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The Penticton Press May 2, 1908

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Array penticton   fl>reee
#
VOL. 2.   No. 42.
PENTICTON, B.C., SATURDAY, MAY 2, 1908.
$1.00 Per Year In Advance.
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
HKAD  OFFICE, TORONTO
ESTABLISH ED   1867
B. E. WALKER, President
ALEX. LAIRD, General Manager
A. H. IRELAND, Superintendent of
Branches
Paid-up Capital, $10,000,000
Rest, - - - 5.000,000
Total Assets, - 113,000,000
Branches throughout Canada, and in the United States and England
BANKING   BY   MAIL ��5
Business may be transacted by mail with any branch
of the Bank.   Accounts may be opened and deposits
made or withdrawn by mail.   Every attention is paid
to out-of-town accounts.
Penticton Branch     *    -    J. J. HUNTER, Manager.
Manufacturers of
j    Manufi
?
Lumber, Sash,
Doors, Mouldings,
Turnings,
Mantles, Cabinets,
Tables,
Store and Bar
Fixtures,
Church Seats and
Pulpits.
u
First here first served.
| Dealers in
AIN /
at        I
1        hi ni ~>   <r~��   tr~m  tir~m  tr~m
\ THE SAW IS SINGING AGAIN
I So get in your order for Lumber if you want it
"* once.
S. C. SMITH
Lumber
(Store and Bar I COItlpafiy
Fixtures,I
Church Seats and _ |        Limited.
Flintkote Roofing,
Nysonset Roofing,
Carpet Felt,
Tar Paper,
Building Paper,
Ibex Extra,
Insulating & Build'g,
Shingles, Lath,
Sheet & Fancy Glass,
Wood Fibre Plaster.
!
We can make you ANYTHING in the factory line
^H    t        on short notice.
nascer.   i
ie I
-0
GENTLEMEN
I
What about a Spring Suit that will keep you
cool ? We have them from $4.00 up to $30.
Now is your chance to get a good selection
to choose from.
NORMAN HILL,
The Up-to-Date Ladle' and Gents' Furnisher.
JUST RECEIVED
A large consignment of
Single and Double
Light and Heavy HARNESS
Express and Driving
KENT & SON
fi iW"!fc^��JRnW��vV.��s.V.����W��^&^^^^^^^&5v'W>��.'����^&^^��.'*>��T>^&^^^^^&W5^&J
COMMERCIAL
Livery, Feed and Sale Stable
.    D1GNAN and WEEKS, Proprietors.
f)    If you /ant a Stylish Outfit, this is the place to come.   You can always   9
$   get teams just when you want them.   We make a specialty of keeping  '4
I
4
4
     'i
fc> <A> *.> 'A* ��"A> 'A* <A> <A> ** <A> <A> /~A> ^A> <A> <A> <A> <A> <A> <A> *A> <A.^ <A> '*> ^A^ *��   tj
good horses, safe rigs, carrful drivers and also saddle and pack  horses.
We are also putting in Hay and Grain for sale, and as we buy for cash
we get the best rates and our patrons get the benefit.
Special  Attention  To The Wants Of Commercial  Men.
Penticton Stage and Livery
Stables.
Stage Connects with Steamer "Okanagan" at Penticton, with Great Northen
Railway at Keremeos, and with stage to Hedley and Princeton. Leaves at 6 a.n
Pianos and Furniture moved to all points,  and a general Drayinp
Business transacted.
Saddle and Pack Horses.
Top Buggies, Four-horse Rigs for Commercial Men.
W. E. Welby, Prop.      Penticton.
mmmmm^mmmmmmmmmmmm^mmmmmmmmmmmmmmMMmmmm
Penticton Store
Established 40 Years.
Alfred H. Wade, Prop.
Dry Goods, Gent's Furnishings, Boots and Shoes, Groceries
and General Merchandize of all Sorts
I Agent for
GIANT POWDER CO.
OKANAGAN FLOUR MILLS CO.
L
Goods delivered through the town.
PENTICTON,
Prompt attention to orders.
B.C.
CONSERVATIVE
CONVENTION
Martin Burrill is the Unanimous
Choice.
(Not appearing in last issue owing to
inefficient long distance telephone
seivice.)
At the Yale-Cariboo convention of Liberal Conservatives
held in Vernon on the afternoon
of Thursday, April 23rd, Martin
Burrill, of Grand Forks, was unanimously chosen candidate to
contest the constituency at the
forthcoming Dominion election.
The proceedings began with
an address by the President,
Price Ellison, M. P. P., after
which Mayor Timmons gave a
very humorous sheech of welcome to the delegates which was
much applauded. Mr. Burrill
had found it impossible to be
present, but had sent a letter
permitting his name to be placed
before the convention, if such
were deemed in the best interests of the party. The names of
W. T. Shatford, of Penticton,
Price Ellison, M. P. P., of Vernon, J. M. Robinson, of Summer-
land, and W. A. Lang, of Peachland, were suggested, but all
gentlemen modestly declined the
honor. Mr. Burrill was, therefore, declared nominated by acclamation.
The convention was undoubt-
e lly the largest and most successful of any ever held in the
interior of the province, there
oeing 149 delegates present.
The voting power of these was
further augmented by 128
proxies.
In the evening a smoker at
which between four and five
hundred persons were present,
was tendered the delegation.
Price Ellison presided, and an
excellent programme was ren-
lered. Stirring speeches by Hon.
Chas. Semlin, ex-Premier of B.
C, J. A. MacKelvie, of Vernon,
Hector Sutherland, of Summer-
land, L. W. Shatford, M. P. P.,
of Penticton, Mr. Miller, of
Grand Forks, J. Dilworth. of
Kelowna, J. T. Robinson, of
Kamloops, J. M. Robinson, 'of
Summerland, and Mr. Shaw, of
Kamloops, interspersed by songs,
and selections by the Vernon
Brass Band, held the audience
until after midnight. Refresh-
meats were served the entire
co npany.
Athletic Association.
The annual meeting of the
Penticton Athletic Association
vas held in Wade's rooms on
Monday evening. A financial
*eport was read which showed a
jalance of $73.65 on hand as
carried over from last year. The
election of officers for the ensuing year then took place and
resulted in the re-election of J.
R. Mitchell as president, while
A. H. Wade was elected vice-
president, J. W. Edmonds, secretary ; and H. Leir, J. W. Gibbons, W. A. McKenzie and W. J.
Clement additional members of
the executive. A meeting will
be held some time during the
present month to determine the
character of the sports for the
First of July. It is probable that
there will be no horse races this
year, but that the water sports
will be made the leading attraction.
FOR SALE
Canadian Bred Shire Stallion; 8 years
old; perfectly sound and ffentle; weight
1,700 lbs. Will exchange for work
horses or drivers.       Apply
S. T. ELLIOTT,
38-tf. Kelowna, B. C.
Subscription $1.00 Year.
H. M. S. PINAEORE
Local Kelowna Troupe Play to Big
House.
The Str. Okanagan made a
special triD on Thursday afternoon bringing the company of
Kelowna players, the Kelowna
Amateur Orchestra, and passengers from Kelowna, Peachland,
Summerland and Naramata,
making a total passenger list of
something like two hundred and
fifty. The occasion was the production of the comic opera, "H.
M. S. Pinafore," in aid of the
Kelowna Hospital. This play
had been put on three nights at
Kelowna, and had on each occasion drawn a full house. The
troupe comprised about twenty-
five persons, all local talent,
while the now famous Kelowna
Amateur Orchestra, consisting of
about twenty-five pieces, furnished the music.
Of course a great many of
those who were passengers on
the steamer had seen the play
once or twice already, and had
come down merely to enjoy the
exquisite trip on the lake. However, Steward's Hall, although
additional seating accommodation had been furnished, was
filled to its full capacity. Comment upon the play, the scenery,
or the music is unnecessary.
The expressions heard on every
hand at the conclusion of the
performance comprise sufficient
comment. 'Fine,' 'good,' 'very
good,' 'the acting shows finish,'
'the best I have seen in Canada,'
'that company might travel all
over Canada and the United
States,' were a few of the notes
of appreciation.
The proceeds netted $247.75.
The Press is glad to note the
rapid progress that is being made
throughout the Okanagan along
such cultured lines, for, in eyery
respect, local talent has surpassed that of the travelling
troupes, while the moral standard of the productions is incomparably higher. Every encouragement should be given to those
who are contributing so ably towards making the Okanagan
Valley a most delightful spot in
which to live.
Born, on Apr.  26, to Mr. and
Mrs. B. H. Jordan, a son.
Gordon Harris has  been ap-
pointed Registrar for purposes
swing. He was 'at home' Saturday afternoon to the entire
community, who  inspected with
_l_  interest, his complete outfit, in-
of the Marriage Act. Those:c]uding bake oven and candy
contemplating   matrimony  need i s'-ove-
not now send to Vernon for a | Jas- Ritchie came up by steam-
license. Gordon can fix things ;er Saturday morning from Sum-
up in tip top shape,  and even j merland on business.   Hisbroth-
Local and Personal
perform the marriage ceremony
in a pinch.
Ronald McDonald Stewart, the
renowned traveller and globe
trotter, formerly of New Zealand and the South Sea Islands,
and lately connected with the
Orphans' Home of this place, is
back in Penticton from an extended visit to Old Scotia, where he
has been renewing acquaintences
with some of the Clan Stewart.
Mrs. Stewart will follow in a
few months.
R. T. Lowery, the publisher of
the Greenwood Ledge and formerly the publisher of the famous
Lowery's Claim, paid the Press
a fraternal call on Friday evening of last week, having just returned from the Conservative
convention in Vernon, at which
he was a delegate from Greenwood. Mr. Lowery is a very
conversant, though quiet spoken,
man, and altogether tamer than
we had expected, judging from
his fiery journalism.
Geo. E. Winkler returned on
Thursday from Westbank where
he has been doing some development work on his coal mine.
Mr. Winkler says things are
progressing at the new West-
bank settlement. About ten men
are engaged in fluming for the
irrigation system, while a number of settlers are busily engaged getting their fruit lots into shape. D. E. Gellatly has recently put a townsite near his
own wharf in the Westbank
vicinity on the market.
PEACHLAND.
Mr. Gaddes, of Kelowna, accompanied a group of land seekers here last week. Unfortunately, they did not see the
best of Peachland owing to misunderstanding as to the time of
meeting the real estate agent
here. They continued their trip
down to the other lake points.
A jolly group accompanied the
baseball team to Summerland
last Saturday. They report the
road in fine condition.
Mrs. Bailey, who has been
quite ill at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Law, is slowly improving ,and we hope she may be
able very soon to mingle among
us again.
The Girls' Handicraft Club
ana" j met at the home of Miss Gum-
mow Thursday with a full attendance. The election of officers
took place with the following
results: Pres., Miss Needham;
Vice Pres., Miss Callendar; Sec.
Treas., Miss Robinson; Pianist,
Miss Gummow.
The Club has decided to assist j
the W. C.  T. U.  in furnishing
the ladies'   sitting   room   in the
hotel.
Mr. J.   Robinson and his two
See ad. of Jas. A. Schubert re
closing sale ; also Jos. A. Nes-
bitt's ad.
Rev. Jas. Hood and wife, of
Summerland, have been spending the present week in Penticton.
Mrs.   H.   D.    Duhamel
dughter arrived from Edmonton
on Friday and are guest of Mr.
and Mrs. Hudon.
The services of the' local
churches will begin at 7:30 on
Sunday evenings instead of at 7,
as during the winter months.
Mrs. Pascoe, who has been the
guest of the Misses Sutherland
for a week or two. left on Thursday for her home in Moose Jaw,
Sask.
Liberals-A meeting of the! daughters,  have come down tc
Liberal Association is to be held :their town cotta^e to sPend the
in the rooms over Layton's store, jsummer months.
Lee's block, next Thursday even-1    The reception given Rov. Mr.
ing at 8 o'clock.   Turn out. Jones, the Baptist minister, who
er, Rev. Jas. Ritchie, drove him
as far as Greata's, where a Summerland team met him. Mrs.
Ritchie accompanied him.
Mr. and Mrs. Morrison spent
the greater part of last week in
Vernon.
Principal Murray has returned
from his Easter holidays and
the Convention.
Peachland enjoyed to the full
extent the concert given by the
Rev. J. P. Hicks and his brother
Gideon Hicks, Monday evening
in the Orange Hall. Rev. Hicks
delivered a lecture on Peter Mc
Kenzie, the old English evangelist and humorist. The lecture
was interspersed with solos sung
by Mr. Gideon Hicks. 'The Lost
Chord,' Rocked in the Cradle of
the Deep,' 'Memory,' 'Youth,'
'Island of Dreams,' 'When Love
is Kind,' 'All through the Night,'
were indeed a rare treat, and it
is hoped that both gentlemen
will again in the near future favor
the valley with entertainments.
Rev. and Mrs. Mclntyre and a
number of Summerland young
paople accompanied the Messrs.
Hicks from Summerland in the
Launch, Maud More. Before
returning home, tea was served
them at Mrs. Needham's home.
KELOWNA
Dr.   Geddas    returned
Manitoba on Wednesday,
22.   He was accompanied
from
Apr.
by a
John Gummow and son, Ben,
came in from Peachland on Monday to clear land on their Penticton property. They will bring
the land under cultivation as soon
as possible.
John Stubbs, of Kelowna, was
in town on Thursday. He, in
conjunction with Messrs. El-
worthy and Cartridge, is about
to open a steam laundry at Vernon, the plant being now on the
way thither.
has been recently stationed hero,
was an event long to be remembered. The speeches, songs and
instrumental were all very fine.
Geo. Aitkens, has hoisted a
huge tent on his ten acre lot.
Mr. Crowley and his two sons,
of Nova Scotia, arrived Friday
to care for Mr. Harrington's orchard. Mrs. Crowley will join
her husband in   a few weeks.
W. A. Angus has his confectionery   business now   in   full
number of men who expect to
purchase land here.
Mr. and Mrs. Conkling and
family, who for several months
have been visiting friends in
Ontario, arrived home on Aprill
22. Mr. Conkling thinks there
are few places as good as the
Okanagan.
J. P. Clement formerly of this
place is in town. He expects to
spend a few weeks visiting different points on the lake before
returning to Vancouver.
A new building for the Bank
of Montreal is under construction on the north side of Bernard Avenue.
A small building to be used as
an isolated ward is being erected
on the hospital grounds.
A number of our citizens attended the Conservative convention held in Vernon on April 23.
They returned on the 24th, bringing reports of a good meeting.
On Wednesday evening,  April
22nd, Rev. J. P. Hicks,  of Victoria, lectured in the Methodist
| church to a small but attentive
I audience.    Mr.   Hicks'   subject
'was "Peter McKenzie,  Humor-
i ist,    Preacher   and   Lecturer."
I Mr.   (.!.   Hicks   who is a well-
known singer in the coast cities
accompanied   his   brother   and
! sang several solos in his usual
: good style,   The same program
was given the following night at
I Mount View Methodist Church.
The Baptist congregation held
a   Missionary   Social    in    their
church on the evening of April
22nd.
NOTICE
FRUIT TREES- Well-grown slock.
Large quantity of apple trees for sale,
only few choice varieties grown : ateo
small stock of ornamental trees. Apply
for varieties and price to Manager,
COLDSTREAM ESTATE CO., Ltd.,
15-tf Vernon, B. C.
FOR SALE
Five Horse Power  Gasoline  Engine,
Circular Saw & Crosscut  Saw.    All  in
go jd condition. Cheap for cash. Applv,
J. R. MITCHELL.   '
IVnticton, B. C�� THE PENTICTON PRESS, PENTICTON, B.C. MAY 2, 1908.
THE PENTICTON PRESS
ISSUED   EVERY   SATURDAY  AT
PENTICTON, B.C. BY
W. J. CLEMENT.
Subscription $1.00 Per Year in
Advance.
Advertising Rates:
Transient Advertisements���Not exceeding one inch, one insertion, oOc.;
for each additional insertion, 25c.
LoJge Notices, Professional Cards, &c.
$1.00 per inch, per month.
Land and Timber Notices���30 Hays, $5;
60 days, $7.
Legal Advertising-First insertion, 10
cents per line; each subsequent insertion, 5c. per line.
Reading Notices in Local News Column
15c. per line, first insertion; 10c. per
line, each subsequent insertion.
Contract Advertisements���Rates arranged according to space taken.
All changes in contract advertisements must be in the hands of the
printer by Tuesday evening to ensure
publication in the next issue.
Growing Peaches by Irrigation.
The growing of peaches in the
irrigated country is increasing at
such a rapid rate that we feel
sure that the following paper,
read before the Colorado State
Horticultural Society by one of
the growers in one of the best
peach sections in the world, will
be appreciated:
In taking up the subject of
peach culture I will try to give
as much of my own personal experience as possible, as I believe
it to be the most helpful and interesting to those who are seeking information and enlightenment in any line, and I will try
to be as direct and clear in the
treatment of the various subjects, which are of vital importance to the successful growing
of the peach.
There are a number of reasons
for claiming superiority for the
arid regions, some of which 1
will give as follows:
The wood of the peach tree
here becomes almost as tough
and wiry as that of an elm, owing
to the dryness of the atmosphere,
as well as the judicious use oi
water throughout the entire season, which enables it to support
a much heavier crop without
breaking, than in the humid and
damp climate of the Atlantic or
Middle states, where there is ar
abundance of dew and copious-
rains at certain seasons, while
th are are drouthy spells at other
times. There the trees will shoot
up and make a wonderful growth
of soft, sappy wood in the rainy
season, only to be starved for
the want of rain at the most
critical time, that of maturing a
crop of fruit. These trees usually are short-lived, and break to
pieces in a moderately high
wind. Again, autumn rains frequently start new growth only
to be injured by the following
cold winter. Rainy seasons not
only produce poor wood, but also
encourage the growth and spread
of different fungous diseases. It
has also been demonstrated that
peaches grown in a rainy, cloudy
climate lack color, flavor and
keeping qualities, as it takes sunshine to paint the peach, and to
develop the sugar, which means
richness of flavor, and the dry
atmosphere toughens the skin,
which gives shipping qualities.
Hence the arid or semi-arid sections, where water can be supplied by irrigation, is the ideal
home of the peach.
LOCATION.
I would select mesa or bench
land, elevated somewhat above
t ie valley lands or streams, protected if possible by higher
mountains, which would break
the strong winds to some extent,
and which by retaining much of
the winter's snow until late in
the spring insures cold nights
and thereby retards the buds
from coming into bloom too early,
and getting killed by late spring
frosts. A southern exposure or
slope means earlier ripening of
fruit, which sometimes is desirable, but a western or northern
exposure, being colder, is rather
s ifcr by holding back  tho blos
soming period until the danger
from late frosts is past. These
bench lands as a rule are safer
from late spring frosts, by being
above the cold frost line of the
lower valley ; they also provide
good drainage, which is so necessary for the best health of the
trees. Light, sandy or gravelly
soils are warmer and ripen their
fruit earlier, but heavier soils
having less sand and gravel will
produce larger trees, and being
richer, will naturally stand the
drain of regular heavy crop
better than the former.
The land should be plowed in
fall to put it in shape to receive
the winter's rains and snows. In
the spring, as soon as the ground
works well, plow again, deeply,
after first having filled up any
hollows or gullies which may
exist, after which harrow or drag
down smooth, when it will be
ready for staking or marking.
PLANTING.
I use the square plan, as it is
easier to cultivate and work the
orchard than by the triangle or
equilateral plan. On good, strong
land, 20 feet will not be too far
apart, while on light soils 16 or
18 feet will do. After the ground
is staked, I take a one-horse turn
plow and run a furrow just as
close on one side of each row as
the stakes will permit. This
furrow for irrigating need not
be deep. After making your
head and waste ditches ready to
turn in water, we are ready to
go to planting. This ought to
be about the first to the fifteenth
of April, or just before the trees
begin to leaf out. I have had
the best success the past two
seasons by planting the latter
part of March, when I had 100
per cent, of the trees to grow.
At that early season the trees
receive less of a shock, as they
are quite dormant, and also the
san is not so hot, which is also
an advantage.
Cut back all broken roots to
sound wood, and also any others
that may show signs of root
knot. It is far better to leave
only a half of the root system,
perfectly sound and healthy,
than to leave all of the roots
mutilated and broken or diseased,
as in this instance roots are liable to become diseased or rot,
and make a poor, crippled tree.
Cut on a slant and in such a way
that the cut surface will face
down in the bottom of the hole ;
this causes the new roots to take
a downward course, which insures deep rooting. After placing the tree in the hole straight,
fill up with fine earth, and turn
the water down the furrow.
CULTIVATION.
As soon as the water is through
the rows and all trees are well
wet up, I shut the water off, and
in 12 or 24 hours, go over the
field, and fill up around the trees
with fine earth, as by this time
you will find cracks around the
trees which, if not covered up,
will permit the air to enter and
iry out. Leave the ground level,
this covering of fine earth will
act as a mulch, and will hold the
moisture a long time. At this
time all trees that may have
settled crooked or leaning, should
be pulled straight while the soil
is still wet, as they should never
be disturbed after growth has
started. As soon as the ground
is dry enough to permit a horse
near the furrow, I take a fine
harrow cultivator and fill the
furrow by making a round or
two, leaving the whole field
smooth and level.
Water should not be turned on
again for at least three or four
weeks, a shallow cultivation
every two weeks will be much
better, as this will stimulate
growth and give the ground a
better chance to warm up. It
takes far less water to get the
best results than a great many
people would suppose, and there
are more trees killed by too much
water than by too much cultivation. For the second irrigation
I prefer to run a furrow on either
side of the rows, as close as possible,  this insures wetting the
(Continued nn last page)
7,'
Main's Pharmacy
Main Street, Penticton.
1 <^^B&^B@^m^BQ^SQ^3
..   LAROE STOCK OF   ��
*     CROCKERY     |
m and 89
L\
WE CARRY A COMPLETE STOCK OF
Drugs, Druggists' Sundries, Rubber Goods (Sick Room Utensils) , Stationery, Post Cards, Magazines, and
Photographic Goods.
WE MAKE A SPECIALTY OF PRESCRrPTION WORK
K ____ 'A
i WINDOW SHADES |
m      JUST ARRIVED.      ��
C. A. C. STEWARD. &
'a @32��<53������3S82�� @i2����^��
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J. A. NESBITT,)
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!
���ELLIS STREET���
The celebrated V2 Spray.   ���;
Sprays, assorted.
Planet Jr. Cultivators.
The newly patented Orchard Whiffletree.
Harrows, Plows, Democrats, Cultivators, etc.
Fine Stock of First Class Harness.
1 Bell Organ.
1 Gerhard Heintzman Piano.
1 Sail and Row Boat with Sails.
1 Large Tent, 14 x 16 feet.
3 Houses to Rent.
Fresh Milk.
DeLaval Cream Separators.
100 Apple Trees, 600 Grapes and a few Peaches.
.tt -*fc�� tt ^tm tZf
Ei��-^^.����-^*.*��-^w*��-^^.*s��-^*fc.*��-^fc.����-^fc-*��-^^.��Ei
Closing Sale
���OF-
GROCERIES, PROVISIONS, CROCKERY
AT
J. A. Schubert's
Commencing
FRIDAY,   MAY   1st,   1908.
This Stock is complete in every
line carried and will be sold at
COST until cleared.
Come early while the stock is
unbroken.
TERMS Strictly GASH
All are invited to take advantage
of this sale.   What we say we mean.
Ever Lie Awake HOME SEEKERS
Nights
Trying to scheme out a
way of reducing your
grocery bill ?
We are scheming along the
same lines. The lowest
possible price for the best
quality is our rule.
Just now we have some
Nice canned Blueberries
2 cans for 25c.
Pineapple Chunks in
cans, large size, 2 for
 35c.
Bananas,
Oranges,
Lemons,
Australian Onions.
Red Star
Grocery
READ!!
Acre Lot on Beach Avenue,
Penticton. The best location a-
vailable on the most beautiful
beach on Okanagan Lake ; price
$753.
:o:
Two One-Half Acre Lots commanding beautiful view of Okanagan Lake ; good soil; available
water supply ; 93J x 280 ft. in
dimension; planted in peach trees
this spring. Price, corner lot,
$600 ; inside lot, $500.
:o:
Corner Building Lot in residential section ; pleasant surroundings; a good buy.    Prico, $600.
:o:
Seven Roomed House, well
finished ; lawn seeded down ;
corner lot; excellent location,
good view, and very pleasing
surroundings.   Price, .f2,500.
Apply
J. R. Mitchell,
Penticton,   -   6. C.
ARE YOU BUND
To the fact that you don't always need SPECIAL
LENSES���which, in many cases, are simply ordinary
lenses with a special price���and that fifty years' experience is not necessary for a person to get a thorough
knowledge of the eye and its uses ? And yet people
will pay a fancy price to travelling mechanics, when
they can have their eyes examined and corrections
made with the best appliances known to optical science,
here in Penticton.
My stock of optical goods is of the best quality on
the market and very complete. I guarantee every
lense.
HARRIS, The Jeweler
���t^mtrntf^m^tt 'mm. tt ^mm tWKiflt^tt "mm. tf^mm.tr^*m.t*
j NOW IS THE TIME TO ORDER f
\     TOMATO,    CAULIFLOWER,     j
I CABBAGE, [
I FLOWERS, FOLIAGE and other \
1       Plants for Spring planting.      j
�� Call and see my Stock. $
(        EXPERIENCED in all Kinds of GARDENING.        /
j JAMES DENN1STOIV,     Ellis Street j
it ��^�� tf^m��.tt ^mj ��v^fc.����*:<�� ^w tf^a*.tf^^.tf^mm.t+
RED GATE TEA and KOFFEE
Is praised for its unexcelled quality and flavor.
TRY IT.       To be had only at
LAYTON'S
HOUSES TO LET
Several Acre Lots���planted   "
MONEY TO LOAN
M. C. KENDALL
Real Estate agent, Notary Public and Conveyancer
AfiFNT   FAR PHCBNIX of London;  LIVERPOOL & LONDON & GLOBE; and ATLAS
HULIl I    I VII Firu Insurance Companies.
Call and get prices at the
i
���:
>:
i
���:
���;
���;
���:
���:
i
OKANAGAN NURSERY CO.
LIA1ITED.
ON ENGLISH WALNUTS, HORSE CHESTNUTS,
CATALPAS, LILACS,     VIRGINIA CREEPERS
and other Ornamental Shrubs, Trees, and Climbing Vines.
Ready for immediate delivery.
Penticton, British Qotumbia.
Capital Stock $50,000
R. H. ROBERTSON, President
THOS. TODHUNTER, Viee-Pres. E. CURTIS, Manager.
W. P. H. SWINTON, Sec-Treas.
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
NOTICE
To Horse-breeders
Suffolk Stallion
" BentCey   Comrade,"
No. 2981, Vo<. XIII.
This 1800 lb. horse will stand for the
season at home, and will seivea limited
number of mares at reasonable figures. I
Last season 90 per cent, of- the  mares |
bred to him conceived.
For   further   particulars    apply    to
owner, 41-4
John M. Thomas,
Pacific Coast Grown
Seeds, Trees,
For the Farm, Garden, Lawn, or
Conservatory.
Reliable, approved  varieties,   at
reasonable prices.
No Borers.    No Scale.    No fumigation to damage stock.
No windy agents to annoy you,
Buy direct  and   get   trees   and
seeds that GROW.
Bee Supplies, Spray Pumps,
Spraying Material and
Cut Flowers.
Catalogue Free.
M. J. HENRY,
(1REHNHOUSES--3O10 Westminster Rd
Branch nurseries���S. Vancouver.
Okanagan Falls,
B. CI THE PENTICTON PRESS, PENTICTON, B.C. MAY 2, 190S.
*
Miss Mabel Rowe
Teacher of Piano, Organ and
Theory.
'PENTICTON
S  C.
Dr.CA.JACKSON
DENTIST
S. O. Land Company's   Block
PENTICTON. B. C.
'Phone II.
CHAS. WERE
Accountant & Auditor,
Notary Public
PENTICTON, B. C.
R. B. KERR,
BARRISTER & SOLICITOR
Notary Public.
KELOWNA,        - -        B. C.
W. H. T. GAHAN,
Barrister, Solicitor, Notary Public.
MURK  BLOCK.
PENTICTON,      -      -      B.C.
'Phone 17.
FRUIT,   CONFECTIONERY,
Full Line of
ENGLISH  CIGARETTES  AND  TOBACCOS
C.   K.   POMEROY,
Kierstead & Steele
Builders and Contractors
ALL KINDS OF JOB WORK
IN OUR LINE.
.   A Card Will Find Us.   .
M. T. Kierstead - R. Steele
PENTICTON, B. C.
Harris
nursery co.,
Penticton.
Beautify your lot with some
of our shade trees.
We have Elm, Ash, Maple,
Catalpa, Mulberry, Black Walnut, and Ash Leaved Maple.
Some perennial shrubs and
apple trees left.
D. W. Crowley
&Co.
Wholesale and Retail Butchers
Goods Delivered to any part of the
Town.
WE GIVE OUR PROMPT ATTENTION TO
MAIL ORDERS
C. E. HOUSER, Manager.
TELEPHONES.
Dwelling���Individual Line . $2.00 per month.
-Party Line  1.60
BusineHS ���Individual Line .. 2.60
-Party Line  2.00
Free installation within three-quartern mile
of office, when one year contract KJven.
Outside three-quarters mile, add cost of
labour to install.
When no contract, or contract for less than
one year (riven, cost of labour to install is
charged at time of installation.
C. F. LAYTON,     -     Local Agent.
Lakeshore Telephone Co.
RATHVON & CARLESS
CONTRACTORS
AND
BUILDERS
Plans,  Specifications  and   Estimates
Furnished for all Kinds of Work.
L. A. RATHVON,
'Phone White I
CHAS. L. CARLESS,
'Phone White 2
THE
Penticton Bakery
-FOR-
Good Wholesome Bread,
Cakes and Pastry.
GIVE US A TRIAL AND WE
WILL PLEASE YOU.
I* T. ROBEROE.
A Rock In trie Baltic
By ROBERT BARR,
yixiihor- of
"The Triumph* of Eugene Valmont," "Tekla," "In Ihe Midit of
Alarms,"   "Speculation! of John Steele,"   "The Viclora,"   Etc
Copyright.   1906.  by   Robert   Birr.
By Arrangement with The Authors snd Newspapers Association of New York.
Now. the Ind.v said she was acquainted
with him, so if I don't wheedle an Introduction out of him it will show that
a man at a dinner and a man in a
bunk are two different individuals.
You were looking for plots, so there is
mine laid bare to you. It's an Introduction, not gold. I'm conspiring for."
The cashier had nothing further to
say. When they entered the bank together, be saw the clerks all busily at
work and knew that no startling event
had happened during his absence. The
girl bad gone direct to the manager's
room, and thither the young men followed her. Tbe bank manager was
standing at his desk, trying to preserve a severe financial cast of countenance, which the twinkle In his eyes
belled. Tbe girl, also standing, had
evidently been giving him a rapid
sketch of whut had occurred, but now
fell Into silence when accuser and accomplice uppeared.
The advent of the Englishman was
a godsend to the manager. He was
too courteous a gentleman to laugh In
the face of a lady who very seriously
was relating a set of Incidents which
appealed to his sense of humor, so the
comiug of tbe lieutenant enabled him
to swiico off his mirth on another sub-
:et. inv i reply to the officer's cordial &ou<' morning. Mr. Morton." he
repdeu:
"Why. H, r.tfeuaut. Tm delighted To
see you. That was r very jolly song
;'ou sang for us 'ast night. I'll never
iorget It. What do you call It? 'Whit-
'Ingion Fair?' " And he laughed outright as at a genial recollection.
The lieutenant blushed red as a girl
and stammered:
"Iteally, Mr. Morton, you know that's
not according to the rules of evidence.
Wheu a fellow comes up for trial previous convictions are never allowed to
he mentioned til, after the sentence.
Whiddlcomb Knir should not be held
ajjalust me In the present crisis."
The manager chuckled gleefully. The
cashier, when he saw now tbe land lay.
had quietly withdrawn, closing the
door behind him.
"Well, lieutenant. I think I must
have this incident cabled to Europe."
snld Morton, "so the eltete nalions of
your continent may know that a plain
bank cashier Isn't afraid to tackle the
British navy. Indeed, Mr. Drutnmond,
If you read history you will learn that
this is a dangerous const for your warships. It seems rather Inhospitable
that a guest of our town cannot pick
all the gold be wants out of a bank,
but a cashier hns necessarily somewhat narrovv views on the sub.'ect I
was just about to apologize to Miss
Amhurst, who Is a valued client of
ours, when you enme In, aud I hope.
Miss Amhurst" he continued gravely,
turning to the trlrl, "that you will excuse us for the Inconvenience to which
you have been put."
"Oh, It does not matter In the least"
replied the young woman, with nevertheless a slsh of relief. "It was all my
own fault In so carelessly leaving the
money. Some time, when less In a hurry than I am at the present moment I
will tell you bow I came to make the
blunder."
Meanwhile the manager caught and
Interpreted correctly an Imploring look
from the lieutenant.
"Before you go. Miss Amhurst will
yon permit me to Introduce to you my
friend. Lieutenant Drummond of H.
M R. Consternation?"
This ritual to convention being performed, the expression on the glrlV
���0,0 pVmirod the renewnl of her anrf
ety to be gone, and as sue tunieJ to the
door the officer sprang forward and
opened It for her If the manager expected the young man to return he
ivas disappointed, for Dnimuiond threw
over his shoulder the hasty remark:
"I will see yon at the club this evening," whereupon the genial Morton,
finding himself deserted, sat down lu
his swivel chair and laughed quietly
to himself.
There was the slightest possible
shade of annoyance ou the girl's face
as the sailor walked beside her from
tbe door of the manager's room,
through the public portion of the bank
to the exit, aud the young man. noticing this, became momentarily tongue
tied, but nevertheless persisted with *
certain awkward doggedness which
was not going to allow so slight a
bint that his further attendance was
unnecessary to baffle him. He did not
speak until they had passed down the
stone steps to tbe pavement, and then
his utterance began with a half embarrassed stammer, as If the shadow
of displeasure demanded justification
on his part.
"Yon���you see. Miss Amhurst. we
have been properly Introduced."
For the first time he heard the girl
laugh, just a little, aud the sound was
very musical to him.
"The introduction was of the slightest." she said. "1 cannot claim even
an acquaintance with Mr. Morton, although I did so In the presence of his
persistent subordinate. I have met the
manager of the bank but once before,
and that for n few moments only, when
he showed me where to sign my name
In a big book."
"Nevertheless." urged Drummnnd, "1
shall defend the validity of that Intro
ductlon agninst all comers. Tbe head
of a hank Is a most important 11 in In
every country, and his commendation
is really very much sought after."
""iou appeur 10 possess u. ne com
plimented your singing, you know."
And there was a roguish twinkle in the
girl's eye as she glanced up sideways
at him. while a smile came to her lips
as she saw the color again mount to his
cheeks. She had never before met a
man who blushed, and she could not
help regarding him rather as a big boy
than a person to be taken seriously;
His stammer became more pronounced.
"1���1 think you are laughing at me.
Miss Amhurst. and indeed I don't wonder at It. and I���1 am afraid you consider me even more persistent than the
cashier. But 1 did want to tell you
how sorry 1 am to have caused you au-
noyance."
"Oh you have not done so." replied
the girl quickly. "As I said before. It
was al) my own fault In the beginning."
"Vr '. it .u:"^': "ijave taken fhe gold
I should have come up with you aud
told you that it still awaited you in
the bunk. And now I beg your permission to walk down tbe street with
you. because if any one were looking
at us from these wludows and saw us
pursued by a bareheaded man with a
revolver they will now. on looking out
again, learn that it is all right and
may eveu come to regard the revolver
and the hatless one ns an optical de
luslon."
Again the girl laughed.
"I am quite unknown In Bar Harbor, having fewer acquaintances than
eveu a stranger like yourself, therefore so fur as I am concerned It does
not in the least matter whether any
one saw ns or not. We shall walk to
gether, then, as far as the spot where
the cashier overtook us. and this will
give rue an opportunity of explaining,
if not of excusing, my leaving the
money on the counter. I am sure my
conduct must have appeared Inexplica
hie both to you nnd the cashier, although, of course, you would be too
polite to say so."
"I assure you, Miss Amhnrst"���
"I know what you would say." she
Interrupted, with a vivacity which bad
not heretofore characterized her. "but.
you see. the distance to the corner Is
t-hort. and. as I am In a hurry, if you
don't wish my story to be continued
in our next"-
"Ah. If there Is to be a next!" murmured the youn-t man so fervently
that It was now the turn of color to
redden her cheeks.
"1 am talking heedlessly." she said
quickly. "What I want to say Is this.
I have never had much money. Quite
recently I Inherited what had been ne
cumulated by a relative whom I never
knew. It seems ' so Incredible, so
?tran;re���well, it seems Incredible and
���trange yet���and I hive been expect
Ing to wnl'e and find It nil a dream.
Indeed, when von overtook me at this
"not where we n'1"- stand I feared von
'inrt come to tell me It was a mlstnke-
fo hurt me from the clouds to the hare
>nrth ,.<i"!n."
"Put It was lust the reverse of that."
'ie crle 1  evTer!"     "Inst  the  reverse
���-������"'"������     I   came  to confirm  youi
'Thllt IWW �� vrrii tally mini |/otl mn<i '
dream, aud you received from my
hand the first of your fortune."
"Yes." she admitted, her eyes fixed
on the sidewalk.
"I see how It wns." he continued enthusiastically. "I suppose you had
never drawn a ("heck before."
"Never," she conceded.
"And this was merely a test. Ton
set up your dream against the hard
common sense of a bank, which has
no dreams. You were to transform
your vision into the actual or find It
vanish. When the commonplace cashier passed forth the coin, their jingle
said to you. 'The supposed phantasy Is
real.' but Ihe gold pieces themselves at
that supreme moment meant no morn
to you than so many worthless counters, so you turned your back upon
them."
She looked up at him. her eyes,
though moist, Illumined with pleasure
inspired by the sympathy In his tones
rnther than the Import of his words.
The girl's life heretofore hnd been as
scant of kindness as of cash, and there
was a deep sincerity In his voice which
wns as refreshing to her lonesome
heart ns It was new to her experience.
This man was not so stupid as he had
pretended to be. He hnd accurately
divined the Inner meaning of what had
Happened,    mic bad forgotten uu- uh-
i-essiiy   for  basic  which   hud   lieen  so
iinpoitiuiare a few minu'es before.
"Yon   must  lie  a   mind   reader." she
���aid.
"No. I am not at all a clever person."
he laughed. "Indeed, as I told you, 1
aj 111 always blundering into trouble and
making things uncomfortable for my
friends. I regret to say I am rather
under a cloud just now in tbe service,
and I have been called upon to endure
tbe frown of my superiors.''
"Why, what lias happened?" she
asked. After their temporary halt at
the corner where they had been overtaken they now strolled along together
like old friends, her prohibition out of
mind.
"Well, you see. I was temporarily in
command of the cruiser coming down
the Baltic, and passing an island rock
a few miles away I thought it would
be a good opportunity to test a new-
gnu that had been put aboard when
we left England. The sea was very
calm and the rod; most temptsome.
Of course I know It was Russian terri
lurj,. uui u.u couid. uuve imagined
that such a point In space was inhabited by anything else than seagulls?"
"What:" cried the girl, looking up at
him with new interest. "Y'ou don't
mean to scy you are the officer that
Russia demanded from England and
England refused to give up?"
"Oh. England could not give me up.
of course, but she apologized and as
surcd Russia she had no evil intent
Still, anything that sets the diplomatists at work is frowned upon, aud the
man who does an act which his govern
ment Is forced lo disclaim becomes
unpopular with his superiors."
"I rend about It in the papers nt the
time. Didu't the rock fire back al
you?"
"Yes, it did, and no one could have
been more surprised than I when I
saw the answering puff of smoke."
"How came a cannon to lie there?"
"Nobody knows. I suppose that rock
In (he Baltic Is a concealed fort, wit!
galleries and- gun rooms cut in thr
stone after the fashion of our defense
at Gibraltar. I told the court martial
that I had added a valuable bit of information to our naval knowledge, but
I don't suppose this contention exer
clsed any Influence on the minds of
my judges. I also called their atten
tion to the fact lhat my shell had hit.
while the Russian shot fell half a mile
short. That remark nearly cost me my
commission. A court, martial hns no
sense of humor."
"I suppose everything Is satlsfactorl-
Iv settled now?"
(To be c nt nued.)
W. R. KING & CO.
BUTTER��� Fresh Grass California Creamery, a big shipment
just arrived, per pound 40c.
FEED-A1 Oats, Bran, Shorts and Chop ;   also Hay.
DRY GOODS-A nice assortment of Lisle and Silk Gloves,
Lace Hosiery, Fancy Collars and Laces, just arrived
from the East.
FURNISHINGS���Balbriggan Underwear, Fancy Lisle Hose,
Shirts, and a big stock of Ties, including the new
stocks Ascot and Derby, just in.
HARDWARE���Pumps, Hoes, Rakes, Garden Hose, Spray
Nozzles, Wheelbarrows, Poultry Netting, Barbed
Wire, etc.
The Ellis Street Store.
'PHONE 25.
SHELF   IIARDWA RE
Saws, Axes, Wedges, Striking Hammers, Table and
Pocket Cutlery.
PENTICTON HARDWARE CO.
w. o. w.
Okanagan Camp No. 261.
Meets 2nd and 4th Saturday  in   the
n onth at 8 p. m. in Woodmen's Hall,
Ellis St.
Vifciting Sovereigns always welcome.
JOHM 1-OWER, C. C.
R. WILTON, CLERrC
HOTEL.  PENTICTON.
First-Class Accommodation For Tourists or Commercial Men.
RATES $2.50 PER DAY
A. Barnes       - -       Prop.
PENTICTON. B.C.
STAGES
Stage leaves for Keremeos at 6 a. m. ��n Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays. Returns on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays.
Stage leaves for Princeton every Tuesday at
7 a. m.
Stage leaves for Fairview and Oroviile on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays at 6:30 a. m. Returns on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays at
6 p. m.
POST OFFICE.
Hours 9 a. m. to 6. p, m.
Registered Letter and Money Order wicket
closes 5 p. tn.
Wicket opened for half an hour after mail is
distributed.
Arrivals���Per Str, Okanagan: Daily except
Sunday 6 p. m.; Per stage from Hedley, Keremeos, Olalla, Green Mountain, Oroviile, P'airview,
and White Lake: Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays at 6 p, m,
Closing���For boat and Btages: 9 p. m. daily except Saturday. For Monday's boat and Htages:
8.46 p. m. Sundays.
C. P. R. TIME TABLE
SHUSWAP & OKANAGAN BRANCH
Daily both ways oxoept Sunday.
Peterborough
Skiffs &
Ganoes
Spring is Coming and Here is
Your Chance to get a Canoe
or Skiff.
17 foot Canoe-Skiffs���Painted Basswood,
2 pair Oars, 1 Paddle, Bow and Stem
Seats  $57.50
18 foot Canoe-Skiffs���Painted Basswood,
2 pair Oars, 1 Paddle, Bow and Stem
Seats    65.00
15 foot Varnished Cedar Skiffs���Clinker
Built, Ribs 4 inches centres,  1 pair
Oars, Bow Seat, Rudder    60.00
16 foot Varnished Cedar Skiffs���Clinker
Built, Ribs 4 inches centres, 1 pair
Oars, Bow Seat and Rudder    65.00
Canoes of all sizes, painted and varnished, basswood
or cedar, from $40.00 to $50.00.
Further particulars on application to
H. J. MOORE, Penticton, B.C.
Sole Agent Okanagan Lake.
WM.   HAUQ,
Wholesale and Retail
MASONS'   SUPPLIES . .
PORTLAND CEMENT, HARD WALL
PLASTER, COAST  LIME
and COAST LATH
Orders by mail promptly attended
to.
BOX 166   -   KELOWNA, B. C.
SOUTH BOUND
Uili.m	
H.27   "    	
H.B2   "    	
8..W " ...ar..
9.30 " ....lv...
9.45
10.00 p. m.
11.10   "    .
8.00   "    .
4.46   "   .
6.00   "    .
lv.
STATION    NORTH BOUND
... SicamouH  6.00 p.m.
 Kudorby  4.48   "
... ArmatroriK  4.08   "
......Vernon lv.... 3.30   "
 Vernon ar  2.30   "
..Ok. Landing ...lv.... 2.16   "
.. Ok. Landing . .ar... .11,00 a.m.
.... Kelowna  8.20
... Peachland  7.25   "
.. .Summerland  6.30   "
... Penticton  6.00   "
THE PENTICTON
DAIRY
Daily delivery of Fresh Milk to
all parts of the Town.
MILK 10c. PER QUART.
H. M. McNeill,    .    Prop.
Galarneau &
McKenzie
BUILDERS & CONTRACTORS
When  you   think  of   Building
Look us up.
ADOLPHUS GALARNEAU  W. A. MCKENZIE
Lake View Poultry Yards 8
FRESH EGGS FOR SALE
3
w
2
3 �� PURE-BRED WHITE q
LEGHORNS    J
O
u E
x s.
w
p
I < EGGS FOR HATCHING ?B
C. P. R.
JUST ARRIVED ==
CAR LOAD OF
Extension and
Reversible Discs
The very latest up - to - date
tools for Orchard Cultivation.
Descriptive  matter   sent   on
LAND FOR
.    SALE
Choice fruit lots, improved antl
unimproved.
FIRE INSURANCE- The Sun of L< n-
i don, Eng., and Queen.   Why not insure
I in the best; they cost no more.
Apply to
J. R. MITCHELL.
application to
S. T.
KELOWNA
Elliott,
B. C.
FOR HIRE.
Good Work  Team,
summer.   Scraping,
rowing.   Apply
89-
and  Driver,  for
plowing,  or  har-
W. E. WELRY.
PENTICTON
& OROVILLE
STAGE
Via Fairview
Leaves Penticton Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays at 6:30 a.m., arriving at Oroviile the same day at 6 p. m.
Through Pare - $6.00
W. HINE and S. M. SNOW
FAIRVIEW. B. C.
g    $1.00 to $1.50 per setting. |
I. KENT, Propr.    i
EATON'S PRICES
Plus the Express
-AT-
H.OLIVER'H
SHOE STORE.
E. J. FINGH
Painter, Paperhanger
and Sign Writer
Picture Framing a Specialty.
WALL PAPER Carried in Stock.
Box 196.       Main St.
Subscribe for
The Penticton Press THE PENTICTON PRESS, PENTICTON, B. C, MAY 2, 1908.
(Continued from page 2)
ground on all sides evenly, and
encourages root growth on all
side?. The practice of allowing
the water to run down along the
trees with the water touching
Ihe trees frequently causes loss
by sunscald. Five or not to exceed six irrigations should be all
that the young trees require, if
they are cultivated after each irrigation, one or two good hoeings
will be apprieciated by a better
growth. After the first irrigation the water ought not to be
permitted to run more than from
six to twelve hours after reaching the end of the rows.
PRUNING.
The following spring the trees
receive their first pruning. This
should be done just before they
burst out in leaf, say ordinarily
in March. Right here we are
laying the foundation for our
.success or failure. It is as important to prune right as it is to
plant right, either a well-balanced, shapely, sturdy tree, capable of bearing a heavy crop of
fruit, or an ill-shaped, straggly
growth that will break to pieces
and go to ruin in a few years. 1
select three of the best branches
distributed on three different
sides, say one near the top, one
about four or five inches below,
and the other four or five inches
below the second, this to avoid
forming crotches; these three I
cut back to one-third their
length, all others I cut away
clean from the tree.
The orchard should be plowed
deeply in the spring to within
three feet on either side of the
trees, as this will encourage and
facilitate deep rooting which is
desirable, follow up with harrowing and firming the soil, so it will
hold the moisture; cultivate and
irrigate about the same as the
previous year, except that it is
well to run two furrows on each
side of rows, about two or three
feet apart.
The second year's pruning I
leave two or three branches for
e /ery one of the first three, and
cut them back about one half,
cut off all others from the main
stem, but leave about one-half
of the laterals on the headed
branches by thinning out. The
s ime cultivating and irrigating
will apply the third year, except
that another furrow should be
aided on each side, to keep
drawing tne root system out and
down.
At the third pruning we should
have a nice, shapely tree, capable of bearing a box or two of
peaches without injury and
should be pruned less severely
than the previous years, yet the
main leaders ought to be cut
back fully one-half, leaving about
half of the latei \l twigs well
distributed over the tree. The
subsequent treatment of the orchard is much the same for the
r 'St. of the years, as they ought
to come into full bearing the following .���ear.
A safe nde to follow is always
tj cut back severely, and thin
out about half of the small twigs,
cultivate frequent!y, the last
about two week., before the
P33chesare ready to pick, and
above all, irrigate moderately,
and when it comes to thinning
peaches, I would say do it
thoroughly, pull off until you get
scared, i.nd note carefully the
results. We cannot lay down an
ironclad rule to thin by. We
must observe and use judgment;
t. ie object shoi Id be to get just
a ; much first-class fruit as possible without injuring the trees.
Never allow a i>each tree to
break down under the weight of
the crop, and never leave so
much fruit that the tree needs
propping, as with this system of
pruning the tree will be able to
support its load without propping if properly thinned. We
must remember it takes four or
more years to bring a tree up to
full bearing, and it will not pay
b permit ;t breaking down.
A poach tree should make
from fighteen inches to three
feet of new growth every year,
in addition to producing a full
NOTIC
aeasa
People are hereby notified not to interfere in any way with the flumes or ditches.
We cannot permit the boring of holes in main flume, or the blocking up of same for the purpose of taking water.
People are warned against the starting of bush fires in the vicinity of the flumes, as this may endanger the whole
system and cause serious damage for which the offenders are liable.
Any pollution of the water in the flumes and ditches, or the infringement of the above regulations will render the
offenders liable to prosecution.
Holders of water agreements are required to have their distribution flumes in order before making application
for water.
All applications and complaints are required to be registered at the Company's office.
The Southern Okanagan Land
Company, Limited
crop, and when it doesn't do that
it is not doing well. The small
peach taxes the tree as much or
more than the large, as it is the
pit that draws the vitality, and
besides the small fruit is never
as profitable or as pleasant to
handle.
I cannot close this paper without a few more general remarks,
but will be brief as possible, as
there is so much to be said, and
I have not the time or space. In
getting nursery stock I find that
good, clean, one-year-old trees,
from one-half to three-quarters
in calibre and four to six feet
tall are the best, and if possible
home-grown or grown in a climate and under conditions similar
to our own, as trees will generally do better. Do not buy trees
because they are cheapest, as
frequently the cheapest are the
most unsatisfactory. Read the
directions given in most nursery
catalogues on handling nursery-
trees and planting, and do not
hesitate to follow instructions.
Do not try to raise peaches on a
large scale where the mercury
goes down more than ten degrees
below zero, as the better varieties
of peaches, such as Elberta,
Globe, Wheatland, and in fact
most of the Crawford type, will
suffer by having the buds winter
killed. Fred Baisch.
A RARE OPPORTUNITY.
LEARN TO MOUNT  BIRDS.
This beautiful art can be easily and
quickly learned. Are you a lover ol
nature, and do you want to adorn your
home with the most attractive forms of
art ? If you are a sportsman, you can
soon have a fine collection, of your own
specimens, which will be a source of
great pride to yon ; and ever reminding
you of some pleasant time that has
passed.
If your boy is Interested in birds, or
out-door life, you will make no mistake
in letting him'learn this branch of taxidermy, it will always be a source of
great pleasure to him throughout his
whole life, and will ever increase his
iiterest in nature.
This course consists of ten lessons,
one each Saturday, of from three to
four hours in length.
As there are only one or two schools
of taxidermy in America, and to attend
one of these is far beyond the means of
an average person, you wdl readily see
what an opportunity this affords.
I solicit your trade in taxidermy-
reptiles, birds, large game heads and
animals mounted. First class work
guaranteed. For further information
address
GUY HEATHER,
Okanagan College,
41-4 Summerland, B. C.
Now is the Time
-TO-
Get a Motor for
your Boat or Launch
I handle the goods.   Write for Catalogue and prices on the size you require.
B. L. HATFIELD,
Gas Engine Expert,
SUMMERLAND, - B. C.
18 Acres
ON MAIN STREET.   Two and One=HaIf Miles from
Town.
Business Lot
ON MAIN STREET.    Near PRESS office.
Apply     ;.- = -...���.'-        W.J.CLEMENT.
Bay view   Sq uare
Situated on Westminster Ave.,
PENTICTON,
Has been sub-divided and is now on the Market at
$250.oo for inside lots
$300.oo for corners.
Easy Terms. No Interest Charged.
Lots are 52 feet by 103 feet.
Now is your chance, boys, to secure a beautiful site for a prospective
home. This is leap year and you may need it���you can't always
sometimes tell.
FOR FURTHER PARTICULARS APPLY TO
ALF. SMITH, - Penticton.

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