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Port Moody Gazette Dec 29, 1883

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Array gort $g*odg tertte.
njsjLUMajD
EVERY 8ATURDAY.
■vascsrmoii srr ran,
TWO DOLLARS PER ANNUM
IXTABIAM.T IN   A1)VA*C».
AH gsassmassioatioua addraatad to
r. a. KAMILTOH. User,
Port Moody.
0 tw thai fhJAiU)iA» Offiea, New Weatmln
star, will revive proanpt attention.
J. A. CLARKE,
PORT   MOODY.
Office:—Telephone Building,
CLARKE STREET.
P. 8. HAMILTON,
Bauristkr-atI.aw,   No-ra.Br PCBI.10,
Souorroa aw» Amnunrr, Bbas, Hmma
Ao«!II      AND      COMV«TANC«H,
VI->arr»y fitxsnH.    -   -   Port ^Coody.
BUILDING LOTS FOR 8ALK IN
every section of Port Moody. Also,
Suburban Lota, by tha Acre, immediately
adjaceat to tbe Port Moody surveyedTown-
site.
Lands for sale on the North aide of, and
having water frontage on, Port Moody
Harbor, finely situated and exceedingly
valuable.
Also, Farm Lands of snnerior quality and
on favorable terns, in New Westminster
District.
Carefully prepared Maps and Plana exhibited, and the fullest information furnished, at Mr. Hamilton's office.
.A.,   NOON,
Carpenter & Builder.
FlTTIHO  UP OF StoBBS AND  OFHCKB  A
Specialty.    All Kinds op Jobbino
Promptly Attkndcd to.
port uoody, b. c.
Port Moody Seminary,
MURRAY 8TREET.
TERMS can be had on application to
  MR8. HE8LOP.
Hong Sing,
BAKERY UAUNDRY
Qur.HN Street, Port Moody.
ZPIOISTEIEI'R,
SHOE    STORE.
Quick* Strkct, Poavr Moody.
"VST. O. ^TVUlTe
•\VISHKS TO INFORM THE PUBLIC
I? that ho ii now thoroughly estah-
K.ihcd in business at the Terminus of the (.'.
1'. it., Antl in pre pa re »i to make and repair
.loot* and Shoes nt exceedingly low rates.
Real Estate for Sale
PORT MOODY!
The Thompson Property!
N«w Wuithinstzr District.
LOT   369,   CROUP    I.
'fBB SUBSCRIBE!! OFFERS FOR SALE
■ nn most favorablo terms, Fifty Acres
of the North-Hast corner of the above Lot,
tha whole Fifty Acres, or one half of the
sains, at tho purchaser's option.    ALSO,
8IXTY-EIGHT
Port Moody Town Lots!
Adjoining and immediately to the North of
the above, comprising a part of District Lot
375, Group I., only twenty-nine chains from
the shore of the harbor. No building lots
more eligible than these are purchaseable at
Port Moody.
Apply personally to the subscriber, at his
ouVc OB th j premises,
GEORGE THOMPSON,
dlS Proprietor.
PIONEER STORE
Qurkn Street, Port Moody.
D-B.6BANT  - - - Proprietor.
Trsmj-ini eo3xntsua.tl3r on. •hanie.
DRY   GOODS, CLOTHING,
BOOTS A SHOES, HATS St. CAPS,
BLANKETS!
HARDWARE, GLASSWARE,
GROCERIES, &c.
Having imported a large stock of
Ready-made Clothing
Direct from the East, I am now prepared to
•upply customers at prices that will
DEFY COMPETITION!
taTOrders will be promptly attended to
and satisfaction guaranteed.
Port Moody
SHINGLE MILL
DONT FORGET TO GO TO THE PORT
Moody Shingle Mill, where the best
of Shingles can In had at tbe lowest prices,
Wholesale or retail.
A supply kept conatatffly on hand.
JOHN" B, TIFFIN.
The Doable tibust we saw ia (ialiria.
It was In the depth of winter when
I, then residing iu the north-east of
Hungary, received a letter of Invitation from an old friend of mine, asking me to pay him a vi-.it in Ualicia,
with the riew of helping him in some
matters of burtiiiiss*.
We, were Englishmen, both of us—
had been schoolfellows together at
Westminster; but in direct opposition
to the classical teaching of our school,
Waiters and I had developod a strong
taste for physical science. Finally
after wasting much valuable time,
(Jreelr and Latin gave us up, and we
were allowed to devote ourselves seriously to chemistry. In furtherance of
these studies, my friend and I were
together again at the German University of Marburg; so the boyish friendship of early years was yet more closely
cemented by later intimacy
Unfortunately our Btudiew at Marburg were interrupted—in fact, as far
as w« were concerned, put an end to
—by the breaking out of the Franco-
(lernian war. In the separation which
ensued, Walters and I had kept up a
very intermittent and fitful correspondence ; still wo never lost sight of
each other entirely, and had often
mode plans for meeting - all of which
hitherto, liod fallen to the ground.
Walters, I am afraid, had been cast-
about rather aimlessly—sometimes in
Iliiliemiii, sometimes in Kussia, or elsewhere. He liad abandoned the pursuit of analytical chemistry and adopted the profession of a mining engineer.
By the death of his father a year ago,
he had come into a few thousand
pounds (this he had told me by letter);
and I, in turn, had cautioned him
against speculating with the backbone
ot' his capital. To this sage advice he
made rejoinder that he was about to
make a colossal fortune. He was engaged in sinking petroleum-wells in Ga-
liuin, where, extensive deposits of this
mineral oil had recently been discovered. But this was not all; his last
idea was to erect a refinery, with all
the newest improvements, for reducing
the crude petroleum. There were
some points on which he thought my
technical knowledge on certain matters would assist him—"Would I not
act the part of a friend and go to him,
as the distance was not more than a
day's journey 1"
It happened that, owing to tho
severe weather, my own work was at a
standstill; so I wrote at once to say he
might expect me at 0 , his nearest
station, on the Wednesday following.
1 had a drive of ten miles in my sledge
to the railway on as cold an evening as
I ever remember. My journey was by
night, for the corresponding trains
served better, and I hud to change en
route.
I was not sorry when at last the
night wore away, and daylight appeared through the frosty window-panes.
At length our station was reached;
and letting down the gloss, I thrust my
head out, looking aliout eagerly for
Walters. He was there all told, but
so encased in furs that I should not
have been able to pick him out if he
had not recognized me (I believe I was
the only first-class traveller), and
rushed up at once to welcome me in his
old hearty manner.
After a cup of hot coffee, we set off
in his sledge, drawn by a couplo of
small Hungarian horses—perfect little
beauties—which took us like the wind
across the plain, over frozen ditch™,
snow-wreathed hedges, and gullies
levelled up with snowdrifts.
"This is our finest time for travelling," said Walters, recovering himself,
after the nearest shave of an upset.
" Driving is delightful under these circumstances," he continued. " You
should see what our roads are when
they am three feet deep in mud or
dust: but I forget you know something
of that sort of thing in Hungary."
In somewhat less than an hour we
arrived at our destination—a long, low
building with overhanging roof, and a
few wooden Bhanties in the rear.
Neighbors there seemed to be none, nor
had we seen a human being in all our
drive. The dogs gave notice of our
approach ; and at the instant we drew
up, a rough-looking servant opened the
door, seized on my portmanteau; flung
it into the hall, stripped us of our rug,
jumped ihto Walter's vacated seat, and
before I had time to look round he was
driving off to the stables.
The front door opened into a hall,
the size of an ordinary room, but so
encumbered with miscellaneous articles
that one had to navigate through the
lumber. The kitchen was to the right.
I had a glimpse of its smoky interior,
and a consummately ugly old hag presiding over the fire and stewpans.
"Follow me this way," said Walter,
pushing open a door on the other side,
which gave us admittance to a living-
room of cosmopolitan character; odds
and ends from everywhere, with "heaven's first law" conspicuous from its absence. "There's your bedroom beyond,"
he added, pointing to a farther apartment. I found out later that this was
my friend's own room, which he made
over to me for the time being—sleeping
himself in an odd comer under the
roof.
A table spread for breakfast in the
sitting room was a welcome sight, as I
was as ravenous as a wolf; and shortly
we sat down to a very decently cooked
meal.
"You we I am roughing it here at
pn-seiit; but the next time you come
and si-e me, I expect to be able to offer
you very different accommodation. I
tell you what it is, Henderson, I have
hit on a good thing at last—sure to
make a fortune ; indeed I do not see
why it should not be a gigantic fortune."
"Glad to hear that you think so well
of the affair; but explain your project
more fully, will you, old fellow r
He then proceeeed to tell me that
vast deposits of earth-wax existed in
Ualicia, equal in quality to similar deposits in Pennsylvania. The fact had
been known some time—indeed the
peasants had long used the ozokerite
for greasing their cart-wheels; bat it*
commercial importance had only lately
been realised, Crowds were flocking
to the district from all parts, mostly
poor ignojant people, who were utterly
without adequate knowledge. Bat even
in this haphazard sort of way, the wells
that have been sunk gave enormous
yields of petroleum. Walters proposed
setting up a refinery for treating the
erude petroleum in a practically scientific manner, and it was about this
business generally that he wanted my
advice. The notion was a good cru<-, I
would not deny it; but witii my less
sanguine temperarrcnt 1 saw certain
difficulties in the way—or, as Walters
put it. I made lions in the path.
V, e spent the best part of tho morning looking over plans and discussing
the general bearings of the question.
Walters promised he would drive me
over some day to see the district where
the greatest number of pits had been
sunk. "The place is called Na
Przedzie, or the 'New World'; and,"
said he, "I do not think In the habitable globe there Is a place that can
compete with it for dirt and disorder.
The very scum of creation are gathere
here, all trying to make money as fas
as they can. An ethnologist would
have a good opportunity of taking
notes. There are Semitic and Slavonic
types by the score, to say nothing of
Magyars, Armenians, Turks, Greeks,
and gipsies,—all cursing, swearing,
bargaining, aud screaming, every one in
their own lingo. The smell of petroleum and garlic will fix that place in
your memory, I guess."
At this moment a letter was brought
to Walters. I thought when he saw
the handwriting he looked surprised ;
and as soon as he had read the few
words in contained, he said, "I find I
have to drive about six miles to meet
some one on business—now, directly.
Are you too tired to go with DM 1 Do
what you like."
"Oh, I'm up for going ; give me five
minutes, and I'm your man,"—and so
saying I went oil'to my bedroom,
1 do not think the five minutes could
have elapsed before Walters was
knocking at the door to ask if I was
not ready. He always was the most
impatient animal in creation.
In our drive we passed several
groups of modern shanties, erected near
petroleum-pits, where there was also
evidence of working machinery of a
rough-and-ready sort. Finally, we came
to u hamlet, or straggling village, evidently ofpreozokerite times ;the last house
was an inn—a building of considerable
size, with several workshops under the
same roof, as ] discovered later. We
drove through an arched entrance into
an interior court, round three sides
of which ran a rather picturesque
raised gallery with open lialustraeies.
There were several nondescript
vehicles about, but amongst them I observed a well-appointed aledgc and nice
little pair of grey horses.
"Henderson, do you mind waiting
a few minutes while 1 speak to some
one in here 1" He threw mo the reins
jumped out, and running up the few
steps to the raised gallery, disappeared
in a doorway, over which was the sign
of a bear. These sort of signboards
indicate a druggist's shop generally in
Eastern Europe; a lion or a bear is usually the animal selected as the presiding genius.
I got tired of sitting in the sledge;
so, beckoning some one to hold the
horses, I amused myself with peering
about the quaint old place. Nobody
took any notice of me, though there
were lots of people about. A woman
carried a screaming turkey, head downwards, across the yard, in the brutal
fashion of these parts; and a man took
the reeking carcass of a newly killed
calf also into the kitchen. A couple
of fellows were sawing up wood, and
then chopping it into small billets ;
they stopped their work to drive away
the dogs from a gipsy woman who had
just entered the court, The dogs always bark furiously at gipsies, no matter how often they see the same individual frequent the place. The gipsies
are really the parcel-carriers of the
country, but the canine guardians of
the house can never tolerate them.
Under the archway a group of wild-
looking Russniacks had squatted on
the ground: they wore sheep-skin
cloaks, leather thongs on their feet in
the place of shoes, and each man had
his formidable axe-headed staff. One
of their number, doffing his large slouch-
hat, had entered the kitchen to buy
some bread and a bottle of slivoviti.
These people are on the lowest rung of
the social scale, and would not think of
seating themselves in the common
room of the inn-. While I was drinking my glass of coffee and cognac, a
couple ot n d-huired, florid-conipUxioued
Jews entered asking for dinner, which
was served them at a small table apart.
These red Jews are a very peculiar
type; and are not unfrequent both in
fialicia and Hungary : they are unmistakably Semitic, not for a moment to
be confounded with the fair-haired
Slavonic people.
It was all very well studying varieties of the human race in a stifling atmosphere of smoke and garlic, amidst
abominations of dirt and disorder; but
I began to wonder what had become
of Walters. His few minutes meant
more than half an hour. I paid my
reckoning, and *enl off to look for him
at the sign of the bear. Tbe outer
door of the shop stood half open, and
entering, I found an old man behind
ihe counter, spectacles on nose, red cap
on head weighing out drugs for a small
fairy-lo iking child, whose wondering
eyes were fixed on the operations of tbe
old alchemist. It was not all my
sight became accustomed to the ill-
lighted place that I saw two people at
ihe father end of the long, low room,
seated at the table, on which were some
papers and writing materials.
"Oh, there you are! 1 was just coming to fetch you," cried Wallers, jumping up from his seat and advancing towards ii e At the same time, the
female figure opposite to him rose from
her chaii and turned my way. Owing
to the darkness, I could only make out
the fact that Walters' companion was
certainly not one of the sterner
sex.
"A nice little game you have been
playing me," I returned, speaking in
KngliBh, which I concluded would be
unintelligible to the young woman—
"a nice little game truly, keeping your
friend waiting in the cold, while you
were amusing yourself with one of the
damsel* of the country,"
"Henderson, you don't understand,"
said Walters, (peaking very quickly
and in some confusion. "The Countess
Kubinsky deisires me to present you
to her. Madam," he ftdded, turning to
the lady and bowing ceremoniously,
"allow me to intioduce the English
friend of whom I was just speaking—
Mr. Henderson."
He spoke in English; and the lady
who also greeted me in my own tongue
came forward, looking not a little
amused at my discomfbuie. She was
quite young, and exceedingly handsome
—it was light enough for me non; and
she spoke in a Bweet musical voice that
would have knocked one over in the
dark.
"You must not judge our poor country in this severe tiuie of winter, but
you must see how well the landscape
can smile in summer," she said, in reference to my being a stranger to this
part of '.he world.
Wh talked a little about ordinary
sul jects, and then the Countes collected together the papers which la
scattered on the table, and turning to
Walters, she said, "If it can be possible
the Count shall be made to see the
good chances of this affair; I will write
to you of my efforts. Now, gentlemen
I must go,—be so kind as to order my
sled lie."
Walters departed to obey her request, and I was left alone for a few
minutes with this very charming lady.
[ wished heartily that the business
could hive detained her half an hour..
1 would havediscussed any th ing under the
sun to rlicitrepliesfroiuthatsoftmusical
voice, with its lisping words of broken
English.
Walters was back again to announce
lhat the coachman was ready, before I
had any lime at all with tha pretty
Countess.
"Mr. Henderson, I hope you shall
[iay us a visit at our castle before you
leave this country," she said, looking
up in my face, while Walters^was placing her fur cloak round  her shoulde is.
Of course I made all proper and
civil speeches in answer to her hospitable wish. The next moment she
was sealed in the open sledge,—and
waving her hand in adieu, as the impatient horses dashed through the archway '*c saw no more.
"Now we must be off, Henderson;
I have some people to see before nightfall," said Walters, speaking as if 1
had been keeping him, forsooth!
When we emerged through the archway, we could only see tho Countess's
sledge appearing like a dark speck on
the white snow track. We turned the
other way, and were soon going across
country at our usual dashing speed.
"Now tell me all about your lovely
and mysterious Countess." I had
hardly addressed these words to my
friend, vheu over went the sledge,
tumbling us down into a ditch eight or
ten feet deep. The horses had only
stumbled in a soft snowdrift, and were
all right, and stood perfectly still, while
we picked ourselves up and righted tbe
sledge.
"These sort of mishaps are all in the
day's work," said Walters, as soon as
we were comfortably seated again.
"But you were just going to tell me
somtthing about the mysterious Countess when we had the upset,—tell me
now."
"There is no mystery," replied Walters, rather drily. "Her husband is a
landowner in the neighbourhood. He
is in money difficulties, like most of
the nobles of this country. He might
improve matters if be put hie shoulder
to ibe wheel; but he is proud, profligate
and obstinate. Tie Countess, poor woman, would gladly see their attars im
proved. The petroleum find gives him
a chance—if he has still any control
over bis property. But, from what 1
have learnt today, 1 strongly suspect he
is completely in the hands of his mortgagees, and his obstinacy is perhaps
only a cloak to disguise tbe real state
of his affairs. Like many Polish ladies
the Countess is tbe better man of business; it is a pity ahe has not more under her control. Chance circumstances
made us acquainted, and I have it iu
my power lo offer hec useful advice and
some assistance."
"Very kind of you Walters, seeing
what tort of man the Count is; but virtue is its own reward."
"I have the greatest respect foi the
Countess," be replied, curtly.
"I wish I had the tpportunity of
greatly respecting such a lovely Countess," said I laughing.
"Do you see that ridge yonder,
crowned with fir-trees!" said Walter-,
pointing with his whip. "Well, I am
going over there to look up an ex-
plonng-party, who have chanced upon
some old pits, perhaps the earliest thai
• ere struck in tha world. 1 may perhaps join them in buying up the patch
of giouiiu, which I hear is going cheap.
I have had my eye on the place for
some time. I like the neighbourhood
of the pine-trees. It has come to be
remarked that where the hills are
covered with pine-forests, the subsoil is
impregnated with earth oil."
"That is an interesting fact, if true.
Has your experience led you to endorse
it?"
"Yes, certainly; and I fancy the Jews
than whom no people are more keen-
sighted, regard the fir-forests as in-
dictative of petroleum. There is a
Jewish company who have bought up a
whole tract of land, of little value, except what it might produce in ozokerite.
You remember that Maria Theresa is
said to have wept when she signed the
secret treaty that gave her the Polish
province of Gulicia, saying, 'She had
prostituted her honor and her reputation for a miserable, morsel of earth.'
Not so miserable, after all.''
"Yes I lemember; and I think the
circumstance gave occasion to the mot
of Frederick, when he sold, 'Elle pre-
nait toujours en pleurant toujours.' "
By this time we were approaching
>ome wooden shanties that marked the
close neighbourhood of the pits. Aa
we came nearer we saw an unusual number of people about, all seemingly in
g-eat excitement. We stopped the
sledge, when up rushed half-a-dozen
fellows, screaming out that the devil
hud been seen down in one of the old
pits, and that he was coming up feet
foremost. On inquiry it appealed that
two workmen had given the alarm, ft
seeuis that they had been lowered into
one of these disused pits, with a view
of repairing the limber-work; but no
sooner had they reached the bottom
than they signalled to be pulled up again.
On reaching the surface they were
pale as death, shaking all over, and declared they had never been so frightened in their lives, for they had seen
the devil coming out of the ground
with his feel foremost.
"I'll go and have a look at the devil,"
said Walters:. "One of you lend me
vi ur canvas suit And who will
volunteer to go with mcl Hero's a
florin for the first man who offers him
self,"
There was a dead silence; no one
came forward. Meauwhile Walters
threw off his coat and put himself into
the canvas hugs, looking as queer an
object as one could possibly see. I
had st first proposed going down wiih
him, but he absolutely declined my services, observing that I should probably
be of no use at all, for itrangcs are
efien affected in a most peculiar manner
by the fumeB if the petroleum, and become excited and pugnacious, losing all
rational control over themselves, It
would be all very well, as Walters said,
laughing, if the devil was really theft?
for me to pitch into; but supposing be
was not, my superfluous energy might
be exercised against Wallers himself.
I scouted the notion as simply ab
surd; but Walters, for this or for some
other reason not avowed, would not have
me, and going up to a young gipsy lad
who was standing at the outskirts of
crowd, he held up the florin to him,
and asked if he would accompany
him.
The gipsy said at once that be was
very ready to go. He dispensed with
the usual canvas suit; merely casting
aside a torn jacket, he stood almost
nude—and what a model he would have
been, wiih his shapely limbs!
"The gipsies are dreadful people—
tbey do not believe in the devil," said a
bystander to me. "Of course he's no
afraid;" and the speaker crossed himself, with a look of great disgust at the
unbeliever.
The kibble was by this time duly
fixed; Walters and the gipsy took their
places, and were slowly lowered into
the dark, oozy depths, amid the breathless excitement of the crowd, which by
this time had considerably augnretated.
The men at the pit's mouth were
ready to haul up at the first signal; but
no signal came. Five.ten, fifteen minutes elapsed—no sign fiom below. 1
confess I got anxious, fearing the effect
of noxious gases.
"You see tbe devil has got  them—
they'll never come to the surface again,"
observed a woman near me.
(To be Continued.)
DRUG STORE,
McbhaT Street, Pout Moodti
M. HESLOP, - - Proprietor*
A complete stock of
Drugs and Patent Medicines
(^Prescriptions carefully (TUpenaasi.
Pacific Boarding House,
Ci.ahka Ktbeet, Pom Mevsr.
GE0B6E AN.NASD • • Proprietor,
PARTIES VISITING POBT MOOD*
will find every convenience and •oar
fort at the above Hotel Meals at all hoursi
Charges moderate. dlSSm
MEEK BROS.,
Real Estate Brokers.
Citt and Farm Piioprktt FOR %*iA
AT   TUB TeRMIHUS   Or   TBS   OaJIAMAlf
Pacific Railway.
Best of reference.   Information willingly
given.
PORT ARTHUR, OUT,
PORT MOODY, B. «.
PORT MOODY FERRY!
R
Patrick Mcdonald
UN'S A FERRY, DAILY/ BETWEEN"
the end of the North Road and Caledonia Hotel pier, on arrival of the stagecoach from New Westminster, RETURNS
in the afternoon, punctually, in time for the
stage coach to New Westminster,
tarCharges moderate.     Freight  tarafnlr/
attended to.
11. I, CURTIS. «. CLARKE, 11. D.
M E DIC A L_ HA.LL I
D. S. CURTIS & CO.,
Direct Importers snd Dealers m
DRUGS AND
MEDICINES,
FASCY 600DS, TOILET ARTICLES,
Lamps and Lamp Goods, &c,
COLUMBIA   STREET,
NEW WESTMINSTER,   -   -   B. C,
(Next Door to the Colonial Hotel.)
Special facilities for the Jobbing Tradd
DOMINION
 il
COMPANY.
(LIMITED)
Richard St, New Westminster
Manufacturers and Dealers in
all kinds of
Rough # Dressed
LUMBEE!
Shingles,
Laths,
Pickets,
Doors,
Windows,
Mouldings,
Orders from the Country
Promptly Filled,
of quantity and cost  of  Assterial  for*
building   carefully   prepared
free of charge.
FIRST-CLASS
Grain-Edged Flsoring
A SPECIALTY.
A- MENNIE   -  -   -  Agent
PORT MOOD*".
LUMBERYARD
DbBM BEOS. & 00.,
KEEP A- FTJUV ASSORTMENT 0»
Rough and IDrensed
L VMM sat
J. A. CALSECK, Agent* fyt |3ut liuty ©n|tttt.
MTU1UUY, DlknfcMHKB M. JIB.
1
■
I
CHINESE IMMIGRATION
(I
The ineprasaWe CWnlW unesiimi
lias again, within a lew  tin)'*, rfespMd
iuelt   with   mi«mtii;cus  proportions,
upon Ihe notice ol our local legWalurr.
ll was very soon are! summarily dis, osc-d
ol, so far a» thai body has ihe po»cr o(
dealing *ilh the mat cr.     The  Rri'.ii-h
Columbian Assembly has resolved, by a
mainland vote, to memoraliie the Dominion Par iament lo impose restrictions upon Chinese immigration.     In
pursuing   this   course,   the   Assembly
doubtless, carry -with ihcm ihe feelings
of the people whom they represent, or
are supposed so to do;for there is probably no oilier question upon which ihe
people of ihis province are so nearly a
unit as upon this one of ihe admission of
more Chinese into our country.    Un
fortunately the settlement of this troublesome matter does not rest so ely with
the people of this province, or their representatives, however unanimous they
may be as to what should be the mode
of its disposal.     The experience which
has been already attained, of late yean,
shows on y  100 plainly that we must
expect a   prolonged   bat )e upon the
floors of the Dominion Parliament, before we can hope to bring that body in
to.our ways of thinking upon this matter.
Hitherto when  the question  has been
brought up in the House of Commons,
the British Columbian members have
found themselves almost- alone in their
efforts to rid themselves of the Chinese
incubus.   Nay, even they—we are sorry
to be obliged  to say—have not been
quite unanimous upon that point.    But
suppose the Canadian Parliament converted to the views of the British Columbians—io   the views indeed of the
white race of the whole Pacific slope of
North America—there will remain a yet
siouter battle still lo be won before we
become rid of the "Heathen Chinee:"
ihnt.is, with the Government of England.   The people of the Eastern Provinces and of the Mother Country cannot conceive, or account for, the inexpressible and all  but universal  repugnance with which the Chinese are regarded   by rhe whites of this   coast
Even if they could, they, and especially
the peop'e of Eng'and, cou'd, and no
doubt wi'l, oppose to the indulgence of
that repugnance cer ain considerations
of national obligation and national in
terests.    Their remonstrances may, and
doubtless will, assume nunc such terms
as these.    There was a time when the
Chinese was an entirely isola ed empire.
Its people never went abroad; they allowed no  foreigners within their own
coasts.     The  trading   and   aggressive
nations of modern Europe, and especially England, did not feel disposed to
tolerate that state ol affairs. They insisted Upon it, that these churlish Mongols
should do as their neighbors did, all the
world over.   They forced China, at the
point of the bayonet, to open tier gates
to whatever strangers choose  to enter
by them; to open the markets lo foreign
trade, and lo allow her own people to
roam at large, over the world, wherever
they pulsed. And can it now be insisted
with any reason, or justice, that, whilst
Britons may invade, and trade with, and
make their home in China, the Chinese
are, on the other hand, to be expelled
and  excluded from   British territory
Such is the view which might be taken
from the honor point. Then as to imcr-
est. If we exclude the Chinese from our
country, we must in fairness expect to
be excluded from China. But what does
that involve?    China is an immense
and densely-peopled country, having, in
the   aggregate,  an   enormous foreign
trade.    It has recently been ascertained
from official sources, lhat Great Britain
alone has in her hands one third of the
foreign trade of China; and that Great
Britain and her dependencies appropriate fully tkree-fourths of the trade of the
whole Chinese Empire.   Still, the consideration of these facts in no way alle
viates our   condition   relative   to  the
Chinaman. We had nothing to do with
forcing these Chinese treaties;  but we
have to bear the misery which they entail. None of this vast China trade comes
our way. It goes to Great Britain, India,
the Australian colonics, &c. Our fellow
colonists  cat the oysters, whilst we receive nothing but the shells; and we
are rapidly getting  buried  under the
accumulation of those shel s.   There is
one way of getting rid of. this Chinese
infliction which would prove most effectual.  The query is—how to accomplish
it. It is, to get a good, heady stream of
Chinese emigra ion diverted into England, or even into the Eastern provinces
of Canada.   Then we should soon hear
such an  astounding  roar of rage and
disgust that no treaty, no Government,
and   no  Parliament  could   stand up
against it.   In the meantime, we should
■ot cease to exert in our own defense
such measures as wc possess.
VUTlulUA TULf. INSUKEJW.
tt is strangv tbe sn&iinar and the eitent
So win. li ilie mainland of tliia Tnvviace has
Sri'iec'if by tli'«H wlm can Manage to nuke
Uieir influence lilt in aoch iasm. It in aa
aujnst and iinni-'.iulJt ss it i« strange.
There are lew ol the reanlenfe--t»(ic<'Ully "I
thmldiT rrHUmtn en tin- uiniukiiiil »!»•
ait- net (MM uf tin- fact, u»l ul.e line le t
keenly MtSSSwflssssI ur**i their imii iutrr
cat. Ituwi notorious aa ikcam-l) to be
necessary to mention, tint, over since tlu-
riolHicul conjunction ol thu two former ore
vincus of Lkitmli Columbia ami Vancouver,
the part which has bcou aivU-il out to the
mainland, .» tho special legislation aud ad-
ministration of thoatlairsol the consolidated
pruvinco, has been usually tluit of the proverbial step-child. Vancouver Island has always been the curled darling—the pet of
whomsoever happened to guide the affairs of
the provinoe as a whole.
It is not, however, solely in provincial
legislation, or iu the administration of public
affairs, that we see this antipathy exhibited
towards the mainland and those who dwell
opon it. Even among those in private life,
upon the island, and especially in and about
Victoria, there seems to prevail a grudge to
wards those upon the mainland an envy of
whatever advuiitiigea the latter weein to
possess. Even business men arc Dot ashamed
to exhibit this feeling and to act upon it,
where they can manage to do no without
materially damaging, or imperiling, their
own interests. The fact is undeniable. We
take no pleasure—have no gratifk-ation-
dwclling upon this fact. By so doing, we
wc might indeed make it conducive, temporarily, if not permanently, to our interests.
But we much prefer to eschew any course
which can tend to promote a poplar feeling
of sectionalism. It is only liccausu their
effects are so painfully ground into us, that
we feci compelled to allude to these facts at
all; ond we would fain lead the people of
British Columbia, in the mass, to believe
that their interests are in common; and that
the sooner and more unreservedly they reach
this conclusion, the better it will be for
them all. It is pleasant to know that all of
our island neighbors arc not animated by
the narrow-minded and nasty spirit of which
wu complain; but sad it is to say that this
littleness of heart and shortness of vision is
too nearly general.
We wish to call attention to one business
practice, illustrating this most unreasonable
and unjust prejudice, or paltry affectation
of prejudice, to which we havo just referred.
There arc certain l-'ire Insurance Companies
doing business in this province, of which the
principal offices, or agencies, are at Victoria.
Will it be beliuvcd, that these cninpainch
nrc in the habit of charging a considerably
higher premium for insurance U|ion the
mainland of this province, than upon Vancouver Island '! Such is really tho foot, incredible as it may appear. Pot what reason
or upon what pretext, this is done, it seems
extremely difficult W divine. We suspect
that many of tho victims themselves now
learn this puzzling fact for the first time
Insurance companies do indulge iu strange
vagarieB, at times. It is not minimal f<
them, although tho reason why dues not
seem to be easily explicable, to charge higl
rates in tho rural districts—sny upon quite
isolated farm buildings—than upon houses
in compact blocks, in the crowded heart of
town, and exposed to dangers tenfold greater
than thoBo of the country risk. But why a
party insured in New Westminster bIiouIi!
pay a higher rate than one in Victoria—why
a farmer, anywhere on the mainland, should
he compelled to pay a higher rate for insurance on his farm house and barns, than another farmer would bo called upon to pay
upon precisely tho same class of buildings,
anywhere in the rural districts <>f Vancouver
Island, is a greater puzzle still. It is nut
only a puzzle; it Is a gross injustice, whatever may be itH protended r-'nlution. There
i i one ready, safe, and prolitablo way of
putting a stop t'» thin injustice. It is for the
miiiulauil people to get up a l-'ire Insurance
Oimpany for themselves, to insure on just,
and reasonable, and impartial rates. Those
who Invest in such an enterprise will tind
tho investment profitable; whilst they are
doing a simple matter of justice to their
mainland neighbors, now so shamefully imposed upon.
OUR WATER SUPPLY.
(From th* MniDitnd Onnrdlsn.l
Some sage opinions have been expressed on the subject of onr waer
supply, evoked, no doubt, by the difficulties experienced at the late fire. Some
ataek the water company, otheis the
engine, and suggest the necessity for a
steam fire engine. We are inclined to
differ with the whole of these people;
wc believe the remedy is to be found in
providing a proper supply of water to
the city. Thar the scheme, if carried
out, would cost a large sum of money,
we are prepared to admit, but the improvement would not be confined to
the present generation; it would be a
benefit lo the residents in New Westminster a hundred years hence; therefore, the cost should be borne only to a
very small degree by the ratepayers of
the present day. Such an arrangement
could be effected by the issue of municipal bonds at a low rate of interest,
repayable in fifty years ; the yearly
amount of sinking fund being proportionately small. Such an investmem
would be very attr.ctive to our local
capitalists, and the chances are that the
bonds (of one hundred dollars each)
would be nearly all absorbed here. The
undertaking would be to bring to the
city a copious supply of pure water from
Burnaby Lake, the Coquitlam, or such
other source as might be decided upon
after careful inspection by competent
surveyors. There is really no difficulty
in the nature or elevation of the ground
between this city and any of the inexhaustible sources of supply in the vicinity; ihe necessary iron pipes could be
cheaply imported from F.ng'aad. Besides a constant and plentiful supply fo»
domestic and other uses for tbe city, s.
large resevoir should be constructed on
the limb plateau in the rear of New
Westminster, connected by pipes wi h
tbe vsi ions parts of the citr, to which
plugs with sciews sliould be filled. The\
tiremen would only require to attach!
tbe hose io one of these fire-plugs to
obtain a stream propelled with more
power than could be produced by the
must powerful steam engine. The advantages over engines of any description, secured by the fire plugs, would be,
that they are never affected by frost;
that they would require no engineer, no
fuel, and be subject to no injury from
accident or bad handling. The wages
of men required about a fire station
where a steam engine was posted, would
g* far to pay the interest on a loan.
All that would be required, at various
stations throughout the city, would be a
plentiful supply of hose, hooks, ladders,
&c. There can be no doubt that such a
plan will, in course of time, be adopted
at Port Mo dy, and we don't see whv it
cannot be equally applied here. The
lite of our city is splendidly adapted to
such a scheme; the descent from the
elevated plateau is beautifully available
for every part ol New Wes'minster,
upper and lower portions of the town.
Our present engine would be perfectly
good if placed in some advantageous
position on some of the higher streets,
so ai to be available in case of fire in
am- of ihe detached houses or streets
where fire plugs had not been fixed.
Touching the advaniages of a copious
supply of good water for domestic and
other purposes, there can be no two
opinions. Water is the gicatest'purifier,
and should be always available ad lib.
We have heard it stated by a very clever
medical man in this ci:y, that if the residents continued lo draw their supplies
of water from the cxis ing sources, such
as wells, that there would certainly be
an epidemic of typhoid fever some day.
This s atement lie cxp ained by the fact
lhat ihe srata on which the city rests
admits of the percolation of surface
w.tcr, which is really what these we Is
are supplied with. This is not a pleasant
subject to contemplate, but it show* the
urgent ncccssi y of some better source
than the cxising ones for our supply ol
the necessary fluid. If we were placed,
like many towns, on a flat, or far from
anv sufficiently extensive source, there
might be some excuse for the present
Hate of things, but surrounded as we
are by magnificent s reams and lakes,
there is no excuse for risk of life from
ill-health, and property fr'-m fire. We
have spoken on the subject with many
of our citizens, w ho arc ready and will-
fng to pay their quota towards the introduction of water in the way indicated
and for the purposes alluded to. We
should advocate the ic;<-ntion of the
water supply in the hand-- of the Municipal Council, as it would produce a
large rev nuc and enable us to make
many needed improvements.
I From the Mainland Outrillnn.]
EDITORIAL NOTES
Tiik lawyers in our local Parliament are
very prudently bestirring themselves in to-
curing all the privileges ptisniMe for their
craft while they havo su--tl a number of the
limbs of tho law in the Hntiso. We must
confess to a feeling of unrest, as honest John
would say, when we find the lawyers asking
for such extended privileges and power as
wc find embodied in the bill now before the
House. Wc should recommend lay in<iul>cr*
to think twico before granting all they ask.
Tub electric light in Victoria does not appear, after nil, to be tho undoubted success
it was supposed. \Yo learn that during a
stiff breeze, such as Victoria is frequently
visited with, the electric iights wore all
blown out. This is a serious defect, since
their value, no matter how- good they were
ou occasions when there was no wind, would
render thum worthless as a means of lighting
the city. Thieves and footpads would look
upon a blow as the best means of " raising
the wind." It would he sail if an enlightened city like Victoria was all in tho dark.
Rome of tho papers aro speculating as to
whether England, in settling this Egyptian
difficulty, won't separate the Soudan from
the other half the Khedive's territory, and
and form that portion along with Kordofan,
into a Beparate kingdom. The idea would
be a good one, but it would then become a
sort of nursery for "black ebony." If England could induce the niggers to cultivate
cotton, sugar, spices, aud bo forth, instead
of following the existing slave trade, she
would do good for the human raco and largely profit by the change.
The late burglary at Maple Ridge might
impress any Government hut the wretched
thing bearing that name, by which wo aro at
present controlled, that immediate steps are
uicessary, in the way of protection for the
lives and property of our settlers. It wifl be
noted that there were several thieves engaged in the burglary at Pockstoader's.
Had that gentleman been awakened, and endeavored to save his property, he would very
likely havo h"*"1 murdered. Mr. DockBtead-
er, in common with other settlers, pays his
taxes to a Government that is Eitpposed to
protect him in return for the money they
collect; if they arc unable to do this, the
collection of taxes is a fraud. What we conceive abould bo done, is to appoint persons
among the settlers, who would be willing,
for a regular payment of one hundred dollars
per annum and the fees for detection and
trial, to take the place of constable's clothed
with all the power of the law. A settler
near the scene of a depredation would hesitate before attempting to arrest the theives,
particularly if it w-ns known that he waa not
an officer. The late robberies and murders
in the immediate vicinity of Mr. Dock-
eteader's place, have, created qrhtS a panic,
and may result in bloodshed, psruops, the
sacrifice of iuiuiceiit people
[Frem tks Maltlial OsarSssa.J
THE PUBLIO DOMAIN.
AniniigM.   all   the   departments  in
»lucb the public business is divkh-d, no
one  is MR  important than   that  to
which the  atx-wiarrUliiii of  the public
dnmui:i is toulidi-d.      It in not merely
the uccruawiof Mllillt income that muy
be squint*! out of it to kocp unpopular iriinistere in power; it is uot, that
having  much land to dispose of,  we
should give it to anyone who aaks for
it, bocauKu this or that person haa made
himself a favorite with till) minuter, or
Wause the latter has some friend* to
serve; the public domain lielonga to the
people, and should only be alienated in
such quantities as may lie fairly given
to settlers who intend to live upon and
improve it.     But of all  things in the
wurlrl,   the bestowal  of  our lands on
aliens sliould 1k> carefully avoided; be
cause they must always lx-  of greater
value to British  Columbians  than to
foreigners;   and   consequently,   when
aliens are very anxious to secure them,
it indicates a knowledge of their great
value for mineral, tiuibi-r or cultivation,
hence,  Bhould bo exclusively reserved
for our own people,      Fifty years ago
the people of the United States supposed that their lands were   inexhaustible, and invited all the world to come
to them.      To-day, the Government of
the Uuited States has very little good
land at its disposal, and strong opinions have been published in the American press, relative to the reckless ex*
travngnneo of former Governments in
giving the   people's  heritage away to
everyone who asked for it, but mtrVfl
than all to the railway companies.    In
the case of our own railway —the Canadian Pacific—the land donated to that
company was perfectly legitimate, because it was tho only  way by which
the  Dominion could be properly united; but in such cases  as the Island
railway or the Kootenay mock railway,
the gifts of land to such corporations is
pure public robber)-.     Such donations
to companies who invest their money
for more self-interest,  is bad enough,
but when foreigners employ our own
people to apply for extensive tracts of
valuable land, for which they odor one
dollar per acre (the sum at which we
offer the land to immigrants as an inducement to settlement and cultiva
tion) the disposal of the land sliould be
immediately  stopped until an  Act restricting   its  sale   should   be   passed
through the House.    It must always he
remembered that we have comparatively little land fit for cultivation, com
pared with the superficial area of this
province.    Our population ut this moment  is  a  mere  bagatelle, compared
with what it will be ten years hence.
In fact, the present population has no
right to give away the land that in a
quarter of a century will belong to fifty
times their number.     I-et each of us
take what wo want of it—so much as
we. can turn to account or afford to pay
taxes upon—but  the idea of allowing
the four nun whom wo dignify by the
name of ministers, to give away our
land by millions of acres, is a degree of
infatuation rarely to lie met with. The
impudent hired  organ of the present
ministry, in Victoria, had the temerity
to state that the land conferred by the
Settlement bill was to the eastward of
the llocky Mountains, hence, valueless
to this province.    The truth is, that no
mountains intervene between any portion of this province and the land thus
conveyed aa a gift. It is the authorities
at Ottawa who are asking for tho land
in the Peace river valley, and they are
distant from  it fully  three thousand
miles; but we, to whom it belongs, a
part of our own province, find it is too
far away for us!    The Chicago man
who said that,  as tho United States
could not annex British Columbia, that
the only way to obtain it was to buy it
out.     Lt would cost more money, but
liave it they must.      How, when it is
known that the two million acres for
tho railway on the Island goes into the
hands of the Americans,  besides what
they previously owned; that the mines
on Texada Island and ou Queen Char-
lotto Island aro bonded to them; that
the Kootenay bill gives them three-
quarters of a million acres and that,
between the smaller schemes by which
they   have   obtained many thousand
acres, the constant influx of Americans
into this province on every portion of
the frontier, we may safely conclude
that it will be very soon annexed to
tho  United States, in., fact if not  in
name.   Honest John and the President
of the Executive Council may be much
gratified, but they must bo lookod upon
as renegades.
woods *.
LAD SURVEYORS
Real Estate Agents.
Conveyancers & Accountente.
PORT MOODY LOTS
FOR  SALE
MONEY    TO   LOAN.
COLUMBIA ST., NKW WESTMINSTER.
J. H. PLEACE k CO.,
—mroaraiui 4KI> bSAURS IS—
ilAltDWARi;,ST(Hi;S.HAMiE
PUMPS. WON PIPES SND FrTTIMS,
PAINTS, OIII.^ m.
aij. covntrt oitnrss pmmPTi.r
BXKCVTED.
COLUMBIA 8T., NEW WESTMINSTER.
POGUE & BROTHERS,
CONTRACTORS
—tou—
Clearing r.an-rl, m«kl»ir Roa<U A fltrttti,
and GKNKKAl- WORKS Halt«ft to
th.- wanta of a Pioneer Tawn.
SATISFACTION  GUARANTEED.
&T Hotel. Livery Stable, and Blackimlth
Shop in progress, and will soon be ready for
•cconiinotlation w\ uuitotnen.
i»o»x 3£oo:D*ar\ ». o.
KVN UfeSTMINSTtR
Soda-water Manulactory
ALFX. PHILLIPS & SON
CAN SUPPLY THE CITY AND VICINITY with Smla water (plain and
sweet), Ginger Beer, Ginger Ale, Sarsana-
rilln; Lemon, Raspberry, and all other
Syrups; Kbsoiico of Clingur; Cocktail Mixtures, etc.
OBDSRS   TBOM   THE CotTHTBY   CaRsnrixT
ExscoTin,
COLUMBIA ST., NEW WESTMINSTER.
DOUGLAS & DEiQHTON.
Saddlers & Harness-makers
Every Article In their Line
Always in Stock.
THE   TRADE   SUPPLIED.
Front St,   -    YALE. B. <").
Weeks
-AND-
Kyle&
Tilton,
NEW WESTHIXSTEft. B. 0.
-•••*•	
IMPOATER8,
And Wuoleasis Desjers In
Groceries!
8U8AW3, »YRU$B,  , r
MOLABSKS, VIJF.GAfc,
TEAS AND C0r*FEE8,
:d:k,i:e:d ariRrcriTS
-strcst as-
PLUMB,      PRUNES,     APPLES,
RAIBINS,     CUKRANT8.
CRACKERS, CAKES,
PILOT BREAD,
YEAST POWDER,
(Cook's Friend snrf P.4M.)
CORN-STAROH, HOPS,
EXTRACTS (Assorted.)
CREAM OF TARTAR,
SODA, SALERATUS,
LYE, WASRINO POWDER,
BLUING, STARCH,
WASHING SOAPS,
TOILET SOAPS,
COARSE AND FINE SALT,
PICKLES, OLIVE OIL,
MUSTARD, KETCHUP,
PEPPER SAUCE,
CURRY POWDER, •
CELERY SALT,
JAMAICA GINGER,
SUGAR OF LEMON
CANDY, AND
ALL KINDS OF NUTS.
LEA & l'ERUINS' SAUCES.
CANMED
GOODS{
—BOCH AS—
JAMS, JELLIES,
PIE FRUITS,
TABLE FRUITS,
PEACHES,
PINE APPLES,
BLUEBERRIES,
TOMATOES, CORN,
ASPARAGUS,
STRTNG BEANS
GREEN PEAS,
LOBSTERS, OYSTERS,
SARDINES, MAOKEMiL,
SALMON,  CODFISH,   .
CORNED BEEF, BRAWN,
LUNCH TONGUE,
DEVILLED MEATS,
BAKED BEANS,
PIGS' FEET,
PORK & BEANS,
ASSORTED BOILED and ROAST
MEATS, Etc., Etc.
Foster,
ESTATE
-AT-
POUT MOODY.
TEL.  O.
PROVISIONS!
FLOUR, FEED, OAT-MEAL, CORN
MEAL, BUCKWHEAT FLOUR,
ORAOK'D WU EAT, GRA3IAM
FLOUR, PEARL BARLEY,
SPLIT PEAS, MACARONI,
VERM1CELLI.TAPIO0A
SAGO, RICE (No.'l & 2,)-
HAM, BACON, LARD,
CHEESE,  BUTTER,
a   SALMON    BELLIES,
MACKEREL,   SALT
HERRING    IN   HALF
BARRELS   AND    KITS,
SMOKED    HERRING    IN
BOXES,   POrATOES    AND
ONIONS,   ETC.,   ETC,,   ETC.
fooiM and TOow Ware
TUBS, PATXS, BROOMS, WASHBOARDS, BRUSHES, BASKETS,
ROLLING-PINS,    CLOTHESPINS, WRINGERS, LEMON
SQUEEZERS, WOODEN
MEASURES   (Patent,)
STEP LADDERS,
BROOM stands;
ETC-, ETC., ETC.
OFFICE:
With tHe N. W. & P.
M. Telephone Co.
At Bocup, in Kngland, recently a girl,
aged 7. died from inflammation of the brain,
m-iinght on by overwork at school, The
medical officer in reporting the case strongly
condemned the practice of making yonng
children do home Usscms at night. He said
it worried them aud inadj them restless in
their sleep.
Lots offered in every
portion of the town-
site; also a few desirable Estates in
the immediate vicinity of Port Moody.
SMOW ARTICLES.
TOBACCO, CIGARETTES,
CIGARETTE PAPER*
PIPE STEMS,
CIGARETTE HOLDERS,
CIGAR HOLDERS,
CIGAR CUTTERS,
CIGAR LIGHTERS,
MATCH SAFES,
,pT3v.      MATCHES,
POUCHES, EH
Cigars from $21 to $150 per 1
STJUXJK,1BS
Coal Oil, Matches, Shoe Blackin
Stove Polish, ' Straw Paper, Papi
Paper Bags, Second-hand Grain Bsg
Cotton Twine, Candle Wick, Ci
Openers, Donrijohns.
PLAYING  CARDS
SHOES—"VVholo and Ground, in
itb, lib, 2J,If) and 511) Tins.    DrJ
Herbs, jib tins; CitronJPecl (Scotc
in 7tb tins; Sultana Rai&ins,
I
LIQUORS!
(Tnbulk) CANADIAN RYE, A
ERIC AN BOURBON, BRAND
SHERRY akd PORT WINE.
(Incase,) AMERICAN BOUliB*1
BRANDY, OTN. CtfLTPORS
RED AND WHITE W1N1
CI.ARKT, CHAMPAGNE, Or
(WS CIDER, and M1LWAUK
BEER 4L> ^crt Jflflrt^ %ttt.
tiATUHDAT. DECEMBER », MM
BCHE*! E OF PARLIAMENT.
m   say
spring,
round*
UOJ1K LOCAL-'.
It is a Wassaii seers* thaiwc b»w in '
midM s heavy oat«it»list, with
days, nl.-'ia buying, buying—at a t*iu..-
uus rat*-.   Tbe Kcntlciiuiti iu queassaB SSS
tu know  srhat lie u> about    When
buying, of courts ssmwi rsalsjstat
Among fibs soflsrssl en'orpriassj In iirmpcrt
l.-ti..-. imow ai.il tliespriiiH. is a brv k in.k
mg fruje* Mr. burr u »wy %wW g"iii|j
into tuat Tiusinui'S, or hi go'lny t" i-at some-
l*>dy alss) ii»Sn H, on U» i^niperty claimed by
him oloss back of Coutwr lfilU The materials fouiul then art o\ in ything tbat could be
sflsTwl. anil the demand for brick, next
is going t" lie IlllimlsSS 'I lie oss*
sirusdy In tbat line urn bean, - Iwtb
br»k aud grauito— tbe latter, of course,
to be iistnl as  facings.
Shall tlie thing he crO*cd (Tver f IV.
mean the uutcrsauitmnt Mi Christmas Eve.
The eoniiui4i -too enmiuoii—exrrrcaslon from
the r.portoiial press, is that something WHS
a ''great success." liut truly, this thing
was a suouens in the most truthful sense.
First anil foremost, tho children's |»ut earn*
Isr-little boys and girls who <lid their iluty
—and very cUverly they did it to", under,
as we must suppose, thu tuitum, or sugMs.
tioii, of Mrs. Healop. And by-the-wuy, Mm.
Hsslop— perhaps uuiuteutioually — distill-
gnialietl bersell afterwards at thu organ,
singing as she accompanied herself on the in
struineut. 'l'ben followed recitation* unil
songs by "einuUurs." As to them wo iirefer
not saying much; not lieenu»e we eouM not
speak highly of the exhibition, but because
some of these same "amateurs" might think
we were flattering them. Truly the whole
thing waa a success—a success in every way.
For lhrtanVc, tho presumption might hs»o
bt*a that the ponplc around here, at this entertainment, were rough fellows—boiuterous
and boosy. Not a bit of it. Every man 01
fheih looked u)Kin himself as upon his gentle
manhood, and behaved himself accordingly,
and at Kiilcau Hall, or Buckingham l'slacc,
notliiug could have been slinwn lnorn oedorous
Dancing was ke|it Up until two, or three,
o'clock. One cannot always lix the hour,—
but tlio^e who did g" home in the morning
seemed to go home happily: and wo have
beard nothing to the contrary Hinco.
DKATH 0$ Mil. fOHN K BA1OJST0N.
(From *h*i MtlnUnfl OusnlUn.]
Amongst the late Victoria news, wo note
tho death of Mr. Barnston is recorded. This
old pioneer lias passed away at the early age
of 45 years, Deceased waH well known and
much respected amougst nil old hands in
this conntfy. Deceased was a native of the
Eastern Provinces of the Dominion, and
came to thiB country in the dayB of the early
gold excitement and proceeded to Cariboo,
where he practised in his profession as a
lrarristcr-at-law. He was a mcmlier of the
legislature for Cariboo for Borne years immediately afrcr confederation, and although
not a fluent speaker, was, nevertheless, valuable as » member from tho fnct that he was
possessed of legal acumen and a comprehensive knowledge of the upper mainland and
its reiiuiremeuts. Deceased was laid to rest
In Ross Bay cemetery, Victoria, in presence
of many of the pioneers 01 < aribo and other
mining districts of the Province, Tbe pallbearers wereChfof .Justice Sir Matthew Hail-
lie llegbic, lion. A.-K. 15. Davie (Attorney-
<Hs«s»»|i, Mosul's. Q. liyrnos (cx-Shcrilf of
Cariboo), It. Kiulaysou, \V. Charles, and C.
E. l'ooley, M. Pt. The cortege also comprised the puisne Suprsma Court Judges and
ineiiiliurs of the bar.    Peace lie with bun.
CHILLLWHACK.
(from tbe MhI  land liimnlinn]
A" petition has been got up and numerously signed by tho people of this district, and
"It's an ornery  looking crowd," whispered a lull sestiss r-U. I luihitui    I Um anjlen,
'. 1    .  .
j IlKsTKCCI'IUN OH-OUEsl IN KL'SSIA.
to yonr * om»|.n ifert, aa tbey
4ir»« on ties new lUsim. Sorax- of U
lery tiilic-ate tlxtui'S. Th. y couie t
pUie> ..uiiuat aa regular as the K|ie: 1 • r h.m-
self. TlK-y pret» n I to kno» what 1. ■ n.g
and have the tunic aat of
[term V' Ha 1. su* «>»ilSttu.J
Tree bit, OKssabSr I8tb. "
Mr. Ileaven, iu cwmmittee on the Settle-
■eat sail, .sored that a elauae be iaaerted
ir\ IS In I un.hihitiii£ tbe employment of
Ckmese ej th* rsa..uy 1* i.iesrhsf Doe*.;
Ilf* ieo'-esnaSei el ' v*rs' *bjSi-t- » t ' tint.
I'itsmm it sreuleT i'>>  smol. inSsriere with |
the asonev ei.-.kii.g echi me. ..f th.-lr fn. iciv    Ui|   , , 1 bekssg fceSSI
So tbay tolS Mr. Beeveo it be did u-l wilb- U udal straw toisgiv--,'   he Ui'ieniured
[bers tii
stmt to the Government, asking that a grant 0j ^y, OM B
may bo made in aid of keeping Dr. McLean
aa a permanent doctor among us.      Dr. Mc-
Leeu hns been residing in this settlement tor
some little time, and hns- won for himself tho
favor of the people generally, who therefore
areaaxioas that he should reinaiu.    Hut as
this settlement is not sufficient of  ilself to
support a gentleman of hiR  ]irofcssion,  the
people, therefore,  ask aid in that respect
from the Government.    We aro groatly in
need ef a reeidottt doctor, lor wo are nearly
fifty miles both np and down the rircr from
any medical man, and that is bad enough In
summer when we can depend on the running
of tho steamers, for even then death might
onsue lieforo a physician could get hero; but
la winter it is much worse when there is no
certainty of getting a doctor at all.     Seeing
that such is the caso, tbo people are Inming
that the prayer of   the   petition   will   lie
granted. rBQ Hoko Pcblioo.
skew the amemlimiit they wield rt.t. it
deww. Under theae cirermnSaneee, Mr.
Hwiniss ih.>in>t eWrcliusj the is.lt.1 part of
is!.*, aed aitbibjiw It, The «emainin|
daasee of tbie mrfauione bell were passed aud
the report adopUnL Mr. Armstrong SBOVed
for aa adlrussto the Dviuiui. 11 Uovenuneut,
asking for a tJ«arautiiH: Station at New
\SeetniinaUr, who h was oarriod. Tbe
AtSoniey-C'iieral moved the first reading of
the Kootenay Amendment Bill, which was
serried, Tbe Attorney rjounal introiluced
the Mineral Laws Ueneolidatlon Art. In
reply to Mr. Armstrong, Mr. Smithe said
tha* a sura of money was to be provided
far a Provincial teol. but where it would be
placud be was unable to say. This wsa iu
answer to a question relating to the Now
Westminster gaol, entirely. We ono eaaily
translate tbe reply. The repeated appeals
through the presentment! of I Iraud .furies in
this city, relative to the srretahad condition
of our gaol, have been systematically ignored
with the inteiitimi of making the vicinity »f
Victoria tbe site of tbe provincial prison,
and making 01 New We-uniiister ft suburb
of the prosaist Capital/ with merely a lockup, llow long will mainlanders ittbmlt to
such traeli ! The idea of s Small city at the
fag end of au iidaad aaaumiag to be t lie Opi-
tolof Uiis gnat mainland, ia the coolest
piece of uheok imaginable, and m«"t soon tie
exploded. If Victorians are w ise, they will
keep perfeeSly ijniet, or the dt-naumeni may
lie helmed wp quicker than they expect.
Hoaest John, replying to Mr. Armstrong,
said tbat the osUblishment of a High
.School at New Westminster was under consideration. Mr. Armstrong said it bad been
eo a lone; time, and it is v,ry likely bo rouiain
under consideration while Victoria remains
tbe Capital. -
Mr. T. Davie introduced a bill to amend
the Municipalities Act ill so far an the payment ot ft water-rate entitled a person to
vote for Mayor and Council. It was ultimately amended by Mr. Drake to read, "that
all persons whu paid their rosd tax end
water rate, if any, hix months liefore the day
of election, should be entitled to vote.
Wednksuay, Dec. 111th.
Mr. Duck, on the part of the present Government, has, w ith the assistance of the legal
luuiinn-rieB connected With the party, discovered a mare's noet. It is much to be regretted that Mr. DuckalloMs himself to be made
a source of ridicule. Mr. T. Davie Urn
doubtless laughing in his sleeve when he
read the extracts from the evidence on the
graving dock enuuiry, in support of Mr.
Duck's resolution for papers and documents
on that subject; be merely rend a paragraph
here raid there, to mike tho Bemblatiec ot' a
casu. The subject very naturally dropped.
On motion of Mr. Beoven, the Municipal
Amendment Act passed yesterday, was
recommitted, and thu following amendments
were added; "That any person qualified to
vote at last municipal election Bball be entitled to vote in future, provided he has paid
his road tax mid wateiratc, if any, ten days
before the date of election. On the motion
of Mr. Orr, tho revised list ot voters prepared for the general election in January
shall lie the list of qualified voters for any
subsequent election during tho year. The
hill was then read a third tunc and passed.
The Attorney-General moved the second
reading of the Kootenay Amendment hill,
by which tho company is prohibited from
establishing a line of steamships between
the Province of British Columbia and any
British or foreign country. There seemed
to be much unanimity of opinion on tho part
of using Belgian horses, have given H up.
It has lie aa-'iuinrd Ibal .»LW ' —	
tfeof a Belgian hois, -i. oaiiug 95«f) duuenot The roaetautly iucreastu;; destrnetiaB of
iveraue mure than sil pease; while a llntuii' Euu.^n loresU is naturally ditiiiasid witn
horse letting on an average uo more) will | uiccli interest by Itustuui papers. Id the
st b set doable tbe time. When tbe Belgian hut hnndrci year.' tin forest area, of Ituasia
lsorse nusedup. the oouiiwm e»:i .lily «ret|bj,»... ruent in'Iwer
ownership as  $#) vi liu for him.    Tlie British horse under , b. forty-six per eeut. 11, Kuzau    Tho beas|_
ppo-   similar e uir.ions willivalixtt, ;tfciful oak foreeta are heeonnnr extinct.    04
t     eeli braSeel   t.<-i!i.iitwe<sd«o|\ie»iiuiour«i.,
A   S nttu-ark   (f/.nd.eil  I«<it  rruiker has -,,.„;, |, ,1, lt/. ,r„„ th.. time ot P.-ter tbe Gieal,
soi I then I rof»   Sarfoor's Chemh   .■■' ,„,^ ti„ borden esrist at present, while ail
h, for (WO for sal (loss reneVred   tbe inter>..r ia raoaaeeL    I b-- exteu«ive  to
incy.snd tho I „& „, tho haaju e] the ValemsaSst Uss lassv
nion Intl. b abh-h stwmd vagaliutid   'li*""''""- "fs* ire remarkable.    He pa/'k-' i-hi -I. oae. .'..• had I .r into U,t .leope. to
had about  hi ,„  oeerpoworod   mo,   ud   I   -d the ■■ u.; h ,r, m ndsys »h.n hi. candnla.
,.. ... 1 |o presicbe.', arid kept pe« p.- sway win n the
it is evident  that Cuugi.-s will  let  |H  ' otlnr eweh la'-   pr.,,.|,..l.     I;  .«')S  s ereat
fully orgaai/.-d awl g.-.l  t>.  work until   lug   deal for thi        • '"- r.-i-r that
BfUirftl  UoiKl.SK.    '11,. 1, thel:- It thi..   v.    ".Il'>".".'i'  '   '.'   ;; ■ nng ;e.'.-ot   w
bill hi , that theappfOSi h 01 hot
oil anu tiave Uie same *»it ot ow
-PasU^ojp; «oe>*4ffltn. D.s,
^ito 1.      ,        .       l       .Id lor!.
but
w«iit.M r ilfinmiil- a. im*') MtM^Sffl   '• I  -'
fptptimikon l»ill anil an eLiljournuioi.t.    N  xt
ses-Kicm than will in   11. Urott <'f
hod, it i.i ti in , bat * Ti rift HTM ». ill \" mi -A
cu»« for an a«ijoummuiit atXiii atL- r u,-   \ \ z
no t.u*t ttierv  viU I't- *carc-ty tfp  Dw4itt|
work'lonc.     'I i,.-    DMMtfitf    I r   eucli   nav
Congraaa i" eoma U<getlii t ou t'ia oth of
Mair h, if nuty tit ct'isii'lrtau tlif prfclunioartc*
of aletfcimj uriuum, RiitUus difpuV 1  ul4o-
ttmi, awgatling tbe committee! in opera,
tion. baconiav more and Don uonl m tlie
oountry aflUar^aa, ami tliu mili^cta .Umautl-
ing legtalaiiou baounte more miincruus nnd
LOinpli.atetl.    Y«t it ii nufe U> ny   Pon-
L.KH- ttaelf will never tnako the  iiinoTfttitui
mo by an ovennaeter-
[From tin UftlnitinA GainiUn 1
Ifijfc News.—The French haVo captured
Snntng; the Chineae defended the place till
after the lK>m1>ar(luicntt then abandoned it
in the night. It ia rumored that England
in to mediate between Frauce and China.
....The permisaiou   to   import    American
pork into France, has been withdrawn	
The Glasgow dynamiters have been gentenc.
ed; five to penal servitude for life, and five
tot seven years each of the same puniah-
i»4iit..,-The King of Abyasinia is going
after the Egyptians, believing that ho will
have them at an advautage The engineers on strike at Winnipeg thought tlioy had
only to go back and aay they would go to
work on tho old terma, to be taken on again.
Iu this thin they were greatly mistaken, and
are now wandering over the continent in
aeareli of a job The thermometer in Toronto ia ranging from zero to 27 below.
[Jrom tHe Mainland Guardian.1
3>ABtN0 BtJBGLART AT   MAPLE   RlDUK.—
On the night of Friday, 22at inaant, tho
store of W. B. Docketeader, of Maple Ridge,
was entered by burglars and property to the
amo int of $300 taken away.   It appears that
the premises are new and the usual shutters
I r er outside fastenings ore nut yot in their
plaoes.   Xhe:.thiBV4a r«move4j)ib*4e of glass
and this enabled one of their number to enter
• '   the store.   The character and|^jjantity of
the goods carried off shows.that a number
must hare been engaged in the roljpery, and,
'   from what has been ascertained, \he burg.
Iary was premeYUtated, because a 'boat was
ready to carry off the booty,  which*   t'ia
■ tluevea probably packed over the 40th par-
■ arUola. The droll part.of the naiscr ia that
Mr.-l>boksteadcr, diasOA-efing h\& robliery,
(nidetCV0red to obtain a flbfctoh waTtant in order to follow and securp the \JfQ]*erty, if successful in catching tha thieves ; hut in spite
of his lie&t efrbrrs, he was two days bofor,e he
.ciou\d obtain one, allowing sufiicient time to
elapae to'i/dmit of the ir-hh^vs reaching Am-
ejrican^teVTitnrv oiuMf^*
11 siUurt o|" tlie House, to
postpone the bill till further infunnation was
obtained. Honest John, however, thought
prober to come to the rescue of the Kopteniy
eomjiany, and Btbteatad against theic bein^
coerce»l in the matter. Houcut Joan knows
what he ia about. On the QualifluatiiM of
Voters Act coming into committee, Mr.
Heaven said that the operation of the Act as
it at present Htood was that a person on
changing bis residence would lose his tjtialn
ticntiou to vote. This was unfair antl the
present amendment was to obviate the injustice. He therefore asked tlie House to
authorize the aolteator to make thu necessary
correction in the record, ho as to enable
voters to preserve their right to vote without registering again.
WAtmM.TON   UOTER.
(From our regular correspondent).
December 11th, 1883.
The rapgit oi tbe Secretary of the Tiavv
oonies into port several days after the President's Message and thu otjnr depar'.iuental
returns hav« been publijhed. Tl.ero is ft
fitness in this delay, perhaps, aa it is signili-
cant of the debilitated eoiulition of the .Marine eoUibhshmeuL. Iu looking it over one is
forced to the conclusion that the he -i thin-
to do with tlie Ainerieaii war navy, hi to
sink it, and either do without any or build
an entirely new line of ships. Our American
Navy yards are mere reminiscences. At
Washington there are several Monitors lying in tlie stream; they run them up to fresh
water to avoid the barnacles, but though
they are manned by tua brave a set of sailors
or soldiers as1 ever walked a deck, they are
of no use, and never will be, for modem at
tUlery would pound them to splinters in no
tiros. But they lie, on tbe peaceful waters
of tlie Potomac, resting after their brief
Uvea of tiery activity, and reminding one of
old sea captains. Their bronzed and batter
ed appearance inspires reverence tathcr than
fear.
I was talking with a sensible woman the
other day. about naval alLirs. It ia a little
out of the order of things for a woman to be
posted ali'MiL the navy. But this woman
whoso husband is a eoidirmed invalid, is his
agent in securing the (uhip. ion, by the Government, ' of his inventions, 'whicli relate to
deflecting steel armor for war ships. She
said that the idea of ever building land de-
fenaes for our immense coast is absurd. The
Government, in her opinion, ought to rely on
sea goingjarmpred ships, for defense to harbors. Tttase a>o portable fortiOcations. Tho
invader can be met at the entrance to our
harbors, and the defense offered would he
equal, or better, than any land constructions could give. tt seems to me sho is
right.-
The lady I reforto'is generally denominated
a lobbyist. She goes before the Naval Com
mittecs and argues tho abstruse problems of
warfare with the knowledge of a veteran,and
the zeal of a woman. Her husband is a man
of great talent, but he has not been out of
bod foe teiUoug years. He passe* his time inventing, his sjieeifrl etudy being in thu direction ftf naval-fnventiono. His devoted wife
is his amiable assistant outside; working together they have acquired wealth.
An old neighbor oi Hon. Tom Ochiltree, of
TexaB, complains that tho honors bestowed
upon tho ted-htired rotnanoiHt- of the Rio
Orande^bsM* spoiled bun. Ochiltree in a
very ur-iir-aay.- wan. to. t*j]l the plain fact,
but he-au^njk'ifij a notional r* putatum aw an
ajiport toilier .rith truth, an-i Some Tt-x:uvs»
who like vigorous exaggeratory, sent hm'N*<
ressi
until it it* forced to d
ina pressure of pablioopinion*. outnpeUi&j] itf
uiembera to do tho duty for which they lesre
elected.
ni-Js-KKALNKWtS ETBMS.
There ar.- sow but t«-i> inrviring offioen
of the gnat aea light of Trafalgar in 1805,
Advices from Zululmd report Cetywayo
sulking, iind the people in much distrese.
Th- K\n% of the Kel^ian* bin l»Uftht luge
estates in Moroocoanu Tunis for « ultivation.
Tin: English public has not taken tho
faintest inUrert Lord Coleridge's American
tour,
The Marquis of Ts^ng is a Ch nose ex-
Jeeuit, who belonged to the Society in
Kiaug Nan.
The Aiiglo-Kgyptian Bank haaoffered tho
Egyptian Oovemment a loan of £10.000,(M)0
to o instruct a canal parallel to the Sue/,
Canal.
An order to vaccinate all of the p'ipils in
the public schorls of France has revived opposition to the mode of preventing small*
pox.
Ireland has thirty prelates to about five
million Roman Catholics, and England thirty-two to stnout twenty million members of
the Church of   Kngland.
It is alleged that, although the Vatican
nrcluves are now open to heretics, everything which it is not expedient that they
shall ace has been put aside.
Ktiling alligators for their teeth and skins
employs a laige force of men in Florida, u ho
lave engaged to furnish 50,000 Bkins to a
French tannery iu a given time.
The Chaplain of the Chapelle Explatoire,
in Paris, efected in memory of Louis XVI ,
hns lately died, aud the Government will
allow no more-services thereon anuivt rsaries<
K^cnlais ia a new Paris tenor with a sur-
paiaingly line voice and great fckUl in using
it; but, ulas, he is no shwrt and fat as to be
ridiculous in the heruic roles of grand opera.
A motion to reduce the Lord Mayor of
Dublin HHalary from 815,000 to *10,000 lias
been negatived. He baa a large oflicial
residence. The Lord Mayor of London has
.CS000.
Skurfu, a wonderfully clever East Indian,
who confesseil to nearly 100 crimes, was
lately sentenced to penal survitude for life.
His practice was to imgr.*tiitte himself with
travellers, get tjlonj to eat with him, and
ilrug, rob, and if  necessary,   murder.
Appeals against Justices' convictions in
Kngland ami Widen appear to result in
nearly lialf the n Villi her of instances iu a condemnation of their decisions by the superior
tribunals. In fifty-two per emit, only of
isiK'h appeals last year were the Justice's
copulations affirmed.
. The Journal dr Rome says that the Government, to avoid a conflict with the Church
has decided to place the nioiiumcntto Victor
Emmanuel hi one of tlie lateral chapels of
the Pantheon. The erection of a monument
in the middle of a church is, it appears, contrary to canon law.
Recently some valuable experiments in
photographing the larynx and soft palate at
the instant o( singing have been made. A
powerful electric lij;lit was thrown into the
throat, the subject then sang aimtc, and the
actual position of the vocal ligaments, uvula,
&c,   was photographed instantaneously.
The l.'nion Medical gives the formula of
Loeegue k Itogisbuld'b valuaMe pomade as
follows: Chloroform twenty parts, and
vaseline nixly parts. Ithas been used ex
tumidly with great hUocea for rheumatic and
neuralgic pains, aud in the vague cheat pains
which accompany tuberculosis,
A writer to the London Mnrtiiii'j Pont Bays
that, except iii the leading streets, it is unsafe to walk in Paris at night unarmed, or
without taking very good care to keep suspicious people at a distance. Ho adds that
the streets are now badly kent and badly
lighted, The writer emphatically denies the
averment that tlie city is  safe.
King Thee haw's wife has borne lihn a
daughter, not a son, and the court of Man-
dalay seems to be in a pretty state of commotion. KingThcebaw upbraids his Queen,
and she upbraids the midwife and the astrologers, while the courtiers lament the loss
of the largesse that would have been presented if the unfortunate little girl had been a
boy.
Mr. Job-u Casimir, Pcrier, lately appoint
ed' Under Secretary for War in France, i
new office which some think has been speoi
ally created for him, is one of the few re
publioaua who come of an ofUeial family
llis grandfather was the well-known Minis
ter of Louis Philippe, and his father t
diplomatist, and subsequeutly Minister of
the Interior under Thiers.
Dr, Noab Porter says that the idea that
evolution ia a self-generated migration from
lower to higher forms is not tenable, but
tbat evolution under the guidance of
formulated plan of Deity is perfectly rational, and is "a theory which, rightly received, btiogftUod mto pur view, and justifies the purpose and progress of the uni
verse."
The paucity of marriage in Jamaica, says
Sir Anthony Musgrave in his recent official
roport on the condition of that island, ii
much to be deplored. In "intimate connec
tion" with tins observation the Governor
notes the fact that tbe annual proportion of
illegitimate to legitimate births is more than
58 of every 100 cnildrun   born.
Catholic. If half the plaiitiff seyi \- tni<-,
St. Saviour's ought to be eritisovt an in-
* u&betiL
M, 00 BtUtt has reach.-1 I'
Thi* Is s bb . • i  native but* at
ih>' en t ■ . 1 of -' nib".- Pool It is on tin-
north Iwink of thi CoatjO, aaa -tudcy'fc
LeesseAaivfUe is almost direotl) op] .te on
theeouth hank. Do Efeetza'i ngnttotho
ph.. e and to the adjoining U nitory in DOW
Hinput.d hy the iitnu, fftenlej I
li*hed *o many sfstSDOS and has au> Of ■ di d m
mcII in hiii .-tfort-t t*> win the good u ill of
the n;itivi'« that it is doflbtod vlwtsher Ds
Braflsi m ill be aUs t<» < goneti srfth him on
<\in t.in, in th« srOTk ot opening up the
country.
Jamr-s Stuart, a'ivil entrincer In the em-
ploy of the London Ml sionary Hociety, is
Imildiiig a road between Lokos N'yanna and
end Tsiaganika. He has completed seventy
milefl of the road, and, as he rxpirfetn
finish it soon, the society hai sent to btio a
ebeanihoat, built in sections for tranaporta-
tion ove-laiid, w hi« h be vJU launch on Lake
Tanganika. The Scottish Missionary Sodety
1ms two tiaiiH-rs DOW on Lak<r \yassa.
Coods can now   be taken s'l  the   wny frnm
London  to tbe  north end of tfyaiw I y
steamer, otcrpt at the rapids in tho rtvei
Shire, aronnd which they hare to be carried
by land.
According to the BrilUk MM***! Journal,
''•nr^erms now hare the hich authoritv of
!>r. Fcnier to eneouraL'e them in untried
efforts for the cure of oerehral diaeaee by
operation." Dr. Ferrier said, before the
Royal Cbirnrgienl Soofoty, that phyBiciana
would not b- justifipd in advising enrcical
operations upon the brain until the prlnetples
an«l practice of regional dtseaee had boen ns
olearly estaWishen aspoeeible, but thought
it doubful that any reason now remains why
a surgeon should not "pen the cranial oatitr.
He bad seen complete recovery repeatedly
follow some of the moat formidable oneratloni
upon the brain of animals of delicate and
almost human organization. Secondary Inflammation e;m be absolutely ^eventetl, and
there is no riak to lifo from even extensive
destruction of the cerebral hemispheres.
The colonists who will leave England before Christmas to settle in New Guinea will
he practically the pioneers in  a i»      that is
nrlv as large as England, France, and Ireland together. Next to Australia, it [s the
largest island in thu world. Its soil is very
fertile, it abounds in Hue natural harljors,
and most of the con-dry Is healthful Many
Of the natives arc cannibals, but they have
been friendly toward the whites, as far a1*
their fears have permitted them to hi.
D'Albertis, the Italian explorer, trusted
himself alone among them for nearly a year,
and from his repor's and the records of
Bacoari, another Italian traveller, Is di rived
the greater part of the information we have
of this little-known land, lfew Guinea Is
north of Australia, from which it i- aepara-
ted hy n stmit only ei'T'i'v miles wide, awl
Queensland is still ag.fcttin'g the question of
annexing the island.
A sin rular ofter wns declined a f"'A' ^I1VS
ago by the Board of Management of the
Manchester (England) R iyal infirmary, An
anonymous offer had been mode of £1,000
on condition that an experiment should be
made in the treatment of disease and surgical cases for twelve m'mdis in adioiuing
wards, in one of which alcohol should be entirely excluded. The Mfldieal Board n ported that tho conditions necessary for arriving
at a trustworthy conclusion :ts tn the value
of alcohol by the method proposed could not
be realised, ami therefore any conclusion
arrived at. whether in favor <f or against
alcohol, might lead to a disastrous practice.
In the Manchester Hospital alooh. I was only
given as medicine. As Biich it was of great
value, and at times it was essential for the
saving of life. This being so, the experiment suggested involved the liv.n i^f th- ir
fellow creatures, and could not therefore be
countenanced.
Most of the scientific parties that were
stationed a year or more ago around the
world, neartnoArctia circle, for the purpose of milking simultaneous observations,
have n turned home. The Kutrlish party
from Port Else, on Great Slave Like, proh-
ably arrived in England a day or two ago.
Germany has relieved her party who were
itaUonod in Cumberland Sound, Davis
Btraits. The Swedish observers In Ice Fiord,
Spitsbergen, have gone home after isue ■ ■•-
ful winter's work, The Anstrn.Hungarian
observers on Jan Mayen, s.'o mill mutfi
West of Spitsbergen, reported, upon their
return, that last winter was a very mild
season there. The rTorwoglana have re-
Ueved their party at Boaokoss, in Lapland,
and our observers at Point BarTow. have i-
rived home. Tlie Dutch party that W( QJ
out in the Varna, bound for the mouth of
the Yenesei, never reached their destination.
Nothing has yet been heard from Lieut
Greely or from the Russian stations at
Moller Hay, Novaya Zemlia. and at the
mouth of the Lena River. Scientists will
be greatly interested in reading and comparing the fortheonting reports of these international observers.
1  i
A Mrs, Pagliati having, on Nov. 1G, ap
plied to a Loudon magistrate regasdipg tlu
ilisappearanee of her husband, a letter was
read from M, Holt, puulpLur \to whom Mr
P. had been moulder), saying that since th.
termination ot the tremendous suit, "Belt
agt. Lawcs," Pagliati's mind had giveli way.
He sat in court for the bust which decided
the case.
The House of Lords baa long complaiued
that bills are sent up to them from the Com-
morn at the fag end of the session, aud hurried thi-ougb without adequate examination.
tHm&aquemly anumlwr of Conservative peers'
have issued'a cireular, binding themselves
i4i future to attend the House from July 15
Se^t. fc; and later if need be, "to carefully
avvl cnticiUly examine whatever mcisui'-s
uxuy b" rjniwifl*! "' • -> Tl*a   l
>'
■   '    •'
VSfld the Ural Moiihtaiii, areimw ilc**tr"\ »>l
Up! ■» nuny if »lia»tl*mi  M-
ii.iiun,' l:u.vo.i  tbat  WsjimI  u
be* "mill.' BOtTCsf m ifiny pr«.viu«ii.
Tin nVsetrenhi a is nnwi on »*ry •y»t*riii-
atic&lly, but, hmtam W9$» II srfB al  BMstl
t.,n»t t>> :^ . inTni'<ci<oi,-u:nptH'ij
n j.n<-ifar Hufl-
ns r:.. ••■ ■ rs, aud fJuUirirs",   it  n
neteevprtMAg that, tsntngJhi  bwt tweatty
tbe eepei 11>! Kn w I ■>■ lian '
ed.   Wood, howewer, \* tseeaeav
. *].«-ri*iv«-, aiid the ifffp4.>rtjiti^b of
c ;d ,»i heing  SssrtoejsN cffisidei-ed  by  large
■'.u-iiii--is. wtlils   I.' troltnin  oiier«  a  thud
alternavvsi of daily lueiwaatng i*opolarity.
It is wonderful what novel and curious in-
f'.ru.'.t er. Wl can snnjt*tlines pick from ni:-
espected i|uai-tv.-ra, wlnm we fall in with
peftona wh« may bo Asemed experts in tiv ir
. and work. A hair-
eutter reeesrsly Iih.1 under his wii*j*or» the
iibumlaiit locks of Mr. Lloyd of London, a
famous lawyer, and complimented bis ciia-
tonier on his fi?i»'*head of hair. "It's tbe
brain thai dote ley1 be said. "You see sir,
the brain is in she skull, eloeetatha r«x>te of
tlie aair. The brain i* a soft sabetwnot, and
BOuritheS th*- hair.'1 "Ah, Indeed j ij. tb;it
Well, you arc d| course an expert in
hair, and you ought to knw." "Yes,, sir ;
it percolates through tlie skull and nourishts
the roots.   Thai s whsd It's for, sir.''
The Karl of Cork. Hester of the Basil-
h rnndi to Quota VI itoria, is. with his eldest
son, Lord Dungsrvan, bravelling out West.
The first Isold Cork, Richard Boylej landed
iu Ireland in l.'iSs with only i'JT 12s, In his
pocket, a diamond ring, a gold bracelet, a
laflety doublet, s pair of black velvet
breeches, a Milan fustian suit, competent
linen and necessaries, a rapier, and a dagger,
and soon became the most powerful man in
the kingdom, dying hereditary Lord High
Treasurer of Ireland. Of him Cromwell said
that if then- had In tn I Lord «lork m every
province it would have been impossible for
the Irish to have raised B rebellion.
HoLLOWAYe Pills.—With darkening
days and changing temperatures the digestion becomes impaired, the liver disordered,
ami the mind despondent, unless the canst
of the irregularity be expelled from the
blood and body by such an alterative as
these I'dls. They directly attack the source
otjthe evil, thrust out all impurities from
the circulation, rettorttht distempered organs to their natural site, and correct all defective or contaminated secretions. Such an
easy means of instituting health; strength,
and cheerfulness, should be applied by all
wIiobc stonii.eha arc weak, WbOte minds are
much harasucd, or whose hrains are overworked. Holloway's is essentially a blood-
temnerrng medicine, whereby it* mfluenoe
teacnes tne remotest fibre of the frame and
effects a universal good.
"Words fail to express my gratitude,'' says
Mr. s.ihy Carter, of Nashville, Teun., "for
the 1" uefits derived From Ayer's Barsa-
parilla. Having been afflicted all my life
with scrofula, my system seemed saturated
with it. It came out iu blotches, ulcers,
and mattery sores, all over my body." Mr.
(larter states that he was entirely cured by
Ayer's Sarsnparilla, and since discontinuing
its use, eight months ago, has had no return
of the scrofulous sym; tows.
ROYAL CITY
Planing
Mills Co,
Take this opportunv
ity of thanking their*
numerous patrons fof
past favors, and re-*
spectfully ask a con-'
tinuance of tho same)
in future. Having on
hand a large stock di
Tun 100-ton- Grss.-—Tho mounting anil
equipment of the 100-ton guns now at C.ifv
niltar and Multa havo been settled at the
War Office, and sealed iu the usual form.
The case-shot or canister will contain no
fewer than 2,110 halls, of which 1,915 will
weigh S oz. each, and the remainder 4 oz.
each. The case will lie of steel, 17u(i inch
in diameter, being rather less than the bore
of the gun, and a stay bolt of wrought iron
will pass through tho axis, 40.5 inches long,
to increase its rigidity and strength. The
total weight of this projectile will be 2,000
lbs., and it is intended to bo fired at ships
or storming parties at close quarters only,
for tho case will open immediately on leaving tlie muzzle, and the shower of shota will
hardly be effective over half a mile. Tlie
common Fullisur and Sharpnell shells for
the .same gun will each have a dt&nreter of
7 72 inches, fitting tightly to the bore of the"
gun, and they will be rotated'hv copper gas
checks screwed to tho base. The fuse for
tlie oommoh shell will for the present be tlie
general service "Pitman," and that of the
Shrapnel tho 16-second nnizzlo-lofiding time
fuse of wood. Eacb of these shells will
weigh; with its bursting charge, 2,000 lbs.
The hydraulic carriages, platforms, loading
gear, and turrets, finally approved for the
100-ton guns, are, with sumo slight modifications, the same ss were tried at the model
ill the Hoyal Arsenal described at the time.
Two sets of hydraulic loading goat arc to be
provided for every gun.—Broad Arroir.
[From lire Mstnlslul lu'liirdi'an.l
Tiik Ki'.ws.—Varncll's declaration of war
against Kngland has had the ctl'ect of uniting
both parties in the British House ol Com
mons against liini. and,probably what he desires; postponing reforms in "> '
In
m TIM'S DA! AT 1'ORt PHY.
THE ROCKYMNT HOTEL-
Will he opened with a
GRAND BALL
(In the evening of
Tuesday, Jan. 1,1884,
SEFPESHMENTS
Will be provided FREE OF CHARGE for
all guests who may bo present.
»4T The residents of I'ort Moody snd New
Westminster are cordially invited.
LAMONT i 8UJOEHBEAU,
Proprietors.
of various kinds and
grades, they are pre-'
pared to give
|«paj ha tyt\\
for the balance of the5
year.
C. D. HAND,
Real Estate Broker,
They have also to*
announce that tfeey
have opened a branch
of their business at
PORT
MOODY1
and will keep a fult
supply of
Lumber,
Sawn # Split
Doors,
Windows,
Mouldings
NOTARY PUBLIC,
Collector, Conveyancer and and all the neCCSSary'
Insurance Agent,
0pp. Post Offlce, Columbia
KKW TTE8TMQI8TEB, B. e.
WRTlODVLOfaFORmE
WT Property for tale in .til parte sf ST«%
Westminster District,
m Strangers will find ii to their odrnn-
tase to c;ill ou the above.
Agent for the "CUy of London" Fire Insurance company, the "Confederation Life"
of Toronto, the ''Aceidcnt" Insurance company of North Ameriea,
and the "North American" Life
Assutanoe company.
star Money to Loan on'tirst-class security.
Best of references given.
j furnishings for buildings at the Terminus.
Parties who intend
building there can
count on obtaining
all tho requisites for
that purpose on the:
ground.
NEW PALL GOODS!
New Fall Goods!!
Wm. elson,
The Cash Tailorl
I/nTO* SlllTAKrl.XBVfWESTMTTSYT'.R,
lias oysmed out his FALL STOCK, ami Is
now vircpBrcd to execute orders.
/WSatisfaotion QnaBASTKBD. sB
MRISTMAS" CAKES!
Is,
FRUIT iB I1NBT CAIES,
(iotd to suit and in every variety)
MINCE   PIES,   ETC.
;■" Or ' ■ ■ ■■ :" '•
•. • ii
M\T AM) BAKf
DIEBEL
TO   RKCEIVK
STO'W  PREPARED
n'ders for all kinds of
The Nanaimo
SAV^
MIL]
is now in operation
under the superintendence of MR. A.
HASLAM, and will
keep a full supply of
DOORS,
WINDOWS, fcC,
ALL
OBDMS   WILL  RECEIVE-'
PROMPT ATTENTION.
Job*
i THE DEADLY COT OF TEA.
I
(LATE BONaONU)
lletd of North Boat!. Port Moody
JOHN B. WATKIS
BEOS TO INFORM HIS NUMEROUS
friends that he has recently taken the
above house, where he is prepared to do
everything possible for tbe acconnnodation
of guests.
THE TABLE U always .are to be »up.
piled with all the delicacies of the season ;
the BEDS are of tbe most comfortable, and
there Is ample and comfortable STABLING
eu the premises.
«T BOATS always obtainable on the harbor in front of the premises, by applying at
the house.
CITY
DRUGSTORE!
NEW WESTMINSTER, B. C.
A. M. Herring,
Wholesale A Retail
m*V€GI&T.
Tlie Largest Stock ia tlis City
—AT THE—
LOWEST   PRICES
STNEXT DOOR TO BONSON'S.
Toys Toys
OF EVERY DESCRIPTION.
SELECTED FOR THIS MARKET BY A
SPECIAL AGENT, AT
W.H.KEARY'S
PIONEER BOOKSELLER AND STATIONER,
COLUMBIA ST., NEW WESTMINSTER.
TUB POBT MOODY AND NEW
WESTMINSTER
LIST OF CHARGES.
Rent of Telephone per month, including erection of wires $5.00
For every message for every person not
being a monthly tenant, and not ex-
ceedXng twenty-five words 25
Every additional ten words 05
All deliveries within a half-mile radius
of office 15
Beyond the above distance, per mile..      .26
The N. W. * P. M. Telephone Co. are
prepared to erect private lines in New Westminster and Port Moody, or between theso
places, and to connect the some with the
Central Telephone Office, if desired.
Parties wishing Telephones should apply
to the undersigned.
CHARLES FOSTER,
Boc. 7, 1883. Sec'y-Troas.
BOOTS & SHOES
IN EVERY VARIETY
FBOH
HEATHORN'S
BOOT & SHOE
MANUFACTORY.
VICTORIA.
AT   VICTORIA PRICES
E. THOMAS,
Under  the new Oddfellows' Hall,
COLUMBIA STREET.
(ESTABLISHED 1862.)
FRED.'K ~EICKH0PF
GENERAL DEALER IN
GROCERIES
Provisions,
Dry   C3rOo<a.s
CLOTHING
BOOTS & SHOES,
(fcC.i &o.
Of First-class Quality,
AND    AT
Moderate   nates-
Corner of Front   and Begbiu Streets,
NEW   WESTMINSTER.
00  TO  THE
San   Francisco
BOOT k ^ SHOE
8TOBB!
and bet tour muhey's worth!
Boots & Shoes
(From an Infant's Shoo up to a Man's Boot
MADE   TO   ORDER.
Repairing Neatly Executed
Highest Market Price paid for
HIDES.
JAMES ROUSSEAU,
COLUMBIA   5TRECT. OPP. BANK OP B  C
An  ENGLISH  CLERGYMAN   WHO THINKS   THI
TEA KKTTLI LEAUa TO TUB   MM   bUTTLt-
1 he Dean of Bangor forwards for publication a full report of his much criticiaeu pneoch
od excessive ten drink log. He says; I am
quite willing to be responsible for the words
which I uttered, but not for the sentimruts
attributed to me by critics who have never
read my speech as a whole. Tbe address
was delivered at a public meeting in Bangor,
held on the ttth inst., to aid thu movement
for introducing practical cookery in elementary schools.
In his speech the Dean said: 1 sometimes
sea young men and young women, well dressed, well behaved, intelligent, and refined
in manner, but prematurely old, with sunken
cheecks, stooping shoulders, and toothless
gnins, and I say to myself. "I suspect
those people are badly fed, They spend
much money on their clothes to keep up appearances. Hut they aro ignorant of the
laws of physical health. They suffer from
want of better food in their homes." [Hear,
hear.] The origin of the mischief is in the
want of more intelligent and skilful house*
wifery. If a woman does not know how to
cook and to make tbe best of the resources
within her reach, she boils the kettle forever,
and enfeebles her husband and sons by
drenching them with oceans of tea, morning,
noon, and night. ["Hear, hear," and
laughter.]
I regret that the dm of tea has become bo
excessive in Wales. I think the people wore
in every way stronger, better, and happier
when they fed mainly upon theold-fashionod
sustenance of oatmeal and milk in their
various forms. If I had my way, there
would th' very much leu tea drinking
than there is among our people of ail
classes. [ "Hear heat,''and laughter.] Oatmeal aud milk produced, in my opinion,
strong, hardy, muscular, conteuted, good-
tempered men and women. Kxcessive tea
drinking creates a generation of nervous,
hysterical, discontented people, always complaining of the existing order of the universe
scolding their neighbors, and sighing after
the impossible. [ "Hear, hear, and
laughter.] Good cooking of more solid substances would, I firmly believe, enable
them to take far happier and mora correct
views of existence. In fact, I suspect that
over-much tea drinking, by destroying the
calmness of the nerves, is acting as a dangerous revolutionary force among ns. [Laughter]
If I may say so without incurring the wrath
of the Chairman, 1 will say that tne torrents
of bad toa seem to me to be swelling into a
flood of radicalism.    [Renewed laughter.]
This bad housewifery ia not only productive of possible revolution but of lamentable immorality. Excessive toa drinking,
renewed thrice a day, and other forms of bad
feeding, make both men and women feel
weak. What is the result? You will remember tbat when Mrs. Brown, on her way
to Brighton, felt again and again what she
called "a sinking* she had perpetual recourse to a certuin bottle, which in the long
run did her no good, but mado her sink
more. [L&ughter.] A badly ted population
suffering from the effects of poor housewifery
must be subject to the sense of "sinking."
Thus the tea kettle goes before thu gin
bottle, and the physical weakness and nervous irritability that had their origin in the
bad cookery of an ignorant, thriftless housewife, end in the ruin of intemperance and
deadly disease.—London Telegraph.
LIFE 1NTHK MANITOBA  WOODH.
The loggers are hurrying into the woods.
One of them tells a reporter the story of a
logger's day. He says. "The first thing to
be done iu the fall is the building of a
shanty, which is generally constructed of
logs, roofed with lumber. This is fitted up
inside with bunks for sleeping purposes, in
which hemlock or snruce brush is commonly
used as heddiu
V
t-hiuks  between  the
18 ALCOHOL GOOD FOB SMOKERS ?
The German savant, Dr. Kissling, has re
cently made some interesting experiments on
this subject, the cigars being smoked with an
aspirator, and the smoke drawn through a
cooler and five bottles. Of the latter, the
first and third were empty, the second being
filled with alcohol, the fourth with dilute
sulphuric acid, and tho fifth with caustic
soda.
Tne general results ol the*e researches by
the German savant are of interest to all cigar
smokers. He found that the active poison-
oub constituents of tobacco smoke are carbonic oxide, Bulphydtic ncid, prussic acid,
and nicotine. The three first named are
present in tobacco smoke in too small
quantities, and are too volatile to deserve any
consideration in judging of the effect of using
tobacco on the system. The picolinc baaea
are present in the smoke in relatively small
quantities, bo that the poisonous qualities
may be attributed almost exclusively to the
nicotine, The amount of nicotine iu smoke
depends chiefly on the quantity a nicotine in
the tobacco. The quantity of nicotine destroyed by the combustion of a cigar ia re
lativcly small.
Perhaps the most interesting remit of tlie
experiments is that they show that as nicotine
is soluble in alcohol, it Jh more than probable
that the use of alcohol beverages prevents
the local accumulation of nicotine, and
hastens its removal from the body. In
other words, a glass of beer or wine h the
proper concomitant to the pipo or cigar.—
London Time*.
.UIONG THE QBCrGBAPHERfl.
Within another year much Information
about the Coingo and the commercial enterprises developing there will be accessible.
The whole course of tho river, from its
mouth to Stanley Pool, has been carefully
surveyed and mapped. Stanley's furthest
station now is at the mouth of the Ikelemba
River, about 1,000 miles up tlie river. He
haa established friendly relations with all the
natives. Commorce in Central Africa is
destined to find along the Congo the lino of
its most rapid development.
Prof. Nordeuskiold has believed, sinco he
made the northeast passage, that in AuguBt
every year vessels from Europe could pass
through the Kara Sea and reach the Yenisei
River. If this were so, it would be a fact
of commercial importance; but, tho experience of Lieut. Hovgaard in the Dijmphna
and of the international polar party in the
Varna confirms the older belief that it is
not safe to count at any time upon the
navigability of the Kara waters. Lieut.
Hovgaard has giving up his trip along the
Siberian coast and has »eturned to Vardo on
his way home.
A man who was once known aa Prince
Charles Edmnnd de Bourbon haa died in
Breda, Holland, in such poverty that he was
buried at the public expense in the paupers'
cemetery. His father was a German watchmaker of Jewish descent named Naundorf.
Fifty years ago this man gave himself out to
be a son of LouiB XVI., claimed that he was
born at Versailles on the 27th of March,
1785, and called himself Charles Louis, Duke
of Normandy. Many persons were induced
to believe in the truth of his pretensionB.
He died in 1845 at Delft, Holland, and his
claims were taken by the Bon, who has just
died at Breda. For a time the latter obtained aid and support, but in the end theso fell
off, and he died in abject misery.
The historical church doors upon which
Luther nailed his famous ninety-five theses
at Wittenberg in 1517 are now to be seen at
the chief entrance to the Church of St. Bartholomew at Berlin. Wittenberg was bombarded during the Seven years war, and, the
church being almost levelled with the ground,
the doors were badly damaged. They were,
however, patched up and restored to their
places when tho church was rebuilt; but as
they suffered a good deal from the effects of
the weather, they were in time removed for
safety to the Berlin Museum, where they
remained until King Frederick William V.
presented them to the Church of St. Bartholomew upon its completion. For the original doon, which are popularly known in
Germany aa the "Gates of the Reformation,"
new ones- of Bronze engraved with Luther's
theses have been substituted at Wittenberg.
These were given to the castle church in 1858
by King Frederick William IV, and are tbe
finest things of their kind in Europe.
logs ore packed" «ith mow and chips, and
tbe shanty U heated by means of what is
called a 'caboose,' or open tire place, from
which the smoke makes its exit by an open*
ing in the roof. The cooking ia generally
done by a man, who is often paid the highest
wages in the camp. The fare consists of
barrel, or rattlesnake pork, beans, potatoes,
dried apples, and such game as the men find
in the woods. A shanty man doesn't get
much time to loaf around tho house. Every
muming two hours before daylight the foreman's 'Hurrah, boys!' is heard, aud a few
minutes after the whole shanty is alive.
Some arc greasing boots, fixing helves, and
grinding axes, while others are performing
their aulusiona and running their fingers
through their hair aa a sort of apology for
combing. Breakfast over, the different gangs
set out to the scene of their work, which in
some cases is from four to five milos from
this shanty, and as work is always com*
meuced by daylight, you can easily see we
have no chance to be late risers. The men
work all day, merely resting to devour their
dinner, which is generally eaten frozen or
half thawed by the Bide of a log fire. Al-out
dusk a start is made for the shanty, which is
reached long after dark. Supper eaten, the
weary men 'bunk in' and are soon asleep."
Winnipeg Times,
A lady calling herself Mme. Dalwville
lately took a magnificent apartment in Paris,
She usually spent her day shopping, but her
ready-money purchases did not amount to
much. On Nov. 12 two jewellers and a
clerk for a furrier waited on her with valuable jewelry and a magnificent fur mantle,
The lady examined the jewels, tried on the
mantle, and, under the pretext of showing
the things to a person in the next room,
disappeared. The employees waited aud at
length inquired for their customer, who had
flown by the servants' staircase, taking articles w ortli $G,000. Parisian tradesmen
ought to be up to such dodges.
The Rast Goftar, a native paper published in Bombay, pretends to have made the
discovery that the present dress of an Englishman is nothing more or less than the
original dress of the Parsces. The statement is rather vogue, and it ia not explained
whether the modern "chimney pot" hat or
the awallow-tailed coat of evening dress is
included in tho discovery; but it is affirmed
that engravings on the ancient rocks of Per-
aepoliB and the comparatively later monuments on the Take Bastan snow that Persians of ancient times wore tho Knglisman's
'abort tunica, pantaloons, and boots." It
is added that several ancient figures of Zoroaster mto clad in costumes which closely
resemble modem European fashions.
The common belief that population in the
West India Islands is stationary or declining
is so far from being accurate that, as Sir
Anthony Musgrave, Governor of Jamaica,
points out in his recent report, it is increasing at a very much more rapid rate than the
population of tho United Kingdom. The
statistics of population in the islands Bhow
an increaso of 10 per cent, ou the last decennial period, while the increase iu the
United Kingdom in the ten years preceding
the last census waa under 11 per cent. This
large increase appears to bo general throughout the ialandB, and ia only very slightly
influenced by coolie immigration. "The po
nutation of tho West Indies," adds Sir A.
Musgrave, "is now greater than that of any
of the .urgent Australian colonies, and three
times that of the New Zealand.
The Tories iu England are jubilant over
the return of Sir Frederick Milner for York
The Solicitors' Journal Bays: "The York
election is noteworthy as being the first
since the Corrupt Practices act of last sea
sion came into operation. The constituency
numbers 1I,10S, and the maximum sum allowed under the act to be expended by a
singl" candidate is$3,2oO. This is, however,
exclusive of the returning officer's charges,
and the personal expenses of tho candidate,
not exceeding SfiiUU. The candidate ia now
relieved from all costs of conveyance of
voters to the poll, the payment of which is
an illegal practice, but of the $3,250 every
expense connected with public meetings,
printing, advertising, hire of committee
rooms, the election agent's fee, and salaries
of polling agents, clerks, and messengers will
have to be paid. It will bo interesting to
learn whether this sum has been found adequate,"
Notwithstanding the numeroua crimes that
have been committed in the compartment
railway cara of Europe, this system of travelling ia still maintained, as though for thu
special benefit of thieves and garroters, and
instances of theft and violenco continue to
be of frequent occurrence. Rignora Falooni,
an Italian prima donna, is the victim of the
latest of this offences. While travailing
from Madrid to Malaga, at the station of
Alcazar a handsomely dressed young man
entered her compartment, and by degrees
dropped into conversation with her. He
finally mado himself so agreeable that when
at a station further on he left the carriage
and returned with a lemonade for tho lady
she waa easily persuaded to accept it. The
drink was drugged; and when Mine. Falconi
awoke at Cordova she found that her pleasant travelling companion had disappeared,
and with him the best part of her baggage,
including all her jewelry, a fan aet with
diamonds, a costly cashmere shawl, and
other articles of value.
Sir Joseph Porter, K. C. B., otherwise ex-
First Lord of the Admiralty W. H. Smith,
has been staying in Ireland, and says:
"Emigration to my mind isthe only remedy.
The population is not, I believe, on the
whole, too large for the land of Ireland, and
the industries of Ireland, if properly carried
on, would support them in prosperity and
happiness. But in tho present state of
things, I believe emigration is the only
remedy. Where is the evil in emigration?
There is not a gentleman who has a large
family that does not feel it for their benefit
that some of its members should emigrate
aud live in Canada, the United States, or
Australia." 	
The Brown "Animal Sanatory Institution"
(under the government of the University of
London) haa issued a notice in which it is
said that hydrophobia occurs in dogs of all
ages, and may appear at any season of the
year. It is recognized by a change of demeanor of the dog, which becomes dejected,
morose, inclined to roam, and anxious to
hide itself. The animal gnaws at wool,
stones, and any refuse which it sees, snaps
at imaginary objects, and becomes unusually
excited by utrange or sudden lolses. It rubs
ita throat with its paws, as if striving to
get rid of some object lodged there; at the
same time there is a more or less abundant
How of saliva from the mouth. The dog will
attack its master, or animals of any kind;
but it ismost easily roused to fury by the presence of other dogs. There is throughout
the disease no'fear of water. In one form of
the disease, called "dumb madness," there
is paralysis of the iaw, and therefore inability to bite. If a dog has shown any of the
symptoms of madness, it should be at once
loose-muzzled and securely chained up.
Owners of dogs are warned of the danger
they may incur by allow ing their faces and
hands (especially if scratched) to be licked
by the ammalB, oven if these show no sign
of madness. All dog bites should be immediately cleansed by suction and washing,
and the wound should b*3 muter, rod as soon
ns possible.
New Fall Goods
 JUST RECEIVED AT	
JAS. ELLARD & CO.'S
Specially Selected by Mr. laney while ii rlRQPI,
 CONSISTING OF	
DRESS   GOODS!
ALL WOOL PLAIDS, BEIGES, FREWCH SERGES, OTTOMAN MERTH-
LEUX, FANCY PLAID CASHMERES, VELVET k VKLVETEEN8,
IN ALL COLORS AND STYLES.
Wqht UonV-WOQH COLLARS and cuffs, rufflings and ruches in
HUH iUJUn.  nOddi, all shades, silk and chenille scarfs and
SQUARES.     APRONS, A GREAT VARIETY.
M7U7 HfflM TABLE COVERS, ANTIMACCA8SAR8 AND KTfW! CfflVI VO
lUjtT   iHILiM    TOILETS, LACE AND NET CURTAINS,    IiUWdIILDO
QUIL8, TOWELS, ETC.
Lad'es land children's Brocaded silk, ottoman Cloth and German
Carl Dolmans, listers and Jackets, the Latest Fashions
IT)r this Fall and Winter.
ALL STYLES IN LADIES* AND CHILDREN 8 FUR, FELT, FEATHER-EDGE
AND STRAW
HATS AND  BONNETS
A SPLENDID ASSORTMENT OF INFANTS' WOOLLEN JACKETS, M5LIS8K
HATS, BONNETS, MITT8, GAITERS, ETC.
A Full Stock of Flowers, Feathers, Hat Ornaments Beads,
ivtiiiLxiory Trlmmln««*.
r   AflDO   MALTESE, SPANISH, HONITON, AND ;BRETONNE   r   inTJQ
I jAtLiiLO LACES, IN ALL COLORS. 1jAL<JCj&
A Full Line or Men's and Dot's Clothing, Shirts, Collars, Neck-
tics, HOsle j, Etc.
VERY LARGE STOCK OF HEMP, KIDDERMINSTER, TAPESTRY ft BRUSSELS
Carpets ctn<a. rtixgai
FLOOR CLOTHS AT VERY LOW PRICES.
CALL AND EXAMINE OUR STO. K.
JAMES ELLARD & CO.,
Corner Mary and Columbia Streets, New Westminster.
Caledonia Hotel
HEAD OF PORT MOODY.
17. B. KELLY.
Proprietor,
THE PEOPRIETOB OF THE ABOVE HOTEL takers pleasure in
announcing that tho House is now completed with every convenience for the traveling public THE TABLES are well supplied with
every article in seuson.andTHEBAR is provided with a well-selected
Stock of
LIQUORS AND CIGARS-
THE BEDS are well aired, and THE STABLING is oxtensivo
and the best of Feed always ready for Horses.
It may be well to remind visitors that this Hotel is within a few
minutes walk of the Railway Wharf and Station, and just at the
Terminus of the New Road, now in course of construction.
GUESTS may depend on receiving every attention and a hearty
welcome from the undersigned, whose long experience is a guarantee
of everything being comfortable and satisfactory.
J. T. SCOTT, Manager.
LONDON MARKET.
W. B. T0WNSEND
HAVING, BY A LONG PERIOD IN THIS CITY, acquired a
reputation for supplying the choicest quality of
BEEF, MUTTON, LAMB, PORK and SAUSAGES
Assures his customers and the public that he is always true to the
position he has obtained, and supplies FAMILIES, HOTELS and
STEAMBOATS promptly, at the lowest market rates.
es-VEOETABLES FRESH EVERY   DAYTa
General  Merchandise
Chas. McDonough
GROCERIES,
CROCKERY,
HAS AN EXTENSIVE STOCK OF
DRY GOODS.        BOOTS & SHOES,
GLASSWARE, HATS A CAPS
IVEexx's %Sc Boy's Stilts
And a great variety of articles necessary for a household.   He has also,
GRAIN, SEEDS,  POTATOES, LIME, and GENERAL STORES.
N. B.—Farm Produce bought at market rates or sold on commission.
K£" Orders from the interior promptly attended to. ul2
Direct Importation
-:o:-
E. BROWN,
BEGS to inform the residents of New Westminster and
vicinity, that he is   constantly receiving from Europe
shipments of choice
WINES,
SPIRITS t
ENGLISH ALES,
LONDON & DUBLIN STOUT,
Wbich he will supply
BOND  or   DUTY PA1D<^£
In quantities to suit purchasers.
LIQUEURS,
HOLLOWAYS PILLS
This Great Household Medicine ranks among the leasl
ing necessaries of Life.
These famous Pills purify iht BLOOD
and set most powerfully, yet iMthi»grr,
on the
LIVER, STOMACH.   KIDNEYS
and BOWELS, gi'i.g ton*, enerty, asvt
»IB.i to the.* great fialN SPRINGS OF
LIFE. Tbe? sr* constantly nceamesded as
s never falling remedy in all cssen vrlier. tha
coostiluiion, Iron whatever ca.se, has be-
conie Impaired or weakened. 1 hey art *••*
derfully efficacious in all ailmanti incidental
lo Kerns In of all age.; nasi a. a GENERAL
FAMILY MEDICINE, ai. nirarpasawd.
Its searching and Healing
Properties are known
throughout the World
For the cure of BAD LEGS, Bad Breasti
Old Wounds, Sores anil Ulcers,
II Is »b Infallible remedy. If effectually fab-
bed on the neck snd cl eat, as salt inlo meat,
it Cures SOI.KTHROAT, Bronchitis. Colds,
Coughs, snd even AS1IIMA. Ker Glsadnlar
Swellings, Abscesses, riles, Fistula",
GOUT    RHEUMATISM,
And ever, kind of BKIN DIBZAPB, h h.i
never been known lo (ail.
The rills and Ointment are Maaafsetued
only at
C33 OXFORD STREET   LONDON
And sre sold by all vendors of Medl.ine.
throughout the civilized win Id,with dircciioss
for nse in a'most every language.
Tho Trnilii Mark, of theee Medicines are
registi'ied in Ottawa. Hence, sny one
throughout the British Possessions w o ma.
keep the American Ceunterleits IV ss ., wilt
lie prosecuted.
t9~Piirohssei. should look te Ihe t.aU>
on the Pots snd Boxes. IT tbe address Is list
633, lis lord Street, London, they sre snarl
ous.
NEW TIME TABLE
(LIMITED)
To Take KffccToct. 20th, I8S3.
Usvh Victoria for Nsw Westminster,
TUKSDAYS and FRIDAYS, at 7 a. m
Leave Nsw Wehtminster fur Victoria,
WEDNESDAYS ft SATURDAYS, 7 a. m.
Mavs New Westminster for Yale on
WEDNESDAYS ft SATURDAYS, 7 a. m.;
THURSDAYS k SUNDAYS, 5 a. m.
Leave Yale for New Westminster, on
MONDAYS, 10 a. m.; TUESDAY8, rjt.rs.|
FRIDAYS, tf a. m.i SATURDAYS, S a. m.
C. P. N. Co. reserve the right to alter thin
time tahlo at any time.
T.L. BEIGGS,
o20 Agent.
OiTlce or the i ontrnciors
CANADIAN
PACIFIC   RAILWAY.
YALE, March 1st, 1882.
New Schedule of Wages
-FOB-
WHITE LABOR,
—ON THK—
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY
In ..rltlsli Columbia.
Overseers $125 y month
Rock Foremen $3 to (4 tf day
Earth Foremen $2 60 to $3       "
Bridge Foremen S3 60 to t6       "
Bridge Carpenters (lit class) $3 50       "
do do        (2d   class) $3       "
Masons t260to$3 60       "
Stonecutters |3 to S3 50       "
Blacksmiths (1st claw) S3 60       "
do (2dclass) |S       "
Drillers f2 to (2 26       "
Laborers SI 67 to $2       "
Hewers $3 SO       "
Uhoppers »2toJ2 20       "
All outside labor io hours per day.
All carpenters to furnish their own
chest tools.
All employes to find themselves bed,
board and lodging.
Boarding Houses will be convenient
along the line.
Board $4 per week.
It will not be compulsory for employes
to board in the Company's houses.
Wages will be paid monthly on the
10th of each month.
A. ONDERDONK,
mli 14 General Manager
flyer's Cherry Pectoral
"Onville.Ohlo, Sept. 10,1883.
COLDS) " Having been subject to a bron»
tUtt aflenttna, with Sreqneat
•old., (or a number of years, I hereby oof
tlfy that Aram's omrssslr rscTORAj, gives
me prompt relief, and I. the most oBeotlvw
remedy I ban ever triad.
•Taxae A. HAtrrLTOir,
JMMor ol Th. assess*)."
" lis. Ollead, Ohio, June M, 188J.
-1 have used Ann's Ckksbt
PwcToun this aprlBg for • seta sad Inns trouble with good
effect, snd I am pleased to recommend IS
So any one similarly affected.
ELajtoy BAUonwAjr,
Proprietor Globe Hotel."
Ftur AXIS BT
!>.J.C.AyerACo.,LoweH,ryrM6V

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