANCY FLAIL CASHMKUKS, VELVET * VKLVKTIuKM.,
IN ALL COLORS AND STYLES.
Hour tf onV.TATOQTi collars and cuffs, ruffunos and hitches in
nun llDbJu. WCal, all .shades, mlk and chenille scarfs and
8QUARES.     APRONS, A GREAT VARIETY.
YIMIf Cfl'l t?C  TABLE COVERS, ANTIM ACCASSAR8 AND tinW CffVI EC
DUtl   iMlLIW    TOILETS, LACE AMI NET CURTAINS,     llallW   OlILUO
QUILS. TOWELS, ETC.
Lad'es and children's Brocaded Silk,Ottoman (Join and Herman
Curl Dolmans, listers and Jackets, the Latest Fashions
for this Fall and Winter.
ALL STYLES IN LADIES' AND CHILDREN 8 FUR, FELT, FEATHER-EDOE
AND STRAW
HATS AND BONNETS
A SPLENDID ASSORTMENT OF INFANTS' WOOLLEN JACKETS, PELI    III
HATS, BONNETS, MITTS, GAITERS, ETC.
1 Fall Stock of Flowers, Feathers, Hat Ornaments Beads,
Mimnory Trimmlnggi.
r   ifl PO   MALTE8E, SPANISH, HONTTON, AND IBRETONNE   r  A sTPO
liAtiHiS LACES, IN ALL COLORS. LALiJV)
A Full Line or Men's and Boy's W .thin*, Shirts, Collars, Heck*
ilea, MOsle r. Etc.
VERY LARGE STOCK OF HEMP, KIDDERMINSTER, TAPESTRY * BRUSSELS
CeurpetB /and Rugs!
FLOOR CLOTHS AT VERY LOW PRICKS.
CALL AND EXAMINE OUR STOCK.
JAMES ELLARD & CO.,
Corner Msry and Columbia Streets, New Westminster,
Direct Importation
B
E. BROWN,
EOS to inform the residents of New Westminster and
1   vicinity, that be ia  constantly receiving from Europe
shipments of choice
WINES,
SPIRITS,
~nTrm ar™       LIQUEURS,
ENGLISH ALES.
LONDON & DUBLIN STOUT,
Which he will supply
IN BOND  or   DUTY  PAIP-^Q
In quantities to suit purchasers.
General  Merchandise
Ohas. McDonough
GROCERIES,
CROCKERY,
HAS AN EXTENSIVE STOCK OF
DRY GOODS.       BOOTS & SHOES,
GLASSWARE, HATS k CAPS
3MCeix'» efts Boy's e.-u.lt»
And a great variety of articles necessary for a household.    He has also
GRAIN, SEEDS, POTATOES, LIME, and GENERAL STORES.
N. B.—Farm Produce bought at market rates or sold on commission.
S3C Orders from the interior promptly attended to. al2
Caledonia Hotel
HEAD OF PORT MOODY.
R. B.  KELLY,
*    .Proprietor,
THE PROPRIETOR OP THE ABOVE HOTEL takes pleasure in
announcing that the House is now oompleted with every convenience for the traveling public. THE TABLES are well supplied with
every article in season, and THE BAB is provided with awell-seloctod
Stock of
LIQUORS AND CIGARS-
THE BEDS are well aired, aud THE STABLING is extensive
and the best of Feed always ready for Horses.
It may be well to remind visitors that this Hotel is within a few
minutes walk of the Railway Wharf and Station, and just at the
Terminus of the New Road, now in course of construction.
GUESTS may depend on receiving every attention and a hearty
weloome from the undersigned, whose long experience is a guarantee
of everything being comfortable and satisfactory.
        J. T. SCOTT, Manager.
LONDON MARKET.
W. B. T0WNSEND
HAVING, BY A LONG PERIOD IN THIS CITY, acquired s
reputation for supplying the choicest quality of
HIT, MUTTON, LAMB, PORK and SAUSAGES
Assures his customers and the public that he is always true to the
Eosition he has obtained, and supplies FAMILIES, HOTELS and-
TEAMBOATS promptly, at the lowest market rates.
••"VEGETABLES FRESH EVERY   DAY-**.
atSssaa ...     -THE-
Jort ®0u«ig ttsxeiife
EVERY JIAT'giiDAY.
mcaimo.i ar fan.
TWO dollars PER ANNUM
IXVAaiABlr fK AUVA1CB.
*U1 ssssiamaJ nail nil addressed to
f r. S. aMsaVIOa. SaSaT,
PortljUsody.
.   tolMPfl**'"**1 OSes, New Weetmin-
'    sUrr, wtflrtoeiv. proniut attention.
J. A. CLARKE,
POUT   MOOOY.
Offloe:—Telephone Building,
CLARKE STREET.
P. 3. HAMILTON,
BABalSISa-AT-LAW,   Notabt  Pcano,
SoucrroaAKnArroasaT, Rbal KaXJB
Aoaxt  4*vn... CfU'sata:
>r* %Cf41y.
BTJILDINO LOTH FOR SALE IN
every section of Port Moody. Also,
Hobnrbau Lot., by th. Acre, immediately
adjacent to the Fort Moody surveyed Town
'*%*
 lids lor wis on the North side of, and
laving water IronUga r,n, l'ort Moody
Harbor, finely situated and exceedingly
valuable.
Also, Farm Land* of superior quality snd
on favorable terms, la New Westminster
District.
Carefully prepared Map* and Flan, ei
MUM, and the fullest information furnish
ed. at Mr. Hamilton's offtivt
a£k.   NOON,
Carpenter & Builder,
Fitthtcj up or Storks ahp Ovkicm a
Specialty; All Kinds or Jobbwo
Promptly ATTgNDBD to.
SAT PLANS AND SPECIFICATIONS.
».   C.
'j » PP^ HOyVj
Fort Moody Seminary,
MURRAY STREET.
TERMS can bo had on application to
MRS. HE8L0P.
Hong Sing,
BASERY&LAinnJIlY
Qua** BtbahW, Port Moomn
flWIiT     QCKBS JjTaaaT, Po»T MoODT.
VLriSHES TO INFORM THE PUBLIC
v V 'that he Is now thoroughly established in business At the Terminus of the C.
P. It., And is prepared to make and repair
Boots and Shoes At exceedingly low rates.
Real Estate for Sale
—AT—j
PORT MOODY t
The Thompson Property!
Nsw WaimnMSTSR Dibtriot.
LOT    369,   CROUP    I.
—'°—
»T»HK SUBSCRIBER OFFERS FOR SALE
* on most favorable terms, Fifty Acres
of the North-East corner of the abovo Lot,
the whole Fifty Acres, or one half of the
ssme, at ths purohssers option.    ALSO,
SIXTY-EIGHT
Port Moody Town Lots!
Adjoining and immediately to ths North of
the above, comprising a part of District Lot
375, (-roup I., only twenty-nine chain, from
the shore of the harbor. No building lot*
f»W» fjvgible than these an pnrchascable at
PORT MOODY, B. 0., JANUARY 6.1884.
BO. 4.
The Doable Ghost ire uw iu (J.liti..
(Continued)
"1 bear sounds from below quite
distinctly," said a man, wbo bad itnown
himself down, aud wis applying his ear
to tLo- ground, then ha added, "Tb'era's
tbe signal to pull up—haul away I"
The signal was an immense relief to
me, for during the last five toinotes 1
was tortured with self-reproach at having let my friend encounter danger without my help.
Tha men at Ibe ropes declared that
tha kibbla waa unusually heavy, and
tbey swore the devil wis pulling against
them.
At length the beads of tbe explorers
appeared at the surface—another. n
of tbe wjndliM brought tha. Isu'i . .0
the land. There were Wallers and tbe
gipsy—all right apparently, though
dirty and besmeared; between them
they held—a ghastly freight—tbe dead
body of a man.
The corpse had been so well preserved in the oleaginous earth, that death
might have been quile recent; but
the finding of the body proved the contrary.
Walters now explained that when
they reached the bottom of the pit, and
groped about with their safety lanterns,
they found, sure enough, two legs,
sticking out of the earth in a lateral
gallery. Of coursa, they taw at once
lhat it was the body of a human being;
and they sat to work to diainler it, for
a lot of debris had fallen or had been
thrown over the body. This work had
caused the delay which surprised and
alarmed us.
When the corpse enme to be ex
smined, it waa made evident that the
unfortunate man had been the victim
of foul play, Tb* excitement at the
pit'a mouth waa most intense, each one
bad something to say, some conjecture
to make.
"There has clearly been a murder,"
said Walters, "and the affair must be
made known to the authorities." Then
turning to me, he said, "Get into the
sledge, and gooff immediately to fetch
tbe mayor of the village. The overseer
will go with you; be speaks both Polish
and German. Some arrangement must
be made at once with the major about
disposing of the body, and a description
will have to be taken by the authorities
before a change ensues, which may
aoon result from exposure to the air.
I muat get rid of  all this filth before I
pan alir " »Wed   Walters,     drinuifig Oil
e a aardine out of a box.
ilk".
Apply pet-tonally to the subscriber, at hu
oftiuc OH the premises.
GEORGE THOMPSON,
PiiorRirroB.
PIONEER STORE
QoaiK SntxiT, Post Moodt.
DB.GBANT  -  - -   Proprietor.
IBCeapa cmataaaj on. luuxd.
DRY   GOODS, CLOfHTJJG,
BOOTS k SHOES, HATS A CAPS,
,PitiIAQ  $VANKET8l
HARDWARE, GLASSWARE,
GROCERIES, fto.
rvri —
' H aving Imported a large stock of
Ready-made Clothing
Direct from the East, I am now prepared to
supply customers at prices thst will
DEFY COMPETITION!
**"Orders will be promptly attendod to
and satisfaction guaranteed.
Port Moody
SHINGLE MILL
BONT FORGET TO GO TO THE PORT
Moody Shingle Mill, where the best
of Shingles can be had at the lowest prices,
wholesale or retail.
A supply kept constantly on hand.
JOHN B. TIFFIN.
We had only to drive three-quarters
of a mile to the village, and were soon
there. The overseer directed me to draw
up at the third house in the streot, on
the left hand side, which he aaid was
the inn, though it bore no sign. The
landlord was the mayor of the village, it
.earned. There waa no one about, and
my companion called out lustily that the
master waa wanted.
A boy, a miserable cripple, came out
from the interior to answer us, and replying in Polish, hobbled off painfully,
to call the master.
After a delay of two or three minutes, the landlord made hia appearance,
lie had been down in tho wino-cellar,
and came up, just as be was, in bis
thirt-eleevea, without a coat; he held
in one hand a aiphoo for drawing off
wine, in the other a larga wooden mallei. Ue stood at the threshold of the
door, upen-mouihcd and evidently surprised to see us. The aspect of tbe
man ia stamped on my reocolleclion.
Tbe overseer spoke to him; I did not,
for I thought lie would only understand
Polish. However, the overseer, addressed him in Gaiman; ami of course
1 knew what be said, which was briefly
tbat a horrible murder had been discovered—the body of the victim having
been raised from tbe bottom of an old
petroleum-pit—and tbat he, tbe mayor
of the village, must come directly to
lake down the evidence of the crime.
While the overseer was thua speaking
the man be addressed gtijw white as a
sheet; bis eyes were fixed, staring into
vaucity; his lower jaw dropped; he
turned positively livid; the things he
held in his bands fell to the ground with
a clutter, I was in the act of jumping
out of the sledge to run to his aid, when
he threw his arms up, and reeling backwards, fell, shrieking out the words—
"Found! found!" We both rushed forward, and quickly raised him, thinking
he bad swooned, It was not so—he
was dead I
It was not till ihe following day that
we learnt tbe full particulars of this
village tragedy. There remained np
sort of doubt in the mind of any one
lhat tbe mayor himself had committed
the murder. The clue once obtained,
a mass of circumstantial evidence went
to prove it.
For some days nothing els* was talked
about in the whole neighbourhood.
Walters waa being perpetually interviewed by persons, with and without
business, anxious to Uarn his account
of the affair. At length we got quite
impatient of the interruptions to our
work, caused by this love of exciting
gossip. My time was not unlimited,
and aa Walters was extremely anxious
so get forward with certain portions of
the business while we where together,
we gave ourselves up to plans, surveying., and estimate*, for three days persistently.
On the morning of the third dav the
post brought a fetter from Countess
Kubinski, inviimg Us, in the Count's
name and her own, to go gver and dine
at tbe castle—.taring tbe night aa •
matter of course. Tbe invitation waa
received.
•Well, I think we may give our-
selvesa holiday," aaid Walieia; "what
do yoa eayt"
"By all means let us go," I replied.
"I abould like to aee aomctbing more ot
the lovely Countess. You hsve been
to their castle, I suppose!"
"Yea once. You must not exprat
much,—it is a tumble-down place, wi h
none of the comforta of an English
country-bouse. But all the lame, the
Kubioskys are a family of great ami
qoity, and tbe Ooaot is proud ai
Lucifer."
Tbe afternoon found us on o r way
We were to dine at five o'clock, so we
had set off in good time. Aa we ap
proachrrl out1 destination, the red sunset shone through the dark brincbes of
s fir wood extending along the crest of
riving ground immediately in front of
us. Skirting this wood, the road, in
dieted by "snow trees," led us round
in sight of ibe castle—a grirn-lo iking
fortalrce of the middle ages. Tbe building at first seemed of no great extent
only in fact, a square lower, with no
architectural beauty. We passed
through tbe open gates; but we might
have passed through a wide gap in the
wall, the masonry of wbicb was broken
down in more places than one. The
bsre branches of some fine oak-trees
met over our heads,—a pretty bit of
avenue in summer; but now all was leafless, snd the details of the landscape far
and near alike obliterated by the snow
An arched opening at the base of th
toaer admitted carriages ioto an inner
court. As 'we drove through, 1 noticed
a door with open gratinga, and an un-
glazed window: this was the castle prison, I learnt,—useful enough in the old
days of serfdom. In the courtyard an
an arched opening led to a night of
wide stone steps. Giving the reins to
the servants who stood waiting for us
we ascended into the interior of th
edifice. I now found that tbe csstle
wsa larger than it at first appeared—
iu gable-end merely was visible in tbe
front, the building extended considers
bly in the rear. Half-way up the steps
a strong iron gate of ancient workman
ship gave the building almost the air of
a prison. It stood wide open, and we
passed on, after ascending again a few
steps to a conidor, lighted by extremely
narrow windows. Tbe Boor wss of
oak, bnt the walls and ceiling were whi
tewashed. Tbe servant who preceded
ua nuenad a pond'rous door, wliicfl admitted US to a lone, low apartment,
with a large mullioned window at
either end.
The short winter day was already
waning; and hut for the light of a
.ingle lamp placod on a aork-table
near an enormous porcelain stove, we
should hardly have discovered th
presence of our hostess. The Countess
immediately rose and welcomed us with
the utmost cordiality. If I bad thought
the lady charming before in her fur
raps, she looked still prettier iu her
soft flowing grey coatome, with its
most aitistic dash of red. Tbe room
though sparsely furnished, waa picturesque in the extreme. Our modern
fashions are ruled by the upholsterer,
not the architect, and luxury often
crowds good taste out of the field.
While the Coumeas and Walters were
talking together ot some mutual friend.
1 looked about me. A few high-backed
chairs stood against the walls, which
lo tbe height of six or seven feet were
covered with a dado of stamped leather.
The ceiling «ai vaulted, and simply
whitewashed. Tbe Orudeness was
toned down by time, a nicer word than
dirt or dual. At the upper edge of the
dado a wooden shelf, .slightly orna-
itienti-.! with carving, ran the whoe
ergtb of the room. It waa some six
oi seven inches wide, and conveniently
held all manner of tbinga for use and
ornsment;— books, swords, vases, and
curiosities. The glass ol the windows
was like the small panes of our own
medieval bouses. Wilb beraldiodevieesin
stained glass in the upper part. The
window-seat looked inviting when I saw
tbe room again by daylight. A handsomely carved sarcophagus-chest, and
two or three ponderous oak-tables, with
a Tuikey rug and a few bear-alcins on
tbe floor, comprised the furniture. It
was all simple, and of old-world aspect
yet harmonious and dignified. The
only evidence of modern life were the
books and newspapers on the table, and
always'of course, the fair chatelaine hei-
self in Parisian toilet.
Tbe Count came in just as we had
ri en to seek our rooms and prepare for
dinner. He was extremely polite, and
led the way to our apartments.
At dinner we were joined ny another
guest «ho waa also staying in the house
—Mayor Dalcovich, a cavalry officer
from the neighbouring garrison town
The cuisine was good, and the viands
abundant; the game especially was ex
cellent. But there were several marked
incongruities in ihe menage which
stiuck me: the livery worn by thn servants was shabby, not to say dirty; ami
I observed there was hardly any plate
on the table; and the china was ill-matching, snd some of it bioken.
Our hostess, near whom 1 was seated
appeared to know intuitively what
wis passing through my mind,
for >he said to me. "We nobles of
Galicii are all poor people; you, who
come from wealthy England, must be
surpiised at much you .<ee."
I made some polite rejoinder to this
rcmaik,    adding    something     about
Galioia having passed through a period
political and commercial depression, but
that I hoped better times were in store
for the province, and that the tnaurritl
resources of the soil would now be
properly developed. "Monsieur I*
(Jomte haa laud in tbe petroleum district
I think; peibapt when I come again
you will all b* millionaires."
"Ah me! there are men who throw
to the four wioda all the. good that
cornea home to them," replied the
Countess, with undisguised bitterness.
"You practical English gentlemen do
not know our nobles ; they do their
best to go to the devil with two horses.
Make them rich, and they will just go
faster to the same devil with four
horses."
To this very awkward speech I wax
fortunately not obliged to make any
rejoinder, for dinner was ended ; and
according to the etiquette of the country, I bowed, shook hands with ray
hostess, and then offered her my arm
to escort her back to the drawing-room
where we all assembled, and the gentlemen lit their cigars.
Following the Count and Major
Dalcovich to the other end of the room
to look at some old Turkish firearms,
we left tho Countess and Walters tete-
a-tete. They seemed to havo a good
deal to uay to each other, and I thought
the Count took note of the fact; but
what his feelings were, I failed to find
out,—bis cold blue eyes were not expressive. He was a handsome man of
about five or six and thirty, with a
manner of constrained courtesy. I
could not imagine his ever warming up
with real sympathy for man, woman,
or child. Apropos of the latter, they
had no family.
After a while the conversation lie-
came general—at least the Major held
forth in the loud Austrian voice on
military matters, and we listened.
The Count looked inexpressibly bored ;
he threw himself back in a low wicker-
chair, of which thero were some half-
dozen in the room,   and   lit   a   fresh
cigar.
"What
say you, gentlemen! shall
we have a game of whist I" said the
Count, breaking in at lost upon the
Major's intermidable flow of talk.
The Count, I may observe, spoke, in
French with us ; he did not understand English, and I fancy was annoyed when his wife addressed cither
of us in our own language. The
Major, wbo was not fluent in French,
laid down the law in tho broadest
South German.
"Will madame play V I asked, turning to the Countess.
"Oh no, I am not wanted," she replied, shrugging her shoulders. She
rose, gathered her work together, and
bowing to us, said, "Good night,
gentleman. I leave yon to your game,
hoping fortune may divide her favours
equally lietwcen you."
The Count boenmo quite animated
at tho prospect of play, and busied
himself giving directions to the servants, who brought in a card-table,
and a tray with bottles and glases
placed near at hand. The fire iu the
stove was made up, and a fresh basket
full of wood brought in, all indicating
that our host intended we should make
a night of it.
We. played rubber after rubber,
changing partners several times. The
stakes were not high, but I got up a
loser to tho amount of 250 florins.
■Walters had lost rather more. I
noticed that ho was singularly taciturn
all thn evening, and played with a keenness that surprised me, in a man so
little addicted to cards.
It was after midnight when we went
to our rooms. The household were
evidently all gone to bed ; for our host
mado no sign of calling up tho servants, and conducted us himself to
our respective rooms, at the end of a
long corridor.
"Gentlemen, you must take your
revenge to-morrow evening. Good
night—sleep well," said the Count,
bowing to us both.
Walters disappeared into his own
room, and I closed my door, while the
retreating step" of our   host were still
audible.    My room wax   rather large,
of the samo character as  the   rest of
the castle,—dark  oak floor and  wain
scot, reaching about four feet high, the
walls and vaulted ceiling of bare whitewash.    I opened the door of the stove
and a warm ruddy light cast its   beam
across the room.    The window—there
was only one—showed by its depth the
extreme thickness of the walls; a piece
of green cloth, much weather-stained,
was hooked up over the window-panes.
I unhitched  this curtain, throwing it
down, and   looked out   on the pale
moonlit world.    Directly in front and
beneath me   was a wall, which threw
its battlemented shadow on the snow-
fields ; to the  right tho   ground  rose
abruptly, and   the  hanging   fir wood
stood clearly defined in tbe soft luminous atmosphere.    Stars shown out between    the    dark    branches,   which
swayed   gently   to and   fro.    I could
hear the   sighing of the   wind   in the
forest; all   other   sounds   were mute.
Away down in the valo,   on  my left,
the distance was lost in hazy   vapour,
indistinct and shadowy.    The stillness
and beauty of the scene, had n wonderfully soothing   effect   on   my   heated
brain; our host's   imperial   Tokay was
more potent than I hod  judged it.    I
was   altogether   more    excited   than
sleepy, and it was   sometime  before I
put out the candle  and   laid  myself
down in bed. My Inpression waa, at
the time, that I had not slept; but the
troth is, I mutt have slept nearly an
hour. My eyes were open ; and with
the firm conviction that I bad never
lost consciousness, I turned slightly on
my left side—that, is, towards the
window. In doing sol caught sigbtof an
object on the floor ; it startled me, and
I raised myself up on my elbow, to aee
more distinctly. 1 then made out, by
the light of the window, that the object waa in fact a human figure,* lying
on thn floor, with the face upwards. 1
liad instantly the impression that it
was a dead man ; and very illogically
I said to myself in my half sleeping
state, "It is the body of the innkeeper
the man I saw fall dead when be heard
tbat hia victim waa found in the petroleum pit" Why I should have been
satisfied with thu conclusion I do not
know. Then it seemed to dawn upon
me that I must do something, tbat I
could not leave the man's body there ;
and pulling myself together, I sat bolt
upright in thu lied, and then I saw the
object more clearly.
"By Jove, it is not the innkeeper, it
is Count Kubinsky ; he lies there dead
or dying from a wound in hia breast."
I saw the white shirt was deluged in
blood. I sprang out of bed, to go to
bis aid. I had my handkerchief in my
hand, and was in the act of kneeling
down to stanch his wound, when a grating noise behind made me turn. I
saw the door open, and I instantly
rose to my feet to confront the intruder. "Walters, is that you? What
the devil do you want?" said 1, excessively irritated at the funk bis sudden
appearance had caused me,
"Have you got any brandy in your
flask, Henderson ? I feel awfully bad."
He staggered towards a chair, arfsd
sinking into it, almost fainted.
I dived into my bag for the brandy-
flask, quickly administered some of its
contents, and happily my friend showed
signs of reviving. Standing by bis side
and supporting his head, I looked
round for the prostrate form of the
Count, which I had surely seen lying
there a moment before. Tho light of
Walters' candlo fell full on that part of
the room, and I saw nothing but the
bare boards. The appearance of the
dying man had been a hallucination of
my brain I
Walters, wrapt in his fur bunda, his
neck open, and his face ghastly pa'e,
was a startling object, but a very substantial one. There wr.s no doubt of
his visible presence. He began to look
a good bit better; he drew himself up,
and passing his   hand across his brow,
he said, "I've been a d d stupid fool;
never felt so queer   before in my life.
Of course you will laugh at me ; but
do you know, I have Been a ghost."
"A ghost 1" said I, with rather a
forced laugh.
"Yes ; and I will tell you all about
it. I got into bed quickly, and fell asleep, for I was very tired. I see by
the clock that I had not Blept much
more than an hour, when I woke in
some agitation, and my gaze was suddenly attracted by a luminous appearance on tho floor. I looked fixedly,
and then saw, to my horror, that it was
the dead body of our host himself: he
was without his coat, inhis shirt-sleeves
and the white linen was deluged in
blood. The sight of this spectre filled
me with indescribable horror ; a sickening sense that 1 was in some way responsible for the life of this man quite
overpowered me. I lay there without
nerve or power of motion ; it seemed
an eternity of time before I could rouse
myself to shake off this horrid nightmare. Feeling faint, I got out of bed
to take somo brandy, but I then rc-
memliered that you had the flask."
"What a Btrange coincidence !" I
said, intending to give my experience
of tho ghostly visitation; but seeing
how thoroughly ill and upset Walters
looked, I thought it better to reserve
my part of the story for another
time.
"What were you doing on tbo floor
when I came in just now?" asked
Walters, sharply.
"The fact is, I felt unwell ; and wanting a light, I hod dropped the match,
which I was looking for,"
'•How very odd that you should have
felt ill at the same time !"
The effects are due to the same
cause, I fancy. I think you and I
Walters, both drank more of our host's
Tokay than was good for us."
"I'm all right now," he replied, "I'll
turn in to bed, and I advise you to do
the same. Sorry to havo disturbed you,
old fellow,"
The next morning, when dressed I
went to look up Walters, curious to
know his impression of tbe spectre, and
to compare notes thereon; but, rather
to my surprise, he had already left his
room without making any sign at my
door.
The light of common day, and the
ordinary surroundings of life, made me
feel somehow that the experiencesof the
night were very vapoury, after all; and
I shrewdly Guspected that my friend,
who had certainly not posed in a heroio
attitude in presence of the ghost,
would perhaps rather not hcaranyraore
about it. After Walters had left me,
I hod slept profoundly, waking up free
of headache, with a brain quite cleared
of cobwebs; in abort, my losses at. cards
were a deuced deal more tangible than
the ghost, and I marvelled over again
at my persistent bad luck.
rTob. Oontlnnta.)
DRUG STORE,
Mcasur BraaaT, Post lloetrr.
M. HE8LOP, - - Proprietor
A complete stock of
Drop and Patent Ietaffl
ssTPresavlptioas csrafalljr
Pacific Boarding House,
Cum Aranr, Poarr Moodt.
(iE0B6K ANJiAliT. • rr.pr.etor.
PARTIES VIHITINIi PORT MOODY
will find *very uoovenwnc. and cats-
fort at th* abov* Hotel. Maali st All hotu*.
Charge* moderate. dlUsa
MEEK BROS.,
Real Estate Brokers.
Citt Aim Farm Property fob 8al«
at thi Turkihub or ths Oahadiaji
Paoisto Kailwat.
BttaH Of  ftriCfsBIKM,
given.
PORT MOODY. I. C
Information   wfrHagly
POST AJTHUR, owT.
PORT MOODY FEBKY!
fatrick Mcdonald
RUNS A FERRY, DAILY, BETWEEN
the end of the North  hoed and Cale
donia Hotel j'ior, oa arrival of the stags
ooach from New Westminster,' RETURNS
in the sfternoon, punctually, in time far tbe
stage coach to New Westminster.
Aa*Charges moderate.     Freight e.r.folly
attended to.
D. B. CrRTlS.
I. CLARKE, M. D.
MEDICAL^ M.KL> I
D. S. CURTIS & CO.,
Direct Importers sod Dealers in
DRUGS AND
MEDICINES,
FASCY GOODS, TOILET ARTICLES,
Lamps and Lamp Goods, ftc.
COLUMBIA   STRUCT,
NEW WESTMINSTER,   -  •  B. C.
(Next Door to the Colonial Hotel.)
Special facilities for tho Jobbing Trade
DOMINION
a*^„_   II
COMPANY.
(LIMITED)
RichardSt., NewWestmiister
Manufacturers and Dealers ia
all kinds of
Rough # Dressed
LUMBER!
Shingles,
Laths,
Pickets,
Doors,
Windows,
Mouldings.
Orders from the Country
Promptly Pilled,
of quantity and cost of material
building   carefully   prepared
free ot charge.
for
FIRST-CLASS
Brain-Edged Flooring
A 8PE0IALTY.
A. MENNIE   -   -   -   Agent
PORT MOODY.
LUMBER, YARD
lleKK BROS. & CO.,
KEEP A FULL ASSORTMENT Os"
Rough and (Dressed
LWMBEm
J. A. CAL8ECK, At?ent. SATURDAY. JANUARY 5. 1884.
* We lirx leave to wish all onr sub-
fcnU'sa, savI indeed cverylorly wbo
■aeirVisl tax fraotnatk.il of the wish, a
.,I*.1:AY New Ybak. We are so ynung
—being only somewhat lens than a
IHoiiUt old—that wo cannot dare to talk
wU-y safrsly, aa to the past; yet we may
* indulfsa in some dreams as U>ti»e future.
Kjxakiiiy from a Port Moody point of
lisi.; w» i»-Kevo tbat the incirmlnflywir
will bu a happy one in tint sense of its
being  a wonderfully  progressive one.
■ We have every reason to believe that,
within tbe twelve months from this
date, the population of Port Moody
will have increased at least ten fold.
Baft that little   fact   is   nothing codi-
; pared with what will bo the anpi it of
the plate, in ono year from now, sim-
altoiieouhly with this increased pope-
latjpn. Thp work of clearing oil the
growing timber; of opening roads and
!/• l'r5!£'?« °^ huilding houses, stores and
fi HfisSfsoa1, apart from all railroad works
-jof «uuplutioii, even now ufTords a ccr
' tairf rndicatjiin, if thorn weri nothing
Yhai to show it, of the immensity of
work in Uio way of city building, that
."-wjll-b« done here wiUiin the next
twilve months. Everybody seeina to
.*to alive, mill preparing for a f,"eat
luture; that ia, everybody hereabouts;
but, in addition to that, every mail
brings us unmistakable intimations
from people East and South—ay, and
West, too—that they are hurrying on
Uhvajr way to Port Moody, or will lie
here in the spring. Yet what will lw
the jre*ult of these pioneer arrangements of the next twelvemonths compared wi A what we Bhall seo in a very
few years lismcnf Imagination can
jsoai'coiy exaggerate the brilliant future.
of ton. Moody. Very, ve y soon we shall
^(VliH.uiuneruiity of Douglas pines und
cii ar* bkirtiii'; our shores and clothing
, 0U1 hi11 sides Huppliui! ed by elegant stonn
V.and brick mansions, warehouses arid
stores.     The sand-flat at the head of
. HlM liay will bo displaced by copious
streets lined by shops and stores, making a perfect hive of industry and
Irailie. The adjacent mai-gin of the
Northijm short) of tlie bay will show a
se*jfes c£('tcje Unest and most capacious
rine (mJcUb in the world, and holding:
liearing. tbe flags of all nations of
tie world. And on the- various pro-
atoiifcs—then castellated promon-
ie«tj; beavtngever tho British flag
a'.iove eh/ir bastions from English Bay
to the bead of Port Moody harbor, wi'.l
be thrown out, every night, an electric
.light, making the whole continuous
fifteen miles of one of ,Uie best harbors
the world, as bright as it could be in
a summer noon-day. And then will
slrrpg, from all coasts and iBltrds of the
Pacific ocean and its branchiations
f ecmie careering up that same magnificent lmrhor without let or hindrance,
.at oil times of tho day or night, to
:,' discharge and receive cargoes.      The;'
( will do so, too, at what will then be—
and not long hence—the most beauij-
ful, the liehest, the grainiest,   aril in
>     -every way the best city on the Pacilic
1    coast of America. Port Moody readers,
we have a great future before us. Let
'   us wish you many Happy New Years;
,?'£#'_ *'° know they will come if you do
not utterly throw away your opportunities.
X
1
,'i   fiftea
inUu
A SORT DP A,MESS.
with tbat distinguished local statecnian
souictiiues playfully called "honest
John". In coiiiosjBi nne Uu-reof, it
further wrraa tKat Mr. McQtllirray
was appointed Btiji. A nil now it comes
out that Mr. Orr, Mr. Kobaou's io-
rppreaentative for this (Kstrict, basin
sisted upon McGillivray's being turner!
out of olliot; and turned out he is. It
said— but we do not profess to know
anything ebtrtit it, and it may not be
true— tbat Mr. Orr consented to vote
in favor of Jthe accursed Settlement
bill, only on condition that Mr. Me-
Uillivray be turned out of the Stiin-ud
lary Magistracy. Of course, we know
nothing aliout it How should wu I
being up here in the dark, outside of
the brilliancy of political light which
irradiates that little seaside village of
Victoria. Put here we are without
any Stipendiary, or Police Magistrate,
ami with much need of one. It ia a
queer looking "kuttle of fish'' altogether;
and whatever does it mean, and who
can explain 1 When we learn something further, we shall have some further remarks to make about this extraordinary allair.
OUR CITY.
, j .t Here scums to lie a prctiy piece of
'"' 'business. A few Weeks ago, we. 1m>
"i dune informed that we had a Stipen-
„ diary. Magistrate appointed for this incipient town, of Port Moody, in the
person of Mr. Thomas Shannon Mc-
Gijlivrajf. It was, highly important—
in; fact,' it wai indisf ensible that we
sliould have such an official. Considering the congregation of men that
might be supposed to be about such a
pew place as Port Moody, one would
Naturally think it highly important that
there; should be such an official here;
although it is, foT the most part, a most
decoroubly behaved town. Still, thare
are uproarious, or very troublesome,
characters, amongst us, sometimes; and
.as-the place grows there is a prospect of
still niore of that class turning up. So
it was indispeusiblc, as seemed to most
of the orderly residents, to have a Stipendiary., Aiid so we had one. But,
after these few weeks, he is "sacked"—
turned outTof office; and here we are, on
our books again.     We say nothing aa
a to Mr. StcGillivray's capacity for the
position. He was too short a time in
office for us to make any comments as
to.Uiat point; but one feels naturally
inclined to ask-"-what does this carious looking piece of business meant
From all we can learn, it seems that
Mr) Mcfiinivray—with the'most vir-
tttoUs intentions for all we know to the.
potrtrary—courted acrfuainfance with
the Rohson family; first, through the
Revert ml Ebenexer, and, through hir
Port Moody becomes daily more
clearly defined; the erection of buildings marks the lines of the streets, and
the removal of limber shows the extent
and facility for building; the constant
passing tip and .down of the locomotive
and the increasing stir of workmen and
people in business, forms the whisperings which herald the early advent of
the great commercial metropolis ol the
Northern Pacific. In four or five weeks,
trains will be running through from this
ity to Yale, and probably to Boston
Bar. It is highly probable lhat exiJua
sive works will be commenced in the
course of a month or two. Mr. Van
Home, the general manager of the Canadian Pacific railway, will be here
shortly, when he will doubtless .make
arrangements for the construe ion of the
sea wall across the head of the harbor,
and also decide upon the material to be
used in the new wharf; iron, stone and
concrete having each its paniculjr advocates. The moment the work has
been decided upon for the sea wa'l and
wharf, the station-houses, round-houses,
machine and blacksmith shops, will be
commenced, and the company's offices
erected. All Ibis will be concurrent with
the construction of wharves on each
side of the harbor, as traffic will be constantly increasing, and steamers from
all quarters will be arriving hourly. The
popularion will then daily increase as
workmen by the hundreds wil' be con
s antly employed in every branch of
business. As a matter of course,, hotels,
stores and warehouses will rise like
magic, and the whole (SI*—from the
wharf to the Coquitlam, wi I resound
to ihe tuneful clang of hammers, sawi,
and pickaxes. Under these circumstances it is imperative lhat incorporation takes place at the earliest possib e
moment, because it is all important
that the positions of public bui dings be
carefully chosen with a view to the con
venience of the great popularion soon
io occupy the site of Port Moody. Markets of several descriptions will bo required, and they should be placed first
in relation to the thickly-popukued part
of the city, and next for the convenience
of vegetable and fruit dealers, butchers,
fishmongers, and the like clashes. A
market is also required for hav, grain,
potatoes and other bulky articles which
will proba'dy be brought up on wagons
dom the Coquitlam. A site lor a good
theatre should also be selected; tites for
places of woith'p will djubtlcss be acquired by the several denominations to
which they belong. Not ihe least important function of the Municipal Council will be the restrictions as io the
qu ility and character of buildings to be
erected on particular streets, so as o
secure as much uniformity as possible in
the structures, The grades of streets
should be fixed as soon as possible, and
so avoid the expense and annoyance to
property holders which must follow sub
sequent alterations. The width of sidewalks should also be decided upon, and
as they will probably be of wood io begin with, they will nevertheless occupy
ihe space which may be afterwards cov-
eied wiih stone or asphalte. The duties
of the Council are so numerous, particularly at the commencement of their
labors, in the passing of By-laws for the
proper government of ihe city, that there
is no time to lose. The lighting, paving, water supply, and fifty other all
important civic enactments which are of
vital importance to the welfare of the
inhabitants, should be passed without
del ay v
PURE 1VHANNY.
[From ths Hnlnland Ounrdi.n.l
Our local Government, judging by
recent achie.veme.nte, is probably not
oxceeded by the most despotic ruler in
tho universe. Tho greatest measure
last session was probably the Kootenay
bill. Honest John aud his colleagues
had mado up their minds to put it
through, and they did so in spite of
all that could be suggested to the con
trary. The Settlement bill, involving  matters  of   the   most   vital   im
pottance to the Province, was introduced as near the end of the seo
that aaeaabers who would liave
opposed it, bad time for consideration
'been allowed them, voted for it, half
inclined by anxiety to get home, and
isled by promises (such as the dry
dock rwfaad to th* amainlanrl) which
were made without any real intention
of abiding by theui. Tha actual legislation beyond these two bills was a mere
bagatelle: much of it unnecessary, and
some of it that would have been better
if it had never been enacted. The recess enabled our ministers to act upon
the prejudices, the vanity, or the mercenary feelings of certain of the members, and the result was, when the
House met a few weeks ago, a compact
body in favor of any measure the Government might introduce, uo matter of
what character. Hence the imperative
tone assumed by the Premier. When
the most reasonable amendments were
offered to the Settlement bill, lie coolly
told the opposition that it was of no
uv- their attempting to bring them
forward, because it would be necessary
for the Government to vote them down
if they were pressed. We are quite
sure that such a state of things never
existed in this Province before, and it
would lie hard to adduce a parallel in
any part of tlie world. For the sake
of argument, let us suppose that our
ministers thought the passing of the
Settlement bill a proceeding necessary
to the wiilfaro of tho Province, that
without it, the Government could not
bu carriod on; it was still open to da-
bate; it was not a matter to be thrust
down the throats of the people like a
dose of physic down the the throat of a
rebellious infant. But we insist that
the Settlement bill was not necessary.
The graving dock is the tiroperty of tho
people; the work was being done by
means of bonds issued, that the money
to be obtained from the Dominion and
Imperial Governments might bo used,
in advance, for the construction of tho
dock, and so avoid using a single dollar
of the money drawn from the people of
this Province. By this means the
people were actually profiting to a considerable extent by the outlay on the
work, and a very valuable property was
bring constructed for them at other
people's expense. Now all this fine income has passed away from our citizens;
the dock will be constructed whenl
and echo answers when ? The refund
will be used by our ministers for political purposes, and property-holders in
Victoria and Esqulpiolt will ever after
curse tbe ministry that gave, them away
without auy possible present or future
advantage. The Island railway is not
an inuuediato necessity; in fact, at present it is not at all required, but it is
made un excuse forgiving lo foreigners
two million acres of the most valuable
laud in the Province. The land has
been carefully tested and is known to
contain immensely rich beds of the
finest coal. It is almost inconceivable
that the Dominion and Imperial Governments should be parties to this nefarious transaction—the giving away
of so much valuable coal to foreigners,
when it is remembered that the quality
of coal contained in these lands cannot
elsowheru be equalled on thu whole
Pacific coast. That coal is a first necessity in war or commerce; that the
object of tho foreign speculators is to
secure an unfailing supply of tho best
of fuel for railways that must be always rivals to the Canadian Pacific, and
that iu case of war they will be fairly
entitled to supply our enemies with
the most potent material of war, to be
used against ourselves. The lunrln and
coal would have been much too high a
price to be paid for 75 mileB of railway
which is a mere luxury, but we are
told that ttie only condition upon
which wo con obtain this railway, is,
that wu must give the $750,000 paid in
full to the entire provineo as compensation for delays iu constructing the
Canadian Pacific railway! a Bum that
was spurned with contempt when it
was offered to us years ago by the
Mackenzie Government, when wo were
allowed to do what we liked with it!
Why we are forced to give away our
money in such an unnecessary and absurd manner, whether we like it or not,
is something that our valuable ministers and those connected w ith them in
the bargain, can alono explain. Our
readers are aware that an offer was
mode to our local Government by a
syndicate ready to furnish all the
requisite guarantees, who wero prepared to construct the railway and
complete the graving dock to tho satisfaction of the local authorities, for the
lands named in the Settlement bill,
and without a single dollar of money.
We conceivo that even that price was
too high for the work to be accomplished, but it was certainly better than the
bargain our precious ministers have
made in the Settlement bill, and would
liave left us the paltry sum given to us
by the Federal Government to reimburse us for tho losses we incurred
by their noj carrying out tho tenus^of
their agreement.
OUR ARBITRARY GOVERNMENT
welfare of the Province. We have shown
that the giving away of the graving dock
at Eaqulmak wai a recklsjs and un-
• arrantab'e sacrifice of public property
and income.   We hare -shown that the
Island railway is not necessary at the
present time, but if it were so. the price
P-id for it it UMwmoual)  too high;* so
much so, in fact, at to cast a very ius-
-fioout appearance apon the bargain,
which, without a better explanation than
that hitherto given, must draw upon all
concerned an amount of odium so dee^i
as to be indelible.      We now come to
tbe utterly inexplicable gift of throe and
a half million acre* ol the best land in
'.he Peace fiver valley.    It it necessary
to look at this extraordinary gift of the
public domain in all its phases, in ordei
to elicit a proper conclusion at to the
object of the gilt     The explanation
vouchsafed by our local Government is
to this effect: Tha' certain portions of
the railway belt being mountainous and
consequently   unfit   for  cultivation,   ll
wouhless, and therefore should be replaced with other lands of a fair quality;
that a great deal  of the belt has been
granted to settlers, and that, consequently, other lands should be given in place
of those granted for pre-emptions and
so forth.   In relation to the question of
quality of land  in  the  bell,  we must
again insist that we have nothing to do
with that.  The Dominion Government
selected the route for the railway in this
Province, and they thereupon accepted
the lands in the belt in accordance with
the Terms of Union.    We defy anyone
to show that we agreed lo give any lands
outsit!* of the railway belt for any reason
whatever; on ihe contrary, we conceive
tbat in convejing tbe lands included fti
the twen y mile belt,  wq were   contributing very handsomely towards the
construction of the railway, and in the
opinion  of many  people—loo much
We have been taxed to the eyes in having  to   pay   heavy   duties on   goods
brought  from  the neighboring States
that we might have obtained free, from
Canada,  had the railway been   completed in accordance with ihe Terms of
Union, and we were refused all panic!
pation in the Washington Treaty, so tbat
our products were met in our principal
market—San Francisco—with an almost
prohibitive   duty,  to  which  wc   were
compelled to submit, thus entailing ad
dltional losses to our people, owing, as
in the former case, to the non completion of the railway, in the time agreed
upon by the Ottawa Government.    It
cannot be pretended that it wasrincon
scQuence of po ideal changes-and consequent   Government  •.«i.irm«»"'**it,q
that  the terms  were no;  carried out.
The changes of Government at Ottawa
have nothing whatever to do with us
A Government   at Ottawa   made the
bargain, and the Government at Ottawa
no matter under what guise, is responsible, and we must insist -that we were
entitled to a fulfilment of the bargain
made at confederation.     We are not
compelled to put gates on the lO-mile
belt; people went upon the lands and
settled as they have every right to do, no
matter who may be supposed co hold
them,  under the Dominion Govern
roent.      But we presume,  since   the
route for the railway was finally declar
ed, that no fuilhcr grants on the railway
belt have been conferred by the local
Government;   therefore,   the  Federal
Government has no claim whatever to
lands   on  account of what has been
alienated to settlers.     It will now be
seen that the Federal Government had
not the shadow ot a claim to lands in
respect of the railway belt.     Such
claim had been put forward during the
term of the  late Government in this
Province, but,   much   to- their credit,
they resisted any such attempts at spoli
atibn.   It remained for the Government
of honest John and  his colleagues to
despoil the Province, for what consideration,  these wonhies and those who
made tbe   bargain  with   them   alone
know.   The murkiesi appearance about
the matter is the peculiar control Obtained  by honest  John  and his colleagues over a certain number of the
members by which means they could
carry through the House an atrocious
bargain   like the Settlement   bill,   or
anything else they pleased, entirely independent'of public opinion   or  the
well known wishes of the peOple.   Such
a   prostitution of  responsible  government and such an outrage on the rights
of free citizens has never been heard of
before, and if our people do not make
this fact clearly apparent to our mock
government and the representatives who
have betrayed them, they are unworthy
the rights of citizens.
We gave our readers an installment
on this subject, In our leader last issue,
but our space being limited, we were
compelled to leave much to say in the
same strain. The Set lement bill must
necessarily occupy the attention of our
people for a long time to c.me; in fact,
its consequences will be a constantly
recurring theme causing bitterness and
regret to all whoM*  interested in the
Rocky Point "Hotel,
•a- r
fHB FINS Hffflr gouBE HAS JUST BEBM FITTED TIP IM
First-class Style, and t» now tb* BEST HUiilJ. at thu Terinlnoa.
—-     TMH TAILfcK WILL A4WA1S BE WELL MPPME)
With swary Dalfcatey of Iho Beaton.
THE     BAH
Is supplied  with   the BEST WISES, LIQUORS and CIOASI to b* foaad In
tht Market. > st . ILA.
Tbe  Beds  are  Carefully  Attended  to
And Guests may dapend en rtctivlnj every Convenience and Comfort
Slncerbeau & Lamont,     -    -    -     Proprietor*.
0
II
8
atf
by steamer and distributed by railway so
to bs dtliverad, fresb, iu any part of
mainland. The demand, however, in. thu
city and lurt Moody will afford a market
fur s large quantity, .uflkitnt to psy a .null
steamer or schooner during the season. W*
congratulats the people of C'omox on beuif
blessed with such-a discovery ; it will be s
little something in the way of eonsolstion
for being deprived of their farm aad oo-U
lsnd. by a railway monopoly.
Tut people of British ColnmM* are certainly not nware of the shann-f ul amonnt of
land grabbing going on at the preaent mo-
mi-lit. It Mem. to have .i.-izt-il upon til*
Government supporter, like a kind of mania;
whether spurred on by the early prospect of
the' present Government melting sway fro an
powur, we know not, but tho fact remain*
that all the land-grabbing i. done by the
tnembors or friend, of the present local Government. One nice little scheme Is tha
"kapswsllowing" of Rchlckmonse narrow, at
tbe head of rdinswap Lake, in which we ar*
told the son-in-law of honest John, the
Speaker of the local House, and snndry
friends and supporter* of tho Government
are interested. It would appear thst the
railway will probably have an Importaat
station at the above-named place; It is just
at the end of the Eagle pan. The (rig* Idea
rtf thu schcmcrH is to stt|ier*ede Ksmloope,
leaving thst place entirely out in tho cold.
U tilers is to be any town In &diiuknwuse
narrows, the Government should at once reserve the land to be sold hi lots for public
benefit. If the Government grunts in these
land-grabbers, this valuable town.lt., there
can bo only one conclusion,in tlie minds of
the public, and that may bring the Govern
inent to a dead stop.
EvKiiron* knows th* advantage, In a
pecuniary sense, of being In close friendship
with the powers that be, and this fact i. not
learned by the promoter oi the Kootenay
bill, fur the first time. Tho ridiculous wagon
road affair, by which this gentleman secures
a donation of 60,000 acres of the finest laud,
bordering on tho railway, In Eagle pass,
is an outrage on the public Th*
bill which so generously conferred' this
splendid stretch of land covered with mag-,
niflcent timber, is an absurdity from beginning to end, Laving the width and character
of this, what will be a, celebrated road; one
of the notorious jobs that are tn inako the
present Government a by-wold for all timo.
Tho road in the first rctacc was wholly un-
^ —r, i.  p parallel a»ua  ^-. <■—
iidi.-ui Pacific railway, which will he the tint,
very probably, in running order; the* road,
after that event, will not be worth a cent to
the country. There are no difficulties of any
moment on the road, except at one point
where it goes round a luko. At this place
thu only expensive part of ths road should
be made, involving a good deal of stone-
cutting. This the noble road-maker ha.
dodged, by placing o scour npon the lake,
And recommencing the road at the place
where the scow will land. Thst jobbery Is
taking place to a considerable extent, everyone is aware, but that the C. ('. of Unlets k
Wirks should pass this mockery of a road
will be about the last straw.
■
IR.
Estate
Broker
nos* ha
,aV*rooi>i '.ja.
II JL J' "      l *m
INSURANCE AGT.
NEW WESTMINSTER, B C
•TAT
}   I
EST Particular Attention given
to tho trim sac ti on of Eoal Estate
Business,   in. New  Westminster
City »nd Dietriet, and the Town
of Port Moody. ;'       '
It
-
■	
	
MONEY TO LOAN
IT
m<H)U THO'i
On Good ■•ottrltv.
William Siacerbeau.
PUBLIC WORK GONmflnB
|S PUEPABICD TO ENTEK INTO CON-
Town
ghway
Itnililings,
nectedwitn tHe cOnstruofion of Railways.
"TRACTS   for  Cleatin* Lend, Opening
hii Streets, or uWc extended Rural
ay., Constructing VTharvst, Ktaetjon
of buildings, or for any class of work con-
ft
A i'kiitais member of the local Moos* 1
boasted that titer* are eight members who
ran with him, and who are ready to take the
office from him and vote together on any
measure. We need hardly say tha member
referred to Is one of ths most faithful adherents of the present ministry. These eight
member, "run" together like so many hoodlum boys, and don't trouble themselves with
the effect or results of any measures passed
by their votes. They Ar* all jolly good fellows, anddriak together with hearty goodwill If they belonged to sonic social club,
we should have no objection to them or their
good-fellowship | but being Banded togsther
Slid used by the Government to do a* tbsy
think proper, they are s serious danger to
the country. It will be seen that ao far
tho amendment of auv measure, brought
forward by tho Government, may be suggest
ed by the Opposition, they might .swell expect a milestone to move with tbe forcu of
wind produced by a small pair of hollows
This is a very serious matter for the people
of British Columbia, who are completely in
tho power of honest John and his colleagues.
What becomes now of responsible govern
inent? Wlist is the advantage of the suffrage to the people, if they are treated like
serfs, and sold or given away With the laud
like so many sheep ? Have tlie people of
this Provinoe lost all notion of what beloni
to them as freemen ? These eight jolly
fellows, who are like so many Neros, am
joy themselves while they are ruining the
country, may laugh and sing just now, but
there will lie a terrible reckoning to pay for
their fun, some day.
°uga
good
47 Every Rsaannahle Satisfaction .seared
to those with whom ha contracts.
Address:-"Rooky Point HoUi," Port
Moody, B. G.
BARKY k ROW UK,
BARBER   SHOP.
ALSO,
,;■•.
TAILORING AND GENERAL CLOTHES
nKPAinTNG noNE.
REPAIRING DONE.
pont'aWbtrY'
Mjakat SrasiT,  •. *   ^°y***,t^a^,irt
EDITORIAL NOTES.
(From tbe Mainland Qn.rdl.D-]
VVr. lbarn that an immense oyster bed
has heen discovered in the vicinity of Comox.
It is said that in size and flavor they are
equal to the treat found on tho Pacific Coast
This should create a very large business during the season, and particularly to the mainland, where gloat quantities arc consumed.
But thu innrket fjrr these delicacies will be
increased to tho extent of the supply when
tho railway is ready for through traffic.
The uy biers can 1 e In ought to Port Moody
Th« Victoria /Wit very properly severe
on tbe Itev. Mr. Watson, who, like many of
his temperance confreres, deceives himself
with tho idea that because he advocates
something that a great number of his fellow
citizens look upon at good in principle, he
has a right to abuse and decry others who
may not possess his own extravagant ideas
of his mission. The fact is, that men like
Rev; Mr. Watson are doing great injury to
the temperance cause. They or* making it
an object of ridicule, and tho advocates
themselves subjects for ribald jests, and iu
this way preventing many people accepting
their artraments for more than the statements
of men ha'f erased by exeats of seal. M
like tho itev. Mr. Watson ar* also doing
great harm to their sacred calling, by bringing it into contempt.
Port Moonr Lots, j-Property at the-terminus continues to change bsnds to a large
amount daily. Ths transactions sine* out
last involve many thousands of dollare; the
buyers being principally from th* Isaatern*
Provinces smith* Unitcdtltate*. — Gaarnhan.
CHWTJM^
^. 331-FTRTt.T-.
18 now prepared to rkcbivb
orders {or all kinds of
FRUIT AND FANCY CAKES,
MI
(Iced to nit and in every variety)
mince; pi_es, etc.
sbT Order* will he carefully executed and
the articles delivered at th* neiaatttee of
the purchasers.
RESTAURANT AND BAKERY,
Front Street, Opp. Irving'* Whsrf.
Nsw Hotel.—The ground is already
undergoing preparation for the Elgin Hotel,
to be erected for Mr. Inslay, who is determined to be one of the first in tbe field with
aa inu worthy of our city.
NEW FALL GOODS!
New FaU_G<K>ds II
J J Wm. ELS0K3 -
The Gash Tailor!
Lrrro* 8oTORa,N*wWa»i»»»4*iS
Has opened out hi. FALL STOCK, aft. ia
'   now prepared- to execute orders!
AarSATlSrACTlO!! gYajuaiuI). a*
\
~-~-
_
_»,««
__
•** Cjjt^DTt Hfioifoj (B.jtttr.
l|rjC>AT. JaVl
JsUit'ARY B, 1t*J4
"
DIT.P.
In Nsw We.tmin.trr, on th* *th InsUnt,
-orge JUohsi4so*i UaniHton, a ssttrve of
x»kfier», Cekh'esUr County, Neva hcotla,
ed 44 tfaaia;   Th* cms* of death w
■ heart
iJ*Ars;
The fsneral will tak* plaee to morrow
nnday) afWrnoftn, st tWo o'clock, from the-
inline* of 11, H. Baker, Patrick .treet.
Colchester papers pleas* copy.
HOME LOCALS.
What ha. proved tventtsily to he a fatal
rjcldeOt occurred Upon (lie railroad, cle»e
r Coquitlam bridge, oe the night of Sun-
ty-Menasf last. Mr. Frank Sinclair, a
rikesinan, was coupling a car, when he
lipped ou the slippery track, And fell bari
sath the moving train, Tho loi-orsotivs
rheels pawed over, aud terribly crushed,
utli of his tfhigh., just sbove the Inees,
?e was taken up to Port Hancy, his pUce
if residence, and a messsgc sent to New
A'.supinator for Dr. Trew to attend to, th*
:ssc. Through unavoidable delays fn flit
ad stat* of traveling just now, the doctor
inly reached the sufferer late iu the after-
icon of Monday. He at once Amputated
me of the maimed limbs; but, whll.t pro-
le.ding to amputate the other, he saw that
Ihe pati.at was dying, :»«.I V* did die immediately, thftiagh exe.as.vu hsmenhage
and nervous .hock.
Mr. Welntcr i. having a large amount of
"slashing" dono on his property dowu the
hssbot.   Mr..ti. W-Williaius has taken a
cuiitract tor chopping the growing tiurborou,
we believe, *yiii. twenty-five acres;   and he
hasa large gang  of men actively  employed
In the work.    The w'.y they brlni; down the
forest giants almost sounds like the work of
eteriisilo.    rV >m tlie clearing aln ad. mads,
along With «lint haa been done on the ml jat-
antpt»ias»ty of Messnv.>BeaVOu audWilsen,
give, on entirely new ai-pcct to that portion
of the shore of Port Moody, ami brings to
light ths hitherto hidden besulies mid capabilities of the place,
,      Sets* of Ui« geiitl.mtrr ahetl town  were
* courteous and careful enough to practically
"hlUfcrve   the custom,   time'honored in the
JJ*jteni Provinces and States, of culling on
their ladv friends on New Year'a Day.   Tho
only rogrets that we have heard »f ware that
there Were so few ladles to call upon.    New
Year's Eve was very .quiet.   One of our reporters aasefti that, in passing the h«k-up,
ho heard a feeble uica'worbling that well-
known Scotch song for tlie occasion i "Hero's
to  the,year that,   awa'."   Otherwise   he
''rt^jjrt'rlilithfe Wruld not have remembered
that the year was mded.
On Tuesday lsit (New Year's Day) thi
Rocky Point Hutxl was opened with a jovial
old-fashioned hoise-warming. Thin hotel,
iho property of, and liuilt bf, Mr John.
Murray, but vi-lii li has remained unoccupied
ever since its cni'ipletioii, ahuut mid irrrriiei
last, has, as we recently announcer, betn
.recently taken bi^-Messrs., .Sinccrloau ■&
J.suKmt| anil ou tiro evening of Ivuw.
Yeses Dm, it was opened te tl»o Juklic,
to whiMU'A'gissxrat  iuiittatjon   was given
l'nfortg,ratciywll£ne filler U#$""w
vile, -*VM.h a cuiistaat down,pour of rain and
ilie* from above Anil slush sn^er fi.oi, that
tni greater proportion of tlie Urlres inviterl
And many expected gueita 0f the other »ojc,
fere deterred from putting in an appear-
nee.     Consequently  the footing "on the
fantastic,  4c.    was   mostly  of   the   diss
lHJih.Iarly   called   "stug;diinuiiig."     Yot it
wan nevertheless kept up with .pint by a
party   who were  lioiiml  to,  and evidently
dirl,   snjoy themselves.     Ihe supper  was
uuivmsally pronouncerl lirst-class—a festiyal
in itself—and doubth^u an earnest of what
i tlie hoard of the Rocky  Point Hotel will
pn.ssnt to its uoutiuuuus guest* hereafter;
and it seemed to bo relished as it dnNrved
hv thos* w lio participated.    The enjoyments
of the evening were further varied  by a
numfM'i. of staaasf aud .the. party broke up
about throe o'clock ou Wednesday morning.
Th* framu of Mr. Odin's new hc-Wl (the
Driard House), or at least of that portion of
It which ts to be completed this winter, on
the corner of Douglas and Columbia street*,
is now up, and rapid nrogrensis being marie
In covering it in.
Fair progress—considering the bad vca-
i.-.thsA we have recently had—in being tirade
in   putting   up the   telegraph line.     The
. office, ftt ail events for the present, will he
in the   station   building, On   tho   railway
wharf, where it is not improbable that th
■tpstullloc will also  bo placed. ,  There  is a
i prevalent desire, however, to have the latter
somewhere    nearer   the present ceutro of
.population   and   business.     Of coiithc the
'TtoVtninient telegraph office must lie at the
railway terminus.     We understand that it
•' is intended to continue ou,  forthwith, the
telegraph line up the railway track to the
front of tho works still in progress.     Tl
im. "aAarxijjan;.r jub agaln'. .
Editor Y re* Press—'llu gn.ud apsaejh .!
the i'irjvnr.-ial S»wH*»w whoa* politsW,
y in not, SCI r-dil . V grinasl "pinion
of an e White! kind, auit-wlmae JiplouitMe-
cAut, is very disgusting, is giveo, we are
told by hi. organ, tlie "Coianibisu," "as a
fair sample of the Covertimeut'. ix>.itioa ou
__■ vvfolfcwl  nofJbad lr>*»    pre. k"w
Inpl* atUjrtf. I jmV |ay tl.t|   it i* 4<
The  "lioiK-raMu  jgei.tlfcii.il."   ('jU^t
the ColuinbiaiiL rUti.1 <»tf by ultnig u*
"ihe »'Ifciui uli Bill flfcvt the ImhI io for<il>(n
cimUltiU (Do you Know by tbe w»;
Kdilor, who ire Crocker, fct».nf©r«i
way, !
wi-lH
5Vi
tinjit'-u;) wlio'ini^ht Imvu umiI the c<>»! ttxreu
vl thi Lilaetf no -wi to otyfil* them ui
ftivcjribly ffr th«i Ji»a<lii^ l^cili'^Ul.wHy,'
v.ii-1 after runeTi«MeirtR«hiit iMvaii'linf; pMe*
df ni.urMiiUijU he ttihl, iu ilraftaug the hill,
(tho  infitnoui    ftettlanciit    bill)   "we  nr»*
UIVINii   Tni'LASll   TO   ONE   OT    OUhSKLVM.
Ml* could nnt uf course with his ].nri).ii.<1
tvyei tluc.rn in the nilroud loutract thu
iiuignilictnt uunipi of Crocktf Stanford and
Huntington, but one or two false coinn, with
a little Fustre and no weight such in Kobert
i>uiM.iiuir, iohi. Itry.ieu aud Jauiua
DuBimuit — ni€4i uf itxaw, coinnajatively
iTH'ikin'g two of whom are u»ea a« men:
dumifiicH, and an the j-a with which the
juggUr tiotsa bin tuin.h.c ng^jug, Uitie
■mart fellows, he ha« discv>\*f>reti7 "will
manage thu whuW 1-uumuia,' uivl, naturally
enough, nricratfl the coal store*, or s«ll tb-Tu
in a mumicr  must likely to luit  Um\i alien
t>rincipaU. who it appear! ftlrntljh imbofly
inowa it, have to bo OMiitmlwed l-eforu tlie
terminus U fixed at Victoria! Mr. Rolison'i
picture of a tunnel with a creature hai.v
white Hs-i.r nwiuh and all t 'uinam an leaning ovcrtliK entrance with the legend Jiaio-
teu across his bark "holding tbia for posterity," is terribly grand in iu conception and
faithful In its delineation. Only a wirndcr-
fully endowed generative mittf. could produce
such it, beautifully mixed hrngfl "Wc
would best twrvepoaterity.'" Mr. Hnhftongovs
on to sfty "by dfivrrlt/ping; our piotwutop
portiinity—uut by hoarding our iiittioual
wealth aa the imntr hoaxda lus gold. J.ut us
take away that tigure from the shaft (v'oci-
focates the political hnrlenuiiij aud let us
i.]min that mine?" "Certainly," say they all.
Let lb, Utiiiiaiuan wado lagVt iu; why kue]>
Ufa vahing! TnfniprOfe the* golden moments ot opportunity aud catch the good
that is within our ler.ch ia the greatest art of
bm~Rob»mn .'rusoe hi bis flifrbta of fnrrcy,
hMtU0O0wdt|d«. llu and hia wtlh-agui ^ liine
hatched a plot to oet bold of tn« public
mango ami luck it, leaving tbe riml for posterity, while the people ot this country—
the explorer ami small carHtnlitfts — who
wiuld aak for an opportunity to begin ns
I'.iiiMinuir^Mi. ybo have long waited tbo
privilege kuA Who have a life interest in
opfniug thu coal arc deprived of the power
to ti< qnire a small proportion of it. Thu
curiit-1 Settlement liiil is intended to create
a right, the 'eitiitencc of whieh annuls the
first : ■ .Wt of all—the right of tho people to
thu Inii-ls and mihkhalu and to be fed mainly
from them—ft right which is to be tbo da-
leetabh) creatur6*bf Mr. Robgon supplanting
and lifiiu' employed to tbe exclusion of the
white man. Thu C'bineao and their iimAping
employer*, only will reap the "untold
benefits" whilo the poor hardworking loyal
citizen, already over-laden with biudenaof
rc'strlcted freedom, will have ailditioual
weight to keep him down, This 1s a terrible
commentary upon Reipoiiaiblo (iovcrnment
—upon govorumeut by tlie people. I wuh 1
could more strongly remind people of their
rights and stimulate them to resent encroach-
ments? Tho Hilly nouseitaee and accumulatefj
absurdity and trash uttered by Mr. ROMon*.
which the country is eagely (Ukod to accept
as "a sample of tho Oov^fnint-ut's position,"
shows clearly enough that such a govern*
mental we- aro.afllictod with (from which
let us all petition in tho languago of tho
terminaUva payer of tho Church litany) id
cmhuer! with — u«idier sense of it* duty
•ti'MtA iu KlUance witn it* .....«, *._*^
organization, concocting Buhemes Ly which
the peonle aro to ha deluded and the province
wantonly impoTcnnhcd, If the ftoVer-
moot Organs have any Claim to infallibility
it may scorn like uilking to the East wind to
further protest against the outrage of a legislature bequeathing the people's horitsgii to
whomever it may think tit; but it will be a
uiatvul if the people do not uooncj: or later,
break out in open rebellion IHihst so
^'rievoul a wrong. Thia matter of xakiso
a ciwt o'f half tho Island to fokiiom Oapit-
ALI8W, and to a turbulent headstrong political part irnii. is too imitortaut to hope for any
respite fn»m a discussion of it, nor imi.-it tho
mistaken or bought zealoti of Mnvorot.Y—
fourteen firm friffttla of hie, who aided in
the presentation to l(is Satanic Majesty, bu
forgotten. Their action will be remembered,
pointed. »t and denounced In the far off
future as abominable, dangerous, execrable
monstrous, pernicious -and villainoua and
themselves tmht throught of as traitors.—
Nanaimo fret Prest.
ANTI—MONOPOLY.
GENBRAL NBWS ITKM8.
wonder is that* it was not put in hands long
before this; but it has become, quite indis
pensible.    -
KaUA Eutaix BiiOKiR.—Wo take great
pleasure in calling tbe attention of our reahV
"*t^.rt the, new advertisement of Mr. C. Di
^i4^»»l«t»te broker, New Westminster.
Mr. Hand has always taken a great interest
tHijKjl'fJrt Moody, and began-trrinveBt in ttfwn
lots there before a stake was driven. He is
thoroughly conversant with the "lay" of the
land, and parties from a distance may rely
on his judgment. He haa recently VisltecV
Seattle and Portland, arid, if rumor be correct*: several citizens of those places have
beepme heavily interested in Port Mo0dy,
chiefly through bis Instrumentality.
BRrc* iTMtt.—ivir. J. E. Insley, lately of
1    the-Colonial Hotel,  Now Westminster, has
taken  the   Blair House, better known as
Clarke's rtotel, which he Will open on Man.
. ) aUjtnex-... .Murchie'slargoitwo-story build-
ing, adjoininffAnnand'e, tsso f»> advanced
as now to -p**« the finest show on  CUrke
street 'Jlie nnloaxhrig of the  "Storay
"Petrel is delayed by the bad weather.
-   ■     [sVrrjifr^o MavinlaB^aua«4ifta-.j
TiW Hkws,*Bakcr rasha'.is at, guakim,
.. JWUfyyring to.rescue tho garrison at KW-
ititsni. f ..At Dromore, Ireland, large bojdies
of Orangemen and nationalists attempted to
kola meetings at a short distance from each
other-, tbe result was a great desl of fighting,
.  in which'aome  were killed and a number
wounded A   collision   occurred on tho
-e*wtaWajVu«ftr Toronto, K% wliidh 25 persons
were "kilied and a largo number injured. Tho
.*$**• at Use.ooUisbia was horrible; the crjish-
TJcTTtfid ■maimed wwe-^^^^aaivy case*, scalded
aad burned.. Jtaklt* aud Loe aro expected at Via+jurjjik.  ^rtie'"Coloiv3t haa.
'4**jboYered  s.  ufiMHiSs «,  Nicola   Vallev,
whttw' H   Htase* au. Mislf was kicko! to
d&ath by the Indliirr Agent The tjher-
]    momster at"^'1»^ri|»eg»arks 45 deg. b^low
faW^UcwoJ.rjOAiOYA.O.leiU   .    .
Wt^sbj*m.*j xitsl
Some facta communicated by an informor
havo led to a reopening'of tbe inquiry into
the murder of Lord Mount-Morrea, in Ireland, three years ago. The persona principally concerned are raid to be iu the United
States,
A uenevolentdtiolrmi/oldman obtained the
simiiiturOB of_ Illinois farmers to petitions
asking tbe legislature" t<» tax church prrt-
perty tho same a-- other property, and transferred them to promissory notes*
It is a very unsatisfactory sign of the times in France that more money is being
drawn out than put Into the banks. Thus,
for the week ending Nov. 24 in Paris, 740,-
067 franoa Were depolitetf 'and 1,161,267
withdrawn.
I The total onmber of sailing vessels of all
the world is 48,704, gauging 30,647,377 tons
Of these more" than a third carry the English
Hag, and less than a twentieth that of France,
which ranks seventh, being below America,
Italy, Qernmny, and Ruraia,
The Thames Is about to have a,second
tunnel. The Severn resents the attempt at
a tunnel by periodically flooding, out and
drowning the operators, the Mersey tunnel
je rapidly btwoining a fact, and the projectors of the Humber tunnel promise success.
In the matter of music the English and
most other European nations are (far behind
the Teutons. According tostatistica recently published, there are 300 towns iu the
German empire possessing orchestras and
choral sociotics that give concerts ia the
season.
The expenso of tlto war on which France
entered wfien she undertook, in 18*0, to
march on Berlin is now declared to be
$1,727,000,000. Ao the war begivh in August
and ended in January, the cost to France
was nearly ten millions a day, bostdea the
loss of Alsace and Lorraine.
There is a Jewish penman in Vienna who
writes 400 Hebrew letters on one grain of
wheat. In order to furnish tbo Emperor
with satisfactory evidence of bis extraordinary skill, he has written tho Jewish- prayer
for tha, imperial family on the narrow edge
of an ordinary visiting card.
A sevaa-storied hotel on the American
principle, with 250 bod and Bitting rooms, is
now building on the Strand, oppoaito tho
new Palaoie of Justice, ltefore long the new
Law Courts, will be encircled !>y a multitude
of hotels, ooccrte,!" 6n tho site of the slums
that now cluster round them.
Lord Palmcrston seldom gave himself real
rest eaoep* when be bad a cold. He would
then alLMf Urn self a holiday, to be spent by
tho ihw wis taw armchair with a novel* the
m.irrt'timiAtatiwUel the better. Disraeli had the
aaitiB- SKsoqr. sks4. wiien wearied, went donn
to Uu^iiuirffca with, a gile. oX ^\'ciicli. uc\ els.
-„*a^al     Vtaiii     \%*t
fl"I"lJilTr1T;"|- the IWis Utaripli last
f-ul« lists be«*u »" iit*U.Ba.i iw <a yrar's impri
liocntveait Slid a line 4*1 fifty irai*oa, apd is *l»<>
.*otrtr» lied to d« fruy the t-rpmiM (t ad.eitis
ill*; the judgment iu  a doieu Freucb juur-
In the Queen agt. Holmes, lately heard
Knk'lttA l>y trt« *t€5aort for Crafen CWs
■etw-rvajl,'' it waadf. id*d tltat a fajae Bre-
teace *i> i\-preBent4ti<>n fua<lo .i a| ;. tt--r
mailed H Knjplnnd and flMiT^redabrnad may
c-nitiUitf *t eriiuio*l rrfffrs in Knchmd,
and u.ua«iju«jitly a oouvicUun at ISotUug-
ham waa coftNrw.Su
In August tbe Town Clerk of Bootle, U
verj»yy., einbsUeulcii. *Jinade tracks," and
committed suicide; and Bow Mr. 1'hifps, ju
Dii>r I'artoer in a la/ge Liveftraol tirm, and
•1 notice of the Pea* e at fioot!e, has dmaapear-
««l, btalw, it n aaid, niw •2.ri0,*J-J*i. i here
hit*, l/tico an uieejdiui.eJ auiouiiL vi this sort.
of thing in England* lately.
Lord KoBsinore, who$M eomndssion as >
Justice of the Peace has lately b*nn saapen
ded ou account of tlie part b* played in ai
Orange deuiontttratioo in Ireland, aueceedtMl
a brother kdU-d by a stcepluehaae accident.
He waa .'IO, ami man h d to tbe daughter bud
coheiress uf a air. Maylur, ftrmerty a banker
at Liverpool and immcuaely rich. He is an
Knglisb as well as Irish peer.
Many oftiie Prniiian oflioers have for a
lung time been learning Huts-Lai), and what
is oulh-d the lUlroad reviment is now study-
iiiifj it. Thau kin.v* ledge of French was
found very convenient in 1870-72, and one
never knows when a language may come in
usefully.
A man of thu name of Colas, who had the
mom.iHily ui rat killing in Purls, has just
died. Ik uj»*'d to ftjed eurlusiAely on the
produce of h.», spoi-t. Kight or ton Hmtt
already he had nearly o»«*•! of indigestion;
this time he expired uftrr a heavy BMU if
rats 1" fors the Qoctor could be ealled in.
Notices have been sirvod on the tenants
of the Marqni* of Wnteiford'h WiekloW estates drniandnig an Increase of rent, in some
eases amounting to SO per t,< nt. The tenants
will take tlie casaj into the Land Court.
The MurpHS, since his hunting was interrupted, has ceased to reside iu   Ireland.
An uxpurt (In a London MiU'cane) luUdy
btatcd tlmt pencil marks ruboed out revive
wheh the texture of the paper returns to its
Uorn.al condition. The existcuce of these
marks proved nii'Stemhait.ismii^ in the case
in ijiieation. The boaton five, too, proved
chat pencil writing was more enduring
than ink.
Hollow Hteel tdiftfting, whieh has como
Very generally into use in Europe, even for
such heavy work as steamship propeller
shafts, ih found to very much lessen the
weight in proportion to the dcereancd
strength. It appears, for example, tlpit a
ton-inch shaft, with u bole four inches in
diameter, has Its weight reduced sixteen per
cent,, v. ith a luus of only 2.50 per cent, of
sti-eugth.
An interustinq torpedo uxporixnent was
made a few days ago iu the roadstead of
T'onloii, in l-'rauce. 'ihe object was to ascertain whether a torpedo containing seven
hundred kilograms o^ powder, which had
bei-n submerged fur six nn>iith>, was damaged by itsrprotraetod contact with tho water.
Au explosion was readily ell'eeted by the
electric current, proving that vitality was
mnintened, but whether the destructive po
wer was unimpaired is not  determined.
The Council General of the Seine have
ordered the removal of tho large portraits of
the Bmparor Napoleon 1. and id theLmpreeb
from the Court ot the Tribunal of t 'oninieree,
The same are to be (ulegated to the mniiici
pal cellars in the Boulevard Morlaud, where
are stored oute famous portraits und stiitues
oi Louis XV'., Louis XVHL, Charles X
Louis Philippe., Napoleon III., and other
lloyal perabiiage. ww^i fiuin p*&4\%*
aoalt] nk>»i »i .urlouB periods been put out
ot sight.
The conqueror of Kordofan, says Father
Dieht], the Apstrian missionary, is ahput 40
years old, tall, and of eoppery-red complexion. An emissary sent to iuten-iew him
sonic time ago found the Mai id i at Abba,
surrounded by 500 or 600 followers, all of
them nuked, with iron chain belts round
theirs waists, and with broad drawn swords
iu their hunds. The MahdJ occupied i
sed seat in their midst," and in hi.i right hand
he held a prophet's btaiF. The three marks
by which lie know the Egyptian Govern
ment to bo false to Islam wire— (1) that they
allowed Christians to have churches of their
own: (2) that they afforded them protection;
and ('.}) that the Government levied taxes.
There Is no politi- un the weather, though
there may bo in this weather. A Blade
representative among other things looking
to the mildness of the present weather so far
intuitively makes a few comparisons. There
is a legem! with the old resident tha*. is
worth remembering, and it is as a winter
commences in this country so will it continue. The winter of 1870—77 in this
country commenced with a blizzard of the
most fierce character al>out the middle of
November. The greatest velocity of the
wind as recorded thenTh the U. S. observatory at Pembina waa 7-1 miles per hour
during the height of the blizzard, and tho
thermometer during the high wind ' pressure
starbiug at 2*5 above zero fell a± iu tbe
space iff a few hqurs, a range of temperature
aud rvUnl velocity th*it had no previous or
bad no subsequent record. The "mild
winter ot 77—78 followed and tbat winter
waa romarkable for the white frost which
prevailed then. It was a mild winter all
over tbo continent,, and though the present
winter may not be a mild one, so far in the
sense continental, it is certainly a mild one
here, and if it is called an open winter we
think the term is not incorrect.—Buandon
Blade.
Slavery is not extinct throughout the British possopsion.i antl protectorates, a8 many
imagine, but exists in a settlement distinctively English, Sarawak, on the JUlaud of
Borneo. The little kingdom of Sarawak was
founded by Sir .lames Brooke in 1843jand is
said to be one of the most interesting expe-
rimonts in Knglish colonization in the history
of tho world. Its population of Chinese,
Europeans, aborigiues and emigrants amounts
to about '250,000 men, Women and children,
aa average of. about seven persons per square
mile. The present monarch of tne principality is Uajah Brooke, a nephew of the founder, who reports his aiiairs, financial, commercial and administrative, in as flourishing
a condition as any colony under the British
flag. The great volcanic eruption of Kra-
katoa, 700 miles off, mode itself felt at Sarawak. Arrangements have been made, we
are pleased to announce, for the entire abolition of slavery at the end of 1S83, sothatby a
gradual effacement in five years it will have
oeased to exist. Any slave con purchase his
own freedom for a sum varying from the
maximum of $15. Hitherto slaves have not
cared to boy their freedom, but now that it
can be purchased with the proceeds of a few
moutlw work, tbey ore becoming alive to
the advantages of liberty, and coming forward in goodly 'numbers to purchase their
fre«dinn. Tft.s process, whtch seems slow to
•us, ia, when the conditions are considered,
the wiser eourae. A decree of abolition
launched in tbe midst of a people accustomed
for centuries to slavery, might do vastly
more harm than good. The imports and
exports of this portion of the island amount
toW,Q:H>,000'ayeai\ They have coal and
other minerals, raise' enOngh sago to feed the
world, and have also large crops of pepper
andgamolr. That a prosperous English Oom-
ma-iity has been built np without the assistance oT the Imperial Government is a fact
worthy of the attention ot those engaged in
discussing the future destiny of the as yet
unekunoa islands of the WorJd.   UamiUon
WOODS & TURN-R,
LAND SURVEYORS
Real Estate Agents,
Conveyancers & Accountants.
PORT MOODY LOTS
Foil  BAIaE
MONEY   TO   LOAN.
COLUMBIA ST.. NEW WESTMINSTER.
Th. PlEACEfcCO.,
-   iMn.lrrtH. A*U UBALtat ■■ —
UARUW ARB.STOVES, RANGB
PUMPS   IRON PIPES AMD FITTINtt,
MIKTO, OILS, &G,
ALL.   I HI MTHT    OHIlI.lt*   PROMPTLY
BZKCCTKD.
Kyle&
Tilton,
NEW WESTM1NBTEB, B. 0.
IMPORTERS,  i
And Wholesale Dealers in
COLUMBIA ST., NEW WESTMINSTER.
POGUE L BROTHERS,
CONTRACTORS
—TOR—
Clrarlnir l.nd, (l.kl.ii Raad. A Strssls,
and UK.NEKAI. WOUKs Maltrd to
th. w.nll.1. Ploa*cr 'Iowa.
SATISFACTION  GUARANTEED.
tl Haul, Livery Stalilo, and Ulackamith
Shop in iirofjrtss, ami will soon be ready for
accommodation ol customers.
apos&T Moomr, ». o.
NEW WESTMINSTER
Soda-water Manufactory
ALEX. PHILLIPS & SON
CAN SUPPLY THE CITY AND VICINITY with .^oda-watcr (ilain and
swest), Ulngor Beer, Ciujjer Ale, SarsAua-
rilla; Lemon, Raspberry, and all other
Syrups; Essence of Ginger; Cuck-tail Mixtures, etc.
Okijibs   yKim   TKa Coustry   Carsivlly
ExECX'TID,
Groceries!
8UGA1W, 8YRUPH,
MOLASSES, VIKEOAE,
TEAS AND COKFKEB,
DRIED IFIR/UTTS
PLUMS,      PEUKE8,     APPLES,
RAISINS,     CURKANT8.
CRACKERS, CAKES,
PILOT BREAD,
YEA.ST POWDER,
(Cook's Friend and P.4M.)
CORN-STARCH, HOP8,
EXTRACTS (Assorted,)
CREAM OF TARTAR,
SODA, 8ALERATUS,
LYK, WASH 1 NO POWDER,
BLUING, STARCH,
WASHING SOAPS,
TOILET SOAPS,
COARSE AND FINE SALT,
PICKLES, OLIVE OIL,
MUSTARD, KETCHUP,
PEPPER SAUCE,
CURRY POWDER,
CELERY SALT,
JAMAICA GINGER,
SUGAR OF LEMON
CANDY, AND
ALL KINDS OF NUTS.
LEA & PERRLNS' SAUCES.
O? H E
COLUMBIA ST., NEW WESTMINSTER.
DOUGLAS & DEICHTON.
Saddlers & Harness-makers!
Every Article in their Line
Always in Stock.
THE   TRADE   SUPPLIED.
Front St    -    YALE  B. C
Weeks
-AND-
Foster,
ESTATE
-AT-
PORT MOODY.
IB.   O.
OFFICE:
With the N. W. & P.
M. Telephone Co.
Lots offered in every
portion of the town-
site; also a few desirable Estates in
the immediate vicinity of Port Moody.
ROYAL SIT*'
Mills Co*
Take this opportune
ity of thanking thei**
numerous patrotas for*
past favors, atid re-'
spectfully ask a continuance of the same1
in future. Having oif
hand a large stock of
Rough and Dressed
M
CANNED
60008I
JAMS, JELLIES,
PIE FRUITS,
TABLE FRUITS,
PEACHES,
PINE APPLES,
BLUEBERRIES,
TOMATOES, CORN,
ASPARAGUS,
STRING DEANS
GREEN PEAS,
LOBSTERS, OYSTERS,
SARDINES, MACKEREL,
SALMON,  CODFISH,
CORNED BEEF, BRAWN,
LUNCH TONGUE,
DEVILLED MEATS,
BAKED BEANS,
PIGS' FEET,
PORK k BEANS,
ASSORTED  BOILED and ROAST
MEATS, Etc., Etc.
PROVISIONS!
FLOUR, FEED, OAT-MEAL, CORN
MEAL, BUCKWHEAT FLOUR,
CRACK'D WHEAT, GRAHAM
FLOUR, PEARL BARLEY,
SPLIT PEAS, MACARONI,
VERMI0ELLI.TAPIO0A
SAGO. RICE (No. 1 * 2,)
HAM, BACON, LARD,
CHEF.SE,   BUTTER,
SALMON    BELLIES,
MACKEREL,   SALT
HERRING    IN   HALF
BARRELS   AND    KITS,
BMOKED    HERRING   IN
BOXES,    POTATOES    AND
ONIONS,    ETC.,    ETC,,   ETC.
Wooden and Willow Ware
TUBS, PAILS, BROOMS, WASHBOARDS, BRUSHES, BASKETS,
ROLLING-PINS,    CLOTHES-
PINS, WRINGERS, LEMON
SQUEEZERS,  WOODEN
MKASURES   (Patent,)
STEP LADDERS,
BROOM   STANDS,
ETC., ETC.,  ETC.
SMOKERS' ARTICLES.
TOBACCO, CIGARETTES,
CIGARETTE PAPER,
PIPE STEMS,
CIGARETTE HOLDERS,
CIGAR HOLDERS,
CIGAR CUTTERS,
CIGAR LIGHTERS,
MATCH SAFES,
MATCHES,
POUCHES, Etc
Cigars from $27 to #50 per M
Coal Oil, Matches, Shoe Blacking,
Stove Polish, Straw Paper, Pnper,
Paper Bags, Second-hand Grain Bags,
Cotton Twine, Candle Wick, Can
Openers, Demijohns.
PLAYING  CARDS
SPICES—Whole and Ground, in Jib,
Jib,  lib, 2Jlb and 5ft Tins.    Dried
Herbs, Jib tins; Citron Peel (Scotch)
in 7fti tins; Sultana Raisini
liquorsr
(Iii bulk) CANADIAN RYE,' AMERICAN B0URBON.BRANDY,
SHERRY and PORT WINE.
(In case,) AMERICAN BOURBOtf,
BRANDY, GIN, CALIFORNIA
RED AND WHITE WINES,
CLARET, CHAMPAGNE. OREGON CIDER, and MILWAUKEE
BEER
of various kinds and
grades, they are pre-'
pared to give
Jargaup fox fyi\\
for the balance of the*
year.
They have also to*
announce that the/
have opened a branch1
of their business at
PORT
MOODY t
and will keep a fall*
supply of
Lumber*
Sawn # Split
Doors,
Windows.
Mouldings*
and all the necessary*
furnishings for buildings at the Terminus.
Parties who intend1
building there can
count on obtaining
all the requisites for'
that purpose oa the*
ground.
The fr'anai*aK>
SAW
MILL
is now in operaflon1
under the superintendence of MR. A.
HASLAM, and witf
keep'a fall supply o4
DOORS,
WIIDOWS, &G,
ADL' ORDERS' VMS .RECEIVE*
PROMPT ATTENTION.
JOHtfHBltofr*;
MAUAOstsT''
k. at.
—m

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