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The Penticton Press Apr 18, 1908

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Array &
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VOL. 2.    No. 40
PENTICTON, B.C., SATURDAY, APRIL 18, 1908.
$1.00 Per Year In Advance.
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
HEAD   OFFICE, TORONTO
ESTABLISHED  1807
B. E. WALKER, President
ALEX. LAIRD, General Manager
A. H. IRELAND, Superintendent of
Branches
Paid-up Capital, $10,000,000
Rest, - - - 5.000,000
Total Assets, -  113,000,000
Branches throughout Canada, and in the United States and England
BANKING  BY   MAIL ��s
Business may be transacted by mail with any branch
of the Bank.   Accounts may be opened and deposits
made or withdrawn by mail.   Every attention is paid
to out-of-town accounts.
Penticton Branch     -    .    J. J. HUNTER, Manager.
!    Flume Lumber   (
I Just arrived, a scow load of 1x6 [
j and1ix6. 1
: Get your orders in as it is going :
I fast. /
j S. C SMITH LUMBER CO., LTD. i
f ^^���r^mm.tf^mm.tf^m~t+f^m~tf^m*tf^m*t^**+^ J
wmmwwiam^Kaa&naammma&K&ammmmammtmammmwmwK
GENTLEMEN :
What about a Spring Suit that will keep you
cool ? We have them from $4.00 up to $30.
Now is your chance to get a good selection
to choose from.
NORMAN HILL,
The Up-to-Date Ladie' and Gents' Furnisher.
JUST RECEIVED
A large consignment of
Single and Double
Light and Heavy HARNESS
Express and Driving
KENT & SON
r��^r/\T/vT/vT/VT/ VY/ KV* W* W* WW \^a
I COMMERCIAL
Livery, Feed and Sale Stable
DIGNAN and WEEKS, Proprietors.
fttttt2��2��
If you /ant a Stylish Outfit, this is the place to come. You can always
get teams just when you want them. We make a specialty of keeping
good horses, safe rigs, carrful drivers and also saddle and pack horses.
We are also putting in Hay and Grain for sale, and as we buy for cash
we get the best rates and our patrons get the benefit.
Special Attention To The Wonts Of Commercial  Men.
A/A%^A>*A>^A\*AN<AN/��A^��fA^fASr*.\ f��\ ��AWA.%^A'��<rA.WA>*A>rf'A'%*'A'��rAWA*/,A'>
'AX'AV'AK'AH'AV'AX'AH'Ati'AK'AV:*
Penticton Stage and Livery
Stables.
Stage Connects with Steamer "Okanagan" at Penticton, with Great Northern
Railway at Keremeos, and with stage to Hedley and Princeton.
Pianos and Furniture moved to all points,  and a general Draying
Business transacted.
Saddle and Pack Horses.
Top Buggies, Four-horse Rigs for Commercial Men.
W. E. Welby, Prop.      Penticton.
f
Penticton Store
Established 40 Years.
Alfred H. Wade, Prop.
Dry Goods, Gent's Furnishings, Boots and Shoes, Groceries
and General Merchandize of all Sorts
L
Agent for
Goods delivered through the town.
PENTICTON,
GIANT POWDER CO.
OKANAGAN FLOUR MILLS CO.
Prompt attention to orders.
B.C.
A
Local and Personal
Born���On Tuesday, April 14,
to Mr. and Mrs. S. W. Hatch, a
son.
M. C. Kendall returned from
Kelowna on Wednesday much
improved in health.
D. W. Crowley, of Crowley &
Co. Kelowna, spent some time in
Penticton this week.
G. H. E. Hudson, photographer of Kelowna, spent several
days in town this week.
Quassia chips, whale oil soap,
Paris green, for spraying, at
Main's Pharmacy.
Norman Hill has greatly improved the appearance of his
home by having the property enclosed by a neat fence.
Welby's stage leaves for Keremeos on Tuesdays, Thursdays
and Saturdays at 6 a. m. instead
of at 5 a. m. as formerly.
J. F. Tupper has moved his
house to the front of his lot on
Ellis St. and is having a two
storey addition built to it.
The time has now arrived
when a meeting of the Athletic
Association should be called to
make plans for the summer
sports.
A first class Gerhard Heintz-
man Piano for sale at greatly
reduced price if taken at once.
Owner going away. Apply, A.
E. Bennett.
Remember the Grand Ball in
aid of the Penticton Athletic Association on Easter Monday evening. Lunch, (not supper) pro- j
vided by the ladies.
Geo. E. Winkler left on Tuesday for his coal mine at West-
bank. He may locate permanently at the new town on the
west side of the lake.
The Dominion Exhibition will
this year be held in Calgary,
Alta., the dates being fixed for
June 29 to July 9. This will afford a good opportunity to visit
the city of the foothills.
A party of Salvation Army
immigrants arrived from the old
country on Monday. They were
the first contingent to arrive of
those for whom situations were
secured when the Army's agent
was here a few months ago.
The stone foundation has been
completed for a handsome residence which Mrs. S. J. Bradshaw
is having built on Winnipeg St.
A sister of Mrs. Bradshaw will
erect another near the same location during the coming summer.
C. E. Houser returned at the
beginning of the week after being absent for several days in
the lower Okanagan, having
been south twenty - five miles
below Oroviile in the interests
of Crowley & Co's butcher business.
L. T. Roberge has secured the
services of W. J. Sharp, baker
and confectioner, recently of
Brandon, Man. Mr. Sharp will
bake, not only bread, but all
kinds of confectionery as well.
Mr. Roberge will immediately
begin the erection of a new and
larger bake house, and also a
new brick oven so that he may
be in a position to meet the full
requirements of the trade in his
line.
L. W. Gould, of the Okanagan,
Vernon, visited Penticton Monday evening. While here he paid
the Press a fraternal call to chat
over matters pertaining to the
printing business. Mr. Gould
was the founder of the Semi-
Weekly Okanagan, the Liberal
journal of Vernon, but has recently disposed of his interests
in the paper, and expects soon
to open op a printing offise in
either Revelstoke or Golden.
Duncan Ross, M. P., was in
town last Saturday, having driv-
on in from the south that day.
He attended a local meeting of
Liberals in the evening, at which
a reorganization of the Liberal
Association took place. F, H.
Latimer was elected President,
S. W. Mutch, Vice - President,
and Henry Murk, Secretary. A.
3. Smith, R. Wilton, F. H. Latimer and S. W. Hatch were appointed delegates to attend the
nominating convention at Vernon
on the 14th.
Bargains in Nursery Stock to
clear up block of land ; fine 2-yr.
)ld stuff. 500 Belle DeBaskoofe,
500 Salome, 400 Gano, 300 Peas-
��oods Nonsuch, 200 Mann, 400
Stark, 300 Yellow Bellflour, 300
Princess Louise, 1000 Ontario,
1000 Northern Spy, 400 York
Imperial, 400 R. I. Greening, 230
tVolfe River, 300 St. Lawrence,
100 Hyslop Crab, 100 Gen. Grant
Grab, $12 per 100, $100 per 1000
P. O. B. cars here. First money
takes them. M. J. Henry, Henry's Nurseries, Vancouver, B. C.
W. T. Shatford, the manager
of the S. 0. Land Co., rerurned
on Wednesday looking hale and
hearty after several months spent
in touring throughout eastern
Canada, the United States and
Mexico. Mr. Shatford particularly enjoyed his visit to the med-
ievial Spanish scenes of Mexico
which carry one back to the days
when Spain was at the zenith of
rter glory. The wooden plow is
still used in Mexico as it was in
Egypt three thousand years ago,
and other implements as well as
customs remain uneffected by
modern civilization. Every city
and town has an ancient appearance except the city of Mexico,
which is modern in every respect.
Naturally, land and land cultivation would appeal to one interested as Mr. Shatford is in the,
subject, and he states that, although the country is one of the
richest in the world, not more
than two per cent, of the land is
under cultivation. On the other
hand the natives in places cultivate patches high up the mountain sides where the slope is at
an angle of at least forty-five
degrees.
Meeting re Incorporation.
The public meeting called on
Tuesday evening to discuss the
question of the incorporation of
Penticton as a city municipality
was not as well attended as it
should have been in consideration
of the amount of talk that has
been current upon the subject
during the past months. In fact
many of those who have been
loudest in advocating the assuming of the responsibilities of local
government did not attend the
meeting at all. It had been advertised, both through the Press
and by circular that several persons would give addresses upon
the subject under discussion, and
to make matters worse two of
them were unable to be present.
This placed the burden of the
meeting upon one speaker.
Between forty and fifty people
having gathered, A. H. Wade
was elected to the chair. Mr.
Wade after a few remarks opened
the meeting. W. J. Clement
then took the floor, and during
the next three-quarters of an
hour endeavored to point out the
advantages that would be derived from incorporation, baaing
his remarks upon the experiences
of Kelowna and Summerland.
He dealt with the subject from
an economic standpoint, giving
an estimate of the amount of,
and sources from which, revenue
would be derived, and the approximate amount of expenditure for administration. In this
his estimates were based upon
the present assessment, and he
was of opinion thai; taxation
would not be increased, and
pointed out the fact that in Summerland taxes have been greatly
reduced since incorporation.
E. W. Mutch next spoke in opposition, contending that the
place was yet too young, the orchards not yet producing, and, in
his opinion, the burdens incumbent upon incorporation would be
too heavy for Penticton to bear
at the present time. H. W. Main
followed in a short address, taking up pretty much the same
lines of argument, after which
J. A. Nesbitt spoke briefly favoring incorporation, stating that
while he and others on Ellis
street had for years been tax
payers they had been obliged to
build a bridge across Penticton
Creek and do other improvements at their own expense.
A vote of the meeting was
then taken on a motion by
Messrs. Mutch and Main. It
read, " Resolved that the time
has not yet arrived for Penticton
to be incorporated either as a
city or as a municipality." The
motion was lost by a large majority, only five voting for it.
The feeling of the meeting
was, unquestionably, in favor of
incorporating, as well as is that
of the majority of the residents
of the town, but, as yet, considerable apathy exists, and it will
probably require a season or two
of bad roads to make them
thoroughly in earnest. As a
petition signed by a majority of
the property interests of the
town would have to be sent to
the Provincial Secretary before
the 13th day of June in order
that incorporation might take
effect upon the first of January,
1909, it is doubtful that the work
could be accomplished in the
time. ' -That anything further
will be done this year is, therefore, doubtful.
However, the objects for which
the meeting was called were accomplished. The subject has
been talked over; so much educational work has been done, and
next year the matter will go
through without any difficulty,
but, between now and then, if
people want sidewalks they must
build them themselves. No cemetery, no park, no recreation
grounds, no waterworks, no
electric lights, until after Jan'y
1st, 1910.
The Tennis Club.
The local tennis club this week
completed the purchase of one-
half acre of land from H. J.
Huycke. Four courts are to be
laid out, two of which will be
seeded in grass this spring.
Shade trees will be planted, and
a club house erected during the
summer. The nets and outfit,
which have been ordered, are
expected any day, and the courts
will be in shape for playing by
the first of May. The club is
certainly displaying a good deal
of enterprise in its efforts to
make life pleasant in Penticton.
Duncan Ross Nominated.
At the convention of Liberals
for Yale-Cariboo which was held
in Vernon on Tuesday, Duncan
Ross the present member for this
constituency was unanimously
tendered the nomination by the
party. No other name was I
brought before the convention, |
and Mr. Ross consented to again
contest the riding at the forthcoming Dominion elections. A
large delegation of Liberals was
present from all the Okanagan
towns, those from Penticton being A. S. Smith and R. Wilton.
It is hoped that the Dominion
Government will see fit to bring
on the election in Yale-Cariboo
upon the same date as the other
elections are held, and thus give
both parties an equal fighting
chance.
SUMMERLAND.
Mr. Gillespie was over from
Naramata Monday on business.
Jas. English arrived last week
from Manitoba to visit his brother, R. H. English, in the livery
stab'e here.
Mrs. D. Williams is convalescent after a somewhat serious
illness.
At the monthly meeting of the
Ladies' Mission Circle held at
the home of Mrs. Jas. Ritchie
last Saturday there were twenty-four ladies present. A special
feature of the meeting was a
very interesting paper on the
South Sea Islanders by Miss M.
Smith. A Bible reading by Mrs.
Sawyer, and the reading of the
new constitutions by Mrs. O. E.
Tomlin were also helpful and instructive. The sum of thirty dollars was voted by the ladies to
assist educational work in India,
and other good work was discussed. The next gathering will
be held on the first Saturday in
May at the home of Mrs. H. G.
Estabrook.
The spring opening held last
week, Wednesday, was an affair
not soon to be forgotten by ladies of Summerland. Early in
the morning the clerks were busily at work arranging laces, curtains, etc. in tempting display on
shelves, counters and show cases,
and before morning was far advanced they had adorned the
store, as one lady was heard to
remark, equal to any eastern
bazaar she had ever seen. The
store was crowded all day with
visitors admiring the beautiful
displays of the various lines of
spring wares for sale. In the
afternoon from 3 to 5 o'clock tea
was served to all comers, Mes-
dames Robinson, Gillespie, Welband and Moreland catering to
the public want���for who could
say that a cup of that delicious
tea could be done without? Music was not lacking; Mrs. R. Sinclair presided at the piano in
charming style. The day throughout was a success, and Manager
Moreland is to be congratulated
on the splendid showing made.
A very pretty baptismal ser-
ice was conducted at the lake
shore by Rev. H. G. Estabrook
last Sunday morning, the ordinance of baptism being administered to one candidate.
While riding in the Peach Orchard last Saturday Miss Evelyn
Brown had the misfortune to
fall from her horse and break
her left arm at the elbow. The
accident was caused by the
horse stumbling. Both horse and
rider fell, and the animal in an
effort to suddenly regain its feet
struck Miss Brown upon the arm
with the result that the limb
was both crushed and broken at
the elbow joint. The injury will
be a long time in mending. Miss
Evelyn's many friends will, however, be glad to learn that she
will not lose the use of her arm.
S. B. Snider, who has been in
Summerland for the last two
weeks, made a trip to Kelowna
last Thursday on business, returning on the following day. He
left for Penticton on Thursday
morning of this week.
The children of the Primary
Department of the Summerland
Public School gave a very pleading little entertainment to the
friends of the school on Thursday. The program was a credit
both to the pupils and their
painstaking teacher, Miss A.
Elliott.
A blessed assurance that in
this fair province of ours "saloons must go" follows the work
(Continued on last page) THE PENTICTON PRESS, PENTICTON, B.C. APRIL 18, 1908.
THE PENTICTON PRESS
ISSUED   EVERY    SATURDAY   AT
PENTICTON, B.C. BY
W. J. CLEMENT.
Subscription $1.00 Per Year in
Advance.
Advertising Rates:
Transient Advertisements���Not exceeding one inch, one insertion, 50c.;
for each additional insertion, 25c.
Lodge Notices, Professional Cards, &c.
$1.00 per inch, per month.
Land and Timber Notices���30 Hays, $5;
60 days, $7.
Legal Advertising���First insertion, 10
cents per line; each subsequent insertion, 5c. per line.
Reading Notices in Local News Column
15c. per line, first insertion; 10c. per
line, each subsequent insertion.
Contract Advertisements���Rates arranged according to space taken.
All changes in contract advertisements must be in the bands of the
printer by Tuesday evening to ensure
publication in the next issue.
have a local option bill presented
at the next session of the Legislature.
PEACHLAND.
KELOWNA
Mr. Ireland, of Summerland, is
in town, having secured the contract of a building to be erected
for the Royal Bank.
Mr. Calder, one of our merchants, is having a building erected beside the telephone office,
which he will use, when completed, for a store.
Chas. Burtch, of Summerland,
returned home on April 10, after
spending a few days renewing
old acquaintance in Kelowna.
L. A. Hayman is again in
town, having been for a short
time at the coast.
John Dilworth arrived home
on April 8th from the coast where
he attended the Farmers' Institute meeting as a representative
of the Osoyoos District.
Many concert companies have
visited Kelowna during the winter and spring; so many, indeed,
that something was on almost
every night. These companies
were usually of the vaudevilk
t/pe, lively, but far from elevating.
The Liberal Association, of this
district held a meeting in Le-
quim's Hall, in order to appoint
a delegate to the convention held
in Vernon.
Mr. Jackson, of Okanagan
Centre, died April 8th, having
been ill five weeks of spinal meningitis. Mrs. Jackson, his widow, has the sympathy of the
community in her sad bereavement.
The Mountview Methodist,
church was opened Sunday, April
12. Rev. Mr. White, Superintendent of Methodist Missions,
was present.
Miss A. L. A. Murcutt, lecturer
and writer, gave an address in
the Methodist Church on the
10th inst. and two on the 12th.
On the 10th her subject was
"The White Slaves of England,"
which was an account of the
sweating system of that country.
On Sunday the 12th her subjects
were "National Righteousness"
and "Local Option." Miss Murcutt spoke eloquently on each
occasion to large audiences and
was very favorably received by
the people of Kelowna.
The fourth annual convention
of the Okanagan Sunday School
Association was held in the
Methodist church on April 8th,
9th and 10th. Mr. Stuart Muirhead, General Secretary of the
Provincial Association, was present, besides seventy delegates, a
n imber being ministers from
different points of the district.
The programme, which had been
arranged some months previous,
was carried out with very few
changes. All departments of
Sunday School work were brought
under discussion, many excellent
papers and addresses being
given. The missionary and temperance departments also presented reports of work done. A
new executive was formed with
Mr. Wallis, of Summerland, as
chairman, and the next convention will be held in Vernon. It
was decided to request the
Premier and local  member   to
Rev. Mr. Mclntyre preached to
a large congregation Sunday
morning. He returned to Summerland in the afternoon, accompanied by Mrs. Mclntyre and
Master Bruce.
Mr. Wm. Douglas, has been
suffering from a lame knee for
the past week, but is now able
to be out again.
Miss M. Smith, M.A., of Summerland, spent the greater part
of last week here. During her
stay she had some remodeling
done at her cottage, which is to
be occupied immediately.
Mr. Dimmoch, proprietor of
the hotel, purchased a big flock
of chickens last week, all choice
Plymouth Rocks.
A. and J. Johnston, entertained
the bachelors of the vicinity at
their home, Thursday evening.
Mr. A. E. Bennett, of Penticton, but formerly one of our best
citizens, was renewing old acquaintances last week, having
driven up in the round-bound
time of four hours, a distance of
thirty-five miles.
The large number who attended the S. S. Convention at Kelowna, returned Friday, each with
renewed enthusiasm and energy
for the coming year.
The fine large library arrived
for the Methodist S. S. last week
and will be ready for circulation
in a week.
The lectures given by Miss
Murcutt were enjoyed and appreciated by large audiences.
A number of homesfiekers are
in town at present and they are
very favorably impressed too.
Dr. and Mrs. Mathison of Summerland spent the past week
here. They were the guests over
Sunday of Mr. and Mrs. Wm.
Douglas.
Miss F. White left for the
coast Tuesday morning. The
Girls' Handicraft Club, of which
she was a member, presented
her with a dainty ebony handkerchief box on the morning of
her departure. She carries with
her the best wishes of the Club.
Mr. Town, who is now in Winnipeg, sent orders, lately, for
the building of a tank of 80
barrels capacity on his property.
Mr. D. Kirkby has the contract
in hand.
Miss Sutton, accompanied by
Mrs. Town, left for Winnipeg
Saturday morning.
GREEN MOUNTAIN
L. A. Clark was appointed delegate from this district to the
Conservative convention at Vernon on the 23rd inst.
It has been bright and warm
here the last few days.
Duncan Ross, M.P. for Yale-
Cariboo passed through this district on Saturday on his way to
Penticton.
J. L. Deardoff, road superintendent, was looking over the
roads in this neighborhood last
week.
G.  A.
were at
week.
Mrs. R. L. Allen spent a day
recently with Mrs. W. H. Crook,
of Maroon Valley.
R. L. Allen spent a portion of
Monday last with John McLennan and family of Okanagan
Falls.
Clark,  wife   and
Okanagan   Falls
son,
this
THE
Penticton Bakery
-FOR-
Good Wholesome Bread,
Cakes and Paltry.
GIVE US A TRIAL AND WE
WILL PLEASE YOU.
L. T. ROBERGE.
WA
Main's Pharmacy
Main Street, Penticton.
,,   LARGE STOCK OF    a,
\\% m~rmf\m~m/Kin%/ ~A
b?
WE CARRY A COMPLETE STOCK OP
Drugs, Druggists' Sundries, Rubber Goods (Sick Room Utensils), Stationery, Post Cards, Magazines, and
Photographic Goods.
 . _
WE MAKE A SPECIALTY OP PRESCRIPTION WORK
k , . a
SAVE
WRITING
LETTERS
To distant friends by sending them
The Penticton Press
A subscription only costs
ONE   DOLLAR   PER   YEAR
And the paper makes a specialty of furnishing information
Of Interest to
Outsiders.
The Press has been largely instrumental
in bringing many settlers to Penticton; so
If you want your friends to come
here send them the paper.
Now is also a good time for you to subscribe
or to renew your old subscription.
It Pays to Advertise
In a paper that is widely circulated. The
Penticton Press is read by practically everybody in the district;    consequently good
Results are Assured
To advertisers who use its columns. The
merchant who gives most attention to his
advertising is the one who will eventually
do the leading business.
This is the season to lay in a stock  of
JOB   PRINTING
For the coming year.
The Penticton Press
Constantly carries a large stock of Stationery to choose from, and is
Up-to-Date In All Its Work.
We guarantee satisfaction
or no pay. Prices moderate.
JUST ARRIVED.
BSHHEsasisaci ;3sic icsaonsarcaa^a
ARE YOU BLIND
To the fact that you don't always need SPECIAL
LENSES���which, in many cases, are simply ordinary
lenses with a special price-and that fifty years' experience is not necessary for a person to get a thorough
knowledge of the eye and its uses ? And yet people
will pay a fancy price to travelling mechanics, when
they can have their eyes examined and corrections
made with the best appliances known to optical science,
here in Penticton.
My stock of optical goods is of the best quality on
the market and very complete. I guarantee every
lense.
HARRIS, The Jeweler
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HORTICU
^ E. J. CLAYTON and C. M. JOHNSTON will shortly
< open up a store on Main Street as Nurserymen,
j   Seedsmen and Florists.
SPECIALTIES
Farm and Garden Seeds, Bulbs, Cut Flowers,
and Horticultural Sundries.
Sole Agents in
B. C. for
j        B. C. for
DANIELS BROS.-Seedsmen to H. M. King Edward VII.��� Norwich, England. fc
RICHARD  SANKEY  & SON
Nottingham.
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���tf*^e~.tf^to��.t**'^m.*f
i,  Royal Potteries,    J
.tt ^Hfc-o ��^�� ������
LAYTON'S
ARE   THE
LOW7
**rn
V  IN   TOWN.
HOUSES TO LET
Several Acre LoU���planted
MONEY TO LOAN
Real Estate agent, Notary Public and Conveyancer
AGENT FOR
PHCENJX of London ;   LIVERPOOL & LONDON & GLOBE; and ATLAS
Fire Insurance Companies.
i
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���:
���:
���:
���:
���:
Call and get prices at the
OKANAGAN NURSERY CO.
LIMITED.
ON ENGLISH WALNUTS, HORSE CHESTNUTS,
CATALPAS, LILACS,     VIRGINIA CREEPERS
and other Ornamental Shrubs, Trees, and Climbing Vines.
Ready for immediate delivery.
Penticton, British Columbia.
Capital Stock $50,000
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
R. H. ROBERTSON, President
THOS. TODHUNTER, Vice-rres. E. CURTIS, Manager.
W. F. H. SWINTON, Sec-Treas.
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Pacific Coast Grown
Seeds, Trees,
For the ^arm, Garden, Lawn, or
Conservatory.
Relialle, approved  varieties,   at
reasonable prices.
No Borers.    No Scale.    No fumigation to damage stock.
No windy agents to annoy you.
Buy  direct   and  get   trees   and
seeds that GROW.
Bee Supplies, Spray Pumps,
Spraying Material and
Cut Flowers.
Catalogue Free.
M. J. HENRY,
ORRENHOUSES-3010 Westmlnstei ttd
Branch nurseries--!*. Vancouvr.
".-> -c'"^~-: ��� ������ THE PENTICTON PRESS, PENTICTON, B.C. APRIL 18, 1908.
(X
\
Miss Mabel Rowe
Teacher of Piano, Organ and
Theory.
���PENTICTON -      - S- C
Dr.CAJACKSON
DENTIST
S. O. Land Company's   Block
PENTICTON, B. C.
'Phone II.
CHAS. WERE
Accountant & Auditor,
Notary Public
PENTICTON, B. C.
R. B. KERR,
BARRISTER & SOLICITOR
Notary Public.
KELOWNA,        - -        B. C.
W. H. T. GAHAN,
Barrister, Solicitor, Notary Public.
MURK   BLOCK.
PENTICTON,      -      -      B.C.
'Phone 17.
PRUIT,   CONFECTIONERY,
Full Line of
ENGLISH  CIGARETTES   AND  TOBACCOS
C.   E.   POMEROY.
Geo. E. Winkler,
Penticton Agent
Westbank Town & Fruit Lots
Kierstead & Steele
Builders and Contractors
ALL KINDS OF JOB WORK
IN OUR LINE.
.   A Card Will Find Us.   .
M. T. Kierstead - R. Steele
PENTICTON. B. C.
Harris
nursery co.,
Penticton.
Beautify your lot with some
of our shade trees.
We have Elm, Ash, Maple,
Catalpa, Mulberry, Black Walnut, and Ash Leaved Maple.
Some perennial shrubs and
apple trees left.
D. W. Crowley
&Co.
Wholesale and Retail Butchers
Goods Delivered to any part of the
Town.
WE GIVE OUR PROMPT ATTENTION TO
MAIL ORDERS
C. E. HOUSER, Manager.
TELEPHONES.
DwelllnffH-Indivirluul Line . $2.00 per month.
��� Party Line  1,00
HuHiriiMM  -Individual Line .. 2.50
-Tarty Line  2.00
Free inKtallntion within three-quartcra mile
of office, when one year contract (riven,
Outside three-(|uaiteiH mile, add coat of
labour to install.
When no contract, or contract for 1ph�� than
one year ffiven, cunt of labour iu inatall i��
charged at time uf iriHtatlatiun.
C. F. LAYTON,     -      Local Agent.
Lakeshore Telephone Co.
RATHVON & CARLESS
CONTRACTORS
an a
BUILDERS
Plans,  Specifications  and  Estimates
Furnished for all Kinds of Work.
L. A. PATHVON,
���I'ho.iL- White 1
CHAS. L. CARLESS,
���I hnnc White 2
FOR SALE
Canadian Bred Shire Stallion; 8 years
oil; perfectly sounl and gentle; weight
1,700 lbs. Will ixchange for wcrk
horses or drivers.      Apply
S. T. ELLIOTT,
38���tf. Kelowna, B. C.
LITERARY COLUMN.
The Poetry of Matthew Arnold.
Setting aside the insetimable
gift of perfect bodily health,
probably no one thing conduces
so much to the happiness of an
individual as the love of books ;
and the keenest pleasure that
books can give belongs to the
person who is fortunate enough
to have a real taste for poetry.
Whether this taste is often acquired after one has outgrown
two years before  the death of
Lord Byron.
After his preliminary  education at Winchester and Rugby,
Arnold went to Baliol College,  fall into the depths of despair or
W" bear the burden and the heat
Of the Lng day, and wish 'twere done.
Not till the hours of light return,
All we have built do we discern."
Let anyone who is tempted to
Oxford, where he took a high
degree in classics. He was elected Fellow of Oriel College in
1845. He drank deep of the
traditions and loveliness of Oxford, and in a famous passage in
one of his essays, he has almost
risen to poetry in speaking of the
Oxford of his university days :
" Beautiful city, so venerable,
so lovely, so unravaged by the
one's youth is questionable; but, fierce intellectual life of our cen
fortunate is he, who, in the days
when his mind was fresh and un-
tired, was admitted into that
realm of eternal spring which
the poets create. Many a one,
on looking back on his life, will
realize that he was first attracted
by the rythm and music of words
rather than by the thoughts they
suggested ; then, as time went
on, new meanings gradually unfolded themselves from the familiar lines, which became an inspiration in time of discouragement or distress, a consolation in
the hour of adversity, or the expression of feeling too intense
for one's own words.
The function of poetry has, in
every age, been a question of
discussion. Some have thought
that its object is to give intellectual pleasure���no mean object,
by-the-way, ���to others its chief
interest seems to lie in its relation to conduct; and in one of
his beautiful essays Matthew Arnold has claimed for it a still
higher and nobler power, that of
bringing the soul of man into
touch with the soul of nature.
"The grand power of poetry,"
he says,   " is its interpretative
power; by which I mean,  not a
power of drawing out in black
and white an explanation of the
mystery of the universe, but the
power of so dealing with things
as to awaken in us a wonderfully
full, new and intimate sense of
them, and of our relations with
them.    When this sense is a-
wakened in us we feel ourselves
to be in contact with the essential nature of these objects, to be
no longer bewildered and oppressed by them,  but to have
their secret and to be in harmony
with  them ;   and  this   feeling
calms and satisfies us as no other
can To awaken this sense
is one of the highest powers of
poetry.   The interpretations  of
science do not give us this intimate sense of objects as the interpretations of poetry give it ;
they appeal to a limited  faculty
and not to the whole man.   It is
not  Linnaeus  or  Cavendish  or
Cuvier who gives us the  true
sense of animals,  or water, or
plants, who seizes their secret
for us, who makes us participate
in their life ;   it is Skakspeare,
with his
' Daffodils
That come before the swallow dares,
and take
The winds of March with beauty.'
It is Wordsworth with his
' Voice heard
In spring-time from the cuckoo bird,
Breaking the silence of the seas
Among the far-off Hebrides.'
It is Keats, with his
'Moving   waters   at   their   pries'like
task
Of pure ablution round earth's human
shores.'
Most lovers of poetry know all
three aspects,���the keen delight
of some felicitous word or phrase,
such as Tennyson's
1 Water lapping on the crag
And  the  long ripple  washing  in  the
reeds'
or the mental tonic of such a
line as
' We always may be what we might
have been.
Matthew Arnold, the subject
of these remarks, was well known
to the writer in his youth and he
can therefore bear personal testimony to his worth, for a more
pure-minded, noble, manly and
at the same time modest man it
would be difficult to meet. In
personal appearance he was tall
and dark with broad shoulders
and a strong, masculine, though
mild and gentle face. He was
the eldest son of the famous Dr.
Arnold, headmaster of Rugby
and was born in the year 1822,
the year of Shelley's death and
tury, so serene. And yet steeped
in sentiment as she lies, spreading her gardens to the moonlight, and whispering from her
towers the last enchantments of
the middle ages, who will deny
that Oxford, by her ineffable
charm, keeps ever calling us
nearer to the true goal of all of
us, to the ideal, to perfection, to
beauty, in a word to beauty,
which is only truth seen from
another side."
In 1851 he was appointed Inspector of schools, a post which
he held until 1886. During this
period he was for some years
professor of poetry at Oxford,
and was several times sent a-
broad by the government to enquire into continental methods
of education. He died suddenly
on Sunday, April 15th, 1888, of
heart disease.
The strongly marked characteristics of his style, whether in
poetry or prose, are wonderful
lucidity, severe simplicity, great
.strength of conviction combined
the most complete self-restraint,
which led him to abhor extremes
whether in literature or conduct;
and, very often, underlying it
all, that haunting 'sense of tears
in mortal things' which strikes
every one who ponders over the
wonder and mystery of human
life.
Arnold has never been a popular poet which may be accounted
for by the fact that his poetry
appeals to the reason and intellect
rather than to the emotions. He
rises above the pain and fire of
passion into a calmer and purer
air which reminds one of the
serenity of the Hebrew poets.
He is, however, essentially manly
in his fearless outlook on life,
and never attempts to ignore
the evils which confront him.
Yet while endeavoring to destroy the complacency of the
self-satisfied and to rouse the
unaspiring, he never indulges in
noisy declamation or outsteps the
self-restraint of thought and
style which are such marked
features of his work. He rather
attempts to reach his end by
quiet suggestion or humorous
irony. Over and over again one
meets in his poems with this
sense of calm and moderation.
"Calm soul of all things, make it
mine
To feel amid the city's jar,
That there abides a peace of thine,
Man did not make and cannot mar."
During Arnold's life he was
often accused of being an atheist
or infidel, yet no one can read
his works without realizing that
he was a man of deep religious
feeling. It is true he had little
regard for many of the religious
opinions current in his day, but
his protests were directed against
the theology, that, attempting to
define the undefinable, narrows
the conception of the Creator to
the limits of its own mental horizon, and not against the true religion which is a life instead of a
hollow creed. He realized that
something more is needed for the
peace of a soul than passive
resignation or meaningless creeds
and catechisms: "Calm is not
lire's crown, though calm is
well" and that the really good
man is marked by the active
doing of right. Who saw one
clue and followed it. His religion showed itself in his idea
of duty, that spirit of morality
which can bring the highest
motive to bear on the smallest
action, and which follows right
because it is right "In scorn of
consequence."
" With aching hands and bleeding feet
We dig and heap, lay stone on stone ;
lapse into the luxury of self-pity
read his "Self-reliance" and see I
if his feet are not strengthened
and his soul braced to face the!
worst that Fate can do:
"Weary of myself, and sick of asking :
What I am and what I ought to be,
At this vessel's  prow  I  stand  which
bears me
Forwards, forwards o'er the starlit sea.
"And a look of passionate desire
O'er the sea and to the stars I send.
Ye who  from  my  childhood  up  have
calmed me,
Calm me, oh compose me to the end.
"'Ah! once more,'I  cried,   'ye  stars,
ye waters,
On my heart your mighty charm renew;
Still, still let me as I gaze upon you
Feel my soul becoming vast like you.'
"From  the intense,   clear,   star-sown
vault of heaven,
From the lit sea's unquiet way,
In  the  rustling night   air  came    the
answer:
'WouHst thou be as these are?   Live
as they.
" ' Unaffrighted by the silence round
them,
Undistracted by the sights they see,
These demand not that the things without them
Yield them love, amusement, sympathy.
"'And with joy the   stars   perform
their shining,
And the sea its long moon-silvered roll;
For self-poised they live, nor pine with
noting
All the fever of some differing soul.
'"Bounded  by themselves,   and    un-
regardful
In what state God's other works may be
In their own tasks all their  powers
pouring,
These attain the mighty life you see.'
"O air-born voice, long since, severely
clear,
A cry like thine in my own heart I
hear :
'Resolve to be thyself; and know that he
Who finds himself, will lose his misery.'''
No one, indeed can read Arnold's poetry without having his
standard of life raised and his
ideals exalted, and, after all,
what we aim at, rather than
what we really attain to, must
be our true measure of life.
' 'What I aspired to be
And was not, comforts me."
New Spring Styles in Boots & Shoes
MEN'S
A good assortment of styles in
all size?., including Oxfords, in
tan and black. 20 per cent, off
all heavy working or plow shoes.
LADIES'
Patent leather, swing last,
Blutcher cut, a new and very
stylish shoe S.s.oo
Velour calf, Blutcher, new and
stylish $.1.50
Vici kid, patent toe caps at	
$3.50, S.ZS, .'.OO.
BOYS'
A 20 per cent, discount on all
boys' shoes, sizes 8 to 5.
MISSES'
Vici kid, Blutcher cut, patent
tips $2.oo pair
Tan Dongola lace	
$2.25 pair
A good assortment of children's
and infant's shoes.
Purchase now before the sizes
arc sold out.
W. R. KING & CO.
'PHONE 25.
THE ELLIS ST. STORE.
gjHELF   HARDWAHK
Saws, Axes, Wedges, Striking Hammers, Table and
Pocket Cutlery.
PENTICTON HARDWARE CO.
W. 0. w.
Okanagan Camp No. 261.
Meets 2nd and 4th Saturday in   the
month at 8 p. m. in Woodmen's Hall,
Ellis St.
Visiting Sovereigns always welcome.
JOHN POWER, C. C.
R. WILTON, CLERK
HOTEL  PENTICTON.
First-Class Accommodation For Tourists or Commercial Men.
RATES $2.50 PER DAY
A. Barnes
PENTICTON. B.C
Prop.
DOMINION ELECTIONS
Yale Cariboo Electoral District
A Convention of the Liberal-Conservatives of Yale-Cariboo will be
held at
Ellison's Hall, Vernon,
On Thur.,April 23,1908
for the purpose of selecting a candidate
to contest the forthcoming Dominion
Elections in the interests of the Liberal-
Conservative Party. Local Associations are requested to meet and appoint
delegates at once. Representation at
the Convention will be by delegations
from the Provincial Electoral Districts
of Grand Forks, Greenwood, Similkameen, Okanagan, Kamloops, Yale, Lil-
looet and Cariboo. One delegate will
be appointed for each twenty or fraction of twenty votes cast at each poll.
Accredited delegates may vote either
in person or by proxy, but not more
than five proxies shall be held by any
one delegate.
Chair will be taken at 2 p. m. All
Conservatives are invited to attend
the Convention, but only accredited
delegates will be allowed to vote.
PRICE ELLISON.
Pres. Yale-Cariboo Conservative Assn.
J. A. McKELVIE,
Sec. Yale-Cariboo  Conservative Assn.
Peterborough
Skiffs &
Ganoes
Spring is Coming and Here is
Your Chance to get a Canoe
or Skiff.
17 foot Canoe=Skiffs--Painted Basswood,
2 pair Oars, 1 Paddle, Bow and Stem
Seats  $57.50
18 foot Canoe-Skiffs���Painted Basswood,
2 pair Oars, 1 Paddle, Bow and Stem
Seats    65.00
15 foot Varnished Cedar Skiffs���Clinker
Built, Ribs 4 inches centres,  1 pair
Oars, Bow Seat, Rudder    60.00
16 foot Varnished Cedar Skiffs���Clinker
Built, Ribs 4 inches centres,  1 pair
Oars, Bow Seat and Rudder    65.00
Canoes of all sizes, painted and varnished, basswood
or cedar, from $40.00 to $50.00.
Further particulars on application to
H. J. MOORE, Penticton, B.C.
Sole Agent Okanagan Lake.
WM.   HAUG,
Wholesale and Retail
MASONS'   SUPPLIES . .
PORTLAND CEMENT, HARD WALL
PLASTER, COAST  LIME
and COAST LATH
Orders by mail promptly attended
to.
BOX 1��6   -   KELOWNA, B. C.
THE PENTICTON
DAIRY
Daily delivery of Fresh Milk to
all parts of the Town.
MILK 10c. PER QUART.
H. M. McNeill,     .    Prop.
Galarneau &
McKenzie
BUILDERS & CONTRACTORS
C. P. R.
LAND FOR
SALE
Choice fruit lots, improved and
unimproved.
FIRE INSURANCE   The Sun of I,, n
don, Eng., and Queen.    Why not insure
in the best; they cost no more.
A pplv to '
J. R. MITCHELL.
When
you   think  of
Look us up.
Building
ADOLrHUSGALARNEAU  W. A. MCKENZIE
Lake View Poultry Yards
FRESH EGGS FOR SALE
ii
si
q
PURE-BRED WHITE
LEGHORNS
M
O
A
tn
"1
O
W
EGGS FOR HATCHING
$1.00 to $1.50 per setting.
I. KENT, Propr.
|3
g
S
IS
I
Now is the Time
-TO-
Get a Motor for
your Boat or Launch
I handle the goods.   Write for Catalogue and prices on the size you require.
B. L. HATFIELD,
Oas Engine Expert,
SUMMERLAND, - B. C.
PENTICTON
& OROVILLE
STAQE
Via Fairview
Leaves Penticton Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays at 6:30 a.m., arriving at Oroviile the same day at 6 p, m.
Through Fare - $6.00
W. HINE and S. M. SNOW
FAIRVIEW. B. C.
EATON'S PRICES
Plus the Express
-AT -
H.OLIVER'S
SHOE STORE.
E. J. FINGH
Painter, Paperhanger
and Sign Writer
Picture Framing a Specialty.
WALL PAFER Carried in Stock.
Box 196.       Main St,
Subscribe for
The Penticton Press THE PENTICTON PRESS, PENTICTON, B. C, APRIL 18, 1908.
SUMMERLAND.
(Continued from first page)
of Miss Ada L. A. Murcutt who
is now travelling throughout B.
C. giving a series of most interesting lectures. Miss Murcutt
was in Summerland on Monday
and Tuesday of this week and
both evenings gave very stirring
addresses in the Methodist
church here. The lecture on
Monday evening was well attended. Prof. Sawyer occupied the
chair and in introducing the
speaker of the evening showed a
deep interest in the work she
is carrying out. The subject on
which Miss Murcutt spoke was
' 'Japan and the Japanese.'' With
a few introductory remarks the
speaker plunged into the heart
of her discourse carrying us
away back to the early religious
history of the island empire and
bringing us back over the difficult path of the missionaries who
planted the seed of our religion
in that then dark country. She
carefully compared the conditions of that island thirty years
ago with those of the present
day, and showed the marked
progress that Japan has made
during the past three decades.
The lecturer related many interesting incidents of her travels
among the Japanese people and
this brought us face to face with
the every day life within that
much talked of nation. The
lady then explained how the accursed liquor traffic had gotten
its hold upon the lower classes in
Japan and convinced us that our
liquor is better known there than
our religion. ' The subject for
Tuesday evening was "Russia
and its Island Prison Saghalien."
It was evident that Miss Murcutt had kept the best till the
last. She pictured very vividly
the horrors of that Russian convict settlement as seen by her
own eyes on the occasion of her
visit there, In closing her address the speaker dealt with the
liquor traffic and laid before us
the course being taken by the
W. C. T, U. in this province, in
whose interest she travels. Two
resolutions were moved by C. S.
Stevens and seconded by J. M,
Robinson and J. W. Logie. The
first one embodied a vote of
thanks and an expression of the
appreciation of the Summerland
people of the work being done
by Miss Murcutt. In the second
a most hearty vote of thanks
was tendered the W. C. T, U.
for the work they are undertaking. We feel sure that their efforts will be rewarded in the establishment of local option legislation in British Columbia in the
near future.
A young man named Basil
Bateman, recently arrived from
England, had the misfortune to
sustain a severe injury to his
left hand at Jas. Ritchie's mill
on the 7th inst. Dr. Smith, of
Summerland, amputated the last
joints of the third and little fingers.      	
OKANAGAN FALLS
A successful and well-attended
meeting of local Conservatives
was held on Saturday, 11th of
April, at Okanagan Falls. Mr.
Matheson was elected chairman
for the meeting and the follow-
i ng officers were then chosen by
acclamation :���Dugald Gillespie,
president; John Matheson, vice-
president; S. M. Snow, secretary,
and C. F. McKinnon, treasurer.
Messrs. Neil McLean and Dugald
Gillespie were then appointed
delegates to the Conservative
convention at Vernon on the 23rd
of April. It was resolved to hold
another meeting after the return
of the delegates from Vernon on
Saturday, May 2nd.
W. B. Hine, representing Okanagan Falls, left on Monday's
stage to attend the Liberal convention at Vernon.
People are hereby notified not to interfere in any way with the flumes or ditches.
We cannot permit the boring of holes in main flume, or the blocking up of same for the purpose of taking water.
People are warned against the starting of bush fires in the vicinity of the flumes, as this may endanger the whole
system and cause serious damage for which the offenders are liable.
Any pollution of the water in the flumes and ditches, or the infringement of the above regulations will render the
offenders liable to prosecution.
Holders of water agreements are required to have their distribution flumes in order before making application
for water.
All applications and complaints are required to be registered at the Company's office.
The Southern Okanagan Land
Company, Limite
NOTICE
FRUIT TREES-Well-grown stock.
Large quantity of apple trees for sale,
only few choice varieties grown : also
small stock of ornamental trees. Apply
for varieties and price to Manager,
COLDSTREAM ESTATE CO., Ltd.,
15-tf Vernon, B. C.
NOTICE.
Similkameen Land District,   District of Osoyoos,
Yale.
TAKE NOTICE that Lydia Droutskoy Fraser,
of Kew Gardens, England, intends to apply fur
permission to purchase the following described
land :���
Commencing at a post planted about 2 mites
in an easterly direction from A. Ford's P. R. No.
3260, thence south 40 chains: thence east 20
chains : thonce north 40 chains ; thence west 20
chains to point of commencement, and containing
SO acres, more or less.
LYDIA DROUTSKOY FRASER,
By her agent John Robert Fraser, Captain.
Dated March 7th, 1908, 34-8t
FOR SALE.
Bronze  Turkev   Eggs,   for  hatching.
$2.50 per setting of 11.    Apply to
C. F. RANDOLPH,
38- Penticton, B. C.
FOR SALE
Five Horse Power  Gasoline  Engine,
Circular Saw & Crosscut  Saw.   All  in
good condition. Cheap for cash. Apply,
J. R. MITCHELL,
Penticton, B. C.
FOR HIRE.
Good Work  Team,  and  Driver,  for
summer.   Scraping,  plowing, or harrowing.   Apply
39- W. E. WELBY.
WANTED.
Oti-
to do housework.       Apply
Mrs. W. R. Kino,
Penticton, B. C.
LIQUOR LICENSE
ACT 1900, AND AMENDMENT ACT 1908.
NOTICE is hereby given that one
month from date I intend to apply to
the Superintendent of Provincial Police,
at Victoria, B. C, for a renewal of my
Liquor License for the premises known
ana described as the B. C. Hotel, Penticton, B. C.
88-4 W. H. TAPLEY.
Penticton, B. C, March 24th, 1908.
HOW ABOUT THOSE
Fruit and  Ornamental
Trees,
Seeds, Bulbs, Roses,
Shrubs, Etc,
You are going to plant this
spring ? The best is what you
want. I have them at right
prices.   Send for catalogue.
DAVID GEL.L.ATL.Y,
GELLATLY,       -       -      B. C.
JUST ARRIVED ==
CAR LOAD OP
Extension and
Reversible Discs
The very latest up - to - date
tools for Orchard Cultivation.
Descriptive matter sent on
application to
S. T. Elliott,
KELOWNA       -      -       B. C.
Subscription $1.00 Year.
18 Acres
OL MAIN STREET.   Two and One=IIa!f Miles from
Town.
usiness
ON MAIN STREET.     Near PRESS office.
Apply = W.J.CLEMENT.
ay view
Btaesa^maaaaa
are
iwa&j:JS!xyim1^*i!MJiJ!ai*asia>&^.   .. vxmsx-it^JkMJKmiB
Situated on Westminster Ave.,
PENTICTON,
Has been sub-divided and is now on the Market at
$250.55 for inside lots
Easy Terms.
$300-55 for corners.
No Interest Charged.
Lots arc 52 feet by 103 feet.
Now is your chance, boys, to secure a beautiful site for a prospective
home. This is leap year and you may need it=~you can't always
sometimes tell.
FOR FURTHER PARTICULARS APPLY TO
ALF. SMITH, - Penticton.

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