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The Penticton Press Jan 4, 1908

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Array ^be   ifcenttcton
VOL. 2.   No. 25.
PENTICTON, B.C., SATURDAY, JANUARY 4, 1908.
$1.00 PEfk^&J^AgyAggE.
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
HEAD  OFFICE, TORONTO
ESTABLISHED  1867
B. E. WALKER, President
ALEX. LAIRD, General Manager
A. H. IRELAND, Superintendent of
Branches
Paid up Capital, $10,000,000
Rest, - - - 5,000,000
Total Assets, -  113,000,000
Branches throughout Canada, and in the United States and England
A GENERAL BANKING BUSINESS TRANSACTED
FARMERS'   BANKING
86
Every facility afforded Farmers for their banking
business.    Sales Notes cashed or taken
for collection
BANKING  BY  MAIL.���Deposits may be made or withdrawn by
mail.    Out-of-town accounts receive every attention
Penticton Branch     *    ��    J. J. HUNTER, Manager.
\Ar
..*��-
�����+��-
���o-
.are You Building ?
We can supply you with anything you require,
LUMBER, SHINGLES, SASH, DOORS, and
BUILDING PAPER. We also keep on hand
a large stock of Fluming Material. Try some
of our Vulcanized Rubber Roofing on your
outbuildings; it is the best. We keep Corrugated Carpet Felt to put under carpet.  Try it.
BARGAIN  SALE
-OF-
Ladies'   Blouses and Skirts
For prices and quality see our window.
NORMAN HILL
The Up-To=Date Ladies and Gents Furnisher
SADDLES SADDLES
For the balance of the year
our line of Saddles will be
sold for cost.
I. KENT & SON.
SADDLES SADDLES
K
* COMMERCIAL
Livery, Feed and Sale Stable
DIGNAN and WEEKS, Proprietors.
If you ./ant a Stylish Outfit, this is the place to come. You can always
get teams just when you want them. We make a specialty of keeping
good horses, safe rigs, carrful drivers and also saddle and pack horses.
We are also putting in Hay and Grain for sale, and as we buy for cash
we get the best rates and our patrons get the benefit.
Special Attention To The Wants Of Commercial Men.
I
���:
g
L<v
I THE PENTICTON LUMBER i
SYNDICATE Ltd.        a
i
Will deliver DRY SLABS      J
$3.50  ^
J
In 4J ft. lengths to householders in the townsite for
a cord.   A full cord���good measure.
BRING CASH WITH ORDER TO
OFFICE and YARDS on MAIN STREET
Penticton Stage and Livery
Stables.
Keremeos, Hedley and Princeton Stage Connect with Steamer "Okanagan."
Makes connection with Great Northern R'y at Keremeos.
Pianos and Furniture moved to all points,  and a general Draying
Business transacted.
Saddle and Pack Horses.
Top Buggies, Four-horse Rigs for Commercial Men.
W. E. Welby, Prop.       Penticton.
THE MASQUERADE BALL
Large Crowd, Good Music, Fine
Costumes make Fancy Dress
Bail a Great Success
G. Smith Lumber Go. V
Between sixty and seventy
people, arrayed in a great variety
of costumes, some quite original,
some comical, many beautiful,
attended the Fancy Dress and
Masquerade Ball given by the
Penticton Quadrille Club in Steward's Hall last Friday evening.
Interest in the event has been
steadily growing since the first
announcement, and much care
had been bestowed on their costumes by the majority of the
dancers.
The able president, Mrs. G. F.
Gurnsey, [assisted by the energetic committee of management
consisting of Mesdames McNeill,
Were, Smith, St. Onge, Huth
and Swinton, and Messrs Leir,
Smith, DeLong, Huth, Hill, Kendall, Swinton and Plummer, and
by several other citizens who
lent their aid, excelled all previous efforts in the way of decorations; and the expressions which
were heard on all sides in praise
of the arrangements of the hall
both for beauty and for comfort
were richly deserved. The platform, the lamps, the ceiling, the
supper table and the cosy corners
all bore splendid testimony to
the good taste and resourceful
energy of the decorators; and
those who went to so much
trouble will have the satisfaction
of knowing that their efforts
added in no small degree to the
evening's enjoyment.
The floor was in good shape;
the music provided by the Kelowna Dance Orchestra was all
that could be desired; the bountiful sapper contributed by the
ladies was most temptingly displayed, and tasted even better
than it looked; and when dancing
commenced it was kept up with
great energy till the program
was completed.
A few minutes before supper
the dancers lined up for the
Grand March, directed by Mr.
W. F. H. Swinton, who put them
through a series of very interesting figures. When the Grand
March was over the judges, Capt.
Estabrooks, Mrs. Estabrooks,
and Mrs. Chalmers, got together
to decide what costumes had
earned the prizes.
That they had ^o easy task to
perform was acknowledged by
the Captain in announcing the
decision when he said that, owing to the many excellent costumes, they simply had to rack
their brains to decide which ones
deserved the prizes. However,
they finally agreed that the lady's
prize (a beautiful silver fern-
bowl) belonged to the lady representing "Folly" who proved
to be Mrs. Gurnsey; while the
gentleman's prize (a pair of gold
cuff-links) was earned by the
gentleman representing "Robinson Crusoe," who, when unmasked, turned out to be Jas.
Edmonds. After congratulations
were over, Mr. Wade proposed a
vote of thanks and three cheers
for the president in appreciation
of the efforts she had put forth
to make the ball a success. The
cheers were heartily given and
all joined in singing "For she's
a jolly good fellow," after which
the guests partook of the supper
provided by the ladies
evening dress and mask, but a
large majority were costumed;
and, if we might be permitted a
suggestion, it would be that, at
similar events in future, those in
costume write on slips of paper
what their costumes represent,
and hand them to the judges. This
would be of great assistance to
them, and could also be used by
us in preparing a correct list for
publication. The following is as
complete a list of those in costume
as could be obtained without
having such a list to refer to:
Folly Mrs. G. F. Gurnsey
Robinson Crusoe   Jas. Edmonds
Chinaman C. A.C. Steward
Queen of Hearts   Mrs. St. Onge
Sailor W. R. King
Jockey T. Bassett
Clown L. W. Plummer
Gipsy girl      Miss H. MacKenzie
Union Jack Mrs. Parkinson
Sunny Jim Chas. Were
Empress of China Mrs. Steward
Gehisha Mrs. E, Smith
Highlander Wm. Denniston
Columbia Miss Thompson
Local and Personal
Clown
Mother Goose
Olden times
Butterfly
Domino
English courtier
Army officer
Cream of wheat
Mexican cavalier
Algerian chasseur
T. McDonald
Mrs. McNeill
Miss Barnes
Mrs. Mitchell
Mrs.  Wade
Fred Baker
T. Hudson
E. Smith
S. St. Onge
H. Leir
Duchess of Devonshire Mrs. Were
Grecian girl
Domino
Clown
English courtier
Uncle Sam
Negro
Country hayseed
Aramis
English courtier
Soldier
Nurse
Periott
Spanish lady
Autumn
Chinese lady
German girl
Mother Hubbard
Little Bo Peep
Miss Mutch
A.   H. Wade
W. Arnott
H. Huth
J. O'Grady
H. M. McNeill
J. Gardiner
W. J. Gibbons
C. F. Johnson
E. Chalmers
Mrs. Lester
Robt. Reid
Mrs. Huth
Mrs. Waterman
Miss Fowler
Miss B. Fowler
Miss Cowley
Miss Ley
Medal Contest.
It was three o'clock before the
program was finished, and although every one was tired, all
departed feeling that this had
been one of the most enjoyable
dances ever held in Penticton.
Fewer visitors from outside
points were present than were
expected, Okanagan Falls and
Kelowna being the best represented plices.
Some were dressed in ordinary
The silver medal contest, held
by the local W. C. T. U. on New
Year's evening in the Methodist
Church, as usual brought out a
good attendance. There were
five contestants: Gladys Weeks,
Tom Martinson, Charlie Thompson, Christina Roadhouse, and
Chester latimer. All did exceptionally well and showed that
they had been carefully trained.
The judges, however, were of
opinion that Christina Roadhouse
surpassed the others, and she
was, in consequence, awarded
the medal. The points upon
which judgment is given are
voice, articulation, gesture, memory, and general effect, ten being
the maximum number of marks
for each. While the audience
usually bases its opinion upon
general effect, it may easily be
seen that the judges have a difficult task to determine to whom
the award is due.
Geo. E. Winkler performed the
duties of chairman, and ��� other
items of the programme were, a
piano duet by Misses Rowe and
Ede; a solo by Miss Bessie
Thompson; a violin solo by Mr.
Wallace; an instrumental by the
Discord Orchestra; a solo by A.
S. Miller; a whistling solo by H.
C. Huycke, and a song by Charlie
Thompson.
The next contest will take
place in about three months.
Born-On Dec. 30th, to Mr.
and Mrs. Chas. E. Houser, a son.
Miss Messenger, of Kelowna,
was the guest of Miss MacKin-
lay for a few days this week.
The Misses Florence and Bessie Thompson left on Thursday
for a few days' visit at Peachland.
F. H. Latimer left on Monday
to survey s)me timber claims for
the S. O. Land Co. in the vicinity of Fairview.
The ladies of the W. C. T. U.
gave a reception to the young
men of the town on the afternoon of New Year's Day.
The Court of Revision and appeal respecting the assessment
roll for 1908 will be held in the
court house, Penticton, on Saturday, Jan. 18.
C. A. Jackson, dentist, of Vancouver, arrived on Wednesday,
and has opened an office in the
S. O. Land Co. block. See his
card in this issue.
The skating was very good on
the pond across the river for two
or three days this week. A
large party availed themselves
of the rare amusement on New
Year's Day.
Andrew Jensen and John Ayer,
charged with being drunk and
creating a disturbance in the B.
C. Hotel, appeared before Justices Wade and Clement on Friday, and were each fined five
dollars and costs.
J. J. Hunter, manager of the
local branch of the Canadian
Bank of Commerce, returned on
Monday from Vancouver, accompanied by his bride. The Press
joins in extending congratulations to the happy couple.
To all appearance the embassy
of Rudolph Lemieux, Canadian
Commissioner to Japan, to the
flowery kingdom has amounted
to little or nothing in the way of
limiting Japanese immigration,
no written promises having been
obtained from the Japanese government.
F. T. Griffin, C. P. R. land
commissioner, states that from
an exhaustive report made up by
the railway and milling people
of the Canadian west, he finds
the crop of 1907 to be valued at
$20,000,000 more than that of
1906. Why complain about hard
times?
The total collections for the
Christmas Tree amounted to
$139.30. From this 222 presents
and 260 bags of candy were purchased. The sum was apportioned among the local stores as
follows : Main, $61.90; Nesbitt,-
$21.00; St. Onge, $18.30; King,
$14.15; Wade, $4.50; Roberge,
$9.75; Pomeroy, $1.60; Penticton
Hardware, $8.10. The committee wish to thank all who assisted in making the event a success.
Canada to Supply Timber to the
World.
FRUIT GROWERS' EXCHANGE.
The Regular Annual Meeting of the
shareholders of the Southern Okanagan
Fruit Growers' Association will be held
on Monday evening, January 6, 1908, at
8 p. m., in the Woodmen's Hall, over
W. R. King & Co's store.
The purpose of the meeting is the
Election of Officers for the coming year
and consideration of such other business
as may come before it.
24-2 E. W. MUTCH, Scc'y.
Our first assistant, Charlie
Shaw, got stringent instructions
from his best girl to join her for
Christmas at Moosejaw, and left
on Saturday for that point. While
it is hard on the staff to get along
without Charlie for two weeks,
still the post - master will now
have an easier time of it. ���Armstrong Advertiser. (Evidently
Charlie hasn't changed any since
leaving Penticton.)
A grand ball will be given in
Steward's Hall on the evening of
Friday, the 17th. inst, the proceeds to be devoted to the purchase of some means of fire protection for the town. Tickets
will be two dollars and will admit the holder and ladies to the
dance and a sit down supper. No
effort is being spared to make
this dance the greatest success
of the kind ever held in Penticton.
The new home of Mr. and Mrs.
L. P. Evarts and family was the
scene of a very pleasant gathering in the form of a surprise party on New Year's evening. Those
present were Mr. and Mrs. Evarts, Misses May, Elsie and Edna
Evarts, Mr. and Miss Alcock,
Mr. and Mrs. McGee, Mr. and
Mrs. Partridge, Mr., Mrs. and
the Misses Hudon, Mr. and Mrs.
Baker, Mr, and Mrs. Lister, Mr.
and Mrs. Mould, Mr. and Mrs.
Pickering, Mr. and Mrs, McKenzie, Mrs. Seaman, Mr. Cornett,
Mr. Huycke, Mr. Clement, and
Mr. Wallace, violinist. Dainty
refreshments were served at 12
o'clock and dancing and games
formed the entertainment until
about three a. m. when tne gathering dispersed, satisfied that
the New Year had begun well.
The general increase in the
price of wood for the past few
years has had the effect of turning public attention to the timber
supply in general. To many,
the increase in prices is sufficiently explained by saying that there
is a combine among lumber producers and manufacturers. But,
independent of the possible existence of any combine, a deeper
cause underlies the increase in
prices, and the cause lies in this,
that timber is becoming harder
and harder for the manufacturer
to get. Greater and greater
economy and use of materials
formerly considered as waste is
being introduced into the manufacture of wood, but in spite of
it all the price of logs is going
up, owing to higher wages that
have to be paid, greater distances
the logs have to be brought and
many other reasons.
Not in America alone is the
scarcity of timber being felt; it
has become a world-wide question. Only seven countries in
the world are now in a position
to export timber. In Europe
there are five, namely, Austro-
Hungary, Norway, Sweden, Finland and Russia; in America
there are two, namely, Canada
and the United States. But
Russia, Austro-Hungary and the
United States are increasing their
population and developing their
industries so fast that they cannot long continue to be exporting
countries. The timber of Norway is threatened with excessive
cutting. Germany, where the'
practice of forestry has been
brought to the greatest perfection, has never been able to supply home demands, and is a
heavy importer.
Canada, Sweden and Finland
are left, and their supply is hopelessly deficient for the world. If
Canada were to attempt to supply the United States alone, its
entire timber area would be cut
off and denuded in the course of
a very few years���probably less
than a decade.
Various estimates of Canada's
forest land have been given.
Eight hundred million acres was
a few years ago accepted as
pretty near the truth; but, considering the damage caused by
fire and other destructive agencies, it is doubtful if the existing
forests cover half that area. To
keep this area in its most productive state, thus enabling it to
meet the demand as far as possible and to produce the largest,
revenue, is the problem set those
in control of these areas, and the
protection of the forests against
fire and other dangers and their
proper management under forestry methods is the only way in
which this can be effected.
SAY,  BOYS!
Did you ever, have to let a good bargain slip by because you had no money
saved up? If so, don't be caught again
but begin now to save $6 or $10 a
month in the B. C. Permanent Loan
and Savings Co., of Vancouver.
Jas. F. Tupper,   Local Representative,' THE PENTICTON PRESS, PENTICTON, B.C. JANUARY 4, 1908.
K������sc*ae��w��M Ufl ^nrrncrx^wnszxxsma
THE PENTICTON PRESS
ISSUED    EVERY.  SATURDAY   AT
PENTICTON, B.C. BY
\V. J. CLIiMUNT.
Subscription $1.00 Per Year in
Advance.
ADVERTISING RATES ON
APPLICATION.
COMMUNICATIONS
Wpdonot hold ourselves responsible for the
oiiiniona of correspondents.
To the Editor of Tun Penticton Press:
Mr. Editor,���At the annual
meeting of the shareholders, of
the Southern Okanagan Fruit
Growers' Exchange, which is to
be held in the Woodmen's Hall
on Monday evening next, the
election of a Board of Directors
for the ensuing year will lake
place, and as a number of persons subscribed for slock and
made Ihe first payment thereon
but failed to respond to the call
for the final payment, il may not
be out of place for me to remind
them that unless the final payment is made on or before that
dale, they will be unable to take
part in the meeting and that the
shares of stuck so in arrears
must, according to law, be sold
at auction.
A statement of the condition
of the Exchange will be laid before the members at the meeting
on Monday, and a full discussion
of its affairs will give us all an
opportunity to make suggestions
that will be of service in placing
it on a better footing for the
coming season, and the Directors
hope to see every member present
at the meeting.
E. W. Mutch, Sec'y.
Penticton, Dec. 31st, 1907.
PEACHLAND.
The festive season is over ;
some are sorry and some are
glad.       . . .
The Dixie Jubilee Singers had
a large and appreciative house
Christmas evening in the Hall.
The children, 'and grown-ups
too, are having fine times coasting, from Mr. J. B. Robinson's
property down to the old Bennett
place, a distance of a quarter of
a mile.'      ""������',
The W. C. T. U. held a very
pleasant "At Home" in the Hall
New1 Year's evening.
The first Quadrille Club dance
was well attended the last night
of the old year.
Mr. and Mrs. Jas, Elliott have
the.sincere sympathy of the entire community.    Tho death of
their youngest child occurred   at
the home  Saturday  afternoon,
The funeral look  place  Monday
afternoon at 1:30 o'clock',   Rev.
Mr. Melnlyre officiating at  the]
h iuse and cemetery,    The pallbearers Were four of  the   buy:, ;
Hugh Ferguson, Harley Douglas, '
Geo, Robinson and Herbert Viv-'
ian.
Mi 13 Sharp, our primary department teacher, spent part of
her vacation at the home of her
brother at Sicamous.
The Misses Verna and II. Cal-
ander, Miss Keys, and Mr. H.
McColl, attended at Kelowna the
wedding of Miss Ada Martin and
Mr, Foster Forbes, of Regina,
last Wednesday.
Mr. and Mrs. Helmer, of Summerland returned home Friday,
having spent Xmas with Mrs.
Helmer's father, Mr. Pope. Mr.
and Mrs. H. Lang, of Vernon,
returned home Thursday.
Mis's A. McDougald spent the
holidays at her home, having
arrived Xmas eve from the Summerland College, where she is
studying music.
The Methodist Sunday School
held its entertainment in the
Hall on Monday evening. The
time was spent enjoyably, playing games, listening to speeches,
etc. Mrs. Vivian and Miss Sutton were pianists for the evening. Duett, Marjory and Malvern Hoover ; recitation, Elva
Murdon; trio, O. Ferguson, G.
Guromow and Geo. Necdham ;
recitation, Arnold Ferguson; trio,
O. Ferguson, E. Brown and Geo. j $
Needham; interesting speech by J
Rev. Mr. Mclntyre; quartette,
O. Ferguson, E. Brown, D. Rob-!
inson and Geo. Needham; recitation, Miss O. Young; instrumental duett, Misses Sutton and
Hoover. A dainty supper was
then partaken of, after which
Mr. Ferguson made a very interesting Santa, giving each a
liberal package of sweets.
^��-:5^x��#��'��^a^*��-������a��**-"^&*��v>-a��*B.#��""l^*-**-*,l^��-*��",^����'*^ iS&BaBS&BEBmaammmmmml^MmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmWm
(HENRY MAIN,! Penticton Store
DRUGGIST
and
STATIONER
j PENTICTON,
i
f.
!:
B. C. fj
Established 40 Years.
Alfred H. Wade, Prop.
Dry Goods, Gent's Furnishings, Boots and Shoes, Groceries
and General Merchandize of all Sorts
Agent for
GIANT POWDER CO.
OKANAGAN FLOUR MILLS CO.
Goods delivered through the town.
^'J I PENTSCTOM,
Prompt attention to orders.
B.C.
i
NARAMATA
House parties and concerts
have kept us busy the last few
weeks.
The contest concerts were a
great success, and added a goodly sum to the piano fund. Messrs
Croshaw a'nd Manchester were
well supported by the teams and
great credit is due them I'vv the
splendid results.
Mr.'!'. A. Smith, of Vancouver,
paid a (lying visit to his friends
last Tuesday.
Rev. A. T. Robinson, his
mother, and Dr. and Mrs. Mc-
Kechnie visited at the home of
Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Robinson
during the week.
Miss Ella Smith and Miss
Conny, of Summerland, were entertained by Miss Collins over
Sunday.
Mr.   and  Mrs.  Robinson   and  fj
family spent Christmas at their
Summerland home entertaining
family friends.
Mr. Roy Robertson, of Vernon,
was the guest of Mr. and Mrs.
Thomas Welband over Sunday.
Mr. and Mrs. Alex. Moreland
and son were Christmas and
week-end guests of Mr. Welband.
Mr. and Mrs. Mitchell entertained their Naramata friends
Christmas night.
Mrs. Gillespie and Messrs.
Gillespie, Manchester, and Miller
were entertained Christmas at
the home of Mr. Murk Manchester, of Summerland.
The general Christmas tree
was held Saturday night in the
new school house, which was
beautifully decorated. The concert given by adults and children
was most delightful. The little
people were all in Greek costume
and looked like pictures. They
did their part of the work in a
very acceptable manner, not one
failing when needed. The older
people entered into the general
happy spirit of the time. Santa
Claus was present and added to
the delight of all. During his
speech he turned to Mrs. Gillespie and in the name of her Naramata friends presented her a
well-filled purse as a Xmas gift;
it was a complete surprise to the
lady, who could only say a feu-
word:; of Ihankr. to the applauding audience.
l\" can only hope for all a
brighl New fear and fulfilment
of desii :.-.
The Literal y.
Tho meeting of the Literary
Society on Thursday evening was
the best attended of any so far
this winter, The programme was
a debate entitled, "Resolved that
Canada has in store a greater
future than the United States."
The affirmative was taken by-
Messrs. Eraut, Hibbert and
Smith, and the negative by-
Messrs. Wilton, Harris and McKenzie. The decision of the
judges was two to one in favor
of the negative. Mr. Miller performed the duties of critique.
Next Thursday evening there
will be a debate on "Resolved
that travel is more educative than
reading, and the affirmative will
be led by Mr. Hibbert, the negative by Mr. Ede.
H. Murk, wife and niece, spent
from Tuesday to Friday with
friends in Vernon.
SAVE
WRITING
LETTERS
To distant friends by sending them
ress
A subscription only costs
ONE   DOLLAR   PER   YEAR
And the paper makes a specialty of furnishing information
Of Interest to
The Press has been- largely instrumental
in bringing many settlers to Penticton;  i.o
If you want your friends to corne
here send them the paper.
Now is also a good time for you to subscribe
or to renew your old subscription.
It Pays to Advertise
In a paper that is widely circulated. The
Penticton Press is read by practically everybody in the district;    consequently good
Results are Assured
To advertisers who use its columns. The
merchant who gives most attention to his
advertising is the one who will eventually
do the leading business.
Tliis is the season to lay in a stock  of
J Oil   PRINTING
For the coming year.
The Penticton Press
Constantly carries a large stock of Stationery to choose from, and is
Up-to-Date In All Its Work.
We guarantee satisfaction
or no pay. Prices moderate.
LIKE SUNSHINE AFTER RAIN
GOLDEN WEST SOAP makes things look bright and
clean. We want to get a lot more people to use GOLDEN
WEST SOAP because it gives such splendid satisfaction.
Five cents for a good-sized bar.
Red Star Grocery
c-
Corner Main and Fairview.
-0
&
n^mt^sm^i
A COMPLETE STOCK
Peicion Furniture Store f
��}    *
C. A. C. STEWARD.
IV   L. A. RATHVON
9% 'Phone White 1.
>V^W>W>V*>W> W>V^VV>VV>VV>V
CHAS. L. CARLESS V
'Phone White 2.   C
8 CONTRACTORS
I
UILDERS |
<
\ Good Workmanship and 5
| Satisfaction Guaranteed j
fe> PLANS and SPECIFICATIONS FURNISHED 4
K       RATHVON & CARLESS       j
A card will bring US lo you. P. 0. BOX 206  C
n
Now is the lime to place your order with the
OKANAGAN NURSERY COMPANY
For Fruit Trees for Fall Planting.
We guarantee trees to grow if planted in the fall, or will replace any
that miss free of charge.     Come early and avoid the rush.     Send or
call for prices.    Office Hours: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.
OKANAGAN NURSERY CO.
LIMITED.
Capital Stock $50,000
Penticton, British Golumbia.
R. H. ROBERTSON, President
THOS. TODHUNTER, Vice-Pres. E. CURTIS, Manager.
F. E. JONES, Sec-Treas.
'i
'i
WSSES
raraw.rfg'aYf
sISSfcS
����gra3a��:acg'BP��aTO��.i   I
TO LET-Four Roomed House with pood water ���pply.
FOR SALE-Five Roomed House and Lot, priCO WZ5.00 Cash.
MONEY TO
LOAN
b. SL_ IL,
-
Real Estate agent, Notary Public and Conveyancer
A/TUT   DA"*    plIOONIX of London; LIVERPOOL, LONDON & GLOBE:   and  ATLAo     I
Anrlll    ilMi Fire Insurance Companies.
rtuLlll    I KJii Tj](>y ���n ,,���;.) 100 cents to the dollar after the San Francisco ire THE PENTICTON PRESS, PENTICTON, B.C. JANUARY 4, 1908.
Dr.CA.JACKSON
DENTIST
S. O. Land Company's   Block
PENTICTON, B. C.
;t*t��t*tHHnH + HltMHlH + H + 4IH+IHHH
I The Hound of the
CHAS. WERE
Accountant & Auditor,
Notary Public
PENTICTON, B. C.
F. E. JONES
Book Keeping & Accountant Work
Office Hours -- 9 to 6
Care of Okanagan Nursery Co.
Baskervilles I
Another Adventure of Sherlock Holmes.
BY A. CONAN DOYLE.
4-
|
4
i
R. B. KERR,
BARRISTER & SOLICITOR
Notary Public.
KELOWNA,        - -        B. C.
W. H. T. GAHAN,
Barrister, Solicitor, Notary Public.
S. O. Land Co. Block,
PENTICTON,      -       -       B.C.
Will open the office about Jan. 1st, 1908.
FRUIT CULTURE
(JET YOUR ORCHARDS  PRUNED  NOW.
12 years' practical experience in fruit
growing.   Post cards will receive
attention.
W. CAMPBELL,   Penticton, B. C.
E. L. CLIMO,
PHOTOORAPHER,
Portraits, Outside Views, Post Cards, etc.
For information apply at Main's Drug
Store.
FRUIT,   CONFECTIONERY,
TOBACCO & CIGARS.
C.  E.  POMEROY.
J. R. CAMPBELL
ELECTRICIAN.
Dealer in all kinds of
Electrical Supplies,  Batteries
and
Gasoline Engine Parts
Terms  and   specifications   for    all
kinds of  Electric Wiring  and  Bell
Work.
Agent for famous Brantford bicycles
Box 160 KELOWNA
OKANAGAN
COLLEGE
SUMMERLAND, B. C.
A CHRISTIAN SCHOOL for
young men and young women, situated amid surroundings beautiful and
inspiring and in a community of exceptional moral strength.
Regular course for University
Entrance.
Thorough Commercial course.
Special advantages for music.
Competent Instructors.
Well appointed building, tastefully furnished, heated with hot
water, provided with bath rooms and
improved sanitary arrangements.
Terms moderate.
COMMEKCIAL DEPARTMENT
Thin department, it is expectedi will provi��li>
faciliticH for work Hctond tu none in the
province. Prof. Aaron Perry, M. A., the organizer and late conductor uf tho Gonwiwcl&l
Department of Victoria Bijrh Behoof will
have charKf of this Department in the College. The HuceeHB that has attended Prof.
Perry's efforts drie where tfuaranteer. the quality of the work to be done in this Department.
PIANOFOKTE DEPARTMENT
Miss Eunice Winnifred Hainc* will conduct
the work in pianoforte instruction. Miss
Haines is a pupil of Prof. George Pratt Max-
Jm( of Benton, a graduate with honors from
the Pianoforte Department nf (he ,SehooI of
Music of Acadia Seminary, and winner in the
competition for musical composition udjiidged
by Dr. Percy Goetschins of Boston, the specialist on Tone Relations. Miss Haines has
had successful experience in teaching and
I'wu'.b highly rccymmt-ridad by Principal De-
Wolfc, of Acadia Seminriiy,
VOCAL DEPARTMENT
The work in Voice Culture will be under
charge of Mi.ss Kathrine Cleveland Davison of
Boston, an experienced. Teacher, Choir and
Choral Class Director and pupil of Prof.Frank
E, Morse of Boston and Madame Gertrude
Franklin Salisbury, of the International
School of Music of Boston, Florence tint} Paris.
For further information apply to
E. SAWYER, M. A., Principal.
Artistic Hair Gut 35c
Easy Shave    -    15
and Hot Baths
-AT-
H. MURK'S
���
���4-
���
| Author of "The Green Flag" an J "The Great Boer War"
-f C ipyilght (WO.) by A. Conau Do.vlo. -f
position, so it must be myseit tnat lie
has tliis aowji on. What has he against
me? I never hurt man or woman in
my life that I  know of. And  yet he
are the last man in the world who
would wish to be a spoil-sport. I must
go out alone."
It put me in a most awkward position, I was at a loss what to say or
what to do, and before I had made up
my mind he picked up his cane and
was gone.
But when I came to think the matter over my conscience reproached
me bitterly for i;aving on any pretext
allowed him to go out of my sight. I
Imagined what 1 ���/ feelings would be
if I had to return to you and to confess that some misfortune had occurred through my disregard for your instructions. I ass.ie you my cheeks
flushed at the very thought. It might
not even now be too late to overtake
him, so I set, off ;it once in the direction of Merripit House.
I hurried along the read at thp lop of
my speed without seeing anything of
Sir Henry, until I came to the point
where the moor path branches off.
There, fearing that perhaps I had
come in tho wrong direction after all,
I mounted a hill from which I could
command a view���the same hill wbirh
is cut into the dirk quarry. Them e
I saw him at once. He was yw the
moor path, ahout a quarter of a mile
off, and a lady was by his side who
could only be Miss Stapieton. It was
clear that the"? was already an understanding brUveen them and that they
bad met by appointment. They were
���v;>lking slowly along in deep conversation, and I saw her making auick little movements of her hands as if sna
were very earnest in what she
was saying, while he listened intently, and once or twice shook
his head in strong dissent. I
stood among the rocks watching
them, very much puzzled as to
what I should do next. To follow them
and break into their intimate conversation seemed to be an outrage, and
yet my clear duty was never for an
instant to let him out of my sight. To
act the spy upon a friend was a hateful task. Still, I could see no better
course than to observe him from the
hill, and to clear my conscience by
confessing to him afterwards what 1
had done. It Is true that if any sudden
danger had threatened him I was too
far away to be of use, and yet I am
sure that you will agree with me that
the position was very difficult, and
that there was nothing more which I
could do.
Our friend, Sir Henry, and the lady
had halted on the path and were
standing deeply absorbed in their conversation, when I was suddenly aware
that I was not the only witness of their
interview. A wisp of green floating in
the a.ir caught my eye, and another
glance showed me that, it was carried
on a stick by a man who was moving
ahiong the broken ground. It was
Stapieton with his butterfly-net. He
was very much closer to the pair than
I was, and he appeared to be moving
la their direction. At this instant Sir
Henry suddenly drew Miss Stapieton
to his side. His arm was round her,
but it seemed to me that she was
straining away from him with ber face
averted. He stooped his head to hers,
and she raised one hand as If in protect. Next moment I saw them spring
apart and turn hurriedly round. Staple-
ton was the cause of the interruption.
He was running wildly towards them,
his absurd net dangling behind him.
He gesticulated and almost danced
with excitement In front of the lovers.
What the scene meant I could not imagine, but it seemed to me that Staple-
ton was abusing Sir Henry, who offered explanations, which became more
ang'17 as the other refused to accept
them. Tho lady stood by In haughty
silence. Finally Stapieton turned upon
his heel nnd beckoned in a peremptory
way to his sister, who, after an irresolute glance at Sir Henry, walked off ujr
the side of her brothel', The naturalist's angry gestures showed that the
lady was included in his displeasure.
The baronet stood for a minute looking after them, and then lis walked
slowly b:ick tho way that he had come,
his head hanging, the very picture of
dejection.
What all this meant I could not imagine, but I was deeply ashamed to
have witnessed so Intimate a scene
Without my friend's knowledge. I ran
down Ihe hill therefore and met tho,
baronet at the bottom. Ifls faro wan
Rushed with auger and his brows wero
wrinkled, like one who is at his w|tg'
ends what to do,
"Halloa, Watson! Where have you
dropped from?" said he. "You don't
mean to say that you came after pig
In spite of all?"
1 explained everything to him: how
I had: found It impossible to remain behind, how I had followed him, and
how I had witnessed all that had occur: ed, For an instant h|a eye*
blazed at me, but my frankiiesa disarmed bin anger, and he broke at last
Into a rather rueful laugh.
"You would have thought the middlo
of that prairie a fairly safe place for
a man to be private," said be, "but. by
thunder, tlia whole country-side seems
to have been out to see me do my wooing���and a mighty poor wooing at
that! Where had you engaged a seat?"
"I was on that hill,"
"Quite In the back row, eh? But her
brother was well up to the front. Did
you see him come out on us?"
"Yes, I did."
"Pit] ho ever strike you as being
crazy���this brother of hers?"
"I can't say that he ever did."
"I daresay not. 1 always thought
him sane enough until to-day, but you
would not so much as let me touch the
tips of her fingers."
"Did he say so?"
"That, and a deal more. I tell you,
Watson, I've only known her these
few weeks, but from the first I just
felt that she was made for me, and
she, too���she was happy when she
was with me, and that I'll swear.
There's a light in a woman's eyes that
speaks louder than words. But he has
never let us get together, and it was
only to-day for the first time that I saw
a chance of having a few words with
her alone. She was glad to meet me,
but when she did, it was not love that
she would talk about, and she wouldn't
have let me talk about it either if she
could have stopped it. She kept coming back to it that this was a place
of danger, and that she would never
he happy until I had left it. I told her
that since I had seen her I was in ne
hurry to leave it, and that if she really wanted me to go the only way to
work It was for her to arrange to go
with me. With that I offered in as
many words to marry her, but before
she could answer down came this brother of hers, running at us with a facr
on him like a madman. He was just
white with rage, and those light eye?
of his were blazing with fury. What
was I doing with the lady? how dared
I offer her attentions which were distasteful to her? Did I think that be
cause I was a bavonet I could do what
I liked? If he had not been her brother I should have known better how
to answer him. As it was I told him
that my feelings towards his siste-
were such as I was not ashamed of
and that I hoped that she might honor
me by becoming my wife. That seem
ed to make the matter no better, so
then I lost my temper too, and I ai.
swered him rather more hotly than 1
should perhaps, considering that she
was standing by. So It ended by hi1
going off with her, as you saw, and
here am I as badly puzzled a man as
any in this county, just tell me wha'
It all mcens, Watson, and I'll owe you
more fchan ever I cap hope to d��.s."
I tried one or two explanations, but,
Indeed, I was completely puzzled myself. Our friend's title, his fortune, his
age, his character, and his appearance
are all in his favor and I know nothing
against him, unless it be this dark
fate which runs in his family. That his
advances should be rejected so brusquely without any reference to the
lady's own wishes, and that the lady
should accept the situation without
protest is very amazing. However, our
conjectures were set at rest by a visit
from Stapieton himself that very afternoon. He had come to offer apologies
for his rudeness of the morning, and
after a long private interview with Sir
Henry in his study, the upshot ot their
conversation was that the breach hi
quite healed, and that we are to dine
at Merripit House next Friday as a
sign of it.
"I don't say now that ho Isn't a
crazy man," said Sir Henry; "I can't
forget the look in his eyes when he
ran at me this morning, but I must allow that no man could make a more
handsome apology than he has done."
"Did he give any explanation of his
conduct?"
"His sister is everything in his life,
he says. That is natural enough, and
I am glad that he should understand
her value. They have always been together, and accoiding to his account
he has been a very lonely Turin with
only her as a Companion, so that the
thought of losing her was really
terrible to him. He had not understood, he said, that I was becoming attached to her, but when he saw
with his own eyes that it was really
io, and that she might be taken away
from him, it gave him such a shock
that for a time he was not responsible
for what he said or dill. He was very
sorry for all that had passed, and he
re-cognized how foolish and how selfish it was that he should imagine that
ho could hold a beautiful Woman 'Ike
his sister to himself for her wh^'e life
If s,hp hud to teava h'-:, he had rather
It was to a neighbor like myself than
to anyone else. But (n any case It was
a blow to him. and it would take him
Home time before he could prepare
himself to meet. It. He would withdraw
all opposition upon his part If I would
promise for three months to let the
mailer rest and to be content with cultivating the lady's friendship during
that time Without claiming her love
This 1 promised, and so the matter
rests,"
. So I here is one of our small mysteries cleared up. It is something to have
touched bottom anywhere In his bog
In which wo wo floundering. We know
now why Stapieton looked with disfavor upon his sister's suitor���even
when that suitor was so eligible a one
as Sir Henry. And now I pass on to
another thread Which I have extricated
out of the tangled skein, the mystery
of the sobs In the night, of the tear-
stained face of Mrs. Barrymore, of the
secret journey of tho butler to tho
western lattice window. Congratulate
mo, my dear Holmes, and tell me that
I have not disappointed you as an
agent���that you do not regret the confidence which you showed In me when
you sent me down. All these things
have by one night's work been
thoroughly cleared.
I have said "by one night's work,
for on the first we drew entirely blank.
I sat up with Sir Henry in his room
until nearly three o'clock In the morn
tne riours crawie , uy, aaa yei we w
helped through it by the sijne 3ort
patient Interest which trie lims^ci  mm
feel :;s he watche3 Ihe trap into wflic
he hopes the game may wander. On<
struck, and two,  and   we had   almost
for the second tin;." given it up in dee-
pair, when in an instant we both sat
bolt   upright   in   our   chairs,   with   ail
our weary senses keenly on the alert
once more. We had heard the creak of
a slen in the naaaace
(To lie continued.)
% ^^e���������������^������^S^P^^^SSESSSE�� n
&OATS
EATON'S PRICES
Plus the Express
-AT-
H.OLIVER'S
SHOE STORE.
BULBS
From France, Holland and
Japan.
Seeds   Trees
Plants
For Fall Planting.
Reliable Varieties at reasonable prices.
Please note that my fruit trees are
not grown from imported piece root
grafts, but are budded on own growth
of seedling, from bearing trees.
Fertilizers, Bee Supplies, Spray
Pumps, Spraying Material, Cut Flowers, etc. Oldest established nursery on
the mainland of B. C.   Catalogue free.
M. J. Henry's Nurseries,
Greenhouses and Seedhouses
VANCOUVER
B.C.
can take it from me that either he or { Ing, but no sound of any sort did we
I ought to be In a strait-jackot, What's hear execpt the chiming clock upon
tho matter with mo, anyhow? You've the stairs. It was a most melancholy
lived near me for some weeks, Watson. ' vigil, and ended by each of us falling
Tell me straight, now! Is there any- asleep in our rhrirs. Fortunately we
thing that would prevent me from "ere not discouraged, and we deter-
making a good husband to a woman mined to try again. The next night
that I loved?" we lowered the lamp, and sat smoking
"1 should say not." | cigarettes,  without  making  the  least
"He  can't  obi.ect  to    my    worldly | sound. It was   Incredible how  slowly
COLUMBIAN   COLLEGE.
N1GW   WKSSTMI.NSTKll, n. C.
Founded 1892. Incorporated 1893.
Provides a Christian home for students of both
;exes at moderate rates. Has a preparatory class
For junior students taking Public School work.
Does High School work, and prepares for Provincial teachers' examinations. Teaches all branches
��f a Practical Business course, and confers Diplomas. Imparts a liberal education in its Colleuiate
Course, and in the Ladies' Course for M.E. L.. and
M. L. A. In Theology confers the degree of B. D.
In University work can take students through tho
complete Arts Course for the B. A. degree of Toronto University, with which the College Is in full
affiliation. In Science teaches tho lirst year of
Toronto School of Science, and has a speciui Engineering work in this Province. In Music, a
complete course in Theory, Voice Culture, and
Piano and Organ, in conjunction with the Toronto
College of Music. Speeinl Instruction in Art and
Elocution, while all students are repuired to take
Physical Training with all the privileges of a well
equipped Gymnasium, For Calendar, address
Columbian College. 17.
PENTICTON
& OROVILLE
STAGE
Via Fairview
Leaves Penticton Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays at 6:30 a.m., arriving at Oroviile the same day at 6 p. m.
Through Fare - $6.00
W. HINE and S. M. SNOW
FAIRVIEW. B. C.
THE PENTICTON
DAIRY
Daily delivery of Fresh Milk to
all parts of the Town.
MILK lCc. PER QUART.
H. M. McNeill,    .    Prop.
D. W. Crowley
&Co.
Wholesale and Retail Butchers
Goods Delivered to any part of  the
Town.
WE GIVE OUK PROMPT ATTENTION TO
MAIL ORDERS
C. E. HOUSER, Manager.
HARRIS
NURSERY CO'Y.
Home Grown Fruit
Trees
Ornamental Trees, Small Fruits &c.
A  Specially   large   stock  of
Shade Trees and Budded
Acples.
Penticton, B. C.
Card of Thanks
I take this opportunity to express
my appreciation of the liberal patronage extended to me by my numerous customers during the past
year, and of wishing them a very
happy and prosperous new year.
E. 0. DeLONG,
General Blacksmith,    -   Penticton.
EED
$36.00 a Tonj
WHEAT    =   $1.75 for 120-lb. Sack
H 'Phone 25.
The Ellis Street Store.
W. R. KING & CO.I
WESTBANK
Town and Fruit Lots at Westbank, eight miles above Peachland,
on Okanagan Lake,
Are Now on the Market.
Maps of the First Sub-Division can be seen on
application to
GEO. E. WINKLER, penticton agent.
NORTH VANCOUVER
The Ambitious City,
With 36 miles of Water Frontage
And the best Harbor on the
Pacific Coast. Offers the best
opportunities for
Business or Investment.
A large list of Properties for
sale or exchange.
Call and see us, or write to
MARTINSON & CO.
Lonsdale Avenue,
North Vancouver.
STAGES
E. J. FINGH
Painter, Paperhanger
and Sign Writer
Picture Framing a Specialty.
WALL PAPER Carried in Stock.
Box 196.       Main St.
South Okanagan Valley
Bureau of information of the South
Okanagan Valley and for a list of property for sale, improved farms, Penticton T. S. Coy's lots, etc. Apply to
Wm. Smyth Parker
General Real Estate Agent, who will
always cheerfully give prompt and beat
attention to all inquiries from intending
investors.
PENTICTON, B. C.
NOTICE TO HORSE OWNERS.
Veterinary Dentistry is practically new. Some of the many
symptoms of bad teeth are:
slovering, loss of flesh, weak
eyes, rough coats and many
other symptoms. If your horses
are troubled with any of these
symptoms, be sure to have him
examined. I use only improved,
modern up-to-date instruments,
including a mouth speculum that
is unexcelled. Call and see me
about your horses at the Commercial Stables.
Dr. C. W. Cross,
VETERINARY DENTIST.
Stage leaves for Keremeoa and Hedley at 7 a. m.
on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays. Returns
on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays.
Stage leaves for Princeton every Tuesday at
7 a. m.
Stage leaves for Fairview and Oroviile on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays at 6:30 a. m. Returns on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays at
ti p. m.
POST OFFICE.
Hours 9 a. m. to 6. p, m.
Registered Letter and Money Order wicket
closes 5 p. m.
Wicket opened for half an hour after mail is
distributed.
Arrivals-Per Str. Okanagan: Daily except
Sunday 6 p.m.; Per Btago from Hedley, Keremeos, Olalla, Green Mountain, Oroviile, Fairview.
and White Lake: Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays at 6 p. m,
Closiiur-For boat and stages: 9 p. m. daily except Saturday. For Monday's boat and stages:
8.45 p. m. Sundays.
C. P. R. TIME TABLE
SIIUSWAP & OKANAGAN BRANCH
Daily both ways except Sunday.
SOUTHBOUND   STATION   NORTHBOUND
7.30 a. m Sicamous 6.00 p.m.
6.27   "    Enderby  4.48   "
8.52         Armstrong 4.08   "
8.80   _    ....ar Vernon lv.... 8.30   "
930        ...lv Vernon ar 2.80   "
9.45        ....ar...Ok. Landing ...lv.... 2.16   "
10.00 p.m... .lv... Ok. Landing.. .ar... .11.00 a.m.
11.10  Kelowna  8.20   "
300   \\    Peachland  7.25   "
4 46         Summerland  6.30   "
6.00         Penticton  6.00   "
C. P. R.
LAND FOR SALE
Agricultural and timber land for sale
for $1.00 per acre with $2.00 per thousand feet of lumber.
Houses to let.
J. R. MITCHELL,
District Agent.
Shropshire   Lambs
If mutton raises or you want a treat,
orders mailed at Penticton on or before
Wednesday will be delivered Friday at
Welby's express office, Penticton, prepaid.
Front quarter 17 cents.
Hind quarter 20   "
Half carcass 18   "
Whole carcass 17   "
R. J. Armstrong,
SHEEP RANCHER,  KEREMEOS.
G. H. KIEFFER
GENERAL BLACKSMITH.
Horse Shoeing and Repair Work.
Give Me a Trial.
Very Best of Workmanship.
4}
ALL THREE FOR #2.CX) THE PENTICTON PRESS, PENTICTON, B. C, JANUARY 4, 1908.
iiiSIORlCAL CORNER.
Crimean War���English and French
allied against the Russians���Description of the Battle of Inker-
man, 6 of November,  1854.
It. was about 5 o'clock; Brigadier General Codrington had just
visited the advance guards of his
brigade of light infantry. The
enemy had made no movement
which caused us to suspect their
presence; and yet they were already advancing in dense masses
and beginning to scale the almost
perpendicular heights which commanded the valley. Their guns
were ready to take up their positions as soon as the first rays
of dawn should permit them to
make sure of the direction of
their aim. On the other hand,
in the English camp everything
was repose and security; and the
troops, asleep in their tents, were
by no means expecting this sudden and bloody awakening.
Then it was that the Britannic
army, surprised in its sleep, presented a resolute front to the
Russian bayonets, and engaged
in one of those indescribable con-
flicts and desperate encounters
of mass to mass in the semi-
darkness, in the midst of a confused attack, and a desperately
heroic, though disorderly defence.
Cannon balls and grape - shot
had surprised the Englsh in their
tents, and shells fell everywhere
killing horses attached to their
pickets and men still asleep.
What an awakening in the midst
of the  most complete security!
Officers and soldiers hurriedlj
seized their weapons and rushed
out in the darkness without
knowing whither to direct their
steps. The shouts of the officers
might be heard rallying their
battalions to the flag of England
in the midst of the roar of the
Russian artillery. The English
on the one side and the Russians
on the other rent the air with
their shouts of "Hurrah!" A
dense fog enveloped the scene of
confusion and tumult. Tents
were overturned and the dead
were piled up on the torn canvas.
The blood of the dying mingled
with the water rills formed by
the falling rain, and the hastily
formed squadrons slipped on the
blood-bespattered mud.
England redeemed herself
from her want of watchfulness
and foresight by her splendid
heroism and indomitable courage.
The magnificent brigade of
guards rushed to the front of the
line of battle with the Duke of
Cambridge and Major General
Bentick at its head. The battalions of the light brigade, commanded by Sir George Brown,
marched off to the firing line as
they were formed; one of these
divisions stopped on the ground
.sloping down to Sebastopol, the
other moved forward; further on,
the fourth division of Gen. Cath-
cart rushed to the right of the
point of attack, and one of hi:
brigades, thai of General Golclie,
occupied the left of the Inker-
man road.
All the divisions have now
come up and qur intrepid allies
recapture a portion of the ground
taken a few minutes before. But
the enemy is still trj ing to crowd
in its columns on all sides and
whenever they are repulsed thej
re - appear more threatening,
more compact, and more furious.
It was in the direction of the redoubt where the English guards
were stationed that the battle
raged in all its fury in the midst
of fog and falling rain. There
was displayed in all its magnificence the cool and persistent
courage of the British; for, instead of abandoning it, they preferred to cover with their dead
bodies that ground which they
were no longer able to defend.
It was about 8 o'c'.xik a. m.
when General Bourbaki's troops
rushed on to the field of conflict.
On the site of the English camp,
which his column crossed, Russian and English corpses were
mingled together and gave evid-
Any person or persons removing" Timber or Wood of any kind from the property
of this Company without permission in writing, signed by the Managing Director
will be prosecuted.
anagan Land Go.
ence of a terrible struggle having
taken place at this point. On all
sides tents were upset and torn
to shreds by grape-shot; and the
remnants of uniforms and arms
belonging to the two nations and
half buried in the soft ground
were lying interspersed with the
prostrate bodies of the dead and
dying.
O.i seeing their (French) allies
rush up with that impetuous onslaught which is peculiar to them,
the English set up a tremendous
shout and ceased fighting for a
moment to wave in the air their
bayonets, dripping with blood.
The wounded sat up and shouted
' Hurrah.' The French troops
answered them by oft - repeated
yells of 'Long live the Emperor,'
and then the united battalions
make a furious charge. One
would say that it was a mass of
steel moved by an invisible power. They are not long in making two enormous gaps in the
hostile ranks; piles of dead are
heaped up in their pathway, and
the Russians retreat. In another
part of the field the situation was
at one time critical and every
moment seemed to aggravate it,
for the Russians crown the crest
of the Inkerman plateau and
their masses became more and
more formidable. Lord Raglan
shook his head and with that
coolness which never forsook him
said: "I think we are .... in a
bad fix." "Not too bad, my
Lord, I hope," said General Can-
robe il.
This was not a bat lie in which
military    strategy    could     be
broil)
rlil
into   play,   or  one
in
which the practise I eye of the
Field Marshall can seize upon
3ome skilful manoeuvre which
changes the face of things and
restores vict'ory trembling in the
balance between the two conflicting parties. The individual pluck,
strength and daring of the soldier was master of the situation;
it was pra-eminently a soldier's
battle.
This memorable and bloody encounter was a great victory for
the French and English, but one
which brought in its train heartrending mourning; for the English army, whose heroic courage
had shone with so much brilliancy, numbered among its dead
three generals: Lieut.-Gen. Sir
George Cathcart, and Brigadier-
Generals Strangeways and Gol-
die. In addition to these more
than 100 officers were killed. The
ground was heaped up with the
dead and dying to such an extent
that the horses could not advance
and in some places they were
several rows deep. Some killed
in the tall brushwood were standing erect, propped up by the
bushes.
Afj soon as the Commander-
in-chief, Lord Raglan, perceived
the French general, Bosquet, he
rode up to him when the fight
was over and, holding out his
hand, said: "In the name of England I thank you." Soon the
Duke of Cambridge arrived, his
face giving evidence of deep
emotion. He had fought at the
head of his guards as a real soldier. The other generals complimented him. "All my friends
are killed," replied ho bitterly,
' 'and it is not my fault that I also
am not dead." Then he showed
his clothes riddled in several
places by shot and shell. ��� From
the writings of the French war-
correspondent, Bazancourt, translated by J. Barker.
Weather Report
Compiled by the Dominion
Government Meterological Observer at Penticton, for December, 1907:
Date Max. Temp.       Min. Temp.
1 47| 30
2 41J 83
3 431 23*
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
.43|.
.46j.
.48 .
.42 .
.42 .
.44 .
.43J.
.43 .
.43 .
.44 .
.40 .
.39 .
.37 .
.33
.311
.29
.29
.29
.36
.35
.34
.32
.30
.30
.31
21
18	
 30 	
 281
23..
24..
2(5.
���ii.
28.
"i.
10.
��� II. .
,36 .
.881.
.47*.
.47 .
.47 .
,39 .
..30J
..8L
..:;!
..881
. .80
..88 .
..361.
.87 .
.38
..28J
.,28
..24
..231
..25
December
4	
Rain
 02
Snow
8	
 04 ...
a
9	
.S
li)	
 09
11	
.   03
12	
.5
21	
25
22
.    18
 22
31	
��s
HOTKEY
w. o. w.
Okanagan Camp No. 261.
Meets every Tuesday in the month at
8 p. m. in Woodmen's Hall, Ellis St.
Visiting Sovereigns always welcome.
J. W. EDMONDS, C. C.
R. WILTON, CLERK
HOTEL  PENTICTON.
First-Class Accommodation For Tourists or Commercial Men.
RATES $2.SO PER DAY
A. Barnes        - -       Prop.
PENTICTON, B.C.
To The Traveling Public.
If you want a good stable and
prime feed for your horses,  call
on
LIVERY & FEED STABLE.
S. D. HINE,
FAIRVIEW, B.C.
Qalarneau &
McKenzie
BUILDERS & CONTRACTORS
When  you   think  of   Building
Look us up.
ADOLPHUS GALARNEAU  W. A. MCKENZIE
It HARLOW
Dealer in
BUILDING MATERIAL: LIME,
LATH, CEMENT, HARD
WALL PLASTER.
Manufacturer of Miracle
Cement Blocks
Which make a true hollow wall,
the strongest cement block wall
built.
The Miracle Block took the
Grand Gold Medal at the Lewis
and Clarke Centennial Exposition
at Portland, Ore. 12-tf
At
Jos. Nesbitts
Subscribe for
The Penticton Press
Subscription $1.00 Year.
WAN1ED IMMEDIATELY
100 BUYERS
FOR
GASOLINE ENGINES
APPLY TO
S. T. Elliott
THE IMPLEMENT MAN
KELOWNA       -      -       B. C.
NURSERIES
Send for our descriptive catalogue of
Nursery Stock.   Address
The   Riverside   Nurseries
25-tf GRAND FORKS, B. C.
STRAYED
To my place near White Lake, ,a dark
chestnut mare; weight about 1,200;
white strip on face; hind feet white;
black mark on right hip; no brand visible. Grey filly, white hind feet, weight
about 900; faint brand on right hip.
23tf JAMES GRANT.
.tt ^to. �����<
I OKANAQAN (
j FRUIT LANDS j
9 And Residential Lots I
1        Fire and Life Insurance        1
j A. E. BENNETT, Mfsr&u. j
[ PENTICTON. (
8 Next Door to Post Office. I
New Year's Specials
Ladies' and Gents' Gold and Silver Watches. Ladies' Gold Watch
Chains, Necklets and Lockets. Ladies' Gold Bracelets. Gentlemen's
Fobs and Watch Chains. STERLING SILVER Toilet Sets, Manicure
Sets, Table-Ware and Trinkets. Sunbursts, Brooches, Scarf Pins, Belt
Pins, Beauty-Pins, Baby-Pins.
An especially fine line of high grade Meerschaum and Briar Pipes.
CUT GL4.SS and Silver Plated Ware of all descriptions.
Complete line of Clocks, including Weathered Oak, Enamel, Natural
Finish, Gilt, etc.
Come and Inspect My Prices.
HARRIS, The Jeweler
SHEI>F   HARDWARE
Saws, Axes, Wedges, Striking Hammers, Table and
Pocket Cutlery.
PENTICTON HARDWARE CO.
NOTICE
FRUIT TRLES-Well-grown stock.
Large quantity of apple trees for sale.
only few choice varieties grown : also
small stock of ornamental trees. Apply
for varieties and price to Manager,
COLDSTREAM ESTATE CO., Ltd.,
15-lf Vernon, B. C.
Kettle River Assessment District
COURTS of REVISION and APPEAL
Under the provisions of the Assessment
Act respecting the Assessment Roll for
1S08, will be held at
Rock Creek Hotel, Rock Creek, Thursday, January 16, 1908, at 10 a. m.;
Court House, Penticton, Saturday, January IS, 1908, at 10 a. m.;
Government Office, Fairview, Monday,
January 20, 1908, at 10 a. m.
(Signed)    HENRY NICHOLSON,
Judge of Court of Revision and Appeal.
Fairview, B. C. Dec. 27, 1907.     25-1
NOTICE
LOGGING TENDERS will be received
by the undersigned up to and including
receipt of mail Friday, January 10th.,
1908, for getting out, hauling, and
banking up in yard 1,800,000feet board
measure, Tamarac, Fir, and Pine from
limits about 3 miles north of McCuddy's
on McKinney Road. Any further information can be obtained on application. The lowest or any tender not
necessarily accepted.
The Southern Okanagan Land Co.,
Ltd.
renticton, B.C., Doc. 27th, 1907.
NOTICE.
After fiO days I intend to apply to the
Honorable the Chief Commissioner of
Lands and Works for permission to
purchase tho following described lands:
Beginning at a post marked lot N.E.
41, thence north 40 chains, more or less,
to Indian reserve lands ; thence 80
chains, more or less, west to Osoyoos
Lake; thence southerly along shore to
west post of lot 41; thence east to
point of commencement.
S. W. BROWN.
Osoyoos, B. C. Nov. 18th, 1907.
NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty
days after date we intend to apply to
the Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a special license to cut and
carry away timber from the following
described lands situated in the Similkameen District:
Starting from a post 20 chains west
and 50 chains north of the S. W. corner
of lot 3639, being the S. E. corner of
P. R. 3255, thence north SO chains;
thence west 80 chains; thence south 80
chains; thence east 80 chains to point
of commencement.
The Penticton Lumber Syndicate,*
25- Per R. P. Brown, Agent.
Dated Dec. 27th, 1907.
Received at Press office Dec. 28, 1907.
SUMMERLAND CIVILIAN RIFLE ASSOCIATION
The Annual General Meeting will  be
held on Monday, 13th January, 1908, at
7:30 p. m., in the Band Hall,   Summer-
land. FRED J. NIXON,
25-1 Secretary.

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